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Sample records for tetrodotoxin binding site

  1. Plasma protein binding of tetrodotoxin in the marine puffer fish Takifugu rubripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Tanuma, Daisuke; Tsutsumi, Kazuma; Jeon, Joong-Kyun; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the involvement of plasma protein binding in the disposition of tetrodotoxin (TTX) in puffer fish, we used equilibrium dialysis to measure protein binding of TTX in the plasma of the marine puffer fish Takifugu rubripes and the non-toxic greenling Hexagrammos otakii, and in solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). TTX (100-1000 microg/mL) bound to protein in T. rubripes plasma with low affinity in a non-saturable manner. The amount of bound TTX increased linearly with the TTX concentration, reaching 3.92+/-0.42 microg TTX/mg protein at 1000 microg TTX/mL. Approximately 80% of the TTX in the plasma of T. rubripes was unbound in the concentration range of TTX examined, indicating that TTX exists predominantly in the unbound form in the circulating blood of T. rubripes at a wide range of TTX concentrations. TTX also bound non-specifically to H. otakii plasma proteins, BSA, and bovine AGP. The amount of the bound TTX in the plasma of H. otakii and BSA, respectively, was 1.86+/-0.36 and 4.65+/-0.70 microg TTX/mg protein at 1000 microg TTX/mL, and that in the bovine AGP was 8.78+/-0.25 microg TTX/mg protein at 200 microg TTX/mL. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bitopic Ligands and Metastable Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronik, Philipp; Gaiser, Birgit I; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) belong to a large superfamily of membrane receptors mediating a variety of physiological functions. As such they are attractive targets for drug therapy. However, it remains a challenge to develop subtype selective GPCR ligands due to the high conservation...... sites. Computational studies on ligand binding to GPCRs have revealed transient, low-affinity binding sites, termed metastable binding sites. Metastable binding sites may provide a new source of allosteric binding sites that could be exploited in the design of bitopic ligands. Unlike the bitopic ligands...

  3. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, S.M. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  4. Improved mapping of protein binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortvelyesi, Tamas; Silberstein, Michael; Dennis, Sheldon; Vajda, Sandor

    2003-02-01

    Computational mapping methods place molecular probes - small molecules or functional groups - on a protein surface in order to identify the most favorable binding positions by calculating an interaction potential. Mapping is an important step in a number of flexible docking and drug design algorithms. We have developed improved algorithms for mapping protein surfaces using small organic molecules as molecular probes. The calculations reproduce the binding of eight organic solvents to lysozyme as observed by NMR, as well as the binding of four solvents to thermolysin, in good agreement with x-ray data. Application to protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B shows that the information provided by the mapping can be very useful for drug design. We also studied why the organic solvents bind in the active site of proteins, in spite of the availability of alternative pockets that can very tightly accommodate some of the probes. A possible explanation is that the binding in the relatively large active site retains a number of rotational states, and hence leads to smaller entropy loss than the binding elsewhere else. Indeed, the mapping reveals that the clusters of the ligand molecules in the protein's active site contain different rotational-translational conformers, which represent different local minima of the free energy surface. In order to study the transitions between different conformers, reaction path and molecular dynamics calculations were performed. Results show that most of the rotational states are separated by low free energy barriers at the experimental temperature, and hence the entropy of binding in the active site is expected to be high.

  5. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

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    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  6. Probing the phalloidin binding site of actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulstich, H; Zobeley, S; Heintz, D; Drewes, G

    1993-03-08

    Phallotoxins form tight complexes with filamentous actin and stabilize the polymer against shearing stress. In the present study a phalloidin derivative containing a thiol-capturing moiety was prepared and reacted with single thiol groups of monomeric muscle actin. Sites of attachment in the protein were Cys-374 next to the C-terminus and Cys-10, close to the N-terminus; the latter was recently shown to be uncovered during a slow but reversible conformational transition occurring in ADP-G-actin. Phalloidin bound to Cys-374 stabilizes filaments against shearing stress almost as effectively as free phalloidin, indicating that the phalloidin binding site cannot be far from the C-terminus of actin. Stabilization was also achieved when the phalloidin reagent was added to F-actin, however, the subsequent formation of a covalent linkage with Cys-374 was not observed, most likely due to a restricted mobility of the reactants. In contrast to the efficient stabilization of filaments by phalloidin linked to Cys-374 a destabilizing effect was observed when phalloidin was attached to Cys-10. It appears that phalloidin located close to the N-terminus is unable to bind to the normal binding site in its own filament. Pronounced gelification of this actin derivative suggests that the toxin is able to mediate crosslinking with neighbouring filaments. From these results we conclude that the phalloidin binding site of actin is distant from the N-terminus, but close to the C-terminus. Furthermore, the data provide evidence that binding of phalloidin reduces the mobility of the C-terminus.

  7. Computational identification of uncharacterized cruzain binding sites.

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    Jacob D Durrant

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, claims 50,000 lives annually and is the leading cause of infectious myocarditis in the world. As current antichagastic therapies like nifurtimox and benznidazole are highly toxic, ineffective at parasite eradication, and subject to increasing resistance, novel therapeutics are urgently needed. Cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi, is one attractive drug target. In the current work, molecular dynamics simulations and a sequence alignment of a non-redundant, unbiased set of peptidase C1 family members are used to identify uncharacterized cruzain binding sites. The two sites identified may serve as targets for future pharmacological intervention.

  8. Distribution of homologous proteins to puffer fish saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin binding protein in the plasma of puffer fish and among the tissues of Fugu pardalis examined by Western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Yamaki, Hiroe; Okoshi, Natsumi; Araki, Nao

    2010-06-01

    Puffer fish saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin binding protein (PSTBP) is a glycoprotein (200 kDa as a dimer) that we previously isolated from the plasma of Fugu pardalis (Yotsu-Yamashita et al., 2001). For the study on functions of PSTBP, here we examined distribution of homologous proteins to PSTBP in the plasma of seven species of puffer fish, and among the tissues of F. pardalis by Western blot analysis probed with a polyclonal IgG against unglycosylated PSTBP1 expressed in Echelichia coli. One or two major positive broad bands were detected at 105-140 kDa molecular weight range in the plasma (0.5 microg protein) of all species of puffer fish tested, while no band was detected in the plasma (5 microg protein) of fish other than puffer fish. Glycopeptidase F treated plasma of all species of puffer fish tested commonly showed the bands at approximately 42 kDa that was consistent to the molecular weight of unglycosylated PSTBP. These data suggest that puffer fish commonly possess glycoproteins homologous to PSTBP, but the sizes of N-glycan are specific to the species. Among soluble protein extracts (5 microg protein) from the tissues of F. pardalis, PSTBP was detected in all tissues examined, most prominently in heart, skin, and gall. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  10. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  11. Binding sites analyser (BiSA: software for genomic binding sites archiving and overlap analysis.

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    Matloob Khushi

    Full Text Available Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding and histone modification reveals complex patterns of interactions. Identifying overlaps in binding patterns by different factors is a major objective of genomic studies, but existing methods to archive large numbers of datasets in a personalised database lack sophistication and utility. Therefore we have developed transcription factor DNA binding site analyser software (BiSA, for archiving of binding regions and easy identification of overlap with or proximity to other regions of interest. Analysis results can be restricted by chromosome or base pair overlap between regions or maximum distance between binding peaks. BiSA is capable of reporting overlapping regions that share common base pairs; regions that are nearby; regions that are not overlapping; and average region sizes. BiSA can identify genes located near binding regions of interest, genomic features near a gene or locus of interest and statistical significance of overlapping regions can also be reported. Overlapping results can be visualized as Venn diagrams. A major strength of BiSA is that it is supported by a comprehensive database of publicly available transcription factor binding sites and histone modifications, which can be directly compared to user data. The documentation and source code are available on http://bisa.sourceforge.net.

  12. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantcheva, Adriana K; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Nissen, Poul

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding.

  13. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantcheva, Adriana K.; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Nissen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding. PMID:23641004

  14. Tuning genetic clocks employing DNA binding sites.

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    Shridhar Jayanthi

    Full Text Available Periodic oscillations play a key role in cell physiology from the cell cycle to circadian clocks. The interplay of positive and negative feedback loops among genes and proteins is ubiquitous in these networks. Often, delays in a negative feedback loop and/or degradation rates are a crucial mechanism to obtain sustained oscillations. How does nature control delays and kinetic rates in feedback networks? Known mechanisms include proper selection of the number of steps composing a feedback loop and alteration of protease activity, respectively. Here, we show that a remarkably simple means to control both delays and effective kinetic rates is the employment of DNA binding sites. We illustrate this design principle on a widely studied activator-repressor clock motif, which is ubiquitous in natural systems. By suitably employing DNA target sites for the activator and/or the repressor, one can switch the clock "on" and "off" and precisely tune its period to a desired value. Our study reveals a design principle to engineer dynamic behavior in biomolecular networks, which may be largely exploited by natural systems and employed for the rational design of synthetic circuits.

  15. Defining the bacteroides ribosomal binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Udo; Horn, Nikki; Carding, Simon R

    2013-03-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, hosts a vast number of commensal microorganisms. Representatives of the genus Bacteroides are among the most abundant bacterial species in the human colon. Bacteroidetes diverged from the common line of eubacterial descent before other eubacterial groups. As a result, they employ unique transcription initiation signals and, because of this uniqueness, they require specific genetic tools. Although some tools exist, they are not optimal for studying the roles and functions of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract. Focusing on translation initiation signals in Bacteroides, we created a series of expression vectors allowing for different levels of protein expression in this genus, and we describe the use of pepI from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis as a novel reporter gene for Bacteroides. Furthermore, we report the identification of the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of Bacteroides ovatus and analyze in detail its ribosomal binding site, thus defining a core region necessary for efficient translation, which we have incorporated into the design of our expression vectors. Based on the sequence logo information from the 5' untranslated region of other Bacteroidales ribosomal protein genes, we conclude that our findings are relevant to all members of this order.

  16. Drug-binding properties of rat alpha-foetoprotein. Specificities of the phenylbutazone-binding and warfarin-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, F; Rajkowski, K M; Martin, M T; Dessen, P; Cittanova, N

    1986-01-01

    Rat alpha-foetoprotein (alpha-FP) strongly binds the drugs warfarin and phenylbutazone, as does albumin; however, the binding sites for the two drugs seemed to be different. This possibility and the specificity of this/these drug-binding site(s) of rat alpha-FP were investigated by competitive protein-binding experiments with a variety of drugs, representing different pharmacological groups, and biomolecules that are strongly bound by the foetal protein and that are suspected to play a specific role during foetal development. The binding mechanisms were further investigated by using comparisons between computer-derived theoretical displacement curves and experimental points in order to distinguish different possible binding models. The results indicate: that warfarin and phenylbutazone are bound at two distinct sites on rat alpha-FP and that a negative modulatory effect is exerted between the two sites; that the degree of specificity of these two drug-binding sites is different, since the warfarin-binding site appears to be specific for the binding of coumarinic and anthranilic drugs whereas that for phenylbutazone is able to bind substances of very varied chemical structure and is more hydrophobic; that the phenylbutazone-binding site is the site that binds oestrogens that thyroid hormones and, probably, fatty acids and bilirubin are bound at (an)other site(s) but exert negative modulatory effects on phenylbutazone binding. The nature of the different binding areas of rat alpha-FP is compared with that of those already proposed for albumin. The potential risks of toxicity of such interactions between drugs and/or biomolecules on foetal development are also discussed. PMID:2434073

  17. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C.; Nguyen, K.; Schapira, M.

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize—or read—methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions.

  18. Evolution of Metal(Loid) Binding Sites in Transcriptional Regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, E.; Thiyagarajan, S.; Cook, J.D.; Stemmler, T.L.; Gil, J.A.; Mateos, L.M.; Rosen, B.P.

    2009-05-22

    Expression of the genes for resistance to heavy metals and metalloids is transcriptionally regulated by the toxic ions themselves. Members of the ArsR/SmtB family of small metalloregulatory proteins respond to transition metals, heavy metals, and metalloids, including As(III), Sb(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). These homodimeric repressors bind to DNA in the absence of inducing metal(loid) ion and dissociate from the DNA when inducer is bound. The regulatory sites are often three- or four-coordinate metal binding sites composed of cysteine thiolates. Surprisingly, in two different As(III)-responsive regulators, the metalloid binding sites were in different locations in the repressor, and the Cd(II) binding sites were in two different locations in two Cd(II)-responsive regulators. We hypothesize that ArsR/SmtB repressors have a common backbone structure, that of a winged helix DNA-binding protein, but have considerable plasticity in the location of inducer binding sites. Here we show that an As(III)-responsive member of the family, CgArsR1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, binds As(III) to a cysteine triad composed of Cys{sup 15}, Cys{sup 16}, and Cys{sup 55}. This binding site is clearly unrelated to the binding sites of other characterized ArsR/SmtB family members. This is consistent with our hypothesis that metal(loid) binding sites in DNA binding proteins evolve convergently in response to persistent environmental pressures.

  19. Uncoupling metallonuclease metal ion binding sites via nudge mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakos, Grigorios A; Nastri, Horacio; Riggs, Paul; Dupureur, Cynthia M

    2007-05-01

    The hydrolysis of phosphodiester bonds by nucleases is critical to nucleic acid processing. Many nucleases utilize metal ion cofactors, and for a number of these enzymes two active-site metal ions have been detected. Testing proposed mechanistic roles for individual bound metal ions has been hampered by the similarity between the sites and cooperative behavior. In the homodimeric PvuII restriction endonuclease, the metal ion dependence of DNA binding is sigmoidal and consistent with two classes of coupled metal ion binding sites. We reasoned that a conservative active-site mutation would perturb the ligand field sufficiently to observe the titration of individual metal ion binding sites without significantly disturbing enzyme function. Indeed, mutation of a Tyr residue 5.5 A from both metal ions in the enzyme-substrate crystal structure (Y94F) renders the metal ion dependence of DNA binding biphasic: two classes of metal ion binding sites become distinct in the presence of DNA. The perturbation in metal ion coordination is supported by 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra of enzyme-Ca(II) and enzyme-Ca(II)-DNA complexes. Metal ion binding by free Y94F is basically unperturbed: through multiple experiments with different metal ions, the data are consistent with two alkaline earth metal ion binding sites per subunit of low millimolar affinity, behavior which is very similar to that of the wild type. The results presented here indicate a role for the hydroxyl group of Tyr94 in the coupling of metal ion binding sites in the presence of DNA. Its removal causes the affinities for the two metal ion binding sites to be resolved in the presence of substrate. Such tuning of metal ion affinities will be invaluable to efforts to ascertain the contributions of individual bound metal ions to metallonuclease function.

  20. Accurate prediction of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces.

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    Evangelia Petsalaki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many important protein-protein interactions are mediated by the binding of a short peptide stretch in one protein to a large globular segment in another. Recent efforts have provided hundreds of examples of new peptides binding to proteins for which a three-dimensional structure is available (either known experimentally or readily modeled but where no structure of the protein-peptide complex is known. To address this gap, we present an approach that can accurately predict peptide binding sites on protein surfaces. For peptides known to bind a particular protein, the method predicts binding sites with great accuracy, and the specificity of the approach means that it can also be used to predict whether or not a putative or predicted peptide partner will bind. We used known protein-peptide complexes to derive preferences, in the form of spatial position specific scoring matrices, which describe the binding-site environment in globular proteins for each type of amino acid in bound peptides. We then scan the surface of a putative binding protein for sites for each of the amino acids present in a peptide partner and search for combinations of high-scoring amino acid sites that satisfy constraints deduced from the peptide sequence. The method performed well in a benchmark and largely agreed with experimental data mapping binding sites for several recently discovered interactions mediated by peptides, including RG-rich proteins with SMN domains, Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 with TRADD domains, DBC1 with Sir2, and the Ago hook with Argonaute PIWI domain. The method, and associated statistics, is an excellent tool for predicting and studying binding sites for newly discovered peptides mediating critical events in biology.

  1. Localization of gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, R.; Kitayama, S.; Yamoto, M.; Shima, K.; Ooshima, A. (Wakayama Medical College (Japan))

    1989-10-01

    The binding of human luteinizing hormone and human follicle-stimulating hormone to ovarian tumor biopsy specimens from 29 patients was analyzed. The binding sites for human luteinizing hormone were demonstrated in one tumor of epithelial origin (mucinous cystadenoma) and in one of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor). The binding sites for human follicle-stimulating hormone were found in three tumors of epithelial origin (serous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenoma) and in two of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor and theca-granulosa cell tumor). The surface-binding autoradiographic study revealed that the binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the stromal tissue. The results suggest that gonadotropic hormones may play a role in the growth and differentiation of a certain type of human ovarian neoplasms.

  2. CaMELS: In silico prediction of calmodulin binding proteins and their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Wajid Arshad; Asif, Amina; Andleeb, Saiqa; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-09-01

    Due to Ca 2+ -dependent binding and the sequence diversity of Calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins, identifying CaM interactions and binding sites in the wet-lab is tedious and costly. Therefore, computational methods for this purpose are crucial to the design of such wet-lab experiments. We present an algorithm suite called CaMELS (CalModulin intEraction Learning System) for predicting proteins that interact with CaM as well as their binding sites using sequence information alone. CaMELS offers state of the art accuracy for both CaM interaction and binding site prediction and can aid biologists in studying CaM binding proteins. For CaM interaction prediction, CaMELS uses protein sequence features coupled with a large-margin classifier. CaMELS models the binding site prediction problem using multiple instance machine learning with a custom optimization algorithm which allows more effective learning over imprecisely annotated CaM-binding sites during training. CaMELS has been extensively benchmarked using a variety of data sets, mutagenic studies, proteome-wide Gene Ontology enrichment analyses and protein structures. Our experiments indicate that CaMELS outperforms simple motif-based search and other existing methods for interaction and binding site prediction. We have also found that the whole sequence of a protein, rather than just its binding site, is important for predicting its interaction with CaM. Using the machine learning model in CaMELS, we have identified important features of protein sequences for CaM interaction prediction as well as characteristic amino acid sub-sequences and their relative position for identifying CaM binding sites. Python code for training and evaluating CaMELS together with a webserver implementation is available at the URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#camels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

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    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  4. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, V Joachim; Daminelli, Simone; Schroeder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology) - a drug's ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand flexibility to have a minor

  5. MODELING LANTHANIDE BINDING SITES ON HUMIC ACID

    OpenAIRE

    Pourret, Olivier; Martinez, Raul,

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Lanthanide (Ln) binding to humic acid (HA) has been investigated by combining ultrafiltration and ICP-MS techniques. A Langmuir sorption isotherm metal complexation model was used in conjunction with a linear programming method (LPM) to fit experimental data representing a wide range of experimental conditions both in HA/Ln ratio (varying between 5 and 20) and in pH range (from 2 to 10) with a ionic strength of 10-3 mol L-1. The LPM approach, not requiring prior knowle...

