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Sample records for tevatron proton-antiproton collider

  1. Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1994-08-01

    These lectures discuss a selection of QCD and Electroweak results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider. Results are presently based on data samples of about 20 pb -1 at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. Results discussed include jet production, direct photon production, W mass and width measurements, the triboson coupling, and most exciting of all, evidence for top quark production

  2. 132 ns Bunch Spacing in the Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, S.D.; Holt, J.; Johnstone, J.A.; Marriner, J.; Martens, M.; McGinnis, D.

    1994-12-01

    Following completion of the Fermilab Main Injector it is expected that the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider will be operating at a luminosity in excess of 5x10 3l cm -2 with 36 proton and antiproton bunches spaced at 396 nsec. At this luminosity, each of the experimental detectors will see approximately 1.3 interactions per crossing. Potential improvements to the collider low beta and rf systems could push the luminosity beyond 10x10 3l cm -2 sec -1 , resulting in more than three interactions per crossing if the bunch separation is left unchanged. This paper discusses issues related to moving to ∼100 bunch operation, with bunch spacings of 132 nsec, in the Tevatron. Specific scenarios and associated hardware requirements are described

  3. The Fermilab proton-antiproton collider upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, J.P.

    1996-10-01

    The plans for increases in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider luminosity in the near future (Run II) and the more distant future (TeV33) are described. While there are many important issues, the fundamental requirement is to produce more antiprotons and to use them more efficiently

  4. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  5. Recent results from E-735 at the Fermilab tevatron proton-antiproton collider with √s=1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Erwin, A.; Findeisen, C.; Nelson, K.; Thompson, M.; Banerjee, S.; Beery, P.D.; Biswas, N.N.; DeBonte, R.; Kenney, V.P.; LoSecco, J.M.; McManus, A.P.; Piekarz, J.; Stampke, S.R.; Carter, T.; Goshaw, A.T.; Oh, S.A.; Walker, W.D.; Wesson, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    E-735 is searching for signs of the quark-gluon-plasma phase transition in minimum bias proton-antiproton events. Results from the 1987 run at the Tevatron Collider at √s=1.8 TeV are presented. Included are distributions of the average p t versus multiplicity dependence for charged particles, and preliminary particle identification analysis using time of flight. (orig.)

  6. The proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  7. Regge pole plus cut model for proton-antiproton elastic scattering at collider and tevatron energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleem, Fazal; Saleem, Mohammad

    1988-01-01

    The Regge pole plus cut model has been used to explain the data at the collider energies √=546 and 630 GeV and the most recent differential cross-section results at √=1.8 TeV. Predictions of the model at 1.8 and 40 TeV are compared with those of Bourrely et al. (1984). (author). 22 refs., 7 figs

  8. Recent results from proton-antiproton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1990-03-01

    New results from the CERN and Fermilab proton-antiproton colliders are summarised. The areas covered are jet physics, direct photon production, W and Z production and decay, heavy flavor production, the search for the top quark, and the search for more exotic phenomena. 46 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Recent results from E-735 at the Fermilab tevatron proton-antiproton collider at √s=1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, N.K.; Allen, C.; Bujak, A.; Carmony, D.D.; Cole, P.; Choi, Y.; Gutay, L.J.; Hirsch, A.S.; Koltick, D.; Lindsey, C.S.; McMahon, T.; Porile, N.T.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Stringfellow, B.C.; Banerjee, S.; Bishop, J.; Biswas, N.N.; Debonte, R.; Kenney, V.P.; Losecco, J.M.; McManus, A.P.; Piekarz, J.; Stampke, S.R.; Zuong, H.; Bhat, P.; Carter, T.; Goshaw, A.T.; Loomis, C.; Oh, S.H.; Robertson, W.R.; Walker, W.D.; Wesson, D.K.; Alexopoulos, T.; Erwin, A.; Findeisen, C.; Nelson, K.; Thompson, M.

    1990-01-01

    E-735 is designed to study charged particle production in the central region of rapidity in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV. Variations in transverse momentum and particle production ratios versus particle density are measured as a possible signature for a quark-gluon-plasma (QGP) phase transition. Preliminary results from the 1987 run are presented. (orig.)

  10. Proton-antiproton colliding beam electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Skrinskij, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    A possibility of effective cooling of high-energy pp tilde beams (E=10 2 -10 3 GeV) in the colliding mode by accompanying radiationally cooled electron beam circulating in an adjacent storage ring is studied. The cooling rate restrictions by the pp tilde beam interaction effects while colliding and the beam self-heating effect due to multiple internal scattering are considered. Some techniques permitting to avoid self-heating of a cooling electron beam or suppress its harmful effect on a heavy particle beam cooling are proposed. According to the estimations the cooling time of 10 2 -10 3 s order can be attained [ru

  11. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  12. 4. topical workshop on proton-antiproton collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenni, H.; Schacher, J.

    1984-01-01

    The most exciting topic at this Workshop was clearly the experimental hint for new unexpected phenomena, reported by the UA1 and UA2 Collaborations: At the CERN SPS Collider (vs = 540 GeV), a few events were observed with high missing transverse energy in association with an isolated electromagnetic cluster or one or more hard jets (UA1) or an isolated electron and one or two hard jets (UA2). Due to the enhanced data sample, the discovery of the intermediate vector bosons W and Z in 1983 was undoubtedly confirmed, and the nice agreement of their properties with the predictions of the electroweak theory was shown. In addition, many new results on experimental and theoretical jet physics were presented. The Tevatron Collider project and its planned experiments at Fermilab were discussed, and there were contributions about the possible future developments in theory (compositeness, supersymmetry) as well as in experimental high energy physics (Supercollider, Juratron). See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  13. Heavy flavour production and heavy flavour mixing at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eijk, B. van.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis some results of the proton-antiproton-collision experiment UA1 with the CERN Super Proton-Antiproton Synchrotron are presented and interpreted. Ch. 1 contians a general introduction to the physics motivations behind the proton-antiproton-collider project, a brief description of the CERN facilities and a summary of collider and UA1 physics achievements. Furthermore the concept of studying heavy flavours via their weak decays into muons is introduced. Ch. 2 gives a brief overview of the UA1 experimental set-up, while those parts of the detector that are relevant for the analysis, presented in this thesis, is discussed in some more detail. Ch. 3 contains a short introduction to, and motivation for the use of Monte Carlo techniques in event simulations, while Ch. 4 describes the framework of the recently developed 'EUROJET' event generator. In Ch. 5 a treatment is given of the theoretical background and concepts like 'quark-mixing' and 'CP-violation' are explained, also other useful definitions and formulae are introduced on which the later analysis of the same-sign to opposite-sign dimuon ratio is built. Data collection and event reconstruction is the subject of Ch. 6, while a detailed comparison between the theoretical models and experimentally obtained distributions is given in Ch. 7. Finally, in Ch. 8 some concluding remarks are made. 182 refs.; 81 figs.; 9 tabs

  14. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros Tautiva, Sandra Jimena

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10 34 cm-2 s-1 luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7x the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5 T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in pp than pp collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller beta* for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  15. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros Tuativa, Sandra Jimena [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5\\,T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  16. Further properties of high-mass multijet events at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, F.; Akimoto, H.; Akopian, A.; Albrow, M.G.; Amendolia, S.R.; Amidei, D.; Antos, J.; Anway-Wiese, C.; Aota, S.; Apollinari, G.; Asakawa, T.; Ashmanskas, W.; Atac, M.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Bagdasarov, S.; Bailey, M.W.; Bao, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barzi, E.; Bauer, G.; Baumann, T.; Bedeschi, F.; Behrends, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Benlloch, J.; Bensinger, J.; Benton, D.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Berryhill, J.; Bertolucci, S.; Bhatti, A.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Blair, R.E.; Blocker, C.; Bodek, A.; Bokhari, W.; Bolognesi, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Breccia, L.; Bromberg, C.; Bruner, N.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Byrum, K.L.; Cammerata, J.; Campagnari, C.; Campbell, M.; Caner, A.; Carithers, W.; Carlsmith, D.; Castro, A.; Cauz, D.; Cen, Y.; Cervelli, F.; Chang, P.S.; Chang, P.T.; Chao, H.Y.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chikamatsu, T.; Chiou, C.N.; Christofek, L.; Cihangir, S.; Clark, A.G.; Cobal, M.; Contreras, M.; Conway, J.; Cooper, J.; Cordelli, M.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Crane, D.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Culbertson, R.; Cunningham, J.D.; Daniels, T.; DeJongh, F.; Delchamps, S.; DellAgnello, S.; DellOrso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Denby, B.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P.F.; Devlin, T.; Dittmann, J.R.; Donati, S.; Done, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dunn, A.; Eddy, N.; Einsweiler, K.; Elias, J.E.; Ely, R.; Engels, E. Jr.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Fan, Q.; Fiori, I.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G.W.; Franklin, M.; Frautschi, M.; Freeman, J.; Friedman, J.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, T.A.; Fukui, Y.; Funaki, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Galeotti, S.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Gay, C.; Geer, S.; Gerdes, D.W.; Giannetti, P.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Gladney, L.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Gordon, A.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Grassmann, H.; Groer, L.

    1996-01-01

    The properties of high-mass multijet events produced at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider are compared with leading order QCD matrix element predictions, QCD parton shower Monte Carlo predictions, and the predictions from a model in which events are distributed uniformly over the available multibody phase space. Multijet distributions corresponding to (4N-4) variables that span the N-body parameter space are found to be well described by the QCD calculations for inclusive three-jet, four-jet, and five-jet events. The agreement between data, QCD matrix element calculations, and QCD parton shower Monte Carlo predictions suggests that 2→2 scattering plus gluon radiation provides a good first approximation to the full LO QCD matrix element for events with three, four, or even five jets in the final state. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Tevatron Collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.J.

    1990-02-01

    The physics of hadron colliders is briefly reviewed. Issues for further study are presented. Particular attention is given to the physics opportunities for a high luminosity (≥ 100 pb -1 /experiment/run) Upgrade of the Tevatron Collider. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Exclusive Central Meson Production in Proton Antiproton Collisions at the Tevatron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swiech Artur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been known since the days of the Intersecting Storage Rings, ISR, at CERN, that one can have pp interactions with more than one pomeron, ℙ, exchanged, known as double pomeron exchange. Exclusive hadronic systems, produced by double pomeron exchange, DℙE, have the potential of opening a rich new window on hadron spectroscopy and the diffraction mechanism. We have studied events of the type p + p¯ $ar p$ → p + X + p¯ $ar p$ where X is a hadron pair (mostly π+π− at √s = 900 GeV and 1960 GeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF. The hadron pair is central, y ≈ 0, and between two rapidity gaps Δy ≈ 4. The dominant process is double pomeron exchange, DℙE, with restrictions on the quantum numbers of X: Q = S = 0, C = +1, J = 0 or 2. The mass spectra, with about 300K candidate events assumed to be π+π−, shows strong resonant structures attributed to f0 and f2 states. We give the ratio of cross sections at √s = 900 GeV and 1960 GeV, and compare with Regge expectations.

  19. FERMILAB: Preparing to collide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Against the background of stringent Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) regulations mandated by the US Department of Energy for all national Labs, Fermilab prepared to mount the next major Tevatron proton-antiproton collider run

  20. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  1. Exploration of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros, Sandra J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Summers, Don [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Cremaldi, Lucien [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Acosta, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Neuffer, David [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-04-12

    New physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. We explore a 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity, 100 TeV $p\\bar{p}$ collider with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC but only 2$\\times$ as much NbTi superconductor, motivating the choice of 4.5 T single bore dipoles. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per beam crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. A Fermilab-like $\\bar p$ source would disperse the beam into 12 momentum channels to capture more antiprotons. Because stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, 12 cooling ring sets would be used. Each set would include phase rotation to lower momentum spreads, equalize all momentum channels, and stochastically cool. One electron cooling ring would follow the stochastic cooling rings. Finally antiprotons would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring by joining them to new bunches with synchrotron damping.

  2. Considerations of bunch-spacing options for multi-bunch operation of the Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, G.

    1989-01-01

    This discussion will consider a number of points relevant to limitations, advantages and disadvantages of various arrangements of bunches in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The considerations discussed here will be limited to: (a) bunch spacing symmetry and relation to the relative luminosity at B0 and D0 and the beam-beam interaction with separated beams; (b) bunch spacing constraints imposed by Main Ring RF coalescing and the optics of beam separation at B0 and D0; and (c) bunch spacing constraints imposed by injection and abort kicker timing requirements, and by the Antiproton Source RF unstacking process. 20 figs., 17 tabs

  3. Elementary design of a 30 TeV on 30 TeV proton antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takahiko

    1984-01-01

    A crude conceptual design was made for a 30TeV on 30TeV antiproton-proton collider. The choice of energy and antiproton-proton (instead of PP) are somewhat arbitrary. The basic parameters of the main ring are listed in a table; the bending radius, ring radius and circumference are 11.1km, 14.4km, and 90.6km, respectively; 7680 dipole magnets with maximum field of 9 Tesla; 1280 quadrupole magnets with maximum gradient of 200Tesla/m. The development of high-field, low-heat loss dipoles and quadrupoles are essential, together with the consideration for their mass production method. On the other hand, the possibility of obtaining antiproton-proton luminosity exceeding 10 32 /cm 2 sec is suggested without any fundamental limitation. With such high luminosity, however, it should be pointed out that particle detectors must face their limitation due to extremely high rate, high multiplicity interaction, requiring large steps of detector research and development efforts. (Aoki, K.)

  4. Physics at the Tevatron

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Physics Results from the Tevatron : The Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab in the US is currently the world's highest energy collider. At the experiments CDF and D0 a broad physics programme is being pursued, ranging from flavour physics via electroweak precision measurements to searches for the Higgs boson and new particles beyond the Standard Model. In my lecture I will describe some of the highlight measurements in the flavour, electroweak and searches sectors, and the experimental techniques that are used.

  5. Search for the top quark at the UA2 detector at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moniez, M.

    1988-06-01

    The results of a search for the top quark, done in the UA2 experiment at CERN is presented in this thesis. The data from proton-antiproton collisions, at 546 and 630 GeV energy in the centre-of-mass system, representing a total integrated luminosity of 894 nb -1 accumulated by the UA2 detector, has been used. A signal coming from the semi-leptonic decay of the top quark (t decays to b + electron + neutrino) has been searched for in the event sample containing an identified electron associated with 0.1 or 2 jets. A detailed study of the experimental background coming from misidentified electrons has been made; furthermore, the standard sources of real electrons have been estimated using a simulation program. Taking into account these background evaluations, and using a top production Monte-Carlo, a statistical analysis of the events containing one electron and 2 jets allows us to discuss a lower limit on the top quark mass. An upper limit on top production through the process proton-antiproton goes to top-antitop is derived, as a function of the top mass, from our data. Extrapolating the background and production evaluations to UA2'indicates that this experiment should be sensitive to top masses below 70 GeV/c 2 [fr

  6. Search for W→cs-bar, Z→cc-bar,bb-bar in muon-jet events at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransdell, J.

    1988-01-01

    A search for quark decays of the W and Z particles produced in proton-antiproton collisions at √s of 630 GeV in the UA1 experiment at the CERN collider is described. The search was made in the channels W→cs-bar, Z→cc-bar,bb-bar where b and c quarks were identified by the presence of a high-p/sub T/ muon in or near a jet. Although these decay channels avoid the copious background of QCD produced light quark and gluon jets, it was not possible to detect a W or Z signal because of the large cross section for strong cc-bar and bb-bar production

  7. Search for (W/Z → jets) + γ Events in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocci, Andrea [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the p¯p → W(Z)γ → γq¯q process at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The analysis is based on the selection of low transverse momentum photons produced in association with at least two jets. A modification of an existing photon trigger was studied and implemented in the data acquisition system to enhance the sensitivity of this analysis. The data presented are from approximately 184 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by this new trigger. A preliminary event sample is obtained requiring a central photon with ET > 12 GeV and two jets with ET > 15 GeV. The corresponding efficiency is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation of the W(Z)γ → γq¯q based on Standard Model predictions. Monte Carlo estimation of the background is not necessary as it is measured from the data. A more advanced selection based on a Neural Network method improves the signal-to-noise ratio from 1/333 to 1/71, and further optimization of the dijet mass search region increases the ratio to its final value of 1/41. No evidence of a W/Z → q¯q peak in the dijet mass distribution is visible when the background contribution is subtracted. Using a fully Bayesian approach, the 95% confidence level upper limit on σ(p¯p → Wγ) x Β(W → q¯q) + σ(p¯p → Zγ) x Β(Z → q¯q) is calculated to be 54 pb, which is consistent with the Standard Model prediction of 20.5 pb.

  8. Estimates of Fermilab Tevatron collider performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, G.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a model which has been used to estimate the average luminosity performance of the Tevatron collider. In the model, the average luminosity is related quantitatively to various performance parameters of the Fermilab Tevatron collider complex. The model is useful in allowing estimates to be developed for the improvements in average collider luminosity to be expected from changes in the fundamental performance parameters as a result of upgrades to various parts of the accelerator complex

  9. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  10. Multibunch operation in the Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.A.; Finley, D.A.; Bharadwaj, V.

    1993-05-01

    The Tevatron Collider at Fermilab is the world's highest energy hadron collider, colliding protons with antiprotons at a center of mass energy of 1800 GeV. At present six proton bunches collide with six antiproton bunches to generate luminosities of up to 9 x 10 30 cm -2 s -1 . It is estimated that to reach luminosities significantly greater than 10 31 cm -2 s -1 while minimizing the number of interactions per crossing, the number of bunches will have to be increased. Thirty-six bunch operation looks like the most promising plan. This paper looks at the strategies for increasing the number of particle bunches, the new hardware that needs to be designed and changes to the operating mode in filling the Tevatron. An interactive program which simulates the filling of the Tevatron collider is also presented. The time scale for multibunch operation and progress towards running greater than six bunches is given in this paper

  11. Th W boson transverse momentum spectrum in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winer, B.L.

    1991-02-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) was used to measure the transverse momentum distribution of W boson produced in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron collider. The W bosons were identified by the decay W → eν. The results are in good agreement with a next-to-leading order calculation. The cross section for W production with P T > 50 GeV/c is 423 ± 58 (stat.) ± 108 (sys.) pb. 58 refs., 53 figs., 16 tabs

  12. Electron identification for transverse momentum above 10 GeV/c in UA2' at the proton-antiproton collider at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.P.

    1989-11-01

    The CERN decision to increase the luminosity of the proton-antiproton collider (ACOL) at 630 GeV in the center of mass by about one order of magnitude, has motivated the upgrade of the UA2 detector in order to search for the top quark. The main improvement of the detector consists in a better electron identification and an increase of the hadronic calorimeter coverage. The upgraded central detector uses new techniques to identify electrons, in particular a scintillating fiber detector (SFD). This detector of cylindrical geometry have been built at the CEN Saclay (DPhPE) using ∼ 60,000 fibers arranged in 24 layers. It measures tracks (6 points in space) as well as the position of electromagnetic preshowers. It rejects fake electrons, simulated by the spacial overlap of a π o and a hadron, with the help of a precise measurement of the distance between track and preshower. Using data from a small integrated luminosity 46 nb -1 achieved on 1987, we have studied the UA2 electron identification improvement. Comparing the electron transverse momentum spectra observed both in the old and the new detector we have found that the electron identification of the new UA2 apparatus has improved by an order of magnitude. The expected increase of the luminosity for the coming runs and the good knowledge of the UA2 apparatus will make it possible to improve tests of the standard model and in particular to achieve a better sensitivity for the top quark search [fr

  13. Multiplicities and minijets at Tevatron Collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcevic, I.

    1989-01-01

    We show that in the parton branching model, the probability distribution does not obey KNO scaling. As energy increases, gluon contribution to multiplicities increases, resulting in the widening of the probability distribution, in agreement with experimental data. We predict that the widening of the distribution will stop at Tevatron Collider energies due to the dominant role of gluons at these energies. We also find that the gluon contribution to the 'minijet' cross section increases with energy and becomes dominant at the Tevatron Collider. We calculate QCD minijet cross sections for a variety of structure functions, QCD scales and p T min . We compare our theoretical results with the experimental data and find that some of the structure functions and choices of scale are preferred by the experimental data. We give theoretical predictions for the minijet cross section at the Tevatron Collider, indicating the possibility of distinguishing between different sets of structure functions and choices of scale. (orig.)

  14. Fundamentally new physics at the Tevatron Collider?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Hongmo; Nellen, L.; Tsou Sheungtsun

    1989-02-01

    A new dispersion relation analysis of present pp-bar scattering data suggests the existence by Tevatron Collider energies of a threshold, of such nature, as is unlikely to be explainable in terms of known physics or any of its standard projections. (author)

  15. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollestrup, A.V.

    1994-11-01

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade

  16. FERMILAB: Collider detectors -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Last month's edition (April, page 12) included a status report on data collection and preliminary physics results from the 'newcomer' DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This time the spotlight falls in the Veteran' CDF detector, in action since 1985 and meanwhile significantly upgraded. Meanwhile the Tevatron collider continues to improve, with record collision rates

  17. Charge-charge correlations and the detection of weak vector bosons by hadronic jets in proton-antiproton and proton-proton collisions at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranft, J.; Ritter, S.

    1980-07-01

    The charge properties of quark jets are studied within a chain decay model for quark jet fragmentation. Using the charge properties of quark jets, charge-charge two-jet cross sections and correlations are defined. In proton-antiproton collisions these correlations show significant structure due to the weak vector bosons W +- and Z 0 . (author)

  18. Initial operation of the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The Tevatron is now the highest energy proton synchrotron and the only accelerator made with superconducting magnets. Operating since 1983 as a fixed-target machine at energies up to 800 GeV, it has now been modified to operate as a 900 GeV antiproton-proton collider. This paper describes the initial operation of the machine in this mode. The new features of the Fermilab complex, including the antiproton source and the Main Ring injector with its two overpasses and new rf requirements, are discussed. Beam characteristics in the Tevatron (including lifetimes, emittances, luminosity, beam-beam tune shifts, backgrounds, and low beta complications), the coordination of the steps in the accelerator chain, and the commissioning history are also discussed. Finally, some plans for the improvement of the collider are presented

  19. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs

  1. Supersymmetry at the Tevatron?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammel, S.

    1998-02-01

    These lectures contain an introduction to the search for supersymmetry at hadron colliders. The Tevatron is one of high-energy physics most sophisticated tools. The high center-of-mass energy of its proton-antiproton collisions makes it an ideal place to search for physics beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry. Two experiments, CDF and D0, completed a long data taking period in summer of 1995, yielding over 100 pb -1 of proton-antiproton interactions. The data recorded by the experiments are still being analyzed. The lectures outline the strategies in the search for supersymmetry at the Tevatron and examine the major analyses in detail. Results obtained by the two experiments are included where available

  2. Electroweak physics at the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aihara, H.

    1993-08-01

    Preliminary results on electroweak physics from the 1992--1993 run with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron collider are presented. New measurements of the ratio of the W and Z production cross sections times the branching fractions for subsequent decay into leptons are shown. The W width, Γ(W), and a limit on the top-quark mass independent of decay mode are extracted. The status of a measurement of the charge asymmetry of electrons from W decay is given. Also shown are a study of diboson (Wγ, Zγ and WZ) production and a search for a new neutral gauge boson (Z')

  3. Tevatron physics results

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    I will summarize the physics results from the Tevatron experiments with particular emphasis on the experimental methods used in different kinds of analysis. In particular, the Tevatron is a proton-antiproton collider that has now accumulated more than 2 fb^-1 of luminosity in the two experiments, called CDF and D0. In this lecture I will review the results on inclusive productions of jets, W- and Z-bosons, the results in the flavor sector, the measurements of top production, searches for Higgs boson production and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In each case I will explain the basic experimental concepts and methods needed for making the measurement.

  4. Results from E735 at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider with radical s = 1. 8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.

    1991-11-01

    Experiment E735{dagger} searched for evidence of the transition to quark-gluon plasma in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}{bar s} = 1.8 TeV. Using data from a high statistics run in 1988--1989, results are presented on multiplicity distributions, hyperon and phi production, and Bose-Einstein correlations. Some data was also taken at lower collision energies and results will be compared to previous experiments.

  5. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-01-15

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions.

  6. Collider workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of initial results after the start of operations at CERN's SPS proton-antiproton collider and the prospects for high energy hadron collisions at Fermilab (Tevatron) and Brookhaven (ISABELLE) provided a timely impetus for the recent Topical Workshop on Forward Collider Physics', held at Madison, Wisconsin, from 10-12 December. It became the second such workshop to be held, the first having been in 1979 at the College de France, Paris. The 100 or so participants had the chance to hear preliminary results from the UA1, UA4 and UA5 experiments at the CERN SPS collider, together with other new data, including that from proton-antiproton runs at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

  7. Tevatron The Cinderella story or the art of collider

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The Tevatron Collider at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) is the world's highest energy particle collider at 1.8TeV c.m.e. The machine was a centerpiece of the US and world's High Energy Physics for many years. Currently, the Tevatron is in the last years of its operation in so-called Run II which started 2001 and is tentatively scheduled to end in 2010. In this lecture series, we'll try to learn from the exciting story of the Tevatron Collider Run II: the story of long preparations, great expectations, initial difficulties, years of "blood and sweat", continuous upgrades, exceeding its goals, high emotions, tune-up of accelerator organization for "combat fighting". The lectures will cover Introduction to the Tevatron, its history and Run II; "Plumbing" Issues; Beam Physics Issues; Luminosity Progress; Organization of Troops and Lessons for LHC.

  8. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions

  9. A 4$\\pi$ Solid Angle Detector for the SPS used as a Proton-Antiproton Collider at a Centre of Mass Energy of 540 GeV

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In the first phase of operation of the UA1 experiment, 700 $ nb ^- ^{1} $ of integrated luminosity were accumulated at the Sp$\\bar{p}$S collider up to the end of 1985. Published results include first observation and measurements of W and Z bosons, significant limits on the top quark, heavy lepton and supersymmetric particle masses, observation of $ B \\bar{B} $ mixing, studies of b~quark production and tests of QCD using jet, intermediate boson and photon production.\\\\ \\\\ For the second phase of operation the following items were upgraded for the high luminosity 1988 and 1989 collider runs: the muon detection system was improved by extra iron shielding, partly magnetised and instrumented with Iarocci tubes; the data acquisition system was redesigned using VME to prov speed and second level trigger capacity followed by a farm of 318E emulators for on-line event reconstruction and selection; the central detector was equipped with a laser calibration system. A total of 5 $ pb ^- ^{1} $ of mainly muon-triggered da...

  10. Search for the associated production of charginos and neutralinos in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV with the D0 detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaare Mundal, Olva Michael

    2009-03-15

    A search for Supersymmetry is performed via the associated production of charginos and neutralinos in final states consisting of three charged leptons and missing transverse energy using data collected with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of {proportional_to} 2.3 fb{sup -1}. This final state is considered one of the most promising channels in the search for supersymmetric particles because of its low Standard Model background. A dedicated event selection is developed and events with two muons plus an additional isolated track or events with two electrons plus an additional isolated track are analyzed. The requirement of an isolated track replaces the third charged lepton in the event. After all selection cuts are applied, in total 7 events are selected in the data with an expected number of background events of 5.24{+-}0.40 (stat){+-}0.30 (syst). Due to the good agreement of events observed in data with the expectation of the Standard Model backgrounds, no evidence for Supersymmetry is found. The present analyses are considered in combination with three other decay channels and limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. The results are interpreted in a constrained scenario and exclusion regions are derived as a function of m{sub 0} and m{sub 1/2}. (orig.)

  11. Search for the associated production of charginos and neutralinos in proton-antiproton collisions at √(s)=1.96 TeV with the D0 detector at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaare Mundal, Olva Michael

    2009-03-01

    A search for Supersymmetry is performed via the associated production of charginos and neutralinos in final states consisting of three charged leptons and missing transverse energy using data collected with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ∝ 2.3 fb -1 . This final state is considered one of the most promising channels in the search for supersymmetric particles because of its low Standard Model background. A dedicated event selection is developed and events with two muons plus an additional isolated track or events with two electrons plus an additional isolated track are analyzed. The requirement of an isolated track replaces the third charged lepton in the event. After all selection cuts are applied, in total 7 events are selected in the data with an expected number of background events of 5.24±0.40 (stat)±0.30 (syst). Due to the good agreement of events observed in data with the expectation of the Standard Model backgrounds, no evidence for Supersymmetry is found. The present analyses are considered in combination with three other decay channels and limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. The results are interpreted in a constrained scenario and exclusion regions are derived as a function of m 0 and m 1/2 . (orig.)

  12. Search for exotic phenomena in association with W/sup +-/ and Z/sup 0/ decays at the CERN proton antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubbia, C.

    1984-01-01

    Using a sample of 66 charged Intermediate Vector Boson events (W/sup +-/ → iota/sup +-/ν/sub iota/) and 9 neutral Intermediate Vector Boson events (Z 0 → iota/sup +/iota/sup -/) produced at the CERN SPS Collider the properties of the underlying event, and the properties of jets produced in association with the Intermediate Vector Bosons have been compared with the corresponding properties from minimum-bias and hadronic-multijet events. The underlying events associated with Intermediate Vector Boson production are similar to the minimum-bias data with the additional occurrence of an occasional jet. The properties of these jets suggest they arise from initial-state gluon bremsstrahlung. The Z 0 events however sometimes contain some jet excess beyond expectation

  13. Luminosity lifetime in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, G.; Finley, D.; Johnson, R.P.; Kerns, Q.; McCarthy, J.; Siemann, R.; Zhang, P.

    1988-01-01

    Since the inauguration of colliding proton-antiproton operations in 1987, the Tevatron has exhibited luminosity lifetimes shorter than expected. During a typical colliding beam storage period, called a store, luminosity is calculated periodically by measuring the charge and emittances of each bunch. The growth of the transverse bunch emittances is the dominant cause of luminosity deterioration. Throughout, this period, the position spectrum of the bunches exhibited betatron signals larger than expected from Schottky noise. A model assuming externally driven betatron oscillations explains both the betatron signals and the emittance growth. A program is underway to improve the Tevatron luminosity lifetime. The abort kickers have been identified as sources of emittance growth, and some quadrupole power supplies are further candidates. Because the horizontal dispersion through the RF cavities is nonzero, RF phase noise has been investigated. Noise in the main dipole regulation circuit has also been studied. 13 refs., 4 figs

  14. The dijet invariant mass at the Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannetti, P.

    1990-01-01

    The differential cross section of the process p + pbar → jet + jet + X as a function of the dijet invariant mass has been measured with the CDF detector at a center of mass energy of 1.8 TeV at the Tevatron Collider in Fermilab. The present analysis is based on the sample of events collected in the 1988/89 run, amounting to a total integrated luminosity of 4.2 pb -1 . A comparison to leading order QCD and quark compositeness predictions is presented as well as a study of the sensitivity of the mass spectrum to the gluon radiation. 10 refs., 6 figs

  15. Online calculation of the Tevatron collider luminosity using accelerator instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, A.A.

    1997-07-01

    The luminosity of a collision region may be calculated if one understands the lattice parameters and measures the beam intensities, the transverse and longitudinal emittances, and the individual proton and antiproton beam trajectories (space and time) through the collision region. This paper explores an attempt to make this calculation using beam instrumentation during Run 1b of the Tevatron. The instrumentation used is briefly described. The calculations and their uncertainties are compared to luminosities calculated independently by the Collider Experiments (CDF and D0)

  16. Minimax: Multiparticle physics at the TeVatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The author and two dozen others are engaged in a small test/experiment in the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It is called Minimax, and its purpose is to explore large-cross-section physics in the forward direction. The primary goal of Minimax is search for events containing the residue of disoriented chiral condensate (dcc) produced in the primary collision. The theoretical ideas are very speculative. But if they are right, they could provide an interpretation of the Centauro/anti-Centauro anomalies claimed to have been seen in cosmic-ray events. In this paper, the history and status of Minimax is described

  17. Successful observation of Schottky signals at the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Lambertson, G.R.

    1989-08-01

    We have constructed a Schottky detector for the Tevatron collider in the form of a high-Q (∼5000) cavity which operates at roughly 2 GHz, well above the frequency at which the Tevatron's single-bunch frequency spectrum begins to roll off. Initial spectra obtained from the detector show clearly observable Schottky betatron lines, free of coherent contaminants; also seen are the ''common-mode'' longitudinal signals due to the offset of the beam from the detector center. The latter signals indicate that at 2 GHz, the coherent single-bunch spectrum from the detector is reduced by >80 dB; therefore, in normal collider operation, the Schottky betatron lines are >40 dB greater than their coherent counterparts. We describe how the data we have obtained give information on transverse and longitudinal emittances, synchrotron frequency, and betatron tunes, as well as reveal what may be previously unobserved phenomena. Space limitations restrict us to presenting only as much data as should be necessary to convince even the skeptical reader of the validity of the claim made in the paper's title. 3 refs., 2 figs

  18. A study of events with large total transverse energy produced in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekarz, H.

    1994-09-01

    Properties of events originating from proton-antiproton interactions in which the total transverse energy, Σ|E T |, of the event exceeded 400 GeV are presented. These events were produced at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider operating at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV and recorded in the D0 detector. The authors describe their analysis method which minimizes the effect of multiple interactions in the data sample. Based on a data sample of 5.45 ± 0.65 pb -1 , the topology of these hard scattering events as well as preliminary results for the cross-section, dσ/dΣ|E T |, are presented and discussed

  19. Results from E735 at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider with √s=1.8 teV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Bhat, P.; Hojvat, C.; Reeves, D.; Turkot, F.; Wesson, D.K.; Alexopoulos, T.; Erwin, A.R.; Findeisen, C.; Jennings, J.R.; Nelson, K.; Thompson, M.; Allen, C.; Bujak, A.; Carmony, D.D.; Cole, P.; Choi, Y.; DeBonte, R.; Gutay, L.J.; Hirsch, A.S.; McMahon, T.; Morgan, N.; Porile, N.T.; Rimai, A.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Stringfellow, B.C.; Anderson, E.W.; Wang, C.H.; Balamurali, V.; Banerjee, S.; Beery, P.D.; Biswas, N.N.; Kenny, V.P.; LoSecco, J.M.; McManus, A.P.; Stampke, S.R.; Warchol, J.; Zhan, Y.; Carter, T.; Goshaw, A.T.; Loomis, G.; Oh, S.H.; Robertson, W.J.; Walker, W.D.; DeCarlo, V.

    1992-01-01

    Experiment E735* searched for evidence of the transition to quark-gluon plasma in panti p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV. Using data from a high statistics run in 1988-1989, results are presented on multiplicity distributions, hyperon and phi production, and Bose-Einstein correlations. Some data were also taken at lower collision energies and results will be compared to previous experiments. (orig.)

  20. Physics with W's, Z's and leptons at the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, A.

    1996-10-01

    Recent data from proton-antiproton collisions at high energy provide information on the masses of the Top quark and W boson. The W asymmetry data constrains the slope of the d/u quark distributions and significantly reduces the systematic error on the extracted value of the W mass. Drell-Yan dilepton production at high invariant mass yield limits on extra Z' bosons, and place strong limits on quark substructure. Compositeness limits from CDF Run 1, and expected sensitivity in Run II and TEV33 are presented

  1. Position sensitive silicon detectors inside the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apollinari, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Bellettini, G.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Cervelli, F.; Del Fabbro, R.; Dell'Orso, M.; Di Virgilio, A.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Sestini, P.; Stefanini, A.; Tonelli, G.; Zetti, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Cordelli, M.; Curatolo, M.; Dulach, B.; Esposito, B.; Giromini, P.; Miscetti, S.; Sansoni, A.

    1986-01-01

    Four position sensitive silicon detectors have been tested inside the Tevatron beam pipe at Fermilab. The system is the prototype of the small angle silicon spectrometer designed to study primarily p-anti p elastic and diffractive cross-sections at the Collider of Fermilab (CDF). Particles in the beam halo during p-anti p storage tests were used to study the performance of the detectors. Efficiency, linearity of response and spatial resolution are shown. Measurements performed at different distances from the beam axis have shown that the detectors could be operated at 8.5 mm from the beam with low rates and no disturbance to the circulating beams. This distance corresponds to about 11 times the standard half-width of the local beam envelope. The behaviour of the detectors with the radiation dose has also been investigated. (orig.)

  2. Search for New Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron p(bar p) Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolli, Simona

    2011-01-01

    We report on selected recent results from the CDF and D0 experiments on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model using data from the Tevatron collider running p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1960 GeV. Over the past decades the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics has been surprisingly successful. Although the precision of experimental tests improved by orders of magnitude no significant deviation from the SM predictions has been observed so far. Still, there are many questions that the Standard Model does not answer and problems it can not solve. Among the most important ones are the origin of the electro-weak symmetry breaking, hierarchy of scales, unification of fundamental forces and the nature of gravity. Recent cosmological observations indicates that the SM particles only account for 4% of the matter of the Universe. Many extensions of the SM (Beyond the Standard Model, BSM) have been proposed to make the theory more complete and solve some of the above puzzles. Some of these extension includes SuperSymmetry (SUSY), Grand Unification Theory (GUT) and Extra Dimensions. At CDF and D0 we search for evidence of such processes in proton-antiproton collisions at √(s) = 1960 GeV. The phenomenology of these models is very rich, although the cross sections for most of these exotic processes is often very small compared to those of SM processes at hadron colliders. It is then necessary to devise analysis strategies that would allow to disentangle the small interesting signals, often buried under heavy instrumental and/or physics background. Two main approaches to search for physics beyond the Standard Model are used in a complementary fashion: model-based analyses and signature based studies. In the more traditional model-driven approach, one picks a favorite theoretical model and/or a process, and the best signature is chosen. The selection cuts are optimized based on acceptance studies performed using simulated signal events. The expected background is

  3. Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, R.

    1978-01-01

    The main ongoing project at Fermilab is called the Tevatron, meaning 1,000 GeV in beam energy. The following is a list of major constituents for this project: Super Ring; upgrading external beam lines for experimental areas; electron cooling and antiproton acceleration; and colliding beam facility and its detectors. At present the Super Ring is being build and installed in the Main Ring tunnel. Its injection line is completed and under test. Modification of the tunnel for the Switchyard beam lines is finished. All magnets for the Electron Cooling Ring are installed. Protons are being injected into the cooling ring for study. The designs for the colliding beam facility and its detectors will be finalized shortly. These facilities and their development are described

  4. A measurement of the t anti t production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV with the DOe detector at the Tevatron using final states with a muon and jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klute, M.

    2004-02-01

    A preliminary measurement of the t anti t production cross section at √s=1.96 TeV is presented. The μ-plus-jets final state is analyzed in a data sample of 94 pb -1 and a total of 14 events are selected with a background expectation of 11.7±1.9 events. The measurement yields: σ p anti p→t anti t+X =2.4 -3.5 +4.2 (stat.) -2.6 +2.5 (syst.)±0.3(lumi.) pb. The analysis, being part of a larger effort to re-observe the top quark in Tevatron Run II data and to measure the production cross section, is combined with results from the available analysis channels. The combined result yields: σ p anti p→t anti t+X =8.1 -2.0 +2.2 (stat.) -1.4 +1.6 (syst.)±0.8(lumi.) pb

  5. A measurement of the t anti t production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s=1.96 TeV with the DOe detector at the Tevatron using final states with a muon and jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klute, M.

    2004-02-01

    A preliminary measurement of the t anti t production cross section at {radical}s=1.96 TeV is presented. The {mu}-plus-jets final state is analyzed in a data sample of 94 pb{sup -1} and a total of 14 events are selected with a background expectation of 11.7{+-}1.9 events. The measurement yields: {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X}=2.4{sub -3.5}{sup +4.2}(stat.){sub -2.6}{sup +2.5}(syst.){+-}0.3(lumi.) pb. The analysis, being part of a larger effort to re-observe the top quark in Tevatron Run II data and to measure the production cross section, is combined with results from the available analysis channels. The combined result yields: {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X}=8.1{sub -2.0}{sup +2.2}(stat.){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6}(syst.){+-}0.8(lumi.) pb.

  6. Upgrading the Tevatron to a 1 TeV on 1 TeV pp collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the tasks necessary to change the Tevatron into a proton-proton collider. Also included in the discussion is an estimate of the cost to carry out the modification. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Achievements and Lessons from Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2011-01-01

    For almost a quarter of a century, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the centerpiece of the world's high energy physics program - beginning operation in December of 1985 until it was overtaken by LHC in 2011. The aim of the this unique scientific instrument was to explore the elementary particle physics reactions with center of mass collision energies of up to 1.96 TeV. The initial design luminosity of the Tevatron was 10 30 cm -2 s -1 , however as a result of two decades of upgrades, the accelerator has been able to deliver 430 times higher luminosities to each of two high luminosity experiments, CDF and D0. Tevatron will be shut off September 30, 2011. The collider was arguably one of the most complex research instruments ever to reach the operation stage and is widely recognized for many technological breakthroughs and numerous physics discoveries. Below we briefly present the history of the Tevatron, major advances in accelerator physics, and technology implemented during the long quest for better and better performance. We also discuss some lessons learned from our experience.

  8. A new Tevatron Collider working point near the integer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.P.; Zhang, P.

    1989-12-01

    It is well established that in hadron colliders the beam-beam interaction is more harmful in the presence of machine resonances of the form mν x + nν y = p, where |m| + |n| is the order of the resonance. Since the closest a resonance line can be to the integer stopband is 1/order, the closer the working point is to the integer, the fewer lower order resonances there are to enhance the beam-beam effects. A shift of the working point of the Tevatron from 19.4 to values near 19 and 20 has been studied. Problems with closed orbit control, dispersion matching, and matched low β insertions were considered. An excellent solution for the B0 insertion was found which has an improved β*. A new injection optics allows a transition to the low β optics which is much easier than the one now used. Results from the first machine studies demonstrate the ability to control the orbit with tunes of 19.03 horizontal and 20.03 vertical. Further studies require the activation of additional quadrupole compensation circuits. 4 refs. , 2 figs

  9. BTEV: a dedicated B physics detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.

    1996-11-01

    The capabilities of future Dedicated Hadron Collider B Physics experiments are discussed and compared to experiments that will run in the next few years. The design for such an experiment at the Tevatron Collider is presented and an evolutionary path for developing it is outlined. 9 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Tevatron in the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that in 1978, Fermilab set out a goal of building a superconducting accelerator (Energy Saver) which would raise the proton energy to close to 1000 GeV for operation in two modes. Tevatron I would provide proton-antiproton collisions at a total CM energy of near 2.0 TeV to study the particle mass domain beyond 100 GeV. Tevatron II would provide extensive facilities for the programmatic study of Standard Model physics in an upgraded fixed-target program. There was of course the realization that with the right mixture of precision and imagination, the collider could add significantly to Standard Model physics (e.g. W and Z physics, W, Z pairs, B-physics) and that the fixed-target program could explore beyond the Standard Model (e.g., rare K-decays, CP violation). In 1988, we are engaged in setting out the future program of the Laboratory based upon the success of the Energy Saver, TeV I and TeV II construction programs. This future program assures the operation of the TEVATRON facility for physics is the overriding priority between now and perhaps 1993 and it also assumes that the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will be funded for construction in 1990 and will begin producing physics by 1999. A brief history of upgrades is presented in section XI

  11. 2007 2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME: Tevatron: The Cinderella Story or The Art Of Collider Commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 01, 03, 04, 05 October 2007 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Tevatron: The Cinderella Story or The Art Of Collider Commissioning V. SHILTSEV / Fermi National Accelerator Laboraty, Batavia IL, USA The Tevatron Collider at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) is the world’s highest energy particle collider at 1.8TeV c.m.e. The machine was a centerpiece of the US and world’s High Energy Physics for many years. Currently, the Tevatron is in the last years of its operation in so-called Run II which started 2001 and is tentatively scheduled to end in 2010. In this lecture series, we’ll try to learn from the exciting story of the Tevatron Collider Run II: the story of long preparations, great expectations, initial difficulties, years of "blood and sweat", continuous upgrades, exceeding its goals, high emotions, tune-up of accelerator organization for "combat fighting". The lectures will cover Introduction to the Tevatron, its history and Run II; "Plumbing"...

