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Sample records for tev spectral characterization

  1. SYNTHESIS, SPECTRAL CHARACTERIZATIONS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    60.55) 4.46 ..... The carbon atom C5, bonded to the chlorine atom, appears at ca. 124 ppm in all of the compounds [63, 70]. Table 6. 13C-NMR spectral (APT) data of the compounds (δC, as ppm, in DMSO-d6). Chloro-hydroxyphenyl carbons.

  2. The spectral imaging facility: Setup characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, Simone, E-mail: simone.deangelis@iaps.inaf.it; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Manzari, Paola Olga [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Ammannito, Eleonora [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567 (United States); Di Iorio, Tatiana [ENEA, UTMEA-TER, Rome (Italy); Liberati, Fabrizio [Opto Service SrL, Campagnano di Roma (RM) (Italy); Tarchi, Fabio; Dami, Michele; Olivieri, Monica; Pompei, Carlo [Selex ES, Campi Bisenzio (Italy); Mugnuolo, Raffaele [Italian Space Agency, ASI, Spatial Geodesy Center, Matera (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The SPectral IMager (SPIM) facility is a laboratory visible infrared spectrometer developed to support space borne observations of rocky bodies of the solar system. Currently, this laboratory setup is used to support the DAWN mission, which is in its journey towards the asteroid 1-Ceres, and to support the 2018 Exo-Mars mission in the spectral investigation of the Martian subsurface. The main part of this setup is an imaging spectrometer that is a spare of the DAWN visible infrared spectrometer. The spectrometer has been assembled and calibrated at Selex ES and then installed in the facility developed at the INAF-IAPS laboratory in Rome. The goal of SPIM is to collect data to build spectral libraries for the interpretation of the space borne and in situ hyperspectral measurements of planetary materials. Given its very high spatial resolution combined with the imaging capability, this instrument can also help in the detailed study of minerals and rocks. In this paper, the instrument setup is first described, and then a series of test measurements, aimed to the characterization of the main subsystems, are reported. In particular, laboratory tests have been performed concerning (i) the radiation sources, (ii) the reference targets, and (iii) linearity of detector response; the instrumental imaging artifacts have also been investigated.

  3. Enhancing the Spectral Hardening of Cosmic TeV Photons by Mixing with Axionlike Particles in the Magnetized Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanino, Daniele; Vazza, Franco; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Viel, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale extragalactic magnetic fields may induce conversions between very-high-energy photons and axionlike particles (ALPs), thereby shielding the photons from absorption on the extragalactic background light. However, in simplified "cell" models, used so far to represent extragalactic magnetic fields, this mechanism would be strongly suppressed by current astrophysical bounds. Here we consider a recent model of extragalactic magnetic fields obtained from large-scale cosmological simulations. Such simulated magnetic fields would have large enhancement in the filaments of matter. As a result, photon-ALP conversions would produce a significant spectral hardening for cosmic TeV photons. This effect would be probed with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array detector. This possible detection would give a unique chance to perform a tomography of the magnetized cosmic web with ALPs.

  4. Calibration and characterization of spectral imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polder, Gerrit; van der Heijden, Gerie W.

    2001-09-01

    Spectral image sensors provide images with a large umber of contiguous spectral channels per pixel. This paper describes the calibration of spectrograph based spectral imaging systems. The relation between pixel position and measured wavelength was determined using three different wavelength calibration sources. Results indicate that for spectral calibration a source with very small peaks,such as a HgAr source, is preferred to arrow band filters. A second order polynomial model gives a better fit than a linear model for the pixel to wavelength mapping. The signal to noise ratio (SNR)is determined per wavelength. In the blue part of the spectrum,the SNR was lower than in the green and red part.This is due to a decreased quantum efficiency of the CCD,a smaller transmission coefficient of the spectrograph,as well as poor performance of the illuminant. Increasing the amount of blue light,using additional Fluorescent tube with special coating increased the SNR considerably. Furthermore, the spatial and spectral resolution of the system are determined.These can be used to choose appropriate binning factors to decrease the image size without losing information.

  5. Spectral characterization and DNA binding properties of lanthanide(III)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with CT-DNA was investigated using absorption spectrophotometry. Based on spectral changes, groove binding of complexes to DNA is suggested. KEY WORDS: Lanthanide(III) complexes, 2-Acetylpyridine isonicotinoylhydrazone, Spectral characterization, DNA binding. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2016, 30(2), 221-230.

  6. Broad Band Spectral Index TeV Blazars Detected by Fermi LAT ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and we seek to find the same kind of flux states (low/average/high), and we define the minimum flux in ... According to the definition of composite spectral indices (Ledden & O'Dell 1985) and the data compiled by ... (U1231202, 11063004), the innovation team of gravitation theory research in Yun- nan Normal University ...

  7. Efficient generation and characterization of spectrally factorable biphotons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changchen; Bo, Cao; Niu, Murphy Yuezhen; Xu, Feihu; Zhang, Zheshen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H; Wong, Franco N C

    2017-04-03

    Spectrally unentangled biphotons with high single-spatiotemporal-mode purity are highly desirable for many quantum information processing tasks. We generate biphotons with an inferred heralded-state spectral purity of 99%, the highest to date without any spectral filtering, by pulsed spontaneous parametric downconversion in a custom-fabricated periodically-poled KTiOPO4 crystal under extended Gaussian phase-matching conditions. To efficiently characterize the joint spectral intensity of the generated biphotons at high spectral resolution, we employ a commercially available dispersion compensation module (DCM) with a dispersion equivalent to 100 km of standard optical fiber and with an insertion loss of only 2.8 dB. Compared with the typical method of using two temperature-stabilized equal-length fibers that incurs an insertion loss of 20 dB per fiber, the DCM approach achieves high spectral resolution in a much shorter measurement time. Because the dispersion amount and center wavelengths of DCMs can be easily customized, spectral characterization in a wide range of quantum photonic applications should benefit significantly from this technique.

  8. Synthesis, spectral characterization and in vitro antibacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shafqat Nadeem

    2015-12-17

    Dec 17, 2015 ... GPCR L = GPCR ligand, ICM = ion channel modulator, KI = kinase inhibitor, NRL = nuclear receptor ligand, PI = protease inhibitor,. EI = enzyme inhibitor. New Palladium(II) iodide complexes ... PSA has been shown to be a very good descriptor characterizing drug absorption, including intestinal absorp-.

  9. Bedform characterization through 2D spectral analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefebvre, Alice; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Winter, Christian

    2011-01-01

    energetic peak of the 2D spectrum was found and its energy, frequency and direction were calculated. A power-law was fitted to the average of slices taken through the 2D spectrum; its slope and y-intercept were calculated. Using these results the test area was morphologically classified into 4 distinct...... morphological regions. The most energetic peak and the slope and yintercept of the power-law showed high values above the crest of the primary bedforms and scour holes, low values in areas without bedforms, and intermediate values in areas with secondary bedforms. The secondary bedform dimensions...... for morphological classification of the seabed and for bedform characterization, being most efficient in areas characterized by bedforms with regular dimensions and directions....

  10. Ultrasonic spectral analysis for nuclear fuel characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, Douglas B.; Bittencourt, Marcelo S.Q.; Leal, Antonio M.M., E-mail: douglasbaroni@ien.gov.b, E-mail: bittenc@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Ceramic materials have been widely used for various purposes in many different industries due to certain characteristics, such as high melting point and high resistance to corrosion. Concerning the areas of applications, automobile, aeronautics, naval and even nuclear, the characteristics of these materials should be strictly controlled. In the nuclear area, ceramics are of great importance once they are the nuclear fuel pellets and must have, among other features, a well controlled porosity due to mechanical strength and thermal conductivity required by the application. Generally, the techniques used to characterize nuclear fuel are destructive and require costly equipment and facilities. This paper aims to present a nondestructive technique for ceramic characterization using ultrasound. This technique differs from other ultrasonic techniques because it uses ultrasonic pulse in frequency domain instead of time domain, associating the characteristics of the analyzed material with its frequency spectrum. In the present work, 40 Alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) ceramic pellets with porosities ranging from 5% to 37%, in absolute terms measured by Archimedes technique, were tested. It can be observed that the frequency spectrum of each pellet varies according to its respective porosity and microstructure, allowing a fast and non-destructive association of the same characteristics with the same spectra pellets. (author)

  11. Spectral characterization of soil and coal contamination on snow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 2. Spectral characterization of soil and coal contamination on snow reflectance using hyperspectral analysis. S K Singh A V ... The absorption peak asymmetry was not significant for soil contamination but showed a nature towards left asymmetry for coal.

  12. Synthesis, spectral characterization and antihaemostatic activity of 1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 118; Issue 2. Synthesis, spectral characterization and antihaemostatic activity of 1,2,4-triazoles ... Author Affiliations. Ravindra R Kamble1 Belgur S Sudha1. Department of Chemistry and Food Science, Yuvaraja's College, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 005 ...

  13. Keck array and BICEP3: spectral characterization of 5000+ detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkare, K. S.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.; Amiri, M.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J. A.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E. W.; Burger, B.; Connors, J.; Crill, B. P.; Davis, G.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S. T.; Golwala, S. R.; Gordon, M. S.; Grayson, J. A.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Hristov, V. V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Kang, J. H.; Karpel, E.; Kefeli, S.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Mason, P.; Megerian, K. G.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pryke, C. L.; Reintsema, C. D.; Richter, S.; Schwarz, R.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Teply, G. P.; Thompson, K. L.; Tolan, J. E.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A.; Weber, A.; Wong, C. L.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.

    2014-08-01

    The inflationary paradigm of the early universe predicts a stochastic background of gravitational waves which would generate a B-mode polarization pattern in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. Precise measurement of B-modes is one of the most compelling observational goals in modern cosmology. Since 2011, the Keck Array has deployed over 2500 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer detectors at 100 and 150 GHz to the South Pole in pursuit of degree-scale B-modes, and Bicep3 will follow in 2015 with 2500 more at 100 GHz. Characterizing the spectral response of these detectors is important for controlling systematic effects that could lead to leakage from the temperature to polarization signal, and for understanding potential coupling to atmospheric and astrophysical emission lines. We present complete spectral characterization of the Keck Array detectors, made with a Martin-Puplett Fourier Transform Spectrometer at the South Pole, and preliminary spectra of Bicep3 detectors taken in lab. We show band centers and effective bandwidths for both Keck Array bands, and use models of the atmosphere at the South Pole to cross check our absolute calibration. Our procedure for obtaining interferograms in the field with automated 4-axis coupling to the focal plane represents an important step towards efficient and complete spectral characterization of next-generation instruments more than 10000 detectors.

  14. Understanding the Spectral Signature Characterization of Cropland Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boren, E. J.; Boschetti, L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate and reliable cropland burned area products are essential for aiding estimates of trace atmospheric gases and particles which influence atmospheric chemistry dynamics and air quality. Cropland residue burning has been estimated to account for approximately 8-11% of all global fires (Korontzi et al. 2006). Cropland residue burning is also a significant fraction of atmospheric emissions at the local level. Timely and accurate assessments of cropland fire activity are needed by local and regional administrators involved in carbon emission, human health, and air quality regulations. Remote sensing systems used for monitoring fire activity have significant detection uncertainty due to ambiguous spectral characteristics of cropland burning. The present research is focused on the quantitative characterization of the spectral signature of cropland burning by monitoring the spectral signal throughout the full growing, harvest, and burning periods. Field data collection was conducted in the southern Palouse region of Idaho and Washington. Reflectance was measured on a test area of spring wheat fields with an analytical spectral device (ASD) spectrometer. All the dates for field data collections are coincident with Landsat 8 overpasses, and the spatial sampling of field measurements were performed following the VALERI protocol for upscaling to 30 meter pixels (Baret et al. 2005).

  15. Type II Supernova Spectral Diversity. I. Observations, Sample Characterization, and Spectral Line Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario; Morrell, Nidia; González-Gaitan, Santiago; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Phillips, Mark M.; Galbany, Lluis; Folatelli, Gastón; Dessart, Luc; Contreras, Carlos; Della Valle, Massimo; Freedman, Wendy L.; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Madore, Barry F.; Maza, José; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Prieto, Jose Luis; González, Luis; Cappellaro, Enrico; Navarrete, Mauricio; Pizzella, Alessandro; Ruiz, Maria T.; Smith, R. Chris; Turatto, Massimo

    2017-11-01

    We present 888 visual-wavelength spectra of 122 nearby type II supernovae (SNe II) obtained between 1986 and 2009, and ranging between 3 and 363 days post-explosion. In this first paper, we outline our observations and data reduction techniques, together with a characterization based on the spectral diversity of SNe II. A statistical analysis of the spectral matching technique is discussed as an alternative to nondetection constraints for estimating SN explosion epochs. The time evolution of spectral lines is presented and analyzed in terms of how this differs for SNe of different photometric, spectral, and environmental properties: velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths, decline rates, magnitudes, time durations, and environment metallicity. Our sample displays a large range in ejecta expansion velocities, from ˜9600 to ˜1500 km s-1 at 50 days post-explosion with a median {{{H}}}α value of 7300 km s-1. This is most likely explained through differing explosion energies. Significant diversity is also observed in the absolute strength of spectral lines, characterized through their pseudo-equivalent widths. This implies significant diversity in both temperature evolution (linked to progenitor radius) and progenitor metallicity between different SNe II. Around 60% of our sample shows an extra absorption component on the blue side of the {{{H}}}α P-Cygni profile (“Cachito” feature) between 7 and 120 days since explosion. Studying the nature of Cachito, we conclude that these features at early times (before ˜35 days) are associated with Si II λ 6355, while past the middle of the plateau phase they are related to high velocity (HV) features of hydrogen lines. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere

  16. Spectral Characterization of Hierarchical Modularity in Product Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Somwrita; Dong, Andy; Henderson, James A; Robinson, P A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of the architectural modularity of products and systems, existing modularity metrics or algorithms do not account for overlapping and hierarchically embedded modules. This paper presents a graph theoretic spectral approach to characterize the degree of modular hierarchical-overlapping organization in the architecture of products and complex engineered systems. It is shown that the eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of a product architecture graph can reveal layers of hidden modular or hierarchical modular organization that are not immediately visible in the predefined architectural description. We use the approach to analyze and discuss several design, management, and system resilience implications for complex engineered systems.

  17. Characterization of spectral compression of OFDM symbols using optical time lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Kasper Meldgaard; Guan, Pengyu; Kjøller, Niels-Kristian

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of a double-time-lens subsystem for spectral compression of OFDM symbols. We derive optimized parameter settings by simulations and experimental characterization. The required chirp for OFDM spectral compression is very large.......We present a detailed investigation of a double-time-lens subsystem for spectral compression of OFDM symbols. We derive optimized parameter settings by simulations and experimental characterization. The required chirp for OFDM spectral compression is very large....

  18. Microburger Biochemistry: Extraction and Spectral Characterization of Myoglyobin from Hamburger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylkas, Sheri A.; Andersson, Laura A.

    1997-04-01

    This experiment provides a demonstration of useful biochemical methods at a Basic or Advanced Level, depending upon the available spectrophotometric equipment. The protocol combines protein extraction, ox-i-dation and reduction, and simple spectroscopic analysis, as well as gel filtration chromatography and generation/analysis of spectral scans. Mammalian myoglobin (Mb) is a monomeric O2-binding protein that functions in muscle to store oxygen. The single iron protoporphyrin IX (heme) group is bound to protein by the amino acid Histidine93. The common, stable forms, Met-Mb and Oxy-Mb are studied because in a non-living system, red Oxy-Mb is converted to brown Met-Mb as bound O2 molecule is released. Mb is easily extracted from steak, to illustrate and address why fresh meat is red and aged meat is brown; the protein has unique spectral properties that are diagnostic for characterization of sample identity. After application of heme redox chemical methods, the MetMb or OxyMb samples can be studied spectroscopically. The color change between Oxy-Mb and Met-Mb is dramatic (illustrating bright red fresh meat vs. brown older meat), and method(s) used in this laboratory are simple, inexpensive, and non-harmful to the student.

  19. Spectral characterization of dielectric materials using terahertz measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Jeffrey M.

    The performance of modern high frequency components and electronic systems are often limited by the properties of the materials from which they are made. Over the past decade, there has been an increased emphasis on the development of new, high performance dielectrics for use in high frequency systems. The development of these materials requires novel broadband characterization, instrumentation, and extraction techniques, from which models can be formulated. For this project several types of dielectric sheets were characterized at terahertz (THz) frequencies using quasi-optical (free-space) techniques. These measurement systems included a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS, scalar), a Time Domain Spectrometer (TDS, vector), a Scalar Network Analyzer (SNA), and a THz Vector Network Analyzer (VNA). Using these instruments the THz spectral characteristics of dielectric samples were obtained. Polarization based anisotropy was observed in many of the materials measured using vector systems. The TDS was the most informative and flexible instrument for dielectric characterization at THz frequencies. To our knowledge, this is the first such comprehensive study to be performed. Anisotropy effects within materials that do not come into play at microwave frequencies (e.g. ~10 GHz) were found, in many cases, to increase measured losses at THz frequencies by up to an order of magnitude. The frequency dependent properties obtained during the course of this study included loss tangent, permittivity (index of refraction), and dielectric constant. The results were largely consistent between all the different systems and correlated closely to manufacturer specifications over a wide frequency range (325 GHz-1.5 THz). Anisotropic behavior was observed for some of the materials. Non-destructive evaluation and testing (NDE/NDT) techniques were used throughout. A precision test fixture was developed to accomplish these measurements. Time delay, insertion loss, and S-parameters were

  20. Insomnia Characterization: From Hypnogram to Graph Spectral Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Vargas, Ramiro; Ahmed, Beena; Wessel, Niels; Penzel, Thomas; Cvetkovic, Dean

    2016-10-01

    To quantify and differentiate control and insomnia sleep onset patterns through biomedical signal processing of overnight polysomnograms. The approach consisted of three tandem modules: 1) biosignal processing module, which used state-space time-varying autoregressive moving average (TVARMA) processes with recursive particle filter, 2) hypnogram generation module that implemented a fuzzy inference system (FIS), and 3) insomnia characterization module that discriminated between control and subjects with insomnia using a logistic regression model trained with a set of similarity measures ( d1, d2 , d3, d4). The study employed sleep onset periods from 16 control and 16 subjects with insomnia. State-spaced TVARMA processes with recursive particle filtering provided resilience to nonlinear, nonstationary, and non-Gaussian conditions of biosignals. FIS managed automated sleep scoring robust to intersubjects' and interraters' variability. The similarity distances quantified in a scalar measure the transitions amongst sleep onset stages, computed from expert and automated hypnograms. A statistical set of unpaired two-tailed t -tests suggested that distances d1 , d2, and d3 had larger statistical significance ( ) to characterize sleeping patterns. The logistic regression model classified control and subjects with insomnia with sensitivity 87 % , specificity 75 %, and accuracy 81 %. Our approach can perform a supportive role in either biosignal processing, sleep staging, insomnia characterization, or all the previous, coping with time-consuming procedures and massive data volumes of standard protocols. The introduction of graph spectral theory and logistic regression for the diagnosis of insomnia represents a novel concept, attempting to describe complex sleep dynamics throughout transitions networks and scalar measures.

  1. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  2. Results and Lessons from a Decade of Terra MODIS On-Orbit Spectral Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X.; Choi, T.; Che, N.; Wang, Z.; Dodd, J.

    2010-01-01

    Since its launch in December 1999, the NASA EOS Terra MODIS has successfully operated for more than a decade. MODIS makes observations in 36 spectral bands from visible (VIS) to longwave infrared (LWIR) and at three nadir spatial resolutions: 250m (2 bands), 500m (5 bands), and 1km (29 bands). In addition to its on-board calibrators designed for the radiometric calibration, MODIS was built with a unique device, called the spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). It can be configured in three different modes: radiometric, spatial, and spectral. When it is operated in the spectral modes, the SRCA can monitor changes in Sensor spectral performance for the VIS and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. For more than 10 years, the SRCA operation has continued to provide valuable information for MODIS on-orbit spectral performance. This paper briefly describes SRCA on-orbit operation and calibration activities; it presents decade-long spectral characterization results for Terra MODIS VIS and NIR spectral bands in terms of chances in their center wavelengths (CW) and bandwidths (BW). It is shown that the SRCA on-orbit wavelength calibration capability remains satisfactory. For most spectral bands, the changes in CW and BW are less than 0.5 and 1 nm, respectively. Results and lessons from Terra MODIS on-orbit spectral characterization have and will continue to benefit its successor, Aqua MODIS, and other future missions.

  3. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography characterization of pediatric epiretinal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Adam L; Folgar, Francisco A; Tong, Amy Y; Toth, Cynthia A

    2014-07-01

    To compare the macular morphology of pediatric versus adult eyes with epiretinal membrane (ERM) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and identify characteristics associated with postoperative visual acuity. This retrospective study analyzed spectral domain optical coherence tomography from pediatric subjects and a randomly selected cohort of adult subjects with ERM. Morphologic retinal and ERM features were graded by two masked spectral domain optical coherence tomography readers and compared with a postoperative change in visual acuity. Pediatric ERMs (age, 0.3-16.5 years) were more confluently attached to the retina than adult ERMs (age, 40-88 years; P = 0.009) and had less fibrillary appearance of the inner retina when separation was present (P = 0.044). Pediatric ERMs were associated with more vessel dragging (P = 0.019) and less external limiting membrane (P = 0.001) and inner segment band visibility (P = 0.010), with a trend toward foveal sparing by ERM (P = 0.051) and "taco" retinal folds (P = 0.052) compared with adult eyes. Visual acuity improvement was associated with intact (P = 0.048) and smooth (P = 0.055, trend) inner segment band in children and with smooth inner segment band (P = 0.083, trend) and visible external limiting membrane (P = 0.098, trend) in adults. We identified morphologic differences between pediatric and adult ERM on spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Similar to adults, photoreceptor integrity with pediatric ERM seems to predict better visual acuity changes after surgical ERM removal.

  4. spectral characterization and dna binding properties of lanthanide(iii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Absorption titration experiments were performed by maintaining the metal complex concentration constant while gradually increasing the concentration of CT-DNA within 0-80. μM. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. The ligand, APINH was sued for the preparation of transition metal complexes. Spectral data of. APINH are as ...

  5. Characterization of $SU_q(\\ell+1)$-equivariant spectral triples for the odd dimensional quantum spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Pal, Arupkumar

    2007-01-01

    The quantum group $SU_q(\\ell+1)$ has a canonical action on the odd dimensional sphere $S_q^{2\\ell+1}$. All odd spectral triples acting on the $L_2$ space of $S_q^{2\\ell+1}$ and equivariant under this action have been characterized. This characterization then leads to the construction of an optimum family of equivariant spectral triples having nontrivial $K$-homology class. These generalize the results of Chakraborty & Pal for $SU_q(2)$.

  6. Comprehensive Space-Object Characterization using Spectrally Compressive Polarimetric Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-08

    spectrum of the test chart in blue star and the ref- erence spectrum in red line. Both spectrums were normalized to the maximum value in their curves. The...compressively sensed spectral polari - metric spatial image data from a solar illuminated reflecting surface to recover its material signature, three...identification and star spectrum reconstruction illustrate the effectiveness of the resulting numerical scheme. 1.3.9 Estimation of Atmospheric PSF Parameters

  7. Characterizing multivariate decoding models based on correlated EEG spectral features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J

    2013-07-01

    Multivariate decoding methods are popular techniques for analysis of neurophysiological data. The present study explored potential interpretative problems with these techniques when predictors are correlated. Data from sensorimotor rhythm-based cursor control experiments was analyzed offline with linear univariate and multivariate models. Features were derived from autoregressive (AR) spectral analysis of varying model order which produced predictors that varied in their degree of correlation (i.e., multicollinearity). The use of multivariate regression models resulted in much better prediction of target position as compared to univariate regression models. However, with lower order AR features interpretation of the spectral patterns of the weights was difficult. This is likely to be due to the high degree of multicollinearity present with lower order AR features. Care should be exercised when interpreting the pattern of weights of multivariate models with correlated predictors. Comparison with univariate statistics is advisable. While multivariate decoding algorithms are very useful for prediction their utility for interpretation may be limited when predictors are correlated. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Type II Supernova Spectral Diversity. I. Observations, Sample Characterization, and Spectral Line Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez, Claudia P.; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario

    2017-01-01

    We present 888 visual-wavelength spectra of 122 nearby type II supernovae (SNe II) obtained between 1986 and 2009, and ranging between 3 and 363 days post-explosion. In this first paper, we outline our observations and data reduction techniques, together with a characterization based on the spect...

  9. Characterization of high density through silicon vias with spectral reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yi-Sha; Huang, Kuo Cheng; Hsu, Weite

    2011-03-28

    Measurement and control is an important step for production-worthy through silicon vias etch. We demonstrate the use and enhancement of an existing wafer metrology tool, spectral reflectometer by implementing novel theoretical model and measurement algorithm for high density through-silicon via (HDTSV) inspection. It is capable of measuring depth and depth variations of array vias by Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) analysis in one shot measurement. Surface roughness of via bottom can also be extracted by scattering model fitting. Our non-destructive solution can measure TSV profile diameters as small as 5 μm and aspect ratios greater than 13:1. The measurement precision is in the range of 0.02 μm. Metrology results from actual 3D interconnect processing wafers are presented.

  10. Spectral and quantum-mechanical characterizations of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchea, Andreea Celia; Gaina, Marius; Dorohoi, Dana Ortansa

    2017-01-01

    Coumarins are crystalline compounds utilized in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic industries. Our study refers to quantum-mechanical and spectral characterization of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin (7-NH2-4-CF3-coumarin or coumarin 151) in order to estimate its stability, reactivity and biological activity. The contribution of different types of interactions to the spectral shifts in homogeneous solutions and the limits in which the excited state dipole moment of the studied molecule can vary are established by solvatochromic study.

  11. Synthesis, spectral characterization and redox properties of iron (II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R', R = H (a), Me (b), Cl (c) and R' = Me (1/3), Et (2/4) have been synthesized and formulated as tris-chelates Fe(RaaiR') 3 2 + . They are characterized by microanalytical, conductance, UV-Vis, IR, magnetic (polycrystalline state) data.

  12. An efficient synthesis, X-ray and spectral characterization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia as well as insulin resistance and/or impaired insulin secretion.1,2 Therapy for NIDDM has been aimed at improving glycemic control by a combination of diet, exercise, and oral agents.3 These oral agents stimulate.

  13. Quantitative characterization of surface topography using spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Tevis D. B.; Junge, Till; Pastewka, Lars

    2017-03-01

    Roughness determines many functional properties of surfaces, such as adhesion, friction, and (thermal and electrical) contact conductance. Recent analytical models and simulations enable quantitative prediction of these properties from knowledge of the power spectral density (PSD) of the surface topography. The utility of the PSD is that it contains statistical information that is unbiased by the particular scan size and pixel resolution chosen by the researcher. In this article, we first review the mathematical definition of the PSD, including the one- and two-dimensional cases, and common variations of each. We then discuss strategies for reconstructing an accurate PSD of a surface using topography measurements at different size scales. Finally, we discuss detecting and mitigating artifacts at the smallest scales, and computing upper/lower bounds on functional properties obtained from models. We accompany our discussion with virtual measurements on computer-generated surfaces. This discussion summarizes how to analyze topography measurements to reconstruct a reliable PSD. Analytical models demonstrate the potential for tuning functional properties by rationally tailoring surface topography—however, this potential can only be achieved through the accurate, quantitative reconstruction of the PSDs of real-world surfaces.

  14. Spectral Characterization of Analog Samples in Anticipation of OSIRIS-REx's Arrival at Bennu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Schrader, D. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Clark, B. E.; Cloutis, E. A.; Connolly, H. C., Jr.; Hamilton, V. E.; Keller, L. P.; Lauretta, D. S.; Lim, L. F.; hide

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission successfully launched on September 8th, 2016. During its rendezvous with near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu beginning in 2018, OSIRIS-REx will characterize the asteroid's physical, mineralogical, and chemical properties in an effort to globally map the properties of Bennu, a primitive carbonaceous asteroid, and choose a sampling location]. In preparation for these observations, analog samples were spectrally characterized across visible, near- and thermal-infrared wavelengths and were used in initial tests on mineral-phase-detection and abundance-determination software algorithms.

  15. Characterization of Forest Disturbance in California using Landsat Spectral Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reents, C.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Natural and anthropogenic forest disturbances are a major contributor to global carbon fluxes, and can act as both a natural component of healthy ecosystem function and a threat to fragile ecosystems as well as human lives and property. The local and global impacts of a disturbance event depend in large part on the timing, intensity, and cause of the disturbance. With some disturbance types expected to increase in frequency and severity under the influence of climate change and increasing anthropogenic land use, knowledge of disturbance events and trends has become particularly crucial for a variety of scientific, political and management needs. Many studies have made use of time series analyses of multitemporal satellite imagery to study forest disturbance events at a variety of scales, but few have endeavored to attribute specific causal information to the disturbances detected, particularly at broad spatial and temporal scales. The purpose of this research is to investigate the suitability of a Landsat time series approach for detecting and describing causes of disturbance events across the heterogeneous, forested landscapes of California. Using existing GIS datasets detailing the locations of logging, fire, pest damage and land use conversion events statewide, we extracted the full Landsat time series (1984-2015) for six Landsat spectral bands at the location of each disturbance event. The characteristics of each time series vary depending on the nature of the disturbance occurring at that location. These differences can be harnessed as a way of differentiating disturbance types based on observed values before, during, and after the time of the event, which together comprise the disturbance's temporal signature. We applied a machine learning algorithm to these temporal signatures in order to construct a classification model linking disturbance type with the associated signature. We then applied this model to all forested areas in California using all Landsat 4

  16. Recent Characterization of the Night-Sky Irradiance in the Visible/Near-Infrared Spectral Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Carolynn; Wood, Michael; Bender, Edward; Hart, Steve

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has made numerous characterizations of the night sky over the past 45 years. Up until the last four years, the measurement devices were highly detector-limited, which led to low spectral resolution, marginal sensitivity in no-moon conditions, and the need for inferential analysis of the resulting data. In 2014, however, the PhotoResearch Model PR-745 spectro-radiometer established a new state of the art for measurement of the integrated night-sky irradiance over the Visible-to-Near-Infrared (VNIR) spectral band (400-1050nm). This has enabled characterization of no-moon night-sky irradiance with a spectral bandwidth less than 15 nanometers, even when this irradiance is attenuated by heavy clouds or forest canopy. Since 2014, we have conducted a series of night-sky data collections at remote sites across the United States. The resulting data has provided new insights into natural radiance variations, cultural lighting impacts, and the spectrally-varying attenuation caused by cloud cover and forest canopy. Several new metrics have also been developed to provide insight into these newly-found components and temporal variations. The observations, findings and conclusions of the above efforts will be presented, including planned near-term efforts to further characterize the night-sky irradiance in the Visible/Near-Infrared spectral band.

  17. Precision Stellar Characterization of FGKM Stars using an Empirical Spectral Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Samuel W.; Petigura, Erik A. [California Institute of Technology (United States); Von Braun, Kaspar, E-mail: syee@caltech.edu [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Classification of stars, by comparing their optical spectra to a few dozen spectral standards, has been a workhorse of observational astronomy for more than a century. Here, we extend this technique by compiling a library of optical spectra of 404 touchstone stars observed with Keck/HIRES by the California Planet Search. The spectra have high resolution ( R ≈ 60,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≈ 150/pixel), and are registered onto a common wavelength scale. The library stars have properties derived from interferometry, asteroseismology, LTE spectral synthesis, and spectrophotometry. To address a lack of well-characterized late-K dwarfs in the literature, we measure stellar radii and temperatures for 23 nearby K dwarfs, using modeling of the spectral energy distribution and Gaia parallaxes. This library represents a uniform data set spanning the spectral types ∼M5–F1 ( T {sub eff} ≈ 3000–7000 K, R {sub ⋆} ≈ 0.1–16 R {sub ⊙}). We also present “Empirical SpecMatch” (SpecMatch-Emp), a tool for parameterizing unknown spectra by comparing them against our spectral library. For FGKM stars, SpecMatch-Emp achieves accuracies of 100 K in effective temperature ( T {sub eff}), 15% in stellar radius ( R {sub ⋆}), and 0.09 dex in metallicity ([Fe/H]). Because the code relies on empirical spectra it performs particularly well for stars ∼K4 and later, which are challenging to model with existing spectral synthesizers, reaching accuracies of 70 K in T {sub eff}, 10% in R {sub ⋆}, and 0.12 dex in [Fe/H]. We also validate the performance of SpecMatch-Emp, finding it to be robust at lower spectral resolution and S/N, enabling the characterization of faint late-type stars. Both the library and stellar characterization code are publicly available.

  18. Precision Stellar Characterization of FGKM Stars using an Empirical Spectral Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Samuel W.; Petigura, Erik A.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2017-02-01

    Classification of stars, by comparing their optical spectra to a few dozen spectral standards, has been a workhorse of observational astronomy for more than a century. Here, we extend this technique by compiling a library of optical spectra of 404 touchstone stars observed with Keck/HIRES by the California Planet Search. The spectra have high resolution (R ≈ 60,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≈ 150/pixel), and are registered onto a common wavelength scale. The library stars have properties derived from interferometry, asteroseismology, LTE spectral synthesis, and spectrophotometry. To address a lack of well-characterized late-K dwarfs in the literature, we measure stellar radii and temperatures for 23 nearby K dwarfs, using modeling of the spectral energy distribution and Gaia parallaxes. This library represents a uniform data set spanning the spectral types ˜M5-F1 (T eff ≈ 3000-7000 K, R ⋆ ≈ 0.1-16 R ⊙). We also present “Empirical SpecMatch” (SpecMatch-Emp), a tool for parameterizing unknown spectra by comparing them against our spectral library. For FGKM stars, SpecMatch-Emp achieves accuracies of 100 K in effective temperature (T eff), 15% in stellar radius (R ⋆), and 0.09 dex in metallicity ([Fe/H]). Because the code relies on empirical spectra it performs particularly well for stars ˜K4 and later, which are challenging to model with existing spectral synthesizers, reaching accuracies of 70 K in T eff, 10% in R ⋆, and 0.12 dex in [Fe/H]. We also validate the performance of SpecMatch-Emp, finding it to be robust at lower spectral resolution and S/N, enabling the characterization of faint late-type stars. Both the library and stellar characterization code are publicly available.

  19. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-01

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  20. Highly accurate spectral retardance characterization of a liquid crystal retarder including Fabry-Perot interference effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Asticio [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco (Chile); Center for Optics and Photonics, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 4016, Concepción (Chile); Mar Sánchez-López, María del [Instituto de Bioingeniería, Universidad Miguel Hernández, 03202 Elche (Spain); García-Martínez, Pascuala [Departament d' Òptica, Universitat de València, 45100 Burjassot (Spain); Arias, Julia; Moreno, Ignacio [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Óptica y Tecnología Electrónica, Universidad Miguel Hernández, 03202 Elche (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    Multiple-beam Fabry-Perot (FP) interferences occur in liquid crystal retarders (LCR) devoid of an antireflective coating. In this work, a highly accurate method to obtain the spectral retardance of such devices is presented. On the basis of a simple model of the LCR that includes FP effects and by using a voltage transfer function, we show how the FP features in the transmission spectrum can be used to accurately retrieve the ordinary and extraordinary spectral phase delays, and the voltage dependence of the latter. As a consequence, the modulation characteristics of the device are fully determined with high accuracy by means of a few off-state physical parameters which are wavelength-dependent, and a single voltage transfer function that is valid within the spectral range of characterization.

  1. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine.

  2. Processing of Natural Sounds: Characterization of Multipeak Spectral Tuning in Human Auditory Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Santoro, Roberta; Ugurbil, Kamil; Goebel, Rainer; Yacoub, Essa; Formisano, Elia

    2013-01-01

    We examine the mechanisms by which the human auditory cortex processes the frequency content of natural sounds. Through mathematical modeling of ultra-high field (7 T) functional magnetic resonance imaging responses to natural sounds, we derive frequency-tuning curves of cortical neuronal populations. With a data-driven analysis, we divide the auditory cortex into five spatially distributed clusters, each characterized by a spectral tuning profile. Beyond neuronal populations with simple sing...

  3. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization and biological activity of N-Substituted Derivatives of Tetrahydrofuran-2-ylmethylamine

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz-ur-Rehman,; Rasool, S.; M. A. Abbasi; Khan, K M; Ahmad, I; Afzal, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahydrofuran-2-ylmethylamine (1) was subjected to condensation reaction with 4-chlorobenzenesulfonyl chloride (2) in a mild basic medium to synthesize N-(tetrahydrofuran-2-ylmethyl)-4-chlorobenzenesulfonamide (3). A series of N-substituted derivatives, 5a-f, were synthesized by condensing alkyl/aralkyl halides, 4a-f, with 3 under polar aprotic conditions using sodium hydride activator. The spectral characterization of all the molecules included IR, 1H-NMR and EI-MS data. The biological act...

  4. Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of Biofield Treated 2, 6-Diaminopyridine

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    International audience; 2, 6-Diaminopyridine (2, 6-DAP) has extensive use in synthesis of pharmaceutical compounds. The objective of present research was to investigate the influence of biofield treatment on physical, thermal and spectral properties of 2, 6-DAP. The study was performed in two groups, control and treated. The control group remained as untreated, and biofield treatment was given to treatment group. The control and treated 2, 6-DAP samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction...

  5. TU-CD-207-01: Characterization of Breast Tissue Composition Using Spectral Mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, H; Cho, H; Kumar, N; Sennung, D; Ng, A Lam; Molloi, S [Department of radiological scicens, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing the chemical composition of breast tissue, in terms of water and lipid, by using spectral mammography in simulation and postmortem studies. Methods: Analytical simulations were performed to obtain low- and high-energy signals of breast tissue based on previously reported water, lipid, and protein contents. Dual-energy decomposition was used to characterize the simulated breast tissue into water and lipid basis materials and the measured water density was compared to the known value. In experimental studies, postmortem breasts were imaged with a spectral mammography system based on a scanning multi-slit Si strip photon-counting detector. Low- and high-energy images were acquired simultaneously from a single exposure by sorting the recorded photons into the corresponding energy bins. Dual-energy material decomposition of the low- and high-energy images yielded individual pixel measurements of breast tissue composition in terms of water and lipid thicknesses. After imaging, each postmortem breast was chemically decomposed into water, lipid and protein. The water density calculated from chemical analysis was used as the reference gold standard. Correlation of the water density measurements between spectral mammography and chemical analysis was analyzed using linear regression. Results: Both simulation and postmortem studies showed good linear correlation between the decomposed water thickness using spectral mammography and chemical analysis. The slope of the linear fitting function in the simulation and postmortem studies were 1.15 and 1.21, respectively. Conclusion: The results indicate that breast tissue composition, in terms of water and lipid, can be accurately measured using spectral mammography. Quantitative breast tissue composition can potentially be used to stratify patients according to their breast cancer risk.

  6. A characterization of the generators of analytic C0-semigroups in the class of scalar type spectral operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat V. Markin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the class of scalar type spectral operators in a complex Banach space, a characterization of the generators of analytic C0-semigroups in terms of the analytic vectors of the operators is found.

  7. Site Characterization in the Urban Area of Tijuana, B. C., Mexico by Means of: H/V Spectral Ratios, Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves, and Random Decrement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Herrera, R.; Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Martinez-Cruzado, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Results of site characterization for an experimental site in the metropolitan area of Tijuana, B. C., Mexico are presented as part of the on-going research in which time series of earthquakes, ambient noise, and induced vibrations were processed with three different methods: H/V spectral ratios, Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW), and the Random Decrement Method, (RDM). Forward modeling using the wave propagation stiffness matrix method (Roësset and Kausel, 1981) was used to compute the theoretical SH/P, SV/P spectral ratios, and the experimental H/V spectral ratios were computed following the conventional concepts of Fourier analysis. The modeling/comparison between the theoretical and experimental H/V spectral ratios was carried out. For the SASW method the theoretical dispersion curves were also computed and compared with the experimental one, and finally the theoretical free vibration decay curve was compared with the experimental one obtained with the RDM. All three methods were tested with ambient noise, induced vibrations, and earthquake signals. Both experimental spectral ratios obtained with ambient noise as well as earthquake signals agree quite well with the theoretical spectral ratios, particularly at the fundamental vibration frequency of the recording site. Differences between the fundamental vibration frequencies are evident for sites located at alluvial fill (~0.6 Hz) and at sites located at conglomerate/sandstones fill (0.75 Hz). Shear wave velocities for the soft soil layers of the 4-layer discrete soil model ranges as low as 100 m/s and up to 280 m/s. The results with the SASW provided information that allows to identify low velocity layers, not seen before with the traditional seismic methods. The damping estimations obtained with the RDM are within the expected values, and the dominant frequency of the system also obtained with the RDM correlates within the range of plus-minus 20 % with the one obtained by means of the H/V spectral

  8. A curved crystal spectrometer for energy calibration and spectral characterization of mammographic x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, L T; Deslattes, R D; Henins, A; Chantler, C T; Kessler, E G; Schweppe, J E

    1996-10-01

    Clinical efficacy of diagnostic radiology for mammographic examinations is critically dependent on source characteristics, detection efficiency, image resolution and applied high voltage. In this report we focus on means for evaluation of source-dependent issues including noninvasive determination of the applied high voltage, and characterization of intrinsic spectral distributions which in turn reflect the effects of added filtration and target and window contamination. It is shown that a particular form of x-ray curved crystal spectrometry with electronic imaging can serve to determine all relevant parameters within the confines of a standard clinical exposure.

  9. Characterization of the human iris spectral reflectance with a multispectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Meritxell; Mercadal, Rita; Pujol, Jaume; Arjona, Monserrat; de Lasarte, Marta; Huertas, Rafael; Melgosa, Manuel; Imai, Francisco H

    2008-10-20

    We present a multispectral system developed and optimized for measurement of the spectral reflectance and the color of the human iris. We tested several sets of filters as acquisition channels, analyzed different reconstruction algorithms, and used different samples as training sets. The results obtained show that a conventional three-channel color camera (RGB) was enough to reconstruct the analyzed reflectances with high accuracy, obtaining averaged color differences of around 2-3 CIEDE2000 units and root mean square errors of around 0.01. The device developed was used to characterize 100 real irises corresponding to 50 subjects, 68 prostheses used in clinical practice, and 17 cosmetic colored contact lenses.

  10. Processing of natural sounds: characterization of multipeak spectral tuning in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Santoro, Roberta; Ugurbil, Kamil; Goebel, Rainer; Yacoub, Essa; Formisano, Elia

    2013-07-17

    We examine the mechanisms by which the human auditory cortex processes the frequency content of natural sounds. Through mathematical modeling of ultra-high field (7 T) functional magnetic resonance imaging responses to natural sounds, we derive frequency-tuning curves of cortical neuronal populations. With a data-driven analysis, we divide the auditory cortex into five spatially distributed clusters, each characterized by a spectral tuning profile. Beyond neuronal populations with simple single-peaked spectral tuning (grouped into two clusters), we observe that ∼60% of auditory populations are sensitive to multiple frequency bands. Specifically, we observe sensitivity to multiple frequency bands (1) at exactly one octave distance from each other, (2) at multiple harmonically related frequency intervals, and (3) with no apparent relationship to each other. We propose that beyond the well known cortical tonotopic organization, multipeaked spectral tuning amplifies selected combinations of frequency bands. Such selective amplification might serve to detect behaviorally relevant and complex sound features, aid in segregating auditory scenes, and explain prominent perceptual phenomena such as octave invariance.

  11. Development and evaluation of spectral transformation algorithms for analysis and characterization of forest vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guang

    1998-11-01

    between the canonical and the principal components. Three-dimensional graphing was a useful tool for the examination of classes which have spectral overlap in multidimensional discriminant space. When comparing dissimilarities of spatial characterizations between using ordinary classification output and probability surface, and when an ordinary classification output was used, spatially varied vegetation communities were sketched as large, homogeneous patches. Inter-class spatial gradients were lost under ordinary membership structure. However, when probability surfaces were combined with ordinary classification output for representation, inter-class and within-class spatial variations were better modeled with certainty. Overall classification accuracies based on MLR images were equivalent to using PCA transformation. The results assured that the MLR transformation can be considered as a "adequate" technique in term of its ability to preserve information for ordinary classification output. The probability surface derived through MLR may also be considered "reliable and predictive" compared to PCA scores.

  12. Spectral classification and mineralogical characterization of Nili Fossae for a better understanding of hydrated mineralogies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serventi, Giovanna; Carli, Cristian; Altieri, Francesca; Geminale, Anna; Sgavetti, Maria; Grassi, Davide; Orosei, Roberto; Bellucci, Giancarlo

    2017-04-01

    The presence of hydrated minerals on Mars provides a record of water-related processes and, in particular, the identification of phyllosilicates puts constraints on the evolution of Mars (Poulet et al., 2005). Even if data from the Observatoire pour la Minèralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces, et l'Activitè (OMEGA) and from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) show the presence of different hydrated minerals, on Mars the spectral regions where hydrated minerals absorb are also affected by atmospheric features due to gaseous components, mostly CO2 and H2O. Among the different methods that have been proposed to separate the atmospheric signatures from the hydrated absorptions, we use the Surface Atmosphere Separation (SAS) method proposed by Geminale et al. (2015) to analyze the Nili Fossae region (in particular, four MEX orbit have been selected and a mosaic have been created). In this work, we spectrally classify the Nili Fossae region using the Spectral Angle Mapping (SAM, Kruse et al., 1993) classification and using a spectral library iteratively built from the image though the Pixel Purity Index (PPI, Boardman, 1995). Mainly, we recognized five spectral regions dominated by: iron-hydroxides, pyroxenes (both orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene), olivine and phyllosilicates, in accordance with the literature. Then, we focused on the hydrated regions: absorptions in the 1.9-2.3 µm are fundamental to recognize a hydrated mineralogy, and to discriminate between phyllosilicates characterized by different cations in the octahedral environment. Comparing our results with maps from Mangold et al. (2007) and Poulet et al (2007), we demonstrated that the SAS+SAM technique permits to identify hydrated regions that cannot be easily recognized using the spectral mapping applied to images corrected with Mons Olympus method (Langevin et al., 2005). Furthermore, applying the MGM algorithm to a set of spectra selected from hydrated regions, we recognized the

  13. Fluvial particle characterization using artificial neural network and spectral image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bim Prasad; Gautam, Bijaya; Nagata, Masateru

    2008-03-01

    Sand, chemical waste, microbes and other solid materials flowing with the water bodies are of great significance to us as they cause substantial impact to different sectors including drinking water management, hydropower generation, irrigation, aquatic life preservation and various other socio-ecological factors. Such particles can't completely be avoided due to the high cost of construction and maintenance of the waste-treatment methods. A detailed understanding of solid particles in surface water system can have benefit in effective, economic, environmental and social management of water resources. This paper describes an automated system of fluvial particle characterization based on spectral image processing that lead to the development of devices for monitoring flowing particles in river. Previous research in coherent field has shown that it is possible to automatically classify shapes and sizes of solid particles ranging from 300-400 μm using artificial neural networks (ANN) and image processing. Computer facilitated with hyper spectral and multi spectral images using ANN can further classify fluvial materials into organic, inorganic, biodegradable, bio non degradable and microbes. This makes the method attractive for real time monitoring of particles, sand and microorganism in water bodies at strategic locations. Continuous monitoring can be used to determine the effect of socio-economic activities in upstream rivers, or to monitor solid waste disposal from treatment plants and industries or to monitor erosive characteristic of sand and its contribution to degradation of efficiency of hydropower plant or to identify microorganism, calculate their population and study the impact of their presence. Such system can also be used to characterize fluvial particles for planning effective utilization of water resources in micro-mega hydropower plant, irrigation, aquatic life preservation etc.

  14. High signal-to-noise spectral characterization of the planetary-mass object HD 106906 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daemgen, Sebastian; Todorov, Kamen; Quanz, Sascha P.; Meyer, Michael R.; Mordasini, Christoph; Marleau, Gabriel-Dominique; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2017-12-01

    Context. Directly imaged planets are ideal candidates for spectroscopic characterization of their atmospheres. The angular separations that are typically close to their host stars, however, reduce the achievable contrast and thus signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). Aims: We spectroscopically characterize the atmosphere of HD 106906 b, which is a young low-mass companion near the deuterium burning limit. The wide separation from its host star of 7.1'' makes it an ideal candidate for high S/N and high-resolution spectroscopy. We aim to derive new constraints on the spectral type, effective temperature, and luminosity of HD 106906 b and also to provide a high S/N template spectrum for future characterization of extrasolar planets. Methods: We obtained 1.1-2.5 μm integral field spectroscopy with the VLT/SINFONI instrument with a spectral resolution of R ≈ 2000-4000. New estimates of the parameters of HD 106906 b are derived by analyzing spectral features, comparing the extracted spectra to spectral catalogs of other low-mass objects, and fitting with theoretical isochrones. Results: We identify several spectral absorption lines that are consistent with a low mass for HD 106906 b. We derive a new spectral type of L1.5 ± 1.0, which is one subclass earlier than previous estimates. Through comparison with other young low-mass objects, this translates to a luminosity of log(L/L⊙) = -3.65 ± 0.08 and an effective temperature of Teff = 1820 ± 240 K. Our new mass estimates range between M = 11.9-0.8+1.7 MJup (hot start) and M = 14.0-0.5+0.2 MJup (cold start). These limits take into account a possibly finite formation time, i.e., HD 106906 b is allowed to be 0-3 Myr younger than its host star. We exclude accretion onto HD 106906 b at rates Ṁ > 4.8 × 10-10 MJup yr-1 based on the fact that we observe no hydrogen (Paschen-β, Brackett-γ) emission. This is indicative of little or no circumplanetary gas. With our new observations, HD 106906 b is the planetary-mass object with

  15. Spectral characterization of volcanic rocks in the VIS-NIR for martian exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Simone; Carli, Cristian; Manzari, Paola; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Capaccioni, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Igneous effusive rocks cover much of the surface of Mars [1,2,3]. Initially only two types of lithologies were thought to constitute the Martian crust, i.e. a basaltic one and a more andesitic one [1,2], while more evolved lithologies were ruled out.Nevertheless a more complex situation is appearing in the last years. Recently several observations have highlighted the presence of evolved, acidic rocks. High-silica dacite units were identified in Syrtis Major caldera by thermal IR data [4]. Outcrops in Noachis Terra were interpreted as constituted of felsic (i.e. feldspar-rich) rocks essentially by the observation of a 1.3-µm spectral feature in CRISM data, attributed to Fe2+ in feldspars [5]. However different interpretations exist, invoking plagioclase-enriched basalts [6] rather than felsic products.The increasing of high-resolution and in-situ rover-based observations datasets and the changing of the initial paradigm justify a new systematic spectral study of igneous effusive rocks. In this work we focus on the spectral characterization of volcanic effusive rocks in the 0.35-2.5-µm range. We are carrying out measurements and spectral analyses on a wide ensemble of effusive samples, from mafic to sialic, with variable alkali contents, following the classification in the Total-Alkali-Silica diagram, and discussing the influence on spectral characteristics of different mineral assemblages and/or texture ([7], [8]). [1] Bandfield J.L., et al., Science, 287, 1626, 2000; [2] Christensen P.R., et al., J. Geophys. Res., 105, N.E4, 9609-9621, 2000; [3] Ehlmann B.L. & Edwards C.S., Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 42, 291-315, 2014; [4] Christensen P.R., et al., Nature, 436, 504-509, 2005; [5] Wray J.J., et al., 44th LPSC, abs. n.3065, 2013; [6] Rogers A.D. & Nekvasil H., Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 2619-2626, 2015; [7] Carli C. and Sgavetti M.,Icarus, 211, 1034-1048, 2011; [7] Carli C. et al., SGL, doi 10.1144/SP401.19, 2015.

  16. Debris Disk Dust Characterization through Spectral Types: Deep Visible-Light Imaging of Nine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Elodie

    2017-08-01

    We propose STIS coronagraphy of 9 debris disks recently seen in the near-infrared from our re-analysis of archival NICMOS data. STIS coronagraphy will provide complementary visible-light images that will let us characterize the disk colors needed to place constraints on dust grain sizes, albedos, and anisotropy of scattering of these disks. With 3 times finer angular resolution and much better sensitivity, our STIS images will dramatically surpass the NICMOS discovery images, and will more clearly reveal disk local structures, cleared inner regions, and test for large-scale asymmetries in the dust distributions possibly triggered by associated planets in these systems. The exquisite sensitivity to visible-light scattering by submicron particles uniquely offered by STIS coronagraphy will let us detect and spatially characterize the diffuse halo of dust blown out of the systems by the host star radiative pressure. Our sample includes disks around 3 low-mass stars, 3 solar-type stars, and 3 massive A stars; together with our STIS+NICMOS imaging of 6 additional disks around F and G stars, our sample covers the full range of spectral types and will let us perform a comparative study of dust distribution properties as a function of stellar mass and luminosity. Our sample makes up more than 1/3 of all debris disks imaged in scattered light to date, and will offer the first homogeneous characterization of the visible-light to near-IR properties of debris disk systems over a large range of spectral types. Our program will let us analyze how the dynamical balance is affected by initial conditions and star properties, and how it may be perturbed by gas drag or planet perturbations.