  6. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs ...

  7. DNA binding site analysis of Burkholderia thailandensis response regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L; Hickmott, Alexana J; Maity, Tuhin S; Bulyk, Martha L; Dunbar, John; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth

    2012-07-01

    Bacterial response regulators (RR) that function as transcription factors in two component signaling pathways are crucial for ensuring tight regulation and coordinated expression of the genome. Currently, consensus DNA binding sites in the promoter for very few bacterial RRs have been identified. A systematic method to characterize these DNA binding sites for RRs would enable prediction of specific gene expression patterns in response to extracellular stimuli. To identify RR DNA binding sites, we functionally activated RRs using beryllofluoride and applied them to a protein-binding microarray (PBM) to discover DNA binding motifs for RRs expressed in Burkholderia, a Gram-negative bacterial genus. We identified DNA binding motifs for conserved RRs in Burkholderia thailandensis, including KdpE, RisA, and NarL, as well as for a previously uncharacterized RR at locus BTH_II2335 and its ortholog in the human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei at locus BPSS2315. We further demonstrate RR binding of predicted genomic targets for the two orthologs using gel shift assays and reveal a pattern of RR regulation of expression of self and other two component systems. Our studies illustrate the use of PBMs to identify DNA binding specificities for bacterial RRs and enable prediction of gene regulatory networks in response to two component signaling. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  9. Binding sites for gonadotropins in human postmenopausal ovaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, R.; Shima, K.; Yamoto, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Nishimori, K.; Hiraoka, J.

    1989-02-01

    The binding of human LH and human FSH to postmenopausal ovarian tissue from 21 patients with cervical carcinoma was analyzed. The binding sites for FSH and LH were demonstrated in postmenopausal ovarian tissue. The surface-binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the cells of cortical stroma of the postmenopausal ovary. In addition, diffuse cytoplasmic staining of endogenous estrogen and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity were detected immunohistochemically and histochemically in the cells of the cortical stroma. Electron microscopic study also suggested steroidogenic function in the cells of the cortical stroma. The results of the present study suggest that postmenopausal ovaries contain specific binding sites for pituitary gonadotropins and play a role in ovarian steroidogenesis.

  10. NMR mapping of copper binding sites in alpha-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yoon-Hui; Rospigliosi, Carla; Eliezer, David

    2006-01-01

    Copper binding to the Parkinson disease-linked protein alpha-synuclein (aS) has been shown to accelerate its oligomerization in vitro and may therefore play a role in aS-mediated pathology in vivo. We use NMR spectroscopy to identify a number of independent copper binding sites in both the lipid-binding N-terminal domain and the highly acidic C-terminal domain of aS. Most of the sites appear to involve negatively charged amino acid side chains, but binding is also observed to the sole histidine residue located at position 50 and to the N-terminal amino group. Both the N-terminal and the histidine sites, as well as the sites in the C-terminal tail, can also bind copper in the more highly structured conformation adopted by aS upon binding to detergent micelles or lipid vesicles. There is no evidence for the formation of any sites requiring long-range order in the protein.

  11. Binding of sea anemone toxin to receptor sites associated with gating system of sodium channel in synaptic nerve endings in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J P; Balerna, M; Barhanin, J; Fosset, M; Lazdunski, M

    1980-01-01

    Iodination of toxin II from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata gives a labeled monoiododerivative that retains 80% of the original neurotoxicity. This derivative binds specifically to rat brain synaptosomes at 20 degrees C and pH 7.4 with a second-order rate constant of association ka = 4.6 x 10(4) M-1 sec-1 and a first-order rate constant of dissociation kd = 1.1 x 10(-2) sec-1. The binding occurs on the Na+ channel at a binding site distinct from that of other gating system toxins like batrachotoxin, veratridine, grayanotoxin, aconitine, and pyrethroids. The maximal binding capacity Bmax is 3.2 pmol/mg of protein (i.e., about two sea anemone toxin binding sites per tetrodotoxin binding site) and the Kd is 240 nM for the monoiododerivative and 150 nM for the native toxin. Corresponding binding parameters for the association of a 125I-labeled derivative of toxin II from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector are Bmax = 0.3 pmol/mg of protein and Kd = 1 nM, whereas the Kd of the unmodified scorpion toxin is 0.6 nM. Competition experiments involving scorpion toxins, sea anemone toxins, and synaptosomes demonstrate that, although the sea anemone toxin is able to displace the scorpion toxin bound to synaptosomes, the scorpion toxin does not displace the sea anemone toxin. The sea anemone toxin but not the scorpion toxin binds to depolarized synaptosomes. Differences between binding properties of the two polypeptide toxins are analyzed in the discussion. PMID:6103536

  12. Biophysical fitness landscapes for transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Haldane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic states and evolutionary trajectories available to cell populations are ultimately dictated by complex interactions among DNA, RNA, proteins, and other molecular species. Here we study how evolution of gene regulation in a single-cell eukaryote S. cerevisiae is affected by interactions between transcription factors (TFs and their cognate DNA sites. Our study is informed by a comprehensive collection of genomic binding sites and high-throughput in vitro measurements of TF-DNA binding interactions. Using an evolutionary model for monomorphic populations evolving on a fitness landscape, we infer fitness as a function of TF-DNA binding to show that the shape of the inferred fitness functions is in broad agreement with a simple functional form inspired by a thermodynamic model of two-state TF-DNA binding. However, the effective parameters of the model are not always consistent with physical values, indicating selection pressures beyond the biophysical constraints imposed by TF-DNA interactions. We find little statistical support for the fitness landscape in which each position in the binding site evolves independently, indicating that epistasis is common in the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, by correlating TF-DNA binding energies with biological properties of the sites or the genes they regulate, we are able to rule out several scenarios of site-specific selection, under which binding sites of the same TF would experience different selection pressures depending on their position in the genome. These findings support the existence of universal fitness landscapes which shape evolution of all sites for a given TF, and whose properties are determined in part by the physics of protein-DNA interactions.

  13. Biophysical fitness landscapes for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, Allan; Manhart, Michael; Morozov, Alexandre V

    2014-07-01

    Phenotypic states and evolutionary trajectories available to cell populations are ultimately dictated by complex interactions among DNA, RNA, proteins, and other molecular species. Here we study how evolution of gene regulation in a single-cell eukaryote S. cerevisiae is affected by interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their cognate DNA sites. Our study is informed by a comprehensive collection of genomic binding sites and high-throughput in vitro measurements of TF-DNA binding interactions. Using an evolutionary model for monomorphic populations evolving on a fitness landscape, we infer fitness as a function of TF-DNA binding to show that the shape of the inferred fitness functions is in broad agreement with a simple functional form inspired by a thermodynamic model of two-state TF-DNA binding. However, the effective parameters of the model are not always consistent with physical values, indicating selection pressures beyond the biophysical constraints imposed by TF-DNA interactions. We find little statistical support for the fitness landscape in which each position in the binding site evolves independently, indicating that epistasis is common in the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, by correlating TF-DNA binding energies with biological properties of the sites or the genes they regulate, we are able to rule out several scenarios of site-specific selection, under which binding sites of the same TF would experience different selection pressures depending on their position in the genome. These findings support the existence of universal fitness landscapes which shape evolution of all sites for a given TF, and whose properties are determined in part by the physics of protein-DNA interactions.

  14. LIGAND-BINDING SITES ON THE MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS UREASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis that remains a serious medical and social health problem. Despite intensive efforts have been made in the past decade, there are no new efficient anti-tuberculosis drugs today, and that need is growing due to the spread of drug-resistant strains of M.tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis urease (MTU, being an important factor of the bacterium viability and virulence, is an attractive target for anti-tuberculosis drugs acting by inhibition of urease activity. However, the commercially available urease inhibitors are toxic and unstable, that prevent their clinical use. Therefore, new more potent anti-tuberculosis drugs inhibiting new targets are urgently needed. A useful tool for the search of novel inhibitors is a computational drug design. The inhibitor design is significantly easier if binding sites on the enzyme are identified in advance. This paper aimed to determine the probable ligand binding sites on the surface of M. tuberculosis urease. Methods. To identify ligand binding sites on MTU surface, сomputational solvent mapping method FTSite was applied by the use of MTU homology model we have built earlier. The method places molecular probes (small organic molecules containing various functional groups on a dense grid defined around the enzyme, and for each probe finds favorable positions. The selected poses are refined by free energy minimization, the low energy conformations are clustered, and the clusters are ranked on the basis of the average free energy. FTSite server outputs the protein residues delineating a binding sites and the probe molecules representing each cluster. To predict allosteric pockets on MTU, AlloPred and AlloSite servers were applied. AlloPred uses the normal mode analysis (NMA and models how the dynamics of a protein would be altered in the presence of a modulator at a specific pocket. Pockets on the enzyme are predicted using the Fpocket

  15. The Art of Compiling Protein Binding Site Ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietz, Stefan; Fährrolfes, Rainer; Rarey, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Structure-based drug design starts with the collection, preparation, and initial analysis of protein structures. With more than 115,000 structures publically available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), fully automated processes reliably performing these important preprocessing steps are needed. Several tools are available for these tasks, however, most of them do not address the special needs of scientists interested in protein-ligand interactions. In this paper, we summarize our research activities towards an automated processing pipeline from raw PDB data towards ready-to-use protein binding site ensembles. Starting from a single protein structure, the pipeline covers the following phases: Extracting structurally related binding sites from the PDB, aligning disconnected binding site sequences, resolving tautomeric forms and protonation, orienting hydrogens and flippable side-chains, structurally aligning the multitude of binding sites, and performing a reasonable reduction of ensemble structures. The pipeline, named SIENA, creates protein-structural ensembles for the analysis of protein flexibility, molecular design efforts like docking or de novo design within seconds. For the first time, we are able to process the whole PDB in order to create a large collection of protein binding site ensembles. SIENA is available as part of the ZBH ProteinsPlus webserver under http://proteinsplus.zbh.uni-hamburg.de. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, L.; Lee, Y.; Schwarz, U.; Lorian, V.

    1986-08-01

    The binding of /sup 35/S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the cell envelope obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. Experiments distinguishing the effect of pH on penicillin binding by PBP 5/6 from its effect on beta-lactamase activity indicated that although substantial binding occurred at the lowest pH, the amount of binding increased with pH, reaching a maximum at pH 10. Based on earlier studies, it is proposed that the binding at high pH involves the formation of a covalent bond between the C-7 of penicillin and free epsilon amino groups of the PBPs. At pHs ranging from 4 to 8, position 1 of penicillin, occupied by sulfur, is considered to be the site that establishes a covalent bond with the sulfhydryl groups of PBP 5. The use of specific blockers of free epsilon amino groups or sulfhydryl groups indicated that wherever the presence of each had little or no effect on the binding of penicillin by PBP 5, the presence of both completely prevented binding. The specific blocker of the hydroxyl group of serine did not affect the binding of penicillin.

  17. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  18. Divergence of transcription factor binding sites across related yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Anthony R; Gianoulis, Tara A; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Yu, Haiyuan; Rozowsky, Joel; Seringhaus, Michael R; Wang, Lu Yong; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2007-08-10

    Characterization of interspecies differences in gene regulation is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of both phenotypic diversity and evolution. By means of chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray analysis, the divergence in the binding sites of the pseudohyphal regulators Ste12 and Tec1 was determined in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. mikatae, and S. bayanus under pseudohyphal conditions. We have shown that most of these sites have diverged across these species, far exceeding the interspecies variation in orthologous genes. A group of Ste12 targets was shown to be bound only in S. mikatae and S. bayanus under pseudohyphal conditions. Many of these genes are targets of Ste12 during mating in S. cerevisiae, indicating that specialization between the two pathways has occurred in this species. Transcription factor binding sites have therefore diverged substantially faster than ortholog content. Thus, gene regulation resulting from transcription factor binding is likely to be a major cause of divergence between related species.

  19. DNase I footprinting of small molecule binding sites on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Christian; Kluza, Jérôme; Martin, Christopher; Ellis, Thomas; Waring, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    Nuclease footprinting techniques were initially developed to investigate protein-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) interactions but these tools of molecular biology have also become instrumental for probing sequence-selective binding of small molecules to DNA. Here, the method is described and technical details are given for performing deoxyribonuclease (DNase) I footprinting with DNA-binding drugs. An example is presented where DNase I is used (as well as DNase II and micrococcal nuclease) to probe the patterns of sequence-selective recognition of DNA by the anticancer antibiotic actinomycin D. DNase I is a convenient endonuclease for detecting and locating the position of actinomycin-binding sites within GC-rich sequences.

  20. Binding-site assessment by virtual fragment screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Huang

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of protein druggability (propensity to bind high-affinity drug-like small molecules would greatly benefit the fields of chemical genomics and drug discovery. We have developed a novel approach to quantitatively assess protein druggability by computationally screening a fragment-like compound library. In analogy to NMR-based fragment screening, we dock approximately 11,000 fragments against a given binding site and compute a computational hit rate based on the fraction of molecules that exceed an empirically chosen score cutoff. We perform a large-scale evaluation of the approach on four datasets, totaling 152 binding sites. We demonstrate that computed hit rates correlate with hit rates measured experimentally in a previously published NMR-based screening method. Secondly, we show that the in silico fragment screening method can be used to distinguish known druggable and non-druggable targets, including both enzymes and protein-protein interaction sites. Finally, we explore the sensitivity of the results to different receptor conformations, including flexible protein-protein interaction sites. Besides its original aim to assess druggability of different protein targets, this method could be used to identifying druggable conformations of flexible binding site for lead discovery, and suggesting strategies for growing or joining initial fragment hits to obtain more potent inhibitors.

  1. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. IMPORTANCE We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. PMID:26764003

  2. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Jay M.; Cura, Anthony J.; Lloyd, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites—the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis. PMID:25715702

  3. Found: Na(+) and K(+) binding sites of the sodium pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, R F; Sagar, S

    2003-08-01

    Homology modeling and valence mapping have been used to predict the location and structure of Na(+) and K(+) binding sites in the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase on the basis of the known atomic resolution structure of SERCA. Additional sites are predicted that may be associated with intracellular access and extracellular egress pathways for Na(+). The model predictions are in excellent agreement with previous structure-function and electrical studies.

  4. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Daniel M; Thuesen, Cathrine K; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless......, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic...... potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area...

  5. Dangerous connections: on binding site models of infectious disease dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka Yin; Diekmann, Odo

    2017-02-01

    We formulate models for the spread of infection on networks that are amenable to analysis in the large population limit. We distinguish three different levels: (1) binding sites, (2) individuals, and (3) the population. In the tradition of physiologically structured population models, the formulation starts on the individual level. Influences from the 'outside world' on an individual are captured by environmental variables. These environmental variables are population level quantities. A key characteristic of the network models is that individuals can be decomposed into a number of conditionally independent components: each individual has a fixed number of 'binding sites' for partners. The Markov chain dynamics of binding sites are described by only a few equations. In particular, individual-level probabilities are obtained from binding-site-level probabilities by combinatorics while population-level quantities are obtained by averaging over individuals in the population. Thus we are able to characterize population-level epidemiological quantities, such as [Formula: see text], r, the final size, and the endemic equilibrium, in terms of the corresponding variables.

  6. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  7. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  8. LASAGNA: a novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2013-03-24

    Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provides scoring matrices for TFs, nearly 78% of the TFs in the public release do not have matrices available. As work on TFBS alignment algorithms has been limited, it is highly desirable to have an alignment algorithm tailored to TFBSs. We designed a novel algorithm named LASAGNA, which is aware of the lengths of input TFBSs and utilizes position dependence. Results on 189 TFs of 5 species in the TRANSFAC database showed that our method significantly outperformed ClustalW2 and MEME. We further compared a PSSM method dependent on LASAGNA to an alignment-free TFBS search method. Results on 89 TFs whose binding sites can be located in genomes showed that our method is significantly more precise at fixed recall rates. Finally, we described LASAGNA-ChIP, a more sophisticated version for ChIP (Chromatin immunoprecipitation) experiments. Under the one-per-sequence model, it showed comparable performance with MEME in discovering motifs in ChIP-seq peak sequences. We conclude that the LASAGNA algorithm is simple and effective in aligning variable-length binding sites. It has been integrated into a user-friendly webtool for TFBS search and visualization called LASAGNA-Search. The tool currently stores precomputed PSSM models for 189 TFs and 133 TFs built from TFBSs in the TRANSFAC Public database (release 7.0) and the ORegAnno database (08Nov10 dump), respectively. The webtool is available at http://biogrid.engr.uconn.edu/lasagna_search/.

  9. Bifunctional avidin with covalently modifiable ligand binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Leppiniemi

    Full Text Available The extensive use of avidin and streptavidin in life sciences originates from the extraordinary tight biotin-binding affinity of these tetrameric proteins. Numerous studies have been performed to modify the biotin-binding affinity of (streptavidin to improve the existing applications. Even so, (streptavidin greatly favours its natural ligand, biotin. Here we engineered the biotin-binding pocket of avidin with a single point mutation S16C and thus introduced a chemically active thiol group, which could be covalently coupled with thiol-reactive molecules. This approach was applied to the previously reported bivalent dual chain avidin by modifying one binding site while preserving the other one intact. Maleimide was then coupled to the modified binding site resulting in a decrease in biotin affinity. Furthermore, we showed that this thiol could be covalently coupled to other maleimide derivatives, for instance fluorescent labels, allowing intratetrameric FRET. The bifunctional avidins described here provide improved and novel tools for applications such as the biofunctionalization of surfaces.