  12. Search for new fermions ('Quirks') at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 21 (2010), "211803-1"-"211803-6" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08047; GA MŠk LC527 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : missing-energy * transverse energy * D0 * Batavia TEVATRON Coll * interaction Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.621, year: 2010 http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1008.3547

  13. Electroweak and b-physics at the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, K.

    1994-04-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments have collected integrated luminosities of 21 pb -1 and 16 pb -1 , respectively, in the 1992--1993 run (Run Ia) at the Fermilab Tevatron. Preliminary results on electroweak physics are reported from both experiments: the W mass, the leptonic branching ratios Τ(W → ell ν), the total W width, gauge boson couplings, W decay asymmetry and W'/Z' search. Preliminary new results on b physics are presented: B o - bar B o mixing from D0, and masses and lifetimes of B-mesons from CDF

  14. CERN scientists take part in the Tevatron Run II performance review committee

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Tevatron Run II is under way at Fermilab, exploring the high-energy frontier with upgraded detectors that will address some of the biggest questions in particle physics.Until CERN's LHC switches on, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider is the world's only source of top quarks. It is the only place where we can search for supersymmetry, for the Higgs boson, and for signatures of additional dimensions of space-time. The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently convened a high-level international review committee to examine Fermilab experts' first-phase plans for the accelerator complex. Pictured here with a dipole magnet in CERN's LHC magnet test facility are the four CERN scientists who took part in the DOE's Tevatron review. Left to right: Francesco Ruggiero, Massimo Placidi, Flemming Pedersen, and Karlheinz Schindl. Further information: CERN Courier 43 (1)

  15. The issue of mass generation: the search for the Higgs boson in the D0 experiment at the proton-antiproton collider of Fermilab and the measurement of neutrino oscillation with OPERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucotte, A.

    2004-09-01

    The first part is dedicated to the theoretical aspects of the mechanism of mass generation in the standard model. The implications of this mechanism in the experimental field concerning the Higgs boson search and neutrinos are detailed. The second part presents the D0 experiment at the Tevatron (Fermilab) and describes in a detailed way the forward pre-shower (FPS) that is a sub-detector of D0 whose aim is to identify the electrons. FPS has required a specific triggering system linked to a data acquisition line. The third part is devoted to the Opera experiment that is planned to operate in 2006. The purpose of this experiment is to confirm the oscillations of muon neutrinos and tau neutrinos through the direct detection of a tau lepton in the pure beam of muon neutrinos produced in CERN. The author describes his contribution to the design and testing of the front-end read electronics of the Opera scintillator tracker. (A.C.)

  16. Introduction to colliding beams at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.

    1994-10-01

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is currently the site of the world's highest center-of-mass energy proton-antiproton colliding beam accelerator, the Tevatron. The CDF and D OE detectors each envelop one of two luminous regions in the collider, and are thus wholly dependent on the accelerator for their success. The Tevatron's high operating energy, reliability, and record setting integrated luminosity have allowed both experiments to make world-class measurements and defined the region of physics that each can explore. The following sections are an overview of the highlights of the accelerator operation and are compiled from many sources. The major sources for each section are listed at the beginning of that section

  17. Searches for Long-lived Particles at the Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, T.; Florida State U.

    2008-01-01

    Several searches for long-lived particles have been performed using data from p(bar p) collisions from Run II at the Tevatron. In most cases, new analysis techniques have been developed to carry out each search and/or estimate the backgrounds. These searches expand the discovery potential of the CDF and D0 experiments to new physics that may have been missed by traditional search techniques. This review discusses searches for (1) neutral, long-lived particles decaying to muons, (2) massive, neutral, long-lived particles decaying to a photon and missing energy, (3) stopped gluinos, and (4) charged massive stable particles. It summarizes some of the theoretical and experimental motivations for such searches

  18. Advanced forward calorimetry for the SSC and TeVatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiBitonto, D.; Van Peteghem, P.M.; Geiger, R.L.; McIntyre, P.M.; Pang, Y.; Thane, J.M.; White, J.T.; Atac, M.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a project to develop fast, radiation hardened forward calorimetry for the SSC and TeVatron collider. Detector technologies discussed are based on gas and warm liquid media. In particular, we present the design of an ultrasensitive hybrid charge preamplifier for liquid technology capable of operating at 0.1-1 GHz. The actual detector bandwidth will depend on the choice of detector media used and the maximum allowable operating high voltage. (orig.)

  19. The physics of proton antiproton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shochet, M. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States))

    1991-12-03

    This paper contains information information on: accelerator and detector; QCD studies; studies of the electroweak force; The search for the top quark; {beta} physics at hadron colliders; and the search for exotic objects and prospects for the future.

  20. The physics of proton antiproton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shochet, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper contains information information on: accelerator and detector; QCD studies; studies of the electroweak force; The search for the top quark; β physics at hadron colliders; and the search for exotic objects and prospects for the future

  1. Measurement of the single top production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a search for singly produced top quarks via an electroweak vertex in head-on proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. The analysis uses a total of 2.3 fb -1 of data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab, corresponding to two different run periods of the Tevatron collider. Two channels contribute to single top quark production at the Tevatron, the s-channel and the t-channel. In the s-channel, a virtual W boson is produced from the aniquilation of a quark and an antiquark and a top and a bottom quarks are produced from the W decay. The top quark decays almost exclusively into a W boson and a bottom quark. Final states are considered in which the W boson decays leptonically into an electron or a muon plus a neutrino. Thus, at the detector level, the final state characterizing the s-channel contains one lepton, missing energy accounting for the neutrino, and two jets from the two bottom quarks. In the t-channel, the final state has an additional jet coming from a light quark. Clearly, a precise reconstruction of the events requires a precise measurement of the energy of the jets. A multivariate technique, Bayesian neural networks, is used to extract the single top signal from the overwhelming background still left after event selection. A Bayesian likelihood probability is then computed to measure the single top cross section. Assuming the observed excess is due to single top events, the measured single top quark production cross section is σ(p(bar p) → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.70 -0.93 +1.18 pb. The observed excess is associated with a p-value of (3.2 ± 2.3) x 10 -8 , assuming the background-only hypothesis. This p-value corresponds to an excess over background of 5.4 standard deviations for a Gaussian density. The p-value computed using the standard model signal cross section of 3.46 pb is (22.7 ± 0.6) x 10 -6 , corresponding to an expected significance of 4.08 standard deviations.

  2. Measurement of the single top production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge [Univ. of Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-03-25

    This thesis describes a search for singly produced top quarks via an electroweak vertex in head-on proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. The analysis uses a total of 2.3 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab, corresponding to two different run periods of the Tevatron collider. Two channels contribute to single top quark production at the Tevatron, the s-channel and the t-channel. In the s-channel, a virtual W boson is produced from the aniquilation of a quark and an antiquark and a top and a bottom quarks are produced from the W decay. The top quark decays almost exclusively into a W boson and a bottom quark. Final states are considered in which the W boson decays leptonically into an electron or a muon plus a neutrino. Thus, at the detector level, the final state characterizing the s-channel contains one lepton, missing energy accounting for the neutrino, and two jets from the two bottom quarks. In the t-channel, the final state has an additional jet coming from a light quark. Clearly, a precise reconstruction of the events requires a precise measurement of the energy of the jets. A multivariate technique, Bayesian neural networks, is used to extract the single top signal from the overwhelming background still left after event selection. A Bayesian likelihood probability is then computed to measure the single top cross section. Assuming the observed excess is due to single top events, the measured single top quark production cross section is σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.70+1.18-0.93 pb. The observed excess is associated with a p-value of (3.2 ± 2.3) x 10-8, assuming the background-only hypothesis. This p-value corresponds to an excess over background of 5.4 standard deviations for a Gaussian density. The p-value computed using the standard model signal cross section of 3.46 pb is (22.7 ± 0.6) x 10-6, corresponding to an expected significance

  3. A realistic study on a forward geometry collider spectrometer: Performance of a typical fixed target spectrometer at the tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, P.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a forward heavy quark experiment at the collider can be estimated in a very realistic way, by simply carrying an existing fixed target spectrometer (E687) to the Tevatron Collider, changing only the beam/target configuration while keeping all reconstruction cuts identical to those used in reconstructing real charmed particles collected during the last fixed target run. Based on the golden - and typical - decay mode D → Kππ, it is found that the overall charm acceptance x efficiency is ∼ 3%, the 5-body B decay B → Dππ being about .6%. Such an experiment compares very favorably to E-831 and has real potential to study in great detail doubly suppressed Cabbibo decays and to observe D 0 - D 0 mixing. In addition, this exercise allows one to perform a rough but effective reality check on similar design (e.g. COBEX)

  4. Mesure de la section efficace de production de paires de quarks top dans le canal μ + jets + τ + b-jet(s) + Energie transverse manquante auprès de l'expérience DØ du Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammes, Jerome [Blaise Pascal Univ., Aubiere (France)

    2011-09-09

    The purpose of high energy physics is to improve our knowledge about the fundamental structure of matter, in particular about particles that constitute the world. One of these is the top quark, that was discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron protons-antiprotons collider. One of the primary aim of the Tevatron has been then the fine study of the top quark properties, in particular the top-antitop production cross section. Different analysis have been performed in the leptons (μ,e,τ) + jets, dileptons, and all hadronic channels to determine accurately the values of these parameters, and thus to test the validity of the Standard Model. The main goal of this thesis is to verify one of the theoretical predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics, the top-antitop production cross section, at the Tevatron collider.

  5. Search for chargino and neutralino at Run II of the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canepa, Anadi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2006-08-01

    In this dissertation we present a search for the associated production of charginos and neutralinos, the supersymmetric partners of the Standard Model bosons. We analyze a data sample representing 745 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF experiment at the p$\\bar{p}$ Tevatron collider. We compare the Standard Model predictions with the observed data selecting events with three leptons and missing transverse energy. Finding no excess, we combine the results of our search with similar analyses carried out at CDF and set an upper limit on the chargino mass in SUSY scenarios.

  6. Production measurements on the quadrupole correctors for the new Low- Beta System for the Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtarani, A.; Brown, B.C.; Hanft, R.; Oleck, A.R.; Peterson, T.; Turkot, F.

    1991-05-01

    Each of the Low Beta Systems for the Tevatron Collider requires 12 spool pieces; eight of the spool pieces contain superconducting quadrupoles as part of the low beta insertion as well as standard correction magnets. The remaining four provide correction magnets, beam position monitors, and current feeds for the neighboring low beta main quadrupoles. Thirty-two of these new spools have been fabricated. We describe here the mechanical, cryogenic and magnetic properties of these new spools as determined in the production test and measurement activities. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  7. Measurements of the top quark pair production cross section in lepton+jets final states using a topological multivariate technique as well as lifetime b-tagging in proton-antiproton collisions at √(s)=1.96 TeV with the DOe detector at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golling, T.

    2005-01-01

    Two alternative measurements of the tt production cross section at √(s)=1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions in the lepton+jets channel are presented. The tt production cross section is extracted by combining the kinematic event information in a multivariate discriminant. The measurement yields σ p anti p→t anti t+X = 5.13 -1.57 +1.76 (stat) -1.10 +0.96 (syst) ±0.33 (lumi) pb in the muon+jets channel, using 229.1 pb -1 , and in the combination with the electron+jets channel (226.3 pb -1 ) σ p anti p→t anti t +X = 6.60 -1.28 +1.37 (stat) -1.11 +1.25 (syst) ± 0.43 (lumi) pb. The second measurement presented reconstructs explicitly secondary vertices to do lifetime b-tagging. The measurement combines the muon+jets and the electron+jets channel, using 158.4 pb -1 and 168.8 pb -1 , respectively: σ p anti p→t anti t+X = 8.24 -1.25 +1.34 (stat) -1.63 +1.89 (syst) ± 0.54 (lumi) pb. (orig.)

  8. Calculation of integrated luminosity for beams stored in the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    A model for calculating the integrated luminosity of beams stored in the Tevatron collider will be presented. The model determines the instantaneous luminosity by calculating the overlap integral of bunched beams passing through the interaction region. The calculation accounts for the variation in beam size due to the beta functions and also for effects due to finite longitudinal emittance and non-zero dispersion in the interaction region. The integrated luminosity is calculated for the beams as they evolve due to processes including collisions and intrabeam scattering. The model has been applied to both the extant and upgraded Tevatron collider, but is not limited to them. The original motivation for developing the computer model was to determine the reduction in luminosity due to beams with non-zero longitudinal emittances. There are two effects: the transverse beam size is increased where the dispersion is non-zero; the finite length of the beam bunch combined with an increasing β function results in an increased transverse beam size at the ends of the bunch. The derivation of a sufficiently useful analytic expression for the luminosity proved to be intractable. Instead, a numerical integration computer program was developed to calculate the luminosity in the presence of a finite longitudinal emittance. The program was then expanded into a model which allows the luminosity to vary due to changes in emittances and reduction in bunch intensities. At that point, it was not difficult to calculate the integrated luminosity. 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Search for Associated Chargino-Neutralino Production in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenschein, Ulla [Albert Ludwigs Univ. of Freiburg (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    interacting, carrying away energy and momentum and leading to detector signatures with large missing energy. Supersymmetric particles have been searched for at the electron-positron collider LEP up to the kinematic limit. No evidence for these particles has been observed which results in lower limits on their masses. Additional constraints stem from precision measurements of quantities, which are sensitive to corrections from SUSY particles and from the search for dark matter in cosmological experiments. The search for SUSY particles beyond the reach of LEP is continued at larger energy regimes at present and future hadron colliders. In its second phase of data taking (Run II), the center-of-mass energy of the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron at Fermilab has been raised and the luminosity has been increased considerably. The D0 experiment, one of the two Tevatron experiments, has been upgraded accordingly. The Tevatron collider allows to probe a substantial SUSY mass range beyond the LEP limits. The search will be continued at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is presently being constructed at the European Research laboratory for particle physics CERN in Geneva. At hadron colliders the supersymmetric partners of quarks and gluons are copiously produced in strong interactions, provided they are light enough. Within most of the established SUSY models, these particles are too heavy to be produced at a sufficient rate at the Tevatron collider and the production of the lighter super-partners of the Higgs and gauge bosons, the charginos and neutralinos, becomes an important source of SUSY particles. Decays of these particles result in final states with leptons or hadrons and large missing energy. Leptonic final states can be separated more easily from the large background of hadronic Standard Model processes. A search for the associated production of the lightest chargino and the second lightest neutralino has been performed in final states with two electrons, an additional

  10. Measurements of the top quark pair production cross section in lepton+jets final states using a topological multivariate technique as well as lifetime b-tagging in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV with the DOe detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golling, T.

    2005-01-01

    Two alternative measurements of the tt production cross section at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions in the lepton+jets channel are presented. The tt production cross section is extracted by combining the kinematic event information in a multivariate discriminant. The measurement yields {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X} = 5.13{sub -1.57}{sup +1.76} (stat) {sub -1.10}{sup +0.96} (syst) {+-}0.33 (lumi) pb in the muon+jets channel, using 229.1 pb{sup -1}, and in the combination with the electron+jets channel (226.3 pb{sup -1}) {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t}+X = 6.60{sub -1.28}{sup +1.37} (stat) {sub -1.11}{sup +1.25} (syst) {+-} 0.43 (lumi) pb. The second measurement presented reconstructs explicitly secondary vertices to do lifetime b-tagging. The measurement combines the muon+jets and the electron+jets channel, using 158.4 pb{sup -1} and 168.8 pb{sup -1}, respectively: {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X} = 8.24{sub -1.25}{sup +1.34} (stat) {sub -1.63}{sup +1.89} (syst) {+-} 0.54 (lumi) pb. (orig.)

  11. Academic Training - Tevatron: studying pp collisions at the highest energy

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 15, 16, 17, 18 May Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 15, 16, 17 May - Council Chamber on 18 May Physics at the Tevatron B. HEINEMANN, Univ. of Liverpool, FERMILAB Physics Results from the Tevatron The Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab in the US is currently the world's highest energy collider. At the experiments CDF and D0 a broad physics programme is being pursued, ranging from flavour physics via electroweak precision measurements to searches for the Higgs boson and new particles beyond the Standard Model. In my lecture I will describe some of the highlight measurements in the flavour, electroweak and searches sectors, and the experimental techniques that are used. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/...

  12. Investigation of hadronic matter at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider: Technical progress report, 1986 October-1987 October

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.W.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of hadronic matter at very high energy densities is reported. The present experiment, E-735, is a search for a deconfined quark-gluon plasma phase of matter expected to occur when temperatures of 240 MeV are achieved. Preliminary data have been obtained during the first operation of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider during the period January to May 1987. The collaboration is about to publish first results on the charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum distributions. In addition, we have data on the particle identification of the produced secondaries. Both measurements are regarded on theoretical grounds to be sensitive indicators of the formation of a high temperature plasma. The capital project funded under this contract was a 240-element trigger hodoscope array, with associated electronics and monitor. The hodoscope was completed and performed to design expectations in the high-rate and high-radiation environment of the Collider. Scientific personnel supported under this contract were also responsible for the implementation of the data acquisition system used for E-735. Although the system underwent several unanticipated modifications in response to changing schedules, the required service was provided. Preparations are currently under way for the principal data acquisition during the spring of 1988. At that time we will have in place the central tracking chamber, and the remainder of the spectrometer chambers. Tests will also be made on backgrounds and detector materials appropriate to our proposal, P-787, to measure leptons and photons in the third Collider running period

  13. Linear beam-beam tune shift calculations for the Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.

    1989-01-01

    A realistic estimate of the linear beam-beam tune shift is necessary for the selection of an optimum working point in the tune diagram. Estimates of the beam-beam tune shift using the ''Round Beam Approximation'' (RBA) have over estimated the tune shift for the Tevatron. For a hadron machine with unequal lattice functions and beam sizes, an explicit calculation using the beam size at the crossings is required. Calculations for various Tevatron lattices used in Collider operation are presented. Comparisons between the RBA and the explicit calculation, for elliptical beams, are presented. This paper discusses the calculation of the linear tune shift using the program SYNCH. Selection of a working point is discussed. The magnitude of the tune shift is influenced by the choice of crossing points in the lattice as determined by the pbar ''cogging effects''. Also discussed is current cogging procedures and presents results of calculations for tune shifts at various crossing points in the lattice. Finally, a comparison of early pbar tune measurements with the present linear tune shift calculations is presented. 17 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Multiple Parton Interactions in p$bar{p}$ Collisions in D0 Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovanov, Georgy [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russia)

    2016-01-01

    The thesis is devoted to the study of processes with multiple parton interactions (MPI) in a ppbar collision collected by D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. The study includes measurements of MPI event fraction and effective cross section, a process-independent parameter related to the effective interaction region inside the nucleon. The measurements are done using events with a photon and three hadronic jets in the final state. The measured effective cross section is used to estimate background from MPI for WH production at the Tevatron energy

  15. Top anti-top Asymmetries at the Tevatron and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Yvonne Reinhild [DESY

    2012-11-01

    The heaviest known elementary particle today, the top quark, has been discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab. Recently, the CDF and D0 collaborations have studied the forward-backward asymmetry in ttbar events, resulting in measured values larger than the standard model prediction. With the start of the LHC at CERN in 2010, a new top quark factory has opened and asymmetry measurements in ttbar have also been performed in a proton proton environment with higher collision energy. No deviations from the standard model have been noticed so far in the measurements of ATLAS and CMS. This article discusses recent results of asymmetry measurements in ttbar events of the ATLAS, CDF, CMS and D0 collaborations.

  16. Single top quarks at the Tevatron and observation of the s-channel production mode

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The presentation gives an overview of single-top-quark production at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The talk covers measurements of the total s+t channel production cross section and the extraction of the CKM matrix element |V_tb|. Furthermore, separate analyses of the s-channel and t-channel production modes are discussed. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment and represent in most cases the full Run-II dataset. Through a combination of the CDF and D0 measurements the first observation of single-top-quark production in the s-channel is claimed. This is particularly highlighted in the seminar.

  17. Searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Wade C. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Junk, Thomas R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    During Run II of the Tevatron collider, which took place from 2001 until 2011, the CDF and D0 detectors each collected approximately 10 fb -1 of collision data at a center-of-mass energy of . This dataset allowed for tests for the presence of the SM Higgs boson in the mass range 90-200 GeV in the production modes gg → H, W/ZH, vector-boson fusion, and H, with H decay modes H → , H → W+W-, H →

  18. Multilepton production in neutrino interactions and proton-antiproton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenzuela, G.N.

    1985-01-01

    In part I, we consider the class of events containing 2 or 3 leptons in (anti-neutrino deep inelastic scattering and in proton-antiproton collisions. Understanding the characteristics and rate of production of this type of event has often proven to be a theoretical challenge. We show that a cluster model involving associated-charm production not only accounts for certain dimuon events, but also affords better agreement with experiment regarding trimuons produced in neutrino interactions. We also investigate correlations between D-meson and dimuon production in p anti p collisions in the context of a cluster model which includes the possibility of finding b anti b pairs in jets. Part II consists of a study of radiation zeros in the reaction p anti p → l anti nuγX. It has been proposed that the radiation zero phenomenon could be observed in processes involving the radiative decay of the W-boson. These processes might allow the measurement of the W anomalous magnetic moment. We calculate the effect on this measurement of the decay width and the non-zero transverse momentum of the W. We find that although the radiation zero is filled in to some extent, it might still be possible to estimate the magnetic moment of the W in future experiments

  19. Properties of W + jet events in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drucker, Robert Brian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-11-22

    W boson + QCD Jet events, produced in 1.8 TeV proton-antiproton collisions and measured by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), were used to measure the center-of-mass production angle of the W + jet system, and were also used to place limits on the production of excited quark states. The center-of-mass production angular distribution agrees well with leading order and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. Excited quark states were searched for in the reaction q + g → q* → q + W. Upper limits on the q* cross section, as a function of the q* mass, are shown. Comparison with a theoretical prediction for q* production excludes excited quark states with a mass in the range 150--530 GeV/c2, at 95% confidence.

  20. Observation and study of bottom-meson decays to a charm meson, a proton-antiproton pair, and pions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tae Min [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2010-04-27

    Bottom-meson decays with baryons show two unusual features—the branching fractions are enhanced for multibody decays and the baryon-antibaryon subsystem recoils against the other decay products—and their reasons are not yet well understood. Moreover, measurements using explicit reconstruction techniques constitute only about 1% out of about 8% of such decays. This Dissertation reports the study of ten bottom-meson decays (labeled 0– 9) to a proton-antiproton pair, a charm meson, and a system of up to two pions, using the BABAR Experiment’s 455×106 BB pairs produced with the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  1. Investigation of hadronic matter at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.W.

    1985-01-01

    Hadronic matter at very high energy densities is investigated. The present experimental effort is focused on a search for a new quark-gluon plasma phase expected to occur when temperatures of 240 MeV are achieved. Instrumentation for several unique signatures is being developed to exploit the first operation of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in 1986. The capital projects funded under this contract are a 240-element trigger hodoscope array, and in phase II a segmented photon detector. For these projects $172K are requested for the period 1986 February 1 through 1987 January 31 to complete the trigger hodoscope, and $160K for the period 1987 February 1 through 1988 January 31 to construct a portion of the photon detector. These figures are as presented in the original proposal. Due to budget constraints on the Fermilab experimental support program, we will not be able to receive the full complement of necessary electronics from the Fermilab PREP pool in the required period. Consequently, an additional $35K is requested for the period 1986 February 1 through 1987 January 31 for a portion of the electronics for the 240-channel trigger hodoscope. For the same reasons, Fermilab cannot provide the required magnet on schedule; a one year delay is proposed. As this would seriously impact our physics goals, the collaboration is attempting to fund the magnet without delay through the universities. Efforts to date have concentrated on the design and testing of the hodoscope. Extensive measurements on the radiation levels and effects during the various accelerator cycles have been made. These data are essential to the proper selection of scintillator and design of electronics. These tests are now complete, and final construction is beginning. 11 refs

  2. Proton-Antiproton Pair Production in Two-Photon Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hakobyan, R.S.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2003-01-01

    The reaction e+e- -> e+e- proton antiproton is studied with the L3 detector at LEP. The analysis is based on data collected at e+e- center-of-mass energies from 183 GeV to 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 667 pb-1. The gamma gamma -> proton antiproton differential cross section is measured in the range of the two-photon center-of-mass energy from 2.1 GeV to 4.5 GeV. The results are compared to the predictions of the three-quark and quark-diquark models.

  3. Production of single top quark - results from the Tevatron and the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2014-01-01

    We present the most recent measurements of single top quark production cross section by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The data were collected at the Tevatron corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-antiproton ($p\\bar p$) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV and at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 4.9 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton ($pp$) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV in 2011 and up to 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV in 2012. The measurements of single top quark production in $s$-channel, $t$-channel and associated production of a top quark and a $W$-boson ($tW$ production) are presented separately and lower limits on the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the single top quark cross section are set.

  4. Combination of measurements of the top-quark pair production cross section from the Tevatron Collider

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 7 (2014), "072001-1"-"072001-16" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Batavia TEVATRON Coll * quantum chromodynamics * perturbation theory * statistical analysis * CDF * DZERO Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.643, year: 2014

  5. Fermilab enters the Tevatron era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, B.

    1985-01-01

    The advent of the world's first superconducting accelerator/storage ring has transformed the physics programme at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary and secondary beam energies (and the coming colliding beam energies) are double those previously available at Fermilab and at the CERN SPS. There is heavy investment in the fixed target programme to use these beam energies and, at present, even more pressure is driving the preparations for proton-antiproton colliding beam operation at energies up to 1 TeV per beam. Since it is the revitalized machine which is making all this possible, we begin with news on machine performance and development. (orig.).

  6. Study of the heavy flavour fractions in z+jets events from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at energy √s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrandrea, Paolo [Univ. of Siena (Italy)

    2008-06-01

    to provide collisions for the experiments at the end of 2008. In the meanwhile the only running accelerator able to provide collisions suitable for the search of the Higgs boson is the Tevatron at Fermilab, a proton-antiproton collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV working at 3 • 1032cm-2s-1 peak luminosity. These features make the Tevatron able for the direct search of the Higgs boson in the 115-200 GeV mass range. Since the coupling of the Higgs boson is proportional to the masses of the particles involved, the decay in b{bar b} has the largest branching ratio for Higgs mass < 135 GeV and thus the events Z/W + $b\\bar{b}$ are the main background to the Higgs signal in the most range favored by Standard Model fits. In this thesis a new technique to identify Heavy Flavour quarks inside high - PT jets is applied to events with a reconstructed Z boson to provide a measurement of the Z+b and Z+c inclusive cross sections. The study of these channels represent also a test of QCD in high transferred momentum regime, and can provide information on proton pdf. This new Heavy Flavour identication technique (tagger) provides an increased statistical separation between b, c and light flavours, using a new vertexing algorithm and a chain of artificial Neural Networks to exploit as much information as possible in each event. For this work I collaborated with the Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' group working in the CDF II experiment at Tevatron, that has at first developed this tagger. After a brief theoretical introduction (chapter 1) and a description of the experimental apparatus (chapter 2), the tagger itself and its calibration procedure are described in chapter 3 and 4. The chapter 5 is dedicated to the event selection and the chapter 6 contains the results of the measurement and the study of the systematic errors.

  7. A search for the Higgs boson in the zh channel with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinmiller, James Matthew [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This analysis describes a search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson through the decay mode ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$ in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample used in this analysis corresponds to 452 pb-1 of integrated luminosity accumulated with the D0 detector. Agreement between data and standard model predictions is observed. A 95% confidence level upper exclusion limit for the σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → ZH) x BR(H → b$\\bar{b}$) channel is set between 3.2-8.2 pb for Higgs masses of 105 to 145 GeV.

  8. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron bar pp collider at √s = 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jaehoon

    1994-06-01

    Abstract: Recent results of QCD studies from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron bar pp collider at Fermilab are presented. The inclusive jet cross section, the internal structure of jets, di-jet angular distributions, di-jet triple differential cross sections, and properties of multi-jet final states are studied and compared with NLO QCD predictions. The comparisons show good agreement between theoretical predictions and the experimental data in general. Some systematic disagreement between LO predictions and the data are observed in di-jet triple differential cross sections. Results of a rapidity gap study are also presented together with an upper limit on the gap fraction. In addition, the inclusive photon cross section and the di-photon cross sections are presented and compared with NLO QCD predictions

  9. A search for the Higgs boson in the zh channel with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinmiller, James Matthew; Illinois U., Chicago

    2006-01-01

    This analysis describes a search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson through the decay mode ZH → e + e - b(bar b) in p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample used in this analysis corresponds to 452 pb -1 of integrated luminosity accumulated with the D(null) detector. Agreement between data and standard model predictions is observed. A 95% confidence level upper exclusion limit for the σ(p(bar p) → ZH) x BR(H → b(bar b)) channel is set between 3.2-8.2 pb for Higgs masses of 105 to 145 GeV

  10. Complementarity of the CERN LEP collider, the Fermilab Tevatron, and the CERN LHC in the search for a light MSSM Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Carena, M S; Wagner, C E M

    2000-01-01

    We study the discovery potential of the CERN LHC, Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LEP colliders in the search for the neutral CP-even Higgs boson of the MSSM which couples to the weak gauge bosons with a strength close to the standard model one and, hence, plays a relevant role in the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. We place special emphasis on the radiative effects which influence the discovery reach of these colliders. We concentrate on the Vbb channel, with V=Z or W, and on the channels with diphoton final states, which are the dominant ones for the search for a light standard model Higgs boson at LEP or Tevatron and LHC, respectively. By analyzing the parameters of the MSSM for which the searches become difficult at one or more of these three colliders, we demonstrate their complementarity in the search for a light Higgs boson which plays a relevant role in the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. (32 refs).

  11. Microwave Schottky diagnostic systems for the Fermilab Tevatron, Recycler, and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph J. Pasquinelli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A means for noninvasive measurement of transverse and longitudinal characteristics of bunched beams in synchrotrons has been developed based on high sensitivity slotted waveguide pickups. The pickups allow for bandwidths exceeding hundreds of MHz while maintaining good beam sensitivity characteristics. Wide bandwidth is essential to allow bunch-by-bunch measurements by means of a fast gate. The Schottky detector system is installed and successfully commissioned in the Fermilab Tevatron, Recycler and CERN LHC synchrotrons. Measurement capabilities include tune, chromaticity, and momentum spread of single or multiple beam bunches in any combination. With appropriate calibrations, emittance can also be measured by integrating the area under the incoherent tune sidebands.

  12. Production of c and b quarks in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Tevatron collider at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 ТеV; Народження $c$ та $b$ кварків в $p\\bar{p}$ зіткненнях на колайдері Tevatron при $Е_{цм}$ = 1.96 ТеВ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogota, Olga [Taras Shevchenko National Univ. of Kyiv, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2016-01-01

    The results of the measurements of c and b quarks productions in proton-antiproton collisions at the D0 experiment at the Tevatron are presented in this thesis. Measurements have been done in 2 aspects: measurement of the W +b-jet and W +c-jet differential production cross sections and a measurement of the fiducial cross sections of quarkonium productions of c quark, simultaneously production of two J/ψ mesons, simultaneously production of J/ψ and Υ mesons in the muon channel decay.

  13. First observation of vector boson pairs in a hadronic final state at the tevatron collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-08-28

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V = W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity of pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 1516 + or - 239(stat) + or - 144(syst) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section sigma(pp[over ]-->VV + X) of 18.0 + or - 2.8(stat) + or - 2.4(syst) + or -1.1(lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectations of the standard model.

  14. Measurement of direct CP violation parameters in B± → J/ψK± and B± → J/ψπ± decays with 10.4 fb-1 of Tevatron data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Beattie, M; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hart, B; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Holzbauer, J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lamont, I; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; Mason, N; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2013-06-14

    We present a measurement of the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry in B(±) mesons decaying to J/ψK(±) and J/ψπ(±) where J/ψ decays to μ(+) μ(-), using the full run II data set of 10.4 fb(-1) of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A difference in the yield of B(-) and B(+) mesons in these decays is found by fitting to the difference between their reconstructed invariant mass distributions resulting in asymmetries of A(J/ψK) = [0.59 ± 0.37]%, which is the most precise measurement to date, and A(J/ψπ) = [-4.2 ± 4.5]%. Both measurements are consistent with standard model predictions.

  15. Standard Model Higgs Searches at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoepfel, Kyle J.

    2012-06-01

    We present results from the search for a standard model Higgs boson using data corresponding up to 10 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data produced by the Fermilab Tevatron at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data were recorded by the CDF and D0 detectors between March 2001 and September of 2011. A broad excess is observed between 105 < m{sub H} < 145 GeV/c{sup 2} with a global significance of 2.2 standard deviations relative to the background-only hypothesis.

  16. Search for the Production of Gluinos and Squarks with the CDF II Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lorenzo, Gianluca [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-19

    This thesis reports on two searches for the production of squarks and gluinos, supersymmetric partners of the Standard Model (SM) quarks and gluons, using the CDF detector at the Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ collider. An inclusive search for squarks and gluinos pair production is performed in events with large ET and multiple jets in the final state, based on 2 fb-1 of CDF Run II data. The analysis is performed within the framework of minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) and assumes R-parity conservation where sparticles are produced in pairs. The expected signal is characterized by the production of multiple jets of hadrons from the cascade decays of squarks and gluinos and large missing transverse energy ET from the lightest supersymmetric particles (LSP). The measurements are in good agreement with SM predictions for backgrounds. The results are translated into 95% confidence level (CL) upper limits on production cross sections and squark and gluino masses in a given mSUGRA scenario. An upper limit on the production cross section is placed in the range between 1 pb and 0.1 pb, depending on the gluino and squark masses considered. The result of the search is negative for gluino and squark masses up to 392 GeV/c2 in the region where gluino and squark masses are close to each other, gluino masses up to 280 GeV/c2 regardless of the squark mass, and gluino masses up to 423 GeV=c2 for squark masses below 378 GeV/c2. These results are compatible with the latest limits on squark/gluino production obtained by the D0 Collaboration and considerably improve the previous exclusion limits from direct and indirect searches at LEP and the Tevatron. The inclusive search is then extended to a scenario where the pair production of sbottom squarks is dominant. The new search is performed in a generic MSSM scenario with R-parity conservation. A specific SUSY particle mass hierarchy is assumed such that the

  17. Measurement of electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Peter Joseph [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The top quark is an extremely massive fundamental particle that is predominantly produced in pairs at particle collider experiments. The Standard Model of particle physics predicts that top quarks can also be produced singly by the electroweak force; however, this process is more difficult to detect because it occurs at a smaller rate and is more difficult to distinguish from background processes. The cross section of this process is related to the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V tb|, and measurement of the single top quark production cross section is currently the only method to directly measure this quantity without assuming the number of generations of fermions. This thesis describes a measurement of the cross section of electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. This analysis uses 2.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The search is performed using a matrix element method which calculates the differential cross section for each event for several signal and background hypotheses. These numbers are combined into a single discriminant and used to construct templates from Monte Carlo simulation. A maximum likelihood fit to the data distribution gives a measurement of the cross section. This analysis measures a value of 2.2$+0.8\\atop{-0.7}$ pb, which corresponds to a value of |V tb| = 0.88$+0.16\\atop{-0.14}$experimental±0.7(theoretical). The probability that this result originates from a background fluctuation in the absence of single top production (p-value) is 0.0003, which is equivalent to 3.4 standard deviations in Gaussian statistics. The expected (median) p-value as estimated from pseudo-experiments for this analysis is 0.000003, which corresponds to 4.5 standard deviations in Gaussian statistics.

  18. Observation of Exclusive Dijet Production at the Fermilab Tevatron p-pbar Collider

    OpenAIRE

    CDF Collaboration; Aaltonen, T.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in pbar-p interactions, pbar + p --> pbar + dijet + p. Using a data sample of 310 pb-1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy ET >= 10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum ET(jet). The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of exp...

  19. Observation of exclusive dijet production at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Kwang, S.; Levy, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yorita, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in pp interactions, pp→p+dijet+p. Using a data sample of 310 pb -1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at √(s)=1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy E T jet ≥10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum E T jet . The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200 pb -1 of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the J z =0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at √(s)=14 TeV are discussed.

  20. Observation of Exclusive Dijet Production at the Fermilab Tevatron p-pbar Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in (bar p)p interactions, (bar p)p → (bar p) + dijet + p. Using a data sample of 310 pb -1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at √s = 1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy E T jet (ge) 10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum E T jet . The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200 pb -1 of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the J z = 0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at √s = 14 TeV are discussed

  1. Study on the top quark pair production mechanism in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganoma, Junji; Waseda U

    2008-01-01

    The study of the top quark pair production mechanism in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is described. The main subjects are the measurements of the top quark pair production cross section, the top quark mass and a search for a new particle decaying to the top quark pair. The analyses are based on 1.9 fb -1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Run II experiment between March 2002 and May 2007, using the lepton+jets events. The measured top quark pair production cross section is 8.2 ± 0.5 (stat.) ± 0.8 (syst.) ± 0.5 (lum.) pb, which is slightly higher than the standard model prediction at the top mass of 175 GeV/c 2 . The top quark mass is an important parameter in the standard model, and also in the experimental studies. The measured top quark mass if 171.6 ± 2.0 (stat.) ± 1.3(syst.) GeV/c 2 . Finally, they report on a search for a new gauge boson decaying to t(bar t), which interferes with the standard model gluon in the q(bar q) → t(bar t) production process. They call such a hypothetical particle a 'Massive Gluon'. The observed t(bar t) invariant mass distribution is consistent with the standard model expectations, and also the measured massive gluon coupling strength with quarks is consistent within a statistical fluctuation of the standard model expectation in the wide range of the massive gluon masses and widths. They set the upper and lower limits on the coupling strength of the massive gluon

  2. Study on the top quark pair production mechanism in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naganoma, Junji [Waseda Univ., Shinjuku (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The study of the top quark pair production mechanism in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is described. The main subjects are the measurements of the top quark pair production cross section, the top quark mass and a search for a new particle decaying to the top quark pair. The analyses are based on 1.9 fb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Run II experiment between March 2002 and May 2007, using the lepton+jets events. The measured top quark pair production cross section is 8.2 ± 0.5 (stat.) ± 0.8 (syst.) ± 0.5 (lum.) pb, which is slightly higher than the standard model prediction at the top mass of 175 GeV/c2. The top quark mass is an important parameter in the standard model, and also in the experimental studies. The measured top quark mass if 171.6 ± 2.0 (stat.) ± 1.3(syst.) GeV/c2. Finally, they report on a search for a new gauge boson decaying to t$\\bar{t}$, which interferes with the standard model gluon in the q$\\bar{q}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ production process. They call such a hypothetical particle a 'Massive Gluon'. The observed t$\\bar{t}$ invariant mass distribution is consistent with the standard model expectations, and also the measured massive gluon coupling strength with quarks is consistent within a statistical fluctuation of the standard model expectation in the wide range of the massive gluon masses and widths. They set the upper and lower limits on the coupling strength of the massive gluon.

  3. Observation of Central Exclusive Diphoton Production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brucken, Jens Erik [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Inst. of Physics (Finland)

    2013-01-01

    We have observed exclusive γγ production in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron at √ s = 1.96 TeV. We use data corresponding to 1.11 ± 0.07 fb-1 integrated luminosity taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, with a trigger requiring two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy ET > 2 GeV, and vetoing on hits in the forward beam shower counters. We select events with two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy ET > 2.5 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| < 1.0, with no other particles detected in -7.4 < η < +7.4. The two showers have similar ET and an azimuthal angle separation Δφ ~ π; we find 34 events with exactly two matching charged particle tracks, agreeing with expectations for the QED process p¯p → p+e+e- + ¯p by two photon exchange; and we find 43 events with no tracks. The latter are candidates for the exclusive process p¯p → p + γγ + ¯p by double pomeron exchange. We use the strip and wire chambers at the longitudinal shower maximum position within the calorimeter to measure a possible exclusive background from IP + IP → π0π0, and conclude that it is consistent with zero and is < 15 events at 95% C.L. The measured cross section is σγγ,excl(|η| < 1, ET (γ) > 2.5 GeV) = 2.48 +0.40 -0.35(stat) +0.40 -0.51(syst) pb and in agreement with the theoretical predictions. This process is closely related to exclusive Higgs boson production pp → p + H + p at the Large Hadron Collider. The observation of the exclusive production of diphotons shows that exclusive Higgs production can happen and could be observed with a proper experimental setup.

  4. Search for new physics in electron-tau final states in proton - antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noeding, Carsten [Albert Ludwigs Univ. of Freiburg (Germany)

    2006-04-01

    large energy regimes. Hence there are strong reasons to believe that the Standard Model is only a low-energy approximation to a more fundamental theory. One of the best studied candidates for an extension of the Standard Model is supersymmetry, which predicts the existence of a supersymmetric partner for each fundamental particle that differs only in spin. To allow different masses for Standard Model particles and their corresponding supersymmetric partners, supersymmetry must be broken. The mechanism behind supersymmetry breaking is currently unknown, however, various hypotheses exist. Supersymmetric models do not only solve the problem of the large quantum corrections to the Higgs boson mass, but they also allow the unification of the coupling constants at a common scale. In addition, certain supersymmetric models provide a suitable candidate for cold dark matter, which represents a large fraction of mass in our universe. Searches for supersymmetric particles have been performed by the four LEP experiments (ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL) up to the kinematic limit. Since no evidence for supersymmetric particles has been found, lower limits on their masses have been derived. The search for supersymmetry is now continuing at the Tevatron collider, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. Two dedicated detector systems, CDF and D0, are installed at the Tevatron to analyze proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. A particular promising discovery channel for supersymmetry within the Tevatron energy range is the trilepton channel. In this channel, the lighter supersymmetric partners of the Higgs and gauge bosons, the charginos and neutralinos, decay into final states with leptons or hadrons and missing energy. Using the leptonic final states, the signal can be separated from the large Standard Model background. Supersymmetry requires an extension of the Standard Model Higgs sector, leading to more than one neutral Higgs

  5. Search for Resonances in the Photoproduction of Proton-Antiproton Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, Burnham [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Results are reported on the reaction γp → p$\\bar{p}$p with beam energy in the range 4.8-5.5 GeV. The data were collected at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in CLAS experiment E01-017(G6C). The focus of this study is an understanding of the mechanisms of photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs, and to search for intermediate resonances, both narrow and broad, which decay to p$\\bar{p}$. The total measured cross section in the photon energy range 4.8-5.5 GeV is σ = 33 ± 2 nb. Measurement of the cross section as a function of energy is provided. An upper limit on the production of a narrow resonance state previously observed with a mass of 2.02 GeV/c2 is placed at 0.35 nb. No intermediate resonance states were observed. Meson exchange production appears to dominate the production of the proton-antiproton pairs.