  17. Spectral characterization, crystal structures and biological activities of iminodiacetate ternary complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, M.; Anjuli; Tasneem, Sana; Mantasha, I.; Ahamad, M. Naqi; Sama, Farasha; Fatma, Kehkeshan; Siddiqi, Zafar A.

    2017-10-01

    The ternary complexes with stoichiometry [M(imda)(bipy)]·6H2O (M = Cu) and [M(imda)(bipy)(H2O)]·4H2O (M = Ni, Co and Mn) where H2imda = iminodiacetic acid and bipy = 2,2‧-bipyridine, are prepared and characterized to exploit as novel antimicrobial agents and SOD mimics. The chemical structures were elucidated by IR, FAB-Mass, 1H, 13C NMR, EPR and spectral techniques. Single crystal X-ray and spectral studies of the complexes (1) and (2) have confirmed a square pyramidal geometry around Cu(II) ion while a saturated six coordinate (distorted octahedral) geometry around the Ni(II), Co(II) and Mn(II) ions due to the additional coordination from water. A supramolecular network is formed by extensive H-bonding in complex (1). The supramolecular assembly in complex (1) is additionally consolidated via the existence of unusual cyclic hexameric water clusters. The antimicrobial activities for the present complexes have been examined against Escherichia coli (K-12), Bacillus subtilis (MTC-121), Staphylococcus aureus (IOASA-22), Salmonella typhymurium (MTCC-98), Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium marneffei. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of the Cu(II) complex (1) is also assessed employing nitrobluetetrazolium (NBT) assay.

  18. Characterization of lunar soils through spectral features extraction in the NIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, U.; Wöhler, C.; Grumpe, A.; Bugiolacchi, R.; Bhatt, M.

    2014-11-01

    Recently launched hyper-spectral instrumentation with ever-increasing data return capabilities deliver the remote-sensing data to characterize planetary soils with increased precision, thus generating the need to classify the returned data in an efficient way for further specialized analysis and detection of features of interest. This paper investigates how lunar near-infrared spectra generated by the SIR-2 on Chandrayaan-1 can be classified into distinctive groups of similar spectra with automated feature extraction algorithms. As common spectral parameters for the SIR-2 spectra, two absorption features near 1300 nm and 2000 and their characteristics provide 10 variables which are used in two different unsupervised clustering methods, the mean-shift clustering algorithm and the recently developed graph cut-based clustering algorithm by Müller et al. (2012). The spectra used in this paper were taken on the lunar near side centering around the Imbrium region of the Moon. More than 100,000 spectra were analyzed.

  19. Spectral Characterization of a Prototype SFA Camera for Joint Visible and NIR Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multispectral acquisition improves machine vision since it permits capturing more information on object surface properties than color imaging. The concept of spectral filter arrays has been developed recently and allows multispectral single shot acquisition with a compact camera design. Due to filter manufacturing difficulties, there was, up to recently, no system available for a large span of spectrum, i.e., visible and Near Infra-Red acquisition. This article presents the achievement of a prototype of camera that captures seven visible and one near infra-red bands on the same sensor chip. A calibration is proposed to characterize the sensor, and images are captured. Data are provided as supplementary material for further analysis and simulations. This opens a new range of applications in security, robotics, automotive and medical fields.

  20. Applications of several spectral techniques to characterize coordination compounds derived from 2,6-diacetylpyridine derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Sharma, Amit Kumar

    2009-09-01

    The coordination compounds of Cr III, Mn II and Co II metal ions derived from quinquedentate 2,6-diacetylpyridine derivative have been synthesized and characterized by using the various physicochemical studies like stoichiometric, molar conductivity and magnetic, and spectral techniques like IR, NMR, mass, UV and EPR. The general stoichiometries of the complexes are found to be [Cr(H 2L)X] and [M(HL)X], where M = Mn(II) and Co(II); H 2L = dideprotonated ligand, HL = monodeprotonated ligand and X = NO 3-, Cl - and OAc -. The studies reveal that the complexes possess monomeric compositions with six coordinated octahedral geometry (Cr III and Mn II complexes) and six coordinated tetragonal geometry (Co II complexes).

  1. Spectral ellipsometry as a method for characterization of nanosized films with ferromagnetic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, H.; Singkh, S. P.; Panina, L. V.; Pudonin, F. A.; Sherstnev, I. A.; Podgornaya, S. V.; Shpetnyi, I. A.; Beklemisheva, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Nanosized films with ferromagnetic layers are widely used in nanoelectronics, sensor systems and telecommunications. Their properties may strongly differ from those of bulk materials that is on account of interfaces, intermediate layers and diffusion. In the present work, spectral ellipsometry and magnetooptical methods are adapted for characterization of the optical parameters and magnetization processes in two- and three-layer Cr/NiFe, Al/NiFe and Cr(Al)/Ge/NiFe films onto a sitall substrate for various thicknesses of Cr and Al layers. At a layer thickness below 20 nm, the complex refractive coefficients depend pronouncedly on the thickness. In two-layer films, remagnetization changes weakly over a thickness of the top layer, but the coercive force in three-layer films increases by more than twice upon remagnetization, while increasing the top layer thickness from 4 to 20 nm.

  2. Synthesis, spectral characterizations and antimicrobial activity of some Schiff bases of 4-chloro-2-aminophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Seher Birteksöz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of 4-chloro-2-[(arylmethylideneamino]phenols (1–11 including methoxy group were synthesized using appropriate synthetic route. The structures of the Schiff bases were characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis, ESI-MS, 1H and 13C-NMR spectroscopic techniques and analytical methods. A relation is observed between melting points and existence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding. IR spectra of the compounds including and not including hydrogen bonding were compared. The compounds 2 and 4 show the characteristic UV bands attributed to the NH-forms. According to the 1H-NMR spectral data the compound 2 has the strongest intramolecular hydrogen bonding and the compound 6 shows two isomeric structure. On the other hand, antibacterial and antifungal activities of the compounds were investigated. Most of the compounds show selective activity toward S. epidermidis and C. albicans.

  3. A series of novel oxovanadium(IV) complexes: Synthesis, spectral characterization and antimicrobial study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, M. K.; Pandey, S. K.; Pandey, O. P.; Sengupta, S. K.

    2014-09-01

    Oxovanadium(IV) complexes have been synthesized by reacting vanadyl sulfate with Schiff bases derived from 4-amino-5-(substitutedphenoxyacetic acid)-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol and benzil. All these complexes are soluble in DMF and DMSO; low molar conductance values indicate that they are non-electrolytes and characterized by elemental analysis, spectral techniques (UV-Vis, IR, EPR and XRD) and magnetic moment measurements. The EPR spectra indicate that the free electron is in dxy orbital. In vitro antifungal activity of ligands and synthesized compounds was determined against fungi Aspergillus niger, Colletotrichum falcatum and Colletotrichum pallescence and in vitro antibacterial activity was determined by screening the compounds against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) bacterial strains. The antimicrobial activities have shown that the activity increases upon complexation.

  4. Carbon nanohorn-based nanofluids: characterization of the spectral scattering albedo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercatelli, Luca; Sani, Elisa; Giannini, Annalisa; Di Ninni, Paola; Martelli, Fabrizio; Zaccanti, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    The full characterization of the optical properties of nanofluids consisting of single-wall carbon nanohorns of different morphologies in aqueous suspensions is carried out using a novel spectrophotometric technique. Information on the nanofluid scattering and absorption spectral characteristics is obtained by analyzing the data within the single scattering theory and validating the method by comparison with previous monochromatic measurements performed with a different technique. The high absorption coefficient measured joint to the very low scattering albedo opens promising application perspectives for single-wall carbon nanohorn-based fluid or solid suspensions. The proposed approximate approach can be extended also to other low-scattering turbid media.PACS: 78.35.+c Brillouin and Rayleigh scattering, other light scattering; 78.40.Ri absorption and reflection spectra, fullerenes and related materials; 81.05.U- carbon/carbon-based materials; 78.67.Bf optical properties of low-dimensional, mesoscopic, and nanoscale materials and structures, nanocrystals, nanoparticles, and nanoclusters.

  5. EEG-Based Tonic Cold Pain Characterization Using Wavelet Higher Order Spectral Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2015-08-01

    A novel approach in tonic cold pain characterization, based on electroencephalograph (EEG) data analysis using wavelet higher order spectral (WHOS) features, is presented here. The proposed WHOS-based feature space extends the relative power spectrum-based (phase blind) approaches reported so far a step forward; this is realized via dynamic monitoring of the nonlinerities of the EEG brain response to tonic cold pain stimuli by capturing the change in the underlying quadratic phase coupling at the bifrequency wavelet bispectrum/bicoherence domain due to the change of the pain level. Three pain characterization scenarios were formed and experimentally tested involving WHOS-based analysis of EEG data, acquired from 17 healthy volunteers that were subjected to trials of tonic cold pain stimuli. The experimental and classification analysis results, based on four well-known classifiers, have shown that the WHOS-based features successfully discriminate relax from pain status, provide efficient identification of the transition from relax to mild and/or severe pain status, and translate the subjective perception of pain to an objective measure of pain endurance. These findings seem quite promising and pave the way for adopting WHOS-based approaches to pain characterization under other types of pain, e.g., chronic pain and various clinical scenarios.

  6. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  7. Dioxidovanadium(V complexes with pyridoxalaminoguanidine: Synthesis, spectral and structural characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalović Mirjana M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three square-pyramidal complexes of dioxidovanadium(V with pyridoxalaminoguanidine (PLAG, of the formulas NH4[VO2(PLAG−2H]∙H2O (1, VO2(PLAG−H (2 and K[VO2(PLAG−2H]∙H2O (3 have been synthesized and characterized by IR and UV-Vis spectral analysis and in case of 1 and 3 by X-ray crystallography as well. The reaction of aqueous ammoniacal solution of NH4VO3 and PLAG resulted in formation of 1, which in MeOH undergoes spontaneous transformation into 2, which, in turn, in the reaction with KOH transforms into 3. In these complexes PLAG is coordinated in a common tridentate ONN mode, via phenoxide oxygen atom and nitrogen atoms of azomethine and imino groups of the aminoguanidine fragment. In all previously characterized complexes PLAG was coordinated in neutral form. However, here we have proven that this ligand can be coordinated in both mono- (2 and doubly deprotonated form (1 and 3 as well. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172014].

  8. Fast characterization of gold nanorods ensemble by correlating its structure with optical extinction spectral features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Hu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Owing to unique size- and shape- dependent localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs, the optical extinction spectroscopy method (OES has received much attention to characterize the geometry of metal NPs by fitting experimental UV-vis-NIR spectra. In this work, we aimed to develop a more convenient and accurate OES method to characterize the structural parameters and concentration of the gold nanorods (GNRs ensemble. The main difference between our approach and previous OES methods is that we solve this inverse spectra problem by establishing the LSPR relation equations of GNRs ensemble so that there is no need of UV-vis-NIR spectra fitting process. The aspect ratio (AR and AR distribution can be directly retrieved from two of UV-vis-NIR spectral parameters (peak position and full width at half maximum using the obtained relation equations. Furthermore, the relation equations are modified for applying to the more general GNRs samples by considering the plasmon shift due to the near distance dielectric sensitivity. Finally, instead of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS measurement, we provide a more facile measure of the mass-volume concentration which can be determined from the extinction value at 400 nm. By comparing with the experimental results, it shows that the retrieved results by the relation equations are reliable.

  9. Spectral and polarimetric characterization of gazeous and telluric planets with SEE COAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller C.-U.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available SEE COAST stands for Super Earth Explorer – Coronagraphic Off-Axis Space Telescope. The concept was initially proposed to ESA for Cosmic Vision. None of the direct detection exoplanet proposals were selected in 2007 and we are now pursuing our efforts to consolidate the astrophysical program and the technical developments for the next call for proposal. The prime objective of SEE COAST is to contribute to the understanding of the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Exploring the diversity of these objects is therefore the main driver to define the instrumentation. In the next decade the improvement of radial velocity instruments and obviously temporal coverage will provide us with a large numbers of long period giants as well as telluric planets, namely Super Earths. Obtaining the spectral and polarimetric signatures of these objects in the visible range to measure atmospheric parameters (molecular composition, clouds, soils, … will be unique and with important scientific returns. A space mission complementary to near IR instruments like SPHERE, GPI, JWST and later ELTs for the full characterization of giants and Super Earths is a first secure step towards the longer term goal that is the characterization of telluric planets with mass and atmosphere comparable to that of the Earth. An overview of the astrophysical motivation and the trade-off that lead to a simple integrated concept of a space-based high contrast imaging instrument are given here.

  10. Characterization of cirrus clouds and atmospheric state using a new hyper-spectral optimal estimation retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veglio, P.; Holz, R.

    2016-12-01

    The importance of cirrus clouds as regulators of Earth's climate and radiation budget has been widely demonstrated, but still their characterization remains challenging. In order to derive cirrus properties, many retrieval techniques rely on prior assumptions on the atmospheric state or on the ice microphysics, either because the computational cost is too high or because the measurements do not have enough information, as in the case of broadband sensors. In this work we present a novel infrared hyper-spectral optimal estimation retrieval capable of simultaneously deriving cirrus cloud parameters (optical depth, effective radius, cloud top height) and atmospheric state (temperature and water vapor profiles) with their associated uncertainties by using a fast forward radiative transfer code. The use of hyperspectral data help overcoming the problem of the information content while the computational cost can be addressed by using a fast radiative transfer model. The tradeoff of this choice is an increasing in the complexity of the problem. Also, it is important to consider that by using a fast, approximate radiative transfer model, the uncertainties must be carefully evaluated in order to prevent or minimize any biases that could negatively affect the results. For this application data from the HS3 field campaign are used, which provide high quality hyper-spectral measurements from Scanning HIS along with CPL and possibly also dropsonde data and GDAS reanalysis to help validate the results. The future of this work will be to move from aircraft to satellite observations, and the natural choice is AIRS and CALIOP that offer a similar setup to what is currently used for this study.

  11. Characterizing Earthflow Surface Morphology With Statistical and Spectral Analyses of Airborne Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, J.; Roering, J.

    High-resolution laser altimetry can depict the topography of large landslides with un- precedented accuracy and allow better management of the hazards posed by such slides. The surface of most landslides is rougher, on a local scale of a few meters, than adjacent unfailed slopes. This characteristic can be exploited to automatically detect and map landslides in landscapes represented by high resolution DTMs. We have used laser altimetry measurements of local topographic roughness to identify and map the perimeter and internal features of a large earthflow in the South Island, New Zealand. Surface roughness was first quantified by statistically characterizing the local variabil- ity of ground surface orientations using both circular and spherical statistics. These measures included the circular resultant, standard deviation and dispersion, and the three-dimensional spherical resultant and ratios of the normalized eigenvalues of the direction cosines. The circular measures evaluate the amount of change in topographic aspect from pixel-to-pixel in the gridded data matrix. The spherical statistics assess both the aspect and steepness of each pixel. The standard deviation of the third di- rection cosine was also used alone to define the variability in just the steepness of each pixel. All of the statistical measures detect and clearly map the earthflow. Cir- cular statistics also emphasize small folds transverse to the movement in the most active zone of the slide. The spherical measures are more sensitive to the larger scale roughness in a portion of the slide that includes large intact limestone blocks. Power spectra of surface roughness were also calculated from two-dimensional Fourier transformations in local test areas. A small earthflow had a broad spectral peak at wavelengths between 10 and 30 meters. Shallower soil failures and surface erosion produced surfaces with a very sharp spectral peak at 12 meters wavelength. Unfailed slopes had an order of magnitude

  12. Spectral characterization of tissues in high spectral and spatial resolution MR images: Implications for a classification-based synthetic CT algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Abbie M; Shea, Steven M; Medved, Milica; Karczmar, Gregory S; Surucu, Murat; Gros, Sebastien; Small, William; Roeske, John

    2017-05-01

    To characterize the spectral parameters of tissues with high spectral and spatial resolution magnetic resonance images to be used as a foundation for a classification-based synthetic CT algorithm. A phantom was constructed consisting of a section of fresh beef leg with bone embedded in 1% agarose gel. The high spectral and spatial (HiSS) resolution MR imaging sequence used had 1.0 mm in-plane resolution and 11.1 Hz spectral resolution. This sequence was used to image the phantom and one patient. Post-processing was performed off-line with IDL and included Fourier transformation of the time-domain data, labeling of fat and water peaks, and fitting the magnitude spectra with Lorentzian functions. Images of the peak height and peak integral of both the water and fat resonances were generated and analyzed. Several regions-of-interest (ROIs) were identified in phantom: bone marrow, cortical bone, adipose tissue, muscle, agar gel, and air; in the patient, no agar gel was present but an ROI of saline in the bladder was analyzed. All spectra were normalized by the noise within each voxel; thus, all parameters are reported in terms of signal-to-noise (SNR). The distributions of tissue spectral parameters were analyzed and scatterplots generated. Water peak height in cortical bone was compared to air using a nonparametric t-test. Composition of the various ROIs in terms of water, fat, or fat and water was also reported. In phantom, the scatterplot of peak height (water versus fat) showed good separation of bone marrow and adipose tissue. Water versus fat integral scatterplot showed better separation of muscle and cortical bone than the peak height scatterplot. In the patient data, the distributions of water and fat peak heights were similar to that in phantom, with more overlap of bone marrow and cortical bone than observed in phantom. The relationship between bone marrow and cortical bone for peak integral was better separated than those of peak heights in the patient data

  13. Identification and spectral characterization of green pigments, anomalous components of petroleum vanadylporphyrines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pevneva, G.S.; Antipenko, V.R.; Titov, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    A complex of methods has been used to characterize the basic mass of mineral porhyrines which have the red and crimson colors typical for metal porphyrines. Moreover, the compounds of the so called minor homological series are discovered in the composition of the concentrate of the vanadylporphyrines of each oil. Their distinguishing feature is their green color. The groups of green pigments have a varying chemical nature. The polar group of green pigments is examined. Polar green components of concentrates of petroleum vanadylprophyrines responsible for absorption in the 595 to 600 nanometer range are isolated in pure form. The totality of spectral data attests to the presence in these compounds of carbonyl groups adjoined with the porphyrine cycle (the carbonyl group in the lateral chain and the ketogroup in an isocyclic ring). The most probable routes of formation of the green pigments are oxidational transformations of the petroleum vanadylporphyrines in rock strata or in the process of porphyrine isolation. The possibility of preservation of the carbonyl groups with the formation of petroleum porphyrines from their predecessors in the conditions deep in the earth is not ruled out.

  14. Spectral characterization of hierarchical network modularity and limits of modularity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Somwrita; Henderson, James A; Robinson, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Many real world networks are reported to have hierarchically modular organization. However, there exists no algorithm-independent metric to characterize hierarchical modularity in a complex system. The main results of the paper are a set of methods to address this problem. First, classical results from random matrix theory are used to derive the spectrum of a typical stochastic block model hierarchical modular network form. Second, it is shown that hierarchical modularity can be fingerprinted using the spectrum of its largest eigenvalues and gaps between clusters of closely spaced eigenvalues that are well separated from the bulk distribution of eigenvalues around the origin. Third, some well-known results on fingerprinting non-hierarchical modularity in networks automatically follow as special cases, threreby unifying these previously fragmented results. Finally, using these spectral results, it is found that the limits of detection of modularity can be empirically established by studying the mean values of the largest eigenvalues and the limits of the bulk distribution of eigenvalues for an ensemble of networks. It is shown that even when modularity and hierarchical modularity are present in a weak form in the network, they are impossible to detect, because some of the leading eigenvalues fall within the bulk distribution. This provides a threshold for the detection of modularity. Eigenvalue distributions of some technological, social, and biological networks are studied, and the implications of detecting hierarchical modularity in real world networks are discussed.

  15. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization and Antioxidant Activity of Tin(II-Morin Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahabuddin Memon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on the interaction between morin and Tin(II and the resulting complex was characterized through various analytical techniques by comparing it with morin. The complexation was confirmed at first by UV-Vis study, which shows that addition of Tin(II to morin may produce bathochromic shifts indicative of complex formation. IR spectral studies indicated that carbonyl has involved in coordination with Tin(II. Moreover, 1H-NMR studies validated that in conjunction with carbonyl, 3-OH of morin is more appropriate to be involved in complexation by replacement of its proton. Scavenging activities of morin and its Tin(II complex on DPPH• radical showed the inhibitory rates of 65% and 49%, respectively. In addition, the reducing capacity of morin was outstanding at 0.5 and 2.0 mg/ml concentrations relative to Tin(II complex. Overall, the study potentially shows the strong impact in order to design the anticancer drugs jointly from its cytotoxic potential and antioxidant activities, thereby selectively targeting the cancerous cells in result increasing their therapeutic index as well as extra advantages over other anticancer drugs.

  16. Synthesis, spectral characterization and computed optical analysis of potent triazole based compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumrra, Sajjad H.; Mushtaq, Fazila; Khalid, Muhammad; Raza, Muhammad Asam; Nazar, Muhammad Faizan; Ali, Bakhat; Braga, Ataualpa A. C.

    2018-02-01

    Biologically active triazole Schiff base ligand (L) and metal complexes [Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)] are reported herein. The ligand acted as tridentate and coordinated towards metallic ions via azomethine-N, triazolic-N moiety and deprotonated-O of phenyl substituents in an octahedral manner. These compounds were characterized by physical, spectral and analytical analysis. The synthesized ligand and metal complexes were screened for antibacterial pathogens against Chromohalobacter salexigens, Chromohalobacter israelensi, Halomonas halofila and Halomonas salina, antifungal bioassay against Aspergillus niger and Aspergellus flavin, antioxidant (DPPH, phosphomolybdate) and also for enzyme inhibition [butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE)] studies. The results of these activities indicated the ligand to possess potential activity which significantly increased upon chelation. Moreover, vibrational bands, frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and natural bond analysis (NBO) of ligand (1) were carried out through density functional theory (DFT) with B3lYP/6-311 ++G (d,p) approach. While, UV-Vis analysis was performed by time dependent TD-DFT with B3lYP/6-311 ++G (d,p) method. NBO analysis revealed that investigated compound (L) contains enormous molecular stability owing to hyper conjugative interactions. Theoretical spectroscopic findings showed good agreement to experimental spectroscopic data. Global reactivity descriptors were calculated using the energies of FMOs which indicated compound (L) might be bioactive. These parameters confirmed the charge transfer phenomenon and reasonable correspondence with experimental bioactivity results.

  17. Plasma density characterization at SPARC-LAB through Stark broadening of Hydrogen spectral lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, F., E-mail: francesco.filippi@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI), ‘Sapienza’ Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Roma (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI), ‘Sapienza’ Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Roma (Italy); Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Zigler, A. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma-based acceleration techniques are of great interest for future, compact accelerators due to their high accelerating gradient. Both particle-driven and laser-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments are foreseen at the SPARC-LAB Test Facility (INFN National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy), with the aim to accelerate high-brightness electron beams. In order to optimize the efficiency of the acceleration in the plasma and preserve the quality of the accelerated beam, the knowledge of the plasma electron density is mandatory. The Stark broadening of the Hydrogen spectral lines is one of the candidates used to characterize plasma density. The implementation of this diagnostic for plasma-based experiments at SPARC-LAB is presented. - Highlights: • Stark broadening of Hydrogen lines has been measured to determine plasma density. • Plasma density diagnostic tool for plasma-based experiments at SPARC-LAB is presented. • Plasma density in tapered laser triggered ablative capillary discharge was measured. • Results of plasma density measurements in ablative capillaries are shown.

  18. Synthesis and spectral characterization of Zn(II) microsphere series for antimicrobial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K.; Pandey, Sarvesh K.; Pandey, O. P.; Sengupta, S. K.

    2014-09-01

    Microsphere series have been synthesized by reacting zinc(II) acetate dihydrate with Schiff bases derived from 2-hydrazino-5-[substituted phenyl]-1,3,4-thiadiazole/oxadiazole/triazole with salicylaldehyde. Elemental analysis suggests that the complexes have 1:2 and 1:1 stoichiometry of the type [Zn(L)2(H2O)2] and [Zn(L‧)(H2O)2]; LH = Schiff bases derived from 2-hydrazino-5-[substituted phenyl]-1,3,4-thia/oxadiazole with salicylaldehyde; L‧H2 = Schiff bases derived from 3-(substituted phenyl)-4-amino-5-hydrazino-1,2,4-triazole and salicylaldehyde and were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral data. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that synthesized materials have microsphere like structure and there EDX analysis comparably matches with elemental analysis. For the antimicrobial application Schiff bases and their zinc(II) complexes were screened for four bacteria e.g. Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Streptococcus pyogenes and four fungi e.g. Cyrtomium falcatum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporium and Curvularia pallescence by the reported method. Schiff base and Zn(II) compounds showed significant antimicrobial activities. However, activities increase upon chelation. Thermal analysis (TGA) data of compound (10) showed its stability up to 300 °C.

  19. Spectral characterization of biological aerosol particles using two-wavelength excited laser-induced fluorescence and elastic scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Lin, Horn-Bond; Huston, Alan L; Eversole, Jay D

    2011-03-28

    A two-wavelength laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument has been developed and used to characterize individual biological aerosol particles, including biological warfare (BW) agent surrogates. Fluorescence in discrete spectral bands from widely different species, and also from similar species under different growth conditions were measured and compared. The two-wavelength excitation approach was found to increase discrimination among several biological materials, and especially with respect to diesel exhaust particles, a common interferent for LIF BW detection systems. The spectral characteristics of a variety of biological materials and ambient air components have been studied as a function of aerosol particle size and incident fluence.

  20. Fluvial reservoir characterization using topological descriptors based on spectral analysis of graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viseur, Sophie; Chiaberge, Christophe; Rhomer, Jérémy; Audigane, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Fluvial systems generate highly heterogeneous reservoir. These heterogeneities have major impact on fluid flow behaviors. However, the modelling of such reservoirs is mainly performed in under-constrained contexts as they include complex features, though only sparse and indirect data are available. Stochastic modeling is the common strategy to solve such problems. Multiple 3D models are generated from the available subsurface dataset. The generated models represent a sampling of plausible subsurface structure representations. From this model sampling, statistical analysis on targeted parameters (e.g.: reserve estimations, flow behaviors, etc.) and a posteriori uncertainties are performed to assess risks. However, on one hand, uncertainties may be huge, which requires many models to be generated for scanning the space of possibilities. On the other hand, some computations performed on the generated models are time consuming and cannot, in practice, be applied on all of them. This issue is particularly critical in: 1) geological modeling from outcrop data only, as these data types are generally sparse and mainly distributed in 2D at large scale but they may locally include high-resolution descriptions (e.g.: facies, strata local variability, etc.); 2) CO2 storage studies as many scales of investigations are required, from meter to regional ones, to estimate storage capacities and associated risks. Recent approaches propose to define distances between models to allow sophisticated multivariate statistics to be applied on the space of uncertainties so that only sub-samples, representative of initial set, are investigated for dynamic time-consuming studies. This work focuses on defining distances between models that characterize the topology of the reservoir rock network, i.e. its compactness or connectivity degree. The proposed strategy relies on the study of the reservoir rock skeleton. The skeleton of an object corresponds to its median feature. A skeleton is

  1. Thermal Properties and Phonon Spectral Characterization of Synthetic Boron Phosphide for High Thermal Conductivity Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joon Sang; Wu, Huan; Hu, Yongjie

    2017-12-13

    Heat dissipation is an increasingly critical technological challenge in modern electronics and photonics as devices continue to shrink to the nanoscale. To address this challenge, high thermal conductivity materials that can efficiently dissipate heat from hot spots and improve device performance are urgently needed. Boron phosphide is a unique high thermal conductivity and refractory material with exceptional chemical inertness, hardness, and high thermal stability, which holds high promises for many practical applications. So far, however, challenges with boron phosphide synthesis and characterization have hampered the understanding of its fundamental properties and potential applications. Here, we describe a systematic thermal transport study based on a synergistic synthesis-experimental-modeling approach: we have chemically synthesized high-quality boron phosphide single crystals and measured their thermal conductivity as a record-high 460 W/mK at room temperature. Through nanoscale ballistic transport, we have, for the first time, mapped the phonon spectra of boron phosphide and experimentally measured its phonon mean free-path spectra with consideration of both natural and isotope-pure abundances. We have also measured the temperature- and size-dependent thermal conductivity and performed corresponding calculations by solving the three-dimensional and spectral-dependent phonon Boltzmann transport equation using the variance-reduced Monte Carlo method. The experimental results are in good agreement with that predicted by multiscale simulations and density functional theory, which together quantify the heat conduction through the phonon mode dependent scattering process. Our finding underscores the promise of boron phosphide as a high thermal conductivity material for a wide range of applications, including thermal management and energy regulation, and provides a detailed, microscopic-level understanding of the phonon spectra and thermal transport mechanisms of

  2. Evaluation of discrimination measures to characterize spectrally similar leaves of African Savannah trees

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudeni, N

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available National Park) situated in South Africa, at leaf level. The leaf measurements were obtained through the Analytical Spectral Radiometer (ASD) spectrometer of a hyperspectral sensor. The study also assesses the statistical significance of variations (the...

  3. Quantitative photoacoustic characterization of blood clot in blood: A mechanobiological assessment through spectral information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Deblina; Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George C. K.; Sharma, Norman

    2017-02-01

    Formation of blood clots, called thrombus, can happen due to hyper-coagulation of blood. Thrombi, while moving through blood vessels can impede blood flow, an important criterion for many critical diseases like deep vein thrombosis and heart attacks. Understanding mechanical properties of clot formation is vital for assessment of severity of thrombosis and proper treatment. However, biomechanics of thrombus is less known to clinicians and not very well investigated. Photoacoustic (PA) spectral response, a non-invasive technique, is proposed to investigate the mechanism of formation of blood clots through elasticity and also differentiate clots from blood. Distinct shift (increase in frequency) of the PA response dominant frequency during clot formation is reported. In addition, quantitative differentiation of blood clots from blood has been achieved through parameters like dominant frequency and spectral energy of PA spectral response. Nearly twofold increases in dominant frequency in blood clots compared to blood were found in the PA spectral response. Significant changes in energy also help in quantitatively differentiating clots from blood, in the blood. Our results reveal that increase in density during clot formation is reflected in the PA spectral response, a significant step towards understanding the mechanobiology of thrombus formation. Hence, the proposed tool, in addition to detecting thrombus formation, could reveal mechanical properties of the sample through quantitative photoacoustic spectral parameters.

  4. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent

  5. The pre-launch characterization of SIMBIO-SYS/VIHI imaging spectrometer for the BepiColombo mission to Mercury. II. Spectral calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, F; Filacchione, G; Capaccioni, F; Carli, C; Dami, M; Tommasi, L; Aroldi, G; Borrelli, D; Barbis, A; Baroni, M; Pastorini, G; Ficai Veltroni, I; Mugnuolo, R

    2017-09-01

    The Visible and near Infrared Hyperspectral Imager (VIHI) is the VIS-IR spectrometer with imaging capabilities aboard the ESA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. In this second paper, we report the instrument spectral characterization derived by the calibration campaign carried out before spacecraft integration. Complementary measurements concerning radiometric and linearity responses, as well as geometric performances, are described in Paper I [G. Filacchione et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 88, 094502 (2017)]. We have verified the VIHI spectral range, spectral dispersion, spectral response function, and spectral uniformity along the whole slit. Instrumental defects and optical aberrations due to smiling and keystone effects have been evaluated, and they are lower than the design requirement (spectral dispersion is well represented by a second order curve, rather than to be constant along the spectral dimension.

  6. The pre-launch characterization of SIMBIO-SYS/VIHI imaging spectrometer for the BepiColombo mission to Mercury. II. Spectral calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, F.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Carli, C.; Dami, M.; Tommasi, L.; Aroldi, G.; Borrelli, D.; Barbis, A.; Baroni, M.; Pastorini, G.; Ficai Veltroni, I.; Mugnuolo, R.

    2017-09-01

    The Visible and near Infrared Hyperspectral Imager (VIHI) is the VIS-IR spectrometer with imaging capabilities aboard the ESA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. In this second paper, we report the instrument spectral characterization derived by the calibration campaign carried out before spacecraft integration. Complementary measurements concerning radiometric and linearity responses, as well as geometric performances, are described in Paper I [G. Filacchione et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 88, 094502 (2017)]. We have verified the VIHI spectral range, spectral dispersion, spectral response function, and spectral uniformity along the whole slit. Instrumental defects and optical aberrations due to smiling and keystone effects have been evaluated, and they are lower than the design requirement (<1/3 pixel). The instrumental response is uniform along the whole slit, while spectral dispersion is well represented by a second order curve, rather than to be constant along the spectral dimension.

  7. Quantitative analysis of the dual-energy CT virtual spectral curve for focal liver lesions characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi, E-mail: wq20@hotmail.com; Shi, Gaofeng, E-mail: gaofengs62@sina.com; Qi, Xiaohui, E-mail: qixiaohui1984@163.com; Fan, Xueli, E-mail: 407849960@qq.com; Wang, Lijia, E-mail: 893197597@qq.com

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We establish a feasible method using the virtual spectral curves (VSC) to differentiate focal liver lesions using DECT. • Our study shows the slope of the VSC can be used to differentiate between hemangioma, HCC, metastasis and cyst. • Importantly, the diagnostic specificities associated with using the slope to diagnose both hemangioma and cysts were 100%. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the usefulness of the spectral curve slope of dual-energy CT (DECT) for differentiating between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), hepatic metastasis, hemangioma (HH) and cysts. Methods: In total, 121 patients were imaged in the portal venous phase using dual-energy mode. Of these patients, 23 patients had HH, 28 patients had HCC, 40 patients had metastases and 30 patients had simple cysts. The spectral curves of the hepatic lesions were derived from the 40–190 keV levels of virtual monochromatic spectral imaging. The spectral curve slopes were calculated from 40 to 110 keV. The slopes were compared using the Kruskal–Wallis test. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were used to determine the optimal cut-off value of the slope of the spectral curve to differentiate between the lesions. Results: The spectral curves of the four lesion types had different baseline levels. The HH baseline level was the highest followed by HCC, metastases and cysts. The slopes of the spectral curves of HH, HCC, metastases and cysts were 3.81 ± 1.19, 1.49 ± 0.57, 1.06 ± 0.76 and 0.13 ± 0.17, respectively. These values were significantly different (P < 0.008). Based on ROC analysis, the respective diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 87% and 100% for hemangioma (cut-off value ≥ 2.988), 82.1% and 65.9% for HCC (cut-off value 1.167–2.998), 65.9% and 59% for metastasis (cut-off value 0.133–1.167) and 44.4% and 100% for cysts (cut-off value ≤ 0.133). Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of the DECT spectral curve in the portal venous phase can be used to

  8. Spectral characterization of jitter, shimmer, and additive noise in synthetically generated voice signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P J

    2000-02-01

    Alteration of the harmonic structure in voice source spectra, taken over at least two periods of the waveform, may occur due to the presence of fundamental frequency (f0) perturbation, amplitude perturbation, additive noise, or changes within the glottal source signal itself. In order to make accurate inferences regarding glottal-flow dynamics or perceptual evaluations based on spectral measurements taken from the acoustic speech waveform, investigation of the spectral features of each aperiodic component is required. Based on a heuristic development involving a consideration of the partial sum of the Fourier series taken for two periods of a jittered, shimmered, and (additive, random) noise-contaminated signal, the corresponding spectral characteristics are hypothesized. Subsequent to this, the Fourier series coefficients are calculated for the two periods in order to test the hypotheses. Definite spectral differences are found for each aperiodic component; based on these findings differential quantitative spectral measurements are suggested. Further supportive evidence is obtained through use of Fourier transform and periodogram-averaged calculations. The analysis is carried out on synthetically generated glottal-pulse waveforms and on radiated speech waveforms. A discussion of the results is given in terms of voice aperiodicity in general and in terms of their implication for future studies involving human voice signals.

  9. Characterizing microstructural changes of skeletal muscle tissues using spectral transformed Mueller matrix polarization parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; He, Honghui; Chang, Jintao; Ma, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Polarization imaging techniques are recognized as potentially powerful tools to detect the structural changes of biological tissues. Meanwhile, spectral features of the scattered light can also provide abundant microstructural information, therefore can be applied in biomedical studies. In this paper, we adopt the polarization reflectance spectral imaging to analyze the microstructural changes of hydrolyzing skeletal muscle tissues. We measure the Mueller matrix, which is a comprehensive description of the polarization properties, of the bovine skeletal muscle samples in different periods of time, and analyze its behavior using the multispectral Mueller matrix transformation (MMT) technique. The experimental results show that for bovine skeletal muscle tissues, the backscattered spectral MMT parameters have different values and variation features at different stages. We can also find the experimental results indicate that the stages of hydrolysis for bovine skeletal muscle samples can be judged by the spectral MMT parameters. The results presented in this work show that combining with the spectral technique, the MMT parameters have the potential to be used as tools for meat quality detection and monitoring.

  10. Using Single-Scattering Albedo Spectral Curvature to Characterize East Asian Aerosol Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral dependence of aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) has been used to infer aerosol composition. In particular, aerosol mixtures dominated by dust absorption will have monotonically increasing SSA with wavelength while that dominated by black carbon absorption has monotonically decreasing SSA spectra. However, by analyzing SSA measured at four wavelengths, 440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm from the Aerosol Robotic Network data set, we find that the SSA spectra over East Asia are frequently peaked at 675 nm. In these cases, we suggest that SSA spectral curvature, defined as the negative of the second derivative of SSA as a function of wavelength, can provide additional information on the composition of these aerosol mixtures. Aerosol SSA spectral curvatures for East Asia during fall and winter are considerably larger than those found in places primarily dominated by biomass burning or dust aerosols. SSA curvature is found to increase as the SSA magnitude decreases. The curvature increases with coarse mode fraction (CMF) to a CMF value of about 0.4, then slightly decreases or remains constant at larger CMF. Mie calculations further verify that the strongest SSA curvature occurs at approx. 40% dust fraction, with 10% scattering aerosol fraction. The nonmonotonic SSA spectral dependence is likely associated with enhanced absorption in the shortwave by dust, absorption by black carbon at longer wavelengths, and also the flattened absorption optical depth spectral dependence due to the increased particle size.

  11. Characterization of myofibrils cold structural deformation degrees of frozen pork using hyperspectral imaging coupled with spectral angle mapping algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiwei; Sun, Da-Wen; Pu, Hongbin; Wei, Qingyi

    2018-01-15

    The study investigated the possibility of using hyperspectral imaging (HSI) in the spectral range of 1000-2200nm to characterize myofibrils cold structural deformation degrees of frozen pork samples. The HSI images of pork samples frozen under different freezing rates were acquired in the frozen state without thawing. The myofibrils cold structural deformation degrees were evaluated by surface hydrophobicity (S0ANS) and Ca(2+)-ATPase activity. Spectral angle mapping (SAM) algorithm was used for the first time to extract the spectral information for regression. Compared with the optimized partial least square regression (PLSR) models based on selected wavebands by successive projections algorithm (SPA), the optimized PLSR models developed based on the spectral angles calculated by the SAM algorithm achieved comparable or even better performance with R(2)P of 0.896 for S0ANS and 0.879 for Ca(2+)-ATPase activity, respectively. The implications of the frozen meat spectrum were also analyzed in the current study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simulator spectral characterization using balloon calibrated solar cells with narrow band pass filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodelle, G. S.; Brooks, G. R.; Seaman, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The development and implementation of an instrument for spectral measurement of solar simulators for testing solar cell characteristics is reported. The device was constructed for detecting changes in solar simulator behavior and for comparing simulator spectral irradiance to solar AM0 output. It consists of a standard solar cell equipped with a band pass filter narrow enough so that, when flown on a balloon to sufficient altitude along with sufficient numbers of cells, each equipped with filters of different bandpass ratings, the entire spectral response of the standard cell can be determined. Measured short circuit currents from the balloon flights thus produce cell devices which, when exposed to solar simulator light, have a current which does or does not respond as observed under actual AM0 conditions. Improvements of the filtered cells in terms of finer bandpass filter tuning and measurement of temperature coefficients are indicated.

  13. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell diagnosis by spectral characterization of the electrochemical noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizia, R.; Dib, A.; Thomas, A.; Martemianov, S.

    2017-02-01

    Electrochemical noise analysis (ENA) has been performed for the diagnosis of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) under various operating conditions. Its interest is related with the possibility of a non-invasive on-line diagnosis of a commercial fuel cell. A methodology of spectral analysis has been developed and an evaluation of the stationarity of the signal has been proposed. It has been revealed that the spectral signature of fuel cell, is a linear slope with a fractional power dependence 1/fα where α = 2 for different relative humidities and current densities. Experimental results reveal that the electrochemical noise is sensitive to the water management, especially under dry conditions. At RHH2 = 20% and RHair = 20%, spectral analysis shows a three linear slopes signature on the spectrum at low frequency range (f fuel cell water balance.

  14. Topographic gradient based site characterization in India complemented by strong ground-motion spectral attributes

    KAUST Repository

    Nath, Sankar Kumar

    2013-12-01

    We appraise topographic-gradient approach for site classification that employs correlations between 30. m column averaged shear-wave velocity and topographic gradients. Assessments based on site classifications reported from cities across India indicate that the approach is reasonably viable at regional level. Additionally, we experiment three techniques for site classification based on strong ground-motion recordings, namely Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR), Response Spectra Shape (RSS), and Horizontal-to-Vertical Response Spectral Ratio (HVRSR) at the strong motion stations located across the Himalayas and northeast India. Statistical tests on the results indicate that these three techniques broadly differentiate soil and rock sites while RSS and HVRSR yield better signatures. The results also support the implemented site classification in the light of strong ground-motion spectral attributes observed in different parts of the globe. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Characterizing and Overcoming Spectral Artifacts in Imaging Fourier-Transform Spectroscopy of Turbulent Exhaust Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Hyperspectral Imagery (Imagerie hyperspectrale thermique ). Meeting Proceedings of Sensors and Electronics Panel (SET) Specialists Meeting held at the Belgian...would corrupt spectral measurements by IFTS. The SR-30 is a small turbojet designed for educa- tional laboratory work. A single- stage centrifugal

  16. Universal dispersion model for characterization of optical thin films over wide spectral range: Application to magnesium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Nečas, David; Giglia, Angelo; Franta, Pavel; Ohlídal, Ivan

    2017-11-01

    Optical characterization of magnesium fluoride thin films is performed in a wide spectral range from far infrared to extreme ultraviolet (0.01-45 eV) utilizing the universal dispersion model. Two film defects, i.e. random roughness of the upper boundaries and defect transition layer at lower boundary are taken into account. An extension of universal dispersion model consisting in expressing the excitonic contributions as linear combinations of Gaussian and truncated Lorentzian terms is introduced. The spectral dependencies of the optical constants are presented in a graphical form and by the complete set of dispersion parameters that allows generating tabulated optical constants with required range and step using a simple utility in the newAD2 software package.

  17. Tetraiodophenolsulfonphthalein as a spectral substitute to characterize the complexation between cationic and anionic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-Wen; Qian, Yan; Hu, Zhang-Jun

    2004-11-01

    The complexation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), with tetraiodophenolsulfonphthalein (TIPST) as a spectral substitute was investigated at pH 5.89 and 8.30 by the microsurface adsorption--spectral correction (MSASC) technique. The aggregations of TIPST, SDS, and SDBS on CTAB obeyed the Langmuir isothermal adsorption. The aggregates TIPST-CTAB, TIPST2-CTAB3, SDS3-CTAB2, and SDBS3-CTAB2 were formed at 20 degrees C and the binding constants of all the aggregates were determined. The replacement of TIPST-binding CTAB monomer with SDS or SDBS at pH 5.89 was applied to the quantitative determination of anionic detergent (AD) in water with satisfactory recovery.

  18. Spectroscopic characterization and EPR spectral studies on transition metal complexes with a novel tetradentate, 12-membered macrocyclic ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lokesh Kumar; Chandra, Sulekh

    2006-11-01

    Complexes of Cr(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) containing a tetradentate macrocyclic N-donor ligand have been prepared via template reaction of 2,3-pentanedione, ethylene-di-ammine and transition metal ions. The complexes have been characterized on the basis of the elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment susceptibility, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. The complexes are of high spin type and possess four coordinate tetrahedral five coordinate square pyramidal and six coordinated octahedral/tetragonal geometry.

  19. Novel Low Spin Mixed Ligand Thiohydrazide Complexes of Iron(III: Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolan Sengupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed ligand complexes of Fe(III with aromatic thiohydrazides of general composition [Fe(acac(L2] have been synthesized and characterized (acac-acetylacetonate, L = bidentate uninegative aromatic thiohydrazide ligand, for example, thiobenzhydrazide, 2-hydroxythiobenzhydrazide, furan-2-thiohydrazide, and thiophen-2-thiohydrazide. The magnetic susceptibility data and the EPR spectra of these complexes suggested the formation of rhombically distorted low spin iron center (d5 in octahedral environment, which was also supported by the UV-vis spectral data of the complexes. Biological studies of these complexes also indicated that the iron-thiohydrazido complexes have superior antibacterial properties compared to the corresponding ligands.

  20. Synthesis and Spectral Characterization of Praseodymium(III Complex with New Amino Acid-Based Azo Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Praseodymium (Pr (III complex has been synthesized and characterized by using a new amino acid-based (leucine azo dye such as N,N-dimethylazoleucine (L1 and 1,10 phenanthroline (L2. Reaction of Pr(III ion with L1 and L2 in 1 : 2 : 1 ratio in alcoholic medium has been carried out with general formula [Pr(L12(L2(H2O2]. Elemental analysis, comparative FT-IR, and 1HNMR spectral studies of Pr(III complex with ligands have been shown in this paper.

  1. Synthesis, Characterization and Spectral Properties of Substituted Tetraphenylporphyrin Iron Chloride Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Li; Xu-Feng Song; Yuan-Bin She; Yang Zhou; Zhi-Cheng Sun

    2011-01-01

    A series of substituted tetraphenylporphyrin iron chloride complexes [RTPPFe(III)Cl, R=o/p-NO2, o/p-Cl, H, o/p-CH3, o/p-OCH3] were synthesized by a novel universal mixed-solvent method and the spectral properties of free base porphyrins and iron porphyrin compounds were compared with each other. The experimental results showed that the one-pot mixed solvent method was superior to the two-step method in the yields, reaction time and workup of reaction mixtures for the synthesis of iron porphyr...

  2. Spectral characterization of mangrove leaves in the Brazilian Amazonian Coast: Turiaçu Bay, Maranhão State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo-Mochel, Flávia; Ponzoni, Flávio J

    2007-12-01

    Mangrove communities are tropical systems which have fewer species than tropical forests, especially in Latin America and display a single architecture, usually lacking the various strata commonly found in other forest ecosystems. The identification of mangrove communities by orbital data is not a difficult task but the most interesting challenge is to identify themselves by the dominant species. The first step toward that floristic identification is the spectral characterization of detached leaves. Leaves from four species of mangrove trees were spectrally characterized considering the Directional Hemispherical Reflectance Factor (DHRF) determined through radiometric measurements using an integrating sphere LICOR 1800 attached to a spectroradiometer SPECTRON SE-590. In the visible bands (0.45-0.69 microm) the button-shaped mangrove Conocarpus erectus was brighter and the red mangrove Rhizophora mangle was darker than the other two species which shows very close DHRF values. Otherwise the black mangrove Avicennia germinans and the white mangrove Laguncularia racemosa can be distinguished from one another in the Near Infra Red (NIR) region (0.76-0.90 microm and in this region of the spectrum the DHRF of C. erectus and R. mangle become very close.

  3. Colored Gaussian Multiple Descriptions: Spectral-Domain Characterization and Time-Domain Design

    CERN Document Server

    Ostergaard, Jan; Zamir, Ram

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that Shannon's rate-distortion function (RDF) in the colored quadratic Gaussian (QG) case, can be parametrized via a single Lagrangian variable (the ``water level'' in the reverse water filling solution). In this work, we show that the symmetric colored QG multiple-description (MD) RDF in the case of two descriptions, can be parametrized via two Lagrangian variables. To establish this result, we use two key ideas. First, we propose a new representation for the MD test channel, and show that the minimum mutual information rate across this channel coincide with the QG MD RDF. Second, we use variational calculus to obtain a spectral domain representation of the test channel's optimal side and central distortion spectra given the source spectral density and the side and central distortion constraints. The distortion spectra are specified via two Lagrangian parameters, which control the trade-off between the side distortion, the central distortion, and the coding rate.We also show that the symmetr...

  4. Processing Pipeline of Sugarcane Spectral Response to Characterize the Fallen Plants Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Agustín; Kemerer, Alejandra; Hadad, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, in agronomic systems it is possible to make a variable management of inputs to improve the efficiency of agronomic industry and optimize the logistics of the harvesting process. In this way, it was proposed for sugarcane culture the use of remote sensing tools and computational methods to identify useful areas in the cultivated lands. The objective was to use these areas to make variable management of the crop. When at the moment of harvesting the sugarcane there are fallen stalks, together with them some strange material (vegetal or mineral) is collected. This strange material is not millable and when it enters onto the sugar mill it causes important looses of efficiency in the sugar extraction processes and affects its quality. Considering this issue, the spectral response of sugarcane plants in aerial multispectral images was studied. The spectral response was analyzed in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. Then, the aerial images were segmented to obtain homogeneous regions useful for producers to make decisions related to the use of inputs and resources according to the variability of the system (existence of fallen cane and standing cane). The obtained segmentation results were satisfactory. It was possible to identify regions with fallen cane and regions with standing cane with high precision rates.

  5. [Spectral characterization for capsanthin molecule with in vitro oxidative defense reaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen-Yu; Ding, Zhu-Hong; Liu, Hai

    2014-02-01

    The changes of UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopic properties for capsanthin before and after reaction with exogenous superoxide anion (*O2(-)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (*OH), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and lipoxygenase (LOX) were explored. The results showed that, the UV-Vis spectral absorption of capsanthin treated with reactive oxygen species had a blue-shift. At the same time, the FTIR spectra changed significantly. The number of FTIR spectral peaks reduced and theFTIR strength weakened for capsanthin molecule treated with *O2(-) and *OH. The characteristic and strong peaks moved to shorter wavelengths when treated with H2O2. And LOX caused breakage of capsanthin molecule and reduction of peak number or groups without carbonyl. Exogenous H2O2 + CAT or H2O2 + POD treatment could not affect the UV-Vis and FTIR spectra significantly. So ROS could cause oxidative degradation of capsanthin and destroy chromophoric groups such as carbon-carbon double bond and carbonyl, then grow colorless alcohols. Hence ROS and LOX should transforms the conjugate system of capsanthin molecules, while CAT and POD could protect the capsanthin.

  6. Using UV-vis absorbance spectral parameters to characterize the fouling propensity of humic substances during ultrafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minghao; Meng, Fangang

    2015-12-15

    Ultrafiltration (UF) can achieve excellent removal of natural organic matter (NOM), but the main challenge for this process is the limited understanding of membrane fouling. The objective of this study is to explore the potential of UV-vis spectroscopic analysis for the detection of membrane fouling caused by humic acids (HA) at different solution chemistries (i.e., calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and pH). In the presence of Ca(2+), several spectral parameters, including the DSlope(325-375) (the slope of the log-transformed absorbance spectra over 325-375 nm), S(275-295) (the slope of the absorption coefficient over 257-295 nm) and S(R) (the ratio of S(275-295) to S(350-400)) of various HA solutions, were correlated with the molecule aggregation and the membrane fouling potential. Interestingly, increased DSlope(325-375) and decreased S(275-295) and S(R) were observed for the HA-Ca(2+) interaction under alkaline conditions (i.e., pH = 9) relative to those in lower pH environments (i.e., pH = 7 or 6), suggesting that spectral parameters were able to predict HA-Ca(2+) interactions under varying pH conditions. The strong correlations between the spectral parameters and the unified membrane fouling index (UMFI) obtained from UF experiments further corroborated that the spectral parameters were able to predict the membrane fouling potential. Moreover, the spectral parameters were also found to well reveal the fouling extent of the mixture of HA and Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM) or the pure SRNOM added with varying calcium concentrations, implying that the spectroscopic analysis was also available for the indication of practical NOM fouling. In addition, the measurement of S(275-295) and S(R) of the permeate solution suggests an increasing proportion of small-molecule HA in the permeate during the UF process. This study not only expands our knowledge of NOM-Ca(2+) aggregates as well as their role in membrane fouling behavior but also provides an approach for the in situ

  7. A Review of Spectral Methods for Dispersion Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jidraph Njuguna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization is a crucial step in the study of properties of nanomaterials to evaluate their full potential in applications. Carbon nanotube-based materials have properties that are sensitive to size, shape, concentration, and agglomeration state. It is therefore critical to quantitatively characterize these factors in situ, while the processing takes place. Traditional characterization techniques that rely on microscopy are often time consuming and in most cases provide qualitative results. Spectroscopy has been studied as an alternative tool for identifying, characterizing, and studying these materials in situ and in a quantitative way. In this paper, we provide a critical review of the spectroscopy techniques used to explore the surface properties (e.g., dispersion characteristics of carbon nanotubes in aqueous suspensions during the sonication process.