  10. The quinone-binding and catalytic site of complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary

    2010-12-01

    The complex II family of proteins includes succinate:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) and quinol:fumarate oxidoreductase (QFR). In the facultative bacterium Escherichia coli both are expressed as part of the aerobic (SQR) and anaerobic (QFR) respiratory chains. SQR from E. coli is homologous to mitochondrial complex II and has proven to be an excellent model system for structure/function studies of the enzyme. Both SQR and QFR from E. coli are tetrameric membrane-bound enzymes that couple succinate/fumarate interconversion with quinone/quinol reduction/oxidation. Both enzymes are capable of binding either ubiquinone or menaquinone, however, they have adopted different quinone binding sites where catalytic reactions with quinones occur. A comparison of the structures of the quinone binding sites in SQR and QFR reveals how the enzymes have adapted in order to accommodate both benzo- and napthoquinones. A combination of structural, computational, and kinetic studies of members of the complex II family of enzymes has revealed that the catalytic quinone adopts different positions in the quinone-binding pocket. These data suggest that movement of the quinone within the quinone-binding pocket is essential for catalysis. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Macrocycles with switchable exo/endo metal binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei-lei; Wang, Chun; Dawn, Sandipan; Smith, Mark D; Krause, Jeanette A; Shimizu, Linda S

    2009-12-09

    We report herein the synthesis and metal complexation properties of two macrocyclic hosts that contain two 2,2'-bipyridines and two urea groups. These hosts take advantage of the conformationally mobile 5,5'-positions of the bipyridines to give metal binding sites that are dynamic. By simple bond rotation, these hosts can exchange an interior (endo) situated metal binding site for an exterior (exo) binding site. We examine the solid-state structures of the two free hosts and two coordination complexes ([Cd(host 1)(H(2)O)(NO(3))(2)] and [Ag(2)(host 2)](SO(3)CF(3))(2)) using X-ray crystallography. Analysis of these crystal structures suggests that the bipyridine groups within the hosts are able to rotate to access multiple conformations including the desired exo and endo conformations. We also investigate the binding affinity of these new ligands in solution by UV-vis titrations with a series of metal nitrate salts (Ag, Cd, Zn, Ni, Mn, Fe, Co, Cr, and Cu) to afford discrete metal complexes. Some complexes showed a slow subsequent assembly to yield coordination polymers. Thus, these systems may afford unique insights into the process of metal organic framework formation.

  12. Ceruloplasmin has two nearly identical sites that bind myeloperoxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhautdin, Bakytzhan; Goksoy, Esen; Fox, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a copper-containing ferroxidase with potent antioxidant activity. Cp is expressed by hepatocytes and activated macrophages and has been known as physiologic inhibitor of myeloperoxidase (MPO). Enzymatic activity of MPO produces anti-microbial agents and strong prooxidants such as hypochlorous acid and has a potential to damage host tissue at the sites of inflammation and infection. Thus Cp-MPO interaction and inhibition of MPO has previously been suggested as an important control mechanism of excessive MPO activity. Our aim in this study was to identify minimal Cp domain or peptide that interacts with MPO. We first confirmed Cp-MPO interaction by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis of the interaction yielded 30 nM affinity between Cp and MPO. We then designed and synthesized 87 overlapping peptides spanning the entire amino acid sequence of Cp. Each of the peptides was tested whether it binds to MPO by direct binding ELISA. Two of the 87 peptides, P18 and P76 strongly interacted with MPO. Amino acid sequence analysis of identified peptides revealed high sequence and structural homology between them. Further structural analysis of Cp's crystal structure by PyMOL software unfolded that both peptides represent surface-exposed sites of Cp and face nearly the same direction. To confirm our finding we raised anti-P18 antisera in rabbit and demonstrated that this antisera disrupts Cp-MPO binding and rescues MPO activity. Collectively, our results confirm Cp-MPO interaction and identify two nearly identical sites on Cp that specifically bind MPO. We propose that inhibition of MPO by Cp requires two nearly identical sites on Cp to bind homodimeric MPO simultaneously and at an angle of at least 120 degrees, which, in turn, exerts tension on MPO and results in conformational change. PMID:25301560

  13. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorica, E.; Spector, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/10/sup 6/ cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine with an IC/sub 50/ value = 0.57..mu..M. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, (D-Pen/sup 2/, D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin and ..beta..-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC/sub 50/ = 60..mu..M, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Binding of dinitrogen to an iron-sulfur-carbon site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čorić, Ilija; Mercado, Brandon Q.; Bill, Eckhard; Vinyard, David J.; Holland, Patrick L.

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogenases are the enzymes by which certain microorganisms convert atmospheric dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia, thereby providing essential nitrogen atoms for higher organisms. The most common nitrogenases reduce atmospheric N2 at the FeMo cofactor, a sulfur-rich iron-molybdenum cluster (FeMoco). The central iron sites that are coordinated to sulfur and carbon atoms in FeMoco have been proposed to be the substrate binding sites, on the basis of kinetic and spectroscopic studies. In the resting state, the central iron sites each have bonds to three sulfur atoms and one carbon atom. Addition of electrons to the resting state causes the FeMoco to react with N2, but the geometry and bonding environment of N2-bound species remain unknown. Here we describe a synthetic complex with a sulfur-rich coordination sphere that, upon reduction, breaks an Fe-S bond and binds N2. The product is the first synthetic Fe-N2 complex in which iron has bonds to sulfur and carbon atoms, providing a model for N2 coordination in the FeMoco. Our results demonstrate that breaking an Fe-S bond is a chemically reasonable route to N2 binding in the FeMoco, and show structural and spectroscopic details for weakened N2 on a sulfur-rich iron site.

  15. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable off......-target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...... potency against class 1 HDACs and are active in tissue culture against various human cancer cell lines. Importantly, enzymological analysis of 26 indicates that the cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide is a fast-on/ off competitive inhibitor of HDACs 1−3 with Ki values of 49, 33, and 37 nM, respectively. Our proof...

  16. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype was effici......Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype...... peptide-MHC complexes may have broad significance in the biology of T cell responses, including generation of the T cell repertoire, the specificity of mixed lymphocyte responses, and the immune surveillance of self and nonself antigens in peripheral lymphoid tissues....

  17. Phenothiazine-binding and attachment sites of CAPP1-calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, D L; Klee, C B

    1989-05-02

    In the presence of Ca2+ norchlorpromazine isothiocyanate forms a monocovalent complex with calmodulin: CAPP1-calmodulin (Newton et al, 1983). Trypsin digestion of [3H]CAPP1-calmodulin yields as the major radioactive peptide N epsilon-CAPP-Lys-Met-Lys, corresponding to residues 75-77 of calmodulin. Stoichiometric amounts of all other expected tryptic peptides are also found, indicating that norchlorpromazine isothiocyanate selectively acylates Lys 75. A second molecule of CAPP-NCS can react, albeit slowly, with calmodulin to form CAPP2-calmodulin. Fragments 38-74 and 127-148 are completely missing from the trypsin digests of CAPP2-calmodulin without deliberate exposure to UV irradiation. Possibly the lengthy preparation of CAPP2-calmodulin favors photolysis, caused by room lights, of the putative CAPP-binding domains located in these two peptides. Lys 148, the sole lysyl residue in fragment 127-148, is a probable site of attachment of the second molecule of CAPP. UV irradiation of CAPP1-calmodulin, followed by digestion with trypsin, results in the selective loss of 50% each of peptides containing residues 38-74 and 127-148, suggesting that these peptides contain the hydrophobic amino acids that form the phenothiazine-binding sites. The loss of peptides encompassing residues 38-74 and 127-148, located in the amino and carboxyl halves of calmodulin, respectively, suggests that the hydrophobic rings of CAPP can bind at either one of the two phenothiazine sites. Computer modeling of CAPP1-calmodulin with the X-ray coordinates of calmodulin (Babu et al., 1986) indicates that CAPP attached to Lys 75 cannot interact with the carboxyl-terminal phenothiazine-binding site.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates.We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data.Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct-interaction detection and TFBS-discovery accuracy. We estimated the accuracy

  19. A Conserved Steroid Binding Site in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Ling; Mills, Denise A.; Buhrow, Leann; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh (Michigan)

    2010-09-02

    Micromolar concentrations of the bile salt deoxycholate are shown to rescue the activity of an inactive mutant, E101A, in the K proton pathway of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase. A crystal structure of the wild-type enzyme reveals, as predicted, deoxycholate bound with its carboxyl group at the entrance of the K path. Since cholate is a known potent inhibitor of bovine oxidase and is seen in a similar position in the bovine structure, the crystallographically defined, conserved steroid binding site could reveal a regulatory site for steroids or structurally related molecules that act on the essential K proton path.

  20. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  1. Cloud Computing for Protein-Ligand Binding Site Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Lun Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  2. Cloud Computing for Protein-Ligand Binding Site Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  3. A molecular dynamics study of human serum albumin binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artali, Roberto; Bombieri, Gabriella; Calabi, Luisella; Del Pra, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    A 2.0 ns unrestrained Molecular Dynamics was used to elucidate the geometric and dynamic properties of the HSA binding sites. The structure is not stress affected and the rmsds calculated from the published crystallographic data are almost constant for all the simulation time, with an averaged value of 2.4A. The major variability is in the C-terminus region. The trajectory analysis of the IIA binding site put in evidence fast oscillations for the Cgamma@Leu203...Cgamma@Leu275 and Cgamma@Leu219...Cgamma@Leu260 distances, with fluctuations around 250 ps, 1000 ps and over for the first, while the second is smoothly increasing with the simulation time from 7 to 10A. These variations are consistent with a volume increase up to 20% confirmed by the inter-domain contacts analysis, in particular for the pair O@Pro148...Ogamma@Ser283, representing the change of distance between IB-h9 and IIA-h6, O@Glu149...Ogamma@Ser189 for sub-domains IB-h9/IIA-h1 and N@Val339...Odelta2@Asp447 sub-domains IIB-h9/IIIA-h1. These inter-domain motions confirm the flexibility of the unfatted HSA with possible binding site pre-formation.

  4. Radioactive labelling of toxin I from Anemonia sulcata and binding to crayfish nerve in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengelin, S; Hucho, F

    1980-04-01

    1. Radioactive derivatives of neurotoxin I (ATX I) from Anemonia sulcata have been synthesized: Iodination of ATX I with 125I yielded a mixture of reaction products from which monoiodo and diiodo ATX I were isolated. 2. 125I-ATX I was shown to bind to the axonal membrane from Astacus leptodactylus main walking nerve. Specificity of binding was shown by saturability of the binding sites and by competitive binding of native and radioactive toxin. 3. Astacus nerve bound 44 fmol of 125I-ATX I/mg nerve (wet weight). The axonal membrane surface of the nerve was determined to be 7800 cm2/g nerve. This amounts to a binding site density of around 35/mu2 axonal surface. Binding was not inhibited by tetrodotoxin, the blocker of the selectivity filter of voltage-dependent sodium channels. 125I-ATX I therefore may bind to the sodium channel-inactivating gate. 4. The affinity of the nerve membrane receptors for 125I-ATX I appears to be voltage-dependent: KD = 5 nM was found with whole crayfish nerves in the presence of tetrodotoxin, KD = 40nM in the absence of tetrodotoxin and an even lower affinity was obtained with axonal membrane fragments isolated from the nerve. Drugs destabilizing the membrane potential, e.g. veratridine, ouabain and sodium azide lowered the affinity or abolished binding completely.

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis of substrate binding sites of azoreductase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Yan, Bin; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Hong; Qu, Yuanyuan; Jin, Ruofei

    2008-05-01

    Comparison of three-dimensional structures of flavin-dependent azoreductases revealed two conserved loops around the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor. Tyr74, His75 and Lys109 in the two loops of azoreductase AZR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were replaced with Trp, Asn and Ala/His by site-directed mutagenesis, respectively. The optimal pH values of K109H and H75N were pH 6, and those of K109A and Y74W were pH 9. The optimal temperature (30 degrees C) was not affected by mutation. Positively charged residues at position 109 is critical for the binding of methyl red. K109 might only be involved in the binding of the 2'-phosphate group of NADPH and have no effect on the binding of NADH. Y74W and H75N mutations decreased the binding of methyl red/nitrofurazone and had no affect on the binding of NADPH.

  6. Bibliographic Studies on the Tetrodotoxin(TTX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang, Tae-Joon

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We were trying to study the validity of Puffer fish's poison(Tetrodotoxin- TTX to make a traditional Korean Medical treatment. The following conclusions were made after literary studies. 1. The first record of the puffer fish dates back 2000 years ago in the Chinese text Book of Mountain and Sea and other texts from the similar period. 2. Puffer fish's poison IS known as tetrodotoxin which is an amino perhydroquinazoline compound. It has a chemical formula of C11H17N3O8 in the hemiacetal structure and has the molecular weight of 319. 3. Tetrodotoxin (TTX plays a role as potent neurotransmitter blocker by blocking the Na+-gate channel which hinders the influx of Na+ ion into the cell. 4. Symptoms of the puffer fish poisoning ranges from blunted sense in the lips and tongue, occasional vomiting in the first degree to sudden descending of the blood pressure, apnea, and other critical conditions in the fourth degree. Intoxication of the puffer fish poison progresses at a rapid pace as death may occur after an hour and half up to eight hours in maximum. Typical death occurs after four to six hours. 5. Ways to treat the puffer fish poisoning include gastric irrigation, induce vomiting, purgation, intravenous fluid injection, and correcting electrolytic imbalance and acidosis. In cases of dyspnea, apply oxygen inhalation and conduct artificial respiration. 6. Tetrodotoxin (TTX may be applied in treating brain disorders, ocular pain, excess pain in the large intestine and ileum, and relieving tension of the skeletal museles, neuralgia, rheumatism, arthritis, and etc. 7. In terms of Oriental medicine, the puffer fish poison has characteristics of sweet, warm, and poisonous. It's known efficacies are to tonify weakness, dispel damp, benefit the lower back, relieve hemorrhoid, kills parasites, remove edema, and so forth. And the puffer fish eggs processed with ginger are said to be effective against tuberculosis and lung cancer, thus, it's validity must be

  7. Platelet serotonin-2 receptor binding sites in depression and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, G N; Pandey, S C; Janicak, P G; Marks, R C; Davis, J M

    1990-08-01

    In order to examine the role of serotonin-2 (5HT2) receptors in depression and suicide, we determined 5HT2 receptors using 125I-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) as the binding ligand in platelets obtained from 20 normal control and 23 drug-free depressed patients. Our results indicate significantly increased 125I-LSD binding sites (Bmax) in the platelets of depressed patients compared with normal control subjects. We also observed that a subgroup of depressed patients with a recent history of suicide attempts or suicidal ideation had significantly higher 5HT2 binding sites as compared with nonsuicidal depressed patients and normal controls. There were no significant differences in the apparent dissociation constant (Kd) values in the platelets of depressed patients compared with normal control subjects. To examine if the baseline 5HT2 receptors are related to either the severity of illness or treatment response, we determined the relationships of the baseline Bmax and Kd with baseline Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores and change in scores after treatment. We found no significant correlation between baseline Bmax and Kd with the baseline HDRS or BPRS scores or change in these scores after psychoactive drug treatment. These results thus indicate increased platelet 5HT2 receptors in depression, but much more so in depressed patients with suicidal ideation or attempts.

  8. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  9. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.; (Drexel-MED); (UPENN)

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  10. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. (Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Nicoletti, G. (Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia)); Holan, G. (CSIRO, Melbourne (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  11. Acetolactate synthase inhibiting herbicides bind to the regulatory site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, M V; Loney-Gallant, V; Dias, J M; Mireles, L C

    1991-05-01

    Acetolactate synthase from spontaneous mutants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum; KS-43 and SK-53) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum; PS-3, PSH-91, and DO-2) selected in tissue culture for resistance to a triazolopyrimidine sulfonanilide showed varying degrees of insensitivity to feedback inhibitor(s) valine and/or leucine. A similar feature was evident in the enzyme isolated from chlorsulfuron-resistant weed biotypes, Kochia scoparia and Stellaria media. Dual inhibition analyses of triazolopyrimidine sulfonanilide, thifensulfuron, and imazethapyr versus feedback inhibitor leucine revealed that the three herbicides were competitive with the amino acid for binding to acetolactate synthase from wild-type cotton cultures. Acetolactate synthase inhibiting herbicides may bind to the regulatory site on the enzyme.

  12. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance allow quantifying substrate binding to different binding sites of Bacillus subtilis xylanase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuyvers, Sven; Dornez, Emmie; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first was a cat......Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first...

  13. Protein-Protein Interactions: Structurally Conserved Residues Distinguish between Binding Sites and Exposed Protein Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buyong Ma; Tal Elkayam; Haim Wolfson; Ruth Nussinov

    2003-01-01

    Polar residue hot spots have been observed at protein-protein binding sites. Here we show that hot spots occur predominantly at the interfaces of macromolecular complexes, distinguishing binding sites from the remainder of the surface...

  14. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward

    2014-01-01

    to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2...... diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele...

  15. Differential effects of Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom on tetrodotoxin-sensitive and tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Eder R; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Naves, Lígia A; Kushmerick, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We examined modification of sodium channel gating by Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom (TbScV), and compared effects on native tetrodotoxin-sensitive and tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium currents from rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and cardiac myocytes. In neurons, TbScV dramatically reduced the rate of sodium current inactivation, increased current amplitude, and caused a negative shift in the voltage-dependence of activation and inactivation of tetrodotoxin-sensitive channels. Enhanced activation of modified sodium channels was independent of a depolarizing prepulse. We identified two components of neuronal tetrodotoxin-resistant current with biophysical properties similar to those described for NaV1.8 and NaV1.9. In contrast to its effects on neuronal tetrodotoxin-sensitive current, TbScV caused a small decrease in neuronal tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium current amplitude and the gating modifications described above were absent. A third tetrodotoxin-resistant current, NaV1.5 recorded in rat cardiac ventricular myocytes, was inhibited approximately 50% by TbScV, and the remaining current exhibited markedly slowed activation and inactivation. In conclusion, TbScV has very different effects on different sodium channel isoforms. Among the neuronal types, currents resistant to tetrodotoxin are also resistant to gating modification by TbScV. The cardiac tetrodotoxin-resistant current has complex sensitivity that includes both inhibition of current amplitude and slowing of activation and inactivation.

  16. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    CERN Document Server

    Clifford, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through Position Weight Matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain a...