  6. Observation of jets in high transverse energy events at the CERN proton antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnison, G.; Astbury, A.; Grayer, G.; Haynes, W.J.; Nandi, A.K.; Roberts, C.; Scott, W.; Shah, T.P.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Eisenhandler, E.; Gibson, W.R.; Honma, A.; Kalmus, P.I.P.; Keeler, R.; Salvi, G.; Thompson, G.; Cochet, C.; DeBeer, M.; Denegri, D.; Givernaud, A.; Laugier, J.P.; Leveque, A.; Locci, E.; Loret, M.; Malosse, J.J.; Rich, J.; Sass, J.; Saudraix, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spiro, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Fontaine, G.; Geer, S.; Ghesquiere, C.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Kryn, D.; Mendiburu, J.P.; Orkin-Lecourtois, A.; Sajot, G.; Vrana, J.; Bacci, C.; Bernabei, R.; Ceradini, F.; Corden, M.; Dallman, D.; D'Angelo, S.; Dowell, J.D.; Edwards, M.; Eggert, K.; Ellis, N.; Erhard, P.; Faissner, H.; Frey, R.; Fruehwirth, R.; Garvey, J.; Giboni, K.L.; Gutierrez, P.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hodges, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Homer, R.J.; Karimaeki, V.; Kenyon, I.; Kernan, A.; Kinnunen, R.; Kozanecki, W.; Lehmann, H.; Leuchs, R.; McMahon, T.; Moricca, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pimia, M.; Radermacher, E.; Ransdell, J.; Reithler, H.; Salvini, G.; Strauss, J.; Sumorok, K.; Szoncso, F.; Tscheslog, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Wahl, H.D.; Watkins, P.; Wilson, J.

    1983-01-01

    With a segmented total absorption calorimeter of large acceptance, we have measured the total transverse energy spectrum for panti p collisions at ssup(1/2)=540 GeV up to μEsub(T)=130 GeV in the pseudo-rapidity range vertical strokeetavertical stroke 40 GeV, the fraction of events with two jets increases with μEsub(T); this event structure is dominant for μEsub(T)> 100 GeV. We measure the inclusive jet cross section up to Esub(T)(jet)=60 GeV and the two-jet mass distribution up to 120 GeV/c 2 . The measured cross sections are compatible with the predictions of hard scattering models based on QCD. (orig.)

  7. Experimental Study of W Z Intermediate Bosons Associated Production with the CDF Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzobon, Nicola; /Pisa U.

    2007-09-01

    Studying WZ associated production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is of great importance for two main reasons. On the one hand, this process would be sensitive to anomalies in the triple gauge couplings such that any deviation from the value predicted by the Standard Model would be indicative of new physics. In addition, by choosing to focus on the final state where the Z boson decays to b{bar b} pairs, the event topology would be the same as expected for associated production of a W and a Standard Model light Higgs boson (m{sub H} {approx}< 135 GeV) which decays into b{bar b} pairs most of times. The process WH {yields} W b{bar b} has an expected {sigma} {center_dot} B about five times lower than WZ {yields} Wb{bar b} for m{sub H} {approx_equal} 120 GeV. Therefore, observing this process would be a benchmark for an even more difficult search aiming at discovering the light Higgs in the WH {yields} Wb{bar b} process. After so many years of Tevatron operation only a weak WZ signal was recently observed in the full leptonic decay channel, which suffers from much less competition from background. Searching for the Z in the b{bar b} decay channel in this process is clearly a very challenging endeavour. In the work described in this thesis, WZ production is searched for in a final state where the W decays leptonically to an electron-neutrino pair or a muon-neutrino pair, with associated production of a jet pair consistent with Z decays. A set of candidate events is obtained by applying appropriate cuts to the parameters of events collected by wide acceptance leptonic triggers. To improve the signal fraction of the selected events, an algorithm was used to tag b-flavored jets by means of their content of long lived b-hadrons and corrections were developed to the jet algorithm to improve the b-jet energy resolution for a better reconstruction of the Z mass. In order to sense the presence of a signal one needs to estimate the amount of background. The relative content of

  8. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier-Thery, Solene [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

    2010-06-01

    The top quark has been discovered by CDF and D0 experiments in 1995 at the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron. The amount of data recorded by both experiments makes it possible to accurately study the properties of this quark: its mass is now known to better than 1% accuracy. This thesis describes the measurement of the top pair cross section in the electron muon channel with 4, 3 fb -1 recorded data between 2006 and 2009 by the D0 experiment. Since the final state included a muon, improvements of some aspects of its identification have been performed : a study of the contamination of the cosmic muons and a study of the quality of the muon tracks. The cross section measurement is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations and the other experimental measurements. This measurement has been used to extract a value for the top quark mass. This method allows for the extraction of a better defined top mass than direct measurements as it depends less on Monte Carlo simulations. The uncertainty on this extracted mass, dominated by the experimental one, is however larger than for direct measurements. In order to decrease this uncertainty, the ratio of the Z boson and the top pair production cross sections has been studied to look for some possible theoretical correlations. At the Tevatron, the two cross sections are not theoretically correlated: no decrease of the uncertainty on the extracted top mass is therefore possible.

  9. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier-Thery, Solene

    2010-01-01

    The top quark has been discovered by CDF and D0 experiments in 1995 at the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron. The amount of data recorded by both experiments makes it possible to accurately study the properties of this quark: its mass is now known to better than 1% accuracy. This thesis describes the measurement of the top pair cross section in the electron muon channel with 4, 3 fb -1 recorded data between 2006 and 2009 by the D0 experiment. Since the final state included a muon, improvements of some aspects of its identification have been performed : a study of the contamination of the cosmic muons and a study of the quality of the muon tracks. The cross section measurement is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations and the other experimental measurements. This measurement has been used to extract a value for the top quark mass. This method allows for the extraction of a better defined top mass than direct measurements as it depends less on Monte Carlo simulations. The uncertainty on this extracted mass, dominated by the experimental one, is however larger than for direct measurements. In order to decrease this uncertainty, the ratio of the Z boson and the top pair production cross sections has been studied to look for some possible theoretical correlations. At the Tevatron, the two cross sections are not theoretically correlated: no decrease of the uncertainty on the extracted top mass is therefore possible.

  10. Research for the boson of Higgs and for couplings of capacity quartic abnormal in the channel WW in electrons in the experiment D0 in Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapon, Emilien

    2013-01-01

    Two physics analyzes are presented in this thesis, both probing the electroweak sector of the Standard Model using events with two oppositely charged electrons and missing transverse energy. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7 fb -1 of proton-antiproton collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s=1.96 TeV. The first analysis is a search for the Higgs boson in H → WW → evev decays. To validate the search methodology, the non-resonant WW production cross section is measured. In the Higgs boson search, no significant excess above the background expectation is observed. Upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are therefore derived, within the Standard Model, but also within a theoretical framework with a fourth generation of fermions, and in the context of fermiophobic Higgs boson couplings. A search for anomalous quartic gauge couplings between the photon and the W boson is then presented, using exclusive W boson pair production, allowing to probe new physics effects. The selection of the events and the analysis techniques used are mostly identical to those used in the first analysis, the search for the Higgs boson. The limits set on this type of anomalous couplings are the first ones from the Tevatron and the most stringent ones at the time of the publication. (author) [fr

  11. Exclusive production of proton-antiproton pairs in photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, W.; Becker, L.; Cords, D.; Felst, R.; Haidt, D.; Knies, G.; Krehbiel, H.; Laurikainen, P.; Magnussen, N.; Meinke, R.; Naroska, B.; Olsson, J.; Schmidt, D.; Steffen, P.; Dietrich, G.; Hagemann, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Kado, H.; Kawagoe, K.; Kleinwort, C.; Kuhlen, M.; Petersen, A.; Ramcke, R.; Schneekloth, U.; Weber, G.; Allison, J.; Ball, A.H.; Barlow, R.J.; Chrin, J.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Greenshaw, T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Stephens, K.; Warming, P.; Glasser, R.G.; Hill, P.; Skard, J.A.J.; Wagner, S.R.; Zorn, G.T.; Cartwright, S.L.; Clarke, D.; Marshall, R.; Middleton, R.P.; Kawamoto, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Yamada, S.

    1986-01-01

    Total and differential cross sections for exclusive production of proton-antiproton pairs in photon-photon collisions have been measured using the JADE detector at PETRA. The total cross section in the CM angular range vertical strokecos thetasup(*)vertical stroke<0.6 reaches a maximum value of 3.8 nb for a γγ invariant mass of Wsub(γγ) = 2.25 GeV, and decreases rapidly for higher values of Wsub(γγ). In the range 2.0 GeV < Wsub(γγ) < 2.6 GeV the angular distribution is not isotropic. The nucleons are preferentially emitted at large angles to the collision axis. (orig.)

  12. Coupling in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1994-12-01

    The performance of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at the commencement of run Ib was far below expectations. After a frustrating period of several months, a low-β quad downstream of the interaction point at B0 was found to be rolled. This rolled quadrupole coupled the horizontal and vertical motion of the Tevatron beams. It also made matching the beam from the Main Ring to the Tevatron impossible, resulting in emittance blow up on injection. The net result of the roll was a significant reduction in the Tevatron luminosity. When the roll in the quadrupole was corrected the performance of the Tevatron improved dramatically. This note will discuss the experimental data indicating the presence of coupling and subsequent calculations which show how coupling an affect the luminosity. It is not intended to exhaust a discussion of coupling, which hopefully will be understood well enough to be discussed in a subsequent note

  13. Measurements of beam halo diffusion and population density in the Tevatron and in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio

    Halo dynamics influences global accelerator performance: beam lifetimes, emittance growth, dynamic aperture, and collimation efficiency. Halo monitoring and control are also critical for the operation of high-power machines. For instance, in the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the energy stored in the beam tails may reach several megajoules. Fast losses can result in superconducting magnet quenches, magnet damage, or even collimator deformation. The need arises to measure the beam halo and to remove it at controllable rates. In the Tevatron and in the LHC, halo population densities and diffusivities were measured with collimator scans by observing the time evolution of losses following small inward or outward collimator steps, under different experimental conditions: with single beams and in collision, and, in the case of the Tevatron, with a hollow electron lens acting on a subset of bunches. After the LHC resumes operations, it is planned to compare measured diffusivities with the known strength of tran...

  14. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a Top-Antitop Quark Pair in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Stanley T. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the first search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with a top-antitop quark pair in proton-antiproton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The integrated luminosity for othis search corresponds to 319 pb-1 of data recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We outline the even selection criteria, evaluate the even acceptance and estimate backgrounds from Standard Model sources. These events are observed that satisfy our event selection, while 2.16 ± 0.66 events are expected from background processes. no significant excess of events above background is thus observed, and we set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section for this process as a function of the Higgs mass. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c2 we find that σ$t\\bar{t}H$ x BR (Hbb) < 690 fb at 95% C.L. These are the first limits set for $t\\bar{t}H$ production. This search also allows us to anticipate the challenges and necessary strategies needed for future searches of $t\\bar{t}H$ production.

  15. A Study of the Energy Dependence of the Underlying Event in Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Marchese, Luigi; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Devoto, Francesco; D'Errico, Maria; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; D'Onofrio, Monica; Donati, Simone; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kim, Young-Jin; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucà, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Prokoshin, Fedor; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Song, Hao; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta-phi space; toward, away, and transverse. The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the underlying event. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the hard component (initial and final-state radiation) from the beam-beam remnant and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  16. Bag-model analyses of proton-antiproton scattering and atomic bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberg, M.A.; Freedman, R.A.; Henley, E.M.; Hwang, W.P.; Seckel, D.; Wilets, L.

    1983-01-01

    We study proton-antiproton (pp-bar ) scattering using the static real potential of Bryan and Phillips outside a cutoff radius rsub0 and two different shapes for the imaginary potential inside a radius R*. These forms, motivated by bag models, are a one-gluon-annihilation potential and a simple geometric-overlap form. In both cases there are three adjustable parameters: the effective bag radius R*, the effective strong coupling constant αsubssup*, and rsub0. There is also a choice for the form of the real potential inside the cutoff radius rsub0. Analysis of the pp-bar scattering data in the laboratory-momentum region 0.4--0.7 GeV/c yields an effective nucleon bag radius R* in the range 0.6--1.1 fm, with the best fit obtained for R* = 0.86 fm. Arguments are presented that the deduced value of R* is likely to be an upper bound on the isolated nucleon bag radius. The present results are consistent with the range of bag radii in current bag models. We have also used the resultant optical potential to calculate the shifts and widths of the sup3Ssub1 and sup1Ssub0 atomic bound states of the pp-bar system. For both states we find upward (repulsive) shifts and widths of about 1 keV. We find no evidence for narrow, strongly bound pp-bar states in our potential model

  17. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nodulman, L.; Aaltonen, T; Albrow, M; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (p(T) > 0.5 GeV/c, vertical bar eta vertical bar < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies root s = 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta - phi space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  18. Measurement of the Top Mass in the All - Jets Channel with the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Brian M. [Florida State U.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a measurement of the top quark mass in $t\\overline{t}$ production where the final state is 6 or more jets, which is otherwise known as the all-jets channel. The mass is extracted from 110.2 $pb^{-1}$ of data taken with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron (center-of-mass energy ps = 1.8 TeV) from 1993-96. The top quark mass is measured to be $176.6^{+17.1}_{-13.4}$ $GeV/c^2$. The corresponding cross section is estimated to be $11.5^{+4.9}_{-4.7}$ pb.

  19. Measurements of beam halo diffusion and population density in the Tevatron and in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab

    2015-03-01

    Halo dynamics influences global accelerator performance: beam lifetimes, emittance growth, dynamic aperture, and collimation efficiency. Halo monitoring and control are also critical for the operation of high-power machines. For instance, in the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the energy stored in the beam tails may reach several megajoules. Fast losses can result in superconducting magnet quenches, magnet damage, or even collimator deformation. The need arises to measure the beam halo and to remove it at controllable rates. In the Tevatron and in the LHC, halo population densities and diffusivities were measured with collimator scans by observing the time evolution of losses following small inward or outward collimator steps, under different experimental conditions: with single beams and in collision, and, in the case of the Tevatron, with a hollow electron lens acting on a subset of bunches. After the LHC resumes operations, it is planned to compare measured diffusivities with the known strength of transverse damper excitations. New proposals for nondestructive halo population density measurements are also briefly discussed.

  20. Search for Leptoquarks Decaying to $\\mu$ + $X$ Meson with the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmgard, Daniel John [Florida State U., SCRI

    1999-01-01

    We describe a search for the pair production of second generation leptoquarks that decay to muons plus other particles in 94 $pb^{-1}$ of data taken with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron (center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.8 TeV) from 1993{96. The search places limits on the cross sections and mass of second generation leptoquarks for various branching ratios and couplings. For both scalar leptoquarks decaying into a muon and a quark the mass limit is 200 GeV/$c^2$ while for one scalar leptoquark decaying into a muon and a quark with the other scalar leptoquark decaying into a neutrino and a quark the mass limit is 160 GeV/$c^2$ at the 95% confidence level.

  1. Top Quark Production at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaf, Lukas Kaj [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-03-01

    This thesis describes both theoretical and experimental research into top quark production. The theoretical part contains a calculation of the single-top quark production cross section at hadron colliders, at Next to Leading Order (NLO) accuracy. The experimental part describes a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions, at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  2. Colliding beam experiments in the Siberian Institute for Nuclear Physics (Present status and prospects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budker, G.I.

    1982-01-01

    Present status of construction of colliding (electron, positron, proton, antiproton and muon) beam facilities is described. Experiments conducted at the VEP-1 and VEPP-2 facilities in 1968-1970 are enumerated. The program of forthcoming investigations at the VAPP-NAP facility is described in brief

  3. Measurement of Z+ γ production and search for anomalous triple gauge couplings in proton-antiproton collisions at √S = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jianrong [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The author presents a measurement of p$\\bar{p}$ → Zγ + X → e+e-γ + X production using proton-antiproton collisions data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Zγ production provides a direct test of the triple neutral gauge couplings. A measurement of Zγ production cross section and search for anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are presented. The data presented are from 1.1 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ integrated luminosity collected at the CDF Detector. Electrons from Z decays are selected with Et > 20 Gev. Photons (Et > 7 GeV) are required to be well-separated from the electrons. There are 390 eeγ candidate events found with 1.1 fb-1 of data, compared to the SM prediction of 375.3 ± 25.2 events. The Standard Model prediction for the cross section for p$\\bar{p}$ → e+e-γ + X production at √s = 1.96 TeV is 4.5 ± 0.4 pb. The measured cross section is 4.7 ± 0.6 pb. The cross section and kinematic distributions of the eeγ events are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Limits on the ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are extracted using the photon Et distribution of eeγ events with meeγ > 100 GeV/c2. These are the first limits measured using CDF Run II data. These limits provide important test of the interaction of the photon and the Z boson.

  4. Identification of tau leptons in the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and search for supersymmetric particles violating R-parity through decay; Identification des leptons taus dans l'experience D0 aupres du tevatron et recherche de particules supersymetriques se desintegrant avec R-parite violee (couplage {lambda}{sub 133})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bihan, A.C

    2005-04-15

    This thesis concerns the search for supersymmetric particles in data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II at Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. Data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 352 pb{sup -1} (2001-2004) at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s=1.96 TeV have been used to search for two electrons plus hadronic tau final states accompanied by missing transverse energy. These topologies are expected to arise if R-parity is violated and the lightest neutralino is allowed to decay through a {lambda}{sub 133} coupling. The data seen is consistent with the Standard Model and with instrumental background expectations which suggests no evidence for supersymmetry with {lambda}{sub 133} coupling. Thus lower limits on the masses of the lightest chargino and neutralino have been set. A significant part of the work has been dedicated to identify decaying tau in an hadronic way. The developed method uses neural networks and exploits the narrowness and low particle multiplicity of tau jets by means of the calorimeter and tracker information. The efficiency and capability of this method have been measured and demonstrated in data using the Z {yields} {tau}{tau} {yields} {mu}{tau}(hadr) process. This algorithm allows us to reduce the important QCD background by a factor 100 for 50% tau identification efficiency. (author)

  5. Physics at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Rick; /Florida U.

    2006-04-01

    The theme of the XXXIV International Meeting on Fundamental Physics held in El Escorial, Spain on April 2-7, 2006 was ''From HERA and the TEVATRON to the LHC''. This is a summary of the four lectures I presented on ''Physics at the Tevatron''. Heavy quark production and the production of photons, bosons, and jets at the Tevatron are discussed. Also, a detailed study at the ''underlying event'' at CDF is presented together with a discussion of PYTHIA 6.2 tunes. A look back at the ''old days'' of Feynman-Field collider phenomenology is included.

  6. Search for the production of ZW and ZZ boson pairs decaying into charged leptons and jets in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; et al,

    2013-11-01

    We present a measurement of the production cross section for ZW and ZZ boson pairs in final states with a pair of charged leptons, from the decay of a Z boson, and at least two jets, from the decay of a W or Z boson, using the full sample of proton-antiproton collisions recorded with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to 8.9 fb^(-1) of integrated luminosity. We increase the sensitivity to vector boson decays into pairs of quarks using a neural network discriminant that exploits the differences between the spatial spread of energy depositions and charged-particle momenta contained within the jet of particles originating from quarks and gluons. Additionally, we employ new jet energy corrections to Monte Carlo simulations that account for differences in the observed energy scales for quark and gluon jets. The number of signal events is extracted through a simultaneous fit to the dijet mass spectrum in three classes of events: events likely to contain jets with a heavy-quark decay, events likely to contain jets originating from light quarks, and events that fail these identification criteria. We determine the production cross section to be 2.5 +2.0 -1.0 pb (< 6.1 pb at the 95% confidence level), consistent with the standard model prediction of 5.1 pb.

  7. Search for first-generation leptoquarks in the jets and missing transverse energy topology in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsybychev, Dmitri [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2004-04-01

    The authors performed a search for the pair production of first-generation leptoquarks using 191 pb-1 of proton-antiproton collision data recorded by the CDF experiment during Run II of the Tevatron. The leptoquarks are sought via their decay into a neutrino and quark, which yields missing transverse energy and several high-ET jets. Several control regions were studied to check the background estimation from Standard Model sources, with good agreement observed in data. In the leptoquark signal region, 124 events were observed with 118.3 ± 14.5 expected from background. Therefore, no evidence for leptoquark production was observed, and limits were set on the cross section times the squared branching ratio. Using the next-to-leading order cross section for leptoquark production, they excluded the mass interval 78 to 117 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level for 100% branching ratio into neutrino plus quark.

  8. Search for Wh Production Using High-PT Isolated Like-Sign Dilepton Events in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakisaka, Takayuki [Osaka City Univ. (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    The thesis describes search for the neutral Higgs production associated with the W boson using high-PT isolated like-sign (LS) dilepton events in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  9. Recent results from the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vellidis, Costas; Bravina, L.; Foka, Y.; Kabana, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider was shut down in 2011, after 10 years of high performance operation at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV in Run II. The two experiments, CDF and DZero, continue to analyze the collected data, aiming to extract all possible information regarding studies of the standard model and searches for new physics. A short review of some of the recent measurements at the Tevatron, and of the impact of the Tevatron program to high energy physics, is presented.

  10. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  11. On Distributions of Emission Sources and Speed-of-Sound in Proton-Proton (Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Na Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The revised (three-source Landau hydrodynamic model is used in this paper to study the (pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in proton-proton and proton-antiproton collisions at high energies. The central source is assumed to contribute with a Gaussian function which covers the rapidity distribution region as wide as possible. The target and projectile sources are assumed to emit isotropically particles in their respective rest frames. The model calculations obtained with a Monte Carlo method are fitted to the experimental data over an energy range from 0.2 to 13 TeV. The values of the squared speed-of-sound parameter in different collisions are then extracted from the width of the rapidity distributions.

  12. Proton-antiproton annihilation into a lambdaC-antiLambdaC pair within the generalized parton picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goritschnig, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    The proton-antiproton annihilation into a LambdaC-AntiLambdaC pair is investigated within the handbag approach. It is shown that the dominant dynamical mechanism, characterized by the partonic subprocess anti-u u -> anti-c c, factorizes in the sense that only the subprocess contains highly virtual partons, a gluon to lowest order of perturbative QCD, while the hadronic matrix elements embody only soft scales and can be parameterized in terms of helicity flip and non-flip generalized parton distributions. Modelling these parton distributions by overlaps of light-cone wave functions for the involved baryons were able to predict cross sections and spin correlation parameters for the process of interest. (author) [de

  13. Large-angle inclusive production of protons, antiprotons and kaons, and particle composition at the CERN ISR

    CERN Document Server

    Alper, B; Booth, P; Bulos, F; Carroll, L J; Damgaard, G; Duff, Brian G; Heymann, Franz F; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jönsson, L B; Klovning, A; Leistam, L; Lillethun, E; Lynch, G; Prentice, M; Quarrie, D; von Dardel, Guy F; Weiss, J M

    1973-01-01

    The production cross-sections for protons, antiprotons and kaons in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies square root s=30.6 and 52.8 GeV at large angles and for the transverse momentum range p /sub T/<1.2 GeV/c for protons and antiprotons and 0.2

  14. Soft photon production from proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, C.A. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of photon production from proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV were measured with a NaI calorimeter. The calorimeter covered a solid angle of 75 msr and was positioned 90 degrees from the beamline. In particular, the differential inclusive photon cross-section was measured over the transverse momentum range 30 ≤ p t ≤ 5000MeV/c. The goals were to search for evidence of a phase transition from normal hadronic matter to a deconfined quark-gluon plasma and for evidence of the anomalous source of soft photons that other experiments have seen. The differential inclusive photon cross-section was compared to several production models. The complexity of the production models varied from the simple Charged Pion Decay model to the complete HIJING model. The Charged Pion Decay model simulated the decay of neutral pions based on the measured transverse momentum spectrum of the charged pions. The HIJING model, on the other hand, simulated QCD processes, hadronic decays, and initial and final state radiation. This model also included minijet production. Predictions from all of the models fit the shape of the differential inclusive photon cross-section well. This agreement indicated that the cross-section was dominated by photons from decays of hadrons (primarily neutral pions). Because of the agreement between the differential cross-section and the predictions of the production models, a quark-gluon plasma contribution in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV was not necessary. Comparing the differential inclusive photon cross-section to the differential cross-section predicted by several production models (normalized over all p t ), it is found that any anomalous source of photons contributes -3 ± 14% of the total in the transverse momentum range 30 ≤ p t ≤ 100 MeV/c

  15. A Measurement of Z Boson Production and Rapidity Distribution in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, Aidan [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Particle Physics Dept.

    2004-12-25

    High-precision measurements are made of Z boson production in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, using the electron decay channel. The cross-section times branching ratio is measured to be σZ · Br(Z → e+e-) = (255.7 ± 2.4stat ± 5.2sys ± 15.2lum)pb in a dataset of 194 pb-1 collected between March 2002 and June 2003. This agrees well with theoretical predictions. The cross-section for W boson production in the electron channel has also been measured in the subset of this dataset of 72 pb-1 collected up until January 2003. Using this smaller dataset the ratio of cross-sections is determined to be R ≡ σW · Br(W → eν)/σZ · Br(Z → ee) = 10.82 ± 0.18stat ± 0.16sys. Combining these results with measurements made in the muon channel gives R = 10.92 ± 0.15stat ± 0.14sys (e + μ channels), from which the branching ratio of the W to electrons and muons, and the total width of the W, have been extracted: Br(W → lν) = 0.1089 ± 0.0022 (l = e,μ); Γ(W) = 2078.8 ± 41.4 MeV, which are in good agreement with the Standard Model values and with other measurements. The CKM quark mixing matrix element |Vcs| has been extracted: |Vcs| = 0.967 ± 0.030. The rapidity distribution dσ/dy for Z → ee has also been measured over close to the full kinematic range using 194 pb-1 of data, and is found to be in good agreement with the NNLO prediction.

  16. B physics at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morello, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    The CDF and DO experiments at the Tevatron pp collider established that extensive and detailed exploration of the b-quark dynamics is possible in hadron collisions, with results competitive and supplementary to those from e + e - colliders. This provides a rich, and highly rewarding program that is currently reaching full maturity. I report a few recent world-leading results on rare decays, CP-violation in B 0 s s mixing, b→s penguin decays, and charm physics.

  17. Recent Results from the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demorden, L.

    1998-06-01

    We review recent results from fixed-target and collider experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron. Among the topics discussed are jet production rates, α S measurements, the anti d/anti u ratio in the proton sea, diffraction, heavy quark physics and leptoquark searches

  18. Tau identification at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Stephen; /Chicago U., EFI

    2005-07-01

    Methods for reconstructing and identifying the hadronic decays of tau leptons with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run II are described. Precision electroweak measurements of W and Z gauge boson cross sections are presented as well as results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with hadronically decaying tau leptons in the final state.

  19. Top quarks at the Tevatron: Measurements of the top quark production and decay with the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, Jonas [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents two measurements of the to pquark using 230 pb-1 of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Tevatron accelerator. The first measurement determines the top pair production cross section at √s = 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions. In the standard model of particle physics the top quark decays almost exclusively into a W boson and a b quark. Candidate events are selected by requiring that at least one jet in the event is tagged with the secondary vertex algorithm.

  20. Direct measurement of the W boson decay width in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jun-jie [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation describes a direct measurement of the W boson total decay width, ΓW, using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement uses an integrated luminosity of 177.3 pb-1 data, collected during the 2002-2003 run. The width is determined from the shape of the transverse mass distribution, MT, by fitting the data in the tail region 100 < MT < 200 GeV. The result if ΓW = 2.011 ± 0.093(stat) ± 0.107(syst) GeV.

  1. Comparison of proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, P.; Nicolescu, B.; Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris; Leader, E.

    1985-09-01

    The ISR results on the differential cross-sections for pp and anti-pp show unambiguously that the crossing-odd amplitude is still important at very high energies. Comparison of ISR and CERN collider anti-pp data suggests that the crossing-odd amplitude is growing maximally fast with energy. We explore the phenomenological consequences of such a ''maximal odderon'' behaviour at TeV energies

  2. Impact parameter analysis of proton-antiproton elastic scattering from √s=7.6 GeV to √s=546 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearnley, T.

    1985-09-01

    The proton-antiproton elastic profile function GAMMA (b) and inelastic overlap function Gsub(in)(b) are calculated from a coherent set of proton-antiproton elastic scattering data at Psub(L)=30 and 50 GeV/c (√s=7.6 and 9.8 GeV), and at √s=53 and 546 GeV. The energy dependence of Gsub(in)(b) is studied in the low energy regime and in the high energy regime. The increase of the inelastic cross section from 50 GeV/c to 30 GeV/c and from √s=53 GeV to √s=546 GeV is found to originate from a peripheral increase of Gsub(in) around 1 fm, accompanied by a non-negligible central increase. The proton-antiproton collision at √s=53 GeV is shown to be slightly less absorptive centrally than pp at this energy, while it is more absorptive peripherally around 1.2 fm. The inelastic overlap functions strongly disagree with the predictions of geometrical scaling and factorizing eikonal models, both in the low energy regime psub(L)=30-50 GeV/c and in the high energy regime √s=53-546 GeV

  3. Fermilab Tevatron and Pbar source status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, H.

    1986-08-01

    The antiproton production cycle is enumerated, and the commissioning of the antiproton source is described, giving milestones and major obstacles. The Tevatron collider operation is described, including procedure to load the Tevatron with three bunches of protons and three bunches of antiprotons. Commissioning of the Main Ring and Tevatron for collider operation is described. Development and accelerator studies in four areas were necessary: main ring RF manipulations; controls and applications software support; Tevatron storage and low-beta squeeze sequence; and study of various beam transfers, storage steps, and sequences. Final tests are described. A long range upgrade program is presently under evaluation to accomplish these goals: luminosity increase to 5 x 10 31 cm -2 sec -1 , production rates up to 4 x 10 11 antiprotons/hr, and intensity increase for fixed target operation. Beam quality is to be improved by the injector and main ring upgrades, and the luminosity goal is addressed by the Collider upgrade

  4. Studying Z/γ*+Jet production in proton-antiproton collisions at √(s) = 1.96 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, Henrik Wold

    2009-01-01

    The production of jets in association with a Z/γ * boson is an example of an important class of processes at hadron colliders, namely vector boson+jet production. Comparisons of measurements of this class of processes with theory predictions constitute an important, fundamental test of the Standard Model of particle physics, and of the theory of QCD in particular. In this thesis several new measurements of differential cross sections of Z/γ * +jet production are presented. The data used in the measurements were collected by the D0 experiment located at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb -1 . Detailed comparisons between the measurements and various theory and event-generator predictions are presented

  5. Studying Z/{gamma}{sup *}+Jet production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}(s) = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, Henrik Wold

    2009-07-30

    The production of jets in association with a Z/{gamma}{sup *} boson is an example of an important class of processes at hadron colliders, namely vector boson+jet production. Comparisons of measurements of this class of processes with theory predictions constitute an important, fundamental test of the Standard Model of particle physics, and of the theory of QCD in particular. In this thesis several new measurements of differential cross sections of Z/{gamma}{sup *}+jet production are presented. The data used in the measurements were collected by the D0 experiment located at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb{sup -1}. Detailed comparisons between the measurements and various theory and event-generator predictions are presented.

  6. Conceptual Design Report. Antiproton - Proton Collider Upgrade 20 GeV Rings. Technical Components and Civil Construction May, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-05-01

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of two new 20 GeV rings which will be required to support the upgrade of the Fermilab Collider with a luminosity goal of 5x10 31 cm-2s-1. The new rings include an antiproton post-accumulator, denoted the Antiproton Super Booster (ASB), and a proton post-booster, denoted the Proton Super Booster (PSB). The siting of the rings is shown in Figure I-1. Both rings are capable of operation at 20 GeV, eliminating the need for ever again injecting beam into the Main Ring below transition, and significantly enhancing Main Ring performance. The Antiproton Super Booster is designed to accept and accumulate up to 4x1012 antiprotons from the existing Antiproton Accumulator, and deliver them to the Main Ring at 20 GeV for acceleration and injection into the Collider. It is also designed to accept diluted antiprotons from the Main Ring at 20 GeV for recooling. The PSB accepts 8.9 GeV protons from the existing Booster and accelerates them to 20 GeV for injection into the Main Ring. The PSB is designed to operate at 5 Hz. The siting shown in Figure I-1 has the attractive feature that it removes all Main Ring injection hardware from the AO straight section, opening the possibility of installing a third proton-antiproton interaction region in the Tevatron Collider.

  7. Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Zeppenfeld, D.

    1999-01-01

    These lectures are intended as a pedagogical introduction to physics at $e^+e^-$ and hadron colliders. A selection of processes is used to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of the different machines. The discussion includes $W$ pair production and chargino searches at $e^+e^-$ colliders, Drell-Yan events and the top quark search at the Tevatron, and Higgs searches at the LHC.

  8. Carbon filament beam profile monitor for high energy proton-antiproton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.R.; Shafer, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The measurement of the evolution of the transverse profile of the stored beams in high energy proton storage rings such as the p-anti p colliders at CERN and at FNAL is of considerable importance. In the present note, a simple monitor is discussed which will allow almost non-destructive measurement of the profile of each individual proton and antiproton bunch separately. It is based on the flying wire technique first used at CEA and more recently at the CPS. A fine carbon filament is passed quickly through the beam, acting as a target for secondary particle production. The flux of secondary particles is measured by two scintillator telescopes, one for protons and one for antiprotons, having an angular acceptance between 30 and 100 mrad. Measurements of secondary particle production performed at FNAL in this angular range show that a very respectable flux can be expected

  9. Tevatron targets three-year extension

    CERN Multimedia

    Harris, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    "Fermilab's Tevatron collider could get a new lease on life following a campaign to keep the facility running beyond the end of 2011, when the rival Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern is scheduled to shut down for 15 months of repairs" (0.75 page)

  10. Fermilab | Tevatron | Tevatron Symposium | Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industry Students and teachers Media Tevatron Navbar Toggle About Leadership and Organization Leadership and video archive Resources for Employees Researchers Job seekers Neighbors Industry Students and Haun Music: John Zorn Costumes: Ariane Dolan Dancers: Simone Baechle, Zada Cheeks, Katie Graves, and

  11. Search for electroweak top quark production in the electron + jets channel in the D0 experiment at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busato, Emmanuel [Paris Univ. (France)

    2005-04-01

    The top quark, whose mass approaches the electroweak symmetry breaking scale, is by far the heaviest known elementary particle. New physics is therefore expected to have its most important effect in the top sector. The Tevatron is, currently, the only collider able to produce the top quark. Among all possible production processes in the standard model, the top-antitop pair production via strong interaction, first observed in 1995, is the one with the largest cross section. The production via electroweak interaction (known as single top production), more difficult to extract from the background because of a lower cross section and of a lower signal to background ratio, has never been observed. In this thesis, we have searched for these processes by studying proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ =1.96 TeV produced by the Tevatron and detected with the DØ detector. The experimental study of the top quark is very sensitive to the quality of the data taken by the calorimeter. This detector showed, at the beginning of the Run II, rather important noise problems. Having identified the origin of the noise, new treatments at the offline level were implemented and their effects studied. It has been shown that these treatments reduce very significantly the effect of the noise in the reconstruction of physical quantities without notable degradation of the signal. Within the standard model, the top quark decays into W b with a branching ratio close to 100%. Leptonic decays of the into electron + neutrino have been used to identify the from the top decay. The main backgrounds to the single top signal ( +jets and QCD) are made essentially of light quark jets in the final state. Two ..-tagging algorithms have therefore been applied in order to improve the signal to background ratio. No evidence for electroweak top quark production has been found. Upper limits at the 95 % confidence level on the observed (expected) cross sections have be computed. They are found to be 14

  12. A Measurement of the Production of Jets in Association with a W Boson in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at the Tevatron Using Data Collected with the CDF Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Ben D. [University Coll. London

    2006-10-01

    A measurement of the diff rential pp → W + ≥ n jets production cross-section with respect to a range of different jet kinematic variables is presented. The W is required to decay leptonically to an electron and neutrino, and the kinematics of the decay products are restricted such that the electron PT > 20 GeV, electron η < 1.1, neutrino PT > 30 GeV and the W transverse mass > 20 GeV/c2. Jets are defi using the CDF JetClu cone algorithm with a radius of R = 0.4, requiring ηjet < 2.0 and ET > 15 GeV. The jet energies are corrected individually such that they are on average equal to the energy of the hadrons within the jet, with additional correction factors being applied to account for the impact of detector resolution on the jet spectra. The diff tial cross-section is measured with respect to the fi second, third and fourth jet ET spectra, the separation in R and the invariant mass of the two leading jets. In addition, the jet ET measurements can be integrated to form W + ≥ n Jets cross-section measurements for 1,2,3 and 4 jets with a range of minimum jet ET requirements, the lowest being 15 GeV. These cross-section results are compared to Enhanced Leading Order (ELO) W + jets theoretical predictions and predictions made using the leading order CKKW and MLM matching prescriptions. The ELO predictions are not suited to describ- ing the absolute rate of W + jet production, but display success in reproducing certain relative rates, dependent on the choice of renormalisation scale. The com- parisons with matching prescriptions indicate that these new approaches could be used successfully to improve W + Jets LO predictions.

  13. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings

  14. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  15. Beta measurements and modeling the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1993-06-01

    The Tevatron collider is now able with two low-β (β*=0.25--0.5m) interaction regions denoted as B0 and D0. This lattice allows independent operation of the interaction regions which required that the previous collider lattice, used in 1988--89, had to be modified. In order to see how well the lattice conforms to the design, measurements of the β function have been carried out at 15 locations in the new Tevatron collider lattice. Agreement can be obtained between the measurements and a computer model for the Tevatron, based on the design, only if the strengths of the gradients in the quadrupoles in the low-β triplet are allowed to differ from their design values. It is also observed that the lattice is very sensitive to the precise values of the gradients in these magnets

  16. Measurement of the Cross-Section for the Process $\\gamma-\\gamma$ to Proton-Antiproton at $\\sqrt{s_{ee}}$ = 183 - 189 GeV with the OPAL Detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Barillari, T

    2004-01-01

    The exclusive production of proton-antiproton pairs in the collisions of two quasi-real photons has been studied using data taken at sqrt(s_ee) = 183 GeV and 189 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. Results are presented for proton-antiproton invariant masses, W, in the range 2.15 < W < 3.95 GeV. The cross-section measurements are compared with previous data and with recent analytic calculations based on the quark-diquark model.

  17. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross-section in dimuon final states in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konrath, Jens Peter [Albert Ludwigs Univ., Freiburg (Germany)

    2008-10-24

    Particle physics deals with the fundamental building blocks of matter and their interactions. The vast number of subatomic particles can be reduced to twelve fundamental fermions, which interact by the exchange of spin-1 particles as described in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The SM provides the best description of the subatomic world to date, despite the fact it does not include gravitation. Following the relation Λ = h/p, where h is Planck's constant, for the examination of physics at subatomic scales with size Λ probes with high momenta p are necessary. These high energies are accessible through particle colliders. Here, particles are accelerated and brought to collision at interaction points at which detectors are installed to record these particle collisions. Until the anticipated start-up of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron collider at Fermilab near Chicago is the highest energy collider operating in the world, colliding protons and anti-protons at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. Its two interaction points are covered by the multi purpose particle detectors D0 and CDF. During the first data-taking period, known as Run I, the Tevatron operated at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. This run period lasted from 1992 to 1996. During this period, the long-predicted top quark was discovered. From 1996 and 2001, the accelerator was upgraded to deliver higher instantaneous luminosities at its current center-of-mass energy. At the same time, the experiments were upgraded to take full advantage of the upgraded accelerator complex. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator in the world with a sufficient energy to produce top quarks. Studying top quark production, decay and properties is an important part of the D0 and CDF physics programs. Because of its large mass, the top quark is a unique probe of the Standard Model, and an interesting environment to search for new physics. In this thesis, a measurement of the

  18. Combined Forward-Backward Asymmetry Measurements in Top-Antitop Quark Production at the Tevatron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Aushev, V; Aushev, Y; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartlett, J F; Bartos, P; Bassler, U; Bauce, M; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Bedeschi, F; Begalli, M; Behari, S; Bellantoni, L; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bortoletto, D; Borysova, M; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brigliadori, L; Brochmann, M; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brucken, E; Bu, X B; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camacho-Pérez, E; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapelain, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Chokheli, D; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Clutter, J; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corbo, M; Corcoran, M; Cordelli, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cuth, J; Cutts, D; Das, A; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Davies, G; de Barbaro, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; D'Errico, M; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Drutskoy, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Edmunds, D; Elagin, A; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Farrington, S; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fernández Ramos, J P; Fiedler, F; Field, R; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Franc, J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Fuess, S; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gershtein, Y; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Ginther, G; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gogota, O; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Golovanov, G; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hahn, S R; Haley, J; Han, J Y; Han, L; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Harder, K; Hare, M; Harel, A; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinrich, J; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herndon, M; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hocker, A; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ito, A S; Ivanov, A; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; James, E; Jang, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Jindariani, S; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Joshi, J; Jun, S Y; Jung, A W; Junk, T R; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Karmanov, D; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurata, M; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lammers, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Limosani, A; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipeles, E; Lipton, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Luna-Garcia, R; Lungu, G; Lyon, A L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansour, J; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez-Ortega, J; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miao, T; Miconi, F; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondal, N K; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nagy, E; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nett, J; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Nunnemann, T; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Orduna, J; Ortolan, L; Osman, N; Pagliarone, C; Pal, A; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parker, W; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Pondrom, L; Popov, A V; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ripp-Baudot, I; Ristori, L; Rizatdinova, F; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Rominsky, M; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sajot, G; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santi, L; Santos, A S; Sato, K; Savage, G; Saveliev, V; Savitskyi, M; Savoy-Navarro, A; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schott, M; Schwanenberger, C; Schwarz, T; Schwienhorst, R; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Sekaric, J; Semenov, A; Severini, H; Sforza, F; Shabalina, E; Shalhout, S Z; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shkola, O; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simak, V; Simonenko, A; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, H; Sonnenschein, L; Sorin, V; Soustruznik, K; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stark, J; Stefaniuk, N; Stentz, D; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Titov, M; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tokmenin, V V; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Verkheev, A Y; Vernieri, C; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vidal, M; Vilanova, D; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wahl, H D; Wallny, R; Wang, M H L S; Wang, S M; Warchol, J; Waters, D; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wobisch, M; Wolbers, S; Wolfmeister, H; Wood, D R; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, S; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Youn, S W; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, J M; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zucchelli, S

    2018-01-26

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron have measured the asymmetry between yields of forward- and backward-produced top and antitop quarks based on their rapidity difference and the asymmetry between their decay leptons. These measurements use the full data sets collected in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV. We report the results of combinations of the inclusive asymmetries and their differential dependencies on relevant kinematic quantities. The combined inclusive asymmetry is A_{FB}^{tt[over ¯]}=0.128±0.025. The combined inclusive and differential asymmetries are consistent with recent standard model predictions.