  8. Synthesis and spectral characterization of acetophenone thiosemicarbazone—A nonlinear optical material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhakumari, R.; Ramamurthi, K.; Vasuki, G.; Yamin, Bohari M.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2010-08-01

    Acetophenone thiosemicarbazone (APTSC) was synthesized. Solubility of APTSC was determined in ethanol and methanol at different temperatures. Single crystals were grown from ethanol by slow evaporation at room temperature. The grown crystal was subjected to FTIR, Laser-Raman and 1H NMR spectral analyses to confirm the synthesized compound. Thermal properties were investigated by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. High-resolution X-ray diffractometry (HRXRD) was employed to evaluate the perfection of the grown crystal. The range and percentage of optical transmission was ascertained by recording UV-vis-NIR spectrum. The third order nonlinear optical parameters (nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficient) were derived by the Z-scan technique.

  9. Characterization and analysis of high temperature superconducting microstrip and coplanar resonators using a spectral domain method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kedar, Ashutosh [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi-110021 (India); Kataria, N D [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India); Gupta, K K [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi-11002, (India)

    2004-07-01

    Microwave characteristics of planar high temperature superconducting microstrip line resonator (MSR) and coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonators have been estimated using a full wave spectral domain technique in conjunction with the complex resistive boundary condition. The computer aided design method developed is applied to simulate the characteristics of planar resonators. The proposed method has been validated with experimental results after taking into account the practical operating conditions. A reasonable agreement for the theoretically computed and measured resonant frequency and unloaded Q-value with experimental data of Porch et al (1995 IEEE Microw. Theory Technol. 2 306-14) has been observed for the MSR operated at 5 GHz as well as for the CPW resonator at 7.95 GHz.

  10. X-ray studies, spectral characterization and thermal behaviour of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP04)3]. H20, I, was synthesized by reacting Zn2+ ions with tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine phosphate [C6H21N4][P04].5H20. The compound was characterized by powder x-ray diffraction analysis, energy dispersive analysis by x-ray and infrared ...

  11. Synthesis, characterization and spectral properties of substituted tetraphenylporphyrin iron chloride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Cheng; She, Yuan-Bin; Zhou, Yang; Song, Xu-Feng; Li, Kai

    2011-04-06

    A series of substituted tetraphenylporphyrin iron chloride complexes [RTPPFe(III)Cl, R=o/p-NO₂, o/p-Cl, H, o/p-CH₃, o/p-OCH₃] were synthesized by a novel universal mixed-solvent method and the spectral properties of free base porphyrins and iron porphyrin compounds were compared with each other. The experimental results showed that the one-pot mixed solvent method was superior to the two-step method in the yields, reaction time and workup of reaction mixtures for the synthesis of iron porphyrin compounds. The highest yields (28.7%-40.4%) of RTPPFe(III)Cl were obtained in the mixed solvents propionic acid, glacial acetic acid and m-nitrotoluene under reflux for 2 h. A detailed analysis of ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), infrared (IR) and far-infrared (FIR) spectra suggested the transformation from free base porphyrins to iron porphyrins. The red shift of the Soret band in ultraviolet-visible spectra due to the presence of p-nitrophenyl substituents and the blue shift of Fe-Cl bond of TPPFeCl in far-infrared spectra were further explained by the electron transfer and molecular planarity in the porphyrin ring.

  12. Optical characterization of agricultural pest insects: a methodological study in the spectral and time domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. Y.; Zhang, H.; Duan, Z.; Lian, M.; Zhao, G. Y.; Sun, X. H.; Hu, J. D.; Gao, L. N.; Feng, H. Q.; Svanberg, S.

    2016-08-01

    Identification of agricultural pest insects is an important aspect in insect research and agricultural monitoring. We have performed a methodological study of how spectroscopic techniques and wing-beat frequency analysis might provide relevant information. An optical system based on the combination of close-range remote sensing and reflectance spectroscopy was developed to study the optical characteristics of different flying insects, collected in Southern China. The results demonstrate that the combination of wing-beat frequency assessment and reflectance spectral analysis has the potential to successfully differentiate between insect species. Further, studies of spectroscopic characteristics of fixed specimen of insects, also from Central China, showed the possibility of refined agricultural pest identification. Here, in addition to reflectance recordings also laser-induced fluorescence spectra were investigated for all the species of insects under study and found to provide complementary information to optically distinguish insects. In order to prove the practicality of the techniques explored, clearly fieldwork aiming at elucidating the variability of parameters, even within species, must be performed.

  13. Optical spectral characterization of leaves for endemic species from La Primavera forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragán, R. C.; Strojnik, Marija; Rodríguez-Rivas, Antonio; Garcia-Torales, G.; González, Francisco Javier

    2017-09-01

    La Primavera forest is the main climate regulator in the metropolitan area of Guadalajara, the second most populated megalopolis in Mexico with approximately 4.4 million people. This forest area has been a focus of fires in the last decade and it is deteriorating the quality of life of the inhabitants. Leaves from the endemic forest provide information about their biochemical composition and physiology. This information is enclosed in the spectral range of the visible band to the middle infrared (400 nm at 2500 nm). In this paper we examine the reflectance of six endemic species leaves of La Primavera forest, considering the measurement in fresh and dry samples. Measurements will be obtained with a Vis-NIR spectrometer that uses a calibrated light source. A formal collection of the optical properties of tree leaves in La Primavera forest does not exist, but it is important to classify about the type of vegetation in the area. In addition, it will provide information to generate vegetation inventories, provide data to the forest fire prevention systems, pest control and erosion in the area.

  14. Quantum chemical spectral characterization of CH2NH2+ for remote sensing of Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackston, Russell; Fortenberry, Ryan C.

    2018-01-01

    Cassini has shown that CH2NH2+ is likely present in relatively high abundance in Titan's upper atmosphere. Relatively little is known about this molecule even though it contains the same number of electrons as ethylene, a molecule of significance to Titan's chemistry. Any studies on CH2NH2+ with application to Titan or its atmospheric chemistry will have to be done remotely at this point with the end of the fruitful Cassini mission. Consequently, trusted quantum chemical techniques are utilized here to produce the rotational, vibrational, and rovibrational spectroscopic constants for CH2NH2+ for the first time. The methodology produces a tightly fit potential energy surface here that is well-behaved indicating a strong credence in the accuracy for the produced values. Most notably, the 884.1 cm-1 NH2 out-of-plane bend is the brightest of the vibrational frequencies reported here for CH2NH2+ , and an observed and unattributed feature in this spectral region has been documented but never assigned to a molecular carrier. Follow-up IR or radio observations making use of the 540 GHz to 660 GHz range with the 0.45 D molecular dipole moment will have to be undertaken in order to confirm this or any attribution, but the data provided in this work will greatly assist in any such studies related to CH2NH2+.

  15. Design, spectral characterization and biological studies of transition metal(II) complexes with triazole Schiff bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Chohan, Zahid H.

    2013-03-01

    A new series of three biologically active triazole derived Schiff base ligands L1-L3 have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 3-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde, 4-bromo-thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde, and 5-iodo-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The prepared Schiff bases were used for further complex formation reaction with different metal elements like Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) as chlorides by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 2:1. The structure and bonding nature of all the compounds were identified by their physical, spectral and analytical data. All the metal(II) complexes possessed an octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complexes which showed a distorted octahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antibacterial, and antifungal activities, against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial strains and against six fungal strains (Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata) by using agar-well diffusion method. It has been shown that all the synthesized compounds showed moderate to significant antibacterial activity against one or more bacterial strains. In vitro Brine Shrimp bioassay was also carried out to investigate the cytotoxic properties of these compounds. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination.

  16. Synthesis, Characterization and Spectral Properties of Substituted Tetraphenylporphyrin Iron Chloride Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of substituted tetraphenylporphyrin iron chloride complexes [RTPPFe(IIICl, R=o/p-NO2, o/p-Cl, H, o/p-CH3, o/p-OCH3] were synthesized by a novel universal mixed-solvent method and the spectral properties of free base porphyrins and iron porphyrin compounds were compared with each other. The experimental results showed that the one-pot mixed solvent method was superior to the two-step method in the yields, reaction time and workup of reaction mixtures for the synthesis of iron porphyrin compounds. The highest yields (28.7%-40.4% of RTPPFe(IIICl were obtained in the mixed solvents propionic acid, glacial acetic acid and m-nitrotoluene under reflux for 2 h. A detailed analysis of ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis, infrared (IR and far-infrared (FIR spectra suggested the transformation from free base porphyrins to iron porphyrins. The red shift of the Soret band in ultraviolet-visible spectra due to the presence of p-nitrophenyl substituents and the blue shift of Fe-Cl bond of TPPFeCl in far-infrared spectra were further explained by the electron transfer and molecular planarity in the porphyrin ring.

  17. Opportunities and Constraints in Characterizing Landscape Distribution of an Invasive Grass from Very High Resolution Multi-Spectral Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Dronova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding spatial distributions of invasive plant species at early infestation stages is critical for assessing the dynamics and underlying factors of invasions. Recent progress in very high resolution remote sensing is facilitating this task by providing high spatial detail over whole-site extents that are prohibitive to comprehensive ground surveys. This study assessed the opportunities and constraints to characterize landscape distribution of the invasive grass medusahead (Elymus caput-medusae in a ∼36.8 ha grassland in California, United States from 0.15m-resolution visible/near-infrared aerial imagery at the stage of late spring phenological contrast with dominant grasses. We compared several object-based unsupervised, single-run supervised and hierarchical approaches to classify medusahead using spectral, textural, and contextual variables. Fuzzy accuracy assessment indicated that 44–100% of test medusahead samples were matched by its classified extents from different methods, while 63–83% of test samples classified as medusahead had this class as an acceptable candidate. Main sources of error included spectral similarity between medusahead and other green species and mixing of medusahead with other vegetation at variable densities. Adding texture attributes to spectral variables increased the accuracy of most classification methods, corroborating the informative value of local patterns under limited spectral data. The highest accuracy across different metrics was shown by the supervised single-run support vector machine with seven vegetation classes and Bayesian algorithms with three vegetation classes; however, their medusahead allocations showed some “spillover” effects due to misclassifications with other green vegetation. This issue was addressed by more complex hierarchical approaches, though their final accuracy did not exceed the best single-run methods. However, the comparison of classified medusahead extents with

  18. Opportunities and Constraints in Characterizing Landscape Distribution of an Invasive Grass from Very High Resolution Multi-Spectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronova, Iryna; Spotswood, Erica N.; Suding, Katharine N.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding spatial distributions of invasive plant species at early infestation stages is critical for assessing the dynamics and underlying factors of invasions. Recent progress in very high resolution remote sensing is facilitating this task by providing high spatial detail over whole-site extents that are prohibitive to comprehensive ground surveys. This study assessed the opportunities and constraints to characterize landscape distribution of the invasive grass medusahead (Elymus caput-medusae) in a ∼36.8 ha grassland in California, United States from 0.15m-resolution visible/near-infrared aerial imagery at the stage of late spring phenological contrast with dominant grasses. We compared several object-based unsupervised, single-run supervised and hierarchical approaches to classify medusahead using spectral, textural, and contextual variables. Fuzzy accuracy assessment indicated that 44–100% of test medusahead samples were matched by its classified extents from different methods, while 63–83% of test samples classified as medusahead had this class as an acceptable candidate. Main sources of error included spectral similarity between medusahead and other green species and mixing of medusahead with other vegetation at variable densities. Adding texture attributes to spectral variables increased the accuracy of most classification methods, corroborating the informative value of local patterns under limited spectral data. The highest accuracy across different metrics was shown by the supervised single-run support vector machine with seven vegetation classes and Bayesian algorithms with three vegetation classes; however, their medusahead allocations showed some “spillover” effects due to misclassifications with other green vegetation. This issue was addressed by more complex hierarchical approaches, though their final accuracy did not exceed the best single-run methods. However, the comparison of classified medusahead extents with field segments of its

  19. Optimized Spectrometers Characterization Procedure for Near Ground Support of ESA FLEX Observations: Part 1 Spectral Calibration and Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mihai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents two procedures for the wavelength calibration, in the oxygen telluric absorption spectral bands (O2-A, λc = 687 nm and O2-B, λc = 760.6 nm, of field fixed-point spectrometers used for reflectance and Sun-induced fluorescence measurements. In the first case, Ne and Ar pen-type spectral lamps were employed, while the second approach is based on a double monochromator setup. The double monochromator system was characterized for the estimation of errors associated with different operating configurations. The proposed methods were applied to three Piccolo Doppio-type systems built around two QE Pros and one USB2 + H16355 Ocean Optics spectrometers. The wavelength calibration errors for all the calibrations performed on the three spectrometers are reported and potential methodological improvements discussed. The suggested calibration methods were validated, as the wavelength corrections obtained by both techniques for the QE Pro designed for fluorescence investigations were similar. However, it is recommended that a neon emission line source, as well as an argon or mercury-argon source be used to have a reference wavelength closer to the O2-B feature. The wavelength calibration can then be optimised as close to the O2-B and O2-A features as possible. The monochromator approach could also be used, but that instrument would need to be fully characterized prior to use, and although it may offer a more accurate calibration, as it could be tuned to emit light at the same wavelengths as the absorption features, it would be more time consuming as it is a scanning approach.

  20. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, and Antibacterial and Antifungal Studies of PANI/V2O5 Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakradhar Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline vanadium pentoxide (V2O5 nanoparticles and their antibacterial and antifungal activity on Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus niger, respectively, by agar diffusion method. The metal oxide has been synthesized by employing the sol-gel method, polyaniline (PANI has been synthesized by chemical oxidation, and PANI/V2O5 composites have been synthesized by in situ polymerization method with different ratios (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 weight% of V2O5 in PANI. The newly prepared composites were characterized by FTIR and powder X-ray diffraction (P-XRD techniques and are found to be formed of PANI/V2O5 nanocomposites, and also the compounds showed moderate antibacterial and antifungal activity.

  1. Green synthesis and spectral characterization of silver nanoparticles from Lakshmi tulasi (Ocimum sanctum) leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba Rao, Y; Kotakadi, Venkata S; Prasad, T N V K V; Reddy, A V; Sai Gopal, D V R

    2013-02-15

    A simple method for the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using aqueous extract of Lakshmi tulasi (Ocimum sanctum) leaf as a reducing and stabilizing agent. AgNPs were rapidly synthesized using aqueous extract of tulasi leaf with AgNO(3) solution within 15 min. The green synthesized AgNPs were characterized using physic-chemical techniques viz., UV-Vis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Characterization data reveals that the particles were crystalline in nature and triangle shaped with an average size of 42 nm. The zeta potential of AgNPs were found to be -55.0 mV. This large negative zeta potential value indicates repulsion among AgNPs and their dispersion stability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectral statistics in damped systems: Diffuse field decay curvature for materials characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, J. [Department of Engineering, Purdue University at Fort Wayne, 2101 Coliseum Boulevard East, Fort Wayne, Indiana 46805-1499 (United States)

    1997-10-01

    A new nondestructive technique is proposed which exploits the unique decay characteristics of diffuse fields in nonproportionally damped systems. A power-law decay model is derived and advanced as the basis for the inverse estimation of both the strength and spatial extent of the dissipative region in nonproportionally damped systems. In materials where mechanical damage results in increased internal friction, a common effect in many engineering metals, this technique is proposed as a nondestructive technique for characterizing such damage. The results of numerical experiments on nonproportionally damped acoustic systems are presented which support the proposed technique. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  3. Synthesis and spectral characterization of silver/magnesium co-substituted hydroxyapatite for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, D.; Shinyjoy, E.; Kavitha, L.

    2014-06-01

    The present work is aimed at the synthesis of antibacterial and bioactive silver/magnesium co-substituted hydroxyapatite (Ag/Mg-HAP) powders. For this purpose, firstly, different concentrations (0.5, 1.5, 2.5 wt.%) of silver substituted HAP (Ag-HAP) powders were prepared by ultrasonic irradiation technique and were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Secondly, magnesium (Mg) is co-substituted as secondary material into Ag-HAP to offset the potential cytotoxicity of Ag, as higher concentration of Ag is toxic. The antibacterial activity of as-synthesized powders was evaluated by Escherichia coli (E. coli) and was found to be effectively high against bacterial colonization. Also, the in vitro cell-material interaction is evaluated with human osteosarcoma MG63 (HOS MG63) cells for cell proliferation. The results showed the evidence of cytotoxic effects of the higher concentration of Ag-HAP characterized by poor cellular viability whereas, Ag/Mg-HAP showed better cell viability indicating that co-substitution of Mg in Ag-HAP effectively offset the negative effects of Ag and improve performance compared with pure HAP. Thus, the as synthesized Ag/Mg-HAP will serve as a better candidate for biomedical applications with good antibacterial property and bone bonding ability.

  4. Exposure to Non-Extreme Solar UV Daylight: Spectral Characterization, Effects on Skin and Photoprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marionnet, Claire; Tricaud, Caroline; Bernerd, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The link between chronic sun exposure of human skin and harmful clinical consequences such as photo-aging and skin cancers is now indisputable. These effects are mostly due to ultraviolet (UV) rays (UVA, 320–400 nm and UVB, 280–320 nm). The UVA/UVB ratio can vary with latitude, season, hour, meteorology and ozone layer, leading to different exposure conditions. Zenithal sun exposure (for example on a beach around noon under a clear sky) can rapidly induce visible and well-characterized clinical consequences such as sunburn, predominantly induced by UVB. However, a limited part of the global population is exposed daily to such intense irradiance and until recently little attention has been paid to solar exposure that does not induce any short term clinical impact. This paper will review different studies on non-extreme daily UV exposures with: (1) the characterization and the definition of the standard UV daylight and its simulation in the laboratory; (2) description of the biological and clinical effects of such UV exposure in an in vitro reconstructed human skin model and in human skin in vivo, emphasizing the contribution of UVA rays and (3) analysis of photoprotection approaches dedicated to prevent the harmful impact of such UV exposure. PMID:25546388

  5. Exposure to Non-Extreme Solar UV Daylight: Spectral Characterization, Effects on Skin and Photoprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Marionnet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The link between chronic sun exposure of human skin and harmful clinical consequences such as photo-aging and skin cancers is now indisputable. These effects are mostly due to ultraviolet (UV rays (UVA, 320–400 nm and UVB, 280–320 nm. The UVA/UVB ratio can vary with latitude, season, hour, meteorology and ozone layer, leading to different exposure conditions. Zenithal sun exposure (for example on a beach around noon under a clear sky can rapidly induce visible and well-characterized clinical consequences such as sunburn, predominantly induced by UVB. However, a limited part of the global population is exposed daily to such intense irradiance and until recently little attention has been paid to solar exposure that does not induce any short term clinical impact. This paper will review different studies on non-extreme daily UV exposures with: (1 the characterization and the definition of the standard UV daylight and its simulation in the laboratory; (2 description of the biological and clinical effects of such UV exposure in an in vitro reconstructed human skin model and in human skin in vivo, emphasizing the contribution of UVA rays and (3 analysis of photoprotection approaches dedicated to prevent the harmful impact of such UV exposure.

  6. Simple and rapid synthesis of some nucleoside derivatives: structural and spectral characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagir A. Chowdhury

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In our present investigation a new series of nucleoside derivatives (2-13 were synthesized from uridine (1 via only two step reactions by direct acylation method. Firstly, uridine (1 was treated with 4-t-butylbenzoyl chloride in pyridine at -5ºC and afforded the 5´-O-(4-t-butylbenzoyluridine derivative (2 in an excellent yield. In order to obtain newer products, the 5´-O-uridine derivative was further transformed to a series of 2´,3´-di-O-acyl derivatives (2-13 containing a wide variety of functionalities in a single molecular framework. The yields of the compounds were more than 80%. The synthesized titled compounds were characterized by their physical properties, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 1H-NMR (Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and elemental analysis.

  7. Opuntia ficus indica peel derived pectin mediated hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: Synthesis, spectral characterization, biological and antimicrobial activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, D.; Kanimozhi, K.; Kavitha, L.

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, we have adapted a facile and efficient green route for the synthesis of HAP nanoparticles using pectin as a template which was extracted from the peel of prickly pear (Opuntia ficus indica) fruits. The concentration of pectin plays a major role in the behavior of crystallinity, purity, morphology as well as biological property of the as-synthesized HAP nanoparticles. The extracted pectin and the as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by various analytical techniques. The in vitro apatite formation on the surface of the as-synthesized nanoparticles in simulated body fluid (SBF) for various days showed an enhanced bioactivity. Also, the antimicrobial activity was investigated using various microorganisms. All the results revealed the formation of pure, low crystalline and discrete granular like HAP nanoparticles of size around 25 nm with enhanced biological and antimicrobial activities. Hence the as-synthesized nanoparticles can act as a better bone regenerating material in the field of biomedicine.

  8. Characterizing the Purple Earth: Modeling the globally integrated spectral variability of the Archean Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanromá, E.; Pallé, E.; López, R.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), Vía Láctea s/n E-38200, La Laguna (Spain); Parenteau, M. N. [NASA Ames Research Center, Exobiology Branch, Mountain View, CA 94035 (United States); Kiang, N. Y. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Gutiérrez-Navarro, A. M., E-mail: mesr@iac.es [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of La Laguna, ES-38206 La Laguna (Spain)

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing searches for exoplanetary systems have revealed a wealth of planets with diverse physical properties. Planets even smaller than the Earth have already been detected and the efforts of future missions are aimed at the discovery, and perhaps characterization, of small rocky exoplanets within the habitable zone of their stars. Clearly, what we know about our planet will be our guideline for the characterization of such planets. However, the Earth has been inhabited for at least 3.8 Gyr and its appearance has changed with time. Here, we have studied the Earth during the Archean eon, 3.0 Gyr ago. At that time, one of the more widespread life forms on the planet was purple bacteria. These bacteria are photosynthetic microorganisms and can inhabit both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Here, we use a radiative transfer model to simulate the visible and near-infrared radiation reflected by our planet, taking into account several scenarios regarding the possible distribution of purple bacteria over continents and oceans. We find that purple bacteria have a reflectance spectrum that has a strong reflectivity increase, similar to the red edge of leafy plants, although shifted redward. This feature produces a detectable signal in the disk-averaged spectra of our planet, depending on cloud amount and purple bacteria concentration/distribution. We conclude that by using multi-color photometric observations, it is possible to distinguish between an Archean Earth in which purple bacteria inhabit vast extensions of the planet and a present-day Earth with continents covered by deserts, vegetation, or microbial mats.

  9. Structural characterization of expressed monoclonal antibodies by single sample mass spectral analysis after IdeS proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirley, Terence L; Greis, Kenneth D; Norman, Andrew B

    2016-08-26

    Simple and rapid methods for analysis of monoclonal antibody structure and post-translational modifications are increasingly needed due to the explosion of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and monoclonal antibody applications. Mass spectral analysis is a powerful method for characterizing monoclonal antibodies. Recent discovery and commercialization of the Immunoglobulin G-degrading enzyme of Streptococcus pyogene (IdeS protease) has facilitated and improved the generation of antibody fragments of suitable size to allow characterization of the structure of the entire antibody molecule via analysis of just a few fragments. In this study, we coupled IdeS fragmentation and simultaneous reduction and alkylation of the resultant fragments using tributylphosphine and iodoacetamide to prepare samples in about 2 h. Following simple introduction of a single, unseparated mixture of alkylated fragments into a mass spectrometer, detailed structural information is obtained, covering the entire antibody molecule. The large majority of the glycoforms present on the single, conserved N-linked glycosylation site of the heavy chain is elucidated, although some of the very low abundance glycoforms are not determined by this protocol. The ease, simplicity, speed, and power of this method make it attractive for analysis of the developmental stages and production batches of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Proteomic characterization of the greening process in rice seedlings using the MS spectral intensity-based label free method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Kentaro; Aki, Toshihiko; Shigyo, Mikao; Sato, Shigeru; Ishida, Tetsuya; Yano, Kentaro; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    Illumination-induced greening in dark-grown plants is one of the most dramatic developmental processes known in plants. In our current study, we characterized the greening process of rice seedlings using comparative proteome analysis. We identified 886 different proteins in both whole cell lysates of illuminated and nonilluminated rice shoots and performed comparative proteome analysis based on the MS spectral intensities obtained for unique peptides from respective proteins. Furthermore, the changes in the levels of individual proteins were then compared with those of the corresponding mRNAs. The results revealed well-coordinated increases in the enzymes involved in the Calvin cycle at both the protein and mRNA levels during greening, and that the changes at the mRNA level precede those at the protein level. Although a much lower effect of illumination was found on the enzymes associated with glycolysis and the TCA cycle, coordinated increases during greening were evident for the enzymes involved in photorespiration and nitrogen assimilation as well as the components of the chloroplastic translational machinery. These results thus define the differential regulation of distinct biological systems during greening in rice and demonstrate the usefulness of comprehensive and comparative proteome analysis for the characterization of biological processes in plant cells.

  11. Synthesis, spectral characterization and thermal aspects of coordination polymers of some transition metal ions with adipoyl bis(isonicotinoylhydrazone)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mahejabeen Azizul; Paliwal, L. J.

    2017-04-01

    A series of metal coordination polymers of Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II), obtained by the reaction of metal acetate with newly synthesized adipoyl bis(isonicotinoylhydrazone) (ADBI) have been investigated. The ligand has been characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FTIR, and ESI mass spectra. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of the coordination polymers have been carried out using elemental analysis, XRD, SEM, infrared and diffused reflectance spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermogravimetric analytical techniques. Each metal ion is coordinated to the ligand through oxygen of carbonyl group and the nitrogen of azomethine group of ligand forming a stable 5-membered heterocyclic ring. The synthesized ligand coordinates in an octadentate manner. Magnetic and diffused reflectance spectral studies reveal octahedral geometry of Co(II), Cu(II), Fe(II) and Ni(II) coordination polymers and tetrahedral geometry of Mn(II) and Zn(II) coordination polymers. The thermal stability and decomposition steps of all coordination polymers have been studied using TG, DTG and DTA techniques. Moreover, the kinetic parameters such as activation energy (Ea*), order of reaction (n), Arrhenius factor (A), change in entropy (ΔS*), change in enthalpy (ΔH*) and free energy change (ΔG*) were evaluated at each stage of decomposition curve using Coats-Redfern method.

  12. A new monitoring and characterization system of partial discharges based on the analysis of the spectral power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Ardila Rey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Partial Discharges (PD are one of the possible causes for unexpected faults in power systems equipment, so that its measure is an essential tool for high-voltage electrical equipment maintenance. In order to characterize the PD activity, some statistic magnitudes are necessary. For this reason, the acquisition and processing of PD is very important when making critical decisions regarding disconnection or repairing assets in power systems. On the other hand, the measurement environments often present multiple sources of electrical noise, thus the proper interpretation of PD patterns is a challenge in the identification of sources of different nature. In this paper, the development of a PD monitoring system capable of displaying in real time the classic PD parameters, the PD waveform, its frequency spectrum and calculating statistical parameters of the acquisition, are presented. On the whole, a new method of identifying sources of PD and electrical noise, developed by the authors, which is based on measuring the relative spectral power of PD pulses, is shown. This method has proven effective in characterizing PD and electrical noise; a series of experiments conducted in several test objects are presented in order to validate the performance of the proposed system.

  13. Spectral and atmospheric characterization of 51 Eridani b using VLT/SPHERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samland, M.; Mollière, P.; Bonnefoy, M.; Maire, A.-L.; Cantalloube, F.; Cheetham, A. C.; Mesa, D.; Gratton, R.; Biller, B. A.; Wahhaj, Z.; Bouwman, J.; Brandner, W.; Melnick, D.; Carson, J.; Janson, M.; Henning, T.; Homeier, D.; Mordasini, C.; Langlois, M.; Quanz, S. P.; van Boekel, R.; Zurlo, A.; Schlieder, J. E.; Avenhaus, H.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonavita, M.; Chauvin, G.; Claudi, R.; Cudel, M.; Desidera, S.; Feldt, M.; Fusco, T.; Galicher, R.; Kopytova, T. G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Le Coroller, H.; Martinez, P.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Mouillet, D.; Mugnier, L. M.; Perrot, C.; Sevin, A.; Sissa, E.; Vigan, A.; Weber, L.

    2017-07-01

    Context. 51 Eridani b is an exoplanet around a young (20 Myr) nearby (29.4 pc) F0-type star, which was recently discovered by direct imaging. It is one of the closest direct imaging planets in angular and physical separation ( 0.5'', 13 au) and is well suited for spectroscopic analysis using integral field spectrographs. Aims: We aim to refine the atmospheric properties of the known giant planet and to constrain the architecture of the system further by searching for additional companions. Methods: We used the extreme adaptive optics instrument SPHERE at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to obtain simultaneous dual-band imaging with IRDIS and integral field spectra with IFS, extending the spectral coverage of the planet to the complete Y- to H-band range and providing additional photometry in the K12-bands (2.11, 2.25 μm). The object is compared to other known cool and peculiar dwarfs. The posterior probability distributions for parameters of cloudy and clear atmospheric models are explored using MCMC. We verified our methods by determining atmospheric parameters for the two benchmark brown dwarfs Gl 570D and HD 3651B. We used archival VLT-NACO (L') Sparse Aperture Masking data to probe the innermost region for additional companions. Results: We present the first spectrophotometric measurements in the Y and K bands for the planet and revise its J-band flux to values 40% fainter than previous measurements. Cloudy models with uniform cloud coverage provide a good match to the data. We derive the temperature, radius, surface gravity, metallicity, and cloud sedimentation parameter fsed. We find that the atmosphere is highly super-solar ([Fe/H] = 1.0 ± 0.1 dex), and the low fsed = 1.26+0.36-0.29 value is indicative of a vertically extended, optically thick cloud cover with small sized particles. The model radius and surface gravity estimates suggest higher planetary masses of Mgravity = 9.1+4.9-3.3 MJ. The evolutionary model only provides a lower mass limit of > 2 MJ

  14. A wide-acceptance Compton spectrometer for spectral characterization of a medical x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, Michelle A.; Gehring, A.; Belian, A.; Haines, T.; Hunter, J.; James, M.; Klasky, M.; Mendez, J.; Moir, D.; Sedillo, R.; Shurter, R.; Stearns, J.; Van Syoc, K.; Volegov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of the x-ray spectra used in medical treatment and radiography is important for dose calculations and material decomposition analysis. Indirect measurements via transmission through materials are possible. However, such spectra are challenging to measure directly due to the high photon fluxes. One method of direct measurement is via a Compton spectrometer (CS) method. In this approach, the x-rays are converted to a much lower flux of electrons via Compton scattering on a converter foil (typically beryllium or aluminum). The electrons are then momentum selected by bending in a magnetic field. With tight angular acceptance of electrons into the magnet of ~ 1 deg, there is a linear correlation between incident photon energy and electron position recorded on an image plate. Here we present measurements of Bremsstrahlung spectrum from a medical therapy machine, a Scanditronix M22 Microtron. Spectra with energy endpoints from 6 to 20 MeV are directly measured, using a CS with a wide energy range from 0.5 to 20 MeV. We discuss the sensitivity of the device and the effects of converter material and collimation on the accuracy of the reconstructed spectra. Approaches toward improving the sensitivity, including the use of coded apertures, and potential future applications to characterization of spectra are also discussed.

  15. Comprehensive isolation of natural organic matter from water for spectral characterizations and reactivity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, J.A.; Croue, J.-P.; Benjamin, M.; Korshin, G.V.; Hwang, C.J.; Bruchet, A.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of approaches were tested to comprehensively isolate natural organic matter (NOM) from water. For waters with high NOM concentrations such as the Suwannee River, Georgia, approaches that used combinations of membrane concentrations, evaporative concentrations, and adsorption on nonionic XAD resins, ion exchange resins and iron oxide coated sand isolated over 90% of the NOM. However, for waters with low NOM concentrations, losses of half of the NOM were common and desalting of NOM isolates was a problem. A new comprehensive approach was devised and tested on the Seine River, France in which 100 L of filtered water was sodium softened by ion exchange and vacuum evaporated to 100 mL. Colloids (32% of the NOM) were isolated using a 3,500 Dalton membrane by dialysis against 0.1 M HCl and 0.2 M HF to remove salts and silica. On the membrane permeate, hydrophobic NOM (42%) was isolated using XAD-8 resin and hydrophilic NOM (26%) was isolated using a variety of selective desalting precipitations. The colloid fraction was characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy as N-acetylamino sugars. ?? 2000 American Chemical Society.

  16. Application of spectral gamma-ray borehole geophysics for characterization of radionuclide contamination at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodeur, J.R.; Koizumi, C.J.; Meisner, J.P.; Price, R.K.; Fassett, J.W.

    1993-10-01

    An innovative, passive, gamma-ray borehole logging program was developed at Hanford for the purpose of identifying and quantifying the gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopes in the subsurface. Recent nuclear counting equipment was configured into a borehole logging system and calibration methods were devised for the in situ assay of man-made radionuclides. Operation procedures and data analysis methods were developed, creating an efficient production logging system. The logging program has proven to be effective when used in a screening mode for characterizing effluent release sites at Hanford. It located the primary gamma-emitting contaminants and identified which of the sites had contributed to the groundwater contamination. At one of the single-shell tank farms, the system was used to quantify the unsaturated zone contamination and trace the contamination back to the tank leak sources. It also provided a baseline of the radioelement concentrations for future data comparisons and to permit identification of a dynamic radionuclide transport system. In this manner, the logging program can help to identify future tank leaks. When combined with an inexpensive drilling method, the logging program can produce in situ radioelement concentration data at a fraction of the cost of conventional drilling and sampling, without personnel exposure to the contamination or generation of waste, and it can be done in a matter of days instead of months. Future developments will refine the quality assurance program so that the system will produce laboratory-quality in situ assays. Future applications will require a high degree of quality assurance.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, spectral, thermal analysis and computational studies of thiamine complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Mamdouh S.; Ghareeb, Doaa A.; Ahmed, Shahenda Sh.

    2017-06-01

    Thiamine metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic susceptibility, ESR spectra of Cu(II) complex and EDX for structural investigation of the complexes to know their geometries and mode of bonding. All the manganese, iron, copper, zinc, tungsten and mercury complexes are with octahedral geometry, while cobalt and nickel complexes are with tetrahedral geometry. The selenium and palladium complexes are with square planner geometry, while vanadium complex with stoichiometry (2:1) is with square pyramidal geometry. The thermal properties of the complexes were examined. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters were estimated from the TGA and DTA curves. Molecular modeling of the ligand and its complexes was performed using PC computer to give extra spot lights on the bonding properties of these compounds. Some theoretical studies were carried out to obtain the charges, bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles, energies of highest occupied molecular orbital (EHOMO), energies of lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO), the separation energy (ΔE), chemical potential, electronegativity, hardness, softness, ionization potential and electron affinity of the studied ligand and its complexes. Correlation analysis was done to explore the relationships between some different parameters of the studied complexes.

  18. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectral characterization and fluorescence studies of salts of α-mangostin with APIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana Reddy, J.; Ravikumar, N.; Gaddamanugu, Gopikrishna; Naresh, K. N.; Rajan, S. S.; Anand Solomon, K.

    2013-05-01

    α-Mangostin is a naturally occurring oxygenated xanthonoid isolated from the mangosteen tree (Garcinia mangostana). We report the molecular salts of α-mangostin with the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) metformin (anti-diabetic) and piperazine (anti-helminthic) obtained by solvent assisted grinding method as well as solution crystallization method based on the ΔpKa criterion. The synergistic pharmaceutically active α-mangostin-metformin molecular salt and α-mangostin-hemipiperazine ethanol solvate were characterized by the single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD), vibrational spectroscopy (FT-IR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The fluorescence properties of the molecular salts are obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy. The molecules in both the crystal forms are stabilized by N+sbnd H⋯N, Osbnd H⋯O-, N+sbnd H⋯O and N+sbnd H⋯O-, Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonding interactions. In the FT-IR spectra characteristic peaks are observed for the protonated amine (sbnd NH2+) group piperazinium dication (sbnd NH+) respectively indicating formation salts.

  19. Magnetic resonance spectral characterization of the heme active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukat, G.S.; Rodgers, K.R.; Jabro, M.N.; Goff, H.M. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (USA))

    1989-04-18

    Examination of the peroxidase isolated from the inkcap Basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus shows that the 42,000-dalton enzyme contains a protoheme IX prosthetic group. Reactivity assays and the electronic absorption spectra of native Coprinus peroxidase and several of its ligand complexes indicate that this enzyme has characteristics similar to those reported for horseradish peroxidase. In this paper, the authors characterize the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-oxidized forms of Coprinus peroxidase compounds I, II, and III by electronic absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of this Coprinus peroxidase indicate the presence of high-spin Fe(III) in the native protein and a number of differences between the heme site of Coprinus peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Carbon-13 (of the ferrous CO adduct) and nitrogen-15 (of the cyanide complex) NMR studies together with proton NMR studies of the native and cyanide-complexed Caprinus peroxidase are consistent with coordination of a proximal histidine ligand. The EPR spectrum of the ferrous NO complex is also reported. Protein reconstitution with deuterated hemin has facilitated the assignment of the heme methyl resonances in the proton NMR spectrum.

  20. Spectral and temporal characterization of nanosecond and femtosecond laser produced plasma from metallic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Smijesh, N

    2015-01-01

    Experimental characterization and comparison of the temporal features of plasma produced by ultrafast (100 fs, 800 nm) and short-pulse (7ns, 1064 nm) laser pulses from a high purity nickel and zinc targets, expanding into a nitrogen background, are presented. The experiment is carried out under a wide pressure range of 10^-6 to 10^2 Torr, where the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly when the pressure approaches 1 Torr. Electron temperature (Te) is calculated from OES and is found to be independent of pressure for ultrafast excitation, whereas an enhancement in Te is observed around milliTorr regime for short-pulse excitation.The velocity measurements indicate acceleration of the fast species to a certain distance upon plume expansion, whereas the slow species are found to decelerate, particularly at higher pressures.A comparison of the time of flight dynamics of neutrals and ions in the LPPs generated by intense laser pulses confirms that the fast species observed are due to the recombination of fas...

  1. Opuntia ficus indica peel derived pectin mediated hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: synthesis, spectral characterization, biological and antimicrobial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, D; Kanimozhi, K; Kavitha, L

    2015-04-15

    In the present study, we have adapted a facile and efficient green route for the synthesis of HAP nanoparticles using pectin as a template which was extracted from the peel of prickly pear (Opuntia ficus indica) fruits. The concentration of pectin plays a major role in the behavior of crystallinity, purity, morphology as well as biological property of the as-synthesized HAP nanoparticles. The extracted pectin and the as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by various analytical techniques. The in vitro apatite formation on the surface of the as-synthesized nanoparticles in simulated body fluid (SBF) for various days showed an enhanced bioactivity. Also, the antimicrobial activity was investigated using various microorganisms. All the results revealed the formation of pure, low crystalline and discrete granular like HAP nanoparticles of size around 25 nm with enhanced biological and antimicrobial activities. Hence the as-synthesized nanoparticles can act as a better bone regenerating material in the field of biomedicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular modeling, FTIR spectral characterization and mechanical properties of carbonated-hydroxyapatite prepared by mechanochemical synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youness, Rasha A. [Spectroscopy Department, National Research Centre, El-Bohouth Str., 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Taha, Mohammed A. [Solid-State Physics Department, National Research Centre, El-Bohouth Str., 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Elhaes, Hanan [Physics Department, Faculty of Women for Arts, Science, and Education, Ain Shams University, 11757 Cairo (Egypt); Ibrahim, Medhat, E-mail: medahmed6@yahoo.com [Spectroscopy Department, National Research Centre, El-Bohouth Str., 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt)

    2017-04-01

    Nanocrystalline B-type carbonate substituted hydroxyapatite (B-CHA) powder has been successively synthesized by mechanochemical method. The effect of milling times on the formation of B-CHA was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction technique and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, physical as well as mechanical properties were examined as a function of milling time. Furthermore, theoretical model was presented for hydroxyapatite (HA). Semiempirical calculations at PM6 level were used to calculate thermal parameters including entropy; enthalpy; heat capacity; free energy and heat of formation in the temperature range from 200 up to 500 k. The results revealed that single phase B-CHA was successfully formed after 8 h of milling when Ball to Powder Ratio (BPR) equals to 10:1. Results revealed that entropy; enthalpy and heat capacity gradually increased as a function of temperature while, free energy and heat of formation decreased with the increasing of temperature. Comparison with higher level of theory was conducted at HF and DFT using the models HF/3-21g**; B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and B3LYP/LANL2DZ, respectively and indicated that PM6 could be utilized with appropriate accuracy and time to study physical and thermochemical parameters for HA. - Highlights: • Preparation of Nanocrystalline B-type carbonate substituted hydroxyapatite (B-CHA) powder by mechanochemical method. • Characterization of CHA. • Semiemperical and DFT models for CHA.

  3. A novel green template assisted synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanorods and their spectral characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, D.; Bhuvaneshwari, N.; Indira, J.; Kanimozhi, K.; Kavitha, L.

    2013-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite [HAP, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] is the main inorganic component of bone material and is widely used in various biomedical applications due to its excellent bioactivity and biocompatibility. In this paper we have reported the synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanorods by green template method using the extracts of three different natural sources which contain tartaric acid and also from commercially available one. The extracts of banana, grape and tamarind are taken as the sources of tartaric acid. The as-synthesized samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Also the antibacterial activity of HAP with different concentrations against two pathogen bacteria strains Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Klebsiella (Gram-negative bacteria) were tested. The results show that the particles of all the samples are of nanosized and pure. The crystallinity decreases as changing the sources of tartaric acid from commercial to natural one and also changing the natural sources from banana to tamarind extracts. The formation of nanorods are found in all the samples but the nanorods with uniform size distribution can be obtained only by using the tamarind extract as the source of tartaric acid. Moreover, the as-synthesised HAP nanorods derived from natural sources exhibited a strong antibacterial activity against both E. coli and Klebsiella at a concentration of 100 μl. The HAP nanorods synthesized by this method can act as a potential candidate for various biomedical applications.

  4. Bimodal spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of hypertrophic skin tissue: pre-clinical experimentation, spectral data selection and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Honghui; Gisquet, Héloïse; Guillemin, F.; Blondel, Walter C. P. M.

    2011-07-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was two folds: firstly, we would like to investigate the efficiency of bimodal spectroscopic technique in characterization of hypertrophic scarring tissue deliberately created on a preclinical model (rabbit's ear); on the other hand, we evaluate the inhibition effect of an anti-inflammatory medication (tacrolimus) on hypertrophic formation in scar by using our bimodal spectroscopic system. Study design: This study was conducted on 20 New Zealand Rabbits receiving hypertrophic scarring treatment on their ears. Fluorescence and Diffuse Reflectance spectra were collected from each scar, amongst which some had received tacrolimus treatment. Features were extracted from corrected spectral data and analyzed to classify the scarring tissues into hypertrophic or non-hypertrophic. Diagnostic algorithms were developed with the use of k-NN classifier and validated by comparing to histological classification result with Leave-one- out cross validation. Results and discussion: The accuracy of our bimodal spectroscopy method for detecting hypertrophic scarring scar tissue was good (sensibility: 90.84%, specificity: 94.44%). The features used for classification were mainly extracted from the spectra exited at 360, 410 and 420 nm. This indicates that the difference between the spectra acquired from hypertrophic and non-hypertrophic tissue may be due to the different intensity distribution of several fluorophores (collagen,elastin and NADH) excited in this range, or to the change in proportion of tissue layers (epidermis and dermis) explored by the CEFS in use.

  5. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular structure and pharmacological studies of N'-(1, 4-naphtho-quinone-2yl) isonicotinohyWdrazide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha Rani, P. R.; Fernandez, Annette; George, Annie; Remadevi, V. K.; Sudarsanakumar, M. R.; Laila, Shiny P.; Arif, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure was employed for the synthesis of N'-(1,4-naphtho-quinone-2-yl) isonicotinohydrazide (NIH) by the reaction of 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthaquinone (lawsone) and isonicotinoyl hydrazine in methanol using ultrasonic irradiation. Lawsone is the principal dye, isolated from the leaves of henna (Lawsonia inermis). Structural modification was done on the molecule aiming to get a more active derivative. The structure of the parent compound and the derivative was characterized by elemental analyses, infrared, electronic, 1H, 13C NMR and GC-MS spectra. The fluorescence spectral investigation of the compound was studied in DMSO and ethanol. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that NIH crystallizes in monoclinic space group. The DNA cleavage study was monitored by gel electrophoresis method. The synthesized compound was found to have significant antioxidant activity against DPPH radical (IC50 = 58 μM). The in vitro cytotoxic studies of the derivative against two human cancer cell lines MCF-7 (human breast cancer) and HCT-15 (human colon carcinoma cells) using MTT assay revealed that the compound exhibited higher cytotoxic activity with a lower IC50 value indicating its efficiency in killing the cancer cells even at low concentrations. These results suggest that the structural modifications performed on lawsone could be considered a good strategy to obtain a more active drug.

  6. Mononuclear Pd(II) complex as a new therapeutic agent: Synthesis, characterization, biological activity, spectral and DNA binding approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidifar, Maryam; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; AhmadiNasab, Navid; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan

    2017-11-01

    The binding ability between a new water-soluble palladium(II) complex [Pd(bpy)(bez-dtc)]Cl (where bpy is 2,2‧-bipyridine and bez-dtc is benzyl dithiocarbamate), as an antitumor agent, and calf thymus DNA was evaluated using various physicochemical methods, such as UV-Vis absorption, Competitive fluorescence studies, viscosity measurement, zeta potential and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The Pd(II) complex was synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and electronic spectra studies. The anticancer activity against HeLa cell lines demonstrated lower cytotoxicity than cisplatin. The binding constants and the thermodynamic parameters were determined at different temperatures (300 K, 310 K and 320 K) and shown that the complex can bind to DNA via electrostatic forces. Furthermore, this result was confirmed by the viscosity and zeta potential measurements. The CD spectral results demonstrated that the binding of Pd(II) complex to DNA induced conformational changes in DNA. We hope that these results will provide a basis for further studies and practical clinical use of anticancer drugs.

  7. Spectral characterization, electrochemical and anticancer studies on some metal(II) complexes containing tridentate quinoxaline Schiff base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellaian, Justin Dhanaraj; Johnson, Jijo

    2014-06-05

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of a tridentate ONO donor Schiff base ligand derived from 3-(2-aminoethylamino)quinoxalin-2(1H)-one were synthesized. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR, (1)H NMR, mass, magnetic susceptibility, electronic spectra and ESR spectral studies. Electrochemical behavior of the synthesized compounds was studied using cyclic voltammetry. The grain size of the synthesized compounds was determined by powder XRD. The Schiff base and its complexes have been screened for their antimicrobial activities against the bacterial species E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus; fungal species include, A. niger, and C. albicans by disc diffusion method. The results show that the complexes have higher activity than the free ligand. The interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) has been investigated by electronic absorption method. Furthermore, the DNA cleavage activity of the complexes was studied using agarose gel electrophoresis. In vitro anticancer studies of the ligand and its complexes using MTT assay was also done. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Unsymmetrical Schiff base (ON) ligand on complexation with some transition metal ions: synthesis, spectral characterization, antibacterial, fluorescence and thermal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Omyma A M; El-Medani, Samir M; Abu Serea, Maha R; Sayed, Abeer S S

    2015-02-05

    A series of eight metal Schiff base complexes were synthesized by the thermal reaction of Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Zn(II), Hg(II), La(III) or Sm(III) with a Schiff base "L" produced by the condensation of furfuraldehyde and 1,2-diaminobenzene. These compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, FT-IR, molar conductance, mass spectrometry, thermal and fluorescence studies. The studies suggested the coordination of the ligand L to metal through azomethine imine nitrogen and furan oxygen atoms of Schiff base moiety. Thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses data were studied and indicated high stability for all complexes and suggested the presence of lattice and/or coordinated water molecules in the complexes. Coats-Redfern method has been used to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the metal complexes. The spectral and thermal analysis reveal that all complexes have octahedral geometry except Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes which can attain a square planner arrangements. The ligand and its complexes exhibited intraligand (π-π(∗)) fluorescence and can potentially serve as photoactive materials. Both the ligand and its complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for spectral characterization of regular coffee beans and luwak coffee bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nufiqurakhmah, Nufiqurakhmah; Nasution, Aulia; Suyanto, Hery

    2016-11-01

    Luwak (civet) coffee refers to a type of coffee, where the cherries have been priorly digested and then defecated by a civet (Paradoxurus Hermaphroditus), a catlike animals typically habited in Indonesia. Luwak will only selectively select ripe cherries, and digesting them by enzymatic fermentation in its digestive system. The defecated beans is then removed and cleaned from the feces. It is regarded as the world's most expensive coffee, Traditionally the quality of the coffee is subjectively determined by a tester. This research is motivated by the needs to study and develop quantitative parameters in determining the quality of coffee bean, which are more objective to measure the quality of coffee products. LIBS technique was used to identify the elemental contents of coffee beans based on its spectral characteristics in the range 200-900 nm. Samples of green beans from variant of arabica and robusta, either regular and luwak, were collected from 5 plantations in East Java. From the recorded spectra, intensity ratio of nitrogen (N), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O) as essential elements in coffee is applied. In general, values extracted from luwak coffee bean is higher with increases 0.03% - 79.93%. A Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA) also applied to identify marker elements that characterize the regular and luwak beans. Elements of Ca, W, Sr, Mg, and H are the ones used to differentiate the regular and luwak beans from arabica variant, while Ca and W are the ones used to differentiate the regular and luwak beans of robusta variant.

  10. Characterization and modelling of the spatially- and spectrally-varying point-spread function in hyperspectral imaging systems for computational correction of axial optical aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špiclin, Žiga; Bürmen, Miran; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Spatial resolution of hyperspectral imaging systems can vary significantly due to axial optical aberrations that originate from wavelength-induced index-of-refraction variations of the imaging optics. For systems that have a broad spectral range, the spatial resolution will vary significantly both with respect to the acquisition wavelength and with respect to the spatial position within each spectral image. Variations of the spatial resolution can be effectively characterized as part of the calibration procedure by a local image-based estimation of the pointspread function (PSF) of the hyperspectral imaging system. The estimated PSF can then be used in the image deconvolution methods to improve the spatial resolution of the spectral images. We estimated the PSFs from the spectral images of a line grid geometric caliber. From individual line segments of the line grid, the PSF was obtained by a non-parametric estimation procedure that used an orthogonal series representation of the PSF. By using the non-parametric estimation procedure, the PSFs were estimated at different spatial positions and at different wavelengths. The variations of the spatial resolution were characterized by the radius and the fullwidth half-maximum of each PSF and by the modulation transfer function, computed from images of USAF1951 resolution target. The estimation and characterization of the PSFs and the image deconvolution based spatial resolution enhancement were tested on images obtained by a hyperspectral imaging system with an acousto-optic tunable filter in the visible spectral range. The results demonstrate that the spatial resolution of the acquired spectral images can be significantly improved using the estimated PSFs and image deconvolution methods.

  11. Mass fractal dimension and spectral dimension to characterize different horizons in La Herreria (Sierra de Guadarrama, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inclan, Rosa Maria

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge on three dimensional soil pore architecture is important to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes as it controls biological, chemical and physical processes at various scales. Computed Tomography (CT) images provide increasingly reliable information about the geometry of pores and solids in soils at very small scale with the benefit that is a non-invasive technique. Fractal formalism has revealed as a useful tool in these cases where highly complex and heterogeneous meda are studied. One of these quantifications is mass dimension (Dm) and spectral dimension (d) applied to describe the water and gas diffusion coefficients in soils (Tarquis et al., 2012). In this work, intact soil samples were collected from the first three horizons of La Herreria soil. This station is located in the lowland mountain area of Sierra de Guadarrama (Santolaria et al., 2015) and it represents a highly degraded type of site as a result of the livestock keeping. The 3D images, of 45.1 micro-m resolution (256x256x256 voxels), were obtained and then binarized following the singularity-CA method (Martín-Sotoca et al. 2016). Based on these images Dm and d were estimated. The results showed an statistical difference in porosity, Dm and d for each horizon. This fact has a direct implication in diffusion parameters for a pore network modeling based on both fractal dimensions. These soil parameters will constitute a basis for site characterization for further studies regarding soil degradation; determining the interaction between soil, plant and atmosphere with respect to human induced activities as well as the basis for several nitrogen and carbon cycles modeling. References Martin Sotoca; J.J. Ana M. Tarquis, Antonio Saa Requejo, and Juan B. Grau (2016). Pore detection in Computed Tomography (CT) soil 3D images using singularity map analysis. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 18, EGU2016-829. Santolaria-Canales, Edmundo and the Gu

  12. Characterizing bidirectional reflectance and spectral albedo of various land cover types in Midwest using GeoTASO Summer-2014 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulamu, A.; Fishman, J.; Maimaitiyiming, M.; Leitch, J. W.; Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Marshall, B.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the bi-directional reflectance function (BRDF) and spectral albedo of various land-cover types is critical for retrieval of trace gas measurements from planned geostationary satellites such as the Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO). Radiant energy, which will be measured by these instruments at the top of atmosphere (TOA) at unprecedented spectral resolution, is strongly influenced by how this energy is reflected by the underlying surface. Thus, it is critical that we understand this phenomenon at comparable wavelength resolution. As part of the NASA ESTO-funded Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) development project, we carried out synchronous field and airborne data collection campaigns in the St Louis Metro region in Summer 2014. We collected spectral reflectance data of various land cover types on the ground within hours of a GeoTASO overpass using a field-based hyperspectral spectroradiometer (model PSR3500 from Spectral Evolution). Field measurements collecting in-situ spectral albedo and bidirectional reflectance factors were also obtained in July and August of 2015. In this study, we present our preliminary findings from in-situ and airborne GeoTASO derived spectral albedo and BRDF characteristics of major land cover types at TEMPO spectral profiles, which are necessary for the accurate retrieval of tropospheric trace gases and aerosols. First, a spectral database of various targets (e.g., plants, soils, rocks, man-made objects and water) was developed using field measurements. Next, the GeoTASO airborne data were corrected using MODTRAN and field measurements to derive spectral albedo and BRDF. High spatial resolution land-cover types were extracted using satellite images (e.g., Landsat, WorldView, IKONOS, etc.) at resolutions from 2 m - 30 m. Lastly, spectral albedo/BRDFs corresponding to various land cover types were analyzed using both field and GeoTASO measurements.