  17. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  18. How to use not-always-reliable binding site information in protein-protein docking prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Huang, Yanzhao; Xiao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    In many protein-protein docking algorithms, binding site information is used to help predicting the protein complex structures. Using correct and accurate binding site information can increase protein-protein docking success rate significantly. On the other hand, using wrong binding sites information should lead to a failed prediction, or, at least decrease the success rate. Recently, various successful theoretical methods have been proposed to predict the binding sites of proteins. However, the predicted binding site information is not always reliable, sometimes wrong binding site information could be given. Hence there is a high risk to use the predicted binding site information in current docking algorithms. In this paper, a softly restricting method (SRM) is developed to solve this problem. By utilizing predicted binding site information in a proper way, the SRM algorithm is sensitive to the correct binding site information but insensitive to wrong information, which decreases the risk of using predicted binding site information. This SRM is tested on benchmark 3.0 using purely predicted binding site information. The result shows that when the predicted information is correct, SRM increases the success rate significantly; however, even if the predicted information is completely wrong, SRM only decreases success rate slightly, which indicates that the SRM is suitable for utilizing predicted binding site information.

  19. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...

  20. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Imaging of jasmonic acid binding sites in tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan hong; Yu, Ying; Hu, Xiao gang; Cao, Yu juan; Wu, Jian zhong

    2013-09-15

    Hormones regulate the mechanism of plant growth and development, senescence, and plants' adaptation to the environment; studies of the molecular mechanisms of plant hormone action are necessary for the understanding of these complex phenomena. However, there is no measurable signal for the hormone signal transduction process. We synthesized and applied a quantum dot-based fluorescent probe for the labeling of jasmonic acid (JA) binding sites in plants. This labeling probe was obtained by coupling mercaptoethylamine-modified CdTe quantum dots with JA using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as a coupling agent. The probe, CdTe-JA, was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescent spectrum and applied in labeling JA binding sites in tissue sections of mung bean seedlings and Arabidopsis thaliana root tips. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) revealed that the probe selectively labeled JA receptor. The competition assays demonstrated that the CdTe-JA probe retained the original bioactivity of JA. An LSCM three-dimensional reconstruction experiment demonstrated excellent photostability of the probe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A third Na+-binding site in the sodium pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ciming; Capendeguy, Oihana; Geering, Käthi; Horisberger, Jean-Daniel

    2005-09-06

    The sodium pump, or Na,K-ATPase, exports three intracellular sodium ions in exchange for two extracellular potassium ions. In the high resolution structure of the related calcium pump, two cation-binding sites have been identified. The two corresponding sites in the sodium pump are expected to be alternatively occupied by sodium and potassium. The position of a third sodium-specific site is still hypothetical. Here, we report the large effects of single residue substitutions on the voltage-dependent kinetics of the release of sodium to the extracellular side of the membrane. These mutations also alter the apparent affinity for intracellular sodium while one of them does not affect the intrinsic affinity for potassium. These results enable us to locate the third sodium-specific site of the sodium pump in a space between the fifth, sixth, and ninth transmembrane helices of the alpha-subunit and provide an experimental validation of the model proposed by Ogawa and Toyoshima [Ogawa, H. & Toyoshima, C. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 15977-15982].

  3. Binding of folates to Dictyostelium discoideum cells. Demonstration of five classes of binding sites and their interconversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, René J.W. de; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the binding of four folate derivatives to the cell surface of Dictyostelium discoideum indicate the existence of five types of sites. About 99% of the total number of binding sites (160000 per cell) belongs to the 'non-selective' type, which recognizes folate, 2-deaminofolate and

  4. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  5. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  6. NMR mapping of the IFNAR1-EC binding site on IFNalpha2 reveals allosteric changes in the IFNAR2-EC binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akabayov, Sabine Ruth; Biron, Zohar; Lamken, Peter; Piehler, Jacob; Anglister, Jacob

    2010-02-02

    All type I interferons (IFNs) bind to a common cell-surface receptor consisting of two subunits. IFNs initiate intracellular signal transduction cascades by simultaneous interaction with the extracellular domains of its receptor subunits, IFNAR1 and IFNAR2. In this study, we mapped the surface of IFNalpha2 interacting with the extracellular domain of IFNAR1 (IFNAR1-EC) by following changes in or the disappearance of the (1)H-(15)N TROSY-HSQC cross peaks of IFNalpha2 caused by the binding of the extracellular domain of IFNAR1 (IFNAR1-EC) to the binary complex of IFNalpha2 with IFNAR2-EC. The NMR study of the 89 kDa complex was conducted at pH 8 and 308 K using an 800 MHz spectrometer. IFNAR1 binding affected a total of 47 of 165 IFNalpha2 residues contained in two large patches on the face of the protein opposing the binding site for IFNAR2 and in a third patch located on the face containing the IFNAR2 binding site. The first two patches form the IFNAR1 binding site, and one of these matches the IFNAR1 binding site previously identified by site-directed mutagenesis. The third patch partially matches the IFNalpha2 binding site for IFNAR2-EC, indicating allosteric communication between the binding sites for the two receptor subunits.

  7. Antibody-antigen interactions: contact analysis and binding site topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, R M; Martin, A C; Thornton, J M

    1996-10-11

    We have analysed antigen-contacting residues and combining site shape in the antibody Fv and Fab crystal structures now available from the Protein Data Bank. Antigen-contacting propensities are presented for each antibody residue, allowing a new definition for the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) to be proposed based on observed antigen contacts. Contacts are more common at CDR residues which are located centrally within the combining site; some less central CDR residues are only contacted by large antigens. Non-contacting residues within the CDRs coincide with residues identified by Chothia and co-workers as important in defining "canonical" conformations. An objective means of classifying protein surfaces by gross topography has been developed and applied to the antibody combining site surfaces. The surfaces have been clustered into four topographic classes: concave and moderately concave (mostly hapten binders), ridged (mostly peptide binders) and planar (mostly protein binders). We have determined the topographic classes for ten pairs of complexed and uncomplexed antibody-antigen crystal structures; four change topographic class on complexation. The results will be of use in antibody engineering, antigen docking and in clinical immunology. To demonstrate one application, we show how the data can be used to locate the antigen binding pocket on antibody structures.

  8. Methods and systems for identifying ligand-protein binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2016-05-06

    The invention provides a novel integrated structure and system-based approach for drug target prediction that enables the large-scale discovery of new targets for existing drugs Novel computer-readable storage media and computer systems are also provided. Methods and systems of the invention use novel sequence order-independent structure alignment, hierarchical clustering, and probabilistic sequence similarity techniques to construct a probabilistic pocket ensemble (PPE) that captures even promiscuous structural features of different binding sites for a drug on known targets. The drug\\'s PPE is combined with an approximation of the drug delivery profile to facilitate large-scale prediction of novel drug- protein interactions with several applications to biological research and drug development.

  9. Mapping protein binding sites on the biomolecular corona of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Philip M.; Åberg, Christoffer; Polo, Ester; O'Connell, Ann; Cookman, Jennifer; Fallon, Jonathan; Krpetić, Željka; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles in a biological milieu are known to form a sufficiently long-lived and well-organized ‘corona’ of biomolecules to confer a biological identity to the particle. Because this nanoparticle-biomolecule complex interacts with cells and biological barriers, potentially engaging with different biological pathways, it is important to clarify the presentation of functional biomolecular motifs at its interface. Here, we demonstrate that by using antibody-labelled gold nanoparticles, differential centrifugal sedimentation and various imaging techniques it is possible to identify the spatial location of proteins, their functional motifs and their binding sites. We show that for transferrin-coated polystyrene nanoparticles only a minority of adsorbed proteins exhibit functional motifs and the spatial organization appears random, which is consistent, overall, with a stochastic and irreversible adsorption process. Our methods are applicable to a wide array of nanoparticles and can offer a microscopic molecular description of the biological identity of nanoparticles.

  10. Molecular characterization of the microsomal tamoxifen binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedjouar, Blandine; de Médina, Philippe; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Payré, Bruno; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Favre, Gilles; Faye, Jean-Charles; Poirot, Marc

    2004-08-06

    Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor modulator widely used for the prophylactic treatment of breast cancer. In addition to the estrogen receptor (ER), tamoxifen binds with high affinity to the microsomal antiestrogen binding site (AEBS), which is involved in ER-independent effects of tamoxifen. In the present study, we investigate the modulation of the biosynthesis of cholesterol in tumor cell lines by AEBS ligands. As a consequence of the treatment with the antitumoral drugs tamoxifen or PBPE, a selective AEBS ligand, we show that tumor cells produced a significant concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of cholesterol precursors. Sterols have been purified by HPLC and gas chromatography, and their chemical structures determined by mass spectrometric analysis. The major metabolites identified were 5alpha-cholest-8-en-3beta-ol for tamoxifen treatment and 5alpha-cholest-8-en-3beta-ol and cholesta-5,7-dien-3beta-ol, for PBPE treatment, suggesting that these AEBS ligands affect at least two enzymatic steps: the 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta8-Delta7-isomerase and the 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta7-reductase. Steroidal antiestrogens such as ICI 182,780 and RU 58,668 did not affect these enzymatic steps, because they do not bind to the AEBS. Transient co-expression of human 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta8-Delta7-isomerase and 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta7-reductase and immunoprecipitation experiments showed that both enzymes were required to reconstitute the AEBS in mammalian cells. Altogether, these data provide strong evidence that the AEBS is a hetero-oligomeric complex including 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta8-Delta7-isomerase and the 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta7-reductase as subunits that are necessary and sufficient for tamoxifen binding in mammary cells. Furthermore, because selective AEBS ligands are antitumoral compounds, these data suggest a link between cholesterol metabolism at a post-lanosterol step and tumor growth control. These data afford both the identification

  11. Tetrodotoxin-resistant non-cholinergic neurogenic contraction evoked by capsaicinoids and piperine on the guinea-pig trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolcsányi, J

    1983-11-21

    Contraction of the isolated tracheal strip to capsaicin was prevented by chronic denervation of the tissue. Tetrodotoxin, hyoscine and hexamethonium caused no inhibition of the response, suggesting that tetrodotoxin-resistant terminal portions of non-cholinergic nerves were activated in this way. There was a strong correlation between the pain-producing and tracheoconstrictor effects of piperine, pungent and non-pungent capsaicin congeners. Common site of action was evidenced by crossed tachyphylaxis. It is concluded that the capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerve endings have a dual sensory-efferent function. Excitation-secretion coupling in this system could operate without an axon reflex.

  12. A conserved chloramphenicol binding site at the entrance to the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S; Porse, Bo T

    2003-01-01

    , of E.coli 23S rRNA and G2084 (2058 in E.coli numbering) in domain V of H.halobium 23S rRNA. The modification sites overlap with a portion of the macrolide binding site and cluster at the entrance to the peptide exit tunnel. The data correlate with the recently reported chloramphenicol binding site...... on an archaeal ribosome and suggest that a similar binding site is present on the E.coli ribosome....

  13. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  14. Structure-based prediction of RNA-binding domains and RNA-binding sites and application to structural genomics targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huiying; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2011-04-01

    Mechanistic understanding of many key cellular processes often involves identification of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and RNA binding sites in two separate steps. Here, they are predicted simultaneously by structural alignment to known protein-RNA complex structures followed by binding assessment with a DFIRE-based statistical energy function. This method achieves 98% accuracy and 91% precision for predicting RBPs and 93% accuracy and 78% precision for predicting RNA-binding amino-acid residues for a large benchmark of 212 RNA binding and 6761 non-RNA binding domains (leave-one-out cross-validation). Additional tests revealed that the method makes no false positive prediction from 311 DNA binding domains but correctly detects six domains binding with both DNA and RNA. In addition, it correctly identified 31 of 75 unbound RNA-binding domains with 92% accuracy and 65% precision for predicted binding residues and achieved 86% success rate in its application to SCOP RNA binding domain superfamily (Structural Classification Of Proteins). It further predicts 25 targets as RBPs in 2076 structural genomics targets: 20 of 25 predicted ones (80%) are putatively RNA binding. The superior performance over existing methods indicates the importance of dividing structures into domains, using a Z-score to measure relative structural similarity, and a statistical energy function to measure protein-RNA binding affinity.

  15. Tetrodotoxin: Chemistry, Toxicity, Source, Distribution and Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Bane

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a naturally occurring toxin that has been responsible for human intoxications and fatalities. Its usual route of toxicity is via the ingestion of contaminated puffer fish which are a culinary delicacy, especially in Japan. TTX was believed to be confined to regions of South East Asia, but recent studies have demonstrated that the toxin has spread to regions in the Pacific and the Mediterranean. There is no known antidote to TTX which is a powerful sodium channel inhibitor. This review aims to collect pertinent information available to date on TTX and its analogues with a special emphasis on the structure, aetiology, distribution, effects and the analytical methods employed for its detection.

  16. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J

    1993-01-01

    Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...... can replicate by using various tRNA molecules as primers and propose primer binding site-tRNA primer interactions to be of major importance for tRNA primer selection. However, efficient primer selection does not require perfect Watson-Crick base pairing at all 18 positions of the primer binding site....

  17. Peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites on striated muscles of the rat: Properties and effect of denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.E.; Ickstadt, A. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pharmakologisches Inst.); Hopf, H.Ch. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1985-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites mediate some direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles, the properties of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding to rat biceps and rat diaphragm homogenates were investigated. In both tissues a single population of sites was found with a Ksub(D) value of 3 nmol/l. The density of these sites in both muscles was higher than the density in rat brain, but was considerably lower than in rat kidney. Competition experiments indicate a substrate specificity of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding similar to the properties already demonstrated for the specific binding of this ligand to peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in many other tissues. The properties of these sites in the rat diaphragm are not changed after motoric denervation by phrenicectomy. It is concluded that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites are not involved in direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles.

  18. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  19. Every Site Counts: Submitting Transcription Factor-Binding Site Information through the CollecTF Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erill, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    Experimentally verified transcription factor-binding sites represent an information-rich and highly applicable data type that aptly summarizes the results of time-consuming experiments and inference processes. Currently, there is no centralized repository for this type of data, which is routinely embedded in articles and extremely hard to mine. CollecTF provides the first standardized resource for submission and deposition of these data into the NCBI RefSeq database, maximizing its accessibility and prompting the community to adopt direct submission policies. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Cerebral decortication reverses the effect of amphetamine on striatal D2 dopamine binding site density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, H A

    1986-12-23

    Unilateral ablation of the cerebral cortex produces a decrease of approximately 38% in striatal D2 dopamine binding site density. Chronic d-amphetamine treatment also produces a decrease of about 22% in D2 binding site density. Paradoxically, when rats were hemidecorticated and treated chronically with d-amphetamine, the density of striatal D2 dopamine binding sites on the decorticated side was increased (by about 50%) rather than decreased. Evidently d-amphetamine-induced down-regulation of D2 dopamine binding sites depends on an intact corticostriatal pathway.

  1. Binding site distribution of nuclear transport receptors and transport complexes in single nuclear pore complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahms, Martin; Lehrich, Philipp; Hüve, Jana; Sanetra, Nils; Peters, Reiner

    2009-09-01

    Transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) involves a large channel and an abundance of binding sites for nuclear transport receptors (NTRs). However, the mechanistically important distribution of NTR-binding sites along the channel is vividly debated. In this study, we visualized binding site distributions directly by two complementary optical super-resolution methods, single-molecule microscopy and 4Pi microscopy. First, we analyzed the distribution of RanGDP because this important nuclear transport substrate has two types of binding sites at the NPC, direct and indirect, NTR-mediated sites. We found that the direct binding sites had a maximum at approximately -30 nm with regard to the NPC center, whereas the indirect transport-relevant binding sites peaked at approximately -10 nm. The 20 nm-shift could be only resolved by 4Pi microscopy because of a two to threefold improved localization precision as compared with single-molecule microscopy. Then we analyzed the distribution of the NTR Kapbeta1 and a Kapbeta1-based transport complex and found them to have also binding maxima at approximately -10 nm. These observations support transport models in which NTR binding sites are distributed all along the transport channel and argue against models in which the cytoplasmic entrance of the channel is surrounded by a large cloud of binding sites.

  2. Split tasks of asymmetric nucleotide-binding sites in the heterodimeric ABC exporter EfrCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hürlimann, Lea M; Hohl, Michael; Seeger, Markus A

    2017-06-01

    Many heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) exporters evolved asymmetric ATP-binding sites containing a degenerate site incapable of ATP hydrolysis due to noncanonical substitutions in conserved sequence motifs. Recent studies revealed that nucleotide binding to the degenerate site stabilizes contacts between the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the inward-facing transporter and regulates ATP hydrolysis at the consensus site via allosteric coupling mediated by the D-loops. However, it is unclear whether nucleotide binding to the degenerate site is strictly required for substrate transport. In this study, we examined the functional consequences of a systematic set of mutations introduced at the degenerate and consensus site of the multidrug efflux pump EfrCD of Enterococcus faecalis. Mutating motifs which differ among the two ATP-binding sites (Walker B, switch loop, and ABC signature) or which are involved in interdomain communication (D-loop and Q-loop) led to asymmetric results in the functional assays and were better tolerated at the degenerate site. This highlights the importance of the degenerate site to allosterically regulate the events at the consensus site. Mutating invariant motifs involved in ATP binding and NBD closure (A-loop and Walker A) resulted in equally reduced transport activities, regardless at which ATP-binding site they were introduced. In contrast to previously investigated heterodimeric ABC exporters, mutation of the degenerate site Walker A lysine completely inactivated ATPase activity and substrate transport, indicating that ATP binding to the degenerate site is essential for EfrCD. This study provides novel insights into the split tasks of asymmetric ATP-binding sites of heterodimeric ABC exporters. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehteshami, Mehdi [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboob, Soltanali [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza, E-mail: rashidi@tbzmed.ac.ir [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP-BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP-BSA complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions.