  19. Colliderscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-04-15

    With the new TRISTAN electronpositron collider at the Japanese KEK Laboratory coming into action last November, the new SLC Stanford Linear Collider preparing for its first electron-positron collisions and Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider now in operation for physics, the big colliding beam machines are setting the particle physics pace.

  20. Search for squarks and gluinos via radiative decays of neutralinos in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.8TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, F.; Albrow, M.; Amidei, D.; Anway-Wiese, C.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Auchincloss, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Baden, A.R.; Badgett, W.; Bailey, M.W.; Bamberger, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Bartalini, P.; Bauer, G.; Baumann, T.; Bedeschi, F.; Behrends, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Benlloch, J.; Bensinger, J.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Bertolucci, S.; Biery, K.; Bhadra, S.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Blair, R.; Blocker, C.; Bodek, A.; Bolognesi, V.; Booth, A.W.; Boswell, C.; Brandenburg, G.; Brown, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Budd, H.S.; Busetto, G.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Byrum, K.L.; Campagnari, C.; Campbell, M.; Caner, A.; Carey, R.; Carithers, W.; Carlsmith, D.; Carroll, J.T.; Cashmore, R.; Castro, A.; Cen, Y.; Cervelli, F.; Chadwick, K.; Chapman, J.; Chiarelli, G.; Chinowsky, W.; Cihangir, S.; Clark, A.G.; Cobal, M.; Connor, D.; Contreras, M.; Cooper, J.; Cordelli, M.; Crane, D.; Cunningham, J.D.; Day, C.; DeJongh, F.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Denby, B.; Derwent, P.F.; Devlin, T.; Dickson, M.; Donati, S.; Drucker, R.B.; Dunn, A.; Einsweiler, K.; Elias, J.E.; Ely, R.; Eno, S.; Errede, S.; Etchegoyen, A.; Farhat, B.; Frautschi, M.; Feldman, G.J.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G.W.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, T.; Fukui, Y.; Gagliardi, G.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Gauthier, A.; Geer, S.; Gerdes, D.W.; Giannetti, P.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Gladney, L.; Gold, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Goulianos, K.; Grassmann, H.; Grieco, G.M.; Grindley, R.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S.R.; Handler, R.; Hara, K.; Harral, B.; Harris, R.M.; Hauger, S.A.; Hauser, J.; Hawk, C.; Hessing, T.; Hollebeek, R.; Holloway, L.; Hoelscher, A.; Hong, S.; Houk, G.; Hu, P.; Hubbard, B.; Huffman, B.T.; Hughes, R.; Hurst, P.; Huth, J.; Hylen, J.; Incagli, M.; Ino, T.; Iso, H.; Jensen, H.; Jessop, C.P.; Johnson, R.P.; Joshi, U.; Kadel, R.W.; Kamon, T.; Kanda, S.; Kardelis, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    We have sought evidence for radiative decays of neutralinos produced in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.8TeV. Events containing two photons plus large missing transverse energy were investigated. The observed event rate and the missing transverse energy distribution of the two-photon events are consistent with QCD predictions. Inferred limits on squark and gluino masses depend on the supersymmetry model parameters. The particular choices μ=-40GeV/c 2 and tanβ=1.5 lead to 90%-confidence-level asymptotic lower limits of 110 GeV/c 2 and 140 GeV/c 2 for squarks and gluinos, respectively

  1. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in low-mass bottom-quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Majersky, O.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report a measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry, AFB , in b b ¯ pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions and identified by muons from semileptonic b -hadron decays. The event sample is collected at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector and corresponds to 6.9 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We obtain an integrated asymmetry of AFB(b b ¯ ) =(1.2 ±0.7 )% at the particle level for b -quark pairs with invariant mass, mb b ¯ , down to 40 GeV /c2 and measure the dependence of AFB(b b ¯ ) on mb b ¯ . The results are compatible with expectations from the standard model.

  2. Search for Higgs Boson Production in Association with a W Boson in 1.96-TeV Proton - Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masubuchi, Tatusya [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2008-02-01

    We have searched for the Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with a W± boson. This search is based on the data collected between February 2002 and May 2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb-1 collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) at the Tevatron which is a p$\\bar{p}$ collider at a center of mass energy 1.96 TeV. W+Higgs channel is one of the most promising channels for the Higgs search at Tevatron in the low Higgs mass region (mH < 135 GeV/c2), where Higgs boson decays into b$\\bar{b}$ dominantly. The detection of lepton from the W boson decay makes the W+Higgs events much cleaner than the direct Higgs production events which have the largest production cross section. Experimentally we select events with a high pT lepton, high missing transverse energy and two b-quark jets. This signature is same as for the W+jets background which has a huge cross section. To reduce the W+jets background, b-jet identification algorithms are applied to at least one jet. The expected signal events in 1.9fb-1 are 1.82 ± 0.15 and 1.68 ± 0.20 for one b-tagged events and two b-tagged events, respectively. The observed data is 805 for one b-tagged events and 173 for two b-tagged events. They are consistent with the Standard Model background expectation. After selecting the events, Neural Network (NN) discriminant technique is performed to distinguish the signal events from still residual backgrounds. We see no evidence for a Higgs signal in the dijet mass distribution and in the NN output distribution. We set a 95% confidence level upper limit on the W+Higgs production cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs decaying into a b$\\bar{b}$ pair. We obtained σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → W±H) x BR(H → b$\\bar{b}$) < 1.4 to 0.9 pb for Higgs masses from 110 GeV/c2 to 150 GeV/c2 using the NN output distribution. The limits are about 10

  3. Collider Detector (CDF) at FERMILAB: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theriot, D.

    1984-07-01

    CDF, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, is a collaboration of almost 150 physicists from ten US universities (University of Chicago, Brandeis University, Harvard University, University of Illinois, University of Pennsylvania, Purdue University, Rockefeller University, Rutgers University, Texas A and M University, and University of Wisconsin), three US DOE supported national laboratories (Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Italy (Frascati Laboratory and University of Pisa), and Japan (KEK National Laboratory and Unversity of Tsukuba). The primary physics goal for CDF is to study the general features of proton-antiproton collisions at 2 TeV center-of-mass energy. On general grounds, we expect that parton subenergies in the range 50 to 500 GeV will provide the most interesting physics at this energy. Work at the present CERN Collider has already demonstrated the richness of the 100 GeV scale in parton subenergies

  4. Collider detector at Fermilab - CDF. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theriot, D.

    1985-06-01

    CDF, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, is a collaboration of almost 180 physicists from ten US universities (University of Chicago, Brandeis University, Harvard University, University of Illinois, University of Pennsylvania, Purdue University, Rockefeller University, Rutgers University, Texas A and M University, and University of Wisconsin), three US DOE supported national laboratories (Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Italy (Frascati National Laboratory and University of Pisa), and Japan (KEK National Laboratory and University of Tsukuba). The primary physics goal for CDF is to study the general features of proton-antiproton collisions at 2 TeV center-of-mass energy. On general grounds, we expect that parton subenergies in the range 50 to 500 GeV will provide the most interesting physics at this energy. Work at the present CERN Collider has already demonstrated the richness of the 100 GeV scale in parton subenergies. 7 refs., 14 figs

  5. Asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Colestock, P.; Goderre, G.; Johnson, D.; Martin, P.; Holt, J.; Kaplan, D.

    1993-01-01

    The study of CP violation in beauty decay is one of the key challenges facing high energy physics. Much work has not yielded a definitive answer how this study might best be performed. However, one clear conclusion is that new accelerator facilities are needed. Proposals include experiments at asymmetric electron-positron colliders and in fixed-target and collider modes at LHC and SSC. Fixed-target and collider experiments at existing accelerators, while they might succeed in a first observation of the effect, will not be adequate to study it thoroughly. Giomataris has emphasized the potential of a new approach to the study of beauty CP violation: the asymmetric proton collider. Such a collider might be realized by the construction of a small storage ring intersecting an existing or soon-to-exist large synchrotron, or by arranging collisions between a large synchrotron and its injector. An experiment at such a collider can combine the advantages of fixed-target-like spectrometer geometry, facilitating triggering, particle identification and the instrumentation of a large acceptance, while the increased √s can provide a factor > 100 increase in beauty-production cross section compared to Tevatron or HERA fixed-target. Beams crossing at a non-zero angle can provide a small interaction region, permitting a first-level decay-vertex trigger to be implemented. To achieve large √s with a large Lorentz boost and high luminosity, the most favorable venue is the high-energy booster (HEB) at the SSC Laboratory, though the CERN SPS and Fermilab Tevatron are also worth considering

  6. Top and Electroweak Measurements at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartos, P. [Comenius U.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precition below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  7. Race for the Higgs hots up as Tevatron seeks extension

    CERN Multimedia

    Banks, Michael

    2009-01-01

    "With researchers at Cern's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) having circulated protons for the first time since last year's accident, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is requesting $25m so that the Tevatron collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois can run for an extra year until 2011" (0.25 page)

  8. Physics at Future Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.

    1999-01-01

    After a brief review of the Big Issues in particle physics, we discuss the contributions to resolving that could be made by various planned and proposed future colliders. These include future runs of LEP and the Fermilab Tevatron collider, B factories, RHIC, the LHC, a linear electron-positron collider, an electron-proton collider in the LEP/LHC tunnel, a muon collider and a future larger hadron collider (FLHC). The Higgs boson and supersymmetry are used as benchmarks for assessing their capabilities. The LHC has great capacities for precision measurements as well as exploration, but also shortcomings where the complementary strengths of a linear electron-positron collider would be invaluable. It is not too soon to study seriously possible subsequent colliders.

  9. Photoproduction of proton-antiproton Paris on hydrogen in the energy region 4.74 - 6.55 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markou, A.

    1979-12-01

    The photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs on hydrogen has been investigated in the elastic reaction γp → p anti p p. In an experiment at the Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron DESY this reaction has been identified. The distribution of the p anti p invariant mass has been measured and the basic features of the dynamics by which the reaction proceeds have been identified. The kinematic region for the experiment was: 4.74 2 . The experiment used a tagged photon beam, a magnetic spectrometer with proportional- and spark-chambers, a time of flight system, and a Cerenkov counter. From a total number of 1.5 x 10 6 triggers about 65 events of the reaction γp → p anti p p have been identified by using the following criteria: The mass of at least the negative outgoing particle, computed from the time of flight information, was about the proton mass and the kinematic analysis of the event yielded the largest probability for the hypothesis γp → p anti p p in comparison with the competing reactions. The basic features of the dynamics by which the reaction proceeds have been identified through a comparison of the experimental momentum- and four momentum transfer distributions with the corresponding distributions of simulated events. The simulated events have been generated by Monte Carlo methods according of forward or backward p anti p photoproduction. The result of the comparison was that in the investigated reaction a proton-antiproton pair is produced in backward direction in the c.m. system and the angular distribution of the anti p in the p anti p rest system is nearly isotropic. The identification of the basic reaction dynamics, allowed us to determine which of the two outgoing protons has been produced together with the antiproton by the photon. Therefore it was possible to calculate the invariant mass of the proton-anti-proton pair unambiguously. The resulting p anti p mass distribution shows within our statistics no significant structures which would

  10. From the Tevatron to Project X

    CERN Multimedia

    Pier Oddone, Fermilab director (from CERN Courier)

    2011-01-01

    In the October issue of the CERN Courier, Fermilab Director Pier Oddone will present the past, present and future of the US laboratory after the Tevatron. The Bulletin presents some early extracts from his article…   Fermilab Director, Pier Oddone. The end of September marks the end of an era at Fermilab, with the shutdown of the Tevatron after 28 years of operation at the frontiers of particle physics. The Tevatron’s far-reaching legacy spans particle physics, accelerator science and industry. The collider established Fermilab as a world leader in particle physics research, a role that will be strengthened with a new set of facilities, programmes and projects in neutrino and rare-process physics, astroparticle physics, and accelerator and detector technologies. The Tevatron exceeded every expectation ever set for it. This remarkable machine achieved luminosities with antiprotons once considered impossible, reaching more than 4x1032 cm-2s-1 instantaneous luminosity and...

  11. Tevatron energy and luminosity upgrades beyond the Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amidei, D.; Kamon, T.; Lopez, J.; McIntyre, P.; White, J.

    1994-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron will be the world's highest energy hadron collider until the LHC is commissioned, it has the world's highest energy fixed target beams, and Fermilab will be the leading high energy physics laboratory in the US for the foreseeable future. Following the demise of the SSC, a number of possible upgrades to the Tevatron complex, beyond construction of the Main Injector, are being discussed. Using existing technology, it appears possible to increase the luminosity of the bar pp Collider to at least 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 (Tevatron-Star) and to increase the beam energy to 2 TeV (DiTevatron). Fixed target beam of energy about 1.5 TeV could also be delivered. Leaving the existing Tevatron in the tunnel and constructing bypasses around the collider halls would allow simultaneous 800 GeV fixed target and √s = 4 TeV collider operation. These upgrades would give Fermilab an exciting physics program which would be complementary to the LHC, and they would lay the groundwork for the construction of a possible post-LHC ultra-high energy hadron collider

  12. Search for Fermiophobic Higgs using the 3γ+X Final State in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamaguchi, Atsunari [Osaka Univ. (Japan)

    2012-01-01

    We search for a fermiophobic Higgs boson using 3γ+X events in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √ s = 1.96 TeV. In the Standard Model (SM), the Higgs boson is introduced to explain the electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) and the origin of fermion masses. The minimal extension of the SM contains an additional Higgs doublet, the “two Higgs doublet model” (2HDM). In this model a fermiophobic Higgs boson (hf) which signifies very suppressed or zero coupling to the fermions, may arise in a paticular version of the 2HDM called type I. The data were collected with the CDF-II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 6.0 fb -1. We estimate the fake-photon backgrounds and Direct Triphoton Production(DTP) backgrounds. The expected number of signal events is 17.7 for the fermiophobic higgs of the mass 75 GeV/c2 and H± of the mass 120 GeV/c2. The expected number of backgrounds is 1.9±0.9, From these results, we obtain the expected limits on σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → H±hf ) × Br(H± → W*hf ) × (Br(hf → γγ))2 of 8.0 fb for the fermiophobic Higgs of 75 GeV/c2 and H± of the mass 120 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level, while the observed limit is 10 fb.

  13. The observation of the beauty baryon Λb in the decay channel Λb→J/ψΛ at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsch, A.

    1992-01-01

    The recently published observation of a∼5σ signal for the beauty baryon is summarized. To search for the beauty baryon Λ b , the decay mode Λ b →JψΛ has been chosen. The main features and results of the analysis is presented, and the measured p t -spectrum of the Λ b candidates is presented. (R.P.) 7 refs.; 3 figs

  14. Fragmentation properties of jets produced in proton-antiproton collisions at √S = 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, B.

    1989-11-01

    Jet fragmentation properties have been studied in collisions of protons and antiprotons at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV, using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The fractional momentum distribution of charged particles within jets is presented and compared with Monte-Carlo predictions. With increasing di-jet invariant mass from 60 to 200 GeV/c 2 the fragmentation is observed to soften as predicted by scale breaking effects in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The charged multiplicity in the jet core is observed to rise with di-jet invariant mass. 57 refs

  15. Hyperon production from proton-antiproton collisions at √s =1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Allen, C.; Anderson, E.W.; Balamurali, V.; Banerjee, S.; Beery, P.D.; Bhat, P.; Biswas, N.N.; Bujak, A.; Carmony, D.D.; Carter, T.; Cole, P.; Choi, Y.; DeBonte, R.; DeCarlo, V.; Erwin, A.E.; Findeisen, C.; Goshaw, A.T.; Gutay, L.J.; Hirsch, A.S.; Hojvat, C.; Jennings, J.R.; Kenney, V.P.; Lindsey, C.S.; Loomis, C.; LoSecco, J.M.; McMahon, T.; McManus, A.P.; Morgan, N.; Nelson, K.; Oh, S.H.; Porile, N.T.; Rimai, A.; Reeves, D.; Robertson, W.J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Stringfellow, B.C.; Stampke, S.R.; Thompson, M.; Turkot, F.; Walker, W.D.; Wang, C.H.; Warchol, J.; Wesson, D.K.; Zhan, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The production properties of lambdas (Λ 0 ,bar Λ 0 ) and cascades (Ξ - ,bar Ξ - ) in the central region in bar pp collisions at √s =1.8 TeV at the Fermilab collider are reported. The transverse-momentum spectra of lambdas are measured as a function of multiplicity and the ratios of lambdas to protons (p,bar p) and to all charged particles are studied as a function of transverse momentum and multiplicity. Moreover the average transverse momentum of cascades and the ratio of cascades to lambdas are presented

  16. Proton-antiproton annihilation into π0π0π0, π0π0η and π0ηη at 900 MeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amsler, C.

    2001-01-01

    Crystal barrel data for proton-antiproton annihilation in flight at 900 MeV/c are presented. The channels pp → π 0 π 0 π 0 , π 0 π 0 η and π 0 ηη are used to search for isoscalar 0 ++ and 2 ++ mesons in the mass range 1500-2000 MeV, which is not accessible with stopping antiprotons. Both π 0 π 0 π 0 and π 0 ηη data sets require an isoscalar 2 ++ resonance decaying into π 0 π 0 and ηη with mass M = (1867 ± 46) MeV and width Γ = (385 ± 58) MeV. The analysis of π 0 π 0 η leads to an isovector 2 ++ state decaying into π 0 η (M = (1698 ± 44) MeV, Γ = (265 ± 55) MeV). The π 0 ηη data show a strong f' 2 (1525) signal, larger than predicted by the OZI rule. The π 0 π 0 π 0 and π 0 ηη data do not show any f 0 (1710). This adds supportive evidence that this meson is mainly ss. (orig.)

  17. Study of muons associated with jets in proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.8-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David Austen [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1988-11-01

    Production of heavy quark flavors in proton-antiproton collisions with a centerof- mass energy of 1.8 X 1012 electron volts is studied for events containing hadronic jets with a nearby muon track, where both the jet and the muon are produced at large angles from the incident beams. The muon tracking system and pattern recognition are described. Detailed calculations of the muon background due to meson decay and hadron noninteractive punchthrough are presented, and other background sources are evaluated. Distributions of muon transverse momentum relative to the beam and to the jet axis agree with QCD expectations for semileptonic charm and beauty decay. Muon identification cuts and background subtraction leave 57.5 ± 17.1 muon-jet pairs, a rate consistent with the established production cross sections for charm and beauty quarks and the acceptance for minimum ionizing particles overlapping with nearby jets. A small dimuon sample clarifies the muon signature. No signatures of undiscovered phenomena are observed in this new energy domain. 111

  18. Measurement of the Λ0b lifetime in Λ0b → Λ+cπ- decays at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumford, Jonathan Reid [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2008-09-01

    The lifetime of the Λ0b baryon (consisting of u, d and b quarks) is the theoretically most interesting of all b-hadron lifetimes. The lifetime of Λ0b probes our understanding of how baryons with one heavy quark are put together and how they decay. Experimentally however, measurements of the Λ0b lifetime have either lacked precision or have been inconsistent with one another. This thesis describes the measurement of Λ0b lifetime in proton-antiproton collisions with center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Using 1070 ± 60pb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), a clean sample of about 3,000 fully-reconstructed Λ0b →Λc+π- decays (with Λ+c subsequently decaying via Λ+c → p+ K- π+) is used to extract the lifetime of the Λ0b baryon, which is found to be cτ(Λ0b) = 422.8 ± 13.8(stat) ± 8.8(syst)μm. This is the most precise measurement of its kind, and is even better than the current world average. It also settles the recent controversy regarding the apparent inconsistency between CDF's other measurement and the rest of the world.

  19. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f ~ 20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  20. Photons and diphotons from the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, R.

    1997-08-01

    Photon measurements from the CDF and D0 collaboration are described. The subjects touched on are loosely organized around the fact that they all have some bearing on the structure functions and pQCD. The methodology of collider measurements is briefly reviewed, and the results for single photons, photons plus jets, photons plus charm and diphotons are discussed. Finally there is a very brief indication of what is expected from the Tevatron based experiments in the future

  1. Searches for new physics at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, K. Wyatt

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes searches at the Fermilab Tevatron for a wide variety of signatures for physics beyond the Standard Model. These include searches for supersymmetric particles, in the two collider detectors and in one fixed target experiment. Also covered are searches for leptoquarks, dijet resonances, heavy gauge bosons, and particles from a fourth generation, as well as searches for deviations from the Standard Model predictions in dijet angular distributions, dilepton mass distributions, and trilinear gauge boson couplings

  2. Higgs boson studies at the Tevatron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, L.; Abbott, B.; Abazov, V. M.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 5 (2013), "052014-1"-"052014-29" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Higgs particle * mass * vector boson * gluon * fusion * Batavia TEVATRON Coll * CDF * DZERO * anti-p p * interaction Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.864, year: 2013

  3. Twenty years of diffraction at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.; Rockefeller U.

    2005-01-01

    Results on diffractive particle interactions from the Fermilab Tevatron (bar p)p collider are placed in perspective through a QCD inspired phenomenological approach, which exploits scaling and factorization properties observed in data. The results discussed are those obtained by the CDF Collaboration from a comprehensive set of single, double, and multigap soft and hard diffraction processes studied during the twenty year period since 1985, when the CDF diffractive program was proposed and the first Blois Workshop was held

  4. Beam-energy dependence of the directed flow of protons, antiprotons, and pions in Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-04-25

    Rapidity-odd directed flow (v1) measurements for charged pions, protons, and antiprotons near midrapidity (y=0) are reported in sNN=7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter dv1/dy|y=0 shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton dv1/dy|y=0 changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  5. Beam-Energy Dependence of the Directed Flow of Protons, Antiprotons, and Pions in Au+Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Rapidity-odd directed flow (v1) measurements for charged pions, protons, and antiprotons near midrapidity (y =0) are reported in √sNN =7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter dv1/dy|y=0 shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton dv1/dy|y=0 changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  6. Tevatron-for-LHC Report of the QCD Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, Michael G.; Begel, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Campanelli, M.; Chlebana, F.; De Roeck, A.; Dittmann, J.R.; Ellis, S.D.; Field, B.; Field, R.; Gallinaro, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The experiments at Run 2 of the Tevatron have each accumulated over 1 fb{sup -1} of high-transverse momentum data. Such a dataset allows for the first precision (i.e. comparisons between theory and experiment at the few percent level) tests of QCD at a hadron collider. While the Large Hadron Collider has been designed as a discovery machine, basic QCD analyses will still need to be performed to understand the working environment. The Tevatron-for-LHC workshop was conceived as a communication link to pass on the expertise of the Tevatron and to test new analysis ideas coming from the LHC community. The TeV4LHC QCD Working Group focused on important aspects of QCD at hadron colliders: jet definitions, extraction and use of Parton Distribution Functions, the underlying event, Monte Carlo tunes, and diffractive physics. This report summarizes some of the results achieved during this workshop.

  7. Celebrating the Tevatron legacy

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Fermilab hosted an exceptional event on 11 June: the Tevatron Impact symposium. More than 800 people attended to hear how the Tevatron advanced our understanding of fundamental physics.   A version of this "Director's Corner" by Pier Oddone first appeared in Fermilab Today on 12 June.   The development of accelerator technology for the Tevatron has influenced every subsequent major hadron accelerator. We heard reviews on the detector technologies and trigger systems developed with the Tevatron that are essential today for high-luminosity machines like the LHC. There were also talks on the superconducting-wire industry that made MRI magnets ubiquitous, and we discussed the major computational systems that use large farms of Linux-based commodity processors. Researchers who worked on the Tevatron also established multivariate analysis techniques that now allow us to squeeze the maximum information from complex data sets. One focus of the symposium was the ...

  8. A feedback microprocessor for hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrup, D.A.; Chapman, L.; Franck, A.; Groves, T.; Lublinsky, B.

    1992-12-01

    A feedback microprocessor has been built for the TEVATRON. It has been constructed to be applicable to hadron colliders in general. Its inputs are realtime accelerator measurements, data describing the state of the TEVATRON, and ramp tables. The microprocessor software includes a finite state machine. Each state corresponds to a specific TEVATRON operation and has a state-specific TEVATRON model. Transitions between states are initiated by the global TEVATRON clock. Each state includes a cyclic routine which is called periodically and where all calculations are performed. The output corrections are inserted onto a fast TEVATRON-wide link from which the power supplies will read the realtime corrections. We also store all of the input data and output corrections in a set of buffers which can easily be retrieved for diagnostic analysis. In this paper we will describe this device and its use to control the TEVATRON tunes as well as other possible applications

  9. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group. Progress report, March 1, 1983-February 29, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered in this research summary include: status of the OPAL collaboration at LEP, CERN; two-photon physics at PLUTO; search for new particles at JADE; neutrinoless double beta decay at DESY; Fermilab jet experiment; neutrino deuterium experiment in the 15 foot bubble chamber at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon experiment at Fermilab; new experiments at the proton-antiproton collider; neutrino-electron scattering at Los Alamos; parity violation in proton-proton scattering; an upgrade of laboratory and computer facilities; and a study of bismuth germanate as a durable scintillation crystal

  10. Relative transverse momentum distributions of bottom hadrons produced in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Philippe; /McGill U.

    2008-05-01

    Fragmentation is the process by which bare quarks dress themselves up as hadrons. Since we cannot get reliable calculations of this process using perturbative quantum chromodynamics, the fragmentation properties of quarks must be obtained empirically. We report on the signal extraction and relative transverse momentum p{sub T} spectrum determination that will lead to a high precision measurement of relative fragmentation fractions of b quarks into B hadrons, in 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions. Using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data taken with the CDF-II detector, we fully reconstruct 473 {+-} 42 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}, 15206 {+-} 203 B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}, 1483 {+-} 45 B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and 4444 {+-} 297 {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} candidate decays. In order to reduce systematic uncertainties, ratios of p{sub T} spectra are reported. We find that B{sub s} and B{sup 0} mesons are produced with similar p{sub T} and {Lambda}{sub b} baryons are produced with lower p{sub T} than B{sup 0} mesons. Our results are consistent with previous CDF measurements suggesting a difference between fragmentation processes observed at lepton and hadron colliders.

  11. Study of the production of the Σ b with the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calancha Paredes, Constantino [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-01

    understanding of the Standard Model and its limitations. In particular, it is very important the measurement of those observables which they are not able to be calculated from theory by perturbation theory. Particle accelerators have played and play nowadays a major role for past and new physics discoverements and has been for many years the source of many precision measurements. Unprecedent discoveries have been made and are yet to come. These measurements allow to select the models that best fit the results and also they can be used as input for those models to get further predictions. Tevatron has been for many years the highest energy particle collider operational in the world. It is located in the high energy physics laboratory Fermilab in Batavia, in the State of Illinois (USA). Tevatron produce proton-antiproton collisions with an energy of 1.96 TeV at the center of the mass. This thesis is based on the data taken by the CDF II detector, one of the two multipurpose detectors located in the two interaction points at Tevatron. In this thesis a precise measurement of the mass and width of four heavy baryon states are performed. These states are described together by the symbol Σ b. They are built by two light quarks and one heavy b quark as it is shown in Fig. 1.2. Baryons containing one bottom quark and two light quarks are described by Heavy Quark Effective Theories (HQET).

  12. Tevatron lower temperature operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1994-07-01

    This year saw the completion of three accelerator improvement projects (AIP) and two capital equipment projects pertaining to the Tevatron cryogenic system. The projects result in the ability to operate the Tevatron at lower temperature, and thus higher energy. Each project improves a subsystem by expanding capabilities (refrigerator controls), ensuring reliability (valve box, subatmospheric hardware, and compressor D), or enhancing performance (cold compressors and coldbox II). In January of 1994, the Tevatron operated at an energy of 975 GeV for the first time. This was the culmination, of many years of R ampersand D, power testing in a sector (one sixth) of the Tevatron, and final system installation during the summer of 1993. Although this is a modest increase in energy, the discovery potential for the Top quark is considerably improved

  13. Search for Higgs boson production in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusakabe, Yoshiaki [Waseda Univ., Shinjuku (Japan)

    2006-12-01

    We performed a search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with W boson (p$\\bar{p}$ → W±H → ℓvb$\\bar{b}$) in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. The search uses the data collected between February 2002 and February 2006 at Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb-1. The experimental final state of WH → ℓvb$\\bar{b}$ process is lepton (e±±), missing transverse energy and two jets. The largest background in lepton+jets events is W+light flavor process, therefore the identification of jets as b-jets reduces this kind of background significantly. We used displaced SECondary VerTeX b-tagging (SECVTX) technique, which utilizes the signature that b-jets have secondary vertex displaced away from primary vertex because of the long life time of B-mesons. However, there is still much contamination in SECVTX b-tagged jets. Finite resolution of secondary vertex tracking measurements results in false tags, and c-jets are also identified as b-jets due to the long life time of D-mesons frequently. For the purpose of increasing the purity of the SECVTX b-tagged jets, we applied Neural Network to SECVTX tagged jets for the first time by using secondary vertex variables and some variables independent of it. Neural Network filter rejects 65% of light flavor jets and 50% of c-jets from the SECVTX tagged jets. We improved the sensitivity of the Higgs boson signal search by 10% with Neural Network b-tagging technique. Events with one high pT electron or muon, large missing transverse energy and either single SECVTX b-tagged jet which passes the Neural Network filter or at least two SECVTX b-tagged jets are selected. The number of selected events and dijet mass distributions are consistent with the Standard Model background expectations. Therefore we set an upper limit on σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → WH) • Br(H → b$\\bar{b}$) as 3.9 to 1

  14. Present searches for Higgs signatures at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groer, L.

    1997-08-01

    We present results for various searches for signatures of standard and non-standard model Higgs boson decays conducted at the collider detectors CDF and D0 using ∼100 pb -1 of integrated luminosity each from the Tevatron collider Run 1 (1992-96) at √s=1.8 TeV. No evidence for a Higgs boson decay is found and various limits are set

  15. Tests of QCD in W and Z production at Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abachi, S.

    1995-01-01

    We present measurements of the production cross sections times leptonic branching fractions and the transverse momentum distributions of W and Z bosons in p bar p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV using data collected with the DO detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p bar p collider. A preliminary measurement of the W charge asymmetry is also presented

  16. Antiproton acceleration in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Dinkel, J.; Ducar, R.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron rf systems for colliding beams physics is discussed. The changes in the rf feedback system required for acceleration of antiprotons, and the methods for achieving proper transfer of both protons and antiprotons are described. Data on acceleration and transfer efficiencies are presented

  17. Generation and diagnostics of uncaptured beam in the Fermilab Tevatron and its control by electron lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Long Zhang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In the collider run II, the Tevatron operates with 36 high intensity bunches of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons. Particles not captured by the Tevatron rf system pose a threat since they can quench the superconducting magnets during acceleration or at beam abort. We describe the main mechanisms for the origination of this uncaptured beam, and present measurements of its main parameters by means of a newly developed diagnostics system. The Tevatron electron lens is effectively used in the collider run II operation to remove uncaptured beam and keep its intensity in the abort gaps at a safe level.

  18. Search for the Higgs boson in the WH channel and production of Wbb-bar in 1.96 TeV pp-bar collisions in the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron; Recherche du boson de Higgs dans le canal WH et etude de la production Wbb-bar dans les collisions pp-bar a 1.96 TeV dans l'experience D0 aupres du Tevatron de Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauceron, St

    2004-05-15

    The introduction of the Higgs boson in the standard model provides a mechanism to explain the origin of the masses of the elementary particles. The Higgs boson has not yet been discovered but a lower limit on its mass has been set at 114.4 GeV at 95% confidence level by LEP experiments. The search for the Higgs boson has been pursued at the Tevatron, proton-antiproton collider, in the associated production channel WH with a Higgs mass lower than 135 GeV where the Higgs decay in bb-bar. The detector D0 is used to record the signals. For this analysis, the calorimeter and the tracker are the main sub-detector. The signals from the calorimeter have been studied through a calibration and a study on the noise level in order to improve the reconstruction of the objects. The missing transverse energy, the electrons and the jets are well identified objects so they can be used in our analysis W({yields} e{nu}) + jets. As D0 has a new tracker and solenoid system, information from this system allow us to tag jets when they are originating from a b-quark. The analysis of events W({yields} e{nu}) + 2*b-tag jets has been made on 174 pb{sup -1}. An upper limit of the cross section production of the process W({yields} e{nu})bb-bar has been derived at 20.3 pb at 95% confidence level. This process is the main irreducible background of the WH {yields} e{nu}bb-bar. In the second part of the analysis, the search for the Higgs boson has been done for different mass values between 105 GeV and 135 GeV. Upper Limits on cross section production times branching ratio have been set. For a Higgs mass of 115 GeV, the upper limit is set of 12.4 pb at 95% confidence limit. (author)

  19. Search for the Higgs boson in the WH channel and production of Wbb-bar in 1.96 TeV pp-bar collisions in the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron; Recherche du boson de Higgs dans le canal WH et etude de la production Wbb-bar dans les collisions pp-bar a 1.96 TeV dans l'experience D0 aupres du Tevatron de Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauceron, St

    2004-05-15

    The introduction of the Higgs boson in the standard model provides a mechanism to explain the origin of the masses of the elementary particles. The Higgs boson has not yet been discovered but a lower limit on its mass has been set at 114.4 GeV at 95% confidence level by LEP experiments. The search for the Higgs boson has been pursued at the Tevatron, proton-antiproton collider, in the associated production channel WH with a Higgs mass lower than 135 GeV where the Higgs decay in bb-bar. The detector D0 is used to record the signals. For this analysis, the calorimeter and the tracker are the main sub-detector. The signals from the calorimeter have been studied through a calibration and a study on the noise level in order to improve the reconstruction of the objects. The missing transverse energy, the electrons and the jets are well identified objects so they can be used in our analysis W({yields} e{nu}) + jets. As D0 has a new tracker and solenoid system, information from this system allow us to tag jets when they are originating from a b-quark. The analysis of events W({yields} e{nu}) + 2*b-tag jets has been made on 174 pb{sup -1}. An upper limit of the cross section production of the process W({yields} e{nu})bb-bar has been derived at 20.3 pb at 95% confidence level. This process is the main irreducible background of the WH {yields} e{nu}bb-bar. In the second part of the analysis, the search for the Higgs boson has been done for different mass values between 105 GeV and 135 GeV. Upper Limits on cross section production times branching ratio have been set. For a Higgs mass of 115 GeV, the upper limit is set of 12.4 pb at 95% confidence limit. (author)

  20. Present state of Tevatron lower temperature operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab continues to work on raising the particle energy of the Tevatron by lowering magnet temperatures using cold vapor compressors. In 1995, another two rounds of power tests were completed. These power tests, although showing significant improvement over the initial tests of 1993-94, have led to the conclusion that 1000 GeV operation cannot be attained without replacing/rearranging magnets with lower quench currents before the next Collider Run in 1999. Development of more cold compressor control strategies also continues

  1. Electron Beam Generation in Tevatron Electron Lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  2. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  3. New diffractive results from the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental results in diffractive processes are summarized and a few notable characteristics described in terms of Quantum Chromodynamics. Exclusive dijet production is used to establish a benchmark for future experiments in the quest for diffractive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider. Using new data from the Tevatron and dedicated diffractive triggers, no excess over a smooth falling distribution for exclusive dijet events could be found. Stringent upper limits on the exclusive dijet production cross section are presented. The quark/gluon composition of dijet final states is used to provide additional hints on exclusive dijet production.

  4. Experimental studies of elementary particle interactions at high energies: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses progress of experiments at CERN and Fermilab. At CERN, data accumulation and analysis is discussed for the UA-6 experiment, which involves proton-antiproton collisions. At Fermilab, the testing of a collider detector for the Tevatron is discussed

  5. Search for non-SM light Higgs Boson in the h $\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnitchouk, Alexander Stepanovych [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2004-05-01

    We present first results on the search for Higgs Boson with an enhanced branching fraction into photons in the h → γγ decay channel using recent Run II data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. We discuss event selection, backgrounds, analysis optimization, and the limits on the Higgs boson mass obtained in this analysis.

  6. Hadron collider luminosity limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1992-01-01

    The three colliders operated to date have taught us a great deal about the behaviour of both bunched and debunched beams in storage rings. The main luminosity limitations are now well enough understood that most of them can be stronglu attenuated or eliminated by approriate design precautions. Experience with the beam-beam interaction in both the SPS and the Tevatron allow us to predict the performance of the new generation of colliders with some degree of confidence. One of the main challenges that the accelerator physicist faces is the problem of the dynamic aperture limitations due to the lower field quality expected, imposed by economic and other constraints.

  7. Analysis of possible free quarks production process at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boos, E.E.; Ermolov, P.F.; Golubkov, Yu.A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors regard the process of free b-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at energies of new colliders. It is suggested to use the pair of unlike sign with transverse momenta in the range p tr >5 GeV/c to trigger this process. Additionally it is suggested to measure a weak ionization signal from free s-quark from b-quark decay. The calculations of free bb-quarks production cross-sections have been made taking into account their energy losses in strong colour field. It is shown that the most effective range of lepton transverse momenta for observation of the process does not depend on threshold energy and is approximately equal to one for usual b mesons. 16 refs.; 10 figs

  8. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in associated production with w boson at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Xu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2009-11-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron is presented in this dissertation. The process of interest is the associated production of W boson and Higgs boson, with the W boson decaying leptonically and the Higgs boson decaying into a pair of bottom quarks. The dataset in the analysis is accumulated by the D0 detector from April 2002 to April 2008 and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1. The events are reconstructed and selected following the criteria of an isolated lepton, missing transverse energy and two jets. The D0 Neural Network b-jet identification algorithm is further used to discriminate b jets from light jets. A multivariate analysis combining Matrix Element and Neural Network methods is explored to improve the Higgs boson signal significance. No evidence of the Higgs boson is observed in this analysis. In consequence, an observed (expected) limit on the ratio of σ (p$\\bar{p}$ → WH) x Br (H → b$\\bar{b}$) to the Standard Model prediction is set to be 6.7 (6.4) at 95% C.L. for the Higgs boson with a mass of 115 GeV.

  9. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the WH → νb(bar b) Channel in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Yoshikazu

    2010-01-01

    We have searched for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the WH → lvbb channel in 1.96 TeV pp collisions at CDF. This search is based on the data collected by March 2009, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb-1. The W H channel is one of the most promising channels for the Higgs boson search at Tevatron in the low Higgs boson mass region.

  10. Standard model Higgs physics at colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this report we briefly review the experimental status and prospects to verify the Higgs mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. The focus is on the most relevant aspects of the phenomenology of the Standard Model Higgs boson at current (Tevatron) and future (Large Hadron Collider, LHC and International Linear Collider, ILC) particle colliders. We review the Standard Model searches: searches at the Tevatron, the program planned at the LHC and prospects at the ILC. Emphasis is put on what follows after a candidate discovery at the LHC: the various measurements which are necessary to precisely determine what the properties of this Higgs candidate are. (author)

  11. Detector implications for eletroweak physics at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madaras, R.J.

    1996-12-01

    D0 and CDF are two large, powerful, multipurpose detectors with outstanding tracking, calorimeter and muon systems that have done an excellent job in exploiting the Top Quark, b Quark, QCD, New Phenomena/Exotics and Electroweak Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The upgrades of the D0 and CDF detectors will further enhance their capabilities for physics at the Tevatron. The addition of a magnetic field and silicon vertex chamber will open up new physical opportunities for D0, and the replacement of the plug and forward gas calorimeters with new scintillator based calorimeters will give CDF uniform calorimetry over all η

  12. 'Electron compression' of beam-beam footprint in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiltsev, V.; Finley, D.A.

    1997-08-01

    The beam-beam interaction in the Tevatron collider sets some limits on bunch intensity and luminosity. These limits are caused by a tune spread in each bunch which is mostly due to head-on collisions, but there is also a bunch-to-bunch tune spread due to parasitic collisions in multibunch operation. We describe a counter-traveling electron beam which can be used to eliminate these effects, and present general considerations and physics limitations of such a device which provides 'electron compression' of the beam-beam footprint in the Tevatron

  13. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including ...

  14. Initial performance of upgraded Tevatron cryogenic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab began operating a re-designed satellite refrigerator systems in November 1993. Upgrades were installed to operate the Tevatron at a magnet temperature of 3.5 K, approximately 1K lower than the original design. Refrigerator upgrades included new valve boxes, larger reciprocating expanders, the installation of cold vapor compressors, new sub-atmospheric instrumentation and an entirely new distributed controls system. Cryogenic system reliability data for Colliding Physics Run 1B is presented emphasizing a failure analysis for each aspect of the upgrade. Comparison to data for Colliding Physics Run 1A (previous to upgrade) is presented to show the impact of a major system overhaul. New operational problems and their solutions are presented in detail

  15. Analysis of nucleon form factor data reveals the e+e-→nucleon-antinucleon cross section to be remarkably larger than the e+e-→proton-antiproton one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubricka, S.