  13. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  14. Spectral characterization of mangrove leaves in the Brazilian Amazonian Coast: Turiaçu Bay, Maranhão State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Rebelo-Mochel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove communities are tropical systems which have fewer species than tropical forests, especially in Latin America and display a single architecture, usually lacking the various strata commonly found in other forest ecosystems. The identification of mangrove communities by orbital data is not a difficult task but the most interesting challenge is to identify themselves by the dominant species. The first step toward that floristic identification is the spectral characterization of detached leaves. Leaves from four species of mangrove trees were spectrally characterized considering the Directional Hemispherical Reflectance Factor (DHRF determined through radiometric measurements using an integrating sphere LICOR 1800 attached to a spectroradiometer SPECTRON SE-590. In the visible bands (0.45-0.69 µm the button-shaped mangrove Conocarpus erectus was brighter and the red mangrove Rhizophora mangle was darker than the other two species which shows very close DHRF values. Otherwise the black mangrove Avicennia germinans and the white mangrove Laguncularia racemosa can be distinguished from one another in the Near Infra Red (NIR region (0.76-0.90 µm and in this region of the spectrum the DHRF of C. erectus and R. mangle become very close.Comunidades de manguezais são sistemas tropicais que apresentam poucas espécies constituintes em relação às florestas tropicais úmidas, especialmente na América Latina e apresentam arquitetura simples, freqüentemente com a falta de vários estratos encontrados em outros ecossistemas florestais. A identificação de manguezais mediante a observação de dados orbitais não é uma tarefa muito complicada, porém um desafio interessante seria sua diferenciação mediante a identificação de espécies dominantes. O primeiro passo para essa identificação florística é a caracterização espectral de folhas isoladas. Folhas de quatro espécies arbóreas de manguezais foram caracterizadas espectralmente

  15. Novel banana peel pectin mediated green route for the synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and their spectral characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, D.; Kanimozhi, K.; Bhuvaneshwari, N.; Indira, J.; Kavitha, L.

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite [HAP, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] is the main inorganic component of natural bone and is widely used in various biomedical applications. In this paper, we have reported the synthesis of HAP nanoparticles by banana peel pectin mediated green template method. The pectin extracted from the peels of banana and its various concentrations were exploited in our study to achieve a controlled crystallinity, particle size as well as uniform morphology of HAP. The extracted pectin was characterized by spectral techniques like Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for the functional group analysis, proton-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) for the identification of H and C atoms in the extracted pectin, respectively. The HAP nanoparticles were synthesized using different concentrations of the as-extracted pectin. The purity, crystallinity and morphology of the as-synthesized HAP nanoparticles were evaluated by FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. Moreover the antibacterial activity of HAP nanoparticles was evaluated against the gram positive and negative bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli), respectively. The experimental results revealed that the HAP nanoparticles synthesized in the presence of an optimized concentration of pectin are pure, low crystalline, spherical and discrete particles with reduced size. Also, the HAP sample derived in the presence of pectin showed an enhanced antibacterial activity than that of the HAP synthesized in the absence of pectin. Hence, the HAP nanoparticles synthesized using pectin as a green template can act as a good biomaterial for biomedical applications.

  16. Mixed-ligand copper(II) phenolate complexes: Synthesis, spectral characterization, phosphate-hydrolysis, antioxidant, DNA interaction and cytotoxic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurumoorthy, Perumal; Mahendiran, Dharmasivam; Prabhu, Durai; Arulvasu, Chinnasamy; Rahiman, Aziz Kalilur

    2015-01-01

    A series of phenol-based mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes of the type [CuL1-4(diimine)] (1-8), where L1-4 = N1,N2-bis(5-substituted-2-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-ethylene/phenylenediimine and diimine = 2,2‧-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), have been isolated and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. Electronic spectra of complexes suggest Cu(II) cation has a d9 electronic configuration, adopting distorted octahedral geometry with axial elongation, due to Jahn-Teller effect. Electrochemical studies of complexes evidenced one-electron irreversible reduction wave in the cathodic region. The observed rate constant (k) values for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylphosphate (4-NPP) are in the range of 0.25-3.82 × 10-2 min-1. The obtained room temperature magnetic moment values (1.79-1.90 BM) lies within the range observed for octahedral copper(II) complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that these complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed intercalation with minor-groove binding, and the complex 4 exhibits highest binding activity than the other complexes. The cleavage activity on supercoiled pBR322 DNA revealed the involvement of hydroxyl radical and singlet-oxygen as reactive oxygen species, and complexes encourage binding to minor-groove. Further, the cytotoxicity of complex 4 on human hepatocellular liver carcinoma HepG2 cell line implies the cell death through apoptosis.

  17. Hadronic origin of the TeV flare of M87 in April 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sarira [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, C.U., A., Postal 70-543, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Palacios, Eddie [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2015-02-01

    M87 is a giant radio galaxy with FR-I morphology. It underwent three episodes of TeV flaring in recent years with the strongest one in April 2010 which was jointly monitored by MAGIC, VERITAS and H.E.S.S. We explain its spectral energy distribution in the energy range 0.3-5 TeV by assuming that the flaring occurs in the innermost region of the jet. In this region the low energy SSC photons serve as the target for the Fermi-accelerated high energy protons of energy ≤30 TeV to form a delta resonance. The TeV photons are produced from the subsequent decay of the delta resonance to neutral pions. In this scenario the observed TeV flux of April 2010 flare is fitted very well. (orig.)

  18. A portable 12-wavelength parallel near-infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system for efficient characterization of breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Burger, William R.; Zhou, Mingwei; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Jiang, Shudong

    2017-02-01

    A portable, 12-wavelength hybrid frequency domain (FD) and continuous wave (CW) near-infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system was developed for efficient characterization of breast cancer in a clinical oncology setting. Two sets of three FD and three CW measurements were acquired simultaneously. The imaging time was reduced from 90 to 55 seconds with a new gain adjustment scheme of the optical detector. The study of integrating this system into the workflow of clinical oncology practice is ongoing.

  19. Radiative modeling and characterization of aerosol plumes hyper-spectral imagery; Modelisation radiative et caracterisation des panaches d'aerosols en imagerie hyperspectrale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alakian, A

    2008-03-15

    This thesis aims at characterizing aerosols from plumes (biomass burning, industrial discharges, etc.) with hyper-spectral imagery. We want to estimate the optical properties of emitted particles and also their micro-physical properties such as number, size distribution and composition. To reach our goal, we have built a forward semi-analytical model, named APOM (Aerosol Plume Optical Model), which allows to simulate the radiative effects of aerosol plumes in the spectral range [0,4-2,5 {mu}m] for nadir viewing sensors. Mathematical formulation and model coefficients are obtained from simulations performed with the radiative transfer code COMANCHE. APOM is assessed on simulated data and proves to be accurate with modeling errors between 1% and 3%. Three retrieval methods using APOM have been developed: L-APOM, M-APOM and A-APOM. These methods take advantage of spectral and spatial dimensions in hyper-spectral images. L-APOM and M-APOM assume a priori knowledge on particles but can estimate their optical and micro-physical properties. Their performances on simulated data are quite promising. A-APOM method does not require any a priori knowledge on particles but only estimates their optical properties. However, it still needs improvements before being usable. On real images, inversion provides satisfactory results for plumes above water but meets some difficulties for plumes above vegetation, which underlines some possibilities of improvement for the retrieval algorithm. (author)

  20. Characterizing Non-Resolved Debris Through Spectral and Photometric Ground-Based Telescopic Data: What Can Laboratory Ground-truth Data Do for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Susan

    2017-01-01

    NASA's ODPO has recently collected data of unresolved objects at GEO with the 3.8m UKIRT infrared telescope on Mauna Kea and the 1.3m MCAT visible telescope on Ascension Island. Analyses of SWIR data of rocket bodies and HS-376 solar-panel covered buses demonstrate the uniqueness of spectral signatures. Data of 3 classes of rocket bodies show similarities amongst a given class, but distinct differences from one class to another, suggesting that infrared reflectance spectra could effectively be used toward characterizing and constraining potential parent bodies of uncorrelated targets (UCTs). The Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA JSC is designed to collect photometric signatures in the laboratory that can be used for comparison with telescopic data. NASA also has a spectral database of spacecraft materials for use with spectral unmixing models. Spectral unmixing of the HS-376 bus data demonstrates how absorption features and slopes can be used to constrain material characteristics of debris. Broadband photometry likewise can be compared with MCAT data of non-resolved debris images. Similar studies have been applied to IDCSP satellites to demonstrate how color-color photometry can be compared with lab data to constrain bulk materials signatures of spacecraft and debris.

  1. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological evaluation of copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes with thiosemicarbazones derived from a bidentate Schiff base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Bargujar, Savita; Nirwal, Rita; Yadav, Neesha

    2013-04-01

    Complexes of copper(II) and nickel(II) of general composition M(L)2X2, have been synthesized with the ligand 1-Tetralone thiosemicarbazone (where L = 1-Tetralone thiosemicarbazone and X=Cl,1/2SO42-). The molar conductance of the complexes in fresh solution of DMSO lies in the range of 10-20 Ω-1 cm2 mol-1 indicating their non-electrolytic behavior. Thus, the complexes may be formulated as [M(L2)X2]. Ligand was characterized by mass, NMR, IR and single crystallographic studies. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moments, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. The IR spectral data of ligand indicated the involvement of sulfur and azomethine nitrogen in coordination to the central metal ion. The copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes were found to have magnetic moments1.93-1.96 BM and 2.91-2.94 BM corresponding to one and two unpaired electrons respectively. On the basis of molar conductance, EPR, electronic and infrared spectral studies, a tetragonal geometry has been assigned for Cu(II) chloride complex and trigonal bipyramidal to Cu(II) sulfate complex but an octahedral geometry for Ni(II) complexes. Newly synthesized ligand and its Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes have also been screened against different bacterial and fungal species.

  2. DA 495: An Aging Pulsar Wind Nebula with Possible TeV Gamma-Ray Counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coerver, Anna; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles; Gotthelf, Eric; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Hui, Michelle; Dingus, Brenda; Goodman, Jordan; NuSTAR, HAWC, VERITAS

    2018-01-01

    A pulsar wind nebula is created when a high-mass star collapses and forms an isolated neutron star surrounded by a relativistic particle wind. DA 495 is thought to be such an object, although no pulsations have been detected. DA 495 was first detected in the radio band and is characterized by an annular radio morphology with a radio emission dip in the center. It has been theorized that the wind nebula has an unusually high magnetization of 1.3 mG, and the age of the PWN has been estimated from the 1.3 GHz energy break to be approximately 20 kyr. With such a high wind magnetization, one would expect synchrotron radiation to fall off fairly quickly, yet NuSTAR (the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array) detected hard X-rays at energies greater than 10 keV, and a study of the Galactic Plane by the HAWC very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray telescope revealed a source coincident with DA 495 at energies greater than 10 TeV. This source was also detected at TeV energies by the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope. DA 495 was detected in the X-ray up to 10 keV by both Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes before NuSTAR performed follow-up observations of the region in June 2017. DA 495 is one of the first TeV sources observed by the NuSTAR-HAWC-VERITAS Galactic Legacy collaboration. We carried out spectral and imaging analysis of both NuSTAR and Chandra data on DA 495 and will present results of our study of DA 495.

  3. Spectral reflectance (0.35-2.5 μm) properties of garnets: Implications for remote sensing detection and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, M. R. M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Rhind, T.; Mertzman, S. A.; Poitras, Jordan; Applin, Daniel M.; Mann, P.

    2018-01-01

    The utility of spectral reflectance for identification of the main end-member garnets: almandine (Fe2+3Al2Si3O12), andradite (Ca3Fe3+2Si3O12), grossular (Ca3Al2Si3O12), pyrope (Mg3Al2Si3O12), spessartine (Mn2+3Al2Si3O12), and uvarovite (Ca3Cr3+2Si3O12) was studied using a suite of 60 garnet samples. Compositional and structural data for the samples, along with previous studies, were used to elucidate the mechanisms that control their spectral reflectance properties. Various cation substitutions result in different spectral properties that can be determine the presence of various optically-active cations and help differentiate between garnet types. It was found that different wavelength regions are sensitive to different compositional and structural properties of garnets. Crystal-field absorptions involving Fe2+ and/or Fe3+ are responsible for the majority of spectral features in the garnet minerals examined here. There can also be spectral features associated with other cations and mechanisms, such as Fe2+-Fe3+ and Fe2+-Ti4+ intervalence charge transfers. The visible wavelength region is useful for identifying the presence of various cations, in particular, Fe (and its oxidation state), Ti4+, Mn2+, and Cr3+. In the case of andradite, spessartine and uvarovite, the visible region absorption bands are characteristic of these garnets in the sense that they are associated with the major cation that distinguishes each: [6]Fe3+ for andradite, [8]Mn2+ for spessartine, and [6]Cr3+ for uvarovite. For grossular, the presence of small amounts of Fe3+ leads to absorption bands near 0.370 and 0.435 μm. These bands are also seen in pyrope-almandine spectra, which also commonly have additional absorption bands, due to the presence of Fe2+. The common presence of Fe2+ in the dodecahedral site of natural garnets gives rise to three Fe2+ spin-allowed absorption bands in the 1.3, 1.7, and 2.3 μm regions, providing a strong spectral fingerprint for all Fe2+-bearing garnets studied

  4. Unsymmetrical Mesoporphyrinic Complexes of Copper (II and Zinc (II. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis, Spectral Characterization and Cytotoxicity Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rica Boscencu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available New unsymmetrical mesoporphyrinic complexes, namely 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl-10,15,20–tris-(4-carboxymethylphenyl–21,23-Zn(II-porphine and 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl-10,15,20–tris-(4-carboxymethylphenyl–21,23-Cu(II-porphine, were synthesized using a microwave irradiation method. The structures of the porphyrinic complexes were confirmed using FT-IR, UV–Vis, EPR and NMR spectral data. The spectral absorption and emission properties of the porphyrinic complexes were studied in organic solvents of different polarities and the influence of solvent polarity on the wavelengths of the absorbance and fluorescence band maxima is described. The cytotoxicity evaluation of the porphyrinic complexes was performed on human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 for different doses and incubation times. The obtained result indicates a lack of or low toxicity for both compounds, thus recommending them for further testing in light activation protocols.

  5. Designing, synthesis and spectral characterization of Schiff base transition metal complexes: DNA cleavage and antimicrobial activity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. RAMAN

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A new series of transition metal complexes of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and Zn(II have been designed and synthesized using a Schiff base (L derived from 4-aminoantipyrine, benzaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine. The structural features were derived from their elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity, as well as from mass, IR, UV–Vis, 1H-NMR and ESR spectral studies. The FAB mass spectral data and elemental analyses showed that the complexes had a composition of the ML type. The UV–Vis and ESR spectral data of the complexes suggested a square-planar geometry around the central metal ion. The magnetic susceptibility values of the complexes indicated that they were monomeric in nature. Antimicrobial screening tests were also performed against four bacteria, viz. Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis and three fungi, viz. Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Rhizoctonia bataicola. These data gave good results in the presence of metal ion in the ligand system. The nuclease activity of the above metal complexes shows that only the copper complex cleaves CT DNA in the presence of an oxidant.

  6. Characterization of fluoxetine effects on ethanol withdrawal-induced cortical hyperexcitability by EEG spectral power in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheaha, Dania; Sawangjaroen, Kitja; Kumarnsit, Ekkasit

    2014-02-01

    Antidepressants have been used for treatment of ethanol withdrawal symptoms mainly in observational studies. However, cortical frequency oscillation of ethanol withdrawal treatment with antidepressants remained to be elucidated. This study aimed to identify surrogate biomarkers that represent intact biological or ethanol withdrawal processes and response to pretreatment with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, with quantitative methods. Adult male Wistar rats implanted with electrodes over the frontal and parietal cortices were rendered dependent on ethanol via modified liquid diet (MLD) containing ethanol. Then, ethanol-containing MLD was replaced with isocaloric ethanol-free MLD to induce ethanol withdrawal symptoms. Locomotor activity, sleep-wakefulness and spectral frequencies of electroencephalographic (EEG) pattern during ethanol-withdrawal period were analyzed. One-way ANOVA confirmed significant increases in locomotor activity and time spent in awake state and decreases time spent in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and REM-sleep during ethanol withdrawal period. Fast Fourier Transformation also revealed predominant increases in gamma spectral powers within both the frontal and parietal cortices during ethanol withdrawal. However, these changes, except sleep-wake disturbances, were significantly attenuated by fluoxetine pretreatment (10 mg/kg). The present study supports the hypothesis that serotonergic hypofunction may underlie most of ethanol withdrawal symptoms and proposes that electroencephalographic patterns are valid biomarkers for ethanol withdrawal evaluation and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of spectral responses of dissolved organic matter (DOM) for atrazine binding during the sorption process onto black soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Xinyuan; Zhang, Xing; Meng, Qingjuan; Gao, Fengjie; Zhang, Ying

    2017-08-01

    This study was aim to investigate the interaction between soil-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) and atrazine as a kind of pesticides during the sorption process onto black soil. According to the experimental data, the adsorption capacity of Soil + DOM, Soil and DOM were 41.80, 31.45 and 9.35 mg kg(-1), separately, which indicated that DOM significantly enhanced the adsorption efficiency of atrazine by soil. Data implied that the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation could well explain the adsorption process. The adsorption isotherms (R(2) > 0.99) had a satisfactory fit in both Langmuir and Freundlich models. Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM), synchronous fluorescence, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were selected to analyze the interaction between DOM and atrazine. 3D-EEM showed that humic acid-like substances were the main component of DOM. The fluorescence of DOM samples were gradually quenched with the increased of atrazine concentrations. Synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that static fluorescence quenching was the main quenching process. 2D-COS indicated that the order of the spectral changes were as following: 336 nm > 282 nm. Furthermore, the fluorescence quenching of humic-like fraction occurred earlier than that of protein-like fraction under atrazine surroundings. FT-IR spectra indicated that main compositions of soil DOM include proteins, polysaccharides and humic substances. The findings of this study are significant to reveal DOM played an important role in the environmental fate of pesticides during sorption process onto black soil and also provide more useful information for understanding the interaction between DOM and pesticides by using spectral responses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The spectral shift function and spectral flow

    OpenAIRE

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A.L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends Krein's spectral shift function theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples. We define the spectral shift function under these hypotheses via Birman-Solomyak spectral averaging formula and show that it computes spectral flow.

  9. TeV Gamma Rays From Galactic Center Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermilab; Cholis, Ilias [Johns Hopkins U.; Linden, Tim [Ohio State U., CCAPP

    2017-05-25

    Measurements of the nearby pulsars Geminga and B0656+14 by the HAWC and Milagro telescopes have revealed the presence of bright TeV-emitting halos surrounding these objects. If young and middle-aged pulsars near the Galactic Center transfer a similar fraction of their energy into TeV photons, then these sources could dominate the emission that is observed by HESS and other ground-based telescopes from the innermost ~10^2 parsecs of the Milky Way. In particular, both the spectral shape and the angular extent of this emission is consistent with TeV halos produced by a population of pulsars. The overall flux of this emission requires a birth rate of ~100-1000 neutron stars per Myr near the Galactic Center, in good agreement with recent estimates.

  10. A beam branching method for timing and spectral characterization of hard X-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Katayama

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a method for achieving advanced photon diagnostics of x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs under a quasi-noninvasive condition by using a beam-splitting scheme. Here, we used a transmission grating to generate multiple branches of x-ray beams. One of the two primary diffracted branches (+1st-order is utilized for spectral measurement in a dispersive scheme, while the other (−1st-order is dedicated for arrival timing diagnostics between the XFEL and the optical laser pulses. The transmitted x-ray beam (0th-order is guided to an experimental station. To confirm the validity of this timing-monitoring scheme, we measured the correlation between the arrival timings of the −1st and 0th branches. The observed error was as small as 7.0 fs in root-mean-square. Our result showed the applicability of the beam branching scheme to advanced photon diagnostics, which will further enhance experimental capabilities of XFEL.

  11. Spectral and thermal characterization of 3-acetyl-5-azophenyl-4-hydroxy-6-methyl-pyran-2-one and its metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Susannah; Aravindakshan, K. K.

    2013-08-01

    Five chelates of 3-acetyl-5-azophenyl-4-hydroxy-6-methyl-pyran-2-one (phenylazo dehydroacetic acid) with Cr(III), Fe(III), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility measurements, electronic, 1H NMR, FAB mass, IR-spectral and thermal (TG/DTG) analytical techniques. In the present work it has been found that oxygen of the deprotonated sbnd OH group and one of the azo-nitrogens of the ligand take part in coordination. The Cr(III), Fe(III) and Ni(II) complexes were found to be having octahedral geometry and the Cu(II) and Zn(II) tetrahedral.

  12. Synthesis, spectral characterization and anti-microbial activity of 6- Substituted [(2-aminoethylamino]-6λ 5-dibenzo [d, h] [1, 3,6,2]oxathiaza- phosphonin-6-ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinta Raveendra Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of a series of a new class of phosphorus macrocycles was accomplished in two steps by condensation of (Z-2-((2-mercaptophenylimino methyl phenol (1 with phosphorus oxychloride (2 in dry THF in the presence of triethylamine at 0-5 °C. In the second step ethylene diols/ amino alcohols/ diamine/ aminothiols/ phenols were reacted at room temperature in THF to afford the title compounds (5a-l. The chemical structures of the title products were characterized by IR, 1H, 13C, 31P-NMR, mass spectral studies and elemental analysis. All the title compounds were evaluated for antimicrobial activity to determine their efficacy and they were found role effective in suppressing the growth of bacteria and fungi.

  13. Synthesis and spectral characterization of 2,2-diphenylethyl glucosinolate and HPLC-based reaction progress curve data for the enzymatic hydrolysis of glucosinolates by Sinapis alba myrosinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase A. Klingaman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article, “HPLC-based enzyme kinetics assay for glucosinolate hydrolysis facilitate analysis of systems with both multiple reaction products and thermal enzyme denaturation” (C.K. Klingaman, M.J. Wagner, J.R. Brown, J.B. Klecker, E.H. Pauley, C.J. Noldner, J.R. Mays, [1]. This data article describes (1 the synthesis and spectral characterization data of a non-natural glucosinolate analogue, 2,2-diphenylethyl glucosinolate, (2 HPLC standardization data for glucosinolate, isothiocyanate, nitrile, and amine analytes, (3 reaction progress curve data for enzymatic hydrolysis reactions with variable substrate concentration, enzyme concentration, buffer pH, and temperature, and (4 normalized initial velocities of hydrolysis/formation for analytes. These data provide a comprehensive description of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of 2,2-diphenylethyl glucosinolate (5 and glucotropaeolin (6 under widely varied conditions.

  14. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    It has been traditional in phonetic research to characterize monophthongs using a set of static formant frequencies, i.e., formant frequencies taken from a single time-point in the vowel or averaged over the time-course of the vowel. However, over the last twenty years a growing body of research has demonstrated that, at least for a number of dialects of North American English, vowels which are traditionally described as monophthongs often have substantial spectral change. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change has been observed in speakers’ productions, and has also been found to have a substantial effect on listeners’ perception. In terms of acoustics, the traditional categorical distinction between monophthongs and diphthongs can be replaced by a gradient description of dynamic spectral patterns. This book includes chapters addressing various aspects of vowel inherent spectral change (VISC), including theoretical and experimental studies of the perceptually relevant aspects of VISC, the relationship between ar...

  15. Microwave-assisted synthesis, characterization and spectral properties of non-peripherally tetra-substituted phthalocyanines containing eugenol moieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar, Cihan; Şahin, Zarife Sibel; Büyükgüngör, Orhan; Şaşmaz, Selami

    2015-06-01

    The microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of novel non-peripherally eugenol substituted metallophthalocyanines (M: Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II)) have been reported for the first time in this study. All the new compounds were characterized by a combination of FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and UV/vis spectroscopy techniques. The crystal structure of compound (1) was also determined by the single crystal diffraction technique. Newly synthesized eugenol substituted phthalocyanines have more redshift Q bands (about 17-18 nm) than previously reported eugenol substituted phthalocyanines. Zinc(II)phthalocyanine (1d) has an extra absorption band at 746 nm that calling "X band" at UV/vis spectrum.

  16. Spectral and spatial characterization of perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fibers for the distribution of optical wireless communication cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, Hani Al; Montero, David S; Lallana, Pedro C; Vázquez, Carmen; Fracasso, Bruno

    2015-02-10

    In this paper, the characterization of a perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fiber (PF-GIPOF) for a high-bitrate indoor optical wireless system is reported. PF-GIPOF is used here to interconnect different optical wireless access points that distribute optical free-space high-bitrate wireless communication cells. The PF-GIPOF channel is first studied in terms of transmission attenuation and frequency response and, in a second step, the spatial power profile distribution at the fiber output is analyzed. Both characterizations are performed under varying restricted mode launch conditions, enabling us to assess the transmission channel performance subject to potential connectorization errors within an environment where the end users may intervene by themselves on the home network infrastructure.

  17. Characterization of Articular Cartilage Recovery and Its Correlation with Optical Response in the Near-Infrared Spectral Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afara, Isaac Oluwaseun; Singh, Sanjleena; Moody, Hayley; Zhang, Lihai; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we examine the capacity of a new parameter, based on the recovery response of articular cartilage, to distinguish between healthy and damaged tissues. We also investigate whether or not this new parameter correlates with the near-infrared (NIR) optical response of articular cartilage. Normal and artificially degenerated (proteoglycan-depleted) bovine cartilage samples were nondestructively probed using NIR spectroscopy. Subsequently they were subjected to a load and unloading protocol, and the recovery response was logged during unloading. The recovery parameter, elastic rebound ( ER), is based on the strain energy released as the samples underwent instantaneous elastic recovery. Our results reveal positive relationship between the rebound parameter and cartilage proteoglycan content (normal samples: 2.20 ± 0.10 N mm; proteoglycan-depleted samples: 0.50 ± 0.04 N mm for 1 hour of enzymatic treatment and 0.13 ± 0.02 N mm for 4 hours of enzymatic treatment). In addition, multivariate analysis using partial least squares regression was employed to investigate the relationship between ER and NIR spectral data. The results reveal significantly high correlation ( R(2)cal = 98.35% and R(2)val = 79.87%; P cartilage in the combined NIR regions 5,450 to 6,100 cm(-1) and 7,500 to 12,500 cm(-1). We conclude that ER can indicate the mechanical condition and state of health of articular cartilage. The correlation of ER with cartilage optical response in the NIR range could facilitate real-time evaluation of the tissue's integrity during arthroscopic surgery and could also provide an important tool for cartilage assessment in tissue engineering and regeneration research.

  18. Synthesis, spectral characterization, electron microscopic study and thermogravimetric analysis of a phosphorus containing dendrimer with diphenylsilanediol as core unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dadapeer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A phosphorus containing dendrimer with a diphenylsilanediol core was synthesized using a divergent method. Several types of reactions were performed on dendrons of several sizes, either at the level of the core or the surface. The giant Schiff’s base macro molecule possesses 12 imine bonds and 8 hydroxy groups on the terminal phenyl groups. The structures of the intermediate compounds were confirmed by IR, GCMS and 31P NMR. The final compound was characterized by 1H, 13C, 31P NMR, MALDI-TOF MS and CHN analysis. Scanning electron microscopic and thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetric studies were also performed on the final dendritic molecule.

  19. Spectral stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to stratigraphic analysis is described which uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. The new stratigraphic procedure is illustrated by examples in the literature. The published results demonstrate the potential of spectral stratigraphy for mapping strata, determining dip and strike, measuring and correlating stratigraphic sequences, defining lithofacies, mapping biofacies, and interpreting geological structures.

  20. Label-free biomolecular characterization of human breast cancer tissue with stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fa-Ke F.; Calligaris, David; Suo, Yuanzhen; Santagata, Sandro; Golby, Alexandra J.; Xie, X. Sunney; Mallory, Melissa A.; Golshan, Mehra; Dillon, Deborah A.; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2017-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has been used for rapid label-free imaging of various biomolecules and drugs in living cells and tissues (Science, doi:10.1126/science.aaa8870). Our recent work has demonstrated that lipid and protein mapping of cancer tissue renders pathology-like images, providing essential histopathological information with subcellular resolution of the entire specimen (Cancer Research, doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-027). We have also established the first SRS imaging Atlas of human brain tumors (Harvard Dataverse, doi: (doi:10.7910/DVN/EZW4EK). SRS imaging of tissue could provide invaluable information for cancer diagnosis and surgical guidance in two aspects: rapid surgical pathology and quantitative biomolecular characterization. In this work, we present the use of SRS microscopy for characterization of a few essential biomolecules in breast cancer. Human breast cancer tissue specimens at the tumor core, tumor margin and normal area (5 cm away from the tumor) from surgical cases will be imaged with SRS at multiple Raman shifts, including the peaks for lipid, protein, blood (absorption), collagen, microcalcification (calcium phosphates and calcium oxalate) and carotenoids. Most of these Raman shifts have relatively strong Raman cross sections, which ensures high-quality and fast imaging. This proof-of-principle study is sought to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of SRS imaging for ambient diagnosis and surgical guidance of breast cancer.

  1. Synthesis, spectral characterization, thermal investigation and electrochemical evaluation of benzilbis(carbohydrazone as Cd(II ion selective electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulekh Chandra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Benzil bis(carbohydrazone (BBC has been synthesized and structurally characterized on the basis of IR, 1H NMR, mass, UV spectra and thermogravimetric analyses. BBC has been analysed electrochemically and explored as new N, N Schiff base. It plays the role of an excellent ion carrier in the construction of cadmium(II ion selective membrane sensor. This sensor shows very good selectivity and sensitivity towards cadmium ion over a wide variety of cations, including alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions. The response mechanism was discussed in the view of UV-spectroscopy and Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The proposed sensor was successfully used for the determination of cadmium in different chocolate samples.

  2. Selective separation, detection of zotepine and mass spectral characterization of degradants by LC–MS/MS/QTOF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V.N. Kumar Talluri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple, precise, accurate stability-indicating gradient reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (RP–HPLC method was developed for the quantitative determination of zotepine (ZTP in bulk and pharmaceutical dosage forms in the presence of its degradation products (DPs. The method was developed using Phenomenex C18 column (250 mm×4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm with a mobile phase containing a gradient mixture of solvents, A (0.05% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA, pH=3.0 and B (acetonitrile. The eluted compounds were monitored at 254 nm; the run time was within 20.0 min, in which ZTP and its DPs were well separated, with a resolution of >1.5. The stress testing of ZTP was carried out under acidic, alkaline, neutral hydrolysis, oxidative, photolytic and thermal stress conditions. ZTP was found to degrade significantly in acidic, photolytic, thermal and oxidative stress conditions and remain stable in basic and neutral conditions. The developed method was validated with respect to specificity, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision and robustness as per ICH guidelines. This method was also suitable for the assay determination of ZTP in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The DPs were characterized by LC–MS/MS and their fragmentation pathways were proposed. Keywords: Zotepine, Stability-indicating RP–HPLC method, Characterization, ESI-Q-TOF-MS, Bulk drugs and formulations

  3. AMS-02: Cosmic electron and positron (e− + e+ spectrum up to 1 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazo J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMS-02 spectrometer, on the ISS since 2011, performs highly accurate measurements of cosmic rays up to the TeV region. We review the analysis of the cosmic (e+ + e− flux in the energy range between 0.5 GeV and 1 TeV, based on 10.6 million (e+ + e− events. The high statistics and detector energy resolution allow for a study of the spectral shape of unprecedented quality, thus improving our understanding of the production, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays. The resulting energy spectrum does not show prominent features.

  4. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological activity of Zn(II complex with 2′-[1-(2-hydroxyphenylethylidene]benzenesulfanohydrazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nura Suleiman Gwaram

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Zinc(II complex with 2′-[1-(2-hydroxyphenyl ethylidene] benzenesulfanohydrazide, was synthesized, and structurally characterized by elemental analysis CHN, TGA, UV, FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Its preventive effect on ulcer activity induced by absolute ethanol in Sprague–Dawley rats was studied in vivo. Gastric ulcers were induced in rats by administrating absolute ethanol. Twenty four Spragu–Dawley rats (12 males and 12 females were assigned equally into the following 4 groups (n = 6: negative control; positive control; low dose, which received low oral doses of the compound; and high dose, which received high oral doses of the compounds . These animals were subjected to overnight fasting (food but not water prior to dosing. Gastric wall mucus, ulcer areas and histology of gastric walls were assessed in addition gastric homogenate was determined for superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde (MDA. Pre-treatment of rats with compound significantly prevented ethanol-induced gastric wall depletion and restored non-sulfhydryl (NP-SH content in glandular stomachs. The Zinc(II complex also exhibits high levels of SOD, and GSH enzymes as well as a reduced amount of lipid peroxidation enzyme, malondialdehyde. This study describes a model to produce extensive gastric necrosis in rats by induction with absolute ethanol. The administration of zinc(II complex with benzensulfanohydrazone at 30 min before induction with absolute ethanol reduced or totally eliminated lesions.

  5. Biological Impact of Pd (II Complexes: Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, In Vitro Anticancer, CT-DNA Binding, and Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new series of Pd (II complexes of methyl substituted benzylamine ligands (BLs has been synthesized and characterized via spectroscopic techniques such as UV/Vis. FTIR, LCMS, 1H, and 13C NMR. The UV/Vis study in DMSO, DMSO + water, and DMSO + PBS buffer (pH = 7.2 confirmed their molecular sustainability in liquids. Their in vitro anticancer activity against breast cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 makes them interesting for in vivo analysis. Their stronger DNA binding activity (DBA compared with free ligand suggested them as a good DNA binder. DBA was further confirmed by physicochemical studies such as surface tension and viscosity of complex + DNA which inferred the disruption of DNA and intercalation of complexes, respectively. Their % binding activity, % disruption of DNA base pairs (DNABP, and % intercalating strength are reported in this paper for the first time for better understanding of DNA binding mechanism. Along with this, their scavenging activity (SA determined through DPPH free radical and the results indicate good antioxidant behaviour of complexes.

  6. Synthesis, Magneto-Spectral, Electrochemical, Thermal Characterization and Antimicrobial Investigations of Some Nickel(II) Complexes of Hydrazones of Isoniazid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Surendra [The University of the South Pacific, Suva (Fiji); Agarwal, Ram K. [Lajpat Rai Postgraduate College, Ghaziabad (India)

    2009-12-15

    The synthesis of a novel series of nickel(II) complexes with new ligands derived from hydrazones of isoniazid have been reported in present work. The complexes have general compositions [Ni(L){sub 2}X{sub 2}] or [Ni(L){sub 3}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} {L = N-isonicotinamido-furfuraldimine (INH-FFL), N-isonicotinamido-3',4',5'-trimethoxybenzaldimine (INH-TMB) or N-isonicotinamido-cinnamalidene (INH-CIN) and X = Cl"-, NO_3 "-, NCS"- or CH_3COO"-}. The ligands hydrazones behave as neutral bidentates (N and O donor) through the carbonyl oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. The new complexes with octahedral geometry have been characterized by elemental analysis, molecular weight determinations, magnetic susceptibility/moment, thermogravimetric, electrochemical and spectroscopic studies viz. infrared and electronic spectra. On the basis of conductivity measurements in nitrobenzene (PhNO{sub 2}) solution the [Ni(L){sub 2}X{sub 2}] and [Ni(L){sub 3}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} complexes have been found to be non-electrolytes and 1:2 electrolytes, respectively. Thermal properties have also been investigated, which support the geometry of the complexes. Antibacterial and antifungal properties of nickel(II) complexes and few standard drugs have also been examined and it has been observed that the complexes have moderate antibacterial activities.

  7. Synthesis, spectral characterization and study of thermal behavior kinetics by thermogravimetric analysis of metal complexes derived from salicylaldehyde and alkylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzerafa, Brahim; Aggoun, Djouhra; Ouennoughi, Yasmina; Ourari, Ali; Ruiz-Rosas, Ramiro; Morallon, Emilia; Mubarak, Mohammad S.

    2017-08-01

    Cobalt(III)- and copper(II)-Schiff base complexes have been prepared by reaction of the bidentate Schiff base ligand (HL: 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-iminosalicylidenethane) with cobalt(II) and copper(II) chlorides. Structures of the synthesized complexes have been characterized by various physicochemical techniques, such as IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG), and by elemental analysis. Additionally, the redox behavior of the cobalt(III) and copper(II) complexes has been examined by cyclic voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode in DMF solutions. Thermogravimetric analysis has been employed to evaluate the thermal stability of the prepared complexes CoIII(L)3·1/2H2O, CuII(L)2, in addition to the previously synthesized HL and NiII(L)2. Furthermore, activation energies of the thermal decomposition were calculated using Kissinger, Ozawa and Coats-Redfern methods. The calculated activation energies were also useful to evaluate kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the ligand and the corresponding metal complexes including ΔS, ΔH and ΔG. Calculated activation energies follow the order: Ea(NiII(L)2) > Ea(CuII(L)2) > Ea(CoIII(L)3·1/2H2O).

  8. Ground-based characterization of aerosol spectral optical properties of haze and Asian dust episodes under Asian continental outflow during winter 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinsang; Yu, JeongAh; Lyu, Youngsook; Lee, Minhee; Hwang, Taekyung; Lee, Sangil

    2017-04-01

    Long-range transported (LRT) haze can affect the regional radiation budget and the air quality in areas downwind of the Asian continental outflow. Because in situ observations of spectral aerosol optical properties of the LRT haze are rare, an intensive characterization of aerosol optical properties is needed. This study characterized the spectral optical properties of the LRT haze and Asian dust originating from the Asian continent. Integrated chemical and optical measurements of aerosol particles were carried out in a downwind area of the Asian continental outflow (Daejeon, South Korea) during winter 2014. High concentrations of PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter ≤ 10 µm) and light scattering coefficients at 550 nm, σs, 550, were observed during a long-range transport (LRT) haze episode (PM10 = 163.9 ± 25.0 µg m-3; σs, 550 = 503.4 ± 60.5 Mm-1) and Asian dust episode (PM10 = 211.3 ± 57.5 µg m-3; σs, 550 = 560.9 ± 151 Mm-1). During the LRT haze episode, no significant change in the relative contribution of PM2. 5 (particulate matter with a diameter ≤ 2.5 µm) chemical components was observed as particles accumulated under stagnant atmospheric conditions (13-17 January 2014), suggesting that the increase in PM2. 5 mass concentration was caused mainly by the accumulation of LRT pollutants. On the other hand, a gradual decrease in Ångström exponent (Å) and a gradual increase in single scattering albedo (ω) and mass scattering efficiency (MSE) were observed during the stagnant period, possibly due to an increase in particle size. These results imply that a change in particle size rather than chemical composition during the stagnant period is the dominant factor affecting the aerosol optical properties. During the Asian dust episode, a low PM2. 5 / PM10 ratio and Å(450/700) were observed with average values of 0.59 ± 0.06 and 1.08 ± 0.14, respectively, which were higher than those during the LRT haze episode (0.75 ± 0.06 and 1.39 ± 0

  9. Metal complexes of Schiff base derived from sulphametrole and o-vanilin . Synthesis, spectral, thermal characterization and biological activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Sharaby, Carmen M.

    2007-04-01

    Metal complexes of Schiff base derived from condensation of o-vanilin (3-methoxysalicylaldehyde) and sulfametrole [ N1-(4-methoxy-1,2,5-thiadiazole-3-yl)sulfanilamide] (H 2L) are reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, mass spectra, UV-vis and thermal analysis (TGA). From the elemental analyses data, the complexes were proposed to have the general formulae [M 2X 3(HL)(H 2O) 5]· yH 2O (where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II), X = Cl, y = 0-3); [Fe 2Cl 5(HL)(H 2O) 3]·2H 2O; [(FeSO 4) 2(H 2L)(H 2O) 4] and [(UO 2) 2(NO 3) 3(HL)(H 2O)]·2H 2O. The molar conductance data reveal that all the metal chelates were non-electrolytes. The IR spectra show that, H 2L is coordinated to the metal ions in a tetradentate manner with ON and NO donor sites of the azomethine-N, phenolic-OH, enolic sulphonamide-OH and thiadiazole-N. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, it is found that the geometrical structures of these complexes are octahedral. The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated complexes losses water molecules of hydration in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the anions and ligand molecules in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, Δ H*, Δ S* and Δ G* are calculated from the DrTG curves using Coats-Redfern method. The synthesized ligand, in comparison to their metal complexes also were screened for their antibacterial activity against bacterial species, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Bacillus subtillus, Staphylococcus aureus and Fungi ( Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus flavus). The activity data show that the metal complexes to be more potent/antimicrobial than the parent Shciff base ligand against one or more microbial species.

  10. Iron and nickel complexes with heterocyclic ligands: stability, synthesis, spectral characterization, antimicrobial activity, acute and subacute toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoucha, Afaf; Terbouche, Achour; Zaouani, Mohamed; Derridj, Fazia; Djebbar, Safia

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis and characterization by elemental analysis, emission atomic spectroscopy, TG measurements, magnetic measurements, FTIR, (1)H NMR, UV-visible spectra and conductivity of a series of iron (II) and nickel (II) complexes with two heterocyclic ligands (L(1)(SMX): sulfamethoxazole and L(2)(MIZ): metronidazole) used in pharmaceutical field and with a new ligand derived benzoxazole (L(3)(MPBO): 2-(5-methylpyridine-2-yl)benzoxazole), were reported. The formulae obtained for the complexes are: [M(L(1))2 Cl2]·nH2O, [M(L(2))2Cl2(H2O)2]·H2O and [M(L(3))2(OH)2]·nH2O. Stability constants of these complexes have been determined by potentiometric methods in water-ethanol (90:10, v/v) mixture at a 0.2 mol L(-1) ionic strength (NaCl) and at 25.0±0.1 °C. Sirko program was used to determine the protonation constants as well as the binding constants of three species [ML2H2](2+), [ML2] and [ML](2+). The antimicrobial activity of the ligands and complexes was evaluated in vitro against different human bacteria and fungi using agar diffusion method. Iron sulfamethoxazole complex showed a remarkable inhibition of bacteria growth especially on Staphylococcus aureus and P. aeruginosa. The iron metronidazole complex is active against yeasts especially on Candida tropicalis strain. Nickel complexes presented different antibacterial and antifungal behavior's against bacteria and fungal. The acute toxicity study revealed that the iron complexes are not toxic at 2000 mg/kg dose orally administrated. LD50 for nickel complexes was determined using graphical method. No significant differences in the body weights between the control and the treated groups of both rat sexes in subacute toxicity study using for iron complexes. Hematological and clinical blood chemistry analysis revealed no toxicity effects of the iron complexes. Pathologically, neither gross abnormalities nor histopathological changes were observed for these complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights

  11. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  12. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  13. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological activities of Mn(II) and Co(II) complexes with benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathima, B.; Subba Rao, Y.; Ramesh, G. N.; Jagadeesh, M.; Reddy, Y. P.; Chalapathi, P. V.; Varada Reddy, A.

    2011-06-01

    Mn(II) and Co(II) complexes of benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone have been synthesized and characterized by the investigations of electronic and EPR spectra and X-ray diffraction. Based on the spectral studies, an octahedral geometry is assigned for the Mn(II) and Co(II) complexes. X-ray powder diffraction studies reveal that Mn(II) and Co(II) complexes have triclinic crystal lattices. The unit cell parameters of the Mn(II) complex are a = 11.0469 Å, b = 6.2096 Å, c = 7.4145 Å, α = 90.646°, β = 95.127°, γ = 104.776°, V = 489.7 Å 3 and those of Co(II) complex are a = 9.3236 Å, b = 10.2410 Å, c = 7.8326 Å, α = 90.694°, β = 99.694°, γ = 100.476°, V = 724.2 Å 3. When the free ligand and its metal complexes are subjected to antibacterial activity, the metal complexes are proved to be more active than the ligand. However with regard to in vitro antioxidant activity, the ligand exhibits greater antioxidant activity than its metal(II) complexes.

  14. Detector-level spectral characterization of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite long-wave infrared bands M15 and M16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong

    2015-06-01

    The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor data record (SDR) product achieved validated maturity status in March 2014 after roughly two years of on-orbit characterization (S-NPP spacecraft launched on 28 October 2011). During post-launch analysis the VIIRS Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) team observed an anomalous striping pattern in the daytime SST data. Daytime SST retrievals use the two VIIRS long-wave infrared bands: M15 (10.7 μm) and M16 (11.8 μm). To assess possible root causes due to detector-level spectral response function (SRF) effects, a study was conducted to compare the radiometric response of the detector-level and operational-band averaged SRFs of VIIRS bands M15 and M16. The study used simulated hyperspectral blackbody radiance data and clear-sky ocean hyperspectral radiances under different atmospheric conditions. It was concluded that the SST product is likely impacted by small differences in detector-level SRFs and that if users require optimal radiometric performance, detector-level processing is recommended for both SDR and EDR products. Future work should investigate potential SDR product improvements through detector-level processing in support of the generation of Suomi NPP VIIRS climate quality SDRs.

  15. Spectral investigation and characterization of host-guest inclusion complex of 4,4'-methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline) with beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, R; Kothainayaki, S; Rajamohan, R; Sivakumar, K

    2014-12-19

    The host-guest inclusion complex of 4,4'-methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline) (MBCA) with beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was prepared by co-precipitation method and characterized using absorption, fluorescence, fourier transform infrared, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The spectral shifts revealed that the aniline ring of 4,4'-methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline) was entrapped in the beta-cyclodextrin cavity. Nano second time resolved fluorescence studies revealed that 4,4'-methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline) exhibits single exponential decay in aqueous medium and bi-exponential in beta-cyclodextrin medium confirmed the formation of 1:1 inclusion complex. The Gibbs free energy change of the complexation process was determined and the complexation process was spontaneous. The differential scanning calorimetry analysis showed that the thermal stability of 4,4'-methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline) was altered in the presence of beta-cyclodextrin. The implementation of molecular docking test confirmed that the complexation could reduce the energy of the system. A mechanism was proposed to explain the mode of inclusion in the inclusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis, spectral characterization, catalytic and antibacterial studies of new Ru(III) Schiff base complexes containing chloride/bromide and triphenylphosphine/arsine as co-ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, S.; Padma Priya, N.; Jayabalakrishnan, C.; Chinnusamy, V.

    2009-10-01

    A new Ru(III) Schiff base complexes of the type [RuX(EPh 3)L] (X = Cl/Br; E = P/As; L = dianion of the Schiff bases were derived by the condensation of 1,4-diformylbenzene with o-aminobenzoic acid/ o-aminophenol/ o-aminothiophenol in the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio) have been synthesized from the reactions of [RuX 3(EPh 3) 3] with appropriate Schiff base ligands in benzene in the 2:1 stoichiometric ratio. The new complexes have been characterized by analytical, spectral (IR, electronic, 1H, 13C NMR and ESR), magnetic moment and electrochemical studies. An octahedral structure has been tentatively proposed for all these new complexes. All the new complexes have been found to be better catalyst for the oxidation of alcohols using molecular oxygen as co-oxidant at ambient temperature and aryl-aryl coupling reactions. These complexes were also subjected to antibacterial activity studies against Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophilla and Salmonella typhi.

  17. Synthesis and spectral characterization of 2-((2-hydroxybenzylidene)amino)-2-methylpropane-1,3-diol derived complexes: Molecular docking and antimicrobial studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Istikhar A.; Sama, Farasha; Raizada, Mukul; Shahid, M.; Rajpoot, Ravi Kant; Siddiqi, Zafar A.

    2017-01-01

    A series of four homo-dinuclear transition metal complexes with stoichiometry [M2(HL)2(H2O)2] [M = Fe (1), Co (2), Ni (3) and Cu (4); H3L = 2-((2-hydroxybenzylidene)amino)-2-methylpropane-1,3-diol] has been prepared. Ligand (H3L) was obtained by the condensation of 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (H2ampd) with salicylaldehyde. The complexes (1-4) are characterized employing elemental analysis, FTIR, ESI mass, 1H &13C NMR, EPR, UV Visible, TGA, cyclic voltammetry, and magnetic studies. Spectral data ascertained the bonding features and the geometry of the complexes and revealed that all the complexes adopt distorted octahedral geometry with high spin state of metal ions. Thermal and ESI mass data confirmed the proposed stoichiometry of the complexes. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) studies ascertain the formation of MII/MIII quasi-reversible redox couples in solution. The antimicrobial activities of the present complexes have been examined against few bacteria (E. coli, B. subtilis, S. aureus and S. typhymurium) and fungi (C. albicans, A. fumigatus and P. marneffeiin) suggesting that the present compounds show moderate to high antimicrobial properties. Among all the compounds tested, complex (4) exhibited highest antibacterial as well as antifungal activity. Molecular docking studies of the free ligand and the complexes are performed with BDNA.

  18. Design, spectral characterization, DFT and biological studies of transition metal complexes of Schiff base derived from 2-aminobenzamide, pyrrole and furan aldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Prateek; Chandra, Sulekh; Saraswat, B S; Sharma, Deepansh

    2015-05-15

    A series of two biologically active Schiff base ligands L(1), L(2) have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 2-aminobenzamide with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde and furan-2-carboxaldehyde. The synthesized Schiff bases were used for complexation with different metal ions like Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) by using a molar ratio of ligand: metal as 2:1. The characterization of newly formed complexes was done by (1)H NMR, UV-Vis, TGA, IR, mass spectrophotometry, EPR and molar conductivity studies. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff bases and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. On the basis of the spectral studies an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes and distorted octahedral geometry for Cu(II) complexes. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antimicrobial activities, against four bacterial strains and two fungal strains by using serial dilution method. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Surface morphology characterization of pentacene thin film and its substrate with under-layers by power spectral density using fast Fourier transform algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Taketsugu [Corning Display Technologies, Corning Japan K.K., Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0052 (Japan)]. E-mail: itohtk@corning.com; Yamauchi, Noriyoshi [Graduate School of Information, Production and Systems, Waseda University, Kitakyushu-shi, Fukuoka 808-0135 (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    Surface morphology of pentacene thin films and their substrates with under-layers is characterized by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power values of power spectral density (PSD) for the AFM digital data were determined by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithms instead of the root-mean-square (rms) and peak-to-valley value. The PSD plots of pentacene films on glass substrate are successfully approximated by the k-correlation model. The pentacene film growth is interpreted the intermediation of the bulk and surface diffusion by parameter C of k-correlation model. The PSD plots of pentacene film on Au under-layer is approximated by using the linear continuum model (LCM) instead of the combination model of the k-correlation model and Gaussian function. The PSD plots of SiO{sub 2} layer on Au under-layer as a gate insulator on a gate electrode of organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) have three power values of PSD. It is interpreted that the specific three PSD power values are caused by the planarization of the smooth SiO{sub 2} layer to rough Au under-layer.

  20. Learning from weakly representative data and applications in spectral image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinh, C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral imaging has been extensively applied in many fields, including agriculture, environmental monitoring, biomedical diagnostics, etc. Thanks to the advances in sensor technology, spectral imaging systems nowadays provide finer and finer spectral resolution needed to characterize the spectral

  1. Spectral Predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  2. Hadronic Synchrotron Mirror Model for Orphan TeV Flares in Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, M.; Postnikov, S.

    2004-08-01

    Very-high-energy gamma-ray flares of TeV blazars are generally accompanied by simultaneous flaring activity in X-rays. The recent observations by the Whipple collaboration of an ``orphan'' TeV flare of 1ES 1959+650 (without simultaneous X-ray flare) is very hard to reconcile with standard leptonic SSC model routinely and usually very successfully employed to explain the SED and spectral variability of TeV blazars. In this paper, we suggest an alternative scenario in which the ``orphan'' TeV flare may originate from relativistic protons, interacting with an external photon field supplied by electron-synchrotron radiation reflected off a dilute ``synchrotron mirror'' located at a few pc from the central black hole. While the external photons will be virtually ``invisible'' to the co-moving ultrarelativistic electrons in the jet due to Klein-Nishina effects, their Doppler boosted energy is high enough to excite the Delta resonance from relativistic protons with Lorentz factors of 103 - 104. This model is capable of explaining the ``orphan'' TeV flare of 1ES 1959+650 with plausible parameters, thus constraining the number and characteristic energy of relativistic protons in the jet of this blazar.