  4. Mutational analysis of the IFNAR1 binding site on IFNalpha2 reveals the architecture of a weak ligand-receptor binding-site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roisman, Laila C; Jaitin, Diego A; Baker, Darren P; Schreiber, Gideon

    2005-10-21

    Type I interferons activate cellular responses by forming a ternary complex with two receptor components, IFNAR1 and IFNAR2. While the binding of the IFNAR2 receptor to interferon is of high affinity and well characterized, the binding to IFNAR1 is weak, transient, and poorly understood. Here, we mapped the complete binding region of IFNAR1 on IFNalpha2 by creating a panel of 21 single alanine mutant proteins, and determined their binding affinities. The IFNAR1 binding site on IFNalpha2 maps to the center of the B and C helices, opposite to the binding site for IFNAR2. No hot spots for binding were found in the interface, with individual mutations having an up to fivefold effect on binding. Of the nine residues that affected binding, three adjacent conserved residues, located on the B helix, conferred an increase in the binding affinity to IFNAR1, as well as an increase in the biological activity of the interferon mutant. This suggests that binding of alpha interferons to the IFNAR1 receptor is sub-optimal. A correlation between binding affinity and biological activity was found, albeit not across the whole range of affinities. In WISH cells, but not DAUDI cells, the anti-proliferative activity was markedly affected by fluctuations in the IFNalpha2 affinity towards the IFNAR1 receptor. On the other hand, the antiviral activity of interferons on WISH cells seems to change in accordance to the binding affinity towards IFNAR1 only as long as the binding affinity is not beyond twofold of the wild-type. In accordance, the biological roles of the two interferon-receptor subunits are discussed.

  5. A tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins from PDB structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jing

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the research on protein functional sites, researchers often need to identify binding-site residues on a protein. A commonly used strategy is to find a complex structure from the Protein Data Bank (PDB that consists of the protein of interest and its interacting partner(s and calculate binding-site residues based on the complex structure. However, since a protein may participate in multiple interactions, the binding-site residues calculated based on one complex structure usually do not reveal all binding sites on a protein. Thus, this requires researchers to find all PDB complexes that contain the protein of interest and combine the binding-site information gleaned from them. This process is very time-consuming. Especially, combing binding-site information obtained from different PDB structures requires tedious work to align protein sequences. The process becomes overwhelmingly difficult when researchers have a large set of proteins to analyze, which is usually the case in practice. Results In this study, we have developed a tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins, TCBRP http://yanbioinformatics.cs.usu.edu:8080/ppbindingsubmit. For an input protein, TCBRP can quickly find all binding-site residues on the protein by automatically combining the information obtained from all PDB structures that consist of the protein of interest. Additionally, TCBRP presents the binding-site residues in different categories according to the interaction type. TCBRP also allows researchers to set the definition of binding-site residues. Conclusion The developed tool is very useful for the research on protein binding site analysis and prediction.

  6. A tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins from PDB structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Yan, Changhui

    2009-08-03

    In the research on protein functional sites, researchers often need to identify binding-site residues on a protein. A commonly used strategy is to find a complex structure from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that consists of the protein of interest and its interacting partner(s) and calculate binding-site residues based on the complex structure. However, since a protein may participate in multiple interactions, the binding-site residues calculated based on one complex structure usually do not reveal all binding sites on a protein. Thus, this requires researchers to find all PDB complexes that contain the protein of interest and combine the binding-site information gleaned from them. This process is very time-consuming. Especially, combing binding-site information obtained from different PDB structures requires tedious work to align protein sequences. The process becomes overwhelmingly difficult when researchers have a large set of proteins to analyze, which is usually the case in practice. In this study, we have developed a tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins, TCBRP http://yanbioinformatics.cs.usu.edu:8080/ppbindingsubmit. For an input protein, TCBRP can quickly find all binding-site residues on the protein by automatically combining the information obtained from all PDB structures that consist of the protein of interest. Additionally, TCBRP presents the binding-site residues in different categories according to the interaction type. TCBRP also allows researchers to set the definition of binding-site residues. The developed tool is very useful for the research on protein binding site analysis and prediction.

  7. Shapes of antibody binding sites: qualitative and quantitative analyses based on a geomorphic classification scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle; Lloyd, Peter; Zhang, Xiyun; Schallhorn, Julie M; Sugimoto, Keiki; Leach, Andrew G; Sapiro, Guillermo; Houk, K N

    2006-07-07

    The topography of antibody binding sites has been classified into five types that evoke familiar geomorphic features of the Earth. The 229 antibody crystal structures from the Protein Data Bank were analyzed and classified into these classes. Relationships to previous topography classifications by Rees et al., who defined three classes, and Thornton et al., who defined four classes, are identified. An algorithm was developed to identify the antibody binding site class automatically based on the definition and the shape of the binding site. A three-dimensional convex hull was formed around the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the antibody. The convex hull was then "trimmed" to fit the binding site by using distance criteria and morphological techniques. Once the program identified the binding site shape, a statistical and distance based analysis was performed to classify automatically the antibody into one of the five geomorphic classes. The five antibody topography classes are as follows: cave (mostly hapten binders), crater (mostly protein and peptide/carbohydrate/nucleic acid binders), canyon, valley, and plain (mostly protein binders). Comparisons of the binding sites of empty and of complexed antibody binding sites gave an indication of how the shape of the binding site is influenced by binding of the antigen.

  8. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  9. Binding site number variation and high-affinity binding consensus of Myb-SANT-like transcription factor Adf-1 in Drosophilidae

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Michael; Juan, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the evolution of transcription factor binding sites and corresponding functional change of transcriptional regulation. In this context, we have examined the structural changes of the ADF-1 binding sites at the Adh promoters of Drosophila funebris and D. virilis. We detected an expanded footprinted region in D. funebris that contains various adjacent binding sites with different binding affinities. ADF-1 was described to direct sequence-specific DNA binding to si...

  10. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-05-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, (/sup 3/H) dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for (/sup 3/H) (D-Ala2, D-Leu5)enkephalin and (3H)ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites.

  11. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Maria E.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation. PMID:24129575

  12. Gephyrin-binding peptides visualize postsynaptic sites and modulate neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Hans Michael; Hausrat, Torben Johann; Neubert, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type A and glycine receptors are the major mediators of fast synaptic inhibition in the human central nervous system and are established drug targets. However, all drugs targeting these receptors bind to the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the receptors, which inherentl...

  13. A molecular model of the folate binding site of Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southerland, William M.

    1994-04-01

    The inhibition of Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) continues to be the major treatment strategy for P. carinii pneumonia (PCP). The design of new anti-pneumocystis agents would be significantly enhanced by the availability of a 3D model of the methotrexate (MTX) binding site of the P. carinii DHFR. However, an X-ray crystal structure of the P. carinii DHFR is not yet available. Alignment of the amino acid sequences of P. carinii and Lactobacillus casei DHFRs indicates that the two proteins show approximately 80% homology among MTX binding-site residues. This high level of homology suggests that the L. casei DHFR MTX binding-site structure could serve as a structural template in developing a model of the P. carinii DHFR MTX binding site. Therefore, the X-ray crystal structure of L. casei DHFR was used to develop a 3D model of the methotrexate binding site of P. carinii DHFR. The molecular modeling and dynamics software QUANTA/CHARMm was used. Amino acid residue mutations and deletions were performed using QUANTA and macromolecular minimizations were achieved with CHARMm. The MTX binding-site residues of L. casei DHFR were mutated to the corresponding residues of the P. carinii DHFR sequence. The resulting structure was extensively minimized. The resulting P. carinii MTX binding-site model showed significant differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns from the L. casei MTX binding site. Also, the P. carinii site is more hydrophobic than the corresponding L. casei site. Analysis of atom-to-atom close contacts between methotrexate and protein binding-site residues indicates that the P. carinii MTX binding-site complex is primarily stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, while the L. casei complex is mostly stabilized by electrostatic interactions. The model is consistent with the observed increased sensitivity of P. carinii DHFR to lipid-soluble inhibitors and provides a rational basis for the design of new anti-pneumocystis agents.

  14. Evolution of transcription factor binding sites in mammalian gene regulatory regions: handling counterintuitive results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, James E; Blomhoff, Rune

    2009-06-01

    The remodeling of transcription factor binding sites is one of the major engines of evolutionary change, yet almost all available examples of this involve sites from regulatory modules brought online during development. Developmental modules are known to enjoy some type of canalization, which allows considerably more cryptic change than would be assumed for nondevelopmental modules. It remains an open question, then, how frequently binding site remodeling occurs in general. There are strong intuitive reasons to expect that regulatory constancy, and hence binding site conservation in general, is the rule, yet little systematic work has been done to verify this. In the present article, we show that the most obvious way of approaching this problem--which is simply to collect experimentally verified binding sites from the literature without further analysis, create multispecies alignments, and apply conservation algorithms--leads to counterintuitive and ultimately inaccurate results. This is because of the low complexity of typical binding sites and, consequently, because of the frequency with which strings resembling legitimate sites occur throughout the genome. In vitro results can easily be confounded by this. Applying one traditional conservation algorithm and two novel algorithms to a data set that ought to be representative of binding sites in general, but which is taken from the literature directly, we find that only 58% of sites appear to be conserved. However, after the data set is carefully vetted against binding site overloading, and after the likelihood of a specific type of compensatory evolution is evaluated, conservation rates as high as 94% appear reasonable.

  15. MotifMap-RNA: a genome-wide map of RBP binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Sun, Sha; Bredy, Timothy; Wood, Marcelo; Spitale, Robert C; Baldi, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    RNA plays a critical role in gene expression and its regulation. RNA binding proteins (RBPs), in turn, are important regulators of RNA. Thanks to the availability of large scale data for RBP binding motifs and in vivo binding sites results in the form of eCLIP experiments, it is now possible to computationally predict RBP binding sites across the whole genome. We describe MotifMap-RNA, an extension of MotifMap which predicts binding sites for RBP motifs across human and mouse genomes and allows large scale querying of predicted binding sites. The data and corresponding web server are available from: http://motifmap-rna.ics.uci.edu/ as part of the MotifMap web portal. rspitale@uci.edu or pfbaldi@uci.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Computational identification of combinatorial regulation and transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Taewoo; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Dae-Won; Lee, Doheon

    2007-08-15

    A number of computational methods have been used to unravel the core mechanisms governing the regulation of gene expression, but these techniques examine only portions of the genetic regulatory mechanism. For example, some studies have failed to include the combined action of multiple transcription factors (TFs) or the importance of TF binding constraints (i.e., the binding position and orientation), while others have examined combinations of only 2 or 3 TFs. Thus, we sought to develop a new method for identifying regulatory modules in yeast, using an algorithm that includes all combinations of TFs plus a number of binding constraints when identifying target genes. We successfully developed a computational method for using microarray and TF-DNA interaction data to identify regulatory modules. All possible combinations of yeast TFs and various binding constraints were tested to identify regulatory modules. Within the identified modules, target genes were found to have common binding constraints such as fixed binding regions and orientations for each TF. Moreover, targets showed similar mRNA expression profiles and high functional coherence. Our novel approach, which accounts for both combined actions of TFs and their binding constraints, can be used to identify target genes and reliably predict regulatory modules over a broad range of functional categories. Complete results and additional information are available online at http://bisl. kaist.ac.kr/~dhlee/comModule/index.html. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Paralytic complications of puffer fish (tetrodotoxin) poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahasan, H A M N; Mamun, A A; Karim, S R; Bakar, M A; Gazi, E A; Bala, C S

    2004-02-01

    Puffer fish is available in Bangladesh and is occasionally eaten by some people. Ignorance regarding its proper cooking process may lead to serious health hazards, including fatality. An unusual catastrophic event happened recently in Khulna, Bangladesh that drew nationwide attention. Eight families were affected. Thirty-seven patients were admitted with a history of consumption of puffer fish. Peri-oral paraesthesia (24), weakness of both lower limbs (22), paraesthesia all over the body (18), headache (15), difficulty in respiration (14), nausea and vomiting (8), blurring of vision (7), and vertigo (6) were common clinical presentations. Twenty-two patients developed ascending paralysis of limbs and involved the respiratory muscles in 17 patients. Eight patients died due to respiratory failure while the rest improved. Health personnel should have sufficient knowledge regarding the clinical manifestations, complications and management of puffer fish poisoning. During its preparation, organs that contain the highest level of tetrodotoxin should be removed. Since there is no specific treatment, people should be made aware of the potential risk of eating puffer fish, about the warning symptoms and signs of puffer fish poisoning, and when to seek medical help.

  18. Lectin-binding sites in the epithelium of normal human appendix vermiformis and in acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinck, U; Bosbach, R; Korabiowska, M; Schauer, A; Gabius, H J

    1995-01-01

    By using histochemical methods, the binding pattern of various lectins in the epithelium of normal human appendix vermiformis was assessed. In addition to plant and invertebrate sugar receptors with nominal monosaccharide specificity for alpha-L-Fuc (UEA-I), alpha-D-Man and alpha-D-Gluc (Con A), alpha-D-GalNAc (DBA), D-GalNAc (SBA, HPA) beta-D-Gal (RCA-I) and D-Gal (VAA), a mammalian beta-galactoside-specific lectin (MW, 14 kDa) was included in the applied panel. The apical surface of enterocytes presented binding sites for RCA-I on all cells, binding sites of UEA-I, DBA, SBA, HPA and VAA heterogeneously and no binding sites of Con A and 14 kDa. Binding sites of DBA, SBA, HPA, VAA and RCA-I within enterocytes were located primarily focally in a supranuclear position, whereas Con A and 14 kDa bound to the cytoplasm both in apical and basal cell parts. In the follicle-associated epithelium more enterocytes expressed SBA- and VAA-binding sites than in the crypt epithelium. No differences between the lectin-binding pattern of M-cells and enterocytes were found in the follicle-associated epithelium. Intraepithelial macrophages were heterogeneously positive for the full panel of applied lectins. In contrast, intraepithelial lymphatic cells expressed binding sites only for RCA-I and less prominently for Con A, VAA and 14 kDa. Goblet cell mucus contained lectin-binding sites in a heterogeneous manner: binding sites for Con A were not detected in goblet cells for DBA, SBA, VAA and 14 kDa in less than 20%, for UEA-I in 20-40%, for HPA in 40-60% and for RCA-I in 60-100% of the goblet cells. Secreted mucus differed in its lectin-binding capacity from intracellular goblet cell mucus selectively by an increase of UEA-I, SBA- and RCA-I-binding sites and a lack of 14 kDa-binding sites. Comparative study of lectin binding to goblet cell mucin in another region of the large intestine, namely the rectosigmoid, demonstrated that DBA, SBA and 14 kDa bound mainly to the distal colon

  19. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  20. Solubilization of serotonin-1a and serotonin-1b binding sites from bovine brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asarch, K.B.; Shih, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    Serotonin1 (5-hydroxytryptamine1, 5-HT1) binding sites have been solubilized from bovine brain cortex using a mixture of 0.1% Nonidet P-40 and 0.3% digitonin in a low-salt buffer containing 0.1% ascorbic acid. The affinity of (/sup 3/H)5-HT for the soluble cortical binding sites (2.1 nM) is identical to its affinity at membrane-bound binding sites (2.1 nM). (/sup 3/H)8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin ((/sup 3/H)DPAT), a selective 5-HT1a radioligand, also binds to soluble cortical binding sites with high affinity (1.8 nM) comparable with its affinity in the crude membranes (1.7 nM). A significant correlation exists in the rank order potency of serotonergic agents for (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding and for (/sup 3/H)DPAT binding to crude and soluble membranes. The density of (/sup 3/H)DPAT binding sites relative to the (/sup 3/H)5-HT sites in the solubilized cortical membranes (35%) corresponds well with the proportion of 5-HT1a sites in the crude membranes determined by spiperone displacement (33%), suggesting that both the 5-HT1a and 5-HT1b binding sites have been cosolubilized. (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding in the soluble preparations was inhibited by GTP, suggesting that a receptor complex may have been solubilized. (/sup 3/H)Spiperone-specific binding was not detectable in this preparation, suggesting that 5-HT2 sites were not cosolubilized.

  1. Mapping the ADF/cofilin binding site on monomeric actin by competitive cross-linking and peptide array: evidence for a second binding site on monomeric actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannherz, Hans Georg; Ballweber, Edda; Galla, Marco; Villard, Sylvie; Granier, Claude; Steegborn, Clemens; Schmidtmann, Anja; Jaquet, Kornelia; Pope, Brian; Weeds, Alan G

    2007-02-23

    The binding sites for actin depolymerising factor (ADF) and cofilin on G-actin have been mapped by competitive chemical cross-linking using deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I), gelsolin segment 1 (G1), thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4), and vitamin D-binding protein (DbP). To reduce ADF/cofilin induced actin oligomerisation we used ADP-ribosylated actin. Both vitamin D-binding protein and thymosin beta4 inhibit binding by ADF or cofilin, while cofilin or ADF and DNase I bind simultaneously. Competition was observed between ADF or cofilin and G1, supporting the hypothesis that cofilin preferentially binds in the cleft between sub-domains 1 and 3, similar to or overlapping the binding site of G1. Because the affinity of G1 is much higher than that of ADF or cofilin, even at a 20-fold excess of the latter, the complexes contained predominantly G1. Nevertheless, cross-linking studies using actin:G1 complexes and ADF or cofilin showed the presence of low concentrations of ternary complexes containing both ADF or cofilin and G1. Thus, even with monomeric actin, it is shown for the first time that binding sites for both G1 and ADF or cofilin can be occupied simultaneously, confirming the existence of two separate binding sites. Employing a peptide array with overlapping sequences of actin overlaid by cofilin, we have identified five sequence stretches of actin able to bind cofilin. These sequences are located within the regions of F-actin predicted to bind cofilin in the model derived from image reconstructions of electron microscopical images of cofilin-decorated filaments. Three of the peptides map to the cleft region between sub-domains 1 and 3 of the upper actin along the two-start long-pitch helix, while the other two are in the DNase I loop corresponding to the site of the lower actin in the helix. In the absence of any crystal structures of ADF or cofilin in complex with actin, these studies provide further information about the binding sites on F-actin for these important actin

  2. Crystal structure of vinculin in complex with vinculin binding site 50 (VBS50), the integrin binding site 2 (IBS2) of talin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogesha, S.D.; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Vonrhein, Clemens; Bricogne, Gerard; Izard, Tina (Globel Phasing); (Scripps)

    2012-05-10

    The cytoskeletal protein talin activates integrin receptors by binding of its FERM domain to the cytoplasmic tail of {beta}-integrin. Talin also couples integrins to the actin cytoskeleton, largely by binding to and activating the cytoskeletal protein vinculin, which binds to F-actin through the agency of its five-helix bundle tail (Vt) domain. Talin activates vinculin by means of buried amphipathic {alpha}-helices coined vinculin binding sites (VBSs) that reside within numerous four- and five-helix bundle domains that comprise the central talin rod, which are released from their buried locales by means of mechanical tension on the integrin:talin complex. In turn, these VBSs bind to the N-terminal seven-helix bundle (Vh1) domain of vinculin, creating an entirely new helix bundle that severs its head-tail interactions. Interestingly, talin harbors a second integrin binding site coined IBS2 that consists of two five-helix bundle domains that also contain a VBS (VBS50). Here we report the crystal structure of VBS50 in complex with vinculin at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and show that intramolecular interactions of VBS50 within IBS2 are much more extensive versus its interactions with vinculin. Indeed, the IBS2-vinculin interaction only occurs at physiological temperature and the affinity of VBS50 for vinculin is about 30 times less than other VBSs. The data support a model where integrin binding destabilizes IBS2 to allow it to bind to vinculin.