    1987-01-01

    A modified six-resonance VMD model for a description of the nucleon electromagnetic structure is constructed. It possesses correct analytic properties and the asymptotic behaviour in accordance with a quark model prediction for baryons. Only parameters with clear physical meaning are contained in the model. They are evaluated numerically in a simultaneous fit of all existing data on electric and magnetic nucleon form factors. As a result, the behaviour in the time-like region of electric and magnetic neutron form factors, for which there are no data up to now, has been predicted. In comparison with the corresponding behaviour of proton form factors above the nucleon-antinucleon threshold one finds them to exceed by a factor of five. Consequently the cross section of e + e - →nucleon-antinucleon is expected to be roughly twenty-five-times as large as the cross section of e + e - →proton-antiproton

  16. The measurement of the real part of the proton-antiproton elastic scattering amplitude at a C.M.S. energy of 546 GEV and the rise of the total cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluit, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the experimental study of the elastic scattering of protons and anti-protons at a centre of mass energy of 546 GeV at the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN. The measurement of ρ, i.e. the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the nuclear part of elastic scattering amplitude for proton-antiproton at zero momentum transfer squared (-t = 0 GeV 2 ), at a centre of mass energy of √s = 546 GeV is described. The implications of the result of this measurement for the behaviour of the total cross section in the TeV domain are derived. The hypothesis is investigated whether there is a relation between the rise of the total cross section and the rise of the total jet cross section, as calculated in perturbative QCD and observed by the UA1 experiment. 104 refs.; 40 figs.; 16 tabs

  17. A measurement of forward-backward charge asymmetry of electron-positron pairs in proton-antiproton collision at 1.8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veramendi, Gregory Francisco [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry for e+e- pairs resulting from γ*/Z decays with mass Mee > 40 GeV/c2. The Run II data sample consists of 72 pb-1 of data, which was collected by the CDF detector in $\\bar{p}$p collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurement is compared with predictions from the Standard Model.

  18. 1987 DOE review: First collider run operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, S.; Crawford, J.; Dugan, G.

    1987-05-01

    This review covers the operations of the first run of the 1.8 TeV superconducting super collider. The papers enclosed cover: PBAR source status, fixed target operation, Tevatron cryogenic reliability and capacity upgrade, Tevatron Energy upgrade progress and plans, status of the D0 low beta insertion, 1.8 K and 4.7 K refrigeration for low-β quadrupoles, progress and plans for the LINAC and booster, near term and long term and long term performance improvements

  19. Measurement of the top quark properties at the Tevatron and the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00040958

    2014-01-01

    Almost two decades after its discovery at Fermilab's Tevatron collider experiments, the top quark is still under the spotlight due to its connections to some of the most interesting puzzles in the Standard Model. The Tevatron has been shut down two years ago, yet some interesting results are coming out of the CDF and D0 collaborations. The LHC collider at CERN produced two orders of magnitude more top quarks than Tevatron's, thus giving birth to a new era for top quark physics. While the LHC is also down at the time of this writing, many top quark physics results are being extracted out of the 7\\,TeV and 8\\,TeV proton proton collisions by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, and many more are expected to appear before the LHC will be turned on again sometime in 2015. These proceedings cover a selection of recent results produced by the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  20. Hadron collider physics 2005. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanelli, M.; Clark, A.; Wu, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Hadron Collider Physics Symposia (HCP) are a new series of conferences that follow the merger of the Hadron Collider Conferences with the LHC Symposia series, with the goal of maximizing the shared experience of the Tevatron and LHC communities. This book gathers the proceedings of the first symposium, HCP2005, and reviews the state of the art in the key physics directions of experimental hadron collider research: - QCD physics - precision electroweak physics - c-, b-, and t-quark physics - physics beyond the Standard Model - heavy ion physics The present volume will serve as a reference for everyone working in the field of accelerator-based high-energy physics. (orig.)

  1. Present status and future prospects for a Higgs boson discovery at the Tevatron and LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, Howard E

    2010-01-01

    Discovering the Higgs boson is one of the primary goals of both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The present status of the Higgs search is reviewed and future prospects for discovery at the Tevatron and LHC are considered. This talk focuses primarily on the Higgs boson of the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension. Theoretical expectations for the Higgs boson and its phenomenological consequences are reviewed.

  2. First search at CDF for the Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Shan-Huei S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2006-01-01

    By way of retaining the gauge invariance of the Standard Model (SM) and giving masses to the W± and Z0 bosons and the fermions, the Higgs mechanism predicts the existence of a neutral scalar bosonic particle, whose mass is not exactly known. The Higgs boson is the only experimentally unconfirmed SM particle to date. This thesis documents a search for the Higgs boson in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron, using 360 ± pb -1 data collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II), as part of the most important quest for contemporary particle physicists. The search was for a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of W± bosons, where each W boson decays to an electron, a muon or a tau that further decays to an electron or a muon with associated neutrinos. Events with two charged leptons plus large missing energy were selected in data triggered on a high p$\\bar{p}$ lepton and compared to the signal and backgrounds modeled using Monte Carlo and jet data. No signal-like excess was observed in data. Therefore, upper limits on the HWW production cross-section in the analyzed mass range were extracted using the binned likelihood maximum from distributions of dilepton azimuthal angle at 95% Bayesian credibility level (CL), as shown in the table below.

  3. FERMILAB: Tevatron upgrade; Magnetic precession in bent crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-01-15

    The Fermilab accelerator complex is in the middle of a major upgrade to increase the luminosity beyond the original design goal. During Phase I of this upgrade, there have been major modifications to the Tevatron. These modifications were commissioned at the start of the latest collider run and include the installation of electrostatic separators to separate the orbits of the stored beams and new low beta insertions to squeeze the colliding proton and antiproton beams at both experiment interaction regions. These modifications have already enabled the Tevatron to achieve a record peak luminosity of 6.93 x 10{sup 30} per sq cm per s and a record weekly integrated luminosity of 10{sup 60} inverse nanobarns. The peak goal for the present run of 5.0 x 10{sup 30} has already been exceeded.

  4. The A0 abort system for the Tevatron upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.

    1989-01-01

    The installation of electrostatic separator modules at B48 and C17 in the Tevatron necessitates changes to the Tevatron abort system. There will no longer be room for either the proton or antiproton kicker magnets used in the present system. The kickers at C17 will be permanently removed. The kickers at B48 will be temporarily removed for collider operation and will be replaced for fixed target operation. The existing proton abort system will remain unchanged during fixed target operation. This note describes a proposed abort system for operation in the collider mode for 22 on 22 bunches and provides details of specifications for the required components. In certain cases, for example in the case of the pulsers for the magnets and the absorber assembly, system components are designed with the option of upgrading to 44 on 44 bunch operation in mind. 8 refs., 14 figs

  5. FERMILAB: Tevatron upgrade; Magnetic precession in bent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Fermilab accelerator complex is in the middle of a major upgrade to increase the luminosity beyond the original design goal. During Phase I of this upgrade, there have been major modifications to the Tevatron. These modifications were commissioned at the start of the latest collider run and include the installation of electrostatic separators to separate the orbits of the stored beams and new low beta insertions to squeeze the colliding proton and antiproton beams at both experiment interaction regions. These modifications have already enabled the Tevatron to achieve a record peak luminosity of 6.93 x 10 30 per sq cm per s and a record weekly integrated luminosity of 10 60 inverse nanobarns. The peak goal for the present run of 5.0 x 10 30 has already been exceeded

  6. Tevatron operational experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, B.L.; Theilacker, J.C.

    1989-02-01

    Fermilabs superconducting accelerator, the Tevatron has been operational for nearly six years. The history of its operation is presented. Several long shutdowns for superconducting dipole repairs are discussed. The dominant factor influencing the repair was conductor motion which fatigued the cable in the magnet ends. Borescoping and x-raying techniques were used to determine which magnet ends required repair. Detailed downtime logs were kept for each of the running periods. A discussion of the sources of downtime and a comparison for different operating modes is presented

  7. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Top Quark Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Cecilia E.; Vellidis, Costas

    2014-09-17

    We present results on top quark physics from the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton anti-proton collider. These include legacy results from Run II that were published or submitted for publication before mid-2014, as well as a summary of Run I results. The historical perspective of the discovery of the top quark in Run I is also described.

  8. Tests of QCD in W and Z production at Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alitti, J.; Chevalier, L.; Ducros, Y.; Lebrat, J.F.; Mangeot, P.

    1995-01-01

    We present measurements of the production cross sections times leptonic branching fractions and the transverse momentum distributions of W and Z bosons in pp-bar collisions at √ s = 1.8 TeV using data collected with the DΦ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp-bar collider. A preliminary measurement of the W charge asymmetry is also presented. (authors). 27 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  9. The CDF upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman-Holmes, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has been used to study proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron since 1985. Over the years, the detector has evolved steadily to increase its physics capability and to keep pace with improvements to the Tevatron. Fermilab is currently building a new Main Injector accelerator which will lead to even larger luminosity values. This paper describes upgrades to CDF that will allow one to exploit the higher luminosity of the Main Injector

  10. Evidence for electroweak top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadfort, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We present the first evidence for electroweak single top quark production using nearly 1 fb -1 of Tevatron Run II data at √s = 1.96 TeV. We select single-top-like data events in the lepton+jets decay channel and separate them from backgrounds using the matrix element analysis method. This technique uses leading order matrix elements to compute an event probability for both signal and background hypotheses. Using the expected signal acceptance, background, and observed data we measure the single top quark cross section: σ(p(bar p) → tb + tqb + X) = 4.6 -1.5 + 1.8 pb. The probability for the background to have fluctuated up to give at least the cross section measured in this analysis is 0.21%, which corresponds to a Gaussian equivalent significance of 2.9σ

  11. Tevatron extraction microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, L.; Finley, D.A.; Harrison, M.; Merz, W.; Batavia, IL)

    1985-01-01

    Extraction in the Fermilab Tevatron is controlled by a multi-processor Multibus microcomputer system called QXR (Quad eXtraction Regulator). QXR monitors several analog beam signals and controls three sets of power supplies: the ''bucker'' and ''pulse'' magnets at a rate of 5760 Hz, and the ''QXR'' magnets at 720 Hz. QXR supports multiple slow spills (up to a total of 35 seconds) with multiple fast pulses intermixed. It linearizes the slow spill and bucks out the high frequency components. Fast extraction is done by outputting a variable pulse waveform. Closed loop learning techniques are used to improve performance from cycle to cycle for both slow and fast extraction. The system is connected to the Tevatron clock system so that it can track the machine cycle. QXR is also connected to the rest of the Fermilab control system, ACNET. Through ACNET, human operators and central computers can monitor and control extraction through communications with QXR. The controls hardware and software both employ some standard and some specialized components. This paper gives an overview of QXR as a control system; another paper (1) summarizes performance

  12. Tevatron extraction microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, L.; Finley, D.A.; Harrison, M.; Merz, W.

    1985-06-01

    Extraction in the Fermilab Tevatron is controlled by a multi-processor Multibus microcomputer system called QXR (Quad eXtraction Regulator). QXR monitors several analog beam signals and controls three sets of power supplies: the ''bucker'' and ''pulse'' magnets at a rate of 5760 Hz, and the ''QXR'' magnets at 720 Hz. QXR supports multiple slow spills (up to a total of 35 seconds) with multiple fast pulses intermixed. It linearizes the slow spill and bucks out the high frequency components. Fast extraction is done by outputting a variable pulse waveform. Closed loop learning techniques are used to improve performance from cycle to cycle for both slow and fast extraction. The system is connected to the Tevatron clock system so that it can track the machine cycle. QXR is also connected to the rest of the Fermilab control system, ACNET. Through ACNET, human operators and central computers can monitor and control extraction through communications with QXR. The controls hardware and software both employ some standard and some specialized components. This paper gives an overview of QXR as a control system; another paper summarizes performance

  13. FERMILAB: Call for physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Several hundred physicists attended a special Fermilab 'All Experimenter's Meeting' on November 20 to hear Director John Peoples call for new Tevatron Collider proposals for the years 2000-2005, when the new Main Injector will be complete. At the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the CDF and DO experiments are currently completing improvements for Run II to use the Tevatron when the Main Injector is complete later in this decade. New proposals would be aimed at a Collider Run III to follow these CDF and DO efforts

  14. Non-SUSY Searches at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strologas, John

    2011-01-01

    We present recent results from searches for new physics beyond supersymmetry performed at the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab. The CDF and D0 analyses presented here utilized data of integrated luminosity up to 6 fb -1 . We cover leptonic and bosonic resonances interpreted in the Randall-Sundrum graviton and new-boson models, rare final states, and the search for vector-like quarks. The search for new phenomena beyond the weak-scale supersymmetry is a vital part of the Fermilab program. Both CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider actively look for signals not expected by the standard model (SM) or minimal supersymmetric models. The searches can be sorted in three categories: (a) searches for generic resonances that can be interpreted in several new-physics models; (b) searches for exotic combinations of final-state objects or abnormal kinematics (not necessarily predicted by current theories); and (c) model-dependent searches that test a particular theory. We present here latest results from all these categories: searches for new dilepton and diboson resonances (interpreted as gravitons and new gauge bosons), searches for anomalous γ + E T + X production, and searches for vector-like quarks.

  15. Mass-identified particle production in proton-antiproton collisions at √s =300, 540, 1000, and 1800 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Allen, C.; Anderson, E.W.; Balamurali, V.; Banerjee, S.; Beery, P.D.; Bhat, P.; Bishop, J.M.; Biswas, N.N.; Bujak, A.; Carmony, D.D.; Carter, T.; Choi, Y.; Cole, P.; DeBonte, R.; DeCarlo, V.; Erwin, A.R.; Findeisen, C.; Goshaw, A.T.; Gutay, L.J.; Hirsch, A.S.; Hojvat, C.; Jennings, J.R.; Kenney, V.P.; Lindsey, C.S.; Loomis, C.; LoSecco, J.M.; McMahon, T.; McManus, A.P.; Morgan, N.; Nelson, K.; Oh, S.H.; Porile, N.T.; Reeves, D.; Rimai, A.; Robertson, W.J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Stampke, S.R.; Stringfellow, B.C.; Thompson, M.; Turkot, F.; Walker, W.D.; Wang, C.H.; Warchol, J.; Wesson, D.K.; Zhan, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The yields and average transverse momenta of pions, kaons, and antiprotons produced at the Fermilab bar pp collider at √s =300, 540, 1000, and 1800 GeV are presented and compared with data from the energies reached at the CERN collider. We also present data on the dependence of average transverse momentum left-angle p t right-angle and particle ratios as a function of charged particle density dN c /dη; data for particle densities as high as six times the average value, corresponding to a Bjorken energy density 6 GeV/fm 3 , are reported. These data are relevant to the search for quark-gluon phase of QCD

  16. Λ0 and Lambda-bar0 production from proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Beery, P.D.; Biswas, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    The transverse-momentum spectra of lambdas (Λ 0 ,Lambda-bar 0 ) produced in the central region has been measured in p-barp collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Collider. We find that the average transverse momentum of the lambdas increases more rapidly with center-of-mass energy than that of charged particles, and the ratio of lambdas to charged particles increases as a function of center-of-mass energy

  17. Recent heavy flavor results from the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorigo, Mirco

    2012-01-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron p(bar p) collider have pioneered and established the role of flavor physics in hadron collisions. A broad program is now at its full maturity. We report on three new results sensitive to physics beyond the standard model, obtained using the whole CDF dataset: a measurement of the difference of CP asymmetries in K + K - and π + π - decays of D 0 mesons, new bounds on the B s 0 mixing phase and on the decay width difference of B s 0 mass-eigenstates, and an update of the summer 2011 search for B (s) 0 mesons decaying into pairs of muons. Finally, the D0 confirmation of the observation of a new hadron, the χ b (3P) state, is briefly mentioned.

  18. Tests of Enhanced Leading Order QCD in W Boson plus Jet Production in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, Soushi [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-01-01

    The authors have studied the W + ≥ n jets process in Tevatron Run II experiment. The data used correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 72 pb-1 taken from March 2002 through January 2003. The lowest order QCD predictions have been tested with a new prescription of the parton-jet matching, which allows to construct the enhanced LO phase space. According to this procedure, one gets unique results which do not depend on unphysical bias of kinematical cuts to avoid the collinear/infrared divergence in calculation. Namely, one can get the meaningful results in the lowest order prediction. The controllable event samples of the W boson plus jets events by the enhanced lowest order prediction will lead smaller systematic uncertainty than the naive prediction without any cares of the collinear/infrared divergence. They expect their method will be also useful to make systematically small samples as the background estimates in the top quark analysis. They found a good agreement between data and theory in typical kinematics distributions. The number of events for each inclusive sample up to 3 jets are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. A comparison with Run I results is also presented. This is the first result for the CDF Run II experiment.

  19. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CDF Collaboration; Freeman, John; Freeman, John

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t(bar t) → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t(bar t) production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb -1 data sample, using events with a high-p T lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find M meas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c 2

  20. Measurements of the B Production Cross Section in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using semileptonic decays of b hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, James Alexander [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The authors present a measurement of the cross section of b hadron (Hb) production in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They use 83 pb-1 of data taken between october 2002 and May 2003 that was collected with a trigger sensitive to high momentum muons and displaced tracks. They use partially reconstructed decays in the following modes: Hb → μ- $\\bar{v}$μD0X, D0 → K-π+, and Hb → μ-$\\bar{v}$μD*+ X, D*+ → D0π+, D0 → K- π+, and their charge conjugates. They correct for the backgrounds from c$\\bar{c}$ and b$\\bar{b}$ decays, for trigger and reconstruction efficiencies, and for detector acceptance. They report the total cross section above a minimum transverse momentum (pT) of 9 GeV/c for the rapidity range |y| ≤ 0.6.

  1. Status of the Tevatron CDF and D0 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolli, Simona

    2010-01-01

    The status of the Tevatron Collider is reviewed and highlights of the rich physics program carried out by the CDF and D0 experiments are presented. The Tevatron Collider has been performing remarkably well in the past few years and it is continuing to deliver record luminosity. The machine collides proton and anti-proton beams at an energy in the center of mass of 1.96 TeV, with average peak luminosity of 300E30 cm -2 s -1 . The total delivered luminosity is slightly above 9 fb -1 . The CDF and D0 experiments have been collecting data with an average efficiency of 90%, while the experiments have enjoyed an annual doubling of the integrated luminosity delivered and recorded. This has led to an avalanche of new results from areas as diverse as QCD, top, searches for new physics and the area of electroweak symmetry breaking with particular focus on direct searches for the Higgs boson. The physics reach of the Tevatron is built on a mountain of measurements that confirm the ability of the Tevatron collaborations to use their detectors to discover new particles. Each measurement is of itself a significant result. Measurements begin with the largest cross section processes, those of B physics, but move on to processes with small branching ratios and backgrounds that are hard to distinguish from the signal. The measurement of Bs oscillations demonstrates the performance of the silicon tracking and vertexing. Discovery of single top production, WZ production, and evidence for the ZZ production in both leptonic and now hadronic modes provide the final base camp from which the Higgs summit is in sight. Processes such as single top and ZZ act as important messengers heralding the impending arrival of the Higgs. This journey through lower and lower cross section processes represents our approach to provide convincing evidence of these processes, first as discovery then as measurements that constrain the Standard Model.

  2. Search for 3rd Generation Vector Leptoquarks in the Di-tau Di-jet Channel in Proton Antiproton Collisions at square √s = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrester, Stanley Scott [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    We search for third generation vector leptoquarks (V LQ3) produced in colliding p$\\bar{p}$ beams operating at √s = 1.96 TeV at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. We use 322 pb-1 of data to search for the V LQ3 signal in the di-tau plus di-jet channel. For the first time, the full matrix element is used in the Monte Carlo simulation of this signal. With no events observed in the signal region, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the V LQ3 pair production cross section of σ < 344fb, assuming Yang-Mills couplings and Br(V LQ3 → bτ) = 1, and a lower limit on the V LQ3 mass of mV LQ3 > 317 GeV=c2. If theoretical uncertainties on the cross section are applied in the least favorable manner the results are σ < 360fb and mV LQ3 > 294 GeV=c2. The Minimal coupling V LQ3 result is an upper limit on the cross section of σ < 493fb (σ < 610fb) and the lower limit on the mass is mV LQ3 > 251 GeV=c2 (mV LQ3 > 223 GeV=c2) for the nominal (1σ varied) theoretical expectation.

  3. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (4/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  4. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  5. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  6. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (3/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  7. B physics at the tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    Precision B-physics results from the CDF and D0 Collaborations based on data collected during the Tevatron 1992-96 run are presented. In particular we discuss the measurement of the B s meson lifetime, B c meson observation, and B 0 - anti B 0 mixing results obtained using time-evolution analyses. Prospects for the next Tevatron run, starting in 1999, are also reported

  8. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t$\\bar{t}$ production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  9. The upgraded data acquisition system for beam loss monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbaugh, A.; Briegel, C.; Brown, B.C.; Capista, D.; Drennan, C.; Fellenz, B.; Knickerbocker, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Marchionni, A.; Needles, C.; Olson, M.

    2011-01-01

    A VME-based data acquisition system for beam-loss monitors has been developed and is in use in the Tevatron and Main Injector accelerators at the Fermilab complex. The need for enhanced beam-loss protection when the Tevatron is operating in collider-mode was the main driving force for the new design. Prior to the implementation of the present system, the beam-loss monitor system was disabled during collider operation and protection of the Tevatron magnets relied on the quench protection system. The new Beam-Loss Monitor system allows appropriate abort logic and thresholds to be set over the full set of collider operating conditions. The system also records a history of beam-loss data prior to a beam-abort event for post-abort analysis. Installation of the Main Injector system occurred in the fall of 2006 and the Tevatron system in the summer of 2007. Both systems were fully operation by the summer of 2008. In this paper we report on the overall system design, provide a description of its normal operation, and show a number of examples of its use in both the Main Injector and Tevatron.

  10. People and things. CERN Courier, May 1985, v. 25(4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1985-05-15

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. A workshop is being arranged to discuss the potential of the CERN SPS proton-antiproton Collider for the early 90s in view of the then simultaneous operation of the Tevatron at Fermilab, LEP at CERN and HERA at DESY, and to evaluate the need for a new Collider detector.

  11. The Reach of CERN LEP2 and Fermilab Tevatron Upgrades for Higgs Bosons in Supersymmetric Models

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, Howard W; Tata, Xerxes; Baer, Howard; Tata, Xerxes

    1999-01-01

    Luminosity upgrades of the Fermilab Tevatron pbar-p collider have been shown to allow experimental detection of a Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson up to $m_{H_{SM}}\\sim 120$ GeV via $WH_{SM} \\to \\ell\

  12. Recent results on QCD at the Tevatron (CDF and D0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschi, E.

    1993-11-01

    In the last run the Tevatron collider delivered an integrated luminosity of 29.9 pb -1 to CDF and D0. We describe here some preliminary result from analyses of relevant QCD processes in the 1992--1993 data from the two experiments

  13. Angular Distributions of Three Jet Events in Proton - Anti-Proton Collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, Robert Matthew [Harvard U.

    1989-07-01

    A measurement of three jet angular distributions is made at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.8 TeV in protonantiproton collisions at the F'ermilab Tevatron using the Collider Detector _at Ferm.ilab (CDF). Results are presented for three different center of mass variables, cos $\\theta$, $\\psi$, and $\\xi$ and are compared to QCD predictions.

  14. Search for Exotic S=-2 Baryons in proton-antiproton Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

    2006-12-01

    A search for a manifestly exotic S = -2 baryon state decaying to {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, and its neutral partner decaying to {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, has been performed using 220 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The {Xi}{sup -} trajectories were measured in a silicon tracker before their decay, resulting in a sample with low background and excellent position resolution. No evidence was found for S = -2 pentaquark candidates in the invariant mass range of 1600-2100 MeV/c{sup 2}. Upper limits on the product of pentaquark production cross section times its branching fraction to {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +,-}, relative to the cross section of the well established {Xi}(1530) resonance, are presented for neutral and doubly negative candidates with p{sub T} > 2 GeV/c and |y| < 1 as a function of pentaquark mass. At 1862 MeV/c{sup 2}, these upper limits for neutral and doubly negative final states were found to be 3.2% and 1.7% at the 90% confidence level, respectively.

  15. Squark production at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beenakker, W.; Hoepker, R.; Spira, M.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-11-01

    We have determined the QCD corrections to the production of squark-antisquark pairs in p anti p collisions at the Tevatron. If the next-to-leading order corrections are taken into account, the renormalization/factorization scale dependence of the theoretical prediction for the cross section is reduced considerably. The higher order corrections increase the production cross section at the Tevatron by about a factor two if we compare the next-to-leading order prediction at a scale near the sqaurk mass with the lowest order prediction for which, in the experimental analyses, the scale was identified with the invariant energy of the parton subprocess. This results in a rise of the experimental lower bound on the squark mass from the Tevatron by about 20 GeV. (orig.)

  16. Resonant second generation slepton production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autermann, Christian Tobias [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany)

    2006-12-01

    A search for R-parity violating supersymmetry with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$-collider is presented. Assuming a non-zero LQ$\\bar{d}$ coupling λ$'\\atop{2jk}$ leads to final state with two muons and jets. A total integrated luminosity of 375 pb-1 collected between April 2002 and August 2004 is utilized. The observed number of events is in agreement with the Standard Model expectation, and limits on Rp supersymmetry are derived.

  17. $B$ physics at the Tevatron: Run II and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Anikeev, K; Azfar, F.; Bailey, S.; Bauer, C.W.; Bell, W.; Bodwin, G.; Braaten, E.; Burdman, G.; Butler, J.N.; Byrum, K.; Cason, N.; Cerri, A.; Cheung, H.W.K.; Dighe, A.; Donati, S.; Ellis, R.K.; Falk, A.; Feild, G.; Fleming, S.; Furic, I.; Gardner, S.; Grossman, Y.; Gutierrez, G.; Hao, W; Harris, B.W.; Hewett, J.; Hiller, G.; Jesik, R.; Jones, M.; Kasper, P.A.; El-Khadra, A.; Kirk, M.; Kiselev, V.V.; Kroll, J.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Kutschke, R.; Kuznetsov, V.E.; Laenen, E.; Lee, J.; Leibovich, A.K.; Lewis, J.D.; Ligeti, Z.; Likhoded, A.K.; Logan, H.E.; Luke, M.; Maciel, A.; Majumder, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, M.; Menary, S.; Nason, P.; Nierste, U.; Nir, Y.; Nogach, L.; Norrbin, E.; Oleari, C.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Petteni, M.; Poling, R.; Procario, M.; Punzi, G.; Quinn, H.; Rakitine, A.; Ridolfi, G.; Shestermanov, K.; Signorelli, G.; Silva, J.P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A.; Speakman, B.; Stenson, K.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stone, S.; Sumorok, K.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, W.; Trischuk, W.; Tseng, J.; Van Kooten, R.; Vasiliev, A.; Voloshin, M.; Wang, J.C.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wurthwein, F.; Xuan, N.; Yarba, J.; Yip, K.; Zieminski, A.

    2002-01-01

    This report provides a comprehensive overview of the prospects for B physics at the Tevatron. The work was carried out during a series of workshops starting in September 1999. There were four working groups: 1) CP Violation, 2) Rare and Semileptonic Decays, 3) Mixing and Lifetimes, 4) Production, Fragmentation and Spectroscopy. The report also includes introductory chapters on theoretical and experimental tools emphasizing aspects of B physics specific to hadron colliders, as well as overviews of the CDF, D0, and BTeV detectors, and a Summary.

  18. Top Production at the Tevatron: The Antiproton Awakens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Kenneth [Nebraska U.

    2017-07-01

    A long time ago, at a laboratory far, far away, the Fermilab Tevatron collided protons and antiprotons at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV. The CDF and D0 experiments each recorded datasets of about 10 fb$^{-1}$. As such experiments may never be repeated, these are unique datasets that allow for unique measurements. This presentation describes recent results from the two experiments on top-quark production rates, spin orientations, and production asymmetries, which are all probes of the $p\\bar{p}$ initial state.

  19. High Mass Standard Model Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petridis Konstantinos A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying predominantly to W+W− pairs, at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV, using up to 8.2 fb−1 of data collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis techniques and the various channels considered are discussed. These searches result in exclusions across the Higgs mass range of 156.5< mH <173.7 GeV for CDF and 161< mH <170 GeV for D0.

  20. Review of physics results from the Tevatron: QCD physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesropian, Christina [Rockefeller U.; Bandurin, Dmitry [Virginia U.

    2015-02-17

    We present a summary of results from studies of quantum chromodynamics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF and the D0 experiments. These include Run II results for the time period up to the end of Summer 2014. A brief description of Run I results is also given. This review covers a wide spectrum of topics, and includes measurements with jet and vector boson final states in the hard (perturbative) energy regime, as well as studies of soft physics such as diffractive and elastic scatterings, underlying and minimum bias events, hadron fragmentation, and multiple parton interactions.

  1. Neural networks at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badgett, W.; Burkett, K.; Campbell, M.K.; Wu, D.Y.; Bianchin, S.; DeNardi, M.; Pauletta, G.; Santi, L.; Caner, A.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.; Lindsey, C.S.; Wainer, N.; Dall'Agata, M.; Johns, K.; Dickson, M.; Stanco, L.; Wyss, J.L.

    1992-10-01

    This paper summarizes neural network applications at the Fermilab Tevatron, including the first online hardware application in high energy physics (muon tracking): the CDF and DO neural network triggers; offline quark/gluon discrimination at CDF; ND a new tool for top to multijets recognition at CDF

  2. Measurement of the Oscillation Frequency of Bs Mesons in the Hadronic Decay Mode Bs→ π Ds(Φ π)X with the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Gernot August [Univ. of Mainz (Germany). Inst. for Physics

    2009-03-01

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics is a theory, describing three out of four fundamental forces. In this model the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix describes the transformation between the mass and weak eigenstates of quarks. The matrix properties can be visualized as triangles in the complex plane. A precise measurement of all triangle parameters can be used to verify the validity of the SM. The least precisely measured parameter of the triangle is related to the CKM element |Vtd|, accessible through the mixing frequency (oscillation) of neutral B mesons, where mixing is the transition of a neutral meson into its anti-particle and vice versa. It is possible to calculate the CKM element |Vtd| and a related element |Vts| by measuring the mass differences Δmd(Δms) between neutral Bd and $\\bar{B}$d (Bs and $\\bar{B}$s) meson mass eigenstates. This measurement is accomplished by tagging the initial and final state of decaying B mesons and determining their lifetime. Currently the Fermilab Tevatron Collider (providing p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV) is the only place, where Bs oscillations can be studied. The first selection of the 'golden', fully hadronic decay mode Bs → πDs(Φπ)X at D0 is presented in this thesis. All data, taken between April 2002 and August 2007 with the D0 detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of integral Ldt = 2.8 fb-1 is used. The oscillation frequency Δms and the ratio |Vtd|/|Vts| are determined as Δms = (16.6-0.4+0.5(stat)-0.3+0.4(sys)) ps-1, |Vtd|/|Vts| = 0.213-0.003+0.004(exp) ± 0.008(theor). These results are consistent with the standard model expectations and no evidence for new physics is

  3. Tevatron constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using decays to bottom-antibottom quark pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartlett, J F; Bartos, P; Bassler, U; Bauce, M; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Bedeschi, F; Begalli, M; Behari, S; Bellantoni, L; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bortoletto, D; Borysova, M; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brigliadori, L; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brucken, E; Bu, X B; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camacho-Pérez, E; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Chokheli, D; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Clutter, J; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corbo, M; Corcoran, M; Cordelli, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cutts, D; Das, A; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Davies, G; de Barbaro, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; D'Errico, M; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Edmunds, D; Elagin, A; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Farrington, S; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fernández Ramos, J P; Fiedler, F; Field, R; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Fuess, S; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gershtein, Y; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Ginther, G; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gogota, O; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Golovanov, G; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hahn, S R; Haley, J; Han, J Y; Han, L; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Harder, K; Hare, M; Harel, A; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinrich, J; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herndon, M; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hocker, A; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ito, A S; Ivanov, A; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; James, E; Jang, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Jindariani, S; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Joshi, J; Jun, S Y; Jung, A W; Junk, T R; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Karmanov, D; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Kiselevich, I; Knoepfel, K; Kohli, J M; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurata, M; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lammers, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Limosani, A; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipeles, E; Lipton, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Luna-Garcia, R; Lungu, G; Lyon, A L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansour, J; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez-Ortega, J; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miao, T; Miconi, F; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondal, N K; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nagy, E; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Nunnemann, T; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Orduna, J; Ortolan, L; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pagliarone, C; Pal, A; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parker, W; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Pondrom, L; Popov, A V; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ripp-Baudot, I; Ristori, L; Rizatdinova, F; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Rominsky, M; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sajot, G; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santi, L; Santos, A S; Sato, K; Savage, G; Saveliev, V; Savitskyi, M; Savoy-Navarro, A; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwanenberger, C; Schwarz, T; Schwienhorst, R; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Sekaric, J; Semenov, A; Severini, H; Sforza, F; Shabalina, E; Shalhout, S Z; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simak, V; Simonenko, A; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, H; Sonnenschein, L; Sorin, V; Soustruznik, K; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stark, J; Stentz, D; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Titov, M; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tokmenin, V V; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Verkheev, A Y; Vernieri, C; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vidal, M; Vilanova, D; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wahl, H D; Wallny, R; Wang, M H L S; Wang, S M; Warchol, J; Waters, D; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wobisch, M; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wood, D R; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, S; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Youn, S W; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, J M; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zucchelli, S

    2015-04-17

    Combined constraints from the CDF and D0 Collaborations on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin J and parity P are presented and compared with results obtained assuming the standard model value JP=0+. Both collaborations analyzed approximately 10  fb(-) of proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected at the Fermilab Tevatron. Two models predicting exotic Higgs bosons with JP=0- and JP=2+ are tested. The kinematic properties of exotic Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson differ from those predicted for the standard model Higgs boson. Upper limits at the 95% credibility level on the production rates of the exotic Higgs bosons, expressed as fractions of the standard model Higgs boson production rate, are set at 0.36 for both the JP=0- hypothesis and the JP=2+ hypothesis. If the production rate times the branching ratio to a bottom-antibottom pair is the same as that predicted for the standard model Higgs boson, then the exotic bosons are excluded with significances of 5.0 standard deviations and 4.9 standard deviations for the JP=0- and JP=2+ hypotheses, respectively.

  4. Cryogenic testing and analysis associated with Tevatron lower temperature operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    An upgrade of the Tevatron cryogenic system was installed and commissioned in 1993 to allow lower temperature operation. As a result, higher energy operation of the Fermilab superconducting Tevatron accelerator is possible. Following the installation and initial commissioning, it was decided to continue the current colliding beam physics run at the previous energy of 900 GeV. This has allowed the author to perform parasitic lower temperature tests in the Tevatron over the last year and a half. This paper presents the results of operational experiences and thermal and hydraulic testing which have taken place. The primary goal of the testing is to better understand the operation of the cold compressor system, associated instrumentation, and the performance of the existing magnet system during lower temperature operation. This will lead to a tentatively scheduled higher energy test run in the fall of 1995. The test results have shown that more elaborate controlling methods are necessary in order to achieve reliable system operation. Fortunately, the new satellite refrigerator controls system is capable of the expansion necessary to reach this goal. New features are being added to the controls systems which will allow for more intelligent control and better diagnostics for component monitoring and trending

  5. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  6. The dijet invariant mass at the Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The differential cross section as a function of the dijet invariant mass has been measured in 1.8 TeV ppbar collisions. A comparison to leading order QCD predictions is presented as well as a study of the sensitivity of the mass spectrum to the gluon radiation. The need to take radiation into account requires the study of its spatial distribution and the comparison of the data to the predictions of shower Monte Carlo programs like Isajet and Herwig. 12 refs., 10 figs

  7. Managing discovery risks--A Tevatron case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakul Banerjee

    2004-01-01

    To meet the increasing need for higher performance, Management of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has undertaken various projects to improve systems associated with the Tevatron high-energy particle collider located at Batavia, Illinois. One of the larger projects is the Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system. The objective of this project is to replace the existing BPM electronics and software system that was originally installed during early 1980s, along with the original construction of the Tevatron.The original system consists of 236 beam position monitors located around the underground tunnel of the accelerator. Above ground control systems are attached to these monitors using pickup cables. When the Tevatron collider is operational, signals received from the BPMs are used to perform a number of control and diagnostic tasks. The original system can only capture the proton signals from the collider. The new system, when fully operational, will be able to capture combined proton and antiproton signals and will be able to separate the antiproton signal from the combined signal at high resolution. This significant enhancement was beyond the range of technical capabilities when the Tevatron was constructed about two decades ago. To take advantage of exceptional progress made in the hardware and software area in past two decades, Department of Energy approved funding of the BPM electronics and software replacement project. The approximate length of the project is sixteen months with a budget of four million dollars not including overhead, escalation, and contingencies. Apart from cost and schedule risks, there are two major risks associated with this research and development project. The primary risk is the risk of discovery. Since the Tevatron beam path is highly complex, BPMs have to acquire and process a large amount of data. In this environment, analysis of data to separate antiproton signals is even more complex. Finding an optimum algorithm that can

  8. Tevatron serial data repeater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducar, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    A ten megabit per second serial data repeater system has been developed for the 6.28km Tevatron accelerator. The repeaters are positioned at each of the thirty service buildings and accommodate control and abort system communications as well as distribution of the Tevatron time and energy clocks. The repeaters are transparent to the particular protocol of the transmissions. Serial data are encoded locally as unipolar two volt signals employing the self-clocking Manchester Bi-Phase code. The repeaters modulate the local signals to low-power bursts of 50 MHz rf carrier for the 260m transmission between service buildings. The repeaters also demodulate the transmission and restructure the data for local utilization. The employment of frequency discrimination techniques yields high immunity to the characteristic noise spectrum

  9. Accelerating polarized beams in Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper, we will examine the totality of equipment, manpower and cost necessary to obtain a polarized proton beam in the Tevatron. We will not, however, be concerned with the acquisition and acceleration of polarized /bar p/ beams. Furthermore we will consider only a planar main ring without overpass, although it is expected that Siberian snake schemes could be made to apply equally well to non-planar machines. In addition to not wanting to tackle here the task of reformulating the theory for a non-planar closed orbit, we also anticipate that as part of the Tevatron upgrade the main ring will in the not too distant future, be replaced by a planar main injector situated in a separate tunnel. 4 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  10. Fermilab Main Injector plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-07-15

    The Fermilab Main Injector is the centrepiece of the 'Fermilab III' scheme to significantly upgrade the Laboratory's existing accelerator complex. The new accelerator is designed to provide increased particle beam levels to boost the collision rate in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider (luminosity in excess of 5 x 10{sup 31} per sq cm per s) and, if approved, would provide increased flexibility in all areas of high energy physics research.

  11. Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6 K and LN 2 for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed

  12. Study of Low $p_{T}$ $D^{0}$ Meson Production at CDF II in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramellini, Elena [Univ. of Bologna (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis a study of the D0 meson production in proton-antiproton collisions is presented. The data were collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. This work is part of a specific effort by the CDF Collaboration to measure the inclusive differential cross section of prompt charmed mesons in the low pT kinematic region.

  13. Highlights from D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madaras, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    The D0 Experiment is a new, large multipurpose experiment at the Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. From the analysis of data taken during August--October, 1992, a selection of preliminary physics results will be given on inclusive jet production, direct photon production, the production and decay properties of the W and Z bosons, the search for the top quark in the dilepton and lepton + jets channels, B physics and searches for new particles

  14. Energy calibration of the jets in the experiment D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coss, J.

    2003-12-01

    This thesis have been performed in the D0 group of the Nuclear Physics Institute at Lyon. This work is about the calibration of the jets in the D0 experiment located on the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron. I studied the Jet Offset Correction and we have proposed a new method to calibrate the b-jets. We have calculated the response of the calorimeter for these jets in the 'photon + b - jets' events. (author)

  15. Fermilab Main Injector plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector is the centrepiece of the 'Fermilab III' scheme to significantly upgrade the Laboratory's existing accelerator complex. The new accelerator is designed to provide increased particle beam levels to boost the collision rate in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider (luminosity in excess of 5 x 10 31 per sq cm per s) and, if approved, would provide increased flexibility in all areas of high energy physics research

  16. Energy calibration of the jets in the experiment D0; Etalonnage de l'energie des jets dans l'experience D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coss, J

    2003-12-15

    This thesis have been performed in the D0 group of the Nuclear Physics Institute at Lyon. This work is about the calibration of the jets in the D0 experiment located on the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron. I studied the Jet Offset Correction and we have proposed a new method to calibrate the b-jets. We have calculated the response of the calorimeter for these jets in the 'photon + b - jets' events. (author)

  17. Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

    1995-03-01

    The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6 degrees K and LN 2 for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed

  18. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in the lepton+jets channel in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 1 (2011), "012008-1"-"012008-18" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08047 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : D0 * Tevatron * pair production * lepton * bottom * jet Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.558, year: 2011

  19. Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LEP II probes of minimal and string-motivated supergravity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.; Gunion, J.F.; Kao, C.; Pois, H.

    1995-01-01

    We explore the ability of the Fermilab Tevatron to probe minimal supersymmetry with high-energy-scale boundary conditions motivated by supersymmetry breaking in the context of minimal and string-motivated supergravity theory. A number of boundary condition possibilities are considered: dilatonlike string boundary conditions applied at the standard GUT unification scale or alternatively at the string scale; and extreme (''no-scale'') minimal supergravity boundary conditions imposed at the GUT scale or string scale. For numerous specific cases within each scenario the sparticle spectra are computed and then fed into ISAGET 7.07 so that explicit signatures can be examined in detail. We find that, for some of the boundary condition choices, large regions of parameter space can be explored via same-sign dilepton and isolated trilepton signals. For other choices, the mass reach of Tevatron collider experiments is much more limited. We also compare the mass reach of Tevatron experiments with the corresponding reach at CERN LEP 200

  20. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, hadronic top decays with the D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegeman, Jeroen Guido [Univ. of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2009-01-16

    is important to measure the cross section (or branching fraction) in each channel independently to fully verify the standard model. Top quark pair production proceeds through the strong interaction, placing the scene for top quark physics at hadron colliders. This adds an additional challenge: the huge background from multi-jet QCD processes. At the Tevatron, for example, t$\\bar{t}$ production is completely hidden in light q$\\bar{q}$ pair production. The light (i.e. not bottom or top) quark pair production cross section is six orders of magnitude larger than that for t$\\bar{t}$ production. Even including the full signature of hadronic t$\\bar{t}$ decays, two b-jets and four additional jets, the QCD cross section for processes with similar signature is more than five times larger than for t$\\bar{t}$ production. The presence of isolated leptons in the (semi)leptonic t$\\bar{t}$ decay channels provides a clear characteristic to distinguish the t$\\bar{t}$ signal from QCD background but introduces a multitude of W- and Z-related backgrounds.

  1. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, hadronic top decays with the D0 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegeman, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    branching fraction) in each channel independently to fully verify the standard model. Top quark pair production proceeds through the strong interaction, placing the scene for top quark physics at hadron colliders. This adds an additional challenge: the huge background from multi-jet QCD processes. At the Tevatron, for example, t(bar t) production is completely hidden in light q(bar q) pair production. The light (i.e. not bottom or top) quark pair production cross section is six orders of magnitude larger than that for t(bar t) production. Even including the full signature of hadronic t(bar t) decays, two b-jets and four additional jets, the QCD cross section for processes with similar signature is more than five times larger than for t(bar t) production. The presence of isolated leptons in the (semi)leptonic t(bar t) decay channels provides a clear characteristic to distinguish the t(bar t) signal from QCD background but introduces a multitude of W- and Z-related backgrounds

  2. A realtime feedback microprocessor for the TEVATRON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrup, D.A.; Chapman, L.; Franck, A.; Groves, T.; Lublinsky, B.