  3. Synthesis, spectral (IR, UV-Vis and variable temperature NMR) characterization and crystal structure of (N-benzyl-N-furfuryldithicarbamato-S,S')(thiocyanato-N)(triphenylphosphine)nickel(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valarmathi, P; Thirumaran, S; Sarmal, Lovely; Kant, Rajni

    2014-08-14

    Planar (N-benzyl-N-furfuryldithiocarbamato-S,S')(thiocyanato-N)(triphenylphospine)nickel(II), [Ni(bfdtc)(NCS)(PPh3)], (1) was prepared from bis(N-benzyl-N-furfuryldithiocarbamato-S,S')nickel(II), [Ni(bfdtc)2], (2) and characterized by elemental analysis, cyclic voltammetry, electronic, IR and variable temperature (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra. For complex 1, the thioureide vCN value is shifted to higher wavenumber compared to 2 and N(13)CS2 carbon signal observed for 1 is additionally shielded compared to the parent complex 2, suggesting increased strength of the thioureide bond due to the presence of the π-accepting phosphine. In the room temperature (13)C NMR spectrum of 1, two pseudo doublets are observed in the aliphatic region. Variable temperature (13)C NMR spectral studies suggest that the fast thiocyanate exchange appears to be responsible for the appearance of pseudo doublets. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis of 1 and 2 confirm the presence of four coordinated nickel in a distorted square planar arrangement with the NiS2PN and NiS4 chromophores, respectively. The NiS bonds are symmetric in 2 (2.1914(14) and 2.2073(13)Å). But significant asymmetry in NiS bond distances was observed in 1 (2.2202(8)Å and 2.1841Å). This observation clearly supports the less effective trans effect of SCN(-) over PPh3. Cyclic voltammetric studies revealed easier reduction of nickel(II) to nickel(I) in complex 1 compared to 2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales: A spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C. Dietze; Rodrigo Vargas; Andrew D. Richardson; Paul C. Stoy; Alan G. Barr; Ryan S. Anderson; M. Altaf Arain; Ian T. Baker; T. Andrew Black; Jing M. Chen; Philippe Ciais; Lawrence B. Flanagan; Christopher M. Gough; Robert F. Grant; David Hollinger; R. Cesar Izaurralde; Christopher J. Kucharik; Peter Lafleur; Shugang Liu; Erandathie Lokupitiya; Yiqi Luo; J. William Munger; Changhui Peng; Benjamin Poulter; David T. Price; Daniel M. Ricciuto; William J. Riley; Alok Kumar Sahoo; Kevin Schaefer; Andrew E. Suyker; Hanqin Tian; Christina Tonitto; Hans Verbeeck; Shashi B. Verma; Weifeng Wang; Ensheng Weng

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem models are important tools for diagnosing the carbon cycle and projecting its behavior across space and time. Despite the fact that ecosystems respond to drivers at multiple time scales, most assessments of model performance do not discriminate different time scales. Spectral methods, such as wavelet analyses, present an alternative approach that enables the...

  5. Spectral Imaging by Upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to obtain spectrally resolved images using upconversion. By this method an image is spectrally shifted from one spectral region to another wavelength. Since the process is spectrally sensitive it allows for a tailored spectral response. We believe this will allow standard...... silicon based cameras designed for visible/near infrared radiation to be used for spectral images in the mid infrared. This can lead to much lower costs for such imaging devices, and a better performance....

  6. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  7. Spectral representation of Gaussian semimartingales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to characterize the spectral representation of Gaussian semimartingales. That is, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions on the kernel K for X t =∫ K t (s) dN s to be a semimartingale. Here, N denotes an independently scattered Gaussian random measure...

  8. Diffuse neutrinos from extragalactic supernova remnants: Dominating the 100 TeV IceCube flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sovan Chakraborty

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available IceCube has measured a diffuse astrophysical flux of TeV–PeV neutrinos. The most plausible sources are unique high energy cosmic ray accelerators like hypernova remnants (HNRs and remnants from gamma ray bursts in star-burst galaxies, which can produce primary cosmic rays with the required energies and abundance. In this case, however, ordinary supernova remnants (SNRs, which are far more abundant than HNRs, produce a comparable or larger neutrino flux in the ranges up to 100–150 TeV energies, implying a spectral break in the IceCube signal around these energies. The SNRs contribution in the diffuse flux up to these hundred TeV energies provides a natural baseline and then constrains the expected PeV flux.

  9. A Structured Leptonic Jet Model of the "Orphan" TeV Gamma-Ray Flares in TeV Blazars

    OpenAIRE

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Takahara, Fumio

    2006-01-01

    The emission spectra of TeV blazars extend up to tens of TeV and the emission mechanism of the TeV $\\gamma$-rays is explained by synchrotron self-Compton scattering in leptonic models. In these models the time variabilities of X-rays and TeV $\\gamma$-rays are correlated. However, recent observations of 1ES 1959+650 and Mrk 421 have found the ``orphan'' TeV $\\gamma$-ray flares, i.e., TeV $\\gamma$-ray flares without simultaneous X-ray flares. In this paper we propose a model for the ``orphan'' ...

  10. Berlin Reflectance Spectral Library (BRSL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckel, D.; Arnold, G.; Kappel, D.; Moroz, L. V.; Markus, K.

    2017-09-01

    The Berlin Reflectance Spectral Library (BRSL) provides a collection of reflectance spectra between 0.3 and 17 µm. It was originally dedicated to support space missions to small solar system bodies. Meanwhile the library includes selections of biconical reflectance spectra for spectral data analysis of other planetary bodies as well. The library provides reference spectra of well-characterized terrestrial analogue materials and meteorites for interpretation of remote sensing reflectance spectra of planetary surfaces. We introduce the BRSL, summarize the data available, and access to use them for further relevant applications.

  11. On the Spectral Singularities and Spectrality of the Hill Operator

    OpenAIRE

    Veliev, O. A.

    2014-01-01

    First we study the spectral singularity at infinity and investigate the connections of the spectral singularities and the spectrality of the Hill operator. Then we consider the spectral expansion when there is not the spectral singularity at infinity.

  12. Characterization of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded lap joints through dynamic, full-spectral interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors: 1. Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.; Shin, P.; Peters, K.; Zikry, M. A.; Stan, N.; Chadderdon, S.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2014-02-01

    In this study we measure the in situ response of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded in the adhesive layer of a single composite lap joint, subjected to harmonic excitation after fatigue loading. After a fully reversed cyclic fatigue loading is applied to the composite lap joint, the full-spectral response of the sensor is interrogated at 100 kHz during two loading conditions: with and without an added harmonic excitation. The full-spectral information avoided dynamic measurement errors often experienced using conventional peak wavelength and edge filtering techniques. The short-time Fourier transform (STFT) is computed for the extracted peak wavelength information to reveal time-dependent frequencies and amplitudes of the dynamic FBG sensor response. The dynamic response of the FBG sensor indicated a transition to strong nonlinear dynamic behavior as fatigue-induced damage progressed. The ability to measure the dynamic response of the lap joint through sensors embedded in the adhesive layer can provide in situ monitoring of the lap joint condition.

  13. Theoretical Characterization of the Spectral Density of the Water-Soluble Chlorophyll-Binding Protein from Combined Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosnik, Andreana M; Curutchet, Carles

    2015-12-08

    Over the past decade, both experimentalists and theorists have worked to develop methods to describe pigment-protein coupling in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in order to understand the molecular basis of quantum coherence effects observed in photosynthesis. Here we present an improved strategy based on the combination of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and excited-state calculations to predict the spectral density of electronic-vibrational coupling. We study the water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP) reconstituted with Chl a or Chl b pigments as the system of interest and compare our work with data obtained by Pieper and co-workers from differential fluorescence line-narrowing spectra (Pieper et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2011, 115 (14), 4042-4052). Our results demonstrate that the use of QM/MM MD simulations where the nuclear positions are still propagated at the classical level leads to a striking improvement of the predicted spectral densities in the middle- and high-frequency regions, where they nearly reach quantitative accuracy. This demonstrates that the so-called "geometry mismatch" problem related to the use of low-quality structures in QM calculations, not the quantum features of pigments high-frequency motions, causes the failure of previous studies relying on similar protocols. Thus, this work paves the way toward quantitative predictions of pigment-protein coupling and the comprehension of quantum coherence effects in photosynthesis.

  14. HESS J1640–465 AND HESS J1641–463: TWO INTRIGUING TeV SOURCES IN LIGHT OF NEW FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Grondin, M.-H.; Laffon, H.; Reposeur, T. [Centre d' Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, IN2P3/CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Acero, F.; Ballet, J., E-mail: lemoine@cenbg.in2p3.fr, E-mail: grondin@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2014-10-10

    We report on γ-ray analysis of the region containing the bright TeV source HESS J1640–465 and the close-by TeV source HESS J1641–463 using 64 months of observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Previously only one GeV source was reported in this region and was associated with HESS J1640–465. With an increased data set and the improved sensitivity afforded by the reprocessed data (P7REP) of the LAT, we now report the detection, morphological study, and spectral analysis of two distinct sources above 100 MeV. The softest emission in this region comes from the TeV source HESS J1641–463 which is well fitted with a power law of index Γ = 2.47 ± 0.05 ± 0.06 and presents no significant γ-ray signal above 10 GeV, which contrasts with its hard spectrum at TeV energies. The Fermi-LAT spectrum of the second TeV source, HESS J1640–465 is well described by a power-law shape of index Γ = 1.99 ± 0.04 ± 0.07 that links up naturally with the spectral data points obtained by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). These new results provide new constraints concerning the identification of these two puzzling γ-ray sources.

  15. A TeV linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hinchliffe, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Various strategies for the development of a linear collider, capable of firing electrons and positrons at each other at collision energies up to about 1 TeV, are discussed. The linear collider's detector will have to detect and precisely measure the energies of electrons, muons, and hadrons. It is suggested that precision must be maintained over the large span of final-state particle energies. Both the superconducting and warm accelerating technologies have demonstrated their viability for a machine starting out with a collision energy of about 500 GeV that could later be upgraded to 1 TeV. (Edited abstract) 9 Refs.

  16. Characterization of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded lap joints through dynamic, full-spectral interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors: 2. Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.; Shin, P.; Peters, K.; Zikry, M. A.; Stan, N.; Chadderdon, S.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we simulate the response of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors embedded in the adhesive layer of a composite lap that is subjected to harmonic excitation. To simulate accumulated fatigue damage at the adhesive layer, two forms of numerical nonlinearities are introduced into the model: (1) progressive plastic deformation of the adhesive and (2) changing the boundary of an interfacial defect at the adhesive layer across the overlap shear area. The simulation results are compared with previous measurements of the dynamic, full-spectral response of such FBG sensors for condition monitoring of the lap joint. Short-time Fourier transforms (STFT) of the locally extracted axial strain time histories reveal a transition to nonlinear behavior of the composite lap joint by means of intermittent frequencies that were observed in the experimental measurements and are not associated with the external excitation. The simulation results verify that the nonlinear changes in measured dynamic FBG responses are due to the progression of damage in the lap joint.

  17. Time-resolved spectral characterization of ring cavity surface emitting and ridge-type distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers by step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Markus; Genner, Andreas; Schwarzer, Clemens; Mujagic, Elvis; Strasser, Gottfried; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-02-10

    We present the time-resolved comparison of pulsed 2nd order ring cavity surface emitting (RCSE) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) and pulsed 1st order ridge-type distributed feedback (DFB) QCLs using a step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Laser devices were part of QCL arrays and fabricated from the same laser material. Required grating periods were adjusted to account for the grating order. The step-scan technique provided a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm(-1) and a time resolution of 2 ns. As a result, it was possible to gain information about the tuning behavior and potential mode-hops of the investigated lasers. Different cavity-lengths were compared, including 0.9 mm and 3.2 mm long ridge-type and 0.97 mm (circumference) ring-type cavities. RCSE QCLs were found to have improved emission properties in terms of line-stability, tuning rate and maximum emission time compared to ridge-type lasers.

  18. Aerosol Characterization at PSA from Spectral and Broadband Measurements of Solar Radiation; Caracterizacion de los Aerosoles en la PSA a partir de Medidas Espectrales y de Banda Ancha de Radiacion Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, P.; Polo, J.; Campos, A.; Espinar, B.

    2006-07-01

    When passing through the atmosphere, the solar radiation suffers extinction processes with and intensity that depends on the atmosphere state. Some of the attenuation mechanisms, in particular those oflicht scattering, are spectrally selective, and thus, the solar spectrum at the earth's surface can change drastically from one place to another. This fact can be used on the determination of some of the Earth atmosphere components. The case of aerosol turbidity has a particular interest due to its high variability. In mis work different methodologies for aerosol characterization are presented, Aerosol optical depth, turbidity and Angstrom exponent are determined by them. Moreover, a comparison among the different methods is established and two heat haze events occurring during summer in PSA (Tabernas) are analyzed. (Author) 18 refs.

  19. Spectral characterization of crude oil using fluorescence (synchronous and time-resolved) and NIR (Near Infrared Spectroscopy); Caracterizacao espectral do petroleo utilizando fluorescencia (sincronizada e resolvida no tempo) e NIR (Near Infrared Spectroscopy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falla Sotelo, F.; Araujo Pantoja, P.; Lopez-Gejo, J.; Le Roux, G.A.C.; Nascimento, C.A.O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Simulacao e Controle de Processos; Quina, F.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Centro de Capacitacao e Pesquisa em Meio Ambiente (CEPEMA)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to evaluate the performance of two spectroscopic techniques employed in the crude oil characterization: NIR spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy (Synchronous fluorescence - SF and Time Resolved Fluorescence - TRF) for the development of correlation models between spectral profiles of crude oil samples and both physical properties (viscosity and API density) and physico-chemical properties (SARA analysis: Saturated, Aromatic, Resins and Asphaltenes). The better results for viscosity and density were obtained using NIR whose prediction capacity was good (1.5 cP and 0.5 deg API, respectively). For SARA analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy revealed its potential in the model calibration showing good results (R2 coefficients greater than 0.85). TRF spectroscopy had better performance than SF spectroscopy. (author)

  20. Interpretation of astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube experiment by setting Galactic and extra-Galactic spectral components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinelli, A.; Gaggero, D.; Grasso, D.; Urbano, A.; Valli, M.

    2016-01-01

    The last IceCube catalog of High Energy Starting Events (HESE) obtained with a livetime of 1347 days comprises 54 neutrino events equally-distributed between the three families with energies between 25 TeV and few PeVs. Considering the homogeneous flavors distribution (1:1:1) and the spectral

  1. Spectral time-domain induced polarization and magnetic surveying – an efficient tool for characterization of solid waste deposits in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemegah, David Dotse; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben

    Time-domain induced polarization (IP) and magnetic data were acquired to map and characterize the decommissioned, un-engineered, municipal solid waste deposit site of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), located in the Kumasi Metropolis of Ghana. Thirteen induced...... polarization profiles 500-800 m long and twenty-six magnetic profiles 600-800 m long were acquired, and two drillings were carried out in order to help in the interpretation of the geophysical data. The study was carried out with the aim of determining the risk posed by the waste deposit to the quality...... and in the polarization parameters were found between the saprolite layer and the granite bedrock, the main lithological units of the area. Furthermore, it was found that the KNUST waste deposit is characterized by a low-chargeability and low-resistivity signature, and that the low-resistivity area spreads out from...

  2. Using new hetero-spectral two-dimensional correlation analyses and synchrotron-radiation-based spectromicroscopy to characterize binding of Cu to soil dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fusheng; Li, Yaqing; Wang, Xiang; Chi, Zhilai; Yu, Guanghui

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the binding characteristics of copper (Cu) to different functional groups in soil dissolved organic matter (DOM) is important to explore Cu toxicity, bioavailability and ultimate fate in the environment. However, the methods used to explore such binding characteristics are still limited. Here, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) integrated with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 27Al NMR, and synchrotron-radiation-based FTIR spectromicroscopy were used to explore the binding characteristics of Cu to soil DOM as part of a long-term (23 years) fertilization experiment. Compared with no fertilization and inorganic fertilization (NPK), long-term pig manure fertilization (M) treatment significantly increased the concentration of total and bioavailable Cu in soils. Furthermore, hetero-spectral 2DCOS analyses demonstrated that the binding characteristics of Cu onto functional groups in soil DOM were modified by fertilization regimes. In the NPK treatment, Cu was bound to aliphatic C, whereas in the manure treatment SiO groups had higher affinity toward Cu than aliphatic C. Also, the sequence of binding of functional groups to Cu was modified by the fertilization treatments. Moreover, synchrotron-radiation-based FTIR spectromicroscopy showed that Cu, clay minerals and sesquioxides, and C functional groups were heterogeneously distributed at the micro-scale. Specifically, clay-OH as well as mineral elements had a distribution pattern similar to Cu, but certain (but not all) C forms showed a distribution pattern inconsistent with that of Cu. The combination of synchrotron radiation spectromicroscopy and 2DCOS is a useful tool in exploring the interactions among heavy metals, minerals and organic components in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis, structure, electrochemistry, and spectral characterization of bis-isatin thiocarbohydrazone metal complexes and their antitumor activity against ehrlich ascites carcinoma in swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathisha, M P; Revankar, V K; Pai, K S R

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis, structure, electrochemistry, and biological studies of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) complexes of thiocarbohydrazone ligand are described. The ligand is synthesized starting from thiocarbohydrazide and isatin. It is evident from the IR data that in all the complexes, only one part of the ligand is coordinated to the metal ion resulting mononuclear complexes. The ligand coordinates essentially through the carbonyl oxygen of the isatin fragment, the nitrogen atom of the azomethine group, and sulfur atom after deprotonation to give five membered rings. H1 NMR spectrum of the ligand shows only one set of signals for the aromatic protons, while the NH of isatin and NH of hydrazone give rise to two different singlets in the 11-14 ppm range. The formulations, [Cu(L)Cl].2H2O, [Cu(L)(CH3COO)].2H2O, [Ni(L)Cl], [Ni(L)(CH3COO)], [Co(L2)], and [Zn(L2)].2H2O are in accordance with elemental analyses, physical, and spectroscopic measurements. The complexes are soluble in organic solvents. Molar conductance values in DMF indicate the nonelectrolytic nature of the complexes. Copper complex displays quasireversible cyclic voltametric responses with Ep near -0.659 v and 0.504 v Vs Ag/AgCl at the scan rate of 0.1 V/s. Copper(II) complexes show a single line EPR signals. For the observed magnetic moment and electronic spectral data possible explanation has been discussed. From all the available data, the probable structures for the complexes have been proposed. The compounds synthesized in present study have shown promising cytotoxic activity when screened using the in vitro method and at the same time were shown to have good activity when tested using the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) model. The antimicrobial screening showed that the cobalt complex possesses enhanced antimicrobial activity towards fungi.

  4. A cut-off in the TeV gamma-ray spectrum of the SNR Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Arcaro, C.; Babić, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Bhattacharyya, W.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Colak, M.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hassan, T.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Inada, T.; Ishio, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Kuveždić, D.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Maggio, C.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Minev, M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moreno, V.; Moretti, E.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Ninci, D.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Righi, C.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sitarek, J.; Šnidarić, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres-Albà, N.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Zarić, D.

    2017-12-01

    It is widely believed that the bulk of the Galactic cosmic rays is accelerated in supernova remnants (SNRs). However, no observational evidence of the presence of particles of PeV energies in SNRs has yet been found. The young historical SNR Cassiopeia A (Cas A) appears as one of the best candidates to study acceleration processes. Between 2014 December and 2016 October, we observed Cas A with the MAGIC telescopes, accumulating 158 h of good quality data. We derived the spectrum of the source from 100 GeV to 10 TeV. We also analysed ∼8 yr of Fermi-LAT to obtain the spectral shape between 60 MeV and 500 GeV. The spectra measured by the LAT and MAGIC telescopes are compatible within the errors and show a clear turn-off (4.6σ) at the highest energies, which can be described with an exponential cut-off at E_c = 3.5(^{+1.6}_{-1.0})_{stat} (^{+0.8}_{-0.9})_{sys} TeV. The gamma-ray emission from 60 MeV to 10 TeV can be attributed to a population of high-energy protons with a spectral index of ∼2.2 and an energy cut-off at ∼10 TeV. This result indicates that Cas A is not contributing to the high energy (∼PeV) cosmic ray sea in a significant manner at the present moment. A one-zone leptonic model fails to reproduce by itself the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution. Besides, if a non-negligible fraction of the flux seen by MAGIC is produced by leptons, the radiation should be emitted in a region with a low magnetic field (B⪅180 μG) like in the reverse shock.

  5. Multiwavelength Observations of Strong Flares from the TeV Blazar 1ES 1959+650

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczynski, H.; Hughes, S. B.; Horan, D.; Aharonian, F.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H.; Boltwood, P.; Buckley, J.; Coppi, P.; Fossati, G.; Götting, N.; Holder, J.; Horns, D.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Marscher, A. P.; Nikolashvili, M.; Remillard, R. A.; Sadun, A.; Schröder, M.

    2004-01-01

    Following the detection of strong TeV γ-ray flares from the BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 with the Whipple 10 m Cerenkov telescope on 2002 May 16 and 17, we performed intensive target of opportunity radio, optical, X-ray, and TeV γ-ray observations from 2002 May 18 to August 14. Observations with the X-ray telescope Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and the Whipple and HEGRA γ-ray telescopes revealed several strong flares, enabling us to sensitively test the X-ray-γ-ray flux correlation properties. Although the X-ray and γ-ray fluxes seemed to be correlated in general, we found an ``orphan'' γ-ray flare that was not accompanied by an X-ray flare. While we detected optical flux variability with the Boltwood and Abastumani observatories, the data did not give evidence for a correlation of the optical flux variability with the observed X-ray and γ-ray flares. Within statistical errors of about 0.03 Jy at 14.5 GHz and 0.05 Jy at 4.8 GHz, the radio fluxes measured with the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory stayed constant throughout the campaign; the mean values agreed well with the values measured on 2002 May 7 and June 7 at 4.9 and 15 GHz with the Very Large Array and at 4.8 GHz with archival flux measurements. After describing in detail the radio, optical, X-ray and γ-ray light curves, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we present initial modeling of the SED with a simple synchrotron self-Compton model. With the addition of another TeV blazar with good broadband data, we consider the set of all TeV blazars, to begin to look for a connection of the jet properties to the properties of the central accreting black hole thought to drive the jet. Remarkably, the temporal and spectral X-ray and γ-ray emission characteristics of TeV blazars are very similar, even though the mass estimates of their central black holes differ by up to 1 order of magnitude.

  6. Cosmic Ray Observations at the TeV Scale with the HAWC Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel-Arias, Zigfried

    2017-08-01

    Over the past two decades, a more detailed understanding of TeV-scale cosmic rays has emerged which appears to deviate from the isotropic, single power law description of the cosmic ray flux. This may be the result of the distribution of sources within the Galaxy, changes in source spectra, effects from the propagation of cosmic rays from their sources to Earth, or a combination of the three. Supernova remnants are thought to be the most likely source of Galactic cosmic rays, providing a natural power law source spectrum with sufficient power to generate the observed cosmic ray energy density. Yet, recent results from balloon-borne experiments hint at a possible change in the spectral index between 20?50 TeV. These direct detection apparatuses provide the most precise measurements of the cosmic ray flux up to ˜30 TeV, beyond which they are limited by the combined effects of their physical dimensions, runtime durations, and a rapidly decreasing flux. Above ˜100 TeV, the spectrum has been measured by ground based air shower arrays, with typical systematic uncertainties of order 10%. Despite having the combined measurements from various experimental techniques, their different energy scales and systematics imply that identifying finer structure between 10 - 100 TeV requires a single experimental method to span the entire range. Furthermore, as the nearest potential source is hundreds of parsecs away and the Larmor radius of TeV scale charged cosmic rays in the Galaxy is of order 10?3 parsecs, the previously observed anisotropy in arrival directions of cosmic rays is unexpected. In order to attain the statistical power necessary to observe TeV cosmic ray anisotropy at the 10-3 level and below, the long data taking periods required are only attainable by air shower arrays. This thesis presents a measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum and the energy dependence of the anisotropy on small scales O(10°) using data from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC

  7. Spectral photoluminescence for the characterization of excitation states in semiconductors and fluorescence solar collectors with manipulation of the in and out coupling of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knabe, Sebastian

    2011-05-20

    In this thesis results of different experiments are presented (e.g. angular dependent photoluminescence) to characterize the propagation of electro-magnetic radiation inside and out of absorbers using the examples of crystalline silicon and fluorescence collectors with and without manipulation of the in- and out-coupling of the radiation by photonic structures (opal and edge filters). Experimental results were compared with results from simulations of the propagation of radiation, which are based on the fundamental equations for the properties of electro-magnetic radiation like reflection, transmission, absorption or phase accumulation.

  8. Synthesis, crystal structure and spectral characterization of the first Ag+ complex compounds involving O,N,O-coordinated N-acylhydrazones of salicylaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repich, H. H.; Orysyk, S. I.; Orysyk, V. V.; Zborovskii, Yu. L.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Vovk, M. V.

    2017-09-01

    N-acylhydrazones of salicylaldehyde is a well known class of ligands bearing O,N,O tridentate chelate coordination site. But up to now no structurally characterized Ag+ complexes with O,N,O coordinated N-acylhydrazones of salicylaldehyde were known. Therefore three Ag+ coordination compounds with functionally substituted N-acylhydrazones of salicylaldehyde were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric studies. In solutions the complexes were studied by 1H NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The influence of the presence and location of additional nitrogen donor atoms in N-acylhydrazones of salicylaldehyde on their coordination modes was investigated. Ligand N'-salicylidenephenylacetohydrazide (contains no additional donor atoms) coordinates to Ag+ in classical O,N,O tridentate chelate manner. Ligand N‧-salicylidene-3-pyridinecarbohydrazide (contains β-N additional donor atom in acyl moiety) involves mixed O,N,O + β-N coordination. Whereas N'-salicylidene-4-pyridinecarbohydrazide (contains γ-N additional donor atom) coordinates to Ag+ in monodentate manner only via γ-N atom of heterocyclic substituent. All the complexes provide high coordination numbers of Ag+ and irregular shapes of coordination polyhedra which are not consistent with classical concepts of Ag+ coordination chemistry. However all the complexes are not thermally stable and easily undergo solvolysis upon dissolution.

  9. Synthesis, spectral characterization and in vitro antibacterial evaluation and Petra/Osiris/Molinspiration analyses of new Palladium(II iodide complexes with thioamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafqat Nadeem

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper emphasizes on the synthesis of Palladium(II iodide complexes containing based ligands. The new compounds of general formulae [Pd(L4]I2 where L = Thiourea (Tu, Methylthiourea (Metu, Dimethylthiourea (Dmtu, Tetramethylthiourea (Tmtu, Imidazolidine-2-thione (Imt, Mercaptopyridine (Mpy, Mercaptopyrimidine (Mpm, and Thionicotinamide (Tna were prepared simply by reacting K2[PdCl4] with the corresponding thioamides in 1:2 M ratio and then with 2 equivalents Potassium iodide. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic techniques (IR, 1H and13C NMR. All the synthesized complexes were screened for antibacterial activity and some of compounds have shown good activities against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. POM analyses reveal that the compounds are only slightly toxic and present a potential for antibacterial activity. Moreover, they have 16–23% drug score which is an important parameter for the compound possessing the drug properties.

  10. A high throughput spectral image microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesley, M.; Puri, R.

    2018-01-01

    A high throughput spectral image microscopy system is configured for rapid detection of rare cells in large populations. To overcome flow cytometry rates and use of fluorophore tags, a system architecture integrates sample mechanical handling, signal processors, and optics in a non-confocal version of light absorption and scattering spectroscopic microscopy. Spectral images with native contrast do not require the use of exogeneous stain to render cells with submicron resolution. Structure may be characterized without restriction to cell clusters of differentiation.

  11. Spectral properties and dynamics of gold nanorods revealed by EMCCD-based spectral phasor method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Gratton, Enrico; Digman, Michelle A

    2015-04-01

    Gold nanorods (NRs) with tunable plasmon-resonant absorption in the near-infrared region have considerable advantages over organic fluorophores as imaging agents due to their brightness and lack of photobleaching. However, the luminescence spectral properties of NRs have not been fully characterized at the single particle level due to lack of proper analytic tools. Here, we present a spectral phasor analysis method that allows investigations of NRs' spectra at single particle level showing the spectral variance and providing spatial information during imaging. The broad phasor distribution obtained by the spectral phasor analysis indicates that spectra of NRs are different from particle to particle. NRs with different spectra can be identified in images with high spectral resolution. The spectral behaviors of NRs under different imaging conditions, for example, different excitation powers and wavelengths, were revealed by our laser-scanning multiphoton microscope using a high-resolution spectrograph with imaging capability. Our results prove that the spectral phasor method is an easy and efficient tool in hyper-spectral imaging analysis to unravel subtle changes of the emission spectrum. We applied this method to study the spectral dynamics of NRs during direct optical trapping and by optothermal trapping. Interestingly, different spectral shifts were observed in both trapping phenomena. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Spectrally Tunable Sources for Advanced Radiometric Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S W; Rice, J P; Neira, J E; Johnson, B C; Jackson, J D

    2006-01-01

    A common radiometric platform for the development of application-specific metrics to quantify the performance of sensors and systems is described. Using this platform, sensor and system performance may be quantified in terms of the accuracy of measurements of standardized sets of source distributions. The prototype platform consists of spectrally programmable light sources that can generate complex spectral distributions in the ultraviolet, visible and short-wave infrared regions for radiometric, photometric and colorimetric applications. In essence, the programmable spectral source is a radiometric platform for advanced instrument characterization and calibration that can also serve as a basis for algorithm testing and instrument comparison.

  13. Compressive Spectral Renormalization Method

    CERN Document Server

    Bayindir, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a novel numerical scheme for finding the sparse self-localized states of a nonlinear system of equations with missing spectral data is introduced. As in the Petviashivili's and the spectral renormalization method, the governing equation is transformed into Fourier domain, but the iterations are performed for far fewer number of spectral components (M) than classical versions of the these methods with higher number of spectral components (N). After the converge criteria is achieved for M components, N component signal is reconstructed from M components by using the l1 minimization technique of the compressive sampling. This method can be named as compressive spectral renormalization (CSRM) method. The main advantage of the CSRM is that, it is capable of finding the sparse self-localized states of the evolution equation(s) with many spectral data missing.

  14. Novel mixed ligand complexes of bioactive Schiff base (E)-4-(phenyl (phenylimino) methyl) benzene-1,3-diol and 2-aminophenol/2-aminobenzoic acid: synthesis, spectral characterization, antimicrobial and nuclease studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraj, P; Ramu, A; Raman, N; Dharmaraja, J

    2014-01-03

    A novel bidentate Schiff base ligand has been synthesized using 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone and aniline. Its mixed ligand complexes of MAB type [M=Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II); HA=Schiff base and B=2-aminophenol/2-aminobenzoic acid] have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of spectral data UV-Vis, IR, (1)H NMR, FAB-Mass, EPR, SEM and magnetic studies. All the complexes were soluble in DMF and DMSO. Elemental analysis and molar conductance values indicate that the complexes are non-electrolytes. HA binds with M(II) ions through azomethine and deprotonated phenolic group and B binds through the primary amine group and deprotonated phenolic/carboxylic groups. Using FAB-Mass the cleavage pattern of the ligand (HA) has been established. All the complexes adopt octahedral geometry around the metal ions. It has been confirmed with the help of UV-Vis, IR, (1)H NMR and FAB-Mass spectral data. DNA binding activities of the complexes 1d and 2d are studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy and cleavage studies of Schiff base ligand and its complexes 1d and 2d have been by agarose gel electrophoresis method. In vitro biological activities of the free ligand (HA) and their metal complexes (1a-1e and 2a-2e) were screened against few bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus saphyphiticus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and fungi Aspergillus niger, Enterobacter species, Candida albicans by well diffusion technique. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA-binding, catalytic oxidation, C—C coupling reactions and antibacterial activities of binuclear Ru(II thiosemicarbazone complexes: Synthesis and spectral characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Manimaran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available New hexa-coordinated binuclear Ru(II thiosemicarbazone complexes of the type {[(B(EPh3(COClRu]2L} (where, E = P or As; B = PPh3 or AsPh3 or pyridine; L = mononucleating NS donor of N-substituted thiosemicarbazones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV–vis and 31P{1H} NMR cyclic voltammetric studies. The DNA-binding studies of Ru(II complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA were investigated by UV–vis, viscosity measurements, gel-electrophoresis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The new complexes have been used as catalysts in C—C coupling reaction and in the oxidation of alcohols to their corresponding carbonyl compounds by using NMO as co-oxidant and molecular oxygen (O2 atmosphere at ambient temperature. Further, the new binucleating thiosemicarbazone ligands and their Ru(II complexes were also screened for their antibacterial activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella sp., Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. From this study, it was found out that the activity of the complexes almost reaches the effectiveness of the conventional bacteriocide.

  16. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological activity of zinc(II) complexes with 3-substituted phenyl-4-amino-5-hydrazino-1, 2, 4-triazole Schiff bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Pandey, O. P.; Sengupta, S. K.

    New Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized by the reactions of zinc(II) acetate with Schiff bases derived from 3-substituted phenyl-4-amino-5-hydrazino-1, 2, 4-triazole and benzaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone or indoline-2,3-dione. All these complexes are soluble in DMF and DMSO; low molar conductance values indicate that they are non-electrolytes. Elemental analyses suggest that the complexes have 1:1 stoichiometry of the type [ZnL(H 2O) 2], [ZnL'(OAc) 2(H 2O) 2] (L = dianionic Schiff bases derived from 3-(substituted phenyl)-4-amino-5-hydrazino-1, 2, 4-triazole and 2-hydroxyacetophenone or indoline-2,3-dione; L' = neutral Schiff bases derived from 3-(substituted phenyl)-4-amino-5-hydrazino-1, 2, 4-triazole and benzaldehyde) and they were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and FAB mass. All these Schiff bases and their complexes have also been screened for their antibacterial activities against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and antifungal activities against Colletotrichum falcatum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporium and Carvularia pallescence by petriplates methods.

  17. Supramolecular complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) p-hydroxybenzoates with caffeine: Synthesis, spectral characterization and crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Erdal; Özbek, Füreya Elif; Sertçelik, Mustafa; Hökelek, Tuncer; Çelik, Raziye Çatak; Necefoğlu, Hacali

    2016-09-01

    Three novel complexes Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) containing p-hydroxybenzoates and caffeine ligands were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and UV-vis Spectroscopy, molar conductivity and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The thermal properties of the synthesized complexes were investigated by TGA/DTA. The general formula of the complexes is [M(HOC6H4COO)2(H2O)4]·2(C8H10N4O2)·8H2O (where: M: Co, Ni and Zn). The IR studies showed that carboxylate groups of p-hydroxybenzoate ligands have monodentate coordination mode. The M2+ ions are octahedrally coordinated by two p-hydroxybenzoate ligands, four water molecules leading to an overall MO6 coordination environment. The medium-strength hydrogen bondings involving the uncoordinated caffeine ligands and water molecules, coordinated and uncoordinated water molecules and p-hydroxybenzoate ligands lead to three-dimensional supramolecular networks in the crystal structures.

  18. Design, synthesis, spectral characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity studies of copper(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes of 6-amino benzothiazole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daravath, Sreenu; Kumar, Marri Pradeep; Rambabu, Aveli; Vamsikrishna, Narendrula; Ganji, Nirmala; Shivaraj

    2017-09-01

    Two novel Schiff bases, L1 = (2-benzo[d]thiazol-6-ylimino)methyl)-4,6-dichlorophenol), L2 = (1-benzo[d]thiazol-6-ylimino)methyl)-6-bromo-4-chlorophenol) and their bivalent transition metal complexes [M(L1)2] and [M(L2)2], where M = Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, IR, UV-visible, mass, magnetic moments, ESR, TGA, SEM, EDX and powder XRD. Based on the experimental data a square planar geometry around the metal ion is assigned to all the complexes (1a-2c). The interaction of synthesized metal complexes with calf thymus DNA was explored using UV-visible absorption spectra, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The experimental evidence indicated that all the metal complexes strongly bound to CT-DNA through an intercalation mode. DNA cleavage experiments of metal(II) complexes with supercoiled pBR322 DNA have also been explored by gel electrophoresis in the presence of H2O2 as well as UV light, and it is found that the Cu(II) complexes cleaved DNA more effectively compared to Co(II), Ni(II) complexes. In addition, the ligands and their metal complexes were screened for antimicrobial activity and it is found that all the metal complexes were more potent than free ligands.

  19. Spectral characterization, optical band gap calculations and DNA binding of some binuclear Schiff-base metal complexes derived from 2-amino-ethanoic acid and acetylacetone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Mostafa A.; Nawar, Nagwa; Radwan, Fatima M.; Hosny, Nasser Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Bi-nuclear metal complexes derived from the reaction of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) acetates with the Schiff-base ligand (H2L) resulted from the condensation of 2-amino-ethanoic acid (glycine) and acetylacetone have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, Raman spectra, FT-IR, ES-MS, UV-Vis., 1H NMR, ESR, thermal analyses (TG, DTG and DTA) and magnetic measurements. The results showed that, the Schiff base ligand can bind two metal ions in the same time. It coordinates to the first metal ion as mono-negative bi-dentate through azomethine nitrogen and enolic carbonyl after deprotonation. At the same time, it binds to the second metal ion via carboxylate oxygen after deprotonation. The thermodynamic parameters E∗, ΔH∗, ΔG∗ and ΔS∗ have been calculated by Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzger (HM) methods. The optical band gaps of the isolated complexes have been calculated from absorption spectra and the results indicated semi-conducting nature of the investigated complexes. The interactions between the copper (II) complex and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been studied by UV spectra. The results confirm that the Cu(II) complex binds to CT-DNA.

  20. Models of Emission-Line Profiles and Spectral Energy Distributions to Characterize the Multi-Frequency Properties of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni La Mura

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs are often characterized by a wealth of emission lines with different profiles and intensity ratios that lead to a complicated classification. Their electromagnetic radiation spans more than 10 orders of magnitude in frequency. In spite of the differences between various classes, the origin of their activity is attributed to a combination of emitting components, surrounding an accreting supermassive black hole (SMBH, in the unified model. Currently, the execution of sky surveys, with instruments operating at various frequencies, provides the possibility to detect and to investigate the properties of AGNs on very large statistical samples. As a result of the spectroscopic surveys that allow the investigation of many objects, we have the opportunity to place new constraints on the nature and evolution of AGNs. In this contribution, we present the results obtained by working on multi-frequency data, and we discuss their relations with the available optical spectra. We compare our findings with the AGN unified model predictions, and we present a revised technique to select AGNs of different types from other line-emitting objects. We discuss the multi-frequency properties in terms of the innermost structures of the sources.

  1. Synthesis, spectral characterization and DNA binding of Schiff-base metal complexes derived from 2-amino-3-hydroxyprobanoic acid and acetylacetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Nasser Mohammed; Hussien, Mostafa A; Radwan, Fatima M; Nawar, Nagwa

    2014-11-11

    Four new metal complexes derived from the reaction of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) acetates with the Schiff-base ligand (H3L) resulted from the condensation of the amino acid 2-amino-3-hydroxyprobanoic acid (serine) and acetylacetone have been synthesized and characterized by, elemental analyses, ES-MS, IR, UV-Vis., 1H NMR, 13C NMR, ESR, thermal analyses (TGA and DTG) and magnetic measurements. The results showed that the Schiff-base ligand acts as bi-negative tridentate through the azomethine nitrogen, the deprotonated carboxylate oxygen and the enolic carbonyl oxygen. The optical band gaps measurements indicated the semi-conducting nature of these complexes. Molecular docking was used to predict the binding between the Schiff base ligand with the receptor of prostate cancer mutant H874Y. The interactions between the Cu(II) complex and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been studied by UV spectra. The results confirm that the Cu(II) complex binds to CT-DNA in an intercalative mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis, spectral characterization, electrochemical, anti-microbial, DNA binding and cleavage studies of new binuclear Schiff base metal(II complexes derived from o-hydroxyacetophenone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jayaseelan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A new tetradentate binucleating ligand [H2L] has been synthesized by condensation between 3, 3′-diaminobenzidine and o-hydroxyacetophenone in the molar ratio 1:4. The reaction of the ligand with metal chelation leads to bimolecular complexes of the general formula [M2(L]. The ligand and metal complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV, IR,…1H NMR, 13C NMR, conductivity measurements and magnetic studies. In conductivity experiments, all metal chelates showed to be non-electrolytic in nature. The bonding sites are the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine and the oxygen atoms of the phenolic groups. The anti-microbial activities were screened against one Gram-positive bacterium (Streptococcus pyogenes and one Gram-negative bacterium (Klebsella pneumoniae. The anti-fungal activity was screened against Asperigillus flavus. All complexes showed significant anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activities. The DNA binding studies were performed by electronic spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry studies and viscosity measurements. The cleavage studies of these complexes are investigated by gel electrophoresis method in the presence of peroxide. All complexes cleaved efficiently and the complex interacts with DNA through an intercalating way.

  3. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, DNA/ Protein Binding, DNA Cleavage, Cytotoxicity, Antioxidative and Molecular Docking Studies of Cu(II)Complexes Containing Schiff Base-bpy/Phen Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anupama, Berelli; Aruna, Airva; Manga, Vijjulatha; Sivan, Sreekanth; Sagar, Madamsetty Vijay; Chandrashekar, Ravula

    2017-05-01

    Ternary Cu(II) complexes [Cu(II)(L)(bpy)Cl] 1, [Cu(II)(L)(Phen)Cl] 2 [L = 2,3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-4(2 hydroxy-5-methyl benzylideneamino)-pyrazol-5-one, bpy = 2,2' bipyridine, phen =1,10 phenanthroline) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, UV-Visible, FT-IR, ESR, Mass, thermogravimetric and SEM EDAX techniques. The complexes exhibit octahedral geometry. The interaction of the Cu(II) with cailf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was explored by using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The results revealed that the complexes have an affinity constant for DNA in the order of 104 M-1 and mode of interaction is intercalative mode. The DNA cleavage study showed that the complexes cleaved DNA without any external agent. The interaction of Cu(II) complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also studied using absorption and fluorescence techniques. The cytotoxic activity of the Cu(II) complexes was probed in HeLa (human breast adenocarcinoma cell line), B16F10 (Murine melanoma cell line) and HEPA1-6 celllines, complex 1 has good cytotoxic activity which is comparable with the doxarubicin drug, with IC50 values ranging from 3 to 12.6 μM. A further molecular docking technique was employed to understand the binding of the complexes towards the molecular target DNA. Investigation of the antioxidative properties showed that the metal complexes have significant radical scavenging activity potency against DPPH radical.

  4. Final Technical Report for Interagency Agreement No. DE-SC0005453 “Characterizing Aerosol Distributions, Types, and Optical and Microphysical Properties using the NASA Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP)”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hostetler, Chris [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Ferrare, Richard [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2015-01-13

    Measurements of the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols and aerosol optical and microphysical characteristics are required to: 1) determine aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing, 2) compute radiative flux and heating rate profiles, 3) assess model simulations of aerosol distributions and types, and 4) establish the ability of surface and space-based remote sensors to measure the indirect effect. Consequently the ASR program calls for a combination of remote sensing and in situ measurements to determine aerosol properties and aerosol influences on clouds and radiation. As part of our previous DOE ASP project, we deployed the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 King Air aircraft during major field experiments in 2006 (MILAGRO and MaxTEX), 2007 (CHAPS), 2009 (RACORO), and 2010 (CalNex and CARES). The HSRL provided measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm). These measurements were typically made in close temporal and spatial coincidence with measurements made from DOE-funded and other participating aircraft and ground sites. On the RACORO, CARES, and CalNEX missions, we also deployed the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). RSP provided intensity and degree of linear polarization over a broad spectral and angular range enabling column-average retrievals of aerosol optical and microphysical properties. Under this project, we analyzed observations and model results from RACORO, CARES, and CalNex and accomplished the following objectives. 1. Identified aerosol types, characterize the vertical distribution of the aerosol types, and partition aerosol optical depth by type, for CARES and CalNex using HSRL data as we have done for previous missions. 2. Investigated aerosol microphysical and macrophysical properties using the RSP. 3. Used the aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles measured by the HSRL

  5. Caracterização espectral de Paspalum notatum em diferentes níveis de adubação nitrogenada Spectral characterization of Paspalum notatum under different nitrogen fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Lima da Fonseca

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available As propriedades espectrais da vegetação podem ser utilizadas para o monitoramento das condições de crescimento da vegetação ao longo do ano, assim como a estimativa da produtividade das espécies, por meio de técnicas de sensoriamento remoto. Para tanto, é necessário, primeiramente, caracterizar espectralmente as espécies que compõem a vegetação de um ecossistema. O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar a reflectância do Paspalum notatum Flügge var. notatum crescendo em diferentes níveis de adubação nitrogenada. Foi realizado um experimento de campo na Estação Experimental Agronômica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (30º5'22'' S e 51º39'8'' W, utilizando-se um espectrorradiômetro portátil, em parcelas de P. notatum adubadas com 0, 200 e 400 kg ha-1 de N. A resposta espectral do P. notatum foi alterada pelas variações na quantidade de biomassa do dossel, provocadas por diferenças nos níveis de adubação nitrogenada. Os aumentos na quantidade de biomassa provocaram diminuição da reflectância na porção visível do espectro e aumento na porção infravermelho, o que mostra que a análise da reflectância é um bom indicador das mudanças que ocorrem em um dossel.Remote sensing techniques using spectral properties of canopies may be used to monitor vegetation growth conditions throughout the year, as well as to estimate the yield of different species. However, before these techniques can be used, it is necessary to establish the spectral properties of each of the different species which make up the landscape. The objective of this study was to characterize the spectral reflectance of Paspalum notatum Flügge var. notatum, growing on different levels of nitrogen fertilization. A field experiment was carried out at the Agronomic Experimental Station of Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil (30º5'22'' S, 51º39''8'' W, using a portable spectroradiometer, on plots with P. notatum fertilized

  6. Adaptive Spectral Doppler Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence...

  7. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  8. On Longitudinal Spectral Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif

    1979-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the longitudinal spectral coherence differs significantly from the transversal spectral coherence in its dependence on displacement and frequency. An expression for the longitudinal coherence is derived and it is shown how the scale of turbulence, the displacement between ...... observation sites and the turbulence intensity influence the results. The limitations of the theory are discussed....

  9. Understanding Soliton Spectral Tunneling as a Spectral Coupling Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Wang, Shaofei; Zeng, Xianglong

    2013-01-01

    between channels, here we suggest that the soliton spectral tunneling effect can be understood supported by a spectral phase coupler. The dispersive wave number in the spectral domain must have a coupler-like symmetric profile for soliton spectral tunneling to occur. We show that such a spectral coupler...

  10. The Effect of Field Spectral Reflectance Measurement Distance to the Spectral Reflectance of Rhizophora stylosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, M.; Ningam, M. U. L.; Alqorina, F.

    2017-12-01

    Mapping mangrove species from remote sensing data through its spectral reflectance pattern collected in the field is challenging. There are high variations in light condition, leaf orientation, canopy structure, background objects and measurement distance when measuring mangrove spectral reflectance in the field. Spectral measurement distance to the object is one of the most important aspects controlling the result of spectral reflectance pattern. This research is aimed to assess the effect of spectral reflectance pattern of Rhizophora stylosa collected at various distances. Specific objectives of this research are to collect samples of mangrove spectral reflectance pattern in the field, to assess the effect of the observation scale to the result of the spectral reflectance pattern, and to characterize the mangrove spectral reflectance pattern resulted from different observation scales. Spectral reflectance data collection in the field was conducted using JAZ EL-350 field spectrometer at 2cm, 50cm, 1m, 2m, and 5m distance and was conducted in Karimunjawa Island, Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. A visual comparison of the spectral reflectance curve was conducted to understand the effect of measurement distance. The results of this study indicate that the difference in the measurement distance of Rhizophora stylosa species was highly influential to the resulting spectral reflectance curve. The spectral reflectance curve recorded at close range to the leaf (i.e. 2 cm) has the lowest curve variation, as well as the furthest distance (i.e. 5 m). This study is a basic study that supports the development of the use of remote sensing imagery for mangrove species mapping.

  11. Synthesis and spectral characterization of mono- and binuclear copper(II) complexes derived from 2-benzoylpyridine-N⁴-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: crystal structure of a novel sulfur bridged copper(II) box-dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, K; Sithambaresan, M; Aiswarya, N; Kurup, M R Prathapachandra

    2015-03-15

    Mononuclear and binuclear copper(II) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine-N(4)-methyl thiosemicarbazone (HL) were prepared and characterized by a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Structural evidence for the novel sulfur bridged copper(II) iodo binuclear complex is obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The complex [Cu2L2I2], a non-centrosymmetric box dimer, crystallizes in monoclinic C2/c space group and it was found to have distorted square pyramidal geometry (Addison parameter, τ=0.238) with the square basal plane occupied by the thiosemicarbazone moiety and iodine atom whereas the sulfur atom from the other coordinated thiosemicarbazone moiety occupies the apical position. This is the first crystallographically studied system having non-centrosymmetrical entities bridged via thiolate S atoms with Cu(II)I bond. The tridentate thiosemicarbazone coordinates in mono deprotonated thionic tautomeric form in all complexes except in sulfato complex, [Cu(HL)(SO4)]·H2O (1) where it binds to the metal centre in neutral form. The magnetic moment values and the EPR spectral studies reflect the binuclearity of some of the complexes. The spin Hamiltonian and bonding parameters are calculated based on EPR studies. In all the complexes g||>g⊥>2.0023 and the g values in frozen DMF are consistent with the d(x2-y2) ground state. The thermal stabilities of some of the complexes were also determined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological evaluation of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with thiosemicarbazone ending by pyrazole and pyridyl rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Al-Jahdali, M.; El-Rakhawy, El-Bastawesy R.

    2014-08-01

    Here we present the synthesis of the new Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with chelating ligand (Z)-(2-((1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methylene) hydrazinyl)(pyridin-2-ylamino)methanethiol. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, UV-vis, magnetic susceptibility measurements and EPR spectral studies. IR spectra of complexes showed that the ligand behaves as NN neutral bidentate, NSN mononegative tridentate and NSNN mononegative tetradentate. The electronic spectra and the magnetic measurements suggested the octahedral geometry for all complexes as well as the EPR confirmed the tetragonal distorted octahedral for Cu(II) complex. Cd(II) complex showed the highest inhibitory antioxidant activity either using ABTS method. The SOD-like activity exhibited those Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes have strong antioxidative properties. We tested the synthesized compounds for antitumor activity and showed that the ability to kill liver (HePG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells definitely.

  13. Synthesis and spectral characterization of mono- and binuclear copper(II) complexes derived from 2-benzoylpyridine-N4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: Crystal structure of a novel sulfur bridged copper(II) box-dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, K.; Sithambaresan, M.; Aiswarya, N.; Kurup, M. R. Prathapachandra

    2015-03-01

    Mononuclear and binuclear copper(II) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine-N4-methyl thiosemicarbazone (HL) were prepared and characterized by a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Structural evidence for the novel sulfur bridged copper(II) iodo binuclear complex is obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The complex [Cu2L2I2], a non-centrosymmetric box dimer, crystallizes in monoclinic C2/c space group and it was found to have distorted square pyramidal geometry (Addison parameter, τ = 0.238) with the square basal plane occupied by the thiosemicarbazone moiety and iodine atom whereas the sulfur atom from the other coordinated thiosemicarbazone moiety occupies the apical position. This is the first crystallographically studied system having non-centrosymmetrical entities bridged via thiolate S atoms with Cu(II)sbnd I bond. The tridentate thiosemicarbazone coordinates in mono deprotonated thionic tautomeric form in all complexes except in sulfato complex, [Cu(HL)(SO4)]·H2O (1) where it binds to the metal centre in neutral form. The magnetic moment values and the EPR spectral studies reflect the binuclearity of some of the complexes. The spin Hamiltonian and bonding parameters are calculated based on EPR studies. In all the complexes g|| > g⊥ > 2.0023 and the g values in frozen DMF are consistent with the dx2-y2 ground state. The thermal stabilities of some of the complexes were also determined.

  14. Spectral characterization of a Philips LED lamp

    OpenAIRE

    Tapia Ayuga, Carlos; Zamorano Calvo, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    A luminaire of LED type has been studied at Laboratorio de Investigación Científica Avanzada (LICA) of Universidad Complutense de Madrid to determine its spectrum, color temperature, and other optical properties. The results for this lamp is compared with previous observations of luminaires found in Madrid streets.

  15. Characterization of spectral triples: A combinatorial approach

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Pal, Arupkumar

    2003-01-01

    We describe a general technique to study Dirac operators on noncommutative spaces under some additional assumptions. The main idea is to capture the compact resolvent condition in a combinatorial set up. Using this, we then prove that for a certain class of representations of the C^*-algebra C(SU_q(\\ell+1)), any Dirac operator that diagonalises with respect to the natural basis of the underlying Hilbert space must have trivial sign.

  16. Synthesis, spectral characterization and in vitro antibacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shafqat Nadeem

    2015-12-17

    Dec 17, 2015 ... analysis. Abstract The paper emphasizes on the synthesis of Palladium(II) iodide complexes containing based ligands. The new ... tural chemistry and biological properties of Palladium–sulfur interaction, in this paper, we .... The antibacterial activity of all synthesized metal complexes has been investigated ...