  3. GenProBiS: web server for mapping of sequence variants to protein binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, Janez; Skrlj, Blaz; Erzen, Nika; Kunej, Tanja; Janezic, Dusanka

    2017-05-11

    Discovery of potentially deleterious sequence variants is important and has wide implications for research and generation of new hypotheses in human and veterinary medicine, and drug discovery. The GenProBiS web server maps sequence variants to protein structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and further to protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, protein-compound, and protein-metal ion binding sites. The concept of a protein-compound binding site is understood in the broadest sense, which includes glycosylation and other post-translational modification sites. Binding sites were defined by local structural comparisons of whole protein structures using the Protein Binding Sites (ProBiS) algorithm and transposition of ligands from the similar binding sites found to the query protein using the ProBiS-ligands approach with new improvements introduced in GenProBiS. Binding site surfaces were generated as three-dimensional grids encompassing the space occupied by predicted ligands. The server allows intuitive visual exploration of comprehensively mapped variants, such as human somatic mis-sense mutations related to cancer and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms from 21 species, within the predicted binding sites regions for about 80 000 PDB protein structures using fast WebGL graphics. The GenProBiS web server is open and free to all users at http://genprobis.insilab.org. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  5. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellis Manolis

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Results Here we analyse the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikatae to study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artefacts of computational motif finding algorithms. Conclusion As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will

  6. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the osteoinductive protein NELL1 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Imai, Arisa; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2015-12-21

    Neural epidermal growth factor-like (NEL)-like 1 (NELL1) is a secretory osteogenic protein comprising an N-terminal thrombospondin-1-like (TSPN) domain, four von Willebrand factor type C domains, and six epidermal growth factor-like repeats. NELL1 shows heparin-binding activity; however, the biological significance remains to be explored. In this report, we demonstrate that NELL1 binds to cell surface proteoglycans through its TSPN domain. Major heparin-binding sites were identified on the three-dimensional structural model of the TSPN domain of NELL1. Mutant analysis of the heparin-binding sites indicated that the heparin-binding activity of the TSPN domain is involved in interaction of NELL1 with cell surface proteoglycans. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacological specificity of some psychotomimetic and antipsychotic agents for the sigma and PCP binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itzhak, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacological specificity of representative psychotomimetic agents such a phencyclidine (PCP) analogs, opiate benzomorphans and several antipsychotic agents was assessed for the sigma and PCP binding sites. In a series of binding experiments, in rat brain membranes, sigma and PCP binding sites were labeled with (/sup 3/H)-1-(1-(3-hydroxyphenyl) cyclohexyl) piperidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH), (+)(/sup 3/H)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047) and (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-(3-hydroxy-phenyl)-N-(1-propyl) piperidine and ((+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP). PCP analogs inhibit potently high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding and (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 binding, moderately the low affinity binding component of (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and very weakly (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding. (+)SKF 10047 and cyclazocine are potent to moderate inhibitors of (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047, high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PCP-3-OH binding. The antipsychotic agents display high affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding sites, moderate affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 sites and have no effect on either the high or low affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Multiple sup 3 H-oxytocin binding sites in rat myometrial plasma membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crankshaw, D.; Gaspar, V.; Pliska, V. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario, (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    The affinity spectrum method has been used to analyse binding isotherms for {sup 3}H-oxytocin to rat myometrial plasma membranes. Three populations of binding sites with dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.6-1.5 x 10(-9), 0.4-1.0 x 10(-7) and 7 x 10(-6) mol/l were identified and their existence verified by cluster analysis based on similarities between Kd, binding capacity and Hill coefficient. When experimental values were compared to theoretical curves constructed using the estimated binding parameters, good fits were obtained. Binding parameters obtained by this method were not influenced by the presence of GTP gamma S (guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate) in the incubation medium. The binding parameters agree reasonably well with those found in uterine cells, they support the existence of a medium affinity site and may allow for an explanation of some of the discrepancies between binding and response in this system.

  9. Impact of Binding Site Comparisons on Medicinal Chemistry and Rational Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrt, Christiane; Brinkjost, Tobias; Koch, Oliver

    2016-05-12

    Modern rational drug design not only deals with the search for ligands binding to interesting and promising validated targets but also aims to identify the function and ligands of yet uncharacterized proteins having impact on different diseases. Additionally, it contributes to the design of inhibitors with distinct selectivity patterns and the prediction of possible off-target effects. The identification of similarities between binding sites of various proteins is a useful approach to cope with those challenges. The main scope of this perspective is to describe applications of different protein binding site comparison approaches to outline their applicability and impact on molecular design. The article deals with various substantial application domains and provides some outstanding examples to show how various binding site comparison methods can be applied to promote in silico drug design workflows. In addition, we will also briefly introduce the fundamental principles of different protein binding site comparison methods.

  10. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi; Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Ando, Hiromune; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.

    2016-01-01

    structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been detd., providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small mol. antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compd. to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate...... the binding mode of SR48692 and other small mol. compds. to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were obsd., despite...

  12. Thermodynamic compensation upon binding to exosite 1 and the active site of thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuheit, Nicholas A; Beach, Muneera A; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2011-05-31

    Several lines of experimental evidence including amide exchange and NMR suggest that ligands binding to thrombin cause reduced backbone dynamics. Binding of the covalent inhibitor dPhe-Pro-Arg chloromethyl ketone to the active site serine, as well as noncovalent binding of a fragment of the regulatory protein, thrombomodulin, to exosite 1 on the back side of the thrombin molecule both cause reduced dynamics. However, the reduced dynamics do not appear to be accompanied by significant conformational changes. In addition, binding of ligands to the active site does not change the affinity of thrombomodulin fragments binding to exosite 1; however, the thermodynamic coupling between exosite 1 and the active site has not been fully explored. We present isothermal titration calorimetry experiments that probe changes in enthalpy and entropy upon formation of binary ligand complexes. The approach relies on stringent thrombin preparation methods and on the use of dansyl-l-arginine-(3-methyl-1,5-pantanediyl)amide and a DNA aptamer as ligands with ideal thermodynamic signatures for binding to the active site and to exosite 1. Using this approach, the binding thermodynamic signatures of each ligand alone as well as the binding signatures of each ligand when the other binding site was occupied were measured. Different exosite 1 ligands with widely varied thermodynamic signatures cause a similar reduction in ΔH and a concomitantly lower entropy cost upon DAPA binding at the active site. The results suggest a general phenomenon of enthalpy-entropy compensation consistent with reduction of dynamics/increased folding of thrombin upon ligand binding to either the active site or exosite 1.

  13. Differential modulation by cations of sigma and phencyclidine binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, S.; Zhou, G.Z.; Katki, A.G.; Rodbard, D. (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation attempted to differentiate haloperidol-sensitive sigma sites (sigma H) from phencyclidine (PCP) binding sites in rat brain membranes. We studied the effects of several cations at physiologically relevant concentrations on the binding of radioligands selective for sigma H sites ((3H)haloperidol, (3H)(+)3-PPP**), and (3H)(+)SKF10,047, or for PCP sites ((3H)PCP and (3H)TCP). The PCP sites displayed a markedly greater sensitivity to cations than sigma H sites. This property was reflected by a greater extent of inhibition of the binding of PCP-selective relative to sigma H-selective ligands at a given cation concentration, as well as by lower IC50's and by steeper slopes of the cation dose-response curves. Divalent cations were approximately 100 times more potent than monovalent cations. All cations were inhibitory, except Sr2+ and Ba2+ which, at micromolar concentrations, enhanced PCP binding but not sigma H binding. Thus, PCP-selective sites appeared to be distinct from sigma H sites with regards to several aspects of cation modulation. This is consistent with the view that PCP and sigma H sites are distinct molecular entities. Further, the marked cation sensitivity of the PCP site is consistent with the current hypothesis according to which the PCP site is linked to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-cation channel complex.

  14. Mapping of SPARC/BM-40/Osteonectin-binding Sites on Fibrillar Collagens*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Giudici, Camilla; Raynal, Nicolas; Wiedemann, Hanna; Wayne A. Cabral; Marini, Joan C.; Timpl, Rupert; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Farndale, Richard W.; Sasaki, Takako; Tenni, Ruggero

    2008-01-01

    The 33-kDa matrix protein SPARC (BM-40, osteonectin) binds several collagen types with moderate affinity. The collagen-binding site resides in helix αA of the extracellular calcium-binding domain of SPARC and is partially masked by helix αC. Previously, we found that the removal of helix αC caused a 10-fold increase in the affinity of SPARC for collagen, and we identified amino acids crucial for binding by site-directed mutagenesis. In this study, we used rotary shadow...

  15. SITE-DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS OF PROPOSED ACTIVE-SITE RESIDUES OF PENICILLIN-BINDING PROTEIN-5 FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLINDEN, MPG; DEHAAN, L; DIDEBERG, O; KECK, W

    1994-01-01

    Alignment of the amino acid sequence of penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) with the sequences of other members of the family of active-site-serine penicillin-interacting enzymes predicted the residues playing a role in the catalytic mechanism of PBP5. Apart from the active-site (Ser(44)), Lys(47),

  16. An Overview of the Prediction of Protein DNA-Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and DNA play an important role in many essential biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and repair. The identification of amino acid residues involved in DNA-binding sites is critical for understanding the mechanism of these biological activities. In the last decade, numerous computational approaches have been developed to predict protein DNA-binding sites based on protein sequence and/or structural information, which play an important role in complementing experimental strategies. At this time, approaches can be divided into three categories: sequence-based DNA-binding site prediction, structure-based DNA-binding site prediction, and homology modeling and threading. In this article, we review existing research on computational methods to predict protein DNA-binding sites, which includes data sets, various residue sequence/structural features, machine learning methods for comparison and selection, evaluation methods, performance comparison of different tools, and future directions in protein DNA-binding site prediction. In particular, we detail the meta-analysis of protein DNA-binding sites. We also propose specific implications that are likely to result in novel prediction methods, increased performance, or practical applications.

  17. Binding site number variation and high-affinity binding consensus of Myb-SANT-like transcription factor Adf-1 in Drosophilidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Michael; Juan, Elvira

    2010-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the evolution of transcription factor binding sites and corresponding functional change of transcriptional regulation. In this context, we have examined the structural changes of the ADF-1 binding sites at the Adh promoters of Drosophila funebris and D. virilis. We detected an expanded footprinted region in D. funebris that contains various adjacent binding sites with different binding affinities. ADF-1 was described to direct sequence-specific DNA binding to sites consisting of the multiple trinucleotide repeat . The ADF-1 recognition sites with high binding affinity differ from this trinucleotide repeat consensus sequence and a new consensus sequence is proposed for the high-affinity ADF-1 binding sites. In vitro transcription experiments with the D. funebris and D. virilis ADF-1 binding regions revealed that stronger ADF-1 binding to the expanded D. funebris ADF-1 binding region only moderately lead to increased transcriptional activity of the Adh gene. The potential of this regional expansion is discussed in the context of different ADF-1 cellular concentrations and maintenance of the ADF-1 stimulus. Altogether, evolutionary change of ADF-1 binding regions involves both, rearrangements of complex binding site cluster and also nucleotide substitutions within sites that lead to different binding affinities.

  18. Binding affinity of a small molecule to an amorphous polymer in a solvent. Part 1: free energy of binding to a binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunsrivirot, Surasak; Diao, Ying; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-10-18

    Crystallization is commonly used in a separation and purification process in the production of a wide range of materials in various industries. In industry, crystallization usually starts with heterogeneous nucleation on a foreign surface. The complicated mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood; however, we hypothesize that there might be a possible correlation between binding affinity to a surface and enhancement of nucleation. Recent studies show that amorphous polymers can be used to control crystallization, selectively produce pharmaceutical polymorphs, and discover novel pharmaceutical polymorphs. To investigate the possible correlation between the binding affinity of one molecule to key binding sites (local binding) and heterogeneous nucleation activity as well as the possibility of using this binding affinity to help guide the selection of polymers that promote heterogeneous nucleation, we computed the free energy of binding of aspirin to four nonporous cross-linked polymers in an ethanol-water 38 v% mixture. These cross-linked polymers are poly(4-acryloylmorpholine) (PAM), poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate) (PCEA), poly(4-hydroxylbutyl acrylate) (PHBA), and polystyrene (PS); all of them were cross-linked with divinylbenzene (DVB). These systems were used because their heterogeneous nucleation activities are available in literature, and the ranking is PAM > PCEA > PHBA ≈ PS. We generated three independent surfaces for each polymer and computed the free energy of binding of aspirin to the best binding site that we found on each surface. The average free energies of binding to the best sites of PAM, PCEA, PHBA, and PS are -20.4 ± 1.0, -16.7 ± 1.0, -14.4 ± 1.1, and -13.6 ± 1.1 kcal/mol, respectively. We found that the trend of the magnitudes of the average free energies of binding to the best sites is PAM > PCEA > PHBA ≈ PS. This trend is very similar to that of heterogeneous nucleation activity. Our results suggest the importance of the

  19. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...

  20. Defining the plasticity of transcription factor binding sites by Deconstructing DNA consensus sequences: the PhoP-binding sites among gamma/enterobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Harari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulators recognize specific DNA sequences. Because these sequences are embedded in the background of genomic DNA, it is hard to identify the key cis-regulatory elements that determine disparate patterns of gene expression. The detection of the intra- and inter-species differences among these sequences is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of both differential gene expression and evolution. Here, we address this problem by investigating the target promoters controlled by the DNA-binding PhoP protein, which governs virulence and Mg(2+ homeostasis in several bacterial species. PhoP is particularly interesting; it is highly conserved in different gamma/enterobacteria, regulating not only ancestral genes but also governing the expression of dozens of horizontally acquired genes that differ from species to species. Our approach consists of decomposing the DNA binding site sequences for a given regulator into families of motifs (i.e., termed submotifs using a machine learning method inspired by the "Divide & Conquer" strategy. By partitioning a motif into sub-patterns, computational advantages for classification were produced, resulting in the discovery of new members of a regulon, and alleviating the problem of distinguishing functional sites in chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray genome-wide analysis. Moreover, we found that certain partitions were useful in revealing biological properties of binding site sequences, including modular gains and losses of PhoP binding sites through evolutionary turnover events, as well as conservation in distant species. The high conservation of PhoP submotifs within gamma/enterobacteria, as well as the regulatory protein that recognizes them, suggests that the major cause of divergence between related species is not due to the binding sites, as was previously suggested for other regulators. Instead, the divergence may be attributed to the fast evolution of orthologous target

  1. Determination of the Clostridium perfringens-binding site on fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Seiichi; Tagomori, Mika; Morita, Naomi; Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Nariya, Hirofumi; Okada, Mariko; Watanabe, Mariko; Hitsumoto, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    The extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (Fn) is known to bind to the surface of Clostridium perfringens cells. Fn is a disulfide-linked homodimer protein, with each Fn polypeptide consisting of three types of repeating modules: 12 type I, 2 type II, and 15-17 type III modules. To determine the epitope on Fn recognized by C. perfringens cells, anti-Fn monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and various Fn fragments (III2-10, rIII2-4, rIII5-7, rIII8, rIII9, rIII10) were employed. Although two C. perfringens-derived Fn-binding proteins, FbpA and FbpB, have been reported, they appear not to be the bacterium's surface Fn receptor. Moreover, both FbpA and FbpB were found to bind to C. perfringens cells. To avoid confusion, a mutant C. perfringens lacking both the fbpA and fbpB genes (MW5) was prepared using an in-frame deletion system. MW5 cells bound Fn on their surface, suggesting the presence of a putative Fn receptor(s) on C. perfringens cells. Of several anti-Fn mAbs, both HB39 and MO inhibited the binding of Fn to MW5 cells. HB39 reacted strongly with III2-10 and rIII9, and weakly with rIII2-4, rIII10 and rIII5-7 in Western blotting analysis. Binding of HB39 to Fn was inhibited in the presence of either rIII9 or rIII10, but not in the presence of rIII2-4, rIII5-7, or rIII8. Binding of Fn to MW5 cells was strongly inhibited by both III2-10 and rIII9, marginally inhibited by rIII2-4, but not affected by rIII5-7, rIII8, or rIII10. Significant binding of MW5 cells to immobilized rIII9 and rIII10 as well as immobilized III2-10 was observed. The region of Fn recognized by C. perfringens was thus mapped to the region encompassed by III9 and III10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M. (WU)

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  3. Partial enterectomy decreases somatostatin-binding sites in residual intestine of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, B; Bodegas, G; Sanz, M; Prieto, J C; Arilla, E

    1988-05-01

    1. Three weeks after partial enterectomy in the rabbit there was an increased somatostatin concentration and a decreased number of somatostatin-binding sites (without changes in the corresponding affinity values) in the cytosol of the residual intestinal tissue, except in the terminal ileum and the colon. 2. Five weeks after surgery both the somatostatin concentration and the number of somatostatin-binding sites returned towards control values. 3. These results suggest that an increase in bowel somatostatin content could lead to down-regulation of somatostatin-binding sites in the intestinal mucosa.

  4. Characteristics of binding sites of intergenic, intronic and exonic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-03-06

    Mar 6, 2013 ... miRNAFinder 2.2 (https://sites.google.com/site/malaheenee/home) was used to find miRNA origins (intergenic, exonic or intronic). A literature review of genes coding intronic miRNAs led to 51 oncogenes (Supplementary Table 1) that encode proteins participating in gastrointestinal and breast cancer.