    1993-01-01

    A feedback microprocessor has been built for the TEVATRON. Its inputs are realtime accelerator measurements, data describing the state of the TEVATRON, and ramp tables. The microprocessor includes a finite state machine. Each state corresponds to a specific TEVATRON operation. Transitions between states are initiated by the global TEVATRON clock. Each state includes a cyclic routine which is called periodically and where all calculations are performed. The output corrections are inserted onto a fast TEVATRON-wide link from which the power supplies will read the realtime correction. The authors also store all of the input data and output corrections in a set of buffers which can easily be retrieved for diagnostic analysis. This talk will describe use of this device to control the TEVATRON tunes and discuss other uses

  3. Applying EVM principles to Tevatron Beam Position Monitor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Bakul

    2005-01-01

    At Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), the Tevatron high energy particle collider must meet the increasing scientific demand of higher beam luminosity. To achieve this higher luminosity goal, U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a major upgrade of capabilities of Fermilab's accelerator complex that spans five years and costs over fifty million dollars. Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system upgrade is a part of this project, generally called RunII upgrade project. Since the purpose of the Tevatron collider is to detect the smashing of proton and anti-protons orbiting the circular accelerator in opposite directions, capability to detect positions of both protons and antiprotons at a high resolution level is a desirable functionality of the monitoring system. The original system was installed during early 1980s, along with the original construction of the Tevatron. However, electronic technology available in 1980s did not allow for the detection of significantly smaller resolution of antiprotons. The objective of the upgrade project is to replace the existing BPM system with a new system utilizing capabilities of modern electronics enhanced by a front-end software driven by a real-time operating software. The new BPM system is designed to detect both protons and antiprotons with increased resolution of up to an order of magnitude. The new system is capable of maintaining a very high-level of data integrity and system reliability. The system consists of 27 VME crates installed at 27 service buildings around the Tevatron ring servicing 236 beam position monitors placed underground, inside the accelerator tunnel. Each crate consists of a single Timing Generator Fanout module, custom made by Fermilab staff, one MVME processor card running VxWorks 5.5, multiple Echotek Digital Receiver boards complimented by custom made Filter Board. The VxWorks based front-end software communicates with the Main Accelerator Control software via a special

  4. High energy collider physics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchti, R.C.; Biswas, N.N.; Wayne, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    With the demise of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) Project, there was great concern that the technological developments for that accelerator and its associated detectors might well be lost in the aftermath. In the case of scintillating fiber tracking, such as not been the case. During the period 1990--1993, several tracking technologies were under development for SDC, including Scintillating Fiber Tracking, Straw-tubes, and Microstrip Gas Chambers. In summer 1990, several members of the Fiber Tracking Group (FTG) proposed the use of Scintillating Fiber Tracking to the D0 experiment at Fermilab. This proposal was accepted, and D0 now is building a 75,000 fiber channel tracking detector with readout via Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPC) which were devices pioneered by the SDC Fiber Tracking Group. In addition, all the preshower detectors for D0 also make use of fiber readout (in this case waveshifting fibers) and VLPC for photosensing. In February 1993, a full 7 months prior to cancellation of the SSC project by Congress, the SDC experiment rejected scintillating fiber tracking for further development. Fortunately for all concerned, the D0 experiment had already embraced this technology, so this important detector concept could be further developed, refined, and utilized for physics experimentation. In early 2000, data will be taken with the D0 fiber tracker to study Top Quarks, Beauty Particles, Electroweak Physics, QCD phenomena, and to search for new phenomena. The University of Notre Dame has played a fundamental and seminal role in the development and implementation of this detector technology. R. Ruchti has served as cospokesman of the Fiber Tracking Group since its inception in 1989, and has been a pioneer of fiber tracking technology since 1980. In addition, at least one other experiment at Fermilab, E835, has utilized scintillating fibers with VLPC readout to study Charmonium in proton-antiproton collisions using a gas-jet target in the Tevatron

  5. BFKL Tests at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goussiou, A.

    1997-06-01

    The azimuthal decorrelation of jets as a function of their rapidity separation and the dependence of the fraction of jet events with central rapidity gaps on the center of mass energy are studied in p anti p collisions at the Tevatron. The preliminary results on jet decorrelation are in disagreement with calculations based on the Leading Logarithmic Approximation for BFKL resummation. The preliminary results on the √s--dependence of the central rapidity gap events are in disagreement with the two-gluon model for color-singlet exchange

  6. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity micro + micro - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed

  7. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, David

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest in the possibility of positive-negative muon colliders was reflected in the second workshop on the Physics Potential and Development of Muon Colliders, held in Sausalito, California, from 16-19 November, with some 60 attendees. It began with an overview of the particle physics goals, detector constraints, the muon collider and mu cooling, and source issues. The major issue confronting muon development is the possible luminosity achievable. Two collider energies were considered: 200 + 200 GeV and 2 + 2 TeV. The major particle physics goals are the detection of the higgs boson(s) for the lower energy collider, together with WW scattering and supersymmetric particle discovery. At the first such workshop, held in Napa, California, in 1992, it was estimated that a luminosity of some 10 30 and 3 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 for the low and high energy collider might be achieved (papers from this meeting were published in the October issue of NIM). This was considered a somewhat conservative estimate at the time. At the Sausalito workshop the goal was to see if a luminosity of 10 32 to 10 34 for the two colliders might be achievable and usable by a detector. There were five working groups - physics, 200 + 200 GeV collider, 2 + 2 TeV collider, detector design and backgrounds, and muon cooling and production methods. Considerable progress was made in all these areas at the workshop.

  8. Measurement of the Bottom Quark Production Cross-Section in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center-of-Mass Energy 630-GeV Using Muons with Associated Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Kevin Patrick [Arizona U.

    1999-01-01

    We have measured the b-quark production cross section for |y| < 1 using a sample of muons with associated jets collected with the DØ detector in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 630 GeV$ at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measured b-quark cross section is consistent in shape with $O {(\\alpha^3_s)}$ QCD predictions, but exceeds them in normalization by roughly a factor of 2.5.

  9. Experimental and numerical studies on the proposed application of hollow electron beam collimation for the LHC at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Moens, Vince; Redaelli, Stefano; Rivkin, Leonid

    This thesis work was carried out in the framework of U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (USLARP), a collaboration between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the U.S. Department of Energy. The first half of the work was completed at Fermilab (USA), the location of the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider and the second largest particle collider in the world. The second half was completed at CERN (Switzerland), the location of the largest proton collider in the world (Large Hadron Collider (LHC)).\

  10. Parton distribution and Tevatron jet data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekhin, S.; Bluemlein, J.; Moch, S.

    2011-05-01

    We study the impact of Tevatron jet data on a global fit of parton distribution functions and on the determination of the value of the strong coupling constant α s (M Z ). The consequences are illustrated for cross sections of Higgs boson production at Tevatron and the LHC. (orig.)

  11. Super High Energy Colliding Beam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    This lecture presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evolution of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 kilometer tunnel of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachie in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particle.

  12. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium in Evian

    CERN Multimedia

    Ludwik Dobrzynski and Emmanuel Tsesmelis

    The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian from 16 to 20 November 2009. The Hadron Collider Physics Symposium series has been a major forum for presentations of physics at the Tevatron over the past two decades. The merger of the former Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics with the LHC Symposium in 2005 brought together the Tevatron and LHC communities in a single forum. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian, on the shores of Lake Geneva, from 16-20 November 2009, some 17 years after the historic ECFA-CERN Evian meeting in March 1992 when Expressions of Interest for LHC detectors were presented for the first time. The 2009 event was organized jointly by CERN and the French high-energy physics community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). More than 170 people registered for this symposium. This year’s symposium was held at an important time for both the Tevatron and the LHC. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sam...

  13. Ageing collider throws up hint or dark matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Ananthaswamy, Anil

    2008-01-01

    "Never mind the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, its ageing predecessor may have discovered a new and unexpected kind of particle. The announcement last week from the Tevatron particle accelerator at Fermilab in Batavai, Illinois, provided some excitement amid the frustration of ongoing repairs to the LHC."

  14. The first colliders: AdA, VEP-1 and Princeton-Stanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    The idea of exploring collisions in the center-of-mass system to fully exploit the energy of the accelerated particles had been given serious consideration by the Norwegian engineer and inventor Rolf Wideröe, who applied for a patent on the idea in 1943 (and got the patent in 1953 [1]) after considering the kinematic advantage of keeping the center of mass at rest to produce larger momentum transfers. Describing this advantage, G. K. O'Neill, one of the collider pioneers, wrote in 1956 [2]: "... as accelerators of higher and higher energy are built, their usefulness is limited by the fact that the energy available for creating new particles is measured in the center-of-mass system of the target nucleon and the bombarding particle. In the relativistic limit, this energy rises only as the square root of the accelerator energy. However, if two particles of equal energy traveling in opposite directions could be made to collide, the available energy would be twice the whole energy of one particle ... " Therefore, no kinetic energy is wasted by the motion of the center of mass of the system, and the available reaction energy ER = 2Ebeam (while a particle with the same energy Ebeam colliding with another particle of the mass m at rest produces only ER = (2Ebeamm)1/2 in the extreme relativistic case). One can also add that the colliders are "cleaner" machines with respect to the fixed-target ones since the colliding beams do not interact with the target materials. The other advantage is that it is much easier to organize collisions of beams composed of matter-antimatter particles, like in electron-positron and proton-antiproton colliders...

  15. The first colliders: AdA, VEP-1 and Princeton-Stanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-07-11

    The idea of exploring collisions in the center-of-mass system to fully exploit the energy of the accelerated particles had been given serious consideration by the Norwegian engineer and inventor Rolf Wideröe, who had applied for a patent on the idea in 1943 (and got the patent in 1953 [1]) after considering the kinematic advantage of keeping the center of mass at rest to produce larger momentum transfers. Describing this advantage G.K.O’Neill, one of the collider pioneers, wrote in 1956 [2]: “…as accelerators of higher and higher energy are built, their usefulness is limited by the fact that the energy available for creating new particles is measured in the center-of-mass system of the target nucleon and the bombarding particle. In the relativistic limit, this energy rises only as the square root of the accelerator energy. However, if two particles of equal energy traveling in opposite directions could be made to collide, the available energy would be twice the whole energy of one particle...” Therefore, no kinetic energy is wasted by the motion of the center of mass of the system, and the available reaction energy ER = 2Ebeam (while a particle with the same energy Ebeam colliding with another particle of the mass m at rest produces only ER = (2Ebeam m)½ in the extreme relativistic case.) One can also add that the colliders are “cleaner” machines with respect to the fixed target ones since the colliding beams do not interact with the target materials. The other advantage is that it is much easier to organize collisions of beams composed of matter-antimatter particles, like in electron-positron and proton-antiproton colliders.

  16. Twistor Spinoffs for Collider Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Lance

    2006-01-01

    In the coming decade, the search for the Higgs boson, and for new particles representing physics beyond the Standard Model, will be carried out by colliding protons at the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. A collision of two protons, each of which is made out of quarks and gluons, is inherently messy. Feynman likened it to smashing two Swiss watches together to figure out how they work. In recent decades, we have learned better how the Swiss watches work, using the theory of quark-gluon interactions, quantum chromodynamics. Armed with this knowledge, we can better predict the results of collisions at the Tevatron and the LHC, to see whether the Standard Model holds up or fails, or whether new particles are in the data. But a major bottleneck is simply in adding up Feynman diagrams, for which the rules are well known, yet there can be thousands of extremely complicated diagrams. In fact, the sum of all diagrams is often much simpler than the typical one, suggesting hidden symmetries and better ways to compute. In the past two years, spinoffs from a new theory, 'twistor string theory', have led to very efficient alternatives to Feynman diagrams for making such predictions, as I will explain.

  17. Theory-motivated benchmark models and superpartners at the Fermilab Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, G.L.; Nelson, Brent D.; Wang Liantao; Wang, Ting T.; Lykken, J.; Mrenna, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Recently published benchmark models have contained rather heavy superpartners. To test the robustness of this result, several benchmark models have been constructed based on theoretically well-motivated approaches, particularly string-based ones. These include variations on anomaly- and gauge-mediated models, as well as gravity mediation. The resulting spectra often have light gauginos that are produced in significant quantities at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, or will be at a 500 GeV linear collider. The signatures also provide interesting challenges for the CERN LHC. In addition, these models are capable of accounting for electroweak symmetry breaking with less severe cancellations among soft supersymmetry breaking parameters than previous benchmark models

  18. Long-range beam-beam interactions in the Tevatron: Comparing simulation to tune shift data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saritepe, S.; Michelotti, L.; Peggs, S.

    1990-07-01

    Fermilab upgrade plans for the collider operation include a separation scheme in the Tevatron, in which protons and antiprotons are placed on separate helical orbits. The average separation distance between the closed orbits will be 5σ (σ of the proton bunch) except at the interaction regions, B0 and D0, where they collide head-on. The maximum beam-beam total tune shift in the Tevatron is approximately 0.024 (the workable tune space between 5th and 7th order resonances), which was reached in the 1988--1989 collider tun. Helical separation scheme allows us to increase the luminosity by reducing the total beam-beam tune shift. The number of bunches per beam will be 6 in the 1991 collider tun, to be increased to 36 in the following collider runs. To test the viability of this scenario, helical orbit studies are being conducted. The most recent studies concentrated on the injection of 36 proton bunches, procedures related to opening and closing of the helix, the feed-down circuits and the beam-beam interaction. In this paper, we present the results of the beam-beam interaction studies only. Our emphasis is on the tune shift measurements and the comparison to simulation. 4 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Min-Bias at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, Rick

    2007-01-01

    As illustrated in Fig. 1, the total proton-antiproton cross section is the sum of the elastic and inelastic components, σ tot = σ EL + σ IN . The inelastic cross section consists of three terms; single diffraction, double-diffraction, and everything else (referred to as the 'hard core'), σ IN = σ SD + σ DD + σ HC . For elastic scattering neither of the beam particles breaks apart (i.e. color singlet exchange). For single and double diffraction one or both of the beam particles are excited into a high mass color singlet state (i.e. N* states) which then decays. Single and double diffraction also corresponds to color singlet exchange between the beam hadrons. When color is exchanged the outgoing remnants are no longer color singlets and one has a separation of color resulting in a multitude of quark-antiquark pairs being pulled out of the vacuum. The 'hard core' component, σ HC , involves color exchange and the separation of color. However, the 'hard core' contribution has both a 'soft' and 'hard' component. Most of the time the color exchange between partons in the beam hadrons occurs through a soft interaction (i.e. no high transverse momentum) and the two beam hadrons 'ooze' through each other producing lots of soft particles with a uniform distribution in rapidity and many particles flying down the beam pipe. Occasionally there is a hard scattering among the constituent partons producing outgoing particles and 'jets' with high transverse momentum

  20. Cryogenic testing and analysis associated with Tevatron lower temperature operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    An upgrade of the Tevatron cryogenic system was installed and commissioned in 1993 to allow lower temperature operation. As a result, higher energy operation is possible. Following the installation and initial commissioning, it was decided to continue the current colliding beam physics at the previous energy of 900 GeV. This has allowed us to perform parasitic lower temperature tests in the Tevatron over the last year and a half. This paper presents the results of operational experiences and thermal and hydraulic testing which has taken place. The primary goal of the testing is to better understand the operation of the cold compressor system, associated instrumentation, and the performance of the existing magnet system during lower temperature operation. This will lead to a tentatively scheduled higher energy test run in the fall of 1995. The test results have shown that more elaborate controlling methods are necessary in order to achieve reliable system operation. Fortunately, our new satellite refrigerator controls system is capable of the expansion necessary to reach our goal. New features are being added to the control system which will allow for more intelligent control and better diagnostics for component monitoring and trending

  1. Measurements of Top Properties at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husemann, Ulrich; Yale U.

    2007-01-01

    The large data samples of thousands of top events collected at the Tevatron experiments CDF and D(O) allow for a variety of measurements to analyze the properties of the top quark. Guided by the question ''Is the top quark observed at the Tevatron really the top quark of the standard model,'' we present Tevatron analyses studying the top production mechanism including resonant t(bar t) production, the V -A structure of the t → Wb decay vertex, the charge of the top quark, and single-top production via flavor-changing neutral currents

  2. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  3. Colliding druthers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Johnson, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    Recommendations are made to maximize the usefulness of the colliding beam facility of the Main Ring and Energy Doubler at the Fermilab accelerator. The advantages of the transposed crossing geometry over the kissing geometry are pointed out

  4. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  5. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  6. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  7. Precision electroweak physics at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Eric B.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of Tevatron electroweak measurements performed by the CDF and Dφ experiments is presented. The current status and future prospects for high precision measurements of electroweak parameters and detailed studies of boson production are highlighted. (author)

  8. Tevatron alignment issues 2003-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volk, J.T.; Annala, J.; Elementi, L.; Gelfand, N.; Gollwitzer, K.E.; Greenwood, J.; Martens, M.; Moore, C.; Nobrega, A.; Russell, A.D.; Shiltsev, V.; Stefanski, R.; Sager, T.; Syphers, M.J.; Wojcik, G.

    2005-01-01

    It was observed during the early part of Run II that dipole corrector currents in the Tevatron were changing over time. Measurement of the roll for dipoles and quadrupoles confirmed that there was a slow and systematic movement of the magnets from their ideal position. A simple system using a digital protractor and laptop computer was developed to allow roll measurements of all dipoles and quadrupoles. These measurements showed that many magnets in the Tevatron had rolled more than 1 milliradian. To aid in magnet alignment a new survey network was built in the Tevatron tunnel. This network is based on the use of free centering laser tracker. During the measurement of the network coordinates for all dipole, quadrupole and corrector magnets were obtained. This paper discusses roll measurement techniques and data, the old and new Tevatron alignment network

  9. Bunch coalescing and bunch rotation in the Fermilab Main Ring: Operational experience and comparison with simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.S.; Wildman, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron I proton-antiproton collider project requires that the Fermilab Main Ring produce intense bunches of protons and antiprotons for injection into the Tevatron. The process of coalescing a small number of harmonic number h=1113 bunches into a single bunch by bunch-rotating in a lower harmonic rf system is described.The Main Ring is also required to extract onto the antiproton production target bunches with as narrow a time spread as possible. This operation is also discussed. The operation of the bunch coalescing and bunch rotation are compared with simulations using the computer program ESME. 2 refs., 8 figs

  10. Collider and Detector Protection at Beam Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Drozhdin, A. I.

    2003-12-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occured at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  11. Seismic studies for Fermilab future collider projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauh, J.; Shiltsev, V.

    1997-11-01

    Ground motion can cause significant beam emittance growth and orbit oscillations in large hadron colliders due to a vibration of numerous focusing magnets. Larger accelerator ring circumference leads to smaller revolution frequency and, e.g. for the Fermilab Very Large Hadron Collider(VLHC) 50-150 Hz vibrations are of particular interest as they are resonant with the beam betatron frequency. Seismic measurements at an existing large accelerator under operation can help to estimate the vibrations generated by the technical systems in future machines. Comparison of noisy and quiet microseismic conditions might be useful for proper choice of technical solutions for future colliders. This article presents results of wide-band seismic measurements at the Fermilab site, namely, in the tunnel of the Tevatron and on the surface nearby, and in two deep tunnels in the Illinois dolomite which is though to be a possible geological environment of the future accelerators

  12. Collider and Detector Protection at Beam Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section

  13. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section

  14. Study and optimal correction of a systematic skew quadrupole field in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snopok, Pavel; Johnstone, Carol; Berz, Martin; Ovsyannikov, Dmitry A.; Ovsyannikov, Alexander D.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing demands for luminosity in existing and future colliders have made lattice design and error tolerance and correction critical to achieving performance goals. The current state of the Tevatron collider is an example, with a strong skew quadrupole error present in the operational lattice. This work studies the high-order performance of the Tevatron and the strong nonlinear behavior introduced when a significant skew quadrupole error is combined with conventional sextupole correction, a behavior still clearly evident after optimal tuning of available skew quadrupole circuits. An optimization study is performed using different skew quadrupole families, and, importantly, local and global correction of the linear skew terms in maps generated by the code COSY INFINITY [M. Berz, COSY INFINITY version 8.1 user's guide and reference manual, Department of Physics and Astronomy MSUHEP-20704, Michigan State University (2002). URL http://cosy.pa.msu.edu/cosymanu/index.html]. Two correction schemes with one family locally correcting each arc and eight independent correctors in the straight sections for global correction are proposed and shown to dramatically improve linearity and performance of the baseline Tevatron lattice

  15. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e + e - linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR

  16. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  17. Stop Lepton Associated Production at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, A; Plehn, Tilman

    2003-01-01

    At hadron colliders, the search for R-parity violating supersymmetry can probe scalar masses beyond what is covered by pair production processes. We evaluate the next-to-leading order SUSY-QCD corrections to the associated stop or sbottom production with a lepton through R-parity violating interactions. We show that higher order corrections render the theoretical predictions more stable with respect to variations of the renormalization and factorization scales and that the total cross section is enhanced by a factor up to 70% at the Tevatron and 50% at the LHC. We investigate in detail how the heavy supersymmetric states decouple from the next-to-leading order process, which gives rise to a theory with an additional scalar leptoquark. In this scenario the inclusion of higher order QCD corrections increases the Tevatron reach on leptoquark masses by up to 40 GeV and the LHC reach by up to 200 GeV.

  18. Tevatron HTS power lead test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feher, S.; Carcagno, R.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Two pairs of ASC 6 kA power leads developed for the Tevatron were successfully tested at Fermilab at over-current conditions. Stable operation was achieved while operating at a current of 9.56 kA for five hours and while continuously ramping between 0-9.56 kA at a ramp rate of 200 A/s for one hour. The minimum required liquid nitrogen flow rate was measured to be 1.5 g/s at 10 kA. After ramping up to 10 kA at 200A/s, it took only 15 minutes to stabilize the upper copper section of the lead with a flow of 1.8 g/s of liquid nitrogen vapor. Testing under extreme operating conditions--270-370 kPa liquid nitrogen vapor pressure and over 0.1 T external magnetic field--demonstrated that the HTS part of the lead can safely operate in the current sharing mode and that this design has large operating margin

  19. Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, J.

    2001-01-01

    After several years of study e''+ e''- linear colliders in the TeV range have emerged as the major and optimal high-energy physics projects for the post-LHC era. These notes summarize the present status form the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC era. These notes summarize the present status, from the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC is expected to provide first discoveries in the new energy domain, whereas an e''+ e''- linear collider in the 500 GeV-1 TeV will be able to complement it to an unprecedented level of precision in any possible areas: Higgs, signals beyond the SM and electroweak measurements. It is evident that the Linear Collider program will constitute a major step in the understanding of the nature of the new physics beyond the Standard Model. (Author) 22 refs

  20. Deterioration of the Skew Quadrupole Moment in Tevatron Dipoles Over Time

    CERN Document Server

    Syphers, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    During the 20 years since it was first commissioned, the Fermilab Tevatron has developed strong coupling between the two transverse degrees of freedom. A circuit of skew quadrupole magnets is used to correct for coupling and, though capable, its required strength has increased since 1983 by more than an order of magnitude. In more recent years changes to the Tevatron for colliding beams operation have altered the skew quadrupole corrector distribution and strong local coupling become evident, often encumbering routine operation during the present physics run. Detailed magnet measurements were performed on each individual magnet during construction, and in early 2003 it was realized that measurements could be performed on the magnets in situ which could determine coil movements within the iron yoke since the early 1980's. It was discovered that the superconducting coils had become vertically displaced relative to their yokes since their construction. The ensuing systematic skew quadrupole field introduced by t...

  1. Future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    The high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, pp), of lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders are considered. Technical arguments for increased energy in each type of machine are presented. Their relative size, and the implications of size on cost are discussed

  2. Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  3. The Next Linear Collider Design: NLC 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Alberta

    2001-08-21

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  4. The Next Linear Collider Design: NLC 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Alberta

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e + e - linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider

  5. Combination of Tevatron searches for the standard model Higgs boson in the W+W- decay mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaltonen, T.; et al., [Unknown; Ancu, L.S.; de Jong, S.J.; Filthaut, F.; Galea, C.F.; Hegeman, J.G.; Houben, P.; Meijer, M.M.; Svoisky, P.; van den Berg, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W+W-. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb(-1) of p (p) over bar collisions at root s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No excess is observed above background

  6. Channeling and Volume Reflection Based Crystal Collimation of Tevatron Circulating Beam Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V.; Drozhdin, A.; Johnson, T.; Legan, A.; Mokhov, N.; Reilly, R.; Still, D.; Tesarek, R.; Zagel, J.; Peggs, S.; Assmann, R.; Previtali, V.; Scandale, W.; Chesnokov, Y.; Yazynin, I.; Guidi, V.; Ivanov, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The T980 crystal collimation experiment is underway at the Tevatron to determine if this technique could increase 980 GeV beam-halo collimation efficiency at high-energy hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the LHC. T980 also studies various crystal types and parameters. The setup has been substantially enhanced during the Summer 2009 shutdown by installing a new O-shaped crystal in the horizontal goniometer, as well as adding a vertical goniometer with two alternating crystals (O-shaped and multi-strip) and additional beam diagnostics. First measurements with the new system are quite encouraging, with channeled and volume-reflected beams observed on the secondary collimators as predicted. Investigation of crystal collimation efficiencies with crystals in volume reflection and channeling modes are described in comparison with an amorphous primary collimator. Results on the system performance are presented for the end-of-store studies and for entire collider stores. The first investigation of colliding be...

  7. SUSY Without Prejudice at Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, T.

    2008-01-01

    We explore the physics of the general CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation, the pMSSM. The 19 soft SUSY breaking parameters are chosen so to satisfy all existing experimental and theoretical constraints assuming that the WIMP is the lightest neutralino. We scan this parameter space twice using both flat and log priors and compare the results which yield similar conclusions. Constraints from both LEP and the Tevatron play an important role in obtaining our final model samples. Implications for future TeV-scale e + e - linear colliders (LC) are discussed

  8. Measurement of the differential γ + c-jet cross section and the ratio of differential γ + c and γ + b cross sections in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 719, 4-5 (2013), s. 354-361 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : D0 * harm * associated production * bottom * associated production * parton * distribution function * quantum chromodynamics * perturbation theory * anti-p p Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 6.019, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0370269313000580

  9. Strong and weak production of beauty and charm at the CERN p anti p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransdell, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Beauty and charm production has been studied in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 630 GeV with the UA1 detector at the CERN collider. Clear evidence for strong production of b- and c-quarks has been obtained. The feasibility of observing hadronic decays of the W and Z intermediate vector bosons in the channels W → cs, Z → cc, bb was investigated. Beauty and charm was identified from their semileptonic decays by the presence of a muon in or near a jet. The analysis was performed on a sample of 20,000 muon trigger events containing jets in which the reconstructed muon has a transverse momentum greater than 6 GeV/c. The integrated luminosity of the sample was 573 nb -1 . The detailed kinematics of the muon-jet events are in excellent agreement with the predictions of QCD for beauty and charm strong production. The QCD expectations were calculated with the ISAJET Monte Carlo in conjunction with a full simulation of the UA1 detector. No evidence for W/Z → c/b was observed in the invariant mass distribution of the jet-jet-μ-υ system. The mass resolution achieved was ±20%. The measured strong beauty and charm cross sections imply a signal to noise ratio of 1/50 for standard model W and Z cross sections

  10. Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

  11. Hard diffraction at HERA and Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidalov, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A relation between hard diffraction at HERA and Tevatron is discussed. A model, which takes into account unitarity effects is developed for interaction of high-energy virtual photons with nucleons. It is shown that this model gives a good description of HERA data on both total γ* p total cross section and diffractive dissociation of virtual photons in a broad region of Q 2 . It is shown how to describe the CDF data on diffractive jet production at Tevatron using an information on distribution of partons in the Pomeron from HERA experiments

  12. Evading the top-quark mass bound at the Fermilab Tevatron: New signals for the top quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyaya, B.; Nandi, S.

    1991-01-01

    If an SU(2)-singlet charge-2/3 quark exists, current data allow a wide range for the parameters of the 4x4 mixing matrix in which the usual ''hard-lepton'' signal of the top quark is suppressed. For a light Higgs boson, the top quark decays predominantly via the flavor-changing Yukawa interaction, thus evading the Fermilab Tevatron bounds on its mass. For a heavier Higgs boson, flavor-changing neutral-current decays become important, giving rise to anomalous Z-pair production, testable at the upgraded Tevetron, at the CERN Large Hardon Collider, and at the Superconducting Super Collider

  13. Colliding muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Is a muon-muon collider really practical? That is the question being asked by Bob Palmer. Well known in particle physics, Palmer, with Nick Samios and Ralph Shutt, recently won the American Physical Society's Panofsky Prize for their 1964 discovery of the omega minus. As well as contributing to other major experiments, both at CERN and in the US, he has contributed ideas to stochastic cooling and novel acceleration schemes

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Missing Transverse Energy and $b$-quark Final States Using Proton-Antiproton Collisions at 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorland, Tyler McMillan [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson is performed in 6.4 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the DØ detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The final state considered is a pair of jets originating from b quarks and missing transverse energy, as expected from p$\\bar{p}$ → ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ production. The search is also sensitive to the WH → ℓvb$\\bar{b}$ channel, where the charged lepton is not identified. Boosted decision trees are used to discriminate signal from background. Good agreement is observed between data and expected backgrounds, and a limit is set at 95% C.L. on the section multiplied by branching fraction of (p$\\bar{p}$ → (Z/W)H) x (H → b$\\bar{b}$). For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV, the observed limit is a factor of 3.5 larger than the value expected from the standard model.

  15. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Missing Transverse Energy and b-jet signature in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apresyan, Artur [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2009-05-01

    We report on the results of a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb-1. We consider events having no identified charged leptons, a large imbalance in transverse momentum, and two or three jets where at least one jet contains a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b hadron. The main backgrounds are modeled with innovative techniques using data. The sensitivity of the search is optimized using multivariate discriminant techniques. We find good agreement between data and the standard model predictions. We place 95% confidence level upper limits on production cross section times branching ratio for several Higgs boson masses ranging from 110 GeV=c2 to 150 GeV=c2. For a mass of 115 GeV=c2 the observed (expected) limit is 6.9 (5.6) times the standard model prediction.

  16. A Measurement of Bottom Quark Production in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.8-TeV.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huehn, Thorsten Bernhard [UC, Riverside

    1995-12-01

    We present a measurement of the bottom quark production cross section at a center of mass energy of 1.8 TeV in the rapidity region $\\mid y \\mid$ < 1 and the transverse momentum range 13 to 37 GeV=c. The measurement is extracted from a dataset of 2707 events containing muons and jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $228nb^{-1}$, taken during the 1992-93 collider run of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab. The measurement is about two standard deviations above QCD predictions, but is consistent with it within measurement uncertainties and uncertainties in the QCD calculation

  17. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Searches for New Particles and Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toback, David [Texas A-M; ŽIvković, Lidija [Belgrade U.

    2015-02-17

    We present a summary of results for searches for new particles and interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF and the D0 experiments. These include results from Run I as well as Run II for the time period up to July 2014. We focus on searches for supersymmetry, as well as other models of new physics such as new fermions and bosons, various models of excited fermions, leptoquarks, technicolor, hidden-valley model particles, long-lived particles, extra dimensions, dark matter particles, and signature-based searches.

  18. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass by Dynamical Likelihood Method using the Lepton + Jets Events with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Taichi [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2008-02-01

    We have measured the top quark mass with the dynamical likelihood method. The data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.7fb-1 was collected in proton antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV with the CDF detector at Fermilab Tevatron during the period March 2002-March 2007. We select t$\\bar{t}$ pair production candidates by requiring one high energy lepton and four jets, in which at least one of jets must be tagged as a b-jet. In order to reconstruct the top quark mass, we use the dynamical likelihood method based on maximum likelihood method where a likelihood is defined as the differential cross section multiplied by the transfer function from observed quantities to parton quantities, as a function of the top quark mass and the jet energy scale(JES). With this method, we measure the top quark mass to be 171.6 ± 2.0 (stat.+ JES) ± 1.3(syst.) = 171.6 ± 2.4 GeV/c2.

  19. Comparison of discovery limits for extra Z bosons at future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, S.

    1995-01-01

    We study and compare the discovery potential for heavy neutral gauge bosons (Z') at various e + e - and pp (-) colliders that are planned or have been proposed. Typical discovery limits are for the Fermilab Tevatron ∼1 TeV, Di-Tevatron ∼2 TeV, CERN LHC ∼4 TeV, LSGNA (a 60 TeV pp collider) ∼13 TeV while the e + e - discovery limits are 2--10x √s with the large variation reflecting the model dependence of the limits. While both types of colliders have comparable discovery limits the hadron colliders are generally less dependent on the specific Z' model and provide more robust limits since the signal has little background. In contrast, discovery limits for e + e - limits are more model dependent and, because they are based on indirect inferences of deviations from standard model predictions, they are more sensitive to systematic errors

  20. Searching for doubly-charged Higgs bosons at future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunion, J.F.; Pitts, K.T.

    1996-10-01

    Doubly-charged Higgs bosons (Δ -- /Δ ++ ) appear in several extensions to the Standard Model and can be relatively light. We review the theoretical motivation for these states and present a study of the discovery reach in future runs of the Fermilab Tevatron for pair-produced doubly-charged Higgs bosons decaying to like-sign lepton pairs. We also comment on the discovery potential at other future colliders. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Higgs-photon associated production at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasabadi, A.; Repko, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    The authors present cross sections for the reactions p anti p → Hγ and pp → Hγ arising from the subprocess q anti q → Hγ. The calculation includes the complete one-loop contribution from all light quarks and is the main source of Higgs-photon associated production in hadron colliders. At Tevatron energies, the cross section is typically 0.1 fb or less, while at LHC energies it can exceed 1.0fb

  2. Are PDFs still consistent with Tevatron data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Zack

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As active data taking has moved to the LHC at CERN, more and more LHC data have been included into fits of parton distribution functions. An anomaly has arisen where formerly excellent agreement between theoretical predictions and experiment in single-top-quark production at the Tevatron is no longer quite as good. Is this indicative of a deeper issue?

  3. Photon final states at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanelli, Mario; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The authors present here several recent measurements involving associate production of photons and jets at the Tevatron. In particular, inclusive photon + met from D0, and photon + b-jets and photon + b-jet + leptons + MET from CDF are described in some detail. These measurements offer a good test of QCD predictions in rather complex final states.

  4. The search for quark-gluon plasma at E735

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findeisen, Ch.

    1989-01-01

    The experiment E735 was designed to measure soft p t physics in proton-antiproton interactions at √s=1.8 TeV performed at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Some ideas related to Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) are recalled with emphasis on their applications to E735. The experiment E735 measures minimum-bias soft p t events in proton-antiproton interactions at √s=1.8 TeV. One goal of E735 is to search for signs of a deconfined hadronic phase produced in the central region. Some results including particle identified spectra are presented from the first run in 1987. (R.P.) 25 refs.; 13 figs

  5. An investigation of triply heavy baryon production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Gomshi Nobary, M A

    2006-01-01

    The triply heavy baryons have a rather diverse mass range. While some of them possess considerable production rates at existing facilities, others need to be produced at future high energy colliders. Here we study the direct fragmentation production of the Ωccc and Ωbbb baryons as the prototypes of triply heavy baryons at the hadron colliders with different . We present and compare the transverse momentum distributions of the differential cross sections, distributions of total cross sections and the integrated total cross sections of these states at the RHIC, the Tevatron Run II and the CERN LHC.

  6. An investigation of triply heavy baryon production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomshi Nobary, M.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Center for Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, AEOI, Roosbeh Building, PO Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: mnobary@razi.ac.ir; Sepahvand, R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-05-01

    The triply heavy baryons have a rather diverse mass range. While some of them possess considerable production rates at existing facilities, others need to be produced at future high energy colliders. Here we study the direct fragmentation production of the {omega}{sub ccc} and {omega}{sub bbb} baryons as the prototypes of triply heavy baryons at the hadron colliders with different s. We present and compare the transverse momentum distributions of the differential cross sections, p{sub T}{sup min} distributions of total cross sections and the integrated total cross sections of these states at the RHIC, the Tevatron Run II and the CERN LHC.

  7. Supersymmetric Higgs pair discovery prospects at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, A; Éboli, Oscar J P; Mizukoshi, J K; Novaes, S F

    2000-01-01

    We study the potential of hadron colliders in the search for the pair production of neutral Higgs bosons in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Using analytical expressions for the relevant amplitudes, we perform a detailed signal and background analysis, working out efficient kinematical cuts for the extraction of the signal. The important role of squark loop contributions to the signal is emphasised. If the signal is sufficiently enhanced by these contributions, it could even be observable at the next run of the upgraded Tevatron collider in the near future. At the LHC the pair production of light and heavy Higgs bosons might be detectable simultaneously.

  8. Probing the Higgs sector of high-scale SUSY-breaking models at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carena, Marcela; Liu, Tao

    2010-12-01

    A canonical signature of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is the presence of a neutral Higgs boson with mass bounded from above by about 135 GeV and Standard Model (SM)-like couplings to the electroweak gauge bosons. In this note we investigate the reach of the Tevatron collider for the MSSM Higgs sector parameter space associated with a variety of high-scale minimal models of supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking, including the Constrained MSSM (CMSSM), minimal Gauge Mediated SUSY-breaking (mGMSB), and minimal Anomaly Mediated SUSY-breaking (mAMSB). We find that the Tevatron can provide strong constraints on these models via Higgs boson searches. Considering a simple projection for the efficiency improvements in the Tevatron analyses, we find that with an integrated luminosity of 16 fb -1 per detector and an efficiency improvement of 20% compared to the present situation, these models could be probed essentially over their entire ranges of validity. With 40% analysis improvements and 16 fb -1 , our projection shows that evidence at the 3σ level for the light Higgs boson could be expected in extended regions of parameter space. (orig.)

  9. Probing the Higgs sector of high-scale SUSY-breaking models at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carena, Marcela [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Chicago Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.; Draper, Patrick [Chicago Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.; Heinemeyer, Sven [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Liu, Tao [Chicago Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.; California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wagner, Carlos E.M. [Chicago Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States). HEP Div.; Chicago Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). KICP and Dept. of Physics; Weiglein, Georg [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    A canonical signature of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is the presence of a neutral Higgs boson with mass bounded from above by about 135 GeV and Standard Model (SM)-like couplings to the electroweak gauge bosons. In this note we investigate the reach of the Tevatron collider for the MSSM Higgs sector parameter space associated with a variety of high-scale minimal models of supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking, including the Constrained MSSM (CMSSM), minimal Gauge Mediated SUSY-breaking (mGMSB), and minimal Anomaly Mediated SUSY-breaking (mAMSB). We find that the Tevatron can provide strong constraints on these models via Higgs boson searches. Considering a simple projection for the efficiency improvements in the Tevatron analyses, we find that with an integrated luminosity of 16 fb{sup -1} per detector and an efficiency improvement of 20% compared to the present situation, these models could be probed essentially over their entire ranges of validity. With 40% analysis improvements and 16 fb{sup -1}, our projection shows that evidence at the 3{sigma} level for the light Higgs boson could be expected in extended regions of parameter space. (orig.)

  10. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Gian Giudice; Ellis, Nick; Jakobs, Karl; Mage, Patricia; Seymour, Michael H; Spiropulu, Maria; Wilkinson, Guy; CERN-FNAL Summer School; Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    2007-01-01

    For the past few years, experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider have once again been exploring uncharted territory at the current energy frontier of particle physics. With CERN's LHC operations to start in 2007, a new era in the exploration of the fundamental laws of nature will begin. In anticipation of this era of discovery, Fermilab and CERN are jointly organizing a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", whose main goal is to offer a complete picture of both the theoretical and experimental aspects of hadron collider physics. Preparing young researchers to tackle the current and anticipated challenges at hadron colliders, and spreading the global knowledge required for a timely and competent exploitation of the LHC physics potential, are concerns equally shared by CERN, the LHC host laboratory, and by Fermilab, the home of the Tevatron and host of CMS's LHC Physics Center in the U.S. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is targeted particularly at young postdocs in exp...

  11. Discovering a Light Scalar or Pseudoscalar at The Large Hadron Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The allowed standard model Higgs mass range has been reduced to a region between 114 and 130 GeV or above 500 GeV, at the 99% confidence level, since the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program started. Furthermore some of the experiments at Tevatron and LHC observe excesses that could arise from...

  12. The impact of PDF and alphas uncertainties on Higgs Production in gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demartin, Federico; Forte, Stefano; Mariani, Elisa; Rojo, Juan; Vicini, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of uncertainties due to parton distributions and the strong coupling on the gluon-fusion production cross section of the Standard Model Higgs at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. We compare procedures and results when three recent sets of PDFs are used, CTEQ6.6, MSTW08

  13. Higgs-boson production with one bottom-quark jet at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, S.; Jackson, C.B.; Reina, L.; Wackeroth, D.

    2005-01-01

    We present total rates and kinematic distributions for the associated production of a single bottom quark and a Higgs boson at the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN Large Hardon Collider. We include next-to-leading order QCD corrections and compare the results obtained in the four and five flavor number schemes for parton distribution functions

  14. Operation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector with colliding beams at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Grieco, G.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Ristori, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F.; Bailey, M.W.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Kruse, M.C.; Shaw, N.M.; Carithers, W.C.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester, W.; Wong, M.; Yao, W.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T.R.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Skarha, J.; Snider, F.D.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S.; Amidei, D.; Derwent, P.F.; Song, T.Y.; Dunn, A.; Gold, M.; Matthews, J.; Bacchetta, N.; Azzi, P.; Bisello, D.; Busetto, G.; Castro, A.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Tipton, P.; Watts, G.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the main features of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) and discuss its performance during actual colliding beam operation at the Fermilab Tevatron. Details on S/N ratio, alignment, resolution and efficiency are given

  15. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronan (Editor), M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and

  16. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.