  17. Spectral transmittance reference standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruglyakova, M.A.; Belyaeva, O.N.; Nikitin, M.V.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents spectral transmittance reference standards for UV and IR spectrophotometers, developed, studied, and certified by a precision spectrophotometry laboratory (the RSP Complex). 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. BL LAC CANDIDATES FOR TeV OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Paggi, A.; D' Abrusco, R. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    BL Lac objects are the most numerous class of extragalactic TeV-detected sources. One of the biggest difficulties in investigating their TeV emission is due to their limited number, since only 47 BL Lac objects are known to be TeV emitters. In this paper, we propose new criteria to select TeV BL Lac candidates based on infrared and X-ray observations. We apply our selection criteria to the BL Lac objects listed in the ROMA-BZCAT catalog, thereby identifying 41 potential TeV emitters. We then perform a search over a more extended sample combining the ROSAT bright source catalog and the WISE all-sky survey, revealing 54 additional candidates for TeV observations. Our investigation also led to a tentative classification of 16 unidentified X-ray sources as BL Lac candidates. This analysis provides new interesting BL Lac targets for future observations with ground-based Cherenkov telescopes.

  19. BL LAC candidates for TeV observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; Errando, M.; D' Abrusco, R.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Funk, S.

    2013-07-01

    BL Lac objects are the most numerous class of extragalactic TeV-detected sources. One of the biggest difficulties in investigating their TeV emission is due to their limited number, since only 47 BL Lac objects are known to be TeV emitters. In this paper, we propose new criteria to select TeV BL Lac candidates based on infrared and X-ray observations. We apply our selection criteria to the BL Lac objects listed in the ROMA-BZCAT catalog, thereby identifying 41 potential TeV emitters. We then perform a search over a more extended sample combining the ROSAT bright source catalog and the WISE all-sky survey, revealing 54 additional candidates for TeV observations. Our investigation also led to a tentative classification of 16 unidentified X-ray sources as BL Lac candidates. This analysis provides new interesting BL Lac targets for future observations with ground-based Cherenkov telescopes.

  20. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  1. Spectrally selective glazings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  2. TeV gravity at neutrino telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Illana, J I; Meloni, D

    2005-01-01

    Cosmogenic neutrinos reach the Earth with energies around 10^9 GeV, and their interactions with matter will be measured in upcoming experiments (Auger, IceCube). Models with extra dimensions and the fundamental scale at the TeV could imply signals in these experiments. In particular, the production of microscopic black holes by cosmogenic neutrinos has been extensively studied in the literature. Here we make a complete analysis of gravity-mediated interactions at larger distances, where they can be calculated in the eikonal approximation. In these processes a neutrino of energy E_\

  3. Testing Supersymmetry #13TeV

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Follow British @ATLASexperiment physicist Mike Flowerdew from Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Germany, as he shares his thoughts about the new physics frontiers opening up now that the LHC has collisions at the higher energy of #13TeV. Each week a new video will be uploaded to https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... allowing you to follow physicists from @ATLASexperiment @ALICEexperiment @CMSexperiment or @LHCbExperiment as they search the new frontiers in physics. Read more about these new frontiers in physics: http://cern.ch/go/x8VH

  4. Understand antimatter better #13TeV

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Follow Italian @LHCbexperiment physicist Barbara Storaci from the University of Zürich, Switzerland, as she shares her thoughts about the new physics frontiers opening up now that the LHC has collisions at the higher energy of #13TeV. Each week a new video will be uploaded to https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... allowing you to follow physicists from @ATLASexperiment @ALICEexperiment @CMSexperiment or @LHCbExperiment as they search the new frontiers in physics. Read more about these new frontiers in physics: http://cern.ch/go/x8VH

  5. A Structured Leptonic Jet Model of the ``Orphan'' TeV Gamma-Ray Flares in TeV Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Takahara, Fumio

    2006-11-01

    The emission spectra of TeV blazars extend up to tens of TeV, and the emission mechanism of the TeV γ-rays is explained by synchrotron self-Compton scattering in leptonic models. In these models the time variabilities of X-rays and TeV γ-rays are correlated. However, recent observations of 1ES 1959+65.0 and Mrk 421 have found the ``orphan'' TeV γ-ray flares, i.e., TeV γ-ray flares without simultaneous X-ray flares. In this paper we propose a model for the orphan TeV γ-ray flares, employing an inhomogeneous leptonic jet model. After a primary flare that accompanies flare-up both in X-rays and TeV γ-rays, radiation propagates in various directions in the comoving frame of the jet. When a dense region in the jet receives the radiation, X-rays are scattered by relativistic electrons/positrons to become TeV γ-rays. These γ-ray photons are observed as an orphan TeV γ-ray flare. The observed delay time between the primary and orphan flares is about 2 weeks, and this is accounted for in our model for parameters such as Γ=20, d=4×1017 cm, α=3, and η=1, where Γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet, d is the distance between the central black hole and the primary flare site, α/Γ is the angle between the jet axis and the direction of the motion of the dense region that scatters incoming X-rays produced by the primary flare, and η/Γ is the angle between the jet axis and the line of sight.

  6. SOCl 2 catalyzed cyclization of chalcones: Synthesis and spectral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some aryl-aryl 1H pyrazoles have been synthesised by cyclization of aryl chalcones and hydrazine hydrate in the presence of SOCl2. The yields of the pyrazoles are more than 85%. These pyrazoles are characterized by their physical constants and spectral data. The infrared, NMR spectral group frequencies of these ...

  7. Treatment of landfill leachate biochemical effluent using the nano-Fe3O4/Na2S2O8 system: Oxidation performance, wastewater spectral analysis, and activator characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanmeng; Li, Xian; Rao, Zhiwei; Hu, Fengping

    2018-02-15

    Nano-Fe3O4 was used as heterogeneous catalyst to activate Na2S2O8 for the generation of the sulfate radicals (SO4-) to oxidize the residual pollutants in landfill leachate biochemical effluent. The oxidation performance, wastewater spectral analysis and activator characterization were discussed. Oxidation experimental result shows that nano-Fe3O4 has obvious catalytic effect on Na2S2O8 and can significantly enhance the oxidation efficiencies of Na2S2O8 on landfill leachate biochemical effluent, with COD and color removals above 63% and 95%, respectively. Based on the analyses of three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectrum (3DEEM), ultraviolet-visible spectra (UV-vis), and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of wastewater samples before and after treatment, it can be concluded that the pollution level of dissolved organic matter (DOM) declined and that the humic acid (HA) fractions were efficiently degraded into small molecules of fulvic acid (FA) fractions with less weight and stable structure. Compared to the raw wastewater sample, the aromaticity and substituent groups of the DOM were lessened in the treated wastewater sample. Moreover, the main structure of the organics and functional groups were changed by the Fe3O4/Na2S2O8 system, with substantial decrease of conjugated double bonds. The micro morphology of nano-Fe3O4 was characterized before and after reaction by the methods of scanning electron microscope spectra (SEM), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XRD pattern analysis showed that nano-Fe3O4 was oxidized into r-Fe2O3 and that the particle size of it also became smaller after reaction. XPS was employed to analyze the content and iron valence on the nano-Fe3O4 surface, and it can be found that the ratio of Fe3+/Fe2+ decreased from 1.8 before reaction to 0.8 after reaction. From the SEM analysis after the treatment, it was determined that the spacing between nano-Fe3O4 was

  8. Testing naturalness at 100 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan-Ren; Hajer, Jan; Liu, Tao; Low, Ian; Zhang, Hao

    2017-09-01

    Solutions to the electroweak hierarchy problem typically introduce a new symmetry to stabilize the quadratic ultraviolet sensitivity in the self-energy of the Higgs boson. The new symmetry is either broken softly or collectively, as for example in supersymmetric and little Higgs theories. At low energies such theories contain naturalness partners of the Standard Model fields which are responsible for canceling the quadratic divergence in the squared Higgs mass. Post the discovery of any partner-like particles, we propose to test the aforementioned cancellation by measuring relevant Higgs couplings. Using the fermionic top partners in little Higgs theories as an illustration, we construct a simplified model for naturalness and initiate a study on testing naturalness. After electroweak symmetry breaking, naturalness in the top sector requires a T = - λ t 2 at leading order, where λ t and a T are the Higgs couplings to a pair of top quarks and top partners, respectively. Using a multivariate method of Boosted Decision Tree to tag boosted particles in the Standard Model, we show that, with a luminosity of 30 ab-1 at a 100 TeV pp-collider, naturalness could be tested with a precision of 10% for a top partner mass up to 2.5 TeV.

  9. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and Antimicrobial Studies of Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II), and Zn(II) Complexes of ONO Schiff Base

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendu, Padmaja; Pragathi, J; Anupama, B; Kumari, C. Gyana

    2012-01-01

    .... The nature of bonding and geometry of the transition metal complexes as well as schiff base ligand L have been deduced from elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1HNMR, ESR spectral studies, mass, thermal (TGA and DTA...

  10. Equivariant spectral triples on the quantum SU(2) group

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Pal, Arupkumar

    2002-01-01

    We characterize all equivariant odd spectral triples for the quantum SU(2) group acting on its L_2-space and having a nontrivial Chern character. It is shown that the dimension of an equivariant spectral triple is at least three, and given any element of the K-homology group of SU_q(2), there is an equivariant odd spectral triple of dimension 3 inducing that element. The method employed to get equivariant spectral triples in the quantum case is then used for classical SU(2), and we prove that...

  11. ADE spectral networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Pietro; Park, Chan Y.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new perspective and a generalization of spectral networks for 4d {N} = 2 theories of class S associated to Lie algebras {g} = A n , D n , E6, and E7. Spectral networks directly compute the BPS spectra of 2d theories on surface defects coupled to the 4d theories. A Lie algebraic interpretation of these spectra emerges naturally from our construction, leading to a new description of 2d-4d wall-crossing phenomena. Our construction also provides an efficient framework for the study of BPS spectra of the 4d theories. In addition, we consider novel types of surface defects associated with minuscule ccrepresentations of {g}.

  12. Interpretation of astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube experiment by setting Galactic and extra-Galactic spectral components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinelli Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The last IceCube catalog of High Energy Starting Events (HESE obtained with a livetime of 1347 days comprises 54 neutrino events equally-distributed between the three families with energies between 25 TeV and few PeVs. Considering the homogeneous flavors distribution (1:1:1 and the spectral features of these neutrinos the IceCube collaboration claims the astrophysical origin of these events with more than 5σ. The spatial distribution of cited events does not show a clear correlation with known astrophysical accelerators leaving opened both the Galactic and the extra-Galactic origin interpretations. Here, we compute the neutrino diffuse emission of our Galaxy on the basis of a recently proposed phenomenological model characterized by radially-dependent cosmic-ray (CR transport properties. We show that the astrophysical spectrum measured by IceCube experiment can be well explained adding to the diffuse Galactic neutrino flux (obtained with this new model a extra-Galactic component derived from the astrophysical muonic neutrinos reconstructed in the Northern hemisphere. A good agreement between the expected astrophysical neutrino flux and the IceCube data is found for the full sky as well as for the Galactic plane region.

  13. Interpretation of astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube experiment by setting Galactic and extra-Galactic spectral components

    CERN Document Server

    Marinelli, Antonio; Grasso, Dario; Urbano, Alfredo; Valli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The last IceCube catalog of High Energy Starting Events (HESE) obtained with a livetime of 1347 days comprises 54 neutrino events equally-distributed between the three families with energies between 25 TeV and few PeVs. Considering the homogeneous flavors distribution (1:1:1) and the spectral features of these neutrinos the IceCube collaboration claims the astrophysical origin of these events with more than $5\\sigma$. The spatial distribution of cited events does not show a clear correlation with known astrophysical accelerators leaving opened both the Galactic and the extra-Galactic origin interpretations. Here, we compute the neutrino diffuse emission of our Galaxy on the basis of a recently proposed phenomenological model characterized by radially-dependent cosmic-ray (CR) transport properties. We show that the astrophysical spectrum measured by IceCube experiment can be well explained adding to the diffuse Galactic neutrino flux (obtained with this new model) a extra-Galactic component derived from the as...

  14. Developement of the method for realization of spectral irradiance scale featuring system of spectral comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skerovic, V; Zarubica, V; Aleksic, M [Directorate of measures and precious metals, Optical radiation Metrology department, Mike Alasa 14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Zekovic, L; Belca, I, E-mail: vladanskerovic@dmdm.r [Faculty of Physics, Department for Applied physics and metrology, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-10-15

    Realization of the scale of spectral responsivity of the detectors in the Directorate of Measures and Precious Metals (DMDM) is based on silicon detectors traceable to LNE-INM. In order to realize the unit of spectral irradiance in the laboratory for photometry and radiometry of the Bureau of Measures and Precious Metals, the new method based on the calibration of the spectroradiometer by comparison with standard detector has been established. The development of the method included realization of the System of Spectral Comparisons (SSC), together with the detector spectral responsivity calibrations by means of a primary spectrophotometric system. The linearity testing and stray light analysis were preformed to characterize the spectroradiometer. Measurement of aperture diameter and calibration of transimpedance amplifier were part of the overall experiment. In this paper, the developed method is presented and measurement results with the associated measurement uncertainty budget are shown.

  15. Sparsity and spectral properties of dual frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krahmer, Felix; Kutyniok, Gitta; Lemvig, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    We study sparsity and spectral properties of dual frames of a given finite frame. We show that any finite frame has a dual with no more than $n^2$ non-vanishing entries, where $n$ denotes the ambient dimension, and that for most frames no sparser dual is possible. Moreover, we derive an expression...... for the exact sparsity level of the sparsest dual for any given finite frame using a generalized notion of spark. We then study the spectral properties of dual frames in terms of singular values of the synthesis operator. We provide a complete characterization for which spectral patterns of dual frames...... are possible for a fixed frame. For many cases, we provide simple explicit constructions for dual frames with a given spectrum, in particular, if the constraint on the dual is that it be tight....

  16. Riesz spectral systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, B.Z.; Zwart, Heiko J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we study systems in which the system operator, $A$, has a Riesz basis of (generalized) eigenvectors. We show that this class is subset of the class of spectral operators as studied by Dunford and Schwartz. For these systems we investigate several system theoretic properties, like

  17. Two-particle Bose--Einstein correlations in $pp$ collisions at $\\mathbf {\\sqrt{s} =}$ 0.9 and 7 TeV measured with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; 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Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Tadashi; Maeno Kataoka, Mayuko; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; 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Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents studies of Bose--Einstein Correlations (BEC) for pairs of like-sign charged particles measured in the kinematic range $p_{\\rm T} >$ 100 MeV and $|\\eta|<$ 2.5 in proton--proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The integrated luminosities are approximately 7 $\\mu$b$^{-1}$, 190 $\\mu$b$^{-1}$ and 12.4 nb$^{-1}$ for 0.9 TeV, 7 TeV minimum-bias and 7 TeV high-multiplicity data samples, respectively. The multiplicity dependence of the BEC parameters characterizing the correlation strength and the correlation source size are investigated for charged-particle multiplicities of up to 240. A saturation effect in the multiplicity dependence of the correlation source size is observed using the high-multiplicity 7 TeV data sample. The dependence of the BEC parameters on the average transverse momentum of the particle pair is also investigated.

  18. Search for contact interactions using the inclusive jet $p_T$ spectrum in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Calpas, Betty; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Gosselink, Martijn; Haller, Johannes; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sibille, Jennifer; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Butt, Jamila; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Shreyber, Irina; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; 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    2013-03-26

    Results are reported of a search for a deviation in the jet production cross section from the prediction of perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order. The search is conducted using a 7 TeV proton-proton data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns, collected with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. A deviation could arise from interactions characterized by a mass scale Lambda too high to be probed directly at the LHC. Such phenomena can be modeled as contact interactions. No evidence of a deviation is found. Using the CLs criterion, lower limits are set on Lambda of 9.9 TeV and 14.3 TeV at 95% confidence level for models with destructive and constructive interference, respectively. Limits obtained with a Bayesian method are also reported.

  19. Search for large extra dimensions in dimuon and dielectron events in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Benucci, Leonardo; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wickens, John; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Julien; Ceard, Ludivine; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Grégoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Alves, Gilvan; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Karadzhinova, Aneliya; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Cabrera, Andrés; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Hektor, Andi; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Czellar, Sandor; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Sillou, Daniel; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Marionneau, Matthieu; Millischer, Laurent; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Elgammal, Sherif; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Thiebaux, Christophe; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Greder, Sebastien; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Baty, Clement; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bedjidian, Marc; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Boumediene, Djamel; Brun, Hugues; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Falkiewicz, Anna; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Le Grand, Thomas; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Lomidze, David; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Erdmann, Martin; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Lingemann, Joschka; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Davids, Martina; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Tornier, Daiske; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Cakir, Altan; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Feindt, Michael; Gruschke, Jasmin; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kuhr, Thomas; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Renz, Manuel; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Petrakou, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Triantis, Frixos A; Aranyi, Attila; Bencze, Gyorgy; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Kapusi, Anita; Krajczar, Krisztian; Sikler, Ferenc; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Veszpremi, Viktor; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Anil; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Devdatta; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Saha, Anirban; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Romano, Francesco; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Tupputi, Salvatore; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Mazzucato, Mirco; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Baesso, Paolo; Berzano, Umberto; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Viviani, Claudio; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Caponeri, Benedetta; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Valdata, Marisa; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Rizzi, Andrea; Segneri, Gabriele; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Franci, Daniele; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Heo, Seong Gu; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Nayak, Aruna; Pela, Joao; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbounov, Nikolai; Gramenitski, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Korenkov, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Tikhonenko, Elena; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bernet, Colin; Bialas, Wojciech; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Breuker, Horst; Bunkowski, Karol; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Curé, Benoît; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaddi, Andrea; Georgiou, Georgios; Gerwig, Hubert; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Guiducci, Luigi; Hansen, Magnus; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Snoek, Hella; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Uzun, Dilber; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Tourneur, Stephane; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Wardrope, David; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Henderson, Conor; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Caulfield, Matthew; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Mall, Orpheus; Miceli, Tia; Nelson, Randy; Pellett, Dave; Robles, Jorge; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Arisaka, Katsushi; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pi, Haifeng; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sfiligoi, Igor; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Zang, Shi-Lei; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Puigh, Darren; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Biselli, Angela; Cirino, Guy; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Atac, Muzaffer; Bakken, Jon Alan; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cooper, William; Eartly, David P; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Esen, Selda; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jensen, Hans; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Miao, Ting; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pivarski, James; Pordes, Ruth; Prokofyev, Oleg; Schwarz, Thomas; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Goldberg, Sean; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Schmitt, Michael Houston; Scurlock, Bobby; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Wang, Dayong; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Sekmen, Sezen; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kunde, Gerd J; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Silvestre, Catherine; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Lae, Chung Khim; McCliment, Edward; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Bonato, Alessio; Eskew, Christopher; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Tran, Nhan Viet; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Peterman, Alison; Rossato, Kenneth; Rumerio, Paolo; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Alver, Burak; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Harris, Philip; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rekovic, Vladimir; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Godang, Romulus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Summers, Don; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Jindal, Pratima; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Wan, Zongru; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Killewald, Phillip; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Borrello, Laura; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Petrillo, Gianluca; Sakumoto, Willis; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Richards, Alan; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Bardak, Cemile; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Mane, Poonam; Roh, Youn; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Appelt, Eric; Brownson, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Gurrola, Alfredo; Issah, Michael; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Conetti, Sergio; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goadhouse, Stephen; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Bellinger, James Nugent; Bernardini, Jacopo; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Efron, Jonathan; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2013-07-16

    Results are presented from a search for large, extra spatial dimensions in events with either two isolated muons or two isolated electrons. The data are from proton-proton interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The size of the data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 2 inverse femtobarns. The observed dimuon and dielectron mass spectra are found to be consistent with standard-model expectations. Depending on the number of extra dimensions, the limits at 95% confidence level are in the range 2.5 TeV < Ms < 3.8 TeV, where Ms characterizes the scale for the onset of quantum gravity.

  20. Interpreting IceCube 6-year HESE data as an evidence for hundred TeV decaying Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Chianese

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The assumption of a single astrophysical power-law flux to explain the IceCube 6-year HESE extraterrestrial events yields a large spectral index that is in tension with gamma-ray observations and the 6-year up-going muon neutrinos data. Adopting a spectral index belonging to the range [2.0,2.2], which is compatible with the one deduced by the analysis performed on the 6-year up-going muon neutrinos data and with p–p astrophysical sources, the latest IceCube data show an up to 2.6σ excess in the number of events in the energy range 40–200 TeV. We interpret such an excess as a decaying Dark Matter signal and we perform a likelihood-ratio statistical test to compare the two-component scenario with respect to the single-component one.

  1. Interpreting IceCube 6-year HESE data as an evidence for hundred TeV decaying Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianese, Marco; Miele, Gennaro; Morisi, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    The assumption of a single astrophysical power-law flux to explain the IceCube 6-year HESE extraterrestrial events yields a large spectral index that is in tension with gamma-ray observations and the 6-year up-going muon neutrinos data. Adopting a spectral index belonging to the range [ 2.0 , 2.2 ], which is compatible with the one deduced by the analysis performed on the 6-year up-going muon neutrinos data and with p-p astrophysical sources, the latest IceCube data show an up to 2.6 σ excess in the number of events in the energy range 40-200 TeV. We interpret such an excess as a decaying Dark Matter signal and we perform a likelihood-ratio statistical test to compare the two-component scenario with respect to the single-component one.

  2. Substitutional impact on biological activity of new water soluble Ni(II) complexes: Preparation, spectral characterization, X-ray crystallography, DNA/protein binding, antibacterial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, C; Kalaivani, P; Puschmann, H; Murugan, S; Mohan, P S; Prabhakaran, R

    2017-02-01

    A series of new water soluble nickel(II) complexes containing triphenylphosphine and 4-methoxysalicylaldehyde-4(N)-substituted thiosemicarbazones were synthesized and characterized. Crystallographic investigations confirmed the structure of the complexes (1-4) having the general structure [Ni(4-Msal-Rtsc)(PPh3)] (Where R=H (1); CH3 (2); C2H5 (3); C6H5 (4)) which showed that thiosemicarbazone ligands coordinated to nickel(II) ion as ONS tridentate bibasic donor. DNA/BSA protein binding ability of the ligands and their new complexes were studied by taking calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and Bovine serum albumin (BSA) through absorption and emission titrations. Ethidium bromide (EB) displacement study showed the intercalative binding trend of the complexes to DNA. From the albumin binding studies, the mechanism of quenching was found as static and the alterations in the secondary structure of BSA by the compounds were confirmed with synchronous spectral studies. The binding affinity of the complexes to CT-DNA and BSA has the order of [Ni(4-Msal-etsc)(PPh3)] (3) >[Ni(4-Msal-mtsc)(PPh3)] (2) >[Ni(4-Msal-tsc)(PPh3)] (1) >[Ni(4-Msal-ptsc)(PPh3)] (4). In vitro cytotoxicity of the complexes was tested on human lung cancer cells (A549), human cervical cancer cells (HeLa), human liver carcinoma cells (Hep G2). All the complexes exhibited significant activity against three cancer cells. Among them, complex 4 exhibited almost 2.5 fold activity than cisplatin in A549 and HepG2 cell lines. In HeLa cell line, the complexes exhibited significant activity which is less than cisplatin. While comparing the activity of the complexes in A549 and HepG2 cell lines it falls in the order 4>1>2>3>cisplatin. The results obtained from DNA, protein binding and cytotoxicity studies, it is concluded that the cytotoxicity of the complexes as determined by MTT assay were not unduly influenced by the complexes having different binding efficiency with DNA and protein. The complexes exhibited good spectrum

  3. Wavelength conversion based spectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    There has been a strong, application driven development of Si-based cameras and spectrometers for imaging and spectral analysis of light in the visible and near infrared spectral range. This has resulted in very efficient devices, with high quantum efficiency, good signal to noise ratio and high...... resolution for this spectral region. Today, an increasing number of applications exists outside the spectral region covered by Si-based devices, e.g. within cleantech, medical or food imaging. We present a technology based on wavelength conversion which will extend the spectral coverage of state of the art...... visible or near infrared cameras and spectrometers to include other spectral regions of interest....

  4. Improved solubility of TEV protease by directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Susanne; Löfdahl, Per-Ake; Härd, Torleif; Berglund, Helena

    2006-02-10

    The efficiency and high specificity of tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease has made it widely used for cleavage of recombinant fusion proteins. However, the production of TEV protease in E. coli is hampered by low solubility. We have subjected the gene encoding TEV protease to directed evolution to improve the yield of soluble protein. Libraries of mutated genes obtained by error-prone PCR and gene shuffling were introduced into the Gateway cloning system for facilitated transfer between vectors for screening, purification, or other applications. Fluorescence based in vivo solubility screening was carried out by cloning the libraries into a plasmid encoding a C-terminal GFP fusion. Mutant genes giving rise to high GFP fluorescence intensity indicating high levels of soluble TEV-GFP were subsequently transferred to a vector providing a C-terminal histidine tag for expression, purification, and activity tests of mutated TEV. We identified a mutant, TEV(SH), in which three amino acid substitutions result in a five-fold increase in the yield of purified protease with retained activity.

  5. Double Higgs production at the 14 TeV LHC and a 100 TeV p p collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Li, Gang; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Dong-Ming; Zhang, Hao

    2017-11-01

    We consider effective Higgs boson couplings, including both C P -even and C P -odd couplings, which affect Higgs boson pair production. Through partial wave analysis, we find that the process g g →h h is dominated by the s -wave component even at a 100 TeV p p collider. Making use of s -wave kinematics, we propose a cut efficiency function to mimic the collider simulation and obtain the potential of measuring Higgs effective couplings at the 14 TeV LHC with an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 and at a 100 TeV p p collider. Analytical expressions of 2σ exclusion limits at the LHC and 5 σ discovery bands at the 100 TeV machine are given.

  6. Physics performances for Scalar Electron, Scalar Muon and Scalar Neutrino searches at 3 TeV and 1.4 TeV at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, M.; Marshall, J.S.; Poss, S.; Sailer, A.; Thomson, M.; van der Kraaij, E.

    2013-01-01

    The determination of scalar lepton and gaugino masses is an important part of the programme of spectroscopic studies of Supersymmetry at a high energy e+e- linear collider. In this article we present results of a study of the processes: e+e- -> eR eR -> e+e- chi0 chi, e+e- -> muR muR -> mu mu- chi0 chi0, e+e- -> eL eL -> e e chi0 chi0 and e+e- -> snu_e snu_e -> e e chi+ chi-in two Supersymmetric benchmark scenarios at 3 TeV and 1.4 TeV at CLIC. We characterize the detector performance, lepton energy resolution and boson mass resolution. We report the accuracy of the production cross section measurements and the eR muR, snu_e, chi+ and chi0 mass determination, estimate the systematic errors affecting the mass measurement and discuss the requirements on the detector time stamping capability and beam polarization. The analysis accounts for the CLIC beam energy spectrum and the dominant beam-induced background. The detector performances are incorporated by full simulation and reconstruction of the events within t...

  7. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, C., E-mail: claudia.monte@ba.infn.i [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Raino, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Villata, M.; Raiteri, C.M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Perri, M. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Richards, J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-02-21

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  8. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, C.; Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D.; Rainò, S.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Perri, M.; Richards, J.

    2011-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  9. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Darin P.

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  10. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin P Clark

    Full Text Available Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID. In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM. Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with

  11. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Darin P; Badea, Cristian T

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  12. Spectral Anonymization of Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasko, Thomas A; Vinterbo, Staal A

    2010-03-01

    The goal of data anonymization is to allow the release of scientifically useful data in a form that protects the privacy of its subjects. This requires more than simply removing personal identifiers from the data, because an attacker can still use auxiliary information to infer sensitive individual information. Additional perturbation is necessary to prevent these inferences, and the challenge is to perturb the data in a way that preserves its analytic utility.No existing anonymization algorithm provides both perfect privacy protection and perfect analytic utility. We make the new observation that anonymization algorithms are not required to operate in the original vector-space basis of the data, and many algorithms can be improved by operating in a judiciously chosen alternate basis. A spectral basis derived from the data's eigenvectors is one that can provide substantial improvement. We introduce the term spectral anonymization to refer to an algorithm that uses a spectral basis for anonymization, and we give two illustrative examples.We also propose new measures of privacy protection that are more general and more informative than existing measures, and a principled reference standard with which to define adequate privacy protection.

  13. USGS Digital Spectral Library splib06a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Wise, Richard A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    ), one simply needs a diagnostic absorption band. The mapping system uses continuum-removed reference spectral features fitted to features in observed spectra. Spectral features for such algorithms can be obtained from a spectrum of a sample containing large amounts of contaminants, including those that add other spectral features, as long as the shape of the diagnostic feature of interest is not modified. If, however, the data are needed for radiative transfer models to derive mineral abundances from reflectance spectra, then completely uncontaminated spectra are required. This library contains spectra that span a range of quality, with purity indicators to flag spectra for (or against) particular uses. Acquiring spectral measurements and performing sample characterizations for this library has taken about 15 person-years of effort. Software to manage the library and provide scientific analysis capability is provided (Clark, 1980, 1993). A personal computer (PC) reader for the library is also available (Livo and others, 1993). The program reads specpr binary files (Clark, 1980, 1993) and plots spectra. Another program that reads the specpr format is written in IDL (Kokaly, 2005). In our view, an ideal spectral library consists of samples covering a very wide range of materials, has large wavelength range with very high precision, and has enough sample analyses and documentation to establish the quality of the spectra. Time and available resources limit what can be achieved. Ideally, for each mineral, the sample analysis would include X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EM) or X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and petrographic microscopic analyses. For some minerals, such as iron oxides, additional analyses such as Mossbauer would be helpful. We have found that to make the basic spectral measurements, provide XRD, EM or XRF analyses, and microscopic analyses, document the results, and complete an entry of one spectral library sample, all takes about

  14. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-09-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  15. Optimization design of spectral discriminator for high-spectral-resolution lidar based on error analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Huige; Zhang, Zhanfei; Hua, Hangbo; Zhang, Jiaqi; Hua, Dengxin; Wang, Yufeng; He, Tingyao

    2017-03-06

    Accurate aerosol optical properties could be obtained via the high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) technique, which employs a narrow spectral filter to suppress the Rayleigh or Mie scattering in lidar return signals. The ability of the filter to suppress Rayleigh or Mie scattering is critical for HSRL. Meanwhile, it is impossible to increase the rejection of the filter without limitation. How to optimize the spectral discriminator and select the appropriate suppression rate of the signal is important to us. The HSRL technology was thoroughly studied based on error propagation. Error analyses and sensitivity studies were carried out on the transmittance characteristics of the spectral discriminator. Moreover, ratwo different spectroscopic methods for HSRL were described and compared: one is to suppress the Mie scattering; the other is to suppress the Rayleigh scattering. The corresponding HSRLs were simulated and analyzed. The results show that excessive suppression of Rayleigh scattering or Mie scattering in a high-spectral channel is not necessary if the transmittance of the spectral filter for molecular and aerosol scattering signals can be well characterized. When the ratio of transmittance of the spectral filter for aerosol scattering and molecular scattering is less than 0.1 or greater than 10, the detection error does not change much with its value. This conclusion implies that we have more choices for the high-spectral discriminator in HSRL. Moreover, the detection errors of HSRL regarding the two spectroscopic methods vary greatly with the atmospheric backscattering ratio. To reduce the detection error, it is necessary to choose a reasonable spectroscopic method. The detection method of suppressing the Rayleigh signal and extracting the Mie signal can achieve less error in a clear atmosphere, while the method of suppressing the Mie signal and extracting the Rayleigh signal can achieve less error in a polluted atmosphere.

  16. Functional characterization of spectral tuning mechanisms in the great bowerbird short-wavelength sensitive visual pigment (SWS1), and the origins of UV/violet vision in passerines and parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hazel, Ilke; Sabouhanian, Amir; Day, Lainy; Endler, John A; Chang, Belinda S W

    2013-11-13

    One of the most striking features of avian vision is the variation in spectral sensitivity of the short wavelength sensitive (SWS1) opsins, which can be divided into two sub-types: violet- and UV- sensitive (VS & UVS). In birds, UVS has been found in both passerines and parrots, groups that were recently shown to be sister orders. While all parrots are thought to be UVS, recent evidence suggests some passerine lineages may also be VS. The great bowerbird (Chlamydera nuchalis) is a passerine notable for its courtship behaviours in which males build and decorate elaborate bower structures. The great bowerbird SWS1 sequence possesses an unusual residue combination at known spectral tuning sites that has not been previously investigated in mutagenesis experiments. In this study, the SWS1 opsin of C. nuchalis was expressed along with a series of spectral tuning mutants and ancestral passerine SWS1 pigments, allowing us to investigate spectral tuning mechanisms and explore the evolution of UV/violet sensitivity in early passerines and parrots. The expressed C. nuchalis SWS1 opsin was found to be a VS pigment, with a λmax of 403 nm. Bowerbird SWS1 mutants C86F, S90C, and C86S/S90C all shifted λmax into the UV, whereas C86S had no effect. Experimentally recreated ancestral passerine and parrot/passerine SWS1 pigments were both found to be VS, indicating that UV sensitivity evolved independently in passerines and parrots from a VS ancestor. Our mutagenesis studies indicate that spectral tuning in C. nuchalis is mediated by mechanisms similar to those of other birds. Interestingly, our ancestral sequence reconstructions of SWS1 in landbird evolution suggest multiple transitions from VS to UVS, but no instances of the reverse. Our results not only provide a more precise prediction of where these spectral sensitivity shifts occurred, but also confirm the hypothesis that birds are an unusual exception among vertebrates where some descendants re-evolved UVS from a violet type

  17. Gamma-ray and neutrino diffuse emissions of the Galaxy above the TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Marinelli, Antonio; Urbano, Alfredo; Valli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    As recently shown, Fermi-LAT measurements of the diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Galaxy favor the presence of a smooth softening in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum with increasing Galactocentric distance. This result can be interpreted in terms of a spatial-dependent rigidity scaling of the diffusion coefficient. The DRAGON code was used to build a model based on such feature. That scenario correctly reproduces the latest Fermi-LAT results as well as local cosmic-ray measurements from PAMELA, AMS-02 and CREAM. Here we show that the model, if extrapolated at larger energies, grasps both the gamma-ray flux measured by MILAGRO at 15 TeV and the H.E.S.S. data from the Galactic ridge, assuming that the cosmic-ray spectral hardening found by those experiments at about 250 GeV/n is present in the whole inner Galactic plane region. Moreover, we show as that model also predicts a neutrino emission which may account for a significant fraction, as well as for the correct spectral shape, of the astrophysical flux mea...

  18. Spectral signatures of chirality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    We present a new way of measuring chirality, via the spectral shift of photonic band gaps in one-dimensional structures. We derive an explicit mapping of the problem of oblique incidence of circularly polarized light on a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal with negligible index contrast...... to the formally equivalent problem of linearly polarized light incident on-axis on a non-chiral structure with index contrast. We derive analytical expressions for the first-order shifts of the band gaps for negligible index contrast. These are modified to give good approximations to the band gap shifts also...

  19. Spectral tripartitioning of networks

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Thomas; Mucha, Peter J; Porter, Mason A.

    2008-01-01

    We formulate a spectral graph-partitioning algorithm that uses the two leading eigenvectors of the matrix corresponding to a selected quality function to split a network into three communities in a single step. In so doing, we extend the recursive bipartitioning methods developed by Newman [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 103, 8577 (2006); Phys. Rev. E 74, 036104 (2006)] to allow one to consider the best available two-way and three-way divisions at each recursive step. We illustrate the method using si...

  20. Inverse boundary spectral problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kachalov, Alexander; Lassas, Matti

    2001-01-01

    Inverse boundary problems are a rapidly developing area of applied mathematics with applications throughout physics and the engineering sciences. However, the mathematical theory of inverse problems remains incomplete and needs further development to aid in the solution of many important practical problems.Inverse Boundary Spectral Problems develop a rigorous theory for solving several types of inverse problems exactly. In it, the authors consider the following: ""Can the unknown coefficients of an elliptic partial differential equation be determined from the eigenvalues and the boundary value

  1. QCD spectral sum rules

    CERN Document Server

    Narison, Stéphan

    The aim of the book is to give an introduction to the method of QCD Spectral Sum Rules and to review its developments. After some general introductory remarks, Chiral Symmetry, the Historical Developments of the Sum Rules and the necessary materials for perturbative QCD including the MS regularization and renormalization schemes are discussed. The book also gives a critical review and some improvements of the wide uses of the QSSR in Hadron Physics and QSSR beyond the Standard Hadron Phenomenology. The author has participated actively in this field since 1978 just before the expanding success

  2. EMCCD-based spectrally resolved fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestvater, Felix; Seghiri, Zahir; Kang, Moon Sik; Gröner, Nadine; Lee, Ji Young; Im, Kang-Bin; Wachsmuth, Malte

    2010-11-08

    We present an implementation of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with spectrally resolved detection based on a combined commercial confocal laser scanning/fluorescence correlation spectroscopy microscope. We have replaced the conventional detection scheme by a prism-based spectrometer and an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera used to record the photons. This allows us to read out more than 80,000 full spectra per second with a signal-to-noise ratio and a quantum efficiency high enough to allow single photon counting. We can identify up to four spectrally different quantum dots in vitro and demonstrate that spectrally resolved detection can be used to characterize photophysical properties of fluorophores by measuring the spectral dependence of quantum dot fluorescence emission intermittence. Moreover, we can confirm intracellular cross-correlation results as acquired with a conventional setup and show that spectral flexibility can help to optimize the choice of the detection windows.

  3. Accurate Measurements of Spectral Reflectance in Picasso's Guernica Painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luna, Javier Muñoz; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Vázquez, Daniel; Melgosa, Manuel; Durán, Humberto; García, Jorge; Muro, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The use of non-invasive spectral measurements to control the conservation status is a part of the preventive conservation of artworks which nowadays is becoming increasingly interesting. This paper describes how to use a spectral measuring device and an illumination system specifically designed for such a task in a very large dimension artwork painting (7.8 m wide × 3.5 m high). The system, controlled by a Cartesian robot, allows spectral measurements in a spectral range of 400-780 nm. The measured data array has a total of 2201 circular regions with 5.5 mm spot diameter placed on a square grid. Colorimetric calculations performed from these spectral measurements may be used to characterize color shifts related to reflectance changes in specific areas of the paint. A color shifting from the expected gray has been shown. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Multi-spectral imaging of oxygen saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelieva, Tatiana A.; Stratonnikov, Aleksander A.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2008-06-01

    The system of multi-spectral imaging of oxygen saturation is an instrument that can record both spectral and spatial information about a sample. In this project, the spectral imaging technique is used for monitoring of oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in human tissues. This system can be used for monitoring spatial distribution of oxygen saturation in photodynamic therapy, surgery or sports medicine. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible range is an effective and extensively used technique for the non-invasive study and characterization of various biological tissues. In this article, a short review of modeling techniques being currently in use for diffuse reflection from semi-infinite turbid media is presented. A simple and practical model for use with a real-time imaging system is proposed. This model is based on linear approximation of the dependence of the diffuse reflectance coefficient on relation between absorbance and reduced scattering coefficient. This dependence was obtained with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon propagation in turbid media. Spectra of the oxygenated and deoxygenated forms of hemoglobin differ mostly in the red area (520 - 600 nm) and have several characteristic points there. Thus four band-pass filters were used for multi-spectral imaging. After having measured the reflectance, the data obtained are used for fitting the concentration of oxygenated and free hemoglobin, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

  5. Dedicated phantom materials for spectral radiography and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2012-03-21

    As x-ray imaging technology moves from conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) to spectral radiography and CT, dedicated phantom materials are needed for spectral imaging. The spectral phantom materials should accurately represent the energy-dependent mass-attenuation coefficients of different types of tissues. Although tissue-equivalent phantom materials were previously developed for CT and radiation therapy applications, these materials are suboptimal for spectral radiography and CT; they are not compatible with contrast agents, do not represent many of the tissue types and do not provide accurate values of attenuation characteristics of tissue. This work provides theoretical framework and a practical method for developing tissue-equivalent spectral phantom materials with a required set of parameters. The samples of the tissue-equivalent spectral phantom materials were developed, tested and characterized. The spectral phantom materials were mixed with iodine, gold and calcium contrast agents and evaluated. The materials were characterized by CT imaging and x-ray transmission experiments. The fabricated materials had nearly identical densities, mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities as compared to corresponding tissue materials presented in the ICRU-44 report. The experimental results have shown good volume uniformity and inter-sample uniformity (repeatability of sample fabrication) of the fabricated materials. The spectral phantom materials were fabricated under laboratory conditions from readily available and inexpensive components. It was concluded that the presented theoretical framework and fabrication method of dedicated spectral phantom materials could be useful for researchers and developers working in the new area of spectral radiography and CT. Independently, the results could also be useful for other applications, such as radiation therapy. © 2012 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine

  6. Atmospheric parameters, spectral indexes and their relation to CPV spectral performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Núñez, Rubén, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Antón, Ignacio, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Askins, Steve, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Sala, Gabriel, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es [Instituto de Energía Solar - Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Instituto de Energía Solar, ETSI Telecomunicación, Ciudad Universitaria 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26

    Air Mass and atmosphere components (basically aerosol (AOD) and precipitable water (PW)) define the absorption of the sunlight that arrive to Earth. Radiative models such as SMARTS or MODTRAN use these parameters to generate an equivalent spectrum. However, complex and expensive instruments (as AERONET network devices) are needed to obtain AOD and PW. On the other hand, the use of isotype cells is a convenient way to characterize spectrally a place for CPV considering that they provide the photocurrent of the different internal subcells individually. Crossing data from AERONET station and a Tri-band Spectroheliometer, a model that correlates Spectral Mismatch Ratios and atmospheric parameters is proposed. Considering the amount of stations of AERONET network, this model may be used to estimate the spectral influence on energy performance of CPV systems close to all the stations worldwide.

  7. Parameterization of temperature and spectral distortions in future CMB experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitrou, Cyril; Stebbins, Albert

    2014-10-15

    CMB spectral distortions are induced by Compton collisions with electrons. We review the various schemes to characterize the anisotropic CMB with a non-Planckian spectrum. We advocate using logarithmically averaged temperature moments as the preferred language to describe these spectral distortions, both for theoretical modeling and observations. Numerical modeling is simpler, the moments are frame-independent, and in terms of scattering the mode truncation is exact.

  8. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchenko Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, we characterize both short-term (solar rotation and long-term (solar cycle changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2 and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2 and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S models.

  9. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, Sergey V.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Lean, Judith L.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), we characterize both short-term (solar rotation) and long-term (solar cycle) changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2) and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) models.

  10. Constraining the red shifts of TeV BL Lac objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Longhua; Wang, Jiancheng; Yan, Dahai; Yang, Chuyuan; Yuan, Zunli; Zhou, Ming

    2018-01-01

    We present a model-dependent method to estimate the red shifts of three TeV BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) through fitting their (quasi-)simultaneous multi-waveband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with a one-zone leptonic synchrotron self-Compton model. Considering the impact of electron energy distributions (EEDs) on the results, we use three types of EEDs to fit the SEDs: a power-law EED with exponential cut-off (PLC), a log-parabola (PLLP) EED and the broken power-law (BPL) EED. We also use a parameter α to describe the uncertainties of the extragalactic background light models, as in Abdo et al. We then use a Markov chain Monte Carlo method to explore the multi-dimensional parameter space and obtain the uncertainties of the model parameters based on the observational data. We apply our method to obtain the red shifts of three TeV BL Lac objects in the marginalized 68 per cent confidence, and find that the PLC EED does not fit the SEDs. For 3C66A, the red shift is 0.14-0.31 and 0.16-0.32 in the BPL and PLLP EEDs. For PKS1424+240, the red shift is 0.55-0.68 and 0.55-0.67 in the BPL and PLLP EEDs. For PG1553+113, the red shift is 0.22-0.48 and 0.22-0.39 in the BPL and PLLP EEDs. We also estimate the red shift of PKS1424+240 in the high stage to be 0.46-0.67 in the PLLP EED, roughly consistent with that in the low stage.

  11. Phenomenology of TeV little string theory from holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Giveon, Amit

    2012-02-24

    We study the graviton phenomenology of TeV little string theory by exploiting its holographic gravity dual five-dimensional theory. This dual corresponds to a linear dilaton background with a large bulk that constrains the standard model fields on the boundary of space. The linear dilaton geometry produces a unique Kaluza-Klein graviton spectrum that exhibits a ~TeV mass gap followed by a near continuum of narrow resonances that are separated from each other by only ~30 GeV. Resonant production of these particles at the LHC is the signature of this framework that distinguishes it from large extra dimensions, where the Kaluza-Klein states are almost a continuum with no mass gap, and warped models, where the states are separated by a TeV.

  12. Visible and Near Infrared Fluorescence Spectral Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John P.; Condello, Danilo; Duggan, Erika; Naivar, Mark; Novo, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a long standing interest in measuring complete emission spectra from individual cells in flow cytometry. We have developed flow cytometry instruments and analysis approaches to enable this to be done routinely and robustly. Our spectral flow cytometers use a holographic grating to disperse light from single cells onto a CCD for high speed, wavelength-resolved detection. Customized software allows the single cell spectral data to be displayed and analyzed to produce new spectra-derived parameters. We show that familiar reference and calibration beads can be employed to quantitatively assess instrument performance. We use microspheres stained with six different quantum dots to compare a virtual bandpass filter approach with classic least squares (CLS) spectral unmixing, and then use antibody capture beads and CLS unmixing to demonstrate immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells using spectral flow cytometry. Finally, we characterize and evaluate several near infrared (NIR) emitting fluorophores for use in spectral flow cytometry. Spectral flow cytometry offers a number of attractive features for single cell analysis, including a simplified optical path, high spectral resolution, and streamlined approaches to quantitative multiparameter measurements. The availability of robust instrumentation, software, and analysis approaches will facilitate the development of spectral flow cytometry applications. PMID:23225549

  13. Rectangular spectral collocation

    KAUST Repository

    Driscoll, Tobin A.

    2015-02-06

    Boundary conditions in spectral collocation methods are typically imposed by removing some rows of the discretized differential operator and replacing them with others that enforce the required conditions at the boundary. A new approach based upon resampling differentiated polynomials into a lower-degree subspace makes differentiation matrices, and operators built from them, rectangular without any row deletions. Then, boundary and interface conditions can be adjoined to yield a square system. The resulting method is both flexible and robust, and avoids ambiguities that arise when applying the classical row deletion method outside of two-point scalar boundary-value problems. The new method is the basis for ordinary differential equation solutions in Chebfun software, and is demonstrated for a variety of boundary-value, eigenvalue and time-dependent problems.

  14. Spectrally resolved incoherent holography: 3D spatial and spectral imaging using a Mach-Zehnder radial-shearing interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Takeda, Mitsuo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Spatial and spectral information holds the key for characterizing incoherently illuminated or self-luminous objects, as well as for imaging fluorescence. We propose spectrally resolved incoherent holography using a multifunctional Mach-Zehnder interferometer that can introduce both a radial shear and a variable time delay between the interfering optical fields and permits the measurement of both spatial and temporal coherence functions, from which a 3D spatial and spectral image of the object is reconstructed. We propose and demonstrate the accurate 3D imaging of the object spectra by in situ calibration.

  15. Suzaku Observation of TeV Blazar the 1ES 1218+304: Clues on Particle Acceleration in an Extreme TeV Blazar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, R.; Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, T.; Madejski, G.M.; Rugamer, S.; Wagner, S.J.

    2008-04-22

    We observed the TeV blazar 1ES 1218+304 with the X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku in May 2006. At the beginning of the two-day continuous observation, we detected a large flare in which the 5-10 keV flux changed by a factor of {approx}2 on a timescale of 5 x 10{sup 4} s. During the flare, the increase in the hard X-ray flux clearly lagged behind that observed in the soft X-rays, with the maximum lag of 2.3 x 10{sup 4} s observed between the 0.3?1 keV and 5?10 keV bands. Furthermore we discovered that the temporal profile of the flare clearly changes with energy, being more symmetric at higher energies. From the spectral fitting of multi-wavelength data assuming a one-zone, homogeneous synchrotron self-Compton model, we obtain B {approx} 0.047 G, emission region size R = 3.0 x 10{sup 16} cm for an appropriate beaming with a Doppler factor of {delta} = 20. This value of B is in good agreement with an independent estimate through the model fit to the observed time lag ascribing the energy-dependent variability to differential acceleration timescale of relativistic electrons provided that the gyro-factor {zeta} is 10{sup 5}.

  16. Spectral unmixing: estimating partial abundances

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available of spectral unmixing 3 End-member spectra and synthetic mixtures 4 Results 5 Conclusions Debba (CSIR) Spectral Unmixing LQM 2009 2 / 22 Background and Research Question If research could be as easy as eating a chocolate cake . . . Figure: Can you guess... the ingredients for this chocolate cake? Debba (CSIR) Spectral Unmixing LQM 2009 3 / 22 Background and Research Question Ingredients Quantity unsweetened chocolate unsweetened cocoa powder boiling water flour baking powder baking soda salt unsalted...

  17. Substructure and strong interactions at the TeV scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1985-12-01

    A review is given of the current status of the three main theoretical ideas relevant to strong-interaction 1 TeV physics. These are composite vector bosons, Higgs bosons (''Technicolor''), and matter fermions. All involve the assumption that some object which is assumed to be fundamental in the standard model actually has dynamical internal structure. Complex, mechanistic models of the new physics are discussed. A brief digression is then made on how the weak interaction allows probing for this new structure. Direct manifestations of new 1 TeV strong interactions are discussed. 125 refs., 18 figs. (LEW)

  18. Low-energy features of a 1-tev higgs sector

    CERN Document Server

    Appelquist, Thomas

    1979-01-01

    It seems very likely that the Higgs sector of a spontaneously broken gauge theory could be heavy (M = 1 TeV) and strongly interacting. By exploiting the intimate connection of such theories to nonlinear a models, it is possible to show under quite general conditions what sort of impact the heavy Higgs sector can have on low energy experiments (E << 1 TeV). In this talk, the techniques and results will be summar- ized for an SU(2) gauge theory, The analysis of the Weinberg-Salam and other realistic theories will appear in a forthcoming paper.

  19. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray e++e- Spectrum from 20GeV to 1TeV with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Battelino, M.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carlson, P.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; di Bernardo, G.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Edmonds, Y.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gaggero, D.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grasso, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Massai, M. M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pohl, M.; Porter, T. A.; Profumo, S.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgrò, C.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-05-01

    Designed as a high-sensitivity gamma-ray observatory, the Fermi Large Area Telescope is also an electron detector with a large acceptance exceeding 2m2sr at 300 GeV. Building on the gamma-ray analysis, we have developed an efficient electron detection strategy which provides sufficient background rejection for measurement of the steeply falling electron spectrum up to 1 TeV. Our high precision data show that the electron spectrum falls with energy as E-3.0 and does not exhibit prominent spectral features. Interpretations in terms of a conventional diffusive model as well as a potential local extra component are briefly discussed.

  20. Spectral functions of the spinless Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, J [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Hohenadler, M [Institute for Theoretical and Computational Physics, TU Graz (Austria); Fehske, H [Institute for Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-03-01

    An analytical approach to the one-dimensional spinless Holstein model is proposed, which is valid at finite charge-carrier concentrations. Spectral functions of charge carriers are computed on the basis of self-energy calculations. A generalization of the Lang-Firsov canonical transformation method is shown to provide an interpolation scheme between the extreme weak-coupling and strong-coupling cases. The transformation depends on a variationally determined parameter that characterizes the charge distribution across the polaron volume. The relation between the spectral functions of the polaron and electron, the latter corresponding to the photoemission spectrum, is derived. Particular attention is paid to the distinction between the coherent and incoherent parts of the spectra, and their evolution as a function of band filling and model parameters. Results are discussed and compared with recent numerical calculations for the many-polaron problem.

  1. [Review of digital ground object spectral library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Hu; Zhou, Ding-Wu

    2009-06-01

    A higher spectral resolution is the main direction of developing remote sensing technology, and it is quite important to set up the digital ground object reflectance spectral database library, one of fundamental research fields in remote sensing application. Remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics, and quantitative analysis has been developed to a new stage. The present article summarized and systematically introduced the research status quo and development trend of digital ground object reflectance spectral libraries at home and in the world in recent years. Introducing the spectral libraries has been established, including desertification spectral database library, plants spectral database library, geological spectral database library, soil spectral database library, minerals spectral database library, cloud spectral database library, snow spectral database library, the atmosphere spectral database library, rocks spectral database library, water spectral database library, meteorites spectral database library, moon rock spectral database library, and man-made materials spectral database library, mixture spectral database library, volatile compounds spectral database library, and liquids spectral database library. In the process of establishing spectral database libraries, there have been some problems, such as the lack of uniform national spectral database standard and uniform standards for the ground object features as well as the comparability between different databases. In addition, data sharing mechanism can not be carried out, etc. This article also put forward some suggestions on those problems.