  5. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Kiso, Makoto [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ando, Hiromune, E-mail: hando@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kato, Ryuichi, E-mail: ryuichi.kato@kek.jp [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity. - Highlights: • The six-bladed β-propeller structure of AOL was solved by seleno-sugar phasing. • The mode of fucose binding is essentially conserved at all six binding sites. • The seleno-fucosides exhibit slightly different interactions and electron densities. • These findings suggest that the affinity for fucose is not identical at each site.

  6. Astrocytes cultured from specific brain regions differ in their expression of adrenergic binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernsberger, P; Iacovitti, L; Reis, D J

    1990-05-28

    We sought to characterize regional heterogeneity of astrocytes using adrenergic receptor sites as cellular markers. Primary cultures made from 6 regions of neonatal rat brain consisted almost exclusively of astrocytes. Membranes from astrocytes cultured 1-3 weeks were prepared for radioligand binding assays of beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic sites using the ligands [3H]dihydroalprenolol and [3H]p-aminoclonidine, respectively. Receptor expression was not affected by time in culture. Astrocytes from different brain regions varied up to 3-fold with respect to number but not affinity for both classes of adrenergic binding site with a rank order of cerebral cortex = superior colliculus greater than hippocampus = ventral midbrain greater than or equal to caudate nucleus greater than or equal to hypothalamus. Binding to beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors was positively correlated across brain regions. Astrocytic receptor binding in each region did not correspond to total receptor levels assessed by quantitative autoradiography. We conclude that: (a) astrocytes are markedly heterogeneous between major brain regions with respect to expression of adrenergic binding sites; (b) regional variations in the density of adrenergic binding sites in brain reflect, in part, local specialization of astrocytes; and (c) a substantial proportion of the adrenergic binding sites in some brain regions may be on astrocytes.

  7. Europium ion as a probe for binding sites to carrageenans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Ana P.; Goncalves, Rogeria R.; Serra, Osvaldo A. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil); Zaniquelli, Maria Elisabete D. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil)], E-mail: medzaniquelli@ffclrp.usp.br; Wong, Kenneth [Laboratorio de Fisico-Quimica, Centro de Pesquisas de Paulinia, Rhodia Brasil, Paulinia, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    Carrageenans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from red algae, present a coil-helix transition and helix aggregation dependence on the type and concentration of counterions. In this study, we focus attention on a mixed valence counterion system: Eu{sup 3+}/Na{sup +} or K{sup +} with different gel-forming carrageenans: kappa, iota, and kappa-2. Results of stationary and time-dependent luminescence showed to be a suitable tool to probe ion binding to both the negatively charged sulfate group and the hydroxyl groups present in the biopolymer. For lower europium ion concentrations, a single longer decay emission lifetime was detected, which was attributed to the binding of europium ion to the carrageenan sulfate groups. An additional decay ascribed to europium binding to hydroxyl groups was observed above a threshold concentration, and this decay was dependent on the carrageenan charge density. Symmetry of the europium ion microenvironment was estimated by the ratio between the intensities of its emission bands, which has been shown to depend on the concentration of europium ions and on the specificity of the monovalent counterion bound to the carrageenan.

  8. Binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in brain: alterations in Brattleboro rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, R.; Plunkett, L.M.

    1986-12-01

    Binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF-28) were analyzed in discrete brain areas of Brattleboro rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus and Long-Evans (LE) controls by quantitative autoradiography. The maximum binding capacity (Bmax) and affinity constant (Ka) for /sup 125/I-ANF-28 were elevated significantly in the subfornical organ of Brattleboro rats compared to matched LE controls. In contrast, values for Bmax and Ka for /sup 125/I-ANF-28 binding in choroid plexus and area postrema were similar for rats of the two strains. These findings are consistent with a selective upregulation of ANF-28 binding sites in the subfornical organ of Brattleboro rats which exhibit a profound disturbance in body fluid homeostasis. These alterations in ANF-28 binding sites in the subfornical organ may represent a compensatory response to the absence of vasopressin in the Brattleboro rat.

  9. Evolutionary mirages: selection on binding site composition creates the illusion of conserved grammars in Drosophila enhancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W Lusk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The clustering of transcription factor binding sites in developmental enhancers and the apparent preferential conservation of clustered sites have been widely interpreted as proof that spatially constrained physical interactions between transcription factors are required for regulatory function. However, we show here that selection on the composition of enhancers alone, and not their internal structure, leads to the accumulation of clustered sites with evolutionary dynamics that suggest they are preferentially conserved. We simulated the evolution of idealized enhancers from Drosophila melanogaster constrained to contain only a minimum number of binding sites for one or more factors. Under this constraint, mutations that destroy an existing binding site are tolerated only if a compensating site has emerged elsewhere in the enhancer. Overlapping sites, such as those frequently observed for the activator Bicoid and repressor Krüppel, had significantly longer evolutionary half-lives than isolated sites for the same factors. This leads to a substantially higher density of overlapping sites than expected by chance and the appearance that such sites are preferentially conserved. Because D. melanogaster (like many other species has a bias for deletions over insertions, sites tended to become closer together over time, leading to an overall clustering of sites in the absence of any selection for clustered sites. Since this effect is strongest for the oldest sites, clustered sites also incorrectly appear to be preferentially conserved. Following speciation, sites tend to be closer together in all descendent species than in their common ancestors, violating the common assumption that shared features of species' genomes reflect their ancestral state. Finally, we show that selection on binding site composition alone recapitulates the observed number of overlapping and closely neighboring sites in real D. melanogaster enhancers. Thus, this study calls into

  10. Computational design of trimeric influenza-neutralizing proteins targeting the hemagglutinin receptor binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Eva-Maria; Bernard, Steffen M.; La, David; Bohn, Alan J.; Lee, Peter S.; Anderson, Caitlin E.; Nieusma, Travis; Holstein, Carly A.; Garcia, Natalie K.; Hooper, Kathryn A.; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Nelson, Jorgen W.; Sheffler, William; Bloom, Jesse D.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ward, Andrew B.; Yager, Paul; Fuller, Deborah H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker , David (UWASH); (Scripps); (FHCRC)

    2017-06-12

    Many viral surface glycoproteins and cell surface receptors are homo-oligomers1, 2, 3, 4, and thus can potentially be targeted by geometrically matched homo-oligomers that engage all subunits simultaneously to attain high avidity and/or lock subunits together. The adaptive immune system cannot generally employ this strategy since the individual antibody binding sites are not arranged with appropriate geometry to simultaneously engage multiple sites in a single target homo-oligomer. We describe a general strategy for the computational design of homo-oligomeric protein assemblies with binding functionality precisely matched to homo-oligomeric target sites5, 6, 7, 8. In the first step, a small protein is designed that binds a single site on the target. In the second step, the designed protein is assembled into a homo-oligomer such that the designed binding sites are aligned with the target sites. We use this approach to design high-avidity trimeric proteins that bind influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) at its conserved receptor binding site. The designed trimers can both capture and detect HA in a paper-based diagnostic format, neutralizes influenza in cell culture, and completely protects mice when given as a single dose 24 h before or after challenge with influenza.

  11. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  12. Structural and biochemical characterization of two heme binding sites on α1-microglobulin using site directed mutagenesis and molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutardottir, Sigurbjörg; Karnaukhova, Elena; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Songtawee, Napat; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Rajabi, Mohsen; Rosenlöf, Lena Wester; Alayash, Abdu I; Åkerström, Bo

    2016-01-01

    α1-Microglobulin (A1M) is a reductase and radical scavenger involved in physiological protection against oxidative damage. These functions were previously shown to be dependent upon cysteinyl-, C34, and lysyl side-chains, K(92, 118,130). A1M binds heme and the crystal structure suggests that C34 and H123 participate in a heme binding site. We have investigated the involvement of these five residues in the interactions with heme. Four A1M-variants were expressed: with cysteine to serine substitution in position 34, lysine to threonine substitutions in positions (92, 118, 130), histidine to serine substitution in position 123 and a wt without mutations. Heme binding was investigated by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, circular dichroism, SPR, electrophoretic migration shift, gel filtration, catalase-like activity and molecular simulation. All A1M-variants bound to heme. Mutations in C34, H123 or K(92, 118, 130) resulted in significant absorbance changes, CD spectral changes, and catalase-like activity, suggesting involvement of these side-groups in coordination of the heme-iron. Molecular simulation support a model with two heme-binding sites in A1M involving the mutated residues. Binding of the first heme induces allosteric stabilization of the structure predisposing for a better fit of the second heme. The results suggest that one heme-binding site is located in the lipocalin pocket and a second binding site between loops 1 and 4. Reactions with the hemes involve the side-groups of C34, K(92, 118, 130) and H123. The model provides a structural basis for the functional activities of A1M: heme binding activity of A1M. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Replication and pathogenicity of primer binding site mutants of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmidt, J; Luz, A

    1999-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNA molecule annealed to an 18-bp primer binding site sequence. The sequence of the primer binding site coincides with that of a negatively acting cis element that mediates transcriptional silencing of murine leukemia virus (MLV) in undiff...... delayed relative to that of the wild-type virus, molecular tumor analysis indicated that all the primer binding site-modified viruses induce T-cell lymphomas similar to those induced by the wild-type virus in terms of frequencies of genomic rearrangements within the T-cell receptor beta......, recombination with endogenous viruses resulting in the generation of recombinant viruses carrying a glutamine primer binding site was detected in the majority of the tumors induced by the SL3-3 Lys3 mutant as well as in two tumors induced by wild-type SL3-3 and the SL3-3 Arg1,2 mutant....

  14. Polymorphisms within micro-RNA-binding sites and risk of sporadic colorectal cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Landi, Debora; Gemignani, Federica; Naccarati, Alessio; Pardini, Barbara; Vodicka, Pavel; Vodickova, Ludmila; Novotny, Jan; Försti, Asta; Hemminki, Kari; Canzian, Federico; Landi, Stefano

    .... Since gene deregulation is one of the key mechanisms by which cells can progress to cancer, we hypothesize that common polymorphisms within miRNA-target binding sites could play a role in the individual risk of cancer...

  15. Three-dimensional binding sites volume assessment during cardiac pacing lead extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich Lien Nguyen

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Real-time 3D binding sites assessment is feasible and improves transvenous lead extraction outcomes. Its role as a complementary information requires extensive validation, and might be beneficial for a tailored strategy.

  16. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  17. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stormo Gary D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data.

  18. Myosin Binding Protein C Interaction with Actin: CHARACTERIZATION AND MAPPING OF THE BINDING SITE*

    OpenAIRE

    Rybakova, Inna N.; Greaser, Marion L.; Moss, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Myosin binding protein C (MyBPC) is a multidomain protein associated with the thick filaments of striated muscle. Although both structural and regulatory roles have been proposed for MyBPC, its interactions with other sarcomeric proteins remain obscure. The current study was designed to examine the actin-binding properties of MyBPC and to define MyBPC domain regions involved in actin interaction. Here, we have expressed full-length mouse cardiac MyBPC (cMyBPC) in a baculovirus system and show...

  19. Quantitative autoradiography of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scatton, B.; Dubois, A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Zahniser, N.R.; Fage, D.

    1985-03-04

    The distribution of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in the rat brain has been studied by quantitative autoradiography. The binding of /sup 3/H-nomifensine to caudate putamen sections was saturable, specific, of a highly affinity (Kd = 56 nM) and sodium-dependent. The dopamine uptake inhibitors benztropine, nomifensine, cocaine, bupropion and amfonelic acid were the most potent competitors of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding to striatal sections. The highest levels of (benztropine-displaceable) /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites were found in the caudate-putamen, the olfactory tubercle and the nucleus accumbens. 6-Hydroxy-dopamine-induced lesion of the ascending dopaminergic bundle resulted in a marked decrease in the /sup 3/H-ligand binding in these areas. Moderately high concentrations of the /sup 3/H-ligand were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the anteroventral thalamic nucleus, the cingulate cortex, the lateral septum, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the zona incerta and some hypothalamic nuclei. There were low levels of binding sites in the habenula, the dorsolateral geniculate body, the substantia nigra, the ventral tegmental area and the periaqueductal gray matter. These autoradiographic data are consistent with the hypothesis that /sup 3/H-nomifensine binds primarily to the presynaptic uptake site for dopamine but also labels the norepinephrine uptake site. 33 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  20. Structure-based function prediction of uncharacterized protein using binding sites comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, Janez; Hodošček, Milan; Ogrizek, Mitja; Trykowska Konc, Joanna; Janežič, Dušanka

    2013-01-01

    A challenge in structural genomics is prediction of the function of uncharacterized proteins. When proteins cannot be related to other proteins of known activity, identification of function based on sequence or structural homology is impossible and in such cases it would be useful to assess structurally conserved binding sites in connection with the protein's function. In this paper, we propose the function of a protein of unknown activity, the Tm1631 protein from Thermotoga maritima, by comparing its predicted binding site to a library containing thousands of candidate structures. The comparison revealed numerous similarities with nucleotide binding sites including specifically, a DNA-binding site of endonuclease IV. We constructed a model of this Tm1631 protein with a DNA-ligand from the newly found similar binding site using ProBiS, and validated this model by molecular dynamics. The interactions predicted by the Tm1631-DNA model corresponded to those known to be important in endonuclease IV-DNA complex model and the corresponding binding free energies, calculated from these models were in close agreement. We thus propose that Tm1631 is a DNA binding enzyme with endonuclease activity that recognizes DNA lesions in which at least two consecutive nucleotides are unpaired. Our approach is general, and can be applied to any protein of unknown function. It might also be useful to guide experimental determination of function of uncharacterized proteins.

  1. Identifying ligand binding sites and poses using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yang, Yanzhi; Chodera, John D.; Shirts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to identify small molecule ligand binding sites and orientations to a given protein crystal structure using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. The Hamiltonians used vary from the physical end state of protein interacting with the ligand to a unphysical end state where the ligand does not interact with the protein. As replicas explore the space of Hamiltonians interpolating between these states the ligand can rapidly escape local minima and explore potential binding sites. Geometric restraints keep the ligands within the protein volume, and a potential energy pathway designed to increase phase space overlap between intermediates ensures good mixing. Because of the rigorous statistical mechanical nature of the Hamiltonian exchange framework, we can also extract binding free energy estimates at all putative binding sites, which agree well with free energies computed from occupation probabilities. We present results of this methodology on the T4 lysozyme L99A model system with four ligands, including one non-binder as a control. We find that our methodology identifies the crystallographic binding sites consistently and accurately for the small number of ligands considered here and gives free energies consistent with experiment. We are also able to analyze the contribution of individual binding sites on the overall binding affinity. Our methodology points to near term potential applications in early-stage drug discovery. PMID:24297454

  2. Binding site prediction for protein-protein interactions and novel motif discovery using re-occurring polypeptide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos-Binks, Adam; Patulea, Catalin; Pitre, Sylvain; Schoenrock, Andrew; Gui, Yuan; Green, James R; Golshani, Ashkan; Dehne, Frank

    2011-06-02

    While there are many methods for predicting protein-protein interaction, very few can determine the specific site of interaction on each protein. Characterization of the specific sequence regions mediating interaction (binding sites) is crucial for an understanding of cellular pathways. Experimental methods often report false binding sites due to experimental limitations, while computational methods tend to require data which is not available at the proteome-scale. Here we present PIPE-Sites, a novel method of protein specific binding site prediction based on pairs of re-occurring polypeptide sequences, which have been previously shown to accurately predict protein-protein interactions. PIPE-Sites operates at high specificity and requires only the sequences of query proteins and a database of known binary interactions with no binding site data, making it applicable to binding site prediction at the proteome-scale. PIPE-Sites was evaluated using a dataset of 265 yeast and 423 human interacting proteins pairs with experimentally-determined binding sites. We found that PIPE-Sites predictions were closer to the confirmed binding site than those of two existing binding site prediction methods based on domain-domain interactions, when applied to the same dataset. Finally, we applied PIPE-Sites to two datasets of 2347 yeast and 14,438 human novel interacting protein pairs predicted to interact with high confidence. An analysis of the predicted interaction sites revealed a number of protein subsequences which are highly re-occurring in binding sites and which may represent novel binding motifs. PIPE-Sites is an accurate method for predicting protein binding sites and is applicable to the proteome-scale. Thus, PIPE-Sites could be useful for exhaustive analysis of protein binding patterns in whole proteomes as well as discovery of novel binding motifs. PIPE-Sites is available online at http://pipe-sites.cgmlab.org/.

  3. Estimating the relative position of risperidone primary binding site in Sera Albumins. Modeling from spectrofluorimetric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Celia Martins; Fragoso, Viviane Muniz S.; Silva, Dilson

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we used a mathematical model to study the interaction of risperidone with human and bovine serum albumins estimating the relative position of the primary binding site, based on the fluorescence quenching theory. Results have shown that the model was able to demonstrate that primary binding site for risperidone in HSA and BSA is very close to the position where is tryptophan 134 of BSA, possibly in domain 1B.

  4. Identification of a Second DNA Binding Site in the Human Rad52 Protein*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Kagawa, Wataru; Kagawa, Ako; Saito, Kengo; Ikawa, Shukuko; Shibata, Takehiko; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2008-01-01

    Rad52 plays essential roles in homology-dependent double-strand break repair. Various studies have established the functions of Rad52 in Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent repair processes. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of Rad52 in these processes remain unknown. In the present study we have identified a novel DNA binding site within Rad52 by a structure-based alanine scan mutagenesis. This site is closely aligned with the putative single-stranded DNA binding ...

  5. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A.J.; Buard, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed an exten......In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed...