    2001-01-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e + e - linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e + e - linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e + e - linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e + e - experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and built in a few years, it would make

  17. A search for charged higgs boson decays of the top quark using hadronic decays of the tau lepton in proton-antiproton collisions at square √s = 1.8 TeV at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groer, Leslie Stevan [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    1999-01-26

    The Standard Model predicts the existence of one neutral scalar Higgs boson, which is a remnant of the mechanism that breaks the SU(2)LxU(1)Y electroweak symmetry and generates masses for the heavy vector bosons and fermions. Many extensions to the Standard Model predict two or more Higgs doublets, resulting in a larger spectrum of Higgs bosons including a charged Higgs boson (H±). For a light charged Higgs boson mass, the top decay into a charged Higgs boson and bottom quark might occur. This thesis presents results of a direct search for this top quark decay mode via the charged Higgs decay to a tau lepton and tau-neutrino, using the hadronic decays of the tau leptons. The search data consist of 100 pb-1 of Run 1 data collected between 1992-1995 at the CDF detector, from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV produced at Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator. A total of seven events are observed in two search channels with an expected background contribution of 7.4±2.0 events coming from fake taus (5.4±1.5), heavy vector boson decays with jets (1.9±1.3) and dibosons(0.08±0.06). Lacking evidence for a signal, we set limits on charged Higgs production at the 95% confidence level in the charged Higgs mass plane versus tanβ(a parameter of the theory) for a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c2 and for top production cross sections (σ t$\\bar{t}$) of 5.0 and 7.5 pb, assuming the Type-II Two-Higgs-Doublet-Model. For large tanβ, this analysis excludes a charged Higgs boson of mass below 147(158)GeV/c2 for σ t$\\bar{t}$=5.0(7.5)pb. Using the Standard Model measured top quark cross section from CDF, this limit increases to 168 GeV/c2 and we also exclude a branching fraction of top decays via this charged Higgs mode of greater than 43% for charged Higgs masses below 168 GeV/c2.

  18. Search prospects of light stabilized radions at Tevatron and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mahanta, U

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we use the conformal anomaly in QCD to derive the radion coupling to gluons in the Randall-Sundrum model and use it to compute the radion production cross section at hadron colliders by gluon fusion. We find that for the vacuum expectation value of the radion field, =1 TeV the radion production cross section by gluon fusion at LHC would exceed that of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson by a factor that lies between 7 and 8 over most of the mass range. The radion production cross-section decreases as 1/(/sup 2/) and for greater than 3 TeV, the Higgs production cross-section exceeds that of the radion production. The decay modes of the radion are similar to that of the SM Higgs boson. But the striking feature is the enhancement of radion to 2-photon and radion to 2-gluon branching ratio over the SM case. Utilizing this, we then discuss the possible search strategies of such scalars at the Tevatron and LHC. Using the gamma gamma decay mode one can explore /exclude a radion mass up to 1 TeV at the...

  19. Colliding nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, Roger; Remaud, Bernard; Suraud, E.; Durand, Dominique; Tamain, Bernard; Gobbi, A.; Cugnon, J.; Drapier, Olivier; Govaerts, Jan; Prieels, Rene

    1995-09-01

    This 14. international school Joliot-Curie of nuclear physic deals with nuclei in collision at high energy. Nine lectures are included in the proceedings of this summer school: 1 - From statistical mechanics outside equilibrium to transport equations (Balian, R.); 2 - Modeling of heavy ions reactions (Remaud, B.); 3 - Kinetic equations in heavy ions physics (Suraud, E.); 4 - Colliding nuclei near the Fermi energy (Durand, D.; Tamain, B.); 5 - From the Fermi to the relativistic energy domain: which observable? For which physics? (Gobbi, A.); 6 - Collisions at relativistic and ultra relativistic energies, Theoretical aspects (Cugnon, J.); 7 - Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures (Drapier, O.); 8 - Electroweak interaction: a window on physics beyond the standard model (Govaerts, J.); 9 - Symmetry tests in β nuclear process: polarization techniques (Prieels, R.)

  20. Reach of the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC for gaugino mediated SUSY breaking models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, Howard; Belyaev, Alexander; Krupovnickas, Tadas; Tata, Xerxes

    2002-01-01

    In supersymmetric models with gaugino mediated SUSY breaking (gMSB), it is assumed that SUSY breaking on a hidden brane is communicated to the visible brane via gauge superfields which propagate in the bulk. This leads to GUT models where the common gaugino mass m 1/2 is the only soft SUSY breaking term to receive contributions at the tree level. To obtain a viable phenomenology, it is assumed that the gaugino mass is induced at some scale M c beyond the GUT scale, and that additional renormalization group running takes place between M c and M GUT as in a SUSY GUT. We assume an SU(5) SUSY GUT above the GUT scale, and compute the SUSY particle spectrum expected in models with gMSB. We use the Monte Carlo program ISAJET to simulate signals within the gMSB model, and compute the SUSY reach including cuts and triggers appropriate to Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC experiments. We find no reach for SUSY by the Tevatron collider in the trilepton channel. At the CERN LHC, values of m 1/2 =1000 (1160) GeV can be probed with 10 (100) fb -1 of integrated luminosity, corresponding to a reach in terms of m g-tilde of 2150 (2500) GeV. The gMSB model and MSUGRA can likely only be differentiated at a linear e + e - collider with sufficient energy to produce sleptons and charginos

  1. Review of searches for Higgs bosons and beyond the standard model physics at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duperrin, Arnaud

    2009-01-01

    The energy frontier is currently at the Fermilab Tevatron accelerator, which collides protons and antiprotons at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The luminosity delivered to the CDF and DOe experiments has now surpassed the 4 fb -1 . This paper reviews the most recent direct searches for Higgs bosons and beyond-the-standard-model (BSM) physics at the tevatron. The results reported correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 2.5 fb -1 of Run II data collected by the two Collaborations. Searches covered include the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (including sensitivity projections), the neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM), charged Higgs bosons and extended Higgs models, supersymmetric decays that conserve or violate R-parity, gauge-mediated supersymmetric breaking models, long-lived particles, leptoquarks, compositeness, extra gauge bosons, extra dimensions, and finally signature-based searches. Given the excellent performance of the collider and the continued productivity of the experiments, the Tevatron physics potential looks promising for discovery with the coming larger data sets. In particular, evidence for the SM Higgs boson could be obtained if its mass is light or near 160 GeV. The observed (expected) upper limits are currently a factor of 3.7 (3.3) higher than the expected SM Higgs boson cross section at m H =115 GeV and 1.1(1.6) at m H =160 GeV at 95% C.L. (orig.)

  2. Tevatron B0 low beta tuning report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study of the low beta insertion for the B0 experimental area has been carried out and is described below. This insertion is similar to the Type C low beta previously report, anti p Note 169, although some changes have been made to the quadrupole lengths and positions. This insertion is designated Type E. The purpose of the study was to see if it is possible to turn the insertion on in a smooth and continuous manner and tune the insertion to a value of β* of less than one meter while maintaining the overall tune of the j Tevatron to a constant value. This was found to be possible. An examination of chromaticity corrections for the Tevatron with the low beta insertion on in various configurations was also undertaken

  3. Recent QCD Studies at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Robert Craig

    2008-04-01

    Since the beginning of Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron the QCD physics groups of the CDF and D0 experiments have worked to reach unprecedented levels of precision for many QCD observables. Thanks to the large dataset--over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by each experiment--important new measurements have recently been made public and will be summarized in this paper.

  4. Top quark production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnes, Erich W.; /Arizona U.

    2010-09-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has, until recently, been the only accelerator with sufficient energy to produce top quarks. The CDF and D0 experiments have collected large samples of top quarks. We report on recent top quark production measurements of the single top and t{bar t} production cross sections, as well as studies of the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution and a search for highly boosted top quarks.

  5. Fermilab tevatron five refrigerator system tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, C.; Ferry, R.; Leiniger, M.; Makara, J.; Misek, J.; Mizicko, D.; Richied, D.; Theilacker, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron refrigeration system is described with the layout illustrated. The compressor control loops, the refrigerator control loops, and magnet control loops (two per refrigerator) are described and each illustrated. The mobile purifier is described. A five refrigerator test is presented, using two compressor buildings, satellite refrigerator concept test and the test current to the writing. The configuration of the five refrigerator test is diagramed

  6. Search for a Standard Model Higgs boson in the $\\tau\\tau$ decay channel produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totaro, Pierluigi [INFN, Univ. degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying to tau lepton pairs, in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV. The search is based on approximately 2.3 fb$^{-1}$ of CDF Run II data and is performed by considering the following signal processes: WH($\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$), ZH($\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$), qHq'$\\rightarrow$q$\\tau\\tau$q' and gg$\\rightarrow$H$\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$. Events are selected by requiring an hadronic tau and one isolated electron or muon, coming from the leptonic decay of one of the two taus. In addition, at least one calorimeter jet must be present in the final state. We expect 921.8$\\pm$48.9 background events in the 1 jet channel and 159.4$\\pm$11.6 in the $\\ge$ 2 jets channel, while in data we observe 965 and 166 events, respectively. In order to improve the search sensitivity we employ a multivariate technique, based on a set of Boosted Decision Trees trained to get the best sep aration between signal and the dominant sources of background. We observe no evidence for a Higgs boson signal and therefore we set a 95\\% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit on the cross section relative to the SM predictions ($\\sigma/\\sigma_{\\mathrm{SM}}$). Results are presented for the Higgs boson mass varying from M$_\\mathrm{H}$ = 100 GeV/$c^2$ to M$_\\mathrm{H}$ = 150 GeV/$c^2$. For the mass hypothesis of 120 GeV/c$^2$ the observed limit is 27.2, while the corresponding expected value is 23.4$^{+9.8}_{-6.4}$.

  7. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Cross Section in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhenbin [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of the single top quark cross section in the lepton plus jets final state using an integrated luminosity corresponding to 7.5 fb-1 of p\\bar p collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The single top candidate events are identified by the signature of a charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and two or three jets with at least one of them identified as originating from a bottom quark. A new Monte Carlo generator POWHEG is used to model the single top quark production processes, which include s-channel, t-channel, and Wt-channel. A neural network multivariate method is exploited to discriminate the single top quark signal from the comparatively large backgrounds. We measure a single top production cross section of $3.04^{+0.57}_{-0.53} (\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})$ pb assuming $m_{\\rm top}=172.5$~GeV/$c^2$. In addition, we extract the CKM matrix element value $|V_{tb}|=0.96\\pm 0.09~(\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})\\ ± 0.05~(\\mathrm{theory})$ and set a lower limit of $|V_{tb}|>0.78$ at the 95% credibility level.

  8. Increasing the energy of the Fermilab Tevatron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerst, J.D.; Theilacker, J.C.

    1994-07-01

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab has reached its eleventh year of operation since being commissioned in 1983. Last summer, four significant upgrades to the cryogenic system became operational which allow Tevatron operation at higher energy. This came after many years of R ampersand D, power testing in sectors (one sixth) of the Tevatron, and final system installation. The improvements include the addition of cold helium vapor compressors, supporting hardware for subatmospheric operation, a new satellite refrigerator control system, and a higher capacity central helium liquefier. A description of each cryogenic upgrade, commissioning experience, and attempts to increase the energy of the Tevatron are presented

  9. Search for the Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a Vector Boson Using Like-Sign Dilepton Events in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamato, Daisuke [Osaka City Univ. (Japan)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a search for the standard model and fermiophobic Higgs bosons produced in association with a vector boson using like-sign dilepton events collected by Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II). This analysis uses the data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb -1. The search is characterized by minimally biased cuts which maximize the acceptance of the Higgs bosons. The numbers of expected signal events passing requirements for like-sign dilepton are 5.6 for the fermiophobic Higgs on the mass of 110 GeV/c2 assuming the standard model production cross section, and 1.7 for the standard model on the mass of 160 GeV/c2. The expectation of background events are 696.1, while the number of observed events are 624. To discriminate signal events from backgrounds, the search employs a multivariate analysis based on boosted decision trees. There are no significant disagreements in the BDT outputs, then, upper limits at a 95% confidence level are set on σ(p$\\bar{p}$→V h) × B(h→WW ) for both Higgs bosons scenarios. The expected and observed limits are 5.9 and 9.2, respectively, relative to the standard model expectation for the standard model Higgs boson mass of 160 GeV/c2. For the fermiophobic Higgs boson corresponding to the mass of 110 GeV/c2, the expected and observed limits are 2.6 and 4.4, respectively.

  10. Searches for supersymmetry at high-energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Nachtman, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the state of the art in searches for supersymmetry at colliders on the eve of the Large Hadron Collider era. Supersymmetry is unique among extensions of the standard model in being motivated by naturalness, dark matter, and force unification, both with and without gravity. At the same time, weak-scale supersymmetry encompasses a wide range of experimental signals that are also found in many other frameworks. Motivations for supersymmetry are recalled and the various models and their distinctive features are reviewed. Searches for neutral and charged Higgs bosons and standard-model superpartners at the high energy frontier are summarized comprehensively, considering both canonical and noncanonical supersymmetric models, and including results from the LEP collider at CERN, HERA at DESY, and the Fermilab Tevatron.

  11. Vacuum technology issues for the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joestlein, H.

    1989-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider, to be built in Texas, will provide an energy of 40 TeV from colliding proton beams. This energy is twenty times higher than currently available from the only other cryogenic collider, the Fermilab Tevatron, and will allow experiments that can lead to a better understanding of the fundamental properties of matter. The energy scale and the size of the new machine pose intriguing challenges and opportunities for the its vacuum systems. The discussion will include the effects of synchrotron radiation on cryogenic beam tubes, cold adsorption pumps for hydrogen, methods of leak checking large cryogenic systems, the development of cold beam valves, and radiation damage to components, especially electronics. 9 figs., 1 tab

  12. Academic Training Lecture: Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Regular Programme 21, 22, 23 & 24 June 2010 from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders by Dr. Karl Jakobs (University of Freiburg) In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and ...

  13. Measurement of the $W+b$-jet and $W+c$-jet differential production cross sections in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Augsten, Kamil; Avila, Carlos A; Badaud, Frederique; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Begalli, Marcia; Bellantoni, Leo; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Borysova, Maryna; Borysov, Oleksandr; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brock, Raymond L; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Bu, Xue-Bing; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Buszello, Claus Peter; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clutter, Justace Randall; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; Davies, Gavin John; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dominguez, DAaron M; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Edmunds, Daniel L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Faure, Alexandre; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fiedler, Frank; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Fuess, Stuart C; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gershtein, Yuri S; Ginther, George E; Gogota, Olga; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Liang; Harder, Kristian; Harel, Amnon; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Ito, Albert S; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joshi, Jyoti; Jung, Andreas Werner; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipton, Ronald J; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Mansour, Jason; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miconi, Florian; Mondal, Naba K; Mulhearn, Michael James; Nagy, Elemer; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pal, Arnab; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Popov, Alexey V; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Gene Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Sajot, Gerard; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santos, Angelo Souza; Savage, David G; Savitskyi, Mykola; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Sekaric, Jadranka; Severini, Horst; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Simak, Vladislav J; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Sonnenschein, Lars; Soustruznik, Karel; Stark, Jan; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Titov, Maxim; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vilanova, Didier; Vokac, Petr; Wahl, Horst D; Wang, Michael HLS; Warchol, Jadwiga; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wobisch, Markus; Wood, Darien Robert; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yang, Siqi; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Jiaming; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2015-04-09

    We present a measurement of the cross sections for the associated production of a $W$ boson with at least one heavy quark jet, $b$ or $c$, in proton-antiproton collisions. Data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb$^{-1}$ recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron \\ppbar Collider at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV are used to measure the cross sections differentially as a function of the jet transverse momenta in the range 20 to 150 GeV. These results are compared to calculations of perturbative QCD theory as well as predictions from Monte Carlo generators.

  14. Search for excited electrons in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    OpenAIRE

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a search for the production of an excited state of the electron, e*, in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96  TeV. The data were collected with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 1  fb-1. We search for e* in the process pp̅ →e*e, with the e* subsequently decaying to an electron plus photon. No excess above the standard model background is observed. Interpreting our data in the context of ...

  15. CP Violation in Single Top Quark Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Weigang [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for CP violation in single top quark production with the DØ experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. CP violation in the top electroweak interaction results in different single top quark production cross sections for top and antitop quarks. We perform the search in the single top quark final state using 5.4 fb-1 of data, in the s-channel, t-channel, and for both combined. At this time, we do not see an observable CP asymmetry.

  16. Study of double parton interactions in diphoton+dijet events in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gaspar, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2016-03-01

    We use a sample of diphoton + dijet events to measure the effective cross section of double parton interactions, which characterizes the area containing the interacting partons in proton-antiproton collisions, and find it to be σ eff = 19.3 ± 1.4 ( stat ) ± 7.8 ( syst ) mb . The sample was collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √ s = 1.96 TeV and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb - 1 .

  17. Measurement of the asymmetry in angular distributions of leptons produced in dilepton tt¯ final states in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapelain, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Falkowski, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2013-12-02

    We present measurements of asymmetries in angular distributions of leptons produced in ttbar events in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We consider final states where the W bosons from top quark and antiquark decays both decay into l nu (l=e, mu) resulting in oppositely charged dilepton final states with accompanying jets. Using 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector, we find the asymmetries in lepton pseudorapidity compatible with predictions based on the standard model.

  18. The Measurement of Cross Section of Drell-Yan Process in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1800

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimashi, Toshihiro [Tsukuba U.

    1990-09-01

    The production cross section and the QCD higher order contribution, K factor of Drell-Yan process have been measured in dielectron mode in proton-antiproton collisions at the center of mass energies of 1800 GeV. The experiment has been performed at Fenni National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States using Tevatron accelerator during the period of 1988 though 1989. A number of physics quantities are measured using the CDF ( Collider Detector at Fermilab) detector in the pseudorapidity range -2.4 < $\\eta$ < 2.4....

  19. Beyond the standard model at Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagliarone, C.

    2000-01-01

    Tevatron experiments performed extensive searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. No positive results have been found so far showing that the data are consistent with the SM expectations. CDF and D0 continue the analysis of Run I data placing limits on new physics, including Supersymmetry, large space time dimensions and leptoquark models. With the Run II upgrades, providing an higher acceptance and higher luminosity, it will be possible to make important progresses in the search for new phenomena as well as in setting limits on a larger variety of theoretical models

  20. Calculating luminosity for a coupled Tevatron lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.A.; Martens, M.A.; Michelotti, L.; Goderre, G.

    1995-05-01

    The traditional formula for calculating luminosity assumes an uncoupled lattice and makes use of one-degree-of-freedom lattice functions, β H and β v , for relating transverse beam widths to emittances. Strong coupling requires changing this approach. It is simplest to employ directly the linear normal form coordinates of the one turn map. An equilibrium distribution in phase space is expressed as a function of the Jacobian's eigenvectors and beam size parameters or emittances. Using the equilibrium distributions an expression for the luminosity was derived and applied to the Tevatron lattice, which was coupled due to a quadrupole roll

  1. Gluino-pair production at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beenakker, W.; Spira, M.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1995-05-01

    The next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production of gluino pairs at the Tevatron are presented in this paper. Similar to the production of squark-antisquark pairs, the dependence of the cross section on the renormalization/factorization scale is reduced considerably by including the higher-order corrections. The cross section increases with respect to the lowest-order calculation which, in previous experimental analyses, had been evaluated at the scale of the invariant energy of the partonic subprocesses. (orig.)

  2. Electroweak, top and bottom physics at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukegawa, Fumihiko; /Tsukuba U.

    2004-10-01

    The Tevatron Run-II program has been in progress since 2001, and the CDF and D0 experiments have been operational with upgraded detectors. Coupled with recent improvements in the Tevatron accelerator performance, the experiments have started producing important physics results and measurements. They report these measurements as well as prospects in the near future.

  3. Radiation hard silicon microstrip detectors for Tevatron experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korjenevski, Sergey

    2004-01-01

    The Silicon Microstrip Tracking detectors at the CDF and D0 experiments have now been operating for almost three years at Fermilab. These detectors were designed originally for an integrated luminosity of 2fb -1 . As the expected luminosity for Run IIb at the Tevatron collider was initially envisioned to reach 15fb -1 , radiation tolerances of both devices were revisited, culminating in proposals for new systems. With reduced expectations for total luminosity at ∼6fb -1 , the full detector-replacement projects were terminated. The CDF detector is expected nevertheless to cope efficiently with the lower anticipated dose, however, the D0 experiment is planning a smaller-scale project: a Layer-0 (L0) upgrade of the silicon tracker (D0SMT). The new device will fit between the beam line and the inner layer of the current Tracker. Built of single-sided sensors, this upgrade is expected to perform well in the harsh radiation environment, and be able to withstand an integrated luminosity of 15fb -1 . Prototypes of Run IIb sensors were irradiated using 10MeV protons at the tandem Van de Graaff at the James R. McDonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. A fit to the 10MeV proton data yields a damage parameter αp=11x10-17Acm. This is consistent with results from RD48 (αp=9.9x10-17Acm). The scaling of damage to 1MeV neutron fluence uses a hardness factor (κ) derived from the non-ionizing components of the energy loss (NEIL). NEIL predicts a hardness factor of 3.87 for 10MeV protons. We obtained an experimental value of this factor of 2.54, or 34% smaller than scaling predictions from NEIL

  4. An Ionization Profile Monitor for the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Jansson, Andreas; Bowie, Kwame; Bross, Alan; Dysert, Robert; Fitzpatrick, Thomas; Kwarciany, Richard; Lundberg, Carl; Nguyen, Hogan; Rivetta, Claudio H; Slimmer, David; Valerio, Linda; Zagel, James

    2005-01-01

    Primarily to study emittance blowup during injection and ramping, an ionization profile monitor has been developed for the Tevatron. It is based on a prototype installed in the Main Injector, although with extensive modifications. In particular, the electromagnetic shielding has been improved, the signal path has been cleaned up, and provisions have been made for an internal electron source. Due to the good Tevatron vacuum, a local pressure bump is introduced to increase the primary signal, which is then amplified by a microchannel plate and detected on anode strips. For the DAQ, a custom ASIC developed for the CMS experiment is used. It is a combined charge integrator and digitizer, with a sensitivity of a few fC, and a time-resolution that allows single bunch measurement. Digitization is done in the tunnel to reduce noise. Preparations for detector installation were made during the long 2004 shutdown, with the installation of magnets, vacuum chambers, vacuum pumps and cabling. The actual detector will be in...

  5. Sonic Helium Detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  6. Sonic helium detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossert, R.J.; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years

  7. Signatures of massive sgoldstinos at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perazzi, Elena; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Zwirner, Fabio

    2000-01-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with a very light gravitino, the effective theory at the weak scale should contain not only the goldstino G-tilde, but also its supersymmetric partners, the sgoldstinos. In the simplest case, the goldstino is a gauge-singlet and its superpartners are two neutral spin-0 particles, S and P. We study possible signals of massive sgoldstinos at hadron colliders, focusing on those that are most relevant for the Tevatron. We show that inclusive production of sgoldstinos, followed by their decay into two photons, can lead to observable signals or to stringent combined bounds on the gravitino and sgoldstino masses. Sgoldstino decays into two gluon jets may provide a useful complementary signature

  8. The behavior of the Tevatron at energies greater than 1000 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelko, O.

    1991-04-01

    If, as appears likely, the top quark lies at the upper range of the mass reach of the Tevatron, then increasing the energy of the collider operation could prove to be a crucial factor in the future program together with projected luminosity enhancements. While a significant amount of data exists on individual magnets up to an energy of 1000 GeV, there are no detailed measurements above this value. We focus on the operating range beyond 1000 GeV in an attempt to see whether there is any realistic opportunity to extend the energy range of the Tevatron into this regime. The proposed modifications to the Tevatron Cryogenic System will provide sufficient cooling to lower the operating temperature of the 1000 superconducting magnets from the present 4.6--4.8K (1-φ inlet temperature) down to a range of 3.6--3.8K. At this temperature the short sample quench current for the dipole magnets should increase from the present value of ∼4000A (900 GeV) up to a level approaching 4800A (1100 GeV.) Increasing the peak current in the dipoles produces some important questions related to possible mechanical effects including catastrophic failure, the change of magnetic field quality, and quench protection problems resulting from the increased stored energy. In this note we shall examine these effects and comment on the existing data on low temperature operation. We have only considered the dipole magnets since the quadrupoles should not limit performance. We have not looked at the interaction region magnets which involve different considerations

  9. Challenges for MSSM Higgs searches at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carena, Marcela S.; /Fermilab; Menon, A.; /Argonne /Chicago U., EFI; Wagner, C.E.M.; /Argonne /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.

    2007-04-01

    In this article we analyze the impact of B-physics and Higgs physics at LEP on standard and non-standard Higgs bosons searches at the Tevatron and the LHC, within the framework of minimal flavor violating supersymmetric models. The B-physics constraints we consider come from the experimental measurements of the rare B-decays b {yields} s{gamma} and B{sub u} {yields} {tau}{nu} and the experimental limit on the B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} branching ratio. We show that these constraints are severe for large values of the trilinear soft breaking parameter A{sub t}, rendering the non-standard Higgs searches at hadron colliders less promising. On the contrary these bounds are relaxed for small values of A{sub t} and large values of the Higgsino mass parameter {mu}, enhancing the prospects for the direct detection of non-standard Higgs bosons at both colliders. We also consider the available ATLAS and CMS projected sensitivities in the standard model Higgs search channels, and we discuss the LHC's ability in probing the whole MSSM parameter space. In addition we also consider the expected Tevatron collider sensitivities in the standard model Higgs h {yields} b{bar b} channel to show that it may be able to find 3 {sigma} evidence in the B-physics allowed regions for small or moderate values of the stop mixing parameter.

  10. Non-perturbative QCD Effects and the Top Mass at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Wicke, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The modelling of non-perturbative effects is an important part of modern collider physics simulations. In hadron collisions there is some indication that the modelling of the interactions of the beam remnants, the underlying event, may require non-trivial colour reconnection effects to be present. We recently introduced a universally applicable toy model of such reconnections, based on hadronising strings. This model, which has one free parameter, has been implemented in the Pythia event generator. We then considered several parameter sets (`tunes'), constrained by fits to Tevatron minimum-bias data, and determined the sensitivity of a simplified top mass analysis to these effects, in exclusive semi-leptonic top events at the Tevatron. A first attempt at isolating the genuine non-perturbative effects gave an estimate of order +-0.5GeV from non-perturbative uncertainties. The results presented here are an update to the original study and include recent bug fixes of Pythia that influenced the tunings investigat...

  11. Beam beam tune shifts for 36 bunch operation in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, P.

    1996-10-01

    We are preparing to upgrade the Tevatron Collider from 6 to 36 bunch operation. The 36 bunches are in 3 ''trains'' of 12 bunches. The spacing between bunches within a train is 21 RF buckets (53.106 MHz) and 139 empty buckets separate the trains. Because the 36 bunches are not evenly spaced around the machine, the different bunches within a train pass the opposing bunches at different points in the ring and so feel different beam beam effects. Through most of the machine the beams have helical separation, so these are mainly long range beam beam effects. As a first, very simple step, we've looked at the differences in the tunes of the different anti-proton (anti p) bunches. During the 36 bunch studies in Fall 1995, we used a new tune measurement system to measure these in several different machine conditions. We compare these measurements to calculations of the tunes for a anti p with zero transverse and longitudinal oscillation amplitudes. We discuss experimental problems, and the assumptions, approximations, and effects included in the calculations. Our main intent is to gain confidence that we can accurately model beam beam effects in the Tevatron

  12. Berkeley mini-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1984-06-01

    The Berkeley Mini-Collider, a heavy-ion collider being planned to provide uranium-uranium collisions at T/sub cm/ less than or equal to 4 GeV/nucleon, is described. The central physics to be studied at these energies and our early ideas for a collider detector are presented

  13. Linear colliders - prospects 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1985-06-01

    We discuss the scaling laws of linear colliders and their consequences for accelerator design. We then report on the SLAC Linear Collider project and comment on experience gained on that project and its application to future colliders. 9 refs., 2 figs

  14. Very high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1986-03-01

    The luminosity and energy requirements are considered for both proton colliders and electron-positron colliders. Some of the basic design equations for high energy linear electron colliders are summarized, as well as design constraints. A few examples are given of parameters for very high energy machines. 4 refs., 6 figs

  15. 2007 2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 27, 28, 29, 30 November 2007 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, 
bldg. 500 Tevatron Physics Results B. HEINEMANN, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA I will summarize the physics results from the Tevatron experiments with particular emphasis on the experimental methods used in different kinds of analysis. In particular, the Tevatron is a proton-antiproton collider that has now accumulated more than 2 fb-1 of luminosity in the two experiments, called CDF and D0. In this lecture I will review the results on inclusive productions of jets, W- and Z-bosons, the results in the flavor sector, the measurements of top production, searches for Higgs boson production and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In each case I will explain the basic experimental concepts and methods needed for making the measurement.

  16. 2007 2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 27, 28, 29, 30 November 2007 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Tevatron Physics Results B. HEINEMANN, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA I will summarize the physics results from the Tevatron experiments with particular emphasis on the experimental methods used in different kinds of analysis. In particular, the Tevatron is a proton-antiproton collider that has now accumulated more than 2 fb-1 of luminosity in the two experiments, called CDF and D0. In this lecture I will review the results on inclusive productions of jets, W- and Z-bosons, the results in the flavor sector, the measurements of top production, searches for Higgs boson production and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In each case I will explain the basic experimental concepts and methods needed for making the measurement.

  17. Beam-induced damage to the Tevatron components and what has been done about it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Czarapata, P.C.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Still, D.A.; Samulyak, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    A beam-induced damage to the Tevatron collimators happened in December 2003 was induced by a failure in the CDF Roman Pot detector positioning during the collider run. Possible scenarios of this failure resulted in an excessive halo generation and superconducting magnet quench have been studied via realistic simulations using the STRUCT and MARS14 codes. It is shown that the interaction of a misbehaved proton beam with the collimators result in a rapid local heating and a possible damage. A detailed consideration is given to the ablation process for the collimator material taking place in high vacuum. It is shown that ablation of tungsten (primary collimator) and stainless steel (secondary collimator) jaws results in creation of a groove in the jaw surface as was observed after the December's accident. The actions undertaken to avoid such an accident in future are described in detail. (author)

  18. Beam-induced damage to the Tevatron components and what has been done about it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Czarapata, P.C.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Still, D.A.; Samulyak, R.V.

    2006-01-01

    A beam-induced damage to the Tevatron collimators happened in December 2003 was induced by a failure in the CDF Roman Pot detector positioning during the collider run. Possible scenarios of this failure resulted in an excessive halo generation and superconducting magnet quench have been studied via realistic simulations using the STRUCT and MARS14 codes. It is shown that the interaction of a misbehaved proton beam with the collimators result in a rapid local heating and a possible damage. A detailed consideration is given to the ablation process for the collimator material taking place in high vacuum. It is shown that ablation of tungsten (primary collimator) and stainless steel (secondary collimator) jaws results in creation of a groove in the jaw surface as was observed after the December's accident. The actions undertaken to avoid such an accident in future are described in detail

  19. Colored resonances at the Tevatron: phenomenology and discovery potential in multijets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, Can; Okui, Takemichi; Sundrum, Raman

    2008-01-01

    There exist several classes of theories beyond the Standard Model which contain massive spin-1 color octets, generically called ''colorons''. Indeed we argue that colorons inevitably appear in the spectrum whenever new colored particles feel an additional confining force. Colorons are distinctive at hadron colliders as this is the only environment in which they can be resonantly produced. In the simplest models we show that the coloron naturally decays to multijets via secondary resonances, which can be consistent with all existing bounds, even for colorons as light as a few hundred GeV. We perform representative case studies and show that a search in the four-jet channel at the Tevatron has strong signal significance, while the LHC faces formidable challenges for such a search.

  20. Search for the Higgs-Boson with the CDF experiment at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennecke, Martin [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-06-10

    A search for a low-mass SM Higgs-Boson in the channel WH → lvb$\\bar{b}$ has been performed using neural networks. The data were taken by the CDF experiment at the p-$\\bar{p}$ collider Tevatron from 2000-2003, corresponding to in integrated luminosity of Lint = 162 pb-1 at a CMS-energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. 95% confidence level upper limits are set on σ × BR, the product of the production cross section times the Branching ratio, as a function of the Higgs boson mass. Cross sections above 8 pb are excluded for six different Higgs masses between 110 GeV/c2 and 150 GeV/c2. The required integrated luminosities for a 95% C.L. exclusion, 3σ evidence and 5σ discovery are calculated.

  1. B-meson production in the Parton Reggeization approach at Tevatron and the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpishkov, A.V.; Saleev, V.A.; Nefedov, M.A.; Shipilova, A.V.; Samara State Aerospace Univ.; Hamburg Univ.

    2014-11-01

    We study the inclusive hadroproduction of B 0 , B + , and B 0 s mesons at leading order in the parton Reggeization approach using the universal fragmentation functions extracted from the combined e + e - annihilation data from CERN LEP1 and SLAC SLC colliders. We have described B-meson transverse momentum distributions measured in the central region of rapidity by the CDF Collaboration at Fermilab Tevatron and CMS Collaboration at LHC within uncertainties and without free parameters, applying Kimber-Martin-Ryskin unintegrated gluon distribution function in a proton. The forward B-meson production (2.0< y<4.5) measured by the LHCb Collaboration also has been studied and expected disagreement between our theoretical predictions and data has been obtained.

  2. Diphoton production at Tevatron in the quasi-multiple-Regge-kinematics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleev, V.A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Samarskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Samara (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-15

    We study the production of prompt diphotons in the central region of rapidity within the frame- work of the quasi-multi-Regge-kinematics approach applying the hypothesis of quark and gluon Reggeization. We describe accurately and without free parameters the experimental data which were obtained by the CDF Collaboration at the Tevatron Collider. It is shown that the main contribution to studied process is given by the direct fusion of two Reggeized gluons into a photon pair, which is described by the effective Reggeon-Reggeon to particle-particle vertex. The contribution from the annihilation of Reggeized quark-antiquark pair into a diphoton is also considered. At the stage of numerical calculations we use the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription for unintegrated quark and gluon distribution functions, with the Martin-Roberts-Stirling-Thorne collinear parton densities for a proton as input. (orig.)

  3. Report of the SUGRA Working Group for Run II of the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, V.; Flattum, E.; Falk, T.; Abel, S.; Accomando, E.; Anderson, G.; Arnowitt, R.; Azzi, P.; Baer, H.; Bagger, J.; Beenakker, W.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E.; Berger, M.; Brhlik, M.; Blazek, T.; Blessing, S.; Bokhari, W.; Bruner, N.; Carena, M.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, D.; Chankowski, P.; Chen, C.H.; Cheng, H.C.; Chertok, M.; Cho, G.C.; Claes, D.; Demina, R.; Done, J.; Duflot, L.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Eboli, O.J.P.; Eno, S.; Feng, J.; Ganis, G.; Gold, M.; Gregores, E.M.; Hagiwara, K.; Han, T.; Harris, B.; Hikasa, K.; Holck, C.; Kao, C.; Kato, Y.; Klasen, M.; Keung, W.Y.; Kramer, M.; Lammel, S.; Li, T.J.; Lykken, J.D.; Magro, M.; Mani, S.; Matchev, K.T.; Mangano, M.; Mercadante, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nachtman, J.; Nath, P.; Nojiri, M.M.; Nomerotski, A.; Norman, D.; Oishi, R.; Ono, K.; Paige, F.; Paterno, M.; Parke, S.; Pierce, D.; Pilaftsis, A.; Plehn, T.; Pompos, A.; Polonksy, N.; Pokorski, S.; Quintana, P.; Roco, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Seiya, Y.; Smith, C.; Spira, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Sullivan, Z.; Szalapski, R.; Tannenbaum, B.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Wang, Y.; White, J.; Williams, H.H.; Worcester, M.; Worm, S.; Zhang, R.J.; Zielinski, M.

    2000-01-01

    We present an analysis of the discovery reach for supersymmetric particles at the upgraded Tevatron collider, assuming that SUSY breaking results in universal soft breaking parameters at the grand unification scale, and that the lightest supersymmetric particle is stable and neutral. We first present a review of the literature, including the issues of unification, renormalization group evolution of the supersymmetry breaking parameters and the effect of radiative corrections on the effective low energy couplings and masses of the theory. We consider the experimental bounds coming from direct searches and those arising indirectly from precision data, cosmology and the requirement of vacuum stability. The issues of flavor and CP-violation are also addressed. The main subject of this study is to update sparticle production cross sections, make improved estimates of backgrounds, delineate the discovery reach in the supergravity framework, and examine how this might vary when assumptions about universality of soft...

  4. Nonlinear dynamics experiment in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merminga, N.; Edwards, D.; Finley, D.

    1989-01-01

    Results of the continuing analysis of the nonlinear dynamics experiment E778 are presented. Sixteen special sextupoles introduced nonlinearities in the Tevatron. 'Smear,' which is one of the parameters used to quantify the degree of nonlinearity, was extracted from the data and compared with calculation. Injection efficiency in the presence of nonlinearities was studied. Measurements of the dynamic aperture were performed. The final results in one degree of freedom of the smear, the injection efficiency and the dynamic aperture are presented. Particles captured on nonlinear resonance islands were directly observed and measurements were performed. The capture efficiency was extracted from the data and compared with prediction. The influence of tune modulation on the stability of these islands was investigated. Plans for future measurements are discussed. 4 refs., 6 figs

  5. Neutrino results from the Fermilab Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaevitz, M.H.; Arroyo, C.; Bachmann, K.T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Blair, R.E.; Bolton, T.A.; Foudas, C.; King, B.J.; Lefmann, W.C.; Leung, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Quintas, P.Z.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Sciulli, F.; Seligman, W.G.; Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A.; Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.B.; Schellman, H.; Yovanovitch, D.D.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; De Barbaro, P.; Salcumoto, W.K.; Kinnel, T.S.; Sandler, P.H.; Smith, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    Results from the high-energy, high-statistics studies of neutrino nucleon interactions by the CCFR collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron are described. Using a data sample of over 3.7million events with energies up to 600GeV, precision measurements are presented for the weak mixing angle, sin 2 θ w , the structure functions, F 2 (x,Q 2 ) and xF 3 (x,Q 2 ), aud the strange quark distribution, xs(x,Q 2 ). Comparisons of these measurements to those obtained in other processes are made in the context of global electroweak and QCD tests. Prospects for the next generation measurements by the NuTeV collaboration at Fermilab are also presented. ((orig.))

  6. Scientific Opportunity: the Tevatron and the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The press makes much of the competition between CERN’s LHC and Fermilab’s Tevatron in the search for the Higgs boson. This competitive aspect is real, and probably adds spice to the scientific exploration, but for us such reporting often feels like spilling the entire pepper shaker over a fine meal. The media’s emphasis on competition obscures the more important substance of our long-standing collaboration in scientific discovery.   Our laboratories and our communities have worked together for decades. Europeans have contributed greatly to the Tevatron’s many successes, including the discovery of the top quark, the discovery of fast oscillations in the decay of strange B mesons and the many searches for new phenomena. Americans have contributed to many programs at CERN, notably the extraordinary precision measurements of LEP, and more recently construction of the LHC accelerator and detectors. Fermilab scientists played a vital role throughout 2009 in...

  7. Developments in perturbative QCD? challenges from collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeppenfeld, Dieter [Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica]. E-mail: dieter@phenom.physics.wisc.edu

    1996-07-01

    The search for new phenomena at hadron colliders requires a good understanding of QCD processes. The analysis of multi-jet signatures in the top quark search at the Tevatron is one example, forward jet tagging and rapidity gap techniques in the analysis of weak boson scattering events at the LH C will be another important application. These topics are discussed in the context of multi-parton/multi-jet QCD processes. Also described are some of the calculation tools, like amplitude techniques and automatic code generation for tree level processes. (author)

  8. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] dipole coil production tooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs

  9. Developments in perturbative QCD? challenges from collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    1996-01-01

    The search for new phenomena at hadron colliders requires a good understanding of QCD processes. The analysis of multi-jet signatures in the top quark search at the Tevatron is one example, forward jet tagging and rapidity gap techniques in the analysis of weak boson scattering events at the LH C will be another important application. These topics are discussed in the context of multi-parton/multi-jet QCD processes. Also described are some of the calculation tools, like amplitude techniques and automatic code generation for tree level processes. (author)

  10. Advanced forward calorimetry for present and future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiBitonto, D.; McIntyre, P.M.; Atac, M.

    1987-01-01

    We propose to develop a compact, high density calorimeter to instrument the very forward region. The design is based on a warm liquid medium such as tetramethylpentane (TMP) or neopentane which is better suited to the expected high background conditions than conventional gas media. The calorimeter will be assembled in sealed units, which can then be placed compactly into a variety of configurations. The accompanying hybrid electronic readout is designed to operate at either 100 MHz or 1 GHz, depending on the specific collider application (Tevatron or SSC)

  11. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Previtali, Valentina [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bruce, Roderik [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Redaelli, Stefano [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, Adriana [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salvachua Ferrando, Belen [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  12. Forward-backward asymmetries of lepton pairs in events with a large-transverse-momentum jet at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguila, F. del; Ametller, Ll.; Talavera, P.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss forward-backward charge asymmetries for lepton-pair production in association with a large-transverse-momentum jet at hadron colliders. The lepton charge asymmetry relative to the jet direction A FB j gives a new determination of the effective weak mixing angle sin 2 θ eff lept (M Z 2 ) with a statistical precision after cuts of ∼10 -3 (8x10 -3 ) at LHC (Tevatron). This is to be compared with the current uncertainty at LEP and SLD from the asymmetries alone, 2x10 -4 . The identification of b jets also allows for the measurement of the bottom-quark-Z asymmetry A FB b at hadron colliders, the resulting statistical precision for sin 2 θ eff lept (M Z 2 ) being ∼9x10 -4 (2x10 -2 at Tevatron), also lower than the reported precision at e + e - colliders, 3x10 -4

  13. The t quark production at the UNK collider energies general characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.V.; Likhoded, A.K.; Petrov, V.A.; Slabospitsky, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The cross sections and inclusive spectra for t quarks in pp-bar collisions at √s=6 TeV (in the UNK collider operational mode) have been calculated as well as different kinematic characteristics of the t-decay products. It is shown that at identical integrated luminosity the region of the maximum t quark masses that can be reached at the UNK collider is considerably beyond the t quark mass limit for the Tevatron (750-800 GeV for UNK and 400-450 GeV for the Tevatron). The role of some background processes to the t quark production reaction has also been treated. 9 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. Proton-Antiproton Annihilation into Neutral Strange Mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, J.; Bertolotto, L.; Buzzo, A.; Debevec, P.; Drijard, D.; Easo, S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Evangelista, C.; Eyrich, W.; Fearnley, T.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Geyer, R.; Hamann, N. H.; Harris, P. G.; Hertzog, D. W.; Hughes, S. A.; Johansson, A.; Johansson, T.; Jones, R. T.; Kilian, K.; Kirsebom, K.; Klett, A.; Korsmo, H.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Marinelli, M.; Moosburger, M.; Mouëllic, B.; Oelert, W.; Ohlsson, S.; Palano, A.; Passaggio, S.; Perreau, J.-M.; Pia, M. G.; Pomp, S.; Price, M.; Reimer, P. E.; Ritter, J.; Robutti, E.; Röhrich, K.; Rook, M.; Sefzick, T.; Rössle, E.; Santroni, A.; Schmitt, H.; Steinkamp, O.; Stinzing, F.; Stugu, B.; Tayloe, R.; Tscheulin, M.; Urban, H. J.; Wirth, H.; Zipse, H.; Jetset (Ps202) Collaboration:

    1997-06-01

    In a search for gluonic hadrons, the formation channels p¯p → K sK s, p¯p → ηη, p¯p → π 0η and p¯p → π 0π 0 were studied in the mass range from 2.1 to 2.4 GeV using the Jetset (PS202) detector and an internal molecular hydrogen cluster jet target installed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Cross sections for p¯p → K sK s have been obtained and limits are set on the non-observation of the ξ(2230). Conversely, we find evidence for a narrow signal in a preliminary analysis of our p¯p → ηη data consistent with a narrow ξ(2230).