  2. CONSTRAINTS ON THE GALACTIC POPULATION OF TeV PULSAR WIND NEBULAE USING FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acero, F.; Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' M. Merlin' ' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: funk@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: joshualande@gmail.com, E-mail: lemoine@cenbg.in2p3.fr, E-mail: rousseau@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); and others

    2013-08-10

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) have been established as the most populous class of TeV {gamma}-ray emitters. Since launch, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has identified five high-energy (100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray sources as PWNe and detected a large number of PWN candidates, all powered by young and energetic pulsars. The wealth of multi-wavelength data available and the new results provided by Fermi-LAT give us an opportunity to find new PWNe and to explore the radiative processes taking place in known ones. The TeV {gamma}-ray unidentified (UNID) sources are the best candidates for finding new PWNe. Using 45 months of Fermi-LAT data for energies above 10 GeV, an analysis was performed near the position of 58 TeV PWNe and UNIDs within 5 Degree-Sign of the Galactic plane to establish new constraints on PWN properties and find new clues on the nature of UNIDs. Of the 58 sources, 30 were detected, and this work provides their {gamma}-ray fluxes for energies above 10 GeV. The spectral energy distributions and upper limits, in the multi-wavelength context, also provide new information on the source nature and can help distinguish between emission scenarios, i.e., between classification as a pulsar candidate or as a PWN candidate. Six new GeV PWN candidates are described in detail and compared with existing models. A population study of GeV PWN candidates as a function of the pulsar/PWN system characteristics is presented.

  3. Spectral unfolding of fast neutron energy distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Michelle; Jackman, Kevin; Engle, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of the energy distribution of a neutron flux is difficult in experiments with constrained geometry where techniques such as time of flight cannot be used to resolve the distribution. The measurement of neutron fluxes in reactors, which often present similar challenges, has been accomplished using radioactivation foils as an indirect probe. Spectral unfolding codes use statistical methods to adjust MCNP predictions of neutron energy distributions using quantified radioactive residuals produced in these foils. We have applied a modification of this established neutron flux characterization technique to experimentally characterize the neutron flux in the critical assemblies at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and the spallation neutron flux at the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results of the unfolding procedure are presented and compared with a priori MCNP predictions, and the implications for measurements using the neutron fluxes at these facilities are discussed.

  4. Physics performances for Z' searches at 3 TeV and 1.5 TeV CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Blaising, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Extra neutral gauge bosons (Z') are predicted in many extensions of the Standard Model (SM). In the minimal anomaly-free Z' model (AFZ'), the phenomenology is controlled by only three parameters beyond the SM ones, the Z' mass and two effective coupling constants g'_Y and g'_{BL}. We study the Z' 5-sigma discovery potential in e+e- collisions at 1.4 and 3 TeV CLIC. Assuming LHC discovers a Z' of 5 TeV mass, the expected accuracies on the Z'mu+mu- couplings are presented. We discuss also the requirements on detector performance and beam polarization.

  5. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Information is carried in changes of a signal. The paper starts with revisiting Dudley's concept of the carrier nature of speech. It points to its close connection to modulation spectra of speech and argues against short-term spectral envelopes as dominant carriers of the linguistic information in speech. The history of spectral ...

  6. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF EXCHANGE RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEŠA LOTRIČ DOLINAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Using spectral analysis is very common in technical areas but rather unusual in economics and finance, where ARIMA and GARCH modeling are much more in use. To show that spectral analysis can be useful in determining hidden periodic components for high-frequency finance data as well, we use the example of foreign exchange rates

  7. A detailed study of the supernova remnant RCW 86 in TeV {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, Sebastian

    2012-03-29

    A detailed study of the supernova remnant RCW 86 is presented. RCW 86 encountered a shell-like structure in radio, X-rays and optical, whereas in the discovery paper of RCW 86 in the very high energy regime the structure could not be confirmed. In this thesis for the first time the shell was resolved in the very high energy gamma rays. The shell width was determined to be 0.125 {+-}0.014 , the radius to be 0.194 {+-} 0.016 and the center to be -62.433 {+-}0.014 in declination and 220.734 {+-}0.016 in rectascension. The spectral analysis was performed for the whole SNR and for the south-east part, which is more pronounced in X-rays separately. But the results were comparable within errors. Additionally a power-law with an exponential cut off described the spectra best with the parameters: an spectral index of 1.50{+-}0.28, a cut-off energy of (2.69{+-}0.99 TeV) and an integral flux above 1 TeV of (6.51{+-}2.69) . 10{sup -12} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The study of the correlation of the X-ray and VHE {gamma}-ray data of RCW 86 was hampered by the poor angular resolution of the VHE data. Therefore detailed studies of the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm have been performed. The outcome is, that deconvolution techniques are applicable to strong VHE {gamma}-ray sources and that fine structure well below the angular resolution can be studied. The application to RX J1713-3946, the brightest SNR in the VHE regime, has shown, that the correlation coefficient of the X-ray data and the VHE data of is stable down to 0.01 and has a value of 0.85. On the other side the significance of the data set is not sufficient in the case of RCW 86 to apply the deconvolution technique.

  8. Heavy flavour production in 13 TeV pp collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Braun, Svende Annelies

    2015-01-01

    This summer first data at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV is collected at the LHC. This opens a new era in searches for new particles and precision tests of the Standard Model. Heavy flavour production plays an important role both as precision QCD test and as backgrounds for new particles. The first measurements of heavy flavour production are presented.

  9. Early 13 TeV Results from the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has recorded almost 200 pb-1 of collision data at 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy. The seminar presents the status of the data taking, the commissioning of the event reconstruction, focusing on the key techniques that have allowed to quickly reach a good understanding of the basic physics objects, and early physics results.

  10. TeV GAMMA RAYS: OBSERVATIONS VERSUS EXPECTATIONS & THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Krennrich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this paper is to discuss two important questions relevant for TeV γ-ray astronomy; the pursuit to reveal the origin of cosmic rays in our galaxy, and the opacity of the universe in γ-rays. The origin of cosmic rays stipulated the field of TeV astronomy in the first place, and led to the development of the atmospheric Cherenkov technique; significant progress has been made in the last decade through the detection of several supernova remnants, the primary suspects for harboring the acceleration sites of cosmic rays. TeV γ-rays propagate mostly unhindered through the galactic plane, making them excellent probes of processes in SNRs and other galactic sources. Key results related to the SNR origin of cosmic rays are discussed. TeV γ-ray spectra from extragalactic sources experience significant absorption when traversing cosmological distances. The opacity of the universe to γ-rays above 10 GeV progressively increases with energy and redshift; the reason lies in their pair production with ambient soft photons from the extragalactic background light (EBL. While this limits the γ-ray horizon, it offers the opportunity to gain information about cosmology, i.e. the EBL intensity, physical conditions in intergalactic space, and potentially new interaction processes. Results and implications pertaining to the EBL are given.

  11. Transplanckian collisions in TeV scale gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Collisions at transplanckian energies offer model independent tests of TeV scale gravity. One spectacular signal is given by black-hole production, though a full calculation of the corresponding cross-section is not yet available. Another signal is given by gravitational elastic scattering, which may be less spectacular but ...

  12. Outburst of TeV photons from Markarian 421

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrick, A. D.; Akerlof, C. W.; Biller, S. D.; Buckley, J. H.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Connaughton, V.; Fegan, D. J.; Fennell, S.; Gaidos, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Markarian 421, an active galactic nucleus (AGN) of the BL Lacertae type, is the closest Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)-detected AGN. It has been monitored by the Whipple Observatory very high energy gamma-ray telescope since its discovery at TeV energies, for approximately 90 nights, totaling 130 hours of observation. Observations from 1993 December 23 to 1994 May 10 showed an average sourve flux only half that of its 1992 discovery level. However, observations on 1994 May 14 and 15 show an increase in flux above this quiescent level by a factor of approximately 10. The timescale of this increase provides the best geometric constraint on the extent of TeV photon emission regions within AGNs. The observation of the high TeV flux occurred 1 day prior to the observation by ASCA of a very high 2-10 keV X-ray flux. This strong TeV outburst is reminiscent of the behavior seen for the stronger 100 MeV-GeV EGRET sources (e.g. 3C 279) but was not anticipated in view of the fact that the six EGRET observations of Mrk 421 from 1991 June to 1993 July showed no evidence for variability.

  13. Event displays at 13 TeV of 2016 data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This performance note presents some illustrative event displays at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data set consists of the proton-proton collision data recorded by the CMS detector in 2016 with a magnetic field of 3.8 Tesla.

  14. Event displays in 13 TeV data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This performance note presents some illustrative event displays at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data set consists of the first proton-proton collision data recorded by the CMS detector in 2015 with a magnetic field of 3.8 Teslas.

  15. Event displays in 13 TeV data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This performance note presents some illustrative event displays together with kinematic quantities for diboson production candidates at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data set consists of the proton-proton collision data recorded by the CMS detector in 2016 with a magnetic field of 3.8 Teslas.

  16. Minimum bias measurement at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, Nicola; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The modelling of Minimum Bias (MB) is a crucial ingredient to learn about the description of soft QCD processes and to simulate the environment at the LHC with many concurrent pp interactions (pile-up). We summarise the ATLAS minimum bias measurements with proton-proton collision at 13 TeV center-of-mass-energy at the Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Parton Distributions at a 100 TeV Hadron Collider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rojo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton will be an essential input for the physics program of a future 100 TeV hadron collider. The unprecedented center-of-mass energy will require knowledge of PDFs in currently unexplored kinematical regions such as the ultra

  18. ATLAS events at 13 TeV - 2016 conferences

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has released in 2016 an impressive number of results using data collected at 13 TeV. Some of the corresponding event displays are grouped here for media and press. The reference to the conference note is given in the caption. Read more on ATLAS results with the links provided below.

  19. ATLAS 13 TeV event displays - 2017 Summer Conferences

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Summer 2017: The ATLAS collaboration released an impressive number of results using data collected at 13 TeV. Some of the corresponding event displays are grouped here for media and press. The reference to the conference note is given in the caption. Read more on ATLAS results with the links provided below.

  20. Search for. gamma. rays from the supernova 1987A at energies greater than 100 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, I.A.; Budding, E.; Conway, M.J.; Fenton, K.B.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, Z.; Hasegawa, H.; Hayashida, N.; Honda, M.; Hotta, N.

    1988-03-21

    We searched for ultrahigh-energy ..gamma.. rays emitted by the supernova 1987A with a new cosmic-ray facility installed at the Black Birch Range in New Zealand. The observations from 13 October to 3 December 1987 suggest no clear clustering of events around the direction of the supernova. We conclude that an upper limit on the flux ..gamma.. rays of energies greater than 100 TeV is 1.1 x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ (95% confidence limit) for a differential spectral index ..cap alpha.. = 2.0 and source distance d = 50 kpc. This value gives an upper bound on the ..gamma..-ray luminosity of the supernova of 5.5 x 10/sup 38/ erg s/sup -1/ for 10/sup 14/--10/sup 17/ eV

  1. Spectral centrality measures in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perra, Nicola; Fortunato, Santo

    2008-09-01

    Complex networks are characterized by heterogeneous distributions of the degree of nodes, which produce a large diversification of the roles of the nodes within the network. Several centrality measures have been introduced to rank nodes based on their topological importance within a graph. Here we review and compare centrality measures based on spectral properties of graph matrices. We shall focus on PageRank (PR), eigenvector centrality (EV), and the hub and authority scores of the HITS algorithm. We derive simple relations between the measures and the (in)degree of the nodes, in some limits. We also compare the rankings obtained with different centrality measures.

  2. Spectral-temporal dynamics of multipulse mode-locking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Li, Bowen; Wei, Xiaoming; Xu, Yiqing; Tsia, Kevin K. M.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2017-05-01

    In addition to stable pulse generation, passively mode-locked fiber lasers can easily run into an unstable regime of multipulse mode-locking. The birth and dynamic behaviors of multipulse mode-locking so far have rarely been experimentally explored, particularly in the spectral domain. In this letter, several kinds of multipulse spectral-temporal dynamics of a passively mode-locked fiber laser are observed in a single-shot manner, e.g., energy quantization, self-phase modulation spectral broadening, wavelength shifting, spectral interfering, and ultraweak pulse interaction. This study is enabled by the high temporal resolution of spectral-temporal technology, i.e., 50 ps in the time domain and tens of nanoseconds in the spectral domain. Moreover, a wide observing time span of our spectral-temporal analyzing system, i.e., >6 ms—equivalent to 100 000 round trips, enables evolutionary characterization of individual pulses. The results will have a significant impact on optimizing the performance of mode-locked fiber lasers and understanding the nonlinear physics in a dissipative system.

  3. Simple spectral stray light correction method for array spectroradiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yuqin; Brown, Steven W.; Johnson, B. Carol; Lykke, Keith R.; Ohno, Yoshi

    2006-02-01

    A simple, practical method has been developed to correct a spectroradiometer's response for measurement errors arising from the instrument's spectral stray light. By characterizing the instrument's response to a set of monochromatic laser sources that cover the instrument's spectral range, one obtains a spectral stray light signal distribution matrix that quantifies the magnitude of the spectral stray light signal within the instrument. By use of these data, a spectral stray light correction matrix is derived and the instrument's response can be corrected with a simple matrix multiplication. The method has been implemented and validated with a commercial CCD-array spectrograph. Spectral stray light errors after the correction was applied were reduced by 1-2 orders of magnitude to a level of approximately 10-5 for a broadband source measurement, equivalent to less than one count of the 15-bit-resolution instrument. This method is fast enough to be integrated into an instrument's software to perform real-time corrections with minimal effect on acquisition speed. Using instruments that have been corrected for spectral stray light, we expect significant reductions in overall measurement uncertainties in many applications in which spectrometers are commonly used, including radiometry, colorimetry, photometry, and biotechnology.

  4. CCN Spectral Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, James G.

    2009-02-27

    Detailed aircraft measurements were made of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra associated with extensive cloud systems off the central California coast in the July 2005 MASE project. These measurements include the wide supersaturation (S) range (2-0.01%) that is important for these polluted stratus clouds. Concentrations were usually characteristic of continental/anthropogenic air masses. The most notable feature was the consistently higher concentrations above the clouds than below. CCN measurements are so important because they provide a link between atmospheric chemistry and cloud-climate effects, which are the largest climate uncertainty. Extensive comparisons throughout the eleven flights between two CCN spectrometers operated at different but overlapping S ranges displayed the precision and accuracy of these difficult spectral determinations. There are enough channels of resolution in these instruments to provide differential spectra, which produce more rigorous and precise comparisons than traditional cumulative presentations of CCN concentrations. Differential spectra are also more revealing than cumulative spectra. Only one of the eleven flights exhibited typical maritime concentrations. Average below cloud concentrations over the two hours furthest from the coast for the 8 flights with low polluted stratus was 614?233 at 1% S, 149?60 at 0.1% S and 57?33 at 0.04% S cm-3. Immediately above cloud average concentrations were respectively 74%, 55%, and 18% higher. Concentration variability among those 8 flights was a factor of two. Variability within each flight excluding distances close to the coast ranged from 15-56% at 1% S. However, CN and probably CCN concentrations sometimes varied by less than 1% over distances of more than a km. Volatility and size-critical S measurements indicated that the air masses were very polluted throughout MASE. The aerosol above the clouds was more polluted than the below cloud aerosol. These high CCN concentrations from

  5. Search for quantum black hole production in high-invariant-mass lepton+jet final states using pp collisions at √s=8  TeV and the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G; Abajyan, T; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abouzeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahmad, A; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allison, L J; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angelidakis, S; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ask, S; Asman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Astbury, A; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Backus Mayes, J; Badescu, E; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, S; Balek, P; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Bartsch, V; Bassalat, A; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Beloborodova, O L; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernard, C; Bernat, P; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia, O; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Bittner, B; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boek, T T; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A S; Bolnet, N M; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boutouil, S; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Branchini, P; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brelier, B; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, K; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Brown, G; Brown, J; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Buehrer, F; Bugge, L; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bundock, A C; Bunse, M; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burghgrave, B; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Busato, E; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Butt, A I; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Byszewski, M; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P

    2014-03-07

    This Letter presents a search for quantum black-hole production using 20.3 fb-1 of data collected with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at the LHC at √s = 8 TeV. The quantum black holes are assumed to decay into a final state characterized by a lepton (electron or muon) and a jet. In either channel, no event with a lepton-jet invariant mass of 3.5 TeV or more is observed, consistent with the expected background. Limits are set on the product of cross sections and branching fractions for the lepton+jet final states of quantum black holes produced in a search region for invariant masses above 1 TeV. The combined 95% confidence level upper limit on this product for quantum black holes with threshold mass above 3.5 TeV is 0.18 fb. This limit constrains the threshold quantum black-hole mass to be above 5.3 TeV in the model considered.

  6. Nonlinear spectral imaging of fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaus, H.

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear microscopy combined with fluorescence spectroscopy is known as nonlinear spectral imaging microscopy (NLSM). This method provides simultaneously specimen morphology – distinguishing different parts in a tissue – and (auto)fluorescence spectra, thus their biochemical composition. A novel

  7. Matched Spectral Filter Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OPTRA proposes the development of an imaging spectrometer for greenhouse gas and volcanic gas imaging based on matched spectral filtering and compressive imaging....

  8. Multi-spectral camera development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Holloway, M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ) ? 6 Spectral bands plus laser range finder ? High Definition (HD) video format ? Synchronised image capture ? Configurable mounts ? positioner and laboratory ? Radiometric and geometric calibration ? Fiber optic data transmission Proposed system...

  9. Broadband Advanced Spectral System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NovaSol proposes to develop an advanced hyperspectral imaging system for earth science missions named BRASS (Broadband Advanced Spectral System). BRASS combines...

  10. Synthesis, spectral characterization and antimicrobial studies of nano-sized oxovanadium(IV) complexes with Schiff bases derived from 5-(phenyl/substituted phenyl)-2-hydrazino-1,3,4-thiadiazole and indoline-2,3-dione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, M. K.; Yadava, U.; Pandey, O. P.; Sengupta, S. K.

    A new class of oxovanadium(IV) complexes with Schiff bases derived by the condensation of 5-(phenyl/substituted phenyl)-2-hydrazino-1,3,4-thiadiazoles and indoline-2,3-dione have been prepared in ethanol in the presence of sodium acetate. Micro-analytical data, magnetic susceptibility, UV-Vis, IR, EPR and XRD spectral techniques were used to confirm the structures. Electronic absorption spectra of the complexes suggest a square-pyramidal geometry. The oxovanadium(IV) complexes have monoclinic crystal system and particle sizes were found to be in the range 18.0 nm to 24.0 nm (nano-size). In vitro antifungal activity of synthesized compounds was determined against fungi Aspergillus niger, Colletotrichum falcatum and Colletotrichum pallescence and in vitro antibacterial activity was determined by screening the compounds against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) bacterial strains. The oxovanadium(IV) complexes have higher antimicrobial effect than free ligands.

  11. Root Asymptotics of Spectral Polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Shapiro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have been studying the asymptotic energy distribution of the algebraic part of the spectrum of the one-dimensional sextic anharmonic oscillator. We review some (both old and recent results on the multiparameter spectral problem and show that our problem ranks among the degenerate cases of Heine-Stieltjes spectral problem, and we derive the density of the corresponding probability measure. 

  12. SINGLE-PARTICLE SPECTRAL DENSITY OF THE HUBBARD-MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEHLIG, B; ESKES, H; HAYN, R; MEINDERS, MBJ

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  13. Single-particle spectral density of the Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehlig, B.; Eskes, H.; Hayn, R.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  14. Spectral measurement using IC-compatible linear variable optical filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emadi, A.; Grabarnik, S.; Wu, H.; De Graaf, G.; Hedsten, K.; Enoksson, P.; Correia, J.H.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the functional and spectral characterization of a microspectrometer based on a CMOS detector array covered by an IC-Compatible Linear Variable Optical Filter (LVOF). The Fabry-Perot LVOF is composed of 15 dielectric layers with a tapered middle cavity layer, which has been

  15. Spatial and spectral imaging of LMA photonic crystal fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate modal characterization using spatial and spectral resolved (S2) imaging, on an Ytterbium-doped large-mode-area photonic crystal fiber (PCF) amplifier and compare results with conventional cut-off methods. We apply numerical simulations and step-index fiber experiments to calibrate...

  16. Crystal growth, structural, spectral, thermal, linear and nonlinear optical characterization of a new organic nonlinear chiral compound: L-tryptophan-fumaric acid-water (1/1/1) suitable for laser frequency conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer Mohamed, M.; Jayaprakash, P.; Nageshwari, M.; Rathika Thaya Kumari, C.; Sangeetha, P.; Sudha, S.; Mani, G.; Lydia Caroline, M.

    2017-08-01

    A new organic active nonlinear optical crystal L-tryptophan fumaric acid water (1/1/1), (C15H17N2 O7. H2O)(LTFAW), consisting of zwitterion tryptophan molecule in conjunction with a fumaric acid molecule and a water molecule was grown by slow solvent evaporation technique from aqueous solution. The organic chromophore crystallizes from water in its zwitterions exhibiting tabular habit in monoclinic system with acentric space group C2 (Z = 4). The sharp peaks observed in Powder X-ray diffractogram depicts the crystalline nature. The presence of functional groups in the grown crystal was analyzed using FT-IR spectrum. The carbon and hydrogen environment in molecular structure was investigated using FT-NMR technique using deuterated DMSO solution. Ultraviolet-visible spectral analysis reveal that the crystal possess lower cut-off wavelength down to 275 nm, is a key factor to exhibit Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) signal. The direct optical band gap is evaluated to be 5.28 eV from the UV absorption profile. The evaluation of optical constants by employing UV-visible absorbance data such as, extinction coefficient, reflectance, refractive index, optical conductivity are supportive towards good performance as NLO devices. Temperature of decomposition was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis techniques (TG/DTA). The luminescence profile exhibited two peaks (362 nm, 683 nm) due to the donation of protons from carboxylic group to amino group. The nonlinear optical behavior from the noncentrosymmetric crystal was observed by the generation of frequency doubled (2ω) optical radiation when subjected to pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz) using Kurtz-Perry method. The variation of dielectric constant (εʹ) and dielectric loss (εʹʹ) vs. Log f for the title compound was analysed at a few selected temperatures and frequencies.

  17. Energy Spectrum of Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron from 10 GeV to 3 TeV Observed with the Calorimetric Electron Telescope on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, O.; Akaike, Y.; Asano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Binns, W. R.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Brogi, P.; Buckley, J. H.; Cannady, N.; Castellini, G.; Checchia, C.; Cherry, M. L.; Collazuol, G.; di Felice, V.; Ebisawa, K.; Fuke, H.; Guzik, T. G.; Hams, T.; Hareyama, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hibino, K.; Ichimura, M.; Ioka, K.; Ishizaki, W.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kasahara, K.; Kataoka, J.; Kataoka, R.; Katayose, Y.; Kato, C.; Kawanaka, N.; Kawakubo, Y.; Krawczynski, H. S.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Kuramata, S.; Lomtadze, T.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A. M.; Mitchell, J. W.; Miyake, S.; Mizutani, K.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, K.; Mori, M.; Mori, N.; Motz, H. M.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, H.; Nakahira, S.; Nishimura, J.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Okuno, S.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozawa, S.; Pacini, L.; Palma, F.; Papini, P.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Rauch, B. F.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sakai, K.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasaki, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Shiomi, A.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stolzi, F.; Takahashi, I.; Takayanagi, M.; Takita, M.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Terasawa, T.; Tomida, H.; Torii, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Ueno, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Wefel, J. P.; Yamaoka, K.; Yanagita, S.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, K.; Yuda, T.; Calet Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    First results of a cosmic-ray electron and positron spectrum from 10 GeV to 3 TeV is presented based upon observations with the CALET instrument on the International Space Station starting in October, 2015. Nearly a half million electron and positron events are included in the analysis. CALET is an all-calorimetric instrument with total vertical thickness of 30 X0 and a fine imaging capability designed to achieve a large proton rejection and excellent energy resolution well into the TeV energy region. The observed energy spectrum over 30 GeV can be fit with a single power law with a spectral index of -3.152 ±0.016 (stat+syst ). Possible structure observed above 100 GeV requires further investigation with increased statistics and refined data analysis.

  18. Hadron supercolliders: The 1-TeV scale and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, C.

    1990-08-10

    Greater understanding of the connection between the weak and electromagnetic interactions is central to progress in elementary-particle physics. A definitive exploration of the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking will require collisions between fundamental constituents at energies on the order of 1 TeV. This goal drives the design of high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders that will be commissioned during the next decade, but by no means completely defines their scientific potential. These three lectures are devoted to a review of the standard-model issues that motivated an experimental assault on the 1-TeV scale, an introduction to the machines and the experimental environment they will present, and a survey of possibilities for measurement and discovery with a multi-TeV hadron collider. 72 refs., 29 figs.

  19. LHCb early measurements at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Spradlin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The LHC's sqrt(s) = 13 TeV proton-proton collisions open a new regime in which the predictions of QCD may be precisely tested via production measurements. LHCb undertook an Early 2015 Measurements campaign to coordinate the operational and analysis activities that are required for rapid completion of such production measurements. The Early Measurements campaign is now bearing fruit with the recent publication of J/psi cross-sections and the imminent publication of charm hadron cross-sections. These are the first results to rely on LHCb's new real-time calibration system, in which the sub-detectors are promptly calibrated and the full event reconstruction of the software High Level Trigger has analysis-quality precision. This seminar will discuss the LHCb real-time calibration system and our recent charm and J/psi production measurements at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV.

  20. WW + jet at 14 and 100 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John [Fermilab; Miller, David [Glasgow U.; Robens, Tania [Dresden, Tech. U.

    2016-11-05

    In the current LHC run, an accurate understanding of Standard Model processes is extremely important. Processes including electroweak gauge bosons serve as standard candles for SM measurements, and equally constitute important backgrounds for Beyond-the-Standard Model (BSM) searches. We present here the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD virtual contributions to W+W- + jet in an analytic format obtained through unitarity methods. We present results for the full process using the Monte Carlo event generator MCFM, and discuss total as well as differential cross-sections for the LHC with 14 TeV center-of-mass energy, as well as a future 100 TeV proton-proton machine.

  1. 3.5 TeV : a good start!

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    To the pessimists out there, the 3.5 TeV starting energy of the LHC will be like a half-empty glass. However, the thousands of physicists working at the experiments certainly do not share these feelings. On the contrary, they are as excited as ever since they will be the first to observe what happens to matter in these (still) unprecedented conditions.

  2. Diphoton resonance and new physics at 1 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godunov, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The diphoton excess with invariant mass 750 GeV observed at the 13 TeV LHC run is studied in the extension of the Standard Model with an extra scalar S which decays can be responsible for the excess. Two scenarios of S production are considered: gluon fusion through a loop of heavy isosinglet quark(s) and photon fusion through a loop of heavy isosinglet leptons.

  3. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-11-23

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  4. Variability in spectral absorbance metrics across boreal lake waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Martin; Futter, Martyn N; Kothawala, Dolly N; Köhler, Stephan J

    2012-10-26

    Ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis) absorbance spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for characterizing dissolved organic matter (DOM). We present an analysis of UV/Vis absorbance spectra from 983 lakes throughout Sweden, sampled during autumn 2009. Metrics included both specific absorbances (i.e. absorbance per mass unit of organic carbon), and descriptions of spectral shape. Overall, we found three factors to which all spectral metrics were similarly related: acidity, retention-time, and latitude. In general, alkaline lakes with a long retention time in northern Sweden have lower specific absorbance and steeper spectral slope than acidic lakes with a short retention time in southern Sweden. Relative to the specific absorbance measured at 254 nm (SUVA), commonly used as a measure of DOM aromaticity, the specific absorbance at longer wavelengths and metrics of spectral shape were more sensitive to acidity and less sensitive to latitude. Although different spectral metrics are hypothesized to reflect different properties of DOM, UV/Vis absorbance spectroscopy may not be useful for more refined characterization of organic matter because of the strong inter-correlation between metrics. Nevertheless, it remains useful as a quick, cheap and reliable method of estimating DOM quantity and describing quality. We suggest that the most informative range to measure absorbance is between approximately 250 and 360 nm, where the between-lake variability is largest and absorbance can, in general, be precisely measured.

  5. LHC Report: First 13TeV collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC team

    2015-01-01

    On Wednesday 20 May at around 10.30 p.m., protons collided in the LHC at the record-breaking energy of 13 TeV for the first time. These test collisions were to set up various systems and, in particular, the collimators. The tests and the technical adjustments will continue in the coming days.   The CCC was abuzz as the LHC experiments saw 13 TeV collisions.   Preparation for the first physics run at 6.5 TeV per beam has continued in the LHC. This included the set-up and verification of the machine protection systems. In addition, precise measurements of the overall focusing properties of the ring – the so-called “optics” – were performed by inducing oscillations of the bunches, and observing the response over many turns with the beam position monitors (BPM). The transverse beam size in the accelerator changes from the order of a millimetre around most of the circumference down to some tens of microns at the centre of the exper...

  6. TeV signatures of compact UHECR accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Neronov, Andrii; Tkachev, I.

    2005-01-01

    We study numerically particle acceleration by the electric field induced near the horizon of a rotating supermassive black hole embedded in a uniform magnetic field. We find that acceleration of protons to energy 10^{20} eV is possible only at extreme values of parameters. We also find that the acceleration is very inefficient and is accompanied by TeV radiation whose total power exceeds at least by a factor of 1000 the total power emitted in ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR). This implies that if the observed UHECR with energy >10^{20} eV were produced by O(10) sources situated within 50 Mpc, each of them would overshine Crab nebula by more than two orders of magnitude. Recent TeV observations exclude this possibility. A model in which O(100) sources are situated at 100-1000 Mpc is not ruled out and can be experimentally tested by present TeV gamma-ray telescopes. Such a model can explain the observed UHECR flux at moderate energies (4-5)x10^{19} eV.

  7. Prospects for Multi-Tev Two-Beam Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Ronald D

    2002-08-12

    Recent work at CERN and SLAC has opened the possibility of the development of concrete designs for electron positron linear colliders that have a center of mass energy substantially above 1 TeV [1,2]. These designs are based on high gradient, normal conducting acceleration with the power provided by an auxiliary beam that is efficiently accelerated in a fully loaded, low frequency linac. This type of power source offers a flexibility to develop linear collider designs that have a wide range of parameters. In particular, the choice of frequency can be made without regard to the availability of high power RF sources, at least up to about 30 GHz. This paper explores possible linear collider designs taking into account limits on acceleration gradient and beam-beam effects. The study shows that electron positron linear colliders have an energy reach far in excess of 1 TeV. In particular we show that an X-band linear collider powered with conventional sources might be upgraded using two-beam techniques to an energy far above 1 TeV. Thus, the linear collider offers a platform for continued exploration at the energy frontier of High Energy Physics.

  8. Wavelength and alignment tests for confocal spectral imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Robert M; Lerner, Jeremy M

    2005-12-01

    Confocal spectral imaging (CSI) microscope systems now on the market delineate multiple fluorescent proteins, labels, or dyes within biological specimens by performing spectral characterizations. However, we find that some CSI present inconsistent spectral profiles of reference spectra within a particular system as well as between related and unrelated instruments. We also find evidence of instability that, if not diagnosed, could lead to inconsistent data. This variability confirms the need for diagnostic tools to provide a standardized, objective means of characterizing instability, evidence of misalignment, as well as performing calibration and validation functions. Our protocol uses an inexpensive multi-ion discharge lamp (MIDL) that contains Hg+, Ar+, and inorganic fluorophores that emit distinct, stable spectral features, in place of a sample. An MIDL characterization verifies the accuracy and consistency of a CSI system and validates acquisitions of biological samples. We examined a total of 10 CSI systems, all of which displayed spectral inconsistencies, enabling us to identify malfunctioning subsystems. Only one of the 10 instruments met its optimal performance expectations. We have found that using a primary light source that emits an absolute standard "reference spectrum" enabled us to diagnose instrument errors and measure accuracy and reproducibility under normalized conditions. Using this information, a CSI operator can determine whether a CSI system is working optimally and make objective comparisons with the performance of other CSI systems. It is evident that if CSI systems of a similar make and model were standardized to reveal the same spectral profile from a standard light source, then researchers could be confident that real-life experimental findings would be repeatable on any similar system. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Spectral filtering for plant production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, R.E.; McMahon, M.J.; Rajapakse, N.C.; Becoteau, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Research to date suggests that spectral filtering can be an effective alternative to chemical growth regulators for altering plant development. If properly implemented, it can be nonchemical and environmentally friendly. The aqueous CuSO{sub 4}, and CuCl{sub 2} solutions in channelled plastic panels have been shown to be effective filters, but they can be highly toxic if the solutions contact plants. Some studies suggest that spectral filtration limited to short EOD intervals can also alter plant development. Future research should be directed toward confirmation of the influence of spectral filters and exposure times on a broader range of plant species and cultivars. Efforts should also be made to identify non-noxious alternatives to aqueous copper solutions and/or to incorporate these chemicals permanently into plastic films and panels that can be used in greenhouse construction. It would also be informative to study the impacts of spectral filters on insect and microbal populations in plant growth facilities. The economic impacts of spectral filtering techniques should be assessed for each delivery methodology.

  10. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  11. New approach to spectral features modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brug, H. van; Scalia, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of spectral features, speckle effects, is explained, followed by a discussion on many aspects of spectral features generation. The next part gives an overview of means to limit the amplitude of the spectral features. This paper gives a discussion of all means to reduce the spectral

  12. Evaluation of coal mixture components using infrared-spectral parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, S.E.; Rus' yanova, N.D.; Popov, V.K.; Bubnovskaya, L.M.; Stepanov, Yu.V.; Belyaeva, L.I. (Vostochnyi Nauchno-Issledovatel' skii Uglekhimicheskii Institut (USSR))

    1989-07-01

    Discusses use of infrared spectrometers for evaluation of black coal supplied by 6 coal preparation plants to the Nizhnii Tagil coking plant. Infrared-spectral parameters as alternative to the following indices are characterized: ash content, volatile matter, thickness of plastic layer, vitrinite reflectivity, vitrinite content, sum of inertinite components. Coal sample preparation and evaluation using standard laboratory measuring instruments are analyzed. Correlations of spectral parameters with conventional parameters are evaluated. Evaluations showed that infrared spectrometers supply accurate information on coal quality. Measuring time is reduced; measuring accuracy is satisfactory. 3 refs.

  13. Spectral SAR Ecotoxicology of Ionic Liquids: The Daphnia magna Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to provide a unified theory of ionic liquids ecotoxicity, the recent spectral structure activity relationship (S-SAR algorithm is employed for testing the two additive models of anionic-cationic interaction containing ionic liquid activity: the causal and the endpoint, |0+〉 and |1+〉 models, respectively. As a working system, the Daphnia magna ecotoxicity was characterized through the formulated and applied spectral chemical-ecobiological interaction principles. Specific anionic-cationic-ionic-liquid rules of interaction along the developed mechanistic hypersurface map of the main ecotoxicity paths together with the so-called resonance limitation of the standard statistical correlation analysis were revealed.

  14. Spectral Power and Irradiance Responsivity Calibration of InSb Working-Standard Radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppeldauer, G; Rácz, M

    2000-11-01

    New, improved-performance InSb power-irradiance meters have been developed and characterized to maintain the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) spectral responsivity scale between 2 and 5.1 mum. The InSb radiometers were calibrated against the transfer-standard cryogenic bolometer that is tied to the primary-standard cryogenic radiometer of the NIST. The InSb radiometers serve as easy-to-use working standards for routine spectral power and irradiance responsivity calibrations. The spectral irradiance responsivities were derived from the spectral power responsivities by use of the measured area of the apertures in front of the InSb detectors.

  15. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    .e., the “cores”) comprising the functional TT decomposition. This result motivates an approximation scheme employing polynomial approximations of the cores. For functions with appropriate regularity, the resulting spectral tensor-train decomposition combines the favorable dimension-scaling of the TT......The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT...

  16. Use of Monte Carlo Event Generators for the study of 13 TeV pp collisions by ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Paul; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The use of NLO and multileg Monte Carlo generators by the ATLAS experiment in the analysis of 13 TeV data is discussed. Procedures to validate these generators by comparing results obtained using data collected at 7 TeV, 8 TeV and 13 TeV to the generator predictions are described. Techniques used to evaluate systematic uncertainties on Monte Carlo modelling are also discussed.

  17. Quantifying Responses of Spectral Vegetation Indices to Dead Materials in Mixed Grasslands

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohui Yang; Xulin Guo

    2014-01-01

    Spectral vegetation indices have been the primary resources for characterizing grassland vegetation based on remotely sensed data. However, the use of spectral indices for vegetation characterization in grasslands has been challenged by the confounding effects from external factors, such as soil properties, dead materials, and shadowing of vegetation canopies. Dead materials refer to the dead component of vegetation, including fallen litter and standing dead grasses accumulated from previous ...

  18. Classification of breast microcalcifications using spectral mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghammraoui, B.; Glick, S. J.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of spectral mammography to distinguish between type I calcifications, consisting of calcium oxalate dihydrate or weddellite compounds that are more often associated with benign lesions, and type II calcifications containing hydroxyapatite which are predominantly associated with malignant tumors. Methods: Using a ray tracing algorithm, we simulated the total number of x-ray photons recorded by the detector at one pixel from a single pencil-beam projection through a breast of 50/50 (adipose/glandular) tissues with inserted microcalcifications of different types and sizes. Material decomposition using two energy bins was then applied to characterize the simulated calcifications into hydroxyapatite and weddellite using maximumlikelihood estimation, taking into account the polychromatic source, the detector response function and the energy dependent attenuation. Results: Simulation tests were carried out for different doses and calcification sizes for multiple realizations. The results were summarized using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with the area under the curve (AUC) taken as an overall indicator of discrimination performance and showing high AUC values up to 0.99. Conclusion: Our simulation results obtained for a uniform breast imaging phantom indicate that spectral mammography using two energy bins has the potential to be used as a non-invasive method for discrimination between type I and type II microcalcifications to improve early breast cancer diagnosis and reduce the number of unnecessary breast biopsies.

  19. Exploratory Item Classification Via Spectral Graph Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunxiao; Li, Xiaoou; Liu, Jingchen; Xu, Gongjun; Ying, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale assessments are supported by a large item pool. An important task in test development is to assign items into scales that measure different characteristics of individuals, and a popular approach is cluster analysis of items. Classical methods in cluster analysis, such as the hierarchical clustering, K-means method, and latent-class analysis, often induce a high computational overhead and have difficulty handling missing data, especially in the presence of high-dimensional responses. In this article, the authors propose a spectral clustering algorithm for exploratory item cluster analysis. The method is computationally efficient, effective for data with missing or incomplete responses, easy to implement, and often outperforms traditional clustering algorithms in the context of high dimensionality. The spectral clustering algorithm is based on graph theory, a branch of mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The algorithm first constructs a graph of items, characterizing the similarity structure among items. It then extracts item clusters based on the graphical structure, grouping similar items together. The proposed method is evaluated through simulations and an application to the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire.

  20. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of the radio galaxy IC310

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraija, N.; Marinelli, A.; Galván-Gámez, A.; Aguilar-Ruiz, E.

    2017-03-01

    The radio galaxy IC310 located in the Perseus Cluster is one of the brightest objects in the radio and X-ray bands, and one of the closest active galactic nuclei observed in very-high energies. In GeV - TeV γ-rays, IC310 was detected in low and high flux states by the MAGIC telescopes from October 2009 to February 2010. Taking into account that the spectral energy distribution (SED) up to a few GeV seems to exhibit a double-peak feature and that a single-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model can explain all of the multiwavelength emission except for the non-simultaneous MAGIC emission, we interpret, in this work, the multifrequency data set of the radio galaxy IC310 in the context of homogeneous hadronic and leptonic models. In the leptonic framework, we present a multi-zone SSC model with two electron populations to explain the whole SED whereas for the hadronic model, we propose that a single-zone SSC model describes the SED up to a few GeVs and neutral pion decay products resulting from pγ interactions could describe the TeV - GeV γ-ray spectra. These interactions occur when Fermi-accelerated protons interact with the seed photons around the SSC peaks. We show that, in the leptonic model the minimum Lorentz factor of second electron population is exceedingly high γe ∼ 105 disfavoring this model, and in the hadronic model the required proton luminosity is not extremely high ∼1044 erg/s, provided that charge neutrality between the number of electrons and protons is given. Correlating the TeV γ-ray and neutrino spectra through photo-hadronic interactions, we find that the contribution of the emitting region of IC310 to the observed neutrino and ultra-high-energy cosmic ray fluxes are negligible.

  1. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays and prompt TeV gamma rays from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1020 eV. The synchrotron radiation of the highest energy protons accelerated within the GRB source should produce gamma rays up to TeV energies. Here we briefly discuss the implications on the energetics of the GRB from the point of view of the detectability of the prompt TeV 7-rays of proton-synchrotron origin in GRBs ...

  2. A Novel Method for High-Level Production of TEV Protease by Superfolder GFP Tag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Wu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of its stringent sequence specificity, tobacco etch virus (TEV protease is widely used to remove fusion tags from recombinant proteins. Due to the poor solubility of TEV protease, many strategies have been employed to increase the expression level of this enzyme. In our work, we introduced a novel method to produce TEV protease by using visible superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP as the fusion tag. The soluble production and catalytic activity of six variants of sfGFP-TEV was examined, and then the best variant was selected for large-scale production. After purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Q anion exchange chromatography, the best variant of sfGFP-TEV fusion protease was obtained with purity of over 98% and yield of over 320 mg per liter culture. The sfGFP-TEV had a similar catalytic activity to that of the original TEV protease. Our research showed a novel method of large-scale production of visible and functional TEV protease for structural genomics research and other applications.

  3. Advances in spectral inversion of time-domain induced polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    The extraction of spectral information in the inversion process of time-domain (TD) induced polarization (IP) data is changing the use of the TDIP method. Data interpretation is evolving from a qualitative description of the subsurface, able only to discriminate the presence of contrasts in charg......The extraction of spectral information in the inversion process of time-domain (TD) induced polarization (IP) data is changing the use of the TDIP method. Data interpretation is evolving from a qualitative description of the subsurface, able only to discriminate the presence of contrasts...... in chargeability parameters, towards a quantitative analysis of the investigated media, which allows for detailed soil- and rock-type characterization. In this work a review of the recent advances in spectral inversion of TDIP data is presented, in terms of: supported IP parameterizations; modelling of transmitter...

  4. Nonconforming mortar element methods: Application to spectral discretizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maday, Yvon; Mavriplis, Cathy; Patera, Anthony

    1988-01-01

    Spectral element methods are p-type weighted residual techniques for partial differential equations that combine the generality of finite element methods with the accuracy of spectral methods. Presented here is a new nonconforming discretization which greatly improves the flexibility of the spectral element approach as regards automatic mesh generation and non-propagating local mesh refinement. The method is based on the introduction of an auxiliary mortar trace space, and constitutes a new approach to discretization-driven domain decomposition characterized by a clean decoupling of the local, structure-preserving residual evaluations and the transmission of boundary and continuity conditions. The flexibility of the mortar method is illustrated by several nonconforming adaptive Navier-Stokes calculations in complex geometry.

  5. Robust spectral clustering using statistical sub-graph affinity model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin A Eichel

    Full Text Available Spectral clustering methods have been shown to be effective for image segmentation. Unfortunately, the presence of image noise as well as textural characteristics can have a significant negative effect on the segmentation performance. To accommodate for image noise and textural characteristics, this study introduces the concept of sub-graph affinity, where each node in the primary graph is modeled as a sub-graph characterizing the neighborhood surrounding the node. The statistical sub-graph affinity matrix is then constructed based on the statistical relationships between sub-graphs of connected nodes in the primary graph, thus counteracting the uncertainty associated with the image noise and textural characteristics by utilizing more information than traditional spectral clustering methods. Experiments using both synthetic and natural images under various levels of noise contamination demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve improved segmentation performance when compared to existing spectral clustering methods.

  6. Robust spectral clustering using statistical sub-graph affinity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichel, Justin A; Wong, Alexander; Fieguth, Paul; Clausi, David A

    2013-01-01

    Spectral clustering methods have been shown to be effective for image segmentation. Unfortunately, the presence of image noise as well as textural characteristics can have a significant negative effect on the segmentation performance. To accommodate for image noise and textural characteristics, this study introduces the concept of sub-graph affinity, where each node in the primary graph is modeled as a sub-graph characterizing the neighborhood surrounding the node. The statistical sub-graph affinity matrix is then constructed based on the statistical relationships between sub-graphs of connected nodes in the primary graph, thus counteracting the uncertainty associated with the image noise and textural characteristics by utilizing more information than traditional spectral clustering methods. Experiments using both synthetic and natural images under various levels of noise contamination demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve improved segmentation performance when compared to existing spectral clustering methods.

  7. Improving the Dynamic Emissivity Measurement Above 1000 K by Extending the Spectral Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, D.; Krenek, S.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.

    2018-01-01

    To improve the dynamic emissivity measurement, which is based on the laser-flash method, an array spectrometer is characterized regarding its spectral radiance responsivity for a spectrally resolved emissivity measurement above 1000 K in the wavelength range between 550 nm and 1100 nm. Influences like dark signals, the nonlinearity of the detector, the size-of-source effect, wavelength calibration and the spectral radiance responsivity of the system are investigated to obtain an uncertainty budget for the spectral radiance and emissivity measurements. Uncertainties for the spectral radiance of lower than a relative 2 % are achieved for wavelengths longer than 550 nm. Finally, the spectral emissivity of a graphite sample was determined in the temperature range between 1000 K and 1700 K, and the experimental data show a good repeatability and agreement with literature data.

  8. Spectral-Domain Measurements of Birefringence and Sensing Characteristics of a Side-Hole Microstructured Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waclaw Urbańczyk

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally characterized a birefringent side-hole microstructured fiber in the visible wavelength region. The spectral dependence of the group and phase modal birefringence was measured using the methods of spectral interferometry. The phase modal birefringence of the investigated fiber increases with wavelength, but its positive sign is opposite to the sign of the group modal birefringence. We also measured the sensing characteristics of the fiber using a method of tandem spectral interferometry. Spectral interferograms corresponding to different values of a physical parameter were processed to retrieve the spectral phase functions and to determine the spectral dependence of polarimetric sensitivity to strain, temperature and hydrostatic pressure. A negative sign of the polarimetric sensitivity was deduced from the simulation results utilizing the known modal birefringence dispersion of the fiber. Our experimental results show that the investigated fiber has a very high polarimetric sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure, reaching –200 rad x MPa–1 x m–1 at 750 nm.

  9. Spectral network based on component cells under the SOPHIA European project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Núñez, Rubén, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Antón, Ignacio; Askins, Steve; Sala, Gabriel [Instituto de Energía Solar - Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Domínguez, César; Voarino, Philippe [CEA-INES, 50 avenue du Lac Léman, 73375 Le Bourget-du-Lac (France); Steiner, Marc; Siefer, Gerald [Fraunhofer ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Fucci, Rafaelle; Roca, Franco [ENEA, P.le E.Fermi 1, Località Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy); Minuto, Alessandro; Morabito, Paolo [RSE, Via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    In the frame of the European project SOPHIA, a spectral network based on component (also called isotypes) cells has been created. Among the members of this project, several spectral sensors based on component cells and collimating tubes, so-called spectroheliometers, were installed in the last years, allowing the collection of minute-resolution spectral data useful for CPV systems characterization across Europe. The use of spectroheliometers has been proved useful to establish the necessary spectral conditions to perform power rating of CPV modules and systems. If enough data in a given period of time is collected, ideally a year, it is possible to characterize spectrally the place where measurements are taken, in the same way that hours of annual irradiation can be estimated using a pyrheliometer.

  10. Spectral and Temporal Laser Fluorescence Analysis Such as for Natural Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekalyuk, Alexander (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An Advanced Laser Fluorometer (ALF) can combine spectrally and temporally resolved measurements of laser-stimulated emission (LSE) for characterization of dissolved and particulate matter, including fluorescence constituents, in liquids. Spectral deconvolution (SDC) analysis of LSE spectral measurements can accurately retrieve information about individual fluorescent bands, such as can be attributed to chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), phycobiliprotein (PBP) pigments, or chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), among others. Improved physiological assessments of photosynthesizing organisms can use SDC analysis and temporal LSE measurements to assess variable fluorescence corrected for SDC-retrieved background fluorescence. Fluorescence assessments of Chl-a concentration based on LSE spectral measurements can be improved using photo-physiological information from temporal measurements. Quantitative assessments of PBP pigments, CDOM, and other fluorescent constituents, as well as basic structural characterizations of photosynthesizing populations, can be performed using SDC analysis of LSE spectral measurements.

  11. Spectral-spatial classification combined with diffusion theory based inverse modeling of hyperspectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Nordgaard, Hâvard B.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2016-02-01

    Hyperspectral imagery opens a new perspective for biomedical diagnostics and tissue characterization. High spectral resolution can give insight into optical properties of the skin tissue. However, at the same time the amount of collected data represents a challenge when it comes to decomposition into clusters and extraction of useful diagnostic information. In this study spectral-spatial classification and inverse diffusion modeling were employed to hyperspectral images obtained from a porcine burn model using a hyperspectral push-broom camera. The implemented method takes advantage of spatial and spectral information simultaneously, and provides information about the average optical properties within each cluster. The implemented algorithm allows mapping spectral and spatial heterogeneity of the burn injury as well as dynamic changes of spectral properties within the burn area. The combination of statistical and physics informed tools allowed for initial separation of different burn wounds and further detailed characterization of the injuries in short post-injury time.

  12. Spectral network based on component cells under the SOPHIA European project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Rubén; Antón, Ignacio; Askins, Steve; Sala, Gabriel; Domínguez, César; Voarino, Philippe; Steiner, Marc; Siefer, Gerald; Fucci, Rafaelle; Roca, Franco; Minuto, Alessandro; Morabito, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    In the frame of the European project SOPHIA, a spectral network based on component (also called isotypes) cells has been created. Among the members of this project, several spectral sensors based on component cells and collimating tubes, so-called spectroheliometers, were installed in the last years, allowing the collection of minute-resolution spectral data useful for CPV systems characterization across Europe. The use of spectroheliometers has been proved useful to establish the necessary spectral conditions to perform power rating of CPV modules and systems. If enough data in a given period of time is collected, ideally a year, it is possible to characterize spectrally the place where measurements are taken, in the same way that hours of annual irradiation can be estimated using a pyrheliometer.

  13. Spectral element simulation of ultrafiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.; Barker, Vincent A.; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    A spectral element method for simulating stationary 2-D ultrafiltration is presented. The mathematical model is comprised of the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity field of the fluid and a transport equation for the concentration of the solute. In addition to the presence of the velocity ve....... The performance of the spectral element code when applied to several ultrafiltration problems is reported. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.......A spectral element method for simulating stationary 2-D ultrafiltration is presented. The mathematical model is comprised of the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity field of the fluid and a transport equation for the concentration of the solute. In addition to the presence of the velocity...... vector in the transport equation, the system is coupled by the dependency of the fluid viscosity on the solute concentration and by a concentration-dependent boundary condition for the Navier-Stokes equations at the membrane surface. The spectral element discretization yields a nonlinear algebraic system...

  14. SPECTRAL DEPENDENT ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    solar cells. The effect of irradiance and spectral illumination on the cell performance was investigated. Finally, the applicability of the investigated thin. film a-Si:H ... ashizli, It has been applied in amorphousoilleon based thin film solar cells. ("Marlo/art ..... simulations. The 13th E. C. Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference.

  15. Spectral clustering with epidemic diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura M.; Lerman, Kristina; Garcia-Cardona, Cristina; Percus, Allon G.; Ghosh, Rumi

    2013-10-01

    Spectral clustering is widely used to partition graphs into distinct modules or communities. Existing methods for spectral clustering use the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the graph Laplacian, an operator that is closely associated with random walks on graphs. We propose a spectral partitioning method that exploits the properties of epidemic diffusion. An epidemic is a dynamic process that, unlike the random walk, simultaneously transitions to all the neighbors of a given node. We show that the replicator, an operator describing epidemic diffusion, is equivalent to the symmetric normalized Laplacian of a reweighted graph with edges reweighted by the eigenvector centralities of their incident nodes. Thus, more weight is given to edges connecting more central nodes. We describe a method that partitions the nodes based on the componentwise ratio of the replicator's second eigenvector to the first and compare its performance to traditional spectral clustering techniques on synthetic graphs with known community structure. We demonstrate that the replicator gives preference to dense, clique-like structures, enabling it to more effectively discover communities that may be obscured by dense intercommunity linking.

  16. A facile access to new diazepines derivatives: Spectral characterization and crystal structures of 7-(thiophene-2-yl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,4-diazepine and 2-thiophene-4-trifluoromethyl-1,5-benzodiazepine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Guillermo; Carrillo, David; Manzur, Carolina; Fuentealba, Mauricio; Roisnel, Thierry; Hamon, Jean-René

    2016-12-01

    The one-pot double condensation reaction of 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (2-TTA) with ethylendiamine or o-phenylenediamine, in a 2:1 stoichiometric molar ratio, leads to the formation of 7-(thiophene-2-yl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,4-diazepine 2 and 2-thiophene-4-trifluoromethyl-1,5-benzodiazepine 3, that were isolated in 56 and 53% yields, respectively. The bis(trifluoroacetamide)ethylene derivative 1 was also isolated in 32% yield as a side-product in the reaction of 2-TTA and ethylenediamine. Compounds 1-3 were fully characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and multinuclear (1H, 13C and 19F) NMR spectroscopy. In addition, their molecular identities and geometries have been authenticated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The spectroscopic and structural data confirm that the 1,4-diazepine 2 and the 1,5-benzodiazepine 3 exist in the imine-enamine and diimine tautomeric forms, respectively, both in solution and in the solid-state.

  17. Synthesis, spectral characterization, in vitro antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activities of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with 1,2,4-triazole Schiff bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagihalli, Gangadhar B; Avaji, Prakash Gouda; Patil, Sangamesh A; Badami, Prema S

    2008-12-01

    A series of metal complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II) have been synthesized with newly synthesized biologically active 1,2,4-triazole Schiff bases derived from the condensation of 3-substituted-4-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole and 8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, which have been characterized by elemental analyses, spectroscopic measurements (IR, UV-vis, fluorescence, ESR), magnetic measurements and thermal studies. Electrochemical study of the complexes is also reported. All the complexes are soluble to limited extent in common organic solvents but soluble to larger extent in DMF and DMSO and are non-electrolytes in DMF and DMSO. All these Schiff bases and their complexes have also been screened for their antibacterial (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and antifungal activities (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Cladosporium) by MIC method. The brine shrimp bioassay was also carried out to study their in vitro cytotoxic properties.

  18. Synthesis and spectral characterization of Schiff base complexes of Cu(II), Co(II), Zn(II) and VO(IV) containing 4-(4-aminophenyl)morpholine derivatives: Antimicrobial evaluation and anticancer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhahagani, K.; Mathan Kumar, S.; Chakkaravarthi, G.; Anitha, K.; Rajesh, J.; Ramu, A.; Rajagopal, G.

    2014-01-01

    Metal(II) chelates of Schiff bases derived from the condensation of 4-morpholinoaniline with substituted salicylaldehyde have been prepared and characterized by 1H NMR, IR, electronic, EPR, and magnetic measurement studies. The complexes are of the type M(X-MPMP)2 [where M = Cu(II), Co(II)), Zn(II), or VO(IV); MPMP = 2-[(4 morpholinophenyl imino) methyl] 4-X-phenol, X = Cl, (L1H), X = Br (L2H)]. Single crystal X-ray crystallography studies confirm the structure of newly synthesized Schiff bases. The Schiff bases act as bidentate monobasic ligands, coordinating through deprotonated phenolic oxygen and azomethine nitrogen atoms. The free ligands and metal complexes are screened for their biopotency. Metal complexes exhibit better activity than ligands. Anticancer activity of ligands and their metal complexes are evaluated in human heptocarcinoma(HepG2) cells. The preliminary bioassay indicates that the Schiff base and its zinc complex exhibit inhibitory activity against the human gastric cancer cell lines.

  19. Synthesis, spectral characterization, solution equilibria, in vitro antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes with Schiff base derived from 5-bromosalicylaldehyde and 2-aminomethylthiophene

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A.; Eldebss, Taha M. A.

    2011-09-01

    Schiff base namely 2-aminomethylthiophenyl-4-bromosalicylaldehyde (ATS)(4-bromo-2-(thiophen-2-yl-imino)methylphenol) and its metal complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, mass spectra, ESR and thermal analysis (TGA). The analytical data of the complexes show the formation of 1:2 [M:L] ratio of the formula [ML 2], where M represents Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cu(II) ions, while L represents the deprotonated Schiff base. IR spectra show that ATS is coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner through azomethine-N and phenolic-oxygen groups. The ligand and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disc diffusion method against the selected bacteria. A cytotoxicity of the compounds against colon (HCT116) and larynx (HEP2) cancer cells have been studied. Protonation constants of (ATS) ligand and stability constants of its Cu 2+, Co 2+, Mn 2+, Zn 2+ and Ni 2+ complexes were determined by potentiometric titration method in 50% (v/v) DMSO-water solution at ionic strength of 0.1 M NaNO 3.

  20. Synthesis, spectral characterization thermal stability, antimicrobial studies and biodegradation of starch–thiourea based biodegradable polymeric ligand and its coordination complexes with [Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, and Zn(II] metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nishat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A biodegradable polymer was synthesized by the modification reaction of polymeric starch with thiourea which is further modified by transition metals, Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II. All the polymeric compounds were characterized by (FT-IR spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy, 13C NMR spectroscopy, UV–visible spectra, magnetic moment measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and antibacterial activities. Polymer complexes of Mn(II, Co(II and Ni(II show octahedral geometry, while polymer complexes of Cu(II and Zn(II show square planar and tetrahedral geometry, respectively. The TGA revealed that all the polymer metal complexes are more thermally stable than their parental ligand. In addition, biodegradable studies of all the polymeric compounds were also carried out through ASTM-D-5338-93 standards of biodegradable polymers by CO2 evolution method which says that coordination decreases biodegradability. The antibacterial activity was screened with the agar well diffusion method against some selected microorganisms. Among all the complexes, the antibacterial activity of the Cu(II polymer–metal complex showed the highest zone of inhibition because of its higher stability constant.

  1. Multimodal Spectral Imaging of Cells Using a Transmission Diffraction Grating on a Light Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Dragan; Xu, Yang; Copus, Tyler; Saraswat, Suraj; Nauli, Surya M.

    2011-01-01

    A multimodal methodology for spectral imaging of cells is presented. The spectral imaging setup uses a transmission diffraction grating on a light microscope to concurrently record spectral images of cells and cellular organelles by fluorescence, darkfield, brightfield, and differential interference contrast (DIC) spectral microscopy. Initially, the setup was applied for fluorescence spectral imaging of yeast and mammalian cells labeled with multiple fluorophores. Fluorescence signals originating from fluorescently labeled biomolecules in cells were collected through triple or single filter cubes, separated by the grating, and imaged using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Cellular components such as nuclei, cytoskeleton, and mitochondria were spatially separated by the fluorescence spectra of the fluorophores present in them, providing detailed multi-colored spectral images of cells. Additionally, the grating-based spectral microscope enabled measurement of scattering and absorption spectra of unlabeled cells and stained tissue sections using darkfield and brightfield or DIC spectral microscopy, respectively. The presented spectral imaging methodology provides a readily affordable approach for multimodal spectral characterization of biological cells and other specimens. PMID:21639978

  2. Demonstration of spectral correlation control in a source of polarization-entangled photon pairs at telecom wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Thomas; Kolenderski, Piotr; Jennewein, Thomas

    2014-03-15

    Spectrally correlated photon pairs can be used to improve the performance of long-range fiber-based quantum communication protocols. We present a source based on spontaneous parametric downconversion, which allows one to control spectral correlations within the entangled photon pair without spectral filtering by changing the pump-pulse duration or the characteristics of the coupled spatial modes. The spectral correlations and polarization entanglement are characterized. We find that the generated photon pairs can feature both positive spectral correlations, decorrelation, or negative correlations at the same time as polarization entanglement with a high fidelity of 0.97 (no background subtraction) with the expected Bell state.

  3. A new Salen-type azo-azomethine ligand and its Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes: Synthesis, spectral characterization, crystal structure and photoluminescence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gozde; Kose, Muhammet; Zengin, Huseyin; McKee, Vickie; Kurtoglu, Mukerrem

    2015-11-05

    A novel Salen-type azo-azomethine ligand H2agen, 2,2'-{ethane-1,2-diylbis[nitrilomethylylidene]}bis{4-[ethylphenyldiazenyl]phenol}, formed by the 1:2M condensation of ethane-1,2-diamine with 5-[(4-ethylphenyl)diazenyl]-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and its nickel(II), copper(II), and zinc(II) complexes were synthesized and characterized by the spectroscopic and analytical methods. The UV-vis spectra of the ligand were investigated in three organic solvents (DMSO, DMF and CHCl3). The ligand shows two absorption bands assigned to π-π(∗) and n-π(∗) transitions in the solvents used. Cu(II), and Ni(II) are tetra-coordinate binding to two phenolic oxygens and two imine nitrogens in approximate square planar geometry. Zn(II) also coordinates using the same sites like other metals but gave tetragonal configuration. Molecular structure of the Cu(II) complex [Cu(agen)] was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. The X-ray data revealed that crystallographic imposed symmetry was absent for the complex molecule. In the structure, the Cu(II) ion is coordinated to two phenolate oxygen atoms and two imine nitrogen atoms of the azo-azomethine ligand with approximate square planar geometry. The ligand H2agen and its metal complexes exhibit strong blue emissions with irradiation. Fluorescence quantum yields and excited-state lifetimes for the ligand and its complexes were obtained. The H2agen ligand had a 35% quantum yield and a 3.27 ns excited-state lifetime. Complexation with metal ions caused reductions in intensities and quantum yields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Plot of invariant mass distribution of diphoton candidates after all selections of the inclusive analysis for the combined 7 TeV and 8 TeV data

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Invariant mass distribution of diphoton candidates after all selections of the inclusive analysis for the combined 7 TeV and 8 TeV data. The result of a fit to the data with the sum of a SM Higgs boson signal (with mH =126.8 GeV and free signal strength) and background is superimposed. The residuals of the data with respect to the fitted background are displayed in the lower panel.

  5. Search for contact interactions using the inclusive jet $P_{T}$ spectrum in PP collisions st $\\sqrt{s}$= 7 TEV

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey David Haas

    2013-01-01

    We report results of a search for a deviation in the jet production cross section from theprediction of perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order. The searchis conducted using a 7 TeV proton-proton data sample corresponding to an integratedluminosity of 5.0 fb−1 , collected with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the LargeHadron Collider. A deviation could arise from interactions characterized by a mass scaleΛ too high to be probed directly at the LHC. Such phenomena can be modeled as contactinteractions. No evidence of a deviation is found. Using a Bayesian method lower limits areset on Λ of 10.1 TeV and 14.1 TeV at 95% confidence level for models with destructive andconstructive interference, respectively.hierarchy, is located away from CERN. The 7 Tier-1 sites archive the LHC proton-protoncollision data that is initially processed at CERN. These sites provide access to all recordedand simulated data for the Tier-2 sites, via wide-area network (WAN) transfers. All centraldata proc...

  6. Spectral Target Detection using Schroedinger Eigenmaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado-Munoz, Leidy P.

    Applications of optical remote sensing processes include environmental monitoring, military monitoring, meteorology, mapping, surveillance, etc. Many of these tasks include the detection of specific objects or materials, usually few or small, which are surrounded by other materials that clutter the scene and hide the relevant information. This target detection process has been boosted lately by the use of hyperspectral imagery (HSI) since its high spectral dimension provides more detailed spectral information that is desirable in data exploitation. Typical spectral target detectors rely on statistical or geometric models to characterize the spectral variability of the data. However, in many cases these parametric models do not fit well HSI data that impacts the detection performance. On the other hand, non-linear transformation methods, mainly based on manifold learning algorithms, have shown a potential use in HSI transformation, dimensionality reduction and classification. In target detection, non-linear transformation algorithms are used as preprocessing techniques that transform the data to a more suitable lower dimensional space, where the statistical or geometric detectors are applied. One of these non-linear manifold methods is the Schroedinger Eigenmaps (SE) algorithm that has been introduced as a technique for semi-supervised classification. The core tool of the SE algorithm is the Schroedinger operator that includes a potential term that encodes prior information about the materials present in a scene, and enables the embedding to be steered in some convenient directions in order to cluster similar pixels together. A completely novel target detection methodology based on SE algorithm is proposed for the first time in this thesis. The proposed methodology does not just include the transformation of the data to a lower dimensional space but also includes the definition of a detector that capitalizes on the theory behind SE. The fact that target pixels and

  7. Spectral Clustering of Hermean craters hollows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Alice; Pajola, Maurizio; Cremonese, Gabriele; Carli, Cristian; Marzo, Giuseppe; Roush, Ted

    2017-04-01

    The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS, Hawkins et al., 2007) onboard NASA MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft, provided high-resolution images of "hollows", i.e. shallow, irregular, rimless, flat-floored depressions with bright interiors and halos, often found on crater walls, rims, floors and central peaks (Blewett et al., 2011, 2013). The formation mechanism of these features was suggested to be related to the depletion of subsurface volatiles (Blewett et al., 2011, Vaughan et al., 2012). To understand the hollows' mineralogical composition, which can provide new insights on Mercury's surface characterization, we applied a spectral clustering method to different craters where hollows are present. We chose, as first test case, the 20 km wide Dominici crater due to previous multiple spectral detection (Vilas et al., 2016). We used the MDIS WAC dataset covering Dominici crater with a scale of 935 m/pixel through eight filters, ranging from 0.433 to 0.996 μm. First, the images have been photometrically corrected using the Hapke parameters (Hapke et al., 2002) derived in Domingue et al. (2015). We then applied a statistical clustering over the entire dataset based on a K-means partitioning algorithm (Marzo et al., 2006). This approach was developed and evaluated by Marzo et al. (2006, 2008, 2009) and makes use of the Calinski and Harabasz criterion (Calinski, T., Harabasz, J., 1974) to identify the intrinsically natural number of clusters, making the process unsupervised. The natural number of ten clusters was identified and spectrally separates the Dominici surrounding terrains from its interior, as well as the two hollows from their edges. The units located on the brightest part of the south wall/rim of Dominici crater clearly present a wide absorption band between 0.558 and 0.828 μm. Hollows surrounding terrains typically present a red slope in the VNIR with a possible weak absorption band centered at 0.748

  8. Pattern recognition in volcano seismology - Reducing spectral dimensionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unglert, K.; Radic, V.; Jellinek, M.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the spectral content of volcano seismicity can relate to changes in volcanic activity. Low-frequency seismic signals often precede or accompany volcanic eruptions. However, they are commonly manually identified in spectra or spectrograms, and their definition in spectral space differs from one volcanic setting to the next. Increasingly long time series of monitoring data at volcano observatories require automated tools to facilitate rapid processing and aid with pattern identification related to impending eruptions. Furthermore, knowledge transfer between volcanic settings is difficult if the methods to identify and analyze the characteristics of seismic signals differ. To address these challenges we evaluate whether a machine learning technique called Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) can be used to characterize the dominant spectral components of volcano seismicity without the need for any a priori knowledge of different signal classes. This could reduce the dimensions of the spectral space typically analyzed by orders of magnitude, and enable rapid processing and visualization. Preliminary results suggest that the temporal evolution of volcano seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, can be reduced to as few as 2 spectral components by using a combination of SOMs and cluster analysis. We will further refine our methodology with several datasets from Hawai`i and Alaska, among others, and compare it to other techniques.

  9. High dynamic, spectral, and polarized natural light environment acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porral, Philippe; Callet, Patrick; Fuchs, Philippe; Muller, Thomas; Sandré-Chardonnal, Etienne

    2015-03-01

    In the field of image synthesis, the simulation of material's appearance requires a rigorous resolution of the light transport equation. This implies taking into account all the elements that may have an influence on the spectral radiance, and that are perceived by the human eye. Obviously, the reflectance properties of the materials have a major impact in the calculations, but other significant properties of light such as spectral distribution and polarization must also be taken into account, in order to expect correct results. Unfortunately real maps of the polarized or spectral environment corresponding to a real sky do not exist. Therefore, it seemed necessary to focus our work on capturing such data, in order to have a system that qualifies all the properties of light and capable of powering simulations in a renderer software. As a consequence, in this work, we develop and characterize a device designed to capture the entire light environment, by taking into account both the dynamic range of the spectral distribution and the polarization states, in a measurement time of less than two minutes. We propose a data format inspired by polarimetric imaging and fitted for a spectral rendering engine, which exploits the "Stokes-Mueller formalism."

  10. 2 TeV walking technirho at LHC?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori S. Fukano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS collaboration has recently reported an excess of about 2.5 σ global significance at around 2 TeV in the diboson channel with the boson-tagged fat dijets, which may imply a new resonance beyond the standard model. We provide a possible explanation of the excess as the isospin-triplet technivector mesons (technirhos, denoted as ρΠ±,3 of the walking technicolor in the case of the one-family model as a benchmark. As the effective theory for the walking technicolor at the scales relevant to the LHC experiment, we take a scale-invariant version of the hidden local symmetry model so constructed as to accommodate technipions, technivector mesons, and the technidilaton in such a way that the model respects spontaneously broken chiral and scale symmetries of the underlying walking technicolor. In particular, the technidilaton, a (pseudo Nambu–Goldstone boson of the (approximate scale symmetry predicted in the walking technicolor, has been shown to be successfully identified with the 125 GeV Higgs. Currently available LHC limits on those technihadrons are used to fix the couplings of technivector mesons to the standard-model fermions and weak gauge bosons. We find that the technirhos are mainly produced through the Drell–Yan process and predominantly decay to the dibosons, which accounts for the currently reported excess at around 2 TeV. The consistency with the electroweak precision test and other possible discovery channels of the 2 TeV technirhos are also addressed.

  11. Modelling and validation of spectral reflectance for the colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidovic-Rowe, Dzena; Claridge, Ela

    2005-03-01

    The spectral reflectance of the colon is known to be affected by malignant and pre-malignant changes in the tissue. As part of long-term research on the derivation of diagnostically important parameters characterizing colon histology, we have investigated the effects of the normal histological variability on the remitted spectra. This paper presents a detailed optical model of the normal colon comprising mucosa, submucosa and the smooth muscle layer. Each layer is characterized by five variable histological parameters: the volume fraction of blood, the haemoglobin saturation, the size of the scattering particles, including collagen, the volume fraction of the scattering particles and the layer thickness, and three optical parameters: the anisotropy factor, the refractive index of the medium and the refractive index of the scattering particles. The paper specifies the parameter ranges corresponding to normal colon tissue, including some previously unpublished ones. Diffuse reflectance spectra were modelled using the Monte Carlo method. Validation of the model-generated spectra against measured spectra demonstrated that good correspondence was achieved between the two. The analysis of the effect of the individual histological parameters on the behaviour of the spectra has shown that the spectral variability originates mainly from changes in the mucosa. However, the submucosa and the muscle layer must be included in the model as they have a significant constant effect on the spectral reflectance above 600 nm. The nature of variations in the spectra also suggests that it may be possible to carry out model inversion and to recover parameters characterizing the colon from multi-spectral images. A preliminary study, in which the mucosal blood and collagen parameters were modified to reflect histopathological changes associated with colon cancer, has shown that the spectra predicted by our model resemble measured spectral reflectance of adenocarcinomas. This suggests that

  12. Precision Measurement of the ($e^+ + e^−$) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray ($e^+ + e^−$) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million ($e^+ + e^−$) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=−3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale).

  13. ATLAS 13 TeV Stable Beam Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Display of a proton-proton collision event recorded by ATLAS on 3 June 2015, with the first LHC stable beams at a collision energy of 13 TeV. Tracks reconstructed from hits in the inner tracking detector are shown as arcs curving in the solenoidal magnetic field. The green and yellow bars indicate energy deposits in the liquid argon and scintillating-tile calorimeters, clustered in a structure typical of a di-jet event. The transverse momentum of the jets are about 200 GeV and 170 GeV.

  14. High precision fundamental constants at the TeV scale

    CERN Document Server

    Moch, S.; Alekhin, S.; Blumlein, J.; de la Cruz, L.; Dittmaier, S.; Dowling, M.; Erler, J.; Espinosa, J.R.; Fuster, J.; Garcia i Tormo, X.; Hoang, A.H.; Huss, A.; Kluth, S.; Mulders, M.; Papanastasiou, A.S.; Piclum, J.; Rabbertz, K.; Schwinn, C.; Schulze, M.; Shintani, E.; Uwer, P.; Zerf, N.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 2014 Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics (MITP) scientific program on "High precision fundamental constants at the TeV scale". The two outstanding parameters in the Standard Model dealt with during the MITP scientific program are the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ and the top-quark mass $m_t$. Lacking knowledge on the value of those fundamental constants is often the limiting factor in the accuracy of theoretical predictions. The current status on $\\alpha_s$ and $m_t$ has been reviewed and directions for future research have been identified.

  15. Inelastic proton cross-section at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Myska, Miroslav; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Poster describes the recent measurement of the inelastic cross-section at 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector, extracted with independent measurements of the rate of inelastic collisions and the LHC luminosity. The result of 79.3 $\\pm$ 2.9 mb has been obtained after extrapolation to the full phase space and is compared with a range of theoretical predictions. In addition, the fraction of diffractive events is measured using two event selections. The low-luminosity data of total integrated luminosity of 60.1 $\\mu b^{-1}$ recorded in June 2016 was used.

  16. Design of a 6 TeV muon collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M. -H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cai, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Palmer, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-19

    A design of a muon collider ring with the center of mass energy of 6 TeV is presented. The ring circumference is about 6.3 km, and the beta functions at collision point are 1 cm in both planes. The ring linear optics, the non-linear chromaticity correction scheme in the Interaction Region (IR), and the additional non-linear field orthogonal knobs are described. The IR magnet specifications are based on the maximum pole tip field of 20 T in dipoles and 15 T in quadrupoles. The results of the beam dynamics optimization for maximum dynamic aperture are presented.

  17. Design of a 6 TeV Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M-H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cai, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Palmer, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A design of a muon collider ring with the center of mass energy of 6 TeV is presented. The ring circumference is about 6.3 km, and the $\\beta$ functions at collision point are 1 cm in both planes. The ring linear optics, the non-linear chromaticity correction scheme in the Interaction Region (IR), and the additional non-linear field orthogonal knobs are described. The IR magnet specifications are based on the maximum pole tip field of 20 T in dipoles and 15 T in quadrupoles. The results of the beam dynamics optimization for maximum dynamic aperture are presented.

  18. The FiDel model at 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aquilina, N; Hagen, P; Lamont, M; Langner, A S; Todesco, E; Tomas, R; Wenninger, J; Sammut, N

    2014-01-01

    After the long shut down of 2013-2014, the LHC energy will be pushed toward 7 TeV. In this range of energy, the main magnets will enter a new regime. For this reason, this paper will present a detailed study of the performance of the FiDeL model that could be critical for the operation in 2015. In particular this paper will study the saturation component and its precision in the model, the errors due to the hysteresis, and an estimate of the dynamic effects for the 7 TeVoperation.

  19. W-tagging performance in 13 TeV simulation

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In the new energy regime explored by the Large Hadron Collider, it has become important to distinguish between jets originating from a single quark/gluon ("one-prong") and jets originating from the merging of the decay products of a W boson ("two-prong"). Several different algorithms have been developed to identify such merged W jets, with the same techniques also applicable for tagging highly energetic Z and Higgs bosons. In this note, the mistagging rate and efficiency for tagging W jets is measured in 13 TeV simulation for three different W-tagging algorithms.

  20. Quark, gluon...plasma! #13TeV

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Follow Italian @ALICEexperiment physicist Chiara Zampolli from INFN Bologna, Italy, as she shares her thoughts about the new physics frontiers opening up when the LHC begins collisions at the higher energy of #13TeV. Each week a new video will be uploaded to https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... allowing you to follow physicists from @ATLASexperiment @ALICEexperiment @CMSexperiment or @LHCbExperiment as the search the new frontiers in physics. Read more about these new frontiers in physics: http://cern.ch/go/x8VH

  1. Stepping into the unknown #13TeV

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Follow Polish @CMSexperiment physicist Piotr Traczyk from Universita di Roma La Sapienza, INFN, Italy, as he shares his thoughts about the new physics frontiers opening up now that the LHC has collisions at the higher energy of #13TeV. Each week a new video has been uploaded to https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... allowing you to follow physicists from @ATLASexperiment @ALICEexperiment @CMSexperiment or @LHCbExperiment as they search the new frontiers in physics. This is the last video in the series. Read more about these new frontiers in physics: http://cern.ch/go/x8VH

  2. Study of Diffractive Bremsstrahlung at 13 TeV LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Czekierda, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Feasibility studies of the diffractive bremsstrahlung measurement at the LHC at $\\sqrt s$ = 13 TeV are presented. The method considered for this measurement uses the ATLAS detector and, in particular, the Zero Degree Calorimeter and the ATLAS Forward Proton detectors. The signal and background processes were generated with GenEx and PYTHIA 8.2 generators, respectively. The obtained fiducial cross sections are 1.2 ub for the signal and 6 ub for the background. Further reduction of the background is possible by the optimisation of event selection cuts.

  3. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showed that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.

  4. Spectral computations for bounded operators

    CERN Document Server

    Ahues, Mario; Limaye, Balmohan

    2001-01-01

    Exact eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and principal vectors of operators with infinite dimensional ranges can rarely be found. Therefore, one must approximate such operators by finite rank operators, then solve the original eigenvalue problem approximately. Serving as both an outstanding text for graduate students and as a source of current results for research scientists, Spectral Computations for Bounded Operators addresses the issue of solving eigenvalue problems for operators on infinite dimensional spaces. From a review of classical spectral theory through concrete approximation techniques to finite dimensional situations that can be implemented on a computer, this volume illustrates the marriage of pure and applied mathematics. It contains a variety of recent developments, including a new type of approximation that encompasses a variety of approximation methods but is simple to verify in practice. It also suggests a new stopping criterion for the QR Method and outlines advances in both the iterative refineme...

  5. INVESTIGATING BROADBAND VARIABILITY OF THE TeV BLAZAR 1ES 1959+650

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Hughes, Z.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nelson, T.; Nieto, D.; de Bhróithe, A. O' Faoláin; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Rajotte, J.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sadun, A.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Sheidaei, F.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Theiling, M.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, and B.; Böttcher, M.; Fumagalli, M.

    2014-12-03

    We summarize broadband observations of the TeV-emitting blazar 1ES 1959+650, including optical R-band observations by the robotic telescopes Super-LOTIS and iTelescope, UV observations by Swift Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope, X-ray observations by the Swift X-ray Telescope, high-energy gamma-ray observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope, and very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations by VERITAS above 315 GeV, all taken between 2012 April 17 and 2012 June 1 (MJD 56034 and 56079). The contemporaneous variability of the broadband spectral energy distribution is explored in the context of a simple synchrotron self Compton (SSC) model. In the SSC emission scenario, we find that the parameters required to represent the high state are significantly different than those in the low state. Motivated by possible evidence of gas in the vicinity of the blazar, we also investigate a reflected emission model to describe the observed variability pattern. This model assumes that the non-thermal emission from the jet is reflected by a nearby cloud of gas, allowing the reflected emission to re-enter the blob and produce an elevated gamma-ray state with no simultaneous elevated synchrotron flux. The model applied here, although not required to explain the observed variability pattern, represents one possible scenario which can describe the observations. As applied to an elevated VHE state of 66% of the Crab Nebula flux, observed on a single night during the observation period, the reflected emission scenario does not support a purely leptonic non-thermal emission mechanism. The reflected emission model does, however, predict a reflected photon field with sufficient energy to enable elevated gamma-ray emission via pion production with protons of energies between 10 and 100 TeV.

  6. INVESTIGATING BROADBAND VARIABILITY OF THE TeV BLAZAR 1ES 1959+650

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliu, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T.; Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Barnacka, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Berger, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bird, R.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Chen, X. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Cui, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Eisch, J. D., E-mail: amy.furniss@gmail.com, E-mail: Markus.Bottcher@nwu.ac.za [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2014-12-20

    We summarize broadband observations of the TeV-emitting blazar 1ES 1959+650, including optical R-band observations by the robotic telescopes Super-LOTIS and iTelescope, UV observations by Swift Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope, X-ray observations by the Swift X-ray Telescope, high-energy gamma-ray observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope, and very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations by VERITAS above 315 GeV, all taken between 2012 April 17 and 2012 June 1 (MJD 56034 and 56079). The contemporaneous variability of the broadband spectral energy distribution is explored in the context of a simple synchrotron self Compton (SSC) model. In the SSC emission scenario, we find that the parameters required to represent the high state are significantly different than those in the low state. Motivated by possible evidence of gas in the vicinity of the blazar, we also investigate a reflected emission model to describe the observed variability pattern. This model assumes that the non-thermal emission from the jet is reflected by a nearby cloud of gas, allowing the reflected emission to re-enter the blob and produce an elevated gamma-ray state with no simultaneous elevated synchrotron flux. The model applied here, although not required to explain the observed variability pattern, represents one possible scenario which can describe the observations. As applied to an elevated VHE state of 66% of the Crab Nebula flux, observed on a single night during the observation period, the reflected emission scenario does not support a purely leptonic non-thermal emission mechanism. The reflected emission model does, however, predict a reflected photon field with sufficient energy to enable elevated gamma-ray emission via pion production with protons of energies between 10 and 100 TeV.

  7. Chebyshev and Fourier spectral methods

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd, John P

    2001-01-01

    Completely revised text focuses on use of spectral methods to solve boundary value, eigenvalue, and time-dependent problems, but also covers Hermite, Laguerre, rational Chebyshev, sinc, and spherical harmonic functions, as well as cardinal functions, linear eigenvalue problems, matrix-solving methods, coordinate transformations, methods for unbounded intervals, spherical and cylindrical geometry, and much more. 7 Appendices. Glossary. Bibliography. Index. Over 160 text figures.

  8. Understanding Big Data Spectral Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Couillet, Romain; Benaych-Georges, Florent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This article introduces an original approach to understand the behavior of standard kernel spectral clustering algorithms (such as the Ng–Jordan–Weiss method) for large dimensional datasets. Precisely, using advanced methods from the field of random matrix theory and assuming Gaussian data vectors, we show that the Laplacian of the kernel matrix can asymptotically be well approximated by an analytically tractable equivalent random matrix. The analysis of the former all...

  9. Remote application for spectral collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Shelli R.; Steele, R. J.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Firpi, Alexer H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the area of collecting field spectral data using a spectrometer, it is common to have the instrument over the material of interest. In certain instances it is beneficial to have the ability to remotely control the spectrometer. While several systems have the ability to use a form of connectivity to capture the measurement it is essential to have the ability to control the settings. Additionally, capturing reference information (metadata) about the setup, system configuration, collection, location, atmospheric conditions, and sample information is necessary for future analysis leading towards material discrimination and identification. This has the potential to lead to cumbersome field collection and a lack of necessary information for post processing and analysis. The method presented in this paper describes a capability to merge all parts of spectral collection from logging reference information to initial analysis as well as importing information into a web-hosted spectral database. This allows the simplification of collecting, processing, analyzing and storing field spectra for future analysis and comparisons. This concept is developed for field collection of thermal data using the Designs and Prototypes (D&P) Hand Portable FT-IR Spectrometer (Model 102). The remote control of the spectrometer is done with a customized Android application allowing the ability to capture reference information, process the collected data from radiance to emissivity using a temperature emissivity separation algorithm and store the data into a custom web-based service. The presented system of systems allows field collected spectra to be used for various applications by spectral analysts in the future.

  10. A wide spectral range photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, C; Menzenbach, P; Bladt, H; Niessner, R

    2012-11-06

    A photoacoustic spectrometer for the measurement of aerosol absorption spectra, based on the excitation of a pulsed nanosecond optical parametrical oscillator (OPO), will be introduced. This spectrometer is working at ambient pressure and can be used to detect and characterize different classes of aerosols. The spectrometer features a spectral range of 410 to 2500 nm and a sensitivity of 2.5 × 10(-7) m(-1) at 550 nm. A full characterization of the system in the visible spectral range is demonstrated, and the potential of the system for near IR measurement is discussed. In the example of different kinds of soot particles, the performance of the spectrometer was assessed. As we demonstrate, it is possible to determine a specific optical absorption per particle by a combination of the new spectrometer with an aerosol particle counter.

  11. Abundance estimation of spectrally similar minerals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates a spectral unmixing method for estimating the partial abundance of spectrally similar minerals in complex mixtures. The method requires formulation of a linear function of individual spectra of individual minerals. The first...

  12. Calibration with near-continuous spectral measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Rasmussen, Michael; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    In chemometrics traditional calibration in case of spectral measurements express a quantity of interest (e.g. a concentration) as a linear combination of the spectral measurements at a number of wavelengths. Often the spectral measurements are performed at a large number of wavelengths and in thi...... by an example in which the octane number of gasoline is related to near infrared spectral measurements. The performance is found to be much better that for the traditional calibration methods....

  13. Life is good at 13 TeV

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The second run of the LHC will start in 2015, when the beams of protons will reach 6.5 TeV of energy and the collisions will happen at 13 TeV. What will physicists look for after the discovery of the Higgs boson?   Life beyond the discovery of the Higgs boson is full of exciting possibilities. “When we were looking for the Higgs boson, we knew it would be difficult to discover but we also knew where to search and how,” says Ignatios Antoniadis, Head of the Theory Unit of CERN’s Physics Department. “The electroweak precision tests of LEP and other experiments had already suggested that the Higgs boson should exist and should be light, not very far from the LEP boundary. Now that we have completed the picture of the Standard Model, we are entering a totally new territory.” The new territory is what scientists call “beyond the Standard Model” physics. It is populated by open-ended questions, including: What is Dark Matter mad...

  14. Deconfinement of Quarks with TeV Attosecond Photon Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2010-02-01

    Recently, I have proposed a novel heuristic method for the deconfinement of quarks.footnotetextM. Gell-Mann. The Quark and the Jaguar: Adventures in the Simple and the Complex (New York, NY: W.H. Freeman and Co., 1994) [cf. M. Gell-Mann, The Garden of Live Flowers in: V. Stefan (Editor), Physics and Society. Essays Honoring Victor Frederick Weisskopf (Springer, 1998), pp. 109-121]. It proceeds in two phases.footnotetextV. Alexander Stefan, On a Heuristic Point of View About Inertial Deconfinement of Quarks, American Physical Society, 2009 APS April Meeting, May 2-5, 2009, abstract #E1.038. Firstly, a frozen hydrogen pellet is inertially confined by the ultra-intense lasers up to a solid state density. Secondly, a solid state nano-pellet is ``punched'' by the photon beam created in the beat wave driven free electron laser (BW-FEL), leading to the ``rapture'' (in a ``karate chop'' model) of the ``MIT Bag''footnotetextJ. I. Friedman and H. Kendall, Viki, in: V. Stefan (Editor), Physics and Society. (Springer, 1998), pp. 103-108]. before the asymptotically free quarks move apart. Hereby, I propose TeV, a few 100s attosecond, photon beams in interaction with the nano-pellet. The threshold ``rapture force'' of the TeV attosecond photon is 10^7 N. )

  15. M rate at TE. Monitoring at TeV energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, Daniela [Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Bretz, Thomas [RWTH Aachen (Germany); Gonzalez, Magdalena; Alfaro, Ruben [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Tovmassian, Gagik [Instituto de Astronomia Sede Ensenada (Mexico)

    2016-07-01

    A dedicated long-term monitoring programm at TeV energies has been started by the FACT project about four years ago. Being limited to one site, gaps due to the rotation of the Earth remain in the measured light curves. This makes it difficult to study typical variability time scales of few hours to one day. To allow for systematic studies of continuous observations over up to 12 hours, a second telescope is being installed at a site in about six hours distance in longitude. For the M rate at TE (Monitoring at TeV energies) telescope, a mount from a previous experiment is being refurbished and will be equipped with a new camera. Using silicon based photo sensors like in FACT, an excellent and stable performance will be achieved. M rate at TE is a joint project of German and Mexican universities which aims at extending the blazar monitoring to so far unexplored time ranges. In the presentation, the status of this emerging project is reported.

  16. Little String Theory at a TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Giveon, Amit; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Dimopoulos, Savas; Giveon, Amit

    2001-01-01

    We propose a framework where the string scale as well as all compact dimensions are at the electroweak scale $\\sim$ TeV$^{-1}$. The weakness of gravity is attributed to the small value of the string coupling $g_s \\sim 10^{-16}$, presumably a remnant of the dilaton's runaway behavior, suggesting the possibility of a common solution to the hierarchy and dilaton-runaway problems. In spite of the small $g_s$, in type II string theories with gauge interactions localized in the vicinity of NS5-branes, the standard model gauge couplings are of order one and are associated with the sizes of compact dimensions. At a TeV these theories exhibit higher dimensional and stringy behavior. The models are holographically dual to a higher dimensional non-critical string theory and this can be used to compute the experimentally accessible spectrum and self-couplings of the little strings. In spite of the stringy behavior, gravity remains weak and can be ignored at collider energies. The Damour-Polyakov mechanism is an automatic...

  17. USGS Spectral Library Version 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Pearson, Neil C.; Wise, Richard A.; Benzel, William M.; Lowers, Heather A.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Klein, Anna J.

    2017-04-10

    We have assembled a library of spectra measured with laboratory, field, and airborne spectrometers. The instruments used cover wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the far infrared (0.2 to 200 microns [μm]). Laboratory samples of specific minerals, plants, chemical compounds, and manmade materials were measured. In many cases, samples were purified, so that unique spectral features of a material can be related to its chemical structure. These spectro-chemical links are important for interpreting remotely sensed data collected in the field or from an aircraft or spacecraft. This library also contains physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures. Four different spectrometer types were used to measure spectra in the library: (1) Beckman™ 5270 covering the spectral range 0.2 to 3 µm, (2) standard, high resolution (hi-res), and high-resolution Next Generation (hi-resNG) models of Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) field portable spectrometers covering the range from 0.35 to 2.5 µm, (3) Nicolet™ Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) interferometer spectrometers covering the range from about 1.12 to 216 µm, and (4) the NASA Airborne Visible/Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer AVIRIS, covering the range 0.37 to 2.5 µm. Measurements of rocks, soils, and natural mixtures of minerals were made in laboratory and field settings. Spectra of plant components and vegetation plots, comprising many plant types and species with varying backgrounds, are also in this library. Measurements by airborne spectrometers are included for forested vegetation plots, in which the trees are too tall for measurement by a field spectrometer. This report describes the instruments used, the organization of materials into chapters, metadata descriptions of spectra and samples, and possible artifacts in the spectral measurements. To facilitate greater application of the spectra, the library has also been convolved to selected spectrometer and imaging spectrometers sampling and

  18. Spectral properties of generalized eigenparameter dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jost function, spectrum, the spectral singularities, and the properties of the principal vectors corresponding to the spectral singularities of L, if. ∞Σn=1 n(∣1 - an∣ + ∣bnl) < ∞. Mathematics Subject Classication (2010): 34L05, 34L40, 39A70, 47A10, 47A75. Key words: Discrete equations, eigenparameter, spectral analysis, ...

  19. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given ...

  20. Calibrating spectral images using penalized likelihood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Glasbey, C.

    2003-01-01

    A new method is presented for automatic correction of distortions and for spectral calibration (which band corresponds to which wavelength) of spectral images recorded by means of a spectrograph. The method consists of recording a bar-like pattern with an illumination source with spectral bands

  1. A General Framework for Analyzing, Characterizing, and Implementing Spectrally Modulated, Spectrally Encoded Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    delay is evident in error control techniques like Turbo coding, IR (see Sect. 2.3.1.3), and hybrid ARQ (see Sect. 2.4.2.2). Redundancy Non uniform...V. Hovinen, R. Tesi , J. J. J. Iinatti, and M. Latva-aho. “On the UWB System Coexistence with GSM900, UMTS/WCDMA, and GPS”. IEEE J. Select. Areas...Commun., 20(9):1712–1721, December 2002. 78. Hamalainen, M., R. Tesi , and J. Iinatti. “UWB Coexistence with IEEE 802.11a and UMTS in Modified Saleh

  2. SUB-PeV NEUTRINOS FROM TeV UNIDENTIFIED SOURCES IN THE GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, D. B.; Kashiyama, K.; Meszaros, P., E-mail: dfox@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: kzk15@psu.edu, E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The IceCube collaboration discovery of 28 high-energy neutrinos over the energy range 30 TeV {approx}< {epsilon}{sub {nu}} {approx}< 1 PeV, a 4.3{sigma} excess over expected backgrounds, represents the first high-confidence detection of cosmic neutrinos at these energies. In light of this discovery, we explore the possibility that some of the sub-PeV cosmic neutrinos might originate in our Galaxy's TeV unidentified (TeV UnID) sources. While typically resolved at TeV energies, these sources lack prominent radio or X-ray counterparts, and so have been considered promising sites for hadron acceleration within our Galaxy. Modeling the TeV UnID sources as Galactic hypernova remnants, we predict sub-PeV neutrino fluxes and spectra consistent with their contributing a minority of n{sub {nu}} {approx}< 2 of the observed events. This is consistent with our analysis of the spatial distribution of the sub-PeV neutrinos and TeV UnID sources, which finds that a best-fit of one, and maximum of 3.8 (at 90% confidence), of the Almost-Equal-To 16 non-atmospheric sub-PeV neutrinos may originate in the TeV UnID sources, with the remaining 75%-95% of events being drawn from an isotropic background. If our scenario is correct, we expect excess sub-PeV neutrinos to accumulate along the Galactic plane, within |l| {approx}< {+-} 30 Degree-Sign of the Galactic center and in the Cygnus region, as observations by IceCube and other high-energy neutrino facilities go forward. Our scenario also has implications for radio, X-ray, and TeV observations of the TeV UnID sources.

  3. SHG FROG characterization of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltuška, Andrius; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate phase and amplitude characterization is essential for many ultrashort-pulse applications. Because autocorrelation measurement allows only a rough estimate of pulse duration and does not reveal spectral structure, we adapted the second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating

  4. First 13TeV collisions, for tuning the LHC, seen by CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    McCauley, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Late at night on 20 May 2015, the LHC delivered its first 13TeV collisions to the detectors, to tune the accelerator as part of its commissioning. These event show the collisions recorded by CMS on 20 May (without the Tracker switched on) and on 21 May (with the Tracker). Read more: - http://home.web.cern.ch/about/updates/2015/05/protons-set-collide-13-tev-prepare-physics - http://home.web.cern.ch/about/updates/2015/05/first-images-collisions-13-tev

  5. Upper Limits on TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrick, A. D.; Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Akerlof, C. W.; Biller, S.; Buckley, J.; Chantell, M.; Cawley, M. F.; Connaughton, V.; Fegan, D. J.; Fennell, S.

    1995-01-01

    The results of a search for TeV gamma-ray emission from 35 active galactic nuclei (AGNS) using the Whipple Observatory High Resolution Atmospheric Cerenkov Camera are reported. Fifteen of these objects have been detected at GeV energies by the EGRET experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. None of the 35 objects gave a signal at the 3 sigma level; Mrk 421 remains the only AGN detected at TeV energies. The absence of a TeV signal may imply a change in the primary source spectrum and/or the effect of absorption by pair production on intergalactic infrared photons.

  6. Di-muon event recorded by the CMS detector (Run 2, 13 TeV)

    CERN Multimedia

    Mc Cauley, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This image shows a collision event with the largest-mass muon pair so far observed by the CMS detector in proton-collision data collected in 2015. The mass of the di-muon system is 2.4 TeV. One muon, with a transverse momentum of 0.7 TeV, goes through the Drift Tubes in the central region, while the second, with a transverse momentum of 1.0 TeV, hits the Cathode Strip Chambers in the forward region. Both muons satisfy the high-transverse-momentum muon selection criteria.

  7. Spectral multitude and spectral dynamics reflect changing conjugation length in single molecules of oligophenylenevinylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule study of phenylenevinylene oligomers revealed distinct spectral forms due to different conjugation lengths which are determined by torsional defects. Large spectral jumps between different spectral forms were ascribed to torsional flips of a single phenylene ring. These spectral changes reflect the dynamic nature of electron delocalization in oligophenylenevinylenes and enable estimation of the phenylene torsional barriers. © 2012 The Owner Societies.

  8. Adaptive optimal spectral range for dynamically changing scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Ephi; Siman-tov, Avihay; Peles, David

    2012-06-01

    A novel multispectral video system that continuously optimizes both its spectral range channels and the exposure time of each channel autonomously, under dynamic scenes, varying from short range-clear scene to long range-poor visibility, is currently being developed. Transparency and contrast of high scattering medium of channels with spectral ranges in the near infrared is superior to the visible channels, particularly to the blue range. Longer wavelength spectral ranges that induce higher contrast are therefore favored. Images of 3 spectral channels are fused and displayed for (pseudo) color visualization, as an integrated high contrast video stream. In addition to the dynamic optimization of the spectral channels, optimal real-time exposure time is adjusted simultaneously and autonomously for each channel. A criterion of maximum average signal, derived dynamically from previous frames of the video stream is used (Patent Application - International Publication Number: WO2009/093110 A2, 30.07.2009). This configuration enables dynamic compatibility with the optimal exposure time of a dynamically changing scene. It also maximizes the signal to noise ratio and compensates each channel for the specified value of daylight reflections and sensors response for each spectral range. A possible implementation is a color video camera based on 4 synchronized, highly responsive, CCD imaging detectors, attached to a 4CCD dichroic prism and combined with a common, color corrected, lens. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) technique is then applied for real time "dimensional collapse" in color space, in order to select and fuse, for clear color visualization, the 3 most significant principal channels out of at least 4 characterized by high contrast and rich details in the image data.

  9. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray e+ plus e- Spectrum from 20 GeV to 1 TeV with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bogaert, G.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Pisa /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; /more authors..

    2012-05-14

    Designed as a high-sensitivity gamma-ray observatory, the Fermi Large Area Telescope is also an electron detector with a large acceptance exceeding 2 m{sup 2}sr at 300 GeV. Building on the gamma-ray analysis, we have developed an efficient electron detection strategy which provides sufficient background rejection for measurement of the steeply-falling electron spectrum up to 1 TeV. Our high precision data show that the electron spectrum falls with energy as E{sup -3.0} and does not exhibit prominent spectral features. Interpretations in terms of a conventional diffusive model as well as a potential local extra component are briefly discussed.

  10. Pion, kaon, and proton production in central Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt[s(NN)] = 2.76 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B; Adam, J; Adamová, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agocs, A G; Agostinelli, A; Aguilar Salazar, S; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, N; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahn, S A; Ahn, S U; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Anson, C; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Aystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldini Ferroli, R; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Baltasar dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Bán, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Bergognon, A A E; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhom, J; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bianchin, C; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bock, N; Böttger, S; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bose, S; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Botta, E; Boyer, B; Braidot, E; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caballero Orduna, D; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Canoa Roman, V; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carlin Filho, N; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Castillo Castellanos, J; Castillo Hernandez, J F; Casula, E A R; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Ceballos Sanchez, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Chawla, I; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Coccetti, F; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Constantin, P; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Cotallo, M E; Crescio, E; Crochet, P; Cruz Alaniz, E; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; Dalsgaard, H H; Danu, A; Das, I; Das, D; Das, K; Dash, S; Dash, A; De, S; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; Delagrange, H; Deloff, A; Demanov, V; De Marco, N; Dénes, E; De Pasquale, S; Deppman, A; Erasmo, G D; de Rooij, R; Diaz Corchero, M A; Di Bari, D; Dietel, T; Di Giglio, C; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Divià, R; Djuvsland, O; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Domínguez, I; Dönigus, B; Dordic, O; Driga, O; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Elia, D; Emschermann, D; Engel, H; Erazmus, B; Erdal, H A; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Evans, D; Eyyubova, G; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fearick, R; Fedunov, A; Fehlker, D; Feldkamp, L; Felea, D; Fenton-Olsen, B; Feofilov, G; Fernández Téllez, A; Ferretti, A; Ferretti, R; Festanti, A; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhøje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Garishvili, I; Gerhard, J; Germain, M; Geuna, C; Gheata, M; Gheata, A; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Gianotti, P; Girard, M R; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glässel, P; Gomez, R; Ferreiro, E G; González-Trueba, L H; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Goswami, A; Gotovac, S; Grabski, V; Graczykowski, L K; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoras, A; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, S; Grigoryan, A; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J-Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerra Gutierrez, C; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gunji, T; Gupta, R; Gupta, A; Gutbrod, H; Haaland, O; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Han, B H; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayrapetyan, A; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hille, P T; Hippolyte, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hřivnáčová, I; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, G M; Innocenti, P G; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivan, C; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, A; Ivanov, V; Ivanytskyi, O; Jacobs, P M; Jang, H J; Janik, R; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, S; Jha, D M; Jimenez Bustamante, R T; Jirden, L; Jones, P G; Jung, H; Jusko, A; Kaidalov, A B; Kakoyan, V; Kalcher, S; Kaliňák, P; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Karasu Uysal, A; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Khan, P; Khan, M M; Khan, S A; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, M; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, J H; Kim, J S; Kim, T; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, S; Kim, B; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kliemant, M; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Koch, K; Köhler, M K; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskikh, A; Korneev, A; Kour, R; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G; Kral, J; Králik, I; Kramer, F; Kraus, I; Krawutschke, T; Krelina, M; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucheriaev, Y; Kugathasan, T; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kulakov, I; Kumar, J; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A B; Kurepin, A; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, S; Kushpil, V; Kvaerno, H; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; La Pointe, S L; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; La Rocca, P; Lazzeroni, C; Lea, R; Le Bornec, Y; Lechman, M; Lee, K S; Lee, G R; Lee, S C; Lefèvre, F; Lehnert, J; Leistam, L; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; León, H; Leoncino, M; León Monzón, I; León Vargas, H; Lévai, P; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, L; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohn, S; Lohner, D; Loizides, C; Loo, K K; Lopez, X; López Torres, E; Løvhøiden, G; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luo, J; Luparello, G; Luquin, L; Luzzi, C; Ma, K; Ma, R; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Mal'kevich, D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Marin Tobon, C A; Markert, C; Martashvili, I; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez Davalos, A; Martínez García, G; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Matthews, Z L; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mercado Pérez, J; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Montaño Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Moon, T; Morando, M; Moreira De Godoy, D A; Moretto, S; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Musa, L; Musso, A; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Nattrass, C; Naumov, N P; Navin, S; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nazarov, G; Nedosekin, A; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Nielsen, B S; Niida, T; Nikolaev, S; Nikolic, V; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A; Nyatha, A; Nygaard, C; Nystrand, J; Ochirov, A; 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    2012-12-21

    In this Letter we report the first results on π(±), K(±), p, and p production at midrapidity (|y|<0.5) in central Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt[s(NN)] = 2.76 TeV, measured by the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The p(T) distributions and yields are compared to previous results at sqrt[s(NN)] = 200 GeV and expectations from hydrodynamic and thermal models. The spectral shapes indicate a strong increase of the radial flow velocity with sqrt[s(NN)], which in hydrodynamic models is expected as a consequence of the increasing particle density. While the K/π ratio is in line with predictions from the thermal model, the p/π ratio is found to be lower by a factor of about 1.5. This deviation from thermal model expectations is still to be understood.

  11. Measurement of the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 200 TeV with the ANTARES telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Larosa, G.; Martinez-Mora, J.A. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Gandia (Spain); Albert, A.; Drouhin, D.; Racca, C. [GRPHE - Institut universitaire de technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit, BP 50568, Colmar (France); Al Samarai, I.; Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Charif, Z.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Dornic, D.; Ernenwein, J.P.; Escoffier, S.; Lambard, E.; Riviere, C.; Vallee, C.; Yatkin, K. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CPPM, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Andre, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Anghinolfi, M.; Sanguineti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Anton, G.; Classen, F.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Fehn, K.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Gleixner, A.; Graf, K.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; James, C.W.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Sieger, C.; Spies, A.; Wagner, S. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S.; Louis, F. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere - Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers - Service d' Electronique des Detecteurs et d' Informatique, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Astraatmadja, T.; Bogazzi, C.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Heijboer, A.J.; Jong, M. de; Michael, T.; Palioselitis, D.; Schulte, S.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Visser, E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baret, B.; Bouhou, B.; Creusot, A.; Galata, S.; Kouchner, A.; Elewyck, V. van [Universite Paris Diderot, APC, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Barrios-Marti, J.; Bigongiari, C.; Emanuele, U.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.P.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Lambard, G.; Mangano, S.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Yepes, H.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J. [CSIC - Universitat de Valencia, IFIC - Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Nezri, E. [Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, LAM - Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Biagi, S.; Fusco, L.A.; Giacomelli, G.; Margiotta, A.; Spurio, M. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Bruijn, R.; Decowski, M.P.; Wolf, E. de [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Capone, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Perrina, C.; Simeone, F. [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Caramete, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Popa, V. [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest (Romania); Carloganu, C.; Dumas, A.; Gay, P.; Guillard, G. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Cecchini, S.; Chiarusi, T. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Charvis, P.; Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y. [Universite Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Geoazur, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Sophia Antipolis (France); Circella, M. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Martini, S.; Robert, A.; Tamburini, C. [Aix-Marseille University, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, CNRS-INSU/IRD UM 110, La Garde Cedex (France); Distefano, C.; Lattuada, D.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Trovato, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Donzaud, C. [Universite Paris Diderot, APC, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Univ Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Dorosti, Q.; Loehner, H. [University of Groningen, Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), Groningen (Netherlands); Flaminio, V. [INFN - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Pisa (Italy); Giordano, V. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Haren, H. van [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), ' t Horntje (Texel) (Netherlands); Kadler, M. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kooijman, P. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Betawetenschappen, Utrecht (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kreykenbohm, I.; Mueller, C.; Wilms, J. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Bamberg (Germany); Kulikovskiy, V. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita, Catania (IT); Loucatos, S.; Schuessler, F.; Stolarczyk, T.; Vallage, B.; Vernin, P. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Montaruli, T. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Bari (IT); Universite de Geneve, Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire, Geneva (CH); Morganti, M. [INFN - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (IT); Pradier, T. [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS/IN2P3, IPHC-Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, Strasbourg Cedex 2 (FR); Rostovtsev, A. [ITEP - Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (RU); Samtleben, D.F.E. [Nikh