  15. Proton-antiproton annihilation into neutral strange mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana (United States). Loomis Lab.; Bertolotto, L.; Buzzo, A.; Debevec, P.; Drijard, D.; Easo, S.; Eisenstein, R.A.; Evangelista, C.; Eyrich, W.; Fearnley, T.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Geyer, R.; Hamann, N.H.; Harris, P.G.; Hertzog, D.W.; Hughes, S.A.; Johansson, A.; Johansson, T.; Jones, R.T.; Kilian, K.; Kirsebom, K.; Klett, A.; Korsmo, H.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Marinelli, M.; Moosburger, M.; Mouellic, B.; Oelert, W.; Ohlsson, S.; Palano, A.; Passaggio, S.; Perreau, J.-M.; Pia, M.G.; Pomp, S.; Price, M.; Reimer, P.E.; Robutti, E.; Roehrich, K.; Rook, M.; Sefzick, T.; Roessle, E.; Santroni, A.; Schmitt, H.; Steinkamp, O.; Stinzing, F.; Stugu, B.; Tayloe, R.; Tscheulin, M.; Urban, H.J.; Wirth, H.; Zipse, H.; JETSET Collaboration

    1997-06-01

    In a search for gluonic hadrons, the formation channels pp{yields}K{sub S}K{sub S}, pp{yields}{eta}{eta}, pp{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{eta} and pp{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} were studied in the mass range from 2.1 to 2.4 GeV using the Jetset (PS202) detector and an internal molecular hydrogen cluster jet target installed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Cross sections for pp{yields}K{sub S}K{sub S} have been obtained and limits are set on the non-observation of the {xi}(2230). Conversely, we find evidence for a narrow signal in a preliminary analysis of our pp{yields}{eta}{eta} d ata consistent with a narrow {xi}(2230). (orig.).

  16. Proton-antiproton annihilation into neutral strange mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, J.; Bertolotto, L.; Buzzo, A.; Debevec, P.; Drijard, D.; Easo, S.; Eisenstein, R.A.; Evangelista, C.; Eyrich, W.; Fearnley, T.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Geyer, R.; Hamann, N.H.; Harris, P.G.; Hertzog, D.W.; Hughes, S.A.; Johansson, A.; Johansson, T.; Jones, R.T.; Kilian, K.; Kirsebom, K.; Klett, A.; Korsmo, H.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Marinelli, M.; Moosburger, M.; Mouellic, B.; Oelert, W.; Ohlsson, S.; Palano, A.; Passaggio, S.; Perreau, J.-M.; Pia, M.G.; Pomp, S.; Price, M.; Reimer, P.E.; Robutti, E.; Roehrich, K.; Rook, M.; Sefzick, T.; Roessle, E.; Santroni, A.; Schmitt, H.; Steinkamp, O.; Stinzing, F.; Stugu, B.; Tayloe, R.; Tscheulin, M.; Urban, H.J.; Wirth, H.; Zipse, H.

    1997-01-01

    In a search for gluonic hadrons, the formation channels pp→K S K S , pp→ηη, pp→π 0 η and pp→π 0 π 0 were studied in the mass range from 2.1 to 2.4 GeV using the Jetset (PS202) detector and an internal molecular hydrogen cluster jet target installed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Cross sections for pp→K S K S have been obtained and limits are set on the non-observation of the ξ(2230). Conversely, we find evidence for a narrow signal in a preliminary analysis of our pp→ηη d ata consistent with a narrow ξ(2230). (orig.)

  17. Proton-antiproton interactions (experimental status of baryonium states)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Y.

    1980-07-01

    Many experiments have been performed in the last few years to search for the existence of baryonium (baryon-antibaryon bound) states. The current status in this direction is reviewed. Prominent resonances such as the S-meson resonance, broad resonances, narrow resonances and states such as the strange baryonium states, exotic states, antiproton-proton states below threshold, six-quark states are explained. A summary of the experimental data with illustrations is presented in a table.

  18. Search for supersymmetric particles decaying into tri-leptons through R-parity violation, with D0 Run-II experiment at Fermilab; Recherche de particules supersymetriques se desintegrant en R-parite violee (couplage {lambda}(121)) dans un etat final a trois leptons, avec les donnees du Run-II de l'experience D0 au TeVatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnan, A.M

    2005-07-15

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the first data taken by the D0 detector during the Run II of the Tevatron. Supersymmetric particles have been search for in proton-antiproton collisions, with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. In the framework of supersymmetry with R-parity violation, I have studied the pair production of Gauginos, leading to a pair of LSP (0,{chi}{sub 1}), each one decaying into ee{nu}{sub {mu}} or e{mu}{nu}{sub e} with a {lambda}(121) coupling. The final state contains at least two electrons: I have thus paid special attention in this work to the methods concerning identification and mis-identification of electromagnetic particles, as well as reconstruction, triggering, and correction (of the reconstructed energy). In a selection of tri-leptons, with at least two electrons, and some transverse missing energy, we observed 0 event in the 350 pb{sup -1} of analyzed data, for 0.4 + 0.35 - 0.05 (sta) {+-} 0.16 (sys) expected from the Standard Model contributions. In the signal considered in this analysis, the selection efficiency is around 12 per cent. Results have been studied in two models: mSUGRA and MSSM. In mSUGRA model, limits on m(1/2) and lightest gauginos's masses have been obtained, with tan({beta}) = 5, A{sub 0} = 0, m{sub 0} = 100 and 1000 GeV.c{sup -2} and both signs of {mu}. In MSSM, with the hypothesis of massive sfermions (1000 GeV.c{sup -2}), we can exclude, at 95% Confidence Level, the region m({chi}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) < 200 GeV.c{sup -2} for all masses of {chi}{sub 1}{sup 0} LSP. (author)

  19. Status of superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schermer, R.I.

    1993-09-01

    The arc sections of the High Energy Booster and the two Collider Rings will need more than 10,000, very large, superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets. Development work on these magnets was carried out at US/DOE laboratories in a program that began in the mid 1980's. In 1991-1992, the technology was transferred to industry and twenty, full-length, Collider dipoles were successfully fabricated and tested. This program, along with HERA and Tevatron experience, has provided industry a data base to use in formulating detailed designs for the prototypes of the accelerator magnets, with an eye to reducing cost and enhancing producibility. Several model magnets from this latest phase of the industrial program have already been tested. The excessive ramp-rate sensitivity of the magnets is understood and solutions are under investigation

  20. Status of superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schermer, R.I.

    1994-01-01

    The arc sections of the High Energy Booster and the two Collider Rings will need more than 10,000, very large, superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets. Development work on these magnets was carried out at US/DOE laboratories in a program that began in the mid 1980's. In 1991--92, the technology was transferred to industry and twenty, full-length, Collider dipoles were successfully fabricated and tested. This program, along with HERA and Tevatron experience, has provided industry a data base to use in formulating detailed designs for the prototypes of the accelerator magnets, with an eye to reducing cost and enhancing producibility. Several model magnets from this latest phase of the industrial program have already been tested. The excessive ramp-rate sensitivity of the magnets is understood and solutions are under investigation

  1. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  2. Determination of the jet energy scale at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatti, A.; Hatakeyama, K. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY 10021 (United States); Canelli, F. [Univ. of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States)]. E-mail: canelli@fnal.gov; Heinemann, B. [Univ. of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Adelman, J.; Hoffman, D.; Kwang, S.; Malkus, A.; Shochet, M. [Enrico Fermi Inst., Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ambrose, D. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Arguin, J.-F. [Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada M5S 1A7 (Canada); Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Currat, C.; Gibson, A.; Movilla-Fernandez, P.A. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Budd, H.; Chung, Y.S.; Sakumoto, W.; Yun, G. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Chung, K. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Cooper, B. [Univ. College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); D' Onofrio, M. [Univ. of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Dorigo, T. [Univ. of Padova, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova-Trento, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Erbacher, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Field, R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Flanagan, G. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Happacher, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Introzzi, G. [Univ. of Pavia, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Kuhlmann, S.; Nodulman, L.; Proudfoot, J. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jun, S.; Paulini, M.; Tiwari, V. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Latino, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Pisa, Univ. of Pisa, Siena and Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)] [and others

    2006-10-15

    A precise determination of the energy scale of jets at the Collider Detector at Fermilab at the Tevatron pp-bar collider is described. Jets are used in many analyses to estimate the energies of partons resulting from the underlying physics process. Several correction factors are developed to estimate the original parton energy from the observed jet energy in the calorimeter. The jet energy response is compared between data and Monte Carlo simulation for various physics processes, and systematic uncertainties on the jet energy scale are determined. For jets with transverse momenta above 50GeV the jet energy scale is determined with a 3% systematic uncertainty.

  3. Final Report - The Decline and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RIORDAN, MICHAEL

    2011-11-29

    In October 1993 the US Congress terminated the Superconducting Super Collider — at the time the largest pure-science project ever attempted, with a total cost estimated to exceed $10 billion. It was a stunning loss for the US highenergy physics community, which until that moment had perched for decades at the pinnacle of American science. Ever since 1993, this once-dominant scientific community has been in gradual decline. With the 2010 startup of research on the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the 2011 shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron, world leadership in elementary-particle physics has crossed the Atlantic and returned to Europe.

  4. Updated overview of the Tevatron control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, P.

    1987-10-01

    A single unified control system is used for all of the Fermilab accelerators and storage rings, from the LINAC to the Tevatron and antiproton source. A review of the general features is given - these include a 'host' system consisting of a number of minicomputers integrated with many distributed microprocessors in a variety of subsystems, usage of an in-house developed protocol, GAS, for communication between the two classes of machines, and a Parameter Page program, designed in conjunction with the system database, which allows a wide variety of quantities to be read and set in a coherent fashion. Recent developments include the implementation of a block transfer and 'fast time plot' facility through CAMAC, inclusion of several new computers in the host, a better understanding of system throughput, greatly improved reliability, advent of programs which sequence a large number of independent operations, and the construction of new hardware subsystems. Possible future system upgrades will be briefly presented. A summary of the utilization of a quite large software staff, at a time when the system is no longer under construction, will be discussed

  5. Digital signal processing the Tevatron BPM signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancelo, G.; James, E.; Wolbers, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Beam Position Monitor (TeV BPM) readout system at Fermilab's Tevatron has been updated and is currently being commissioned. The new BPMs use new analog and digital hardware to achieve better beam position measurement resolution. The new system reads signals from both ends of the existing directional stripline pickups to provide simultaneous proton and antiproton measurements. The signals provided by the two ends of the BPM pickups are processed by analog band-pass filters and sampled by 14-bit ADCs at 74.3MHz. A crucial part of this work has been the design of digital filters that process the signal. This paper describes the digital processing and estimation techniques used to optimize the beam position measurement. The BPM electronics must operate in narrow-band and wide-band modes to enable measurements of closed-orbit and turn-by-turn positions. The filtering and timing conditions of the signals are tuned accordingly for the operational modes. The analysis and the optimized result for each mode are presented

  6. SYMPOSIUM: Particle identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-07-15

    Typical elementary particle experiments consist of a source of interactions (an external beam and a fixed target or two colliding beams) and a detector system including most of the following components: a tracking system and analysis magnet, calorimetry (measurement of energy deposition), hadron and electron identification, muon detection, trigger counters and processors, and data acquisition electronics. Experiments aimed at future high luminosity hadron collider (proton-proton or proton-antiproton) projects such as an upgraded Tevatron at Fermilab, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) idea at CERN, and the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), must ideally cover the entire solid angle and be capable of not only surviving the collisions, but also providing high resolution event information at incredible interaction rates. The Symposium on Particle Identification at High Luminosity Hadron Colliders held at Fermilab from 5-7 April (sponsored by Fermilab, the US Department of Energy, and the SSC Central Design Group) focused on this single facet of detector technology.

  7. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    During the period of the 50's and the 60's colliders were developed. Prior to that time there were no colliders, and by 1965 a number of small devices had worked, good understanding had been achieved, and one could speculate, as Gersh Budker did, that in a few years 20% of high energy physics would come from colliders. His estimate was an under-estimate, for now essentially all of high energy physics comes from colliders. The author presents a brief review of that history: sketching the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological advances which made it all possible

  8. Development and applications of super high energy collider accelerators. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelaziz, E M [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evaluation of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab, and the large harden collider (LHD) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 Kilometer tunnel of the large electron positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 Kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachile in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particles. 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Development and applications of super high energy collider accelerators. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evaluation of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab, and the large harden collider (LHD) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 Kilometer tunnel of the large electron positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 Kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachile in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particles. 12 figs., 1 tab

  10. A TRD Trigger for the tevatron collider experiment at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utes, M.; Johnson, M.; Martin, M.

    1991-11-01

    A VME-based module for use as an input to the D0 Detector Level 1.5 Trigger is described. Its main function will be the confirmation of electron candidates flagged by the First Level Calorimeter Trigger using digitized data from the Transition Radiation Detector. Features of the board include the use of fast FIFOs to store incoming track coordinates, dual ported SRAM lookup tables for addressing integrated charge data and forming scalars, multiplier/accumulators for speed of calculation, and a single synchronous finite state machine to control all board operations. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Single-top-squark production via baryon-number-violating couplings at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E. L.; Harris, B. W.; Sullivan, Z.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the s-channel R-parity-violating production of a single light top squark tilde t 1 and its subsequent R-parity-conserving decay. For masses in the range 180-325 GeV, and R-parity-violating couplings λ 3ij double p rime > 0.02-0.05, we show that discovery of the top squark is possible with 2 fb -1 of integrated luminosity at run II. If no evidence for the top squark is found, the bound on λ 3ij '' can be reduced by up to an order of magnitude with existing data from run I, and by two orders of magnitude at run II

  12. A TRD Trigger for the tevatron collider experiment at D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utes, M.; Johnson, M.; Martin, M.

    1991-11-01

    A VME-based module for use as an input to the D0 Detector Level 1.5 Trigger is described. Its main function will be the confirmation of electron candidates flagged by the First Level Calorimeter Trigger using digitized data from the Transition Radiation Detector. Features of the board include the use of fast FIFOs to store incoming track coordinates, dual ported SRAM lookup tables for addressing integrated charge data and forming scalars, multiplier/accumulators for speed of calculation, and a single synchronous finite state machine to control all board operations. 4 refs., 3 figs

  13. Prospects for top at the Tevatron collider in the 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abachi, S.; Butler, J.; Baden, D.; Barnett, B.; Matthews, J.A.; Buchholz, D.; Gordon, H.; Protopopescu, S.; Hedin, D.; Kim, Shinhong; Sinervo, P.; Smith, D.; Wagner, R.; Wolf, Z.; Zieminska, D.

    1989-01-01

    We calculated the signal and background rates for top masses of 90, 120, 150, and 180 GeV for both the CDF and D null detectors. This allowed us to determine the prospects for both discovery as well as detailed study of heavy top depending on the luminosity. We have focused on the leptons + jets and dilepton signatures. We also consider the question of tagging b-jets and how that should reduce background and help in making a mass determination. 8 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Limits on quark-lepton compositeness and studies of W asymmetry at the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, A.

    1996-10-01

    Drell-Yan dilepton production at high invariant mass place strong limits on quark substructure. Compositeness limits from CDF Run 1, and expected sensitivity in Run II and TEV33 are presented. The W asymmetry data constrains the slope of the d/u quark distributions and significantly reduces the systematic error on the extracted value of the W mass

  15. Combination of the top-quark mass measurements from the Tevatron collider

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 9 (2012), "092003-1"-"092003-30" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : measured * CDF * DZERO * anti-p p * dilepton * (n)jet lepto Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.691, year: 2012

  16. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a W Boson in the isolated-track charged-lepton channel using the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzatu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has not yet been observed experimentally. If it exists, it explains the spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking and the origin of mass for gauge bosons and fermions. We test the validity of the SM by performing a search for the associated production of a Higgs boson and a W boson in the channel where the Higgs boson decays to a bottom-antibottom quark pair and the W boson decays to a charged lepton and a neutrino (the WH channel). We study a dataset of proton-antiproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Tevatron accelerator, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 , and recorded using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF).We select events consistent with the signature of exactly one charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy due to the undetected neutrino (MET) and two collimated streams of particles (jets), at least one of which is required to be identified as originating from a bottom quark. We improve the discrimination of Higgs signal from backgrounds through the use of an artificial neural network. Using a Bayesian statistical inference approach, we set for each hypothetical Higgs boson mass in the range 100-150 GeV/c 2 with 5 GeV/c 2 increments a 95% credibility level (CL) upper limit on the ratio between the Higgs production cross section times branching fraction and the SM prediction. Our main original contributions are the addition of a novel charged lepton reconstruction algorithm with looser requirements (ISOTRK) with respect the electron or muon tight criteria (TIGHT), as well as the introduction of a novel trigger-combination method that allows to maximize the event yield while avoiding trigger correlations and that is used for the ISOTRK category. The ISOTRK candidate is a high-transverse-momentum good-quality track isolated from other activity in the tracking system and not required to

  17. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a W Boson in the isolated-track charged-lepton channel using the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzatu, Adrian [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-08-01

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has not yet been observed experimentally. If it exists, it explains the spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking and the origin of mass for gauge bosons and fermions. We test the validity of the SM by performing a search for the associated production of a Higgs boson and a W boson in the channel where the Higgs boson decays to a bottom-antibottom quark pair and the W boson decays to a charged lepton and a neutrino (the WH channel). We study a dataset of proton-antiproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Tevatron accelerator, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb-1, and recorded using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF).We select events consistent with the signature of exactly one charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy due to the undetected neutrino (MET) and two collimated streams of particles (jets), at least one of which is required to be identified as originating from a bottom quark. We improve the discrimination of Higgs signal from backgrounds through the use of an artificial neural network. Using a Bayesian statistical inference approach, we set for each hypothetical Higgs boson mass in the range 100-150 GeV/c2 with 5 GeV/c2 increments a 95% credibility level (CL) upper limit on the ratio between the Higgs production cross section times branching fraction and the SM prediction. Our main original contributions are the addition of a novel charged lepton reconstruction algorithm with looser requirements (ISOTRK) with respect the electron or muon tight criteria (TIGHT), as well as the introduction of a novel trigger-combination method that allows to maximize the event yield while avoiding trigger correlations and that is used for the ISOTRK category. The ISOTRK candidate is a high-transverse-momentum good-quality track isolated from other activity in the tracking

  18. Central Exclusive Production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, Michael G. [Fermilab

    2014-11-10

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF, observed for the first time in hadron-hadron collisions photon-photon (gamma + gamma -> e+e-, mu+mu-) and photon-pomeron (gamma + \\BbbP -> J/psi, psi(2S)) interactions, as well as $p+\\bar{p}\\rightarrow p+\\chi_c+\\bar{p}$ by double pomeron exchange, \\BbbP + \\BbbP or DPE. Exclusive pi+pi- production was also measured at $\\sqrt{s} = 900~{\\rm GeV}$ and 1960 GeV; resonance structures are discussed.

  19. Stanford's linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, B.

    1985-01-01

    The peak of the construction phase of the Stanford Linear Collider, SLC, to achieve 50 GeV electron-positron collisions has now been passed. The work remains on schedule to attempt colliding beams, initially at comparatively low luminosity, early in 1987. (orig./HSI).

  20. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1985-01-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The author discusses the status of the machine and the detectors and give an overview of the physics which can be done at this new facility. He also gives some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built

  1. Coherent betatron instability in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogacz, S.A.; Harrison, M.; Ng, K.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The coherent betatron instability was first observed during the recent 1987-88 Tevatron fixed target run. In this operating mode 1000 consecutive bunches are loaded into the machine at 150 GeV with a bunch spacing of 18.8 /times/ 10 -9 sec (53 MHz). The normalized transverse emittance is typically 15 π /times/ 10 -6 m rad in each plane with a longitudinal emittance of about 1.5 eV-sec. The beam is accelerated to 800 GeV in 13 sec. and then it is resonantly extracted during a 23 sec flat top. As the run progressed the bunch intensities were increased until at about 1.4 /times/ 10 10 ppb (protons per bunch) we experienced the onset of a coherent horizontal oscillation taking place in the later stages of the acceleration cycle (>600 GeV). This rapidly developing coherent instability results in a significant emittance growth, which limits machine performance and in a catastrophic scenario it even prevents extraction of the beam. In this paper we will present a simple analytic description of the observed instability. We will show that a combination of a resistive wall coupled bunch effect and a single bunch slow head-tail instability is consistent with the above observations. Finally, a systematic numerical analysis of our model (growth-time vs chromaticity plots) points to the existence of the ≥1 slow head-tail modes as a plausible mechanism for the observed coherent instability. This last claim, as mentioned before, does not have conclusive experimental evidence, although it is based on a very good agreement between the measured values of the instability growth-time and the ones calculated on the basis of our model. 4 refs., 3 figs

  2. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Applications are now open for the 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, which will take place at CERN from 6 to 15 June 2007. The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic program and application procedure. The application deadline is 9 March 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be given on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be  supported by in-depth discussion sess...

  3. Constraints on unparticles from top properties measured at Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Rashidul; Dahiya, Mamta; Dutta, Sukanta

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the recent observations of the top pair production at Tevatron through flavor conserving and flavor violating channels via vector and tensor unparticles. The unparticle sector is considered to be a color singlet or octet. We have used the unparticle propagators modified for full conformal invariance to investigate the contribution of these unparticles to the observed forward backward asymmetry and the spin correlation in top pair production at Tevatron. We also discuss the impact of the flavor violating couplings of unparticles to the third generation quarks on (a) pair production of same sign tops/antitops at TeVatron and (b) the partial top decay width for Γ u (t → uU V )

  4. Simulation of beam-beam effects in tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, C.S.; Assadi, S.; Talman, R.

    1995-08-01

    The Fermilab accelerator complex is in the middle of an upgrade plan Fermilab III. In the last phase of this upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron will increase by at least one order of magnitude. In order to keep the number of interactions per crossing manageable for experiments, the number of bunches will be increased from 6 x 6 to 36 x 36 and finally to ∼100 x 100 bunches. The beam dynamics of the Tevatron has been studied from Beam-Beam effect point of view in a ''Strong-Weak'' representation with a single particle being tracked in presence of other beam. This paper describes the beam-beam effect in 6 x 6 operation of Tevatron

  5. Search for supersymmetric Higgs bosons in the D0 experiment at the Tevatron; Recherche de bosons de Higgs supersymetriques au Tevatron dans l'experience D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaut, M

    2006-09-15

    A search for the neutral Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model is performed in the 3 or 4 jets channels, pp-bar {yields} {phi}({yields} bb-bar)b(b-bar) with {phi} = h, H or A. For this purpose, the data collected with the D0 detector from 2002 to 2006 at the Tevatron hadronic collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV are analyzed. A complete study of the triggering is first done. The triggering conditions are optimized in order to keep the more signal fraction possible. Furthermore, a method is developed to predict the triggering efficiencies on our signal and backgrounds using only the data. Then an analysis method that allows the prediction of our background without the help of simulations is studied. No excess in events is observed in the data sample analyzed, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.9 fb{sup -1}, so limits are set in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model. At 95% confidence level, the following limits are found: tan({beta}) < 46 - 121 for m{sub {phi}} equals 100 - 170 GeV. (author)

  6. Search for supersymmetric Higgs bosons in the D0 experiment at the Tevatron; Recherche de bosons de Higgs supersymetriques au Tevatron dans l'experience D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaut, M

    2006-09-15

    A search for the neutral Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model is performed in the 3 or 4 jets channels, pp-bar {yields} {phi}({yields} bb-bar)b(b-bar) with {phi} = h, H or A. For this purpose, the data collected with the D0 detector from 2002 to 2006 at the Tevatron hadronic collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV are analyzed. A complete study of the triggering is first done. The triggering conditions are optimized in order to keep the more signal fraction possible. Furthermore, a method is developed to predict the triggering efficiencies on our signal and backgrounds using only the data. Then an analysis method that allows the prediction of our background without the help of simulations is studied. No excess in events is observed in the data sample analyzed, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.9 fb{sup -1}, so limits are set in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model. At 95% confidence level, the following limits are found: tan({beta}) < 46 - 121 for m{sub {phi}} equals 100 - 170 GeV. (author)

  7. Towards future circular colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  8. Signal processing for longitudinal parameters of the Tevatron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, S.; Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Flora, R.; Para, A.; Tollestrup, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the system known as the Tevatron SBD [1] which is used to provide information on the longitudinal parameters of coalesced beam bunches in the Tevatron. The system has been upgraded over the past year with a new digitizer and improved software. The quantities provided for each proton and antiproton bunch include the intensity, the longitudinal bunch profile, the timing of the bunch with respect to the low-level RF, the momentum spread and the longitudinal emittance. The system is capable of 2 Hz operation and is run at 1 Hz

  9. TEVATRON Searches for Large Extra Dimensions and Leptoquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents searches for large extra dimensions and leptoquarks in p(anti)p collisions from Run 1 at the Tevatron. Large extra dimensions are searched for in real graviton production with a monojet or monophoton and in virtual graviton exchange processes with electron or photon pairs. Results from leptoquark searches are presented for three generations of leptoquarks. No evidence of signal is found in any searches for large extra dimensions or leptoquarks and limits are placed. Perceptivities for these searches in the Tevatron's Run 2 are discussed and initial Run 2 data is presented. (author)

  10. SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Bell, R.A.; Brown, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    The SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER is designed to achieve an energy of 100 GeV in the electron-positron center-of-mass system by accelerating intense bunches of particles in the SLAC linac and transporting the electron and positron bunches in a special magnet system to a point where they are focused to a radius of about 2 microns and made to collide head on. The rationale for this new type of colliding beam system is discussed, the project is described, some of the novel accelerator physics issues involved are discussed, and some of the critical technical components are described

  11. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABE, T.; DAWSON, S.; HEINEMEYER, S.; MARCIANO, W.; PAIGE, F.; TURCOT, A.S.; ET

    2001-01-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e + e - linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e + e - linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e + e - linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e + e - experiments can provide

  12. Linear collider: a preview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  13. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  14. Linear collider: a preview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

  15. Superconducting linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) for particle accelerators have been demonstrated by successful operation of systems in the TRISTAN and LEP electron-positron collider rings respectively at the Japanese KEK Laboratory and at CERN. If performance continues to improve and costs can be lowered, this would open an attractive option for a high luminosity TeV (1000 GeV) linear collider

  16. A Measurement of the B0$\\bar{B}$0 mixing Using Muon Pairs at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschi, E. [Scuola Normale Superiore (SNS), Pisa (Italy)

    1995-10-01

    This thesis concerns the experimental study of B mesons (mesons containing a b quark) produced in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy of 1800 GeV. This work has been performed within the CDF collaboration. CDF is a general purpose detector located at Fermilab, in Batavia, which exploits the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider.

  17. Observation of s-channel production of single top quarks at the Tevatron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartlett, J F; Bartos, P; Bassler, U; Bauce, M; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Bedeschi, F; Begalli, M; Behari, S; Bellantoni, L; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bortoletto, D; Borysova, M; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brigliadori, L; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brucken, E; Bu, X B; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camacho-Pérez, E; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Chokheli, D; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Clutter, J; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corbo, M; Corcoran, M; Cordelli, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cutts, D; Das, A; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Davies, G; de Barbaro, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; D'Errico, M; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Edmunds, D; Elagin, A; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Farrington, S; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fernández Ramos, J P; Fiedler, F; Field, R; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Fuess, S; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gershtein, Y; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Ginther, G; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Golovanov, G; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hahn, S R; Haley, J; Han, J Y; Han, L; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Harder, K; Hare, M; Harel, A; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinrich, J; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herndon, M; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hocker, A; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ito, A S; Ivanov, A; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; James, E; Jang, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Jindariani, S; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Joshi, J; Jun, S Y; Jung, A W; Junk, T R; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Karmanov, D; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Kiselevich, I; Knoepfel, K; Kohli, J M; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurata, M; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lammers, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Limosani, A; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipeles, E; Lipton, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Luna-Garcia, R; Lungu, G; Lyon, A L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansour, J; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez-Ortega, J; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miao, T; Miconi, F; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondal, N K; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nagy, E; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Nunnemann, T; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Orduna, J; Ortolan, L; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pagliarone, C; Pal, A; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parker, W; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Pondrom, L; Popov, A V; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ranjan, N; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ripp-Baudot, I; Ristori, L; Rizatdinova, F; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Rominsky, M; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sajot, G; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santi, L; Santos, A S; Sato, K; Savage, G; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwanenberger, C; Schwarz, T; Schwienhorst, R; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Sekaric, J; Semenov, A; Severini, H; Sforza, F; Shabalina, E; Shalhout, S Z; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simak, V; Simonenko, A; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, H; Sonnenschein, L; Sorin, V; Soustruznik, K; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stark, J; Stentz, D; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Titov, M; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tokmenin, V V; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Verkheev, A Y; Vernieri, C; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vidal, M; Vilanova, D; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wahl, H D; Wallny, R; Wang, M H L S; Wang, S M; Warchol, J; Waters, D; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wobisch, M; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wood, D R; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, S; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Youn, S W; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, J M; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zucchelli, S

    2014-06-13

    We report the first observation of single-top-quark production in the s channel through the combination of the CDF and D0 measurements of the cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb(-1) per experiment. The measured cross section is σ(s) = 1.29(-0.24)(+0.26) pb. The probability of observing a statistical fluctuation of the background to a cross section of the observed size or larger is 1.8 × 10(-10), corresponding to a significance of 6.3 standard deviations for the presence of an s-channel contribution to the production of single-top quarks.

  18. Studies and calculations of transverse emittance growth in high-energy proton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.; Jackson, G.

    1989-03-01

    In the operation of proton-antiproton colliders, an important goal is to maximize the integrated luminosity. During such operations in the Fermilab Tevatron, the transverse beam emittances were observed to grow unexpectedly quickly, thus causing a serious reduction of the luminosity. We have studied this phenomenon experimentally and theoretically. A formula for the emittance growth rate, due to random dipole kicks, is derived. In the experiment, RF phase noise of known amplitude was deliberately injected into the Tevatron to kick the beam randomly, via dispersion at the RF cavities. Theory and experiment are found to agree reasonably well. We also briefly discuss the problem of quadrupole kicks. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  20. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detector, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The int...

  1. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The in...

  2. Towards a Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.

    2011-01-01

    A multi TeV Muon Collider is required for the full coverage of Terascale physics. The physics potential for a Muon Collider at ∼3 TeV and integrated luminosity of 1 ab -1 is outstanding. Particularly strong cases can be made if the new physics is SUSY or new strong dynamics. Furthermore, a staged Muon Collider can provide a Neutrino Factory to fully disentangle neutrino physics. If a narrow s-channel resonance state exists in the multi-TeV region, the physics program at a Muon Collider could begin with less than 10 31 cm -2 s -1 luminosity. Detailed studies of the physics case for a 1.5-4 TeV Muon Collider are just beginning. The goals of such studies are to: (1) identify benchmark physics processes; (2) study the physics dependence on beam parameters; (3) estimate detector backgrounds; and (4) compare the physics potential of a Muon Collider with those of the ILC, CLIC and upgrades to the LHC.

  3. Photon collider at TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-01-01

    High energy photon colliders (γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e + e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3)L e + e - . Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e + e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e + e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is ''an optical storage ring (optical trap)'' with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems

  4. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were check...

  5. Tevatron-for-LHC Report: Preparations for Discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullin, Salavat; Asai, Shoji; Atramentov, Oleksiy Vladimirovich; Baer, Howard; Balazs, Csaba; Bartalini, Paolo; Belyaev, Alexander; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Birkedal, Andreas; Buescher, Volker; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Mu-Chun; Clement, Christophe; Datta, AseshKrishna; de Boer, Ytsen R.; De Roeck, Albert; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Gershtein, Yuri S.; Glenzinski, Douglas A.; Group, Robert Craig; Heinemeyer, Sven; Heldmann, Michael; Hubisz, Jay; Karlsson, Martin; Kong, Kyoungchul; Korytov, Andrey; Kraml, Sabine; Krupovnickas, Tadas; Lafaye, Remi; Lane, Kenneth; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lehner, Frank; Lin, Cheng-Ju; Macesanu, Cosmin; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Menon, Arjun; Milstead, David; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Morel, Julien; Morrissey, David; Mrenna, Steve; O'Farrill, Jorge; Pakhotin, Yu.; Perelstein, Maxim; Plehn, Tilman; Rainwater, David; Raklev, Are; Schmitt, Michael; Scurlock, Bobby; Sherstnev, Alexander; Skands, Peter Z.; Sullivan, Zack; Tait, Timothy M.P.; Tata, Xerxes; Torchiani, Ingo; Trocme, Benjamin; Wagner, Carlos; Weiglein, Georg; Zerwas, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    This is the "TeV4LHC" report of the "Physics Landscapes" Working Group, focused on facilitating the start-up of physics explorations at the LHC by using the experience gained at the Tevatron. We present experimental and theoretical results that can be employed to probe various scenarios for physics beyond the Standard Model.

  6. Experience with the new reverse injection scheme in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saritepe, S.; Goderre, G.; Annala, G.; Hanna, B.; Braun, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the new injection scenario the antiproton beam is injected onto a helical Tevatron orbit to avoid the detrimental effects of the beam-beam interaction at 150 GeV. The new scenario required changes in the tuning procedures. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning, therefore the antiproton injection line has to be tuned with protons by reverse injecting them from the Tevatron into the Main Ring. Previously, the reverse injection was performed in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. The orbit closure was performed in the Main Ring. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved, separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS (Tevatron Beam Synchronized Clock) event $D8 as MRBS (Main Ring Beam Synchronized Clock) $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the Main Ring

  7. On Self-Similarity of Top Production at Tevatron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tokarev, M. V.; Zborovský, Imrich

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 8 (2012), s. 815-820 ISSN 2153-120X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08002; GA MŠk LA08015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : top quark * Tevatron Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?paperID=21690

  8. Searches for New Phenomena at the Tevatron and at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Arnd

    2006-10-01

    Recent results on searches for new physics at Run II of the Tevatron and highlights from HERA are reported. The searches cover many different final states and a wide range of models. All analyses have at this point led to negative results, but some interesting anomalies have been found.

  9. Surge recovery techniques for the Tevatron cold compressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A.L.; Makara, J.N.; Theilacker, J.C.; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, made by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high-energy operations [1]. The compressor is designed to pump 60 g/s of 3.6 K saturated helium vapor at a pressure ratio of 2.8, with an off-design range of 40 to 70 g/s and operating speeds between 40 and 95 krpm. Since initial commissioning in 1993, Tevatron transient conditions such as quench recovery have led to multiple-location machine trips as a result of the cold compressors entering the surge regime. Historically, compressors operating at lower inlet pressures and higher speeds have been especially susceptible to these machine trips and it was not uncommon to have multiple compressor trips during large multiple-house quenches. In order to cope with these events and limit accelerator down time, surge recovery techniques have been implemented in an attempt to prevent the compressors from tripping once the machine entered this surge regime. This paper discusses the different methods of surge recovery that have been employed. Data from tests performed at the Cryogenic Test Facility at Fermilab as well as actual Tevatron operational data were utilized. In order to aid in the determination of the surge region, a full mapping study was undertaken to characterize the entire pressure field of the cold compressor. These techniques were then implemented and tested at several locations in the Tevatron with some success

  10. Tevatron: recent results and prospects at the upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Naba K.

    1998-01-01

    In this article, we review some of the recent results from CDF and DΦ experiments at the Tevatron and their prospects at the upgrade. Among the topics discussed are top quark physics, electroweak physics, QCD physics and new physics beyond standard model. (author)

  11. Explaining Tevatron leptons photons missing- T events with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The CDF experiment reported a lepton photon missing transverse energy. (/ET) signal 3σ in excess of the standard model prediction in Tevatron Run I data. The excess can be explained by the resonant production of a smuon, which subsequently decays to a muon, a photon and a gravitino. Here, we perform ...

  12. Angular distribution of Drell-Yan process at hadron colliders to NLO-QCD in models of TeV scale gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.

    2006-01-01

    In TeV scale gravity models, for dilepton production at hadron colliders, we present the NLO-QCD corrections for the double differential cross section in the invariant mass and scattering angle. For both ADD and RS models, the quantitative impact of QCD corrections for extra dimension searches at LHC and Tevatron are investigated. We present the K-factors for both ADD and RS models at LHC and Tevatron. Inclusion of QCD corrections to NLO stabilises the cross section with respect to scale variations

  13. Search for squarks and gluinos in the D0 experiment of the Run-II-a at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdier, P.

    2007-11-01

    The D0 experiment is recording pp-bar collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV since the beginning of the Run II-a of the Tevatron in 2001. The design of processor boards for the D0 level 2 trigger system is first presented. Those boards were installed in 2003, and they have been working perfectly since that date. Performances of missing transverse energy (/ ET ) reconstruction are then described. This quantity is important at hadron colliders especially for new particles searches. Finally, squarks and gluinos, supersymmetric partners of quarks and gluons, could be the most copiously produced supersymmetric particles at the Tevatron, if they are sufficiently light. Those particles were searched for in 0.96 fb -1 of data recorded by D0 during the Run II-a. The final state consists of jets and missing transverse energy. The numbers of observed events are in good agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Lower mass limits at 95 % confidence level are obtained on the squark and gluino masses in the framework of the mSUGRA model. Contributions to other D0 data analyses are also shortly described. Those analyses are the search for first generation leptoquarks and the search for squarks in jets+τ(s)+E T events. The possibility to constrain a 'Little Higgs' model using the results of the jets+E T searches is then discussed. (author)

  14. Signatures for isoscalar weak vector bosons at pp and panti p colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, U.; Schwarzer, K.H.

    1986-01-01

    In a wide class of composite models of quarks, leptons and W-bosons the existence of isoscalar weak vector bosons Y or Y L is predicted. They either couple to the weak hypercharge current j μ Y or its left-handed part j Y μL =j μ YL and have a mass in the few hundred GeV range. The signatures of such particles at future hadron-hadron colliders is studied by means of an effective lagrangian incorporating vector dominance. Quantities relevant for detecting and studying isoscalar weak vector bosons turn out to be sensitive to the mixing strength λ Y of the Y- or Y L -boson with the photon. The Y or Y L are expected to be produced abundantly at multi-TeV colliders. The Tevatron collider will be able to see a Y L -boson if its mass is ≤400 GeV. (orig.)

  15. Photoproduction at collider energies: from RHIC and HERA to the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Baltz, A; Brodsky, S J; D'Enterria, D G; Dreyer, U; Engel, R; Frankfurt, L; Gorbunov, Y; Guzey, V; Hamilton, A; Klasen, M; Klein, S R; Kowalski, H; Levonian, S; Lourenço, C; Machado, M V T; Nachtmann, O; Nagy, Z; Nystrand, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Ramalhete, P; Savin, A; Scapparone, E; Schicker, R; Silvermyr, D; Strikman, M I; Valkárová, A; Vogt, R; Yilmaz, M; Enterria, David d'

    2007-01-01

    We present the mini-proceedings of the workshop on "Photoproduction at collider energies: from RHIC and HERA to the LHC" held at the European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT*, Trento) from January 15 to 19, 2007. The workshop gathered both theorists and experimentalists to discuss the current status of investigations of high-energy photon-induced processes at different colliders (HERA, RHIC, and Tevatron) as well as preparations for extension of these studies at the LHC. The main physics topics covered were: (i) small-$x$ QCD in photoproduction studies with protons and in electromagnetic (aka. ultraperipheral) nucleus-nucleus collisions, (ii) hard diffraction physics at hadron colliders, and (iii) photon-photon collisions at very high energies: electroweak and beyond the Standard Model processes. These mini-proceedings consist of an introduction and short summaries of the talks presented at the meeting.

  16. Assessing Risk in Costing High-energy Accelerators: from Existing Projects to the Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    High-energy accelerators are large projects funded by public money, developed over the years and constructed via major industrial contracts both in advanced technology and in more conventional domains such as civil engineering and infrastructure, for which they often constitute one-of markets. Assessing their cost, as well as the risk and uncertainty associated with this assessment is therefore an essential part of project preparation and a justified requirement by the funding agencies. Stemming from the experience with large circular colliders at CERN, LEP and LHC, as well as with the Main Injector, the Tevatron Collider Experiments and Accelerator Upgrades, and the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab, we discuss sources of cost variance and derive cost risk assessment methods applicable to the future linear collider, through its two technical approaches for ILC and CLIC. We also address disparities in cost risk assessment imposed by regional differences in regulations, procedures and practices.

  17. Measurement of the t (bar t) cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation measures the t(bar t) production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p(bar p) collider with center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 ± 0.1 fb -1 . A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t(bar t) events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t(bar t) production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be σ t# bar t# = 7.14 ± 0.25 (stat) -0.86 +0.61 (sys) pb.

  18. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander [Fermilab; Bruce, Roderik [CERN; Redaelli, Stefano [CERN; Rossi, Adriana [CERN; Salvachua, Belen [CERN

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  19. Weak boson emission in hadron collider processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, U.

    2007-01-01

    The O(α) virtual weak radiative corrections to many hadron collider processes are known to become large and negative at high energies, due to the appearance of Sudakov-like logarithms. At the same order in perturbation theory, weak boson emission diagrams contribute. Since the W and Z bosons are massive, the O(α) virtual weak radiative corrections and the contributions from weak boson emission are separately finite. Thus, unlike in QED or QCD calculations, there is no technical reason for including gauge boson emission diagrams in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In most calculations of the O(α) electroweak radiative corrections, weak boson emission diagrams are therefore not taken into account. Another reason for not including these diagrams is that they lead to final states which differ from that of the original process. However, in experiment, one usually considers partially inclusive final states. Weak boson emission diagrams thus should be included in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In this paper, I examine the role of weak boson emission in those processes at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC for which the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections are known to become large at high energies (inclusive jet, isolated photon, Z+1 jet, Drell-Yan, di-boson, tt, and single top production). In general, I find that the cross section for weak boson emission is substantial at high energies and that weak boson emission and the O(α) virtual weak radiative corrections partially cancel

  20. Electron lenses for the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari†, G; Bruce, R; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Salvachua Ferrando, B

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beamswhose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-bybunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beamcompensation, and for the demonstration of halo scrapingwith hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. A conceptual design was recently completed, and the project is moving towards a technical design in 2014–2015 for construction in 2015–2017, if needed, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing collimation needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of the...