  6. New insights into a classic aptamer: binding sites, cooperativity and more sensitive adenosine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijie; Oni, Olatunji; Liu, Juewen

    2017-07-27

    The DNA aptamer for adenosine (also for AMP and ATP) is a highly conserved sequence that has recurred in a few selections. It it a widely used model aptamer for biosensor development, and its nuclear magnetic resonance structure shows that each aptamer binds two AMP molecules. In this work, each binding site was individually removed by rational sequence design, while the remaining site still retained a similar binding affinity and specificity as confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry. The thermodynamic parameters of binding are presented, and its biochemical implications are discussed. The number of binding sites can also be increased, and up to four sites are introduced in a single DNA sequence. Finally, the different sequences are made into fluorescent biosensors based on the structure-switching signaling aptamer design. The one-site aptamer has 3.8-fold higher sensitivity at lower adenosine concentration with a limit of detection of 9.1 μM adenosine, but weaker fluorescence signal at higher adenosine concentrations, consistent with a moderate cooperativity in the original aptamer. This work has offered insights into a classic aptamer for the relationship between the number of binding sites and sensitivity, and a shorter aptamer for improved biosensor design. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Substance P Receptor Binding Sites are Expressed by Glia in vivo after Neuronal Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantyh, Patrick W.; Johnson, Donald J.; Boehmer, Christian G.; Catton, Mark D.; Vinters, Harry V.; Maggio, John E.; Too, Heng-Phon; Vigna, Steven R.

    1989-07-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, we examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were examined. Specific receptor binding sites for each of these neurotransmitters were identified in the rabbit forebrain but were not detected in the normal optic nerve or tract. In the transected optic nerve and tract, only receptor binding sites for substance P were expressed at detectable levels. The density of substance P receptor binding sites observed in this glial scar is among the highest observed in the rabbit forebrain. Ligand displacement and saturation experiments indicate that the substance P receptor binding site expressed by the glial scar has pharmacological characteristics similar to those of substance P receptors in the rabbit striatum, rat brain, and rat and canine gut. The present study demonstrates that glial cells in vivo express high concentrations of substance P receptor binding sites after transection of retinal ganglion cell axons. Because substance P has been shown to regulate inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues, substance P may also, by analogy, be involved in regulating the glial response to injury in the central nervous system.

  8. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalevskaya, N.V.; Bokhovchuk, F.M.; Vuister, G.W.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal

  9. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    under the profile Pi, the model respects the initial base composition through position-specific substitution rates. The position-specific transition probabilities at a position i are then given by: where µ is the rate of mutations per site and δ is the Kronecker delta function with δu,v=1 if (u = v) and 0 otherwise. Inserting. PSA u v.

  10. Propofol Shares the Binding Site with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane on Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Koichi; Bu, Weiming; Xi, Jin; Shimaoka, Motomu; Eckenhoff, Roderic

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that propofol interacted with the leukocyte adhesion molecule leukocyte function–associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and inhibited the production of interleukin-2 via LFA-1 in a dependent manner. However, the binding site(s) of propofol on LFA-1 remains unknown. Methods First, the inhibition of LFA-1's ligand binding by propofol was confirmed in an ELISA-type assay. The binding site of propofol on LFA-1 was probed with a photolabeling experiment using a photoactivatable propofol analog called azi-propofol-m. The adducted residues of LFA-1 by this compound were determined using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, the binding of propofol to the ligand-binding domain of LFA-1 was examined using 1-aminoanthracene (1-AMA) displacement assay. Furthermore, the binding site(s) of 1-AMA and propofol on LFA-1 was studied using the docking program GLIDE. Results We demonstrated that propofol impaired the binding of LFA-1 to its ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1. The photolabeling experiment demonstrated that the adducted residues were localized in the allosteric cavity of the ligand-binding domain of LFA-1 called “lovastatin site. ” The shift of fluorescence spectra was observed when 1-AMA was coincubated with the low-affinity conformer of LFA-1 ligand-binding domain (wild-type [WT] αL I domain), not with the high-affinity conformer, suggesting that 1-AMA bound only to WT αL I domain. In the 1-AMA displacement assay, propofol decreased 1-AMA fluorescence signal (at 520 nm), suggesting that propofol competed with 1-AMA and bound to the WT αL I domain. The docking simulation demonstrated that both 1-AMA and propofol bound to the lovastatin site, which agreed with the photolabeling experiment. Conclusions We demonstrated that propofol bound to the lovastatin site in LFA-1. Previously we showed that the volatile anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane bound to this site. Taken together, the lovastatin site is an

  11. Folate binding site of flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Eric M; Perissinotti, Laura L; Moghram, Salah; Prabhakar, Arjun; Lesley, Scott A; Mathews, Irimpan I; Kohen, Amnon

    2012-09-25

    The DNA nucleotide thymidylate is synthesized by the enzyme thymidylate synthase, which catalyzes the reductive methylation of deoxyuridylate using the cofactor methylene-tetrahydrofolate (CH(2)H(4)folate). Most organisms, including humans, rely on the thyA- or TYMS-encoded classic thymidylate synthase, whereas, certain microorganisms, including all Rickettsia and other pathogens, use an alternative thyX-encoded flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS). Although several crystal structures of FDTSs have been reported, the absence of a structure with folates limits understanding of the molecular mechanism and the scope of drug design for these enzymes. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of FDTS with several folate derivatives, which together with mutagenesis, kinetic analysis, and computer modeling shed light on the cofactor binding and function. The unique structural data will likely facilitate further elucidation of FDTSs' mechanism and the design of structure-based inhibitors as potential leads to new antimicrobial drugs.

  12. Characterization of the Copper(II) Binding Sites in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Whitnee L.; Song, He; Farquhar, Erik R.; Fitzkee, Nicholas C.; Emerson, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a well-studied, robust, mononuclear Zn-containing metalloprotein that serves as an excellent biological ligand system to study the thermodynamics associated with metal ion coordination chemistry in aqueous solution. The apo-form of human carbonic anhydrase II (CA) binds two equivalents of copper(II) with high affinity. The Cu2+ ions bind independently forming two non-coupled type-II copper centers in CA (CuA and CuB). However, the location and coordination mode of the CuA site in solution is unclear, compared to the CuB site that has been well characterized. Using paramagnetic NMR techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have identified an N-terminal Cu2+ binding location and collected information on the coordination mode of the CuA site in CA, which is consistent with a four to five coordinate N-terminal Cu2+ binding site reminiscent to a number of N-terminal copper(II) binding sites including the copper(II)-ATCUN and copper(II)-beta-amyloid complexes. Additionally, we report a more detailed analysis of the thermodynamics associated with copper(II) binding to CA. Although we are still unable to fully deconvolute Cu2+ binding data to the high-affinity CuA site, we have derived pH- and buffer-independent values for the thermodynamics parameters K and ΔH associated with Cu2+ binding to the CuB site of CA to be 2 × 109 and −17.4 kcal/mol, respectively. PMID:26010488

  13. Cooperative equilibrium curves generated by ordered ligand binding to multi-site molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Denis

    2007-09-01

    The sigmoid shape of equilibrium curves in normal axes and Hill coefficients higher than unity, are indexes of cooperativity or homotropic allostery where the affinity for the ligand increases as saturation progresses. The mathematical transformation of the Adair scheme of equilibria in the Hill plot, reveals that sigmoid binding curves can also be generated by ordered ligand binding to a receptor with multiple binding sites of identical microscopic association constants. This mechanism only based on the law of mass action, could participate to some extent to certain cooperative effects observed in non-biological systems and perhaps in the physiological binding of oxygen to heme proteins.

  14. sc-PDB: a database for identifying variations and multiplicity of 'druggable' binding sites in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslamani, Jamel; Rognan, Didier; Kellenberger, Esther

    2011-05-01

    The sc-PDB database is an annotated archive of druggable binding sites extracted from the Protein Data Bank. It contains all-atoms coordinates for 8166 protein-ligand complexes, chosen for their geometrical and physico-chemical properties. The sc-PDB provides a functional annotation for proteins, a chemical description for ligands and the detailed intermolecular interactions for complexes. The sc-PDB now includes a hierarchical classification of all the binding sites within a functional class. The sc-PDB entries were first clustered according to the protein name indifferent of the species. For each cluster, we identified dissimilar sites (e.g. catalytic and allosteric sites of an enzyme). SCOPE AND APPLICATIONS: The classification of sc-PDB targets by binding site diversity was intended to facilitate chemogenomics approaches to drug design. In ligand-based approaches, it avoids comparing ligands that do not share the same binding site. In structure-based approaches, it permits to quantitatively evaluate the diversity of the binding site definition (variations in size, sequence and/or structure). The sc-PDB database is freely available at: http://bioinfo-pharma.u-strasbg.fr/scPDB.

  15. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sebeson

    Full Text Available The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  16. A Sequence-Based Dynamic Ensemble Learning System for Protein Ligand-Binding Site Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Hu, ShanShan; Zhang, Jun; Gao, Xin; Li, Jinyan; Xia, Junfeng; Wang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures. This paper proposes a dynamic ensemble approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues by using sequence information only. To avoid problems resulting from highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we constructed several balanced data sets and we trained a random forest classifier for each of them. We dynamically selected a subset of classifiers according to the similarity between the target protein and the proteins in the training data set. The combination of the predictions of the classifier subset to each query protein target yielded the final predictions. The ensemble of these classifiers formed a sequence-based predictor to identify protein-ligand binding sites. Experimental results on two Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction datasets and the ccPDB dataset demonstrated that of our proposed method compared favorably with the state-of-the-art. http://www2.ahu.edu.cn/pchen/web/LigandDSES.htm.

  17. Differential Modulation of Annexin I Binding Sites on Monocytes and Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Euzger

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific binding sites for the anti-inflammatory protein annexin I have been detected on the surface of human monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN. These binding sites are proteinaceous in nature and are sensitive to cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes trypsin, collagenase, elastase and cathepsin G. When monocytes and PMN were isolated independently from peripheral blood, only the monocytes exhibited constitutive annexin I binding. However PMN acquired the capacity to bind annexin I following co-culture with monocytes. PMN incubation with sodium azide, but not protease inhibitors, partially blocked this process. A similar increase in annexin I binding capacity was also detected in PMN following adhesion to endothelial monolayers. We propose that a juxtacrine activation rather than a cleavage-mediated transfer is involved in this process. Removal of annexin I binding sites from monocytes with elastase rendered monocytes functionally insensitive to full length annexin I or to the annexin I-derived pharmacophore, peptide Ac2-26, assessed as suppression of the respiratory burst. These data indicate that the annexin I binding site on phagocytic cells may have an important function in the feedback control of the inflammatory response and their loss through cleavage could potentiate such responses.

  18. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo

    2014-01-01

    be divided into two groups with most likely two topographically distinct binding sites. The aim of the current study was to identify the binding site of one such group of ligands, exemplified by three allosteric antagonists, CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. We first used a chimeric CCR2/CCR5 receptor...... approach to obtain insight into the binding site of the allosteric antagonists and additionally introduced eight single point mutations in CCR2 to further characterize the putative binding pocket. All constructs were studied in radioligand binding and/or functional IP turnover assays, providing evidence...... for an intracellular binding site for CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. For CCR2-RA-[R] the most important residues for binding were found to be the highly conserved tyrosine Y(7.53) and phenylalanine F(8.50) of the NPxxYx(5,6)F motif, as well as V(6.36) at the bottom of TM-VI and K(8.49) in helix...

  19. 2( sup 125 I)Iodomelatonin binding sites in spleens of guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, A.M.S. (Univ. of Hong Kong, (Hong Kong)); Pang, S.F. (Clarke Inst. of Psychiatry, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-01-01

    2-({sup 125}I)Iodomelatonin was found to bind specifically to the membrane preparations of the spleens of guinea pigs with high affinity. The binding was rapid, stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of the binding assays revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 49.8{plus minus}4.12 pmol/l and binding site density (Bmax) of 0.69{plus minus}0.082 fmol/mg protein at mid-light. There was no significant change in the Kd or the Bmax at mid-dark. Kinetic analysis showed a Kd of 23.13{plus minus}4.81 pmol/l, in agreement to that derived from the saturation studies. The 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin binding sites have the following order of potency: 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 6-chloromelatonin {much gt} N-acetylserotonin, 6-hydroxymelatonin > 5-methoxytryptamine, 5-methoxytryptophol > serotonin, 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid > 5-hydroxytryptophol, 3-acetylindole, 1-acetylindole-3-carboxyaldehyde, L-tryptophan > tryptamine, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid. Differential centrifugation studies showed that the binding sites are localized mainly in the nuclear fraction, the rest are distributed in the microsomal fraction, mitochondrial fraction and cytosolic fraction. The demonstration of 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin binding sites in the spleen suggests the presence of melatonin receptors and a direct mechanism of action of melatonin on the immune system.

  20. Photoaffinity crosslinking of etorphine with opioid binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantau, P.; Bourhim, N.; Giraud, P.; Oliver, C.; Castanas, E.

    1987-04-01

    The covalent crosslinking of (/sup 3/H)etorphine with opioid binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla is reported. Of all the radiolabeled opiates tested (ethylketocyclazocine, etorphine, (D-Ala2, D-Leu5)enkephalin, (D-Ala2, Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol)enkephalin only etorphine could be crosslinked under uv irradiation. In our conditions (black uv lamp, 160 W, peak mean 360 nm, from a distance of 10 cm) maximum covalent binding was observed after a 10-min irradiation. Protein concentration was a crucial factor for the irreversible/total binding ratio. A good ratio (50%) was obtained at protein concentrations of about 1.0 mg/ml. Covalent binding of nonmodified opiates could be of interest for the biochemical characterization of their binding sites.

  1. An Improved Method for Identifying Specific DNA-Protein-Binding Sites In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangyan; Lu, Huizhi; Wang, Yunguang; Yang, Su; Xu, Hong; Cheng, Kaiying; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2017-03-01

    Binding of proteins to specific DNA sequences is essential for a variety of cellular processes such as DNA replication, transcription and responses to external stimuli. Chromatin immunoprecipitation is widely used for determining intracellular DNA fragments bound by a specific protein. However, the subsequent specific or accurate DNA-protein-binding sequence is usually determined by DNA footprinting. Here, we report an alternative method for identifying specific sites of DNA-protein-binding (designated SSDP) in vitro. This technique is mainly dependent on antibody-antigen immunity, simple and convenient, while radioactive isotope labeling and optimization of partial degradation by deoxyribonuclease (DNase) are avoided. As an example, the specific binding sequence of a target promoter by DdrO (a DNA damage response protein from Deinococcus radiodurans) in vitro was determined by the developed method. The central sequence of the binding site could be easily located using this technique.

  2. Erroneous attribution of relevant transcription factor binding sites despite successful prediction of cis-regulatory modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halfon Marc S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-regulatory modules are bound by transcription factors to regulate gene expression. Characterizing these DNA sequences is central to understanding gene regulatory networks and gaining insight into mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, but genome-scale regulatory module discovery remains a challenge. One popular approach is to scan the genome for clusters of transcription factor binding sites, especially those conserved in related species. When such approaches are successful, it is typically assumed that the activity of the modules is mediated by the identified binding sites and their cognate transcription factors. However, the validity of this assumption is often not assessed. Results We successfully predicted five new cis-regulatory modules by combining binding site identification with sequence conservation and compared these to unsuccessful predictions from a related approach not utilizing sequence conservation. Despite greatly improved predictive success, the positive set had similar degrees of sequence and binding site conservation as the negative set. We explored the reasons for this by mutagenizing putative binding sites in three cis-regulatory modules. A large proportion of the tested sites had little or no demonstrable role in mediating regulatory element activity. Examination of loss-of-function mutants also showed that some transcription factors supposedly binding to the modules are not required for their function. Conclusions Our results raise important questions about interpreting regulatory module predictions obtained by finding clusters of conserved binding sites. Attribution of function to these sites and their cognate transcription factors may be incorrect even when modules are successfully identified. Our study underscores the importance of empirical validation of computational results even when these results are in line with expectation.

  3. Determination of a transcription factor-binding site by nuclease protection footprinting onto southwestern blots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2009-01-01

    DNA-transcription factor interactions in eukaryotic systems have been documented by a broad gamut of biochemical techniques including deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) footprinting and Southwestern (SW) assays. In spite of their wide applicability, each of these approaches provides only partial information about DNA-protein complexes. DNase I footprinting identifies the extent and location of the binding site within the DNA but does not yield information about the protein(s) involved. On the other hand, the SW assay can reveal the relative size of active protein species in crude extracts, facilitating their identification, but fails to localize their binding site within the probing DNA sequence. Coupling SW and in situ (on-blot) DNase I footprinting methodologies has the dual potential of accurately determining the molecular mass of individual DNA-binding transcription factors and precisely mapping their cognate binding sites.

  4. Properties of achetakinin binding sites on malpighian tubule membranes from the house cricket, Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J S; Wheeler, C H; Goldsworthy, G J; Coast, G M

    1995-01-01

    A biologically active 125I-labeled analogue of AK-II (3'-hydroxyphenyl propionic-Gly-Gly-Gly-Phe-Ser-Pro-Trp-Gly-NH2) was used to investigate the properties of achetakinin binding sites on plasma membranes from Malpighian tubules of Acheta domesticus. With optimized conditions, binding was rapid, reversible, and specific, and saturation studies revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd 0.55 nM and Bmax 39.9 fmol/mg membrane protein. The affinities of achetakinins for binding sites on tubule membranes ranked AK-V > AK III > AK-II > AK-I > or = AK-IV, in general agreement with their potencies in functional assays. However, IC50 values were several orders of magnitude higher than corresponding values for EC50, which suggests a considerable receptor reserve.

  5. A propofol binding site on mammalian GABAA receptors identified by photolabeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Grace M S; Chen, Zi-Wei; Edge, Christopher J; Smith, Edward H; Dickinson, Robert; Hohenester, Erhard; Townsend, R Reid; Fuchs, Karoline; Sieghart, Werner; Evers, Alex S; Franks, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    Propofol is the most important intravenous general anesthetic in current clinical use. It acts by potentiating GABAA receptors, but where it binds to this receptor is not known and has been a matter of some controversy. We have synthesized a novel propofol analogue photolabeling reagent that has a biological activity very similar to that of propofol. We confirmed that this reagent labeled known propofol binding sites in human serum albumin which have been identified using X-ray crystallography. Using a combination of the protiated label and a deuterated version, and mammalian receptors labeled in intact membranes, we have identified a novel binding site for propofol in GABAA receptors consisting of both β3 homopentamers and α1β3 heteropentamers. The binding site is located within the β subunit, at the interface between the transmembrane domains and the extracellular domain, and lies close to known determinants of anesthetic sensitivity in transmembrane segments TM1 and TM2. PMID:24056400

  6. Determination of the toluene diisocyanate binding sites on human serum albumin by tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettick, Justin M; Siegel, Paul D

    2011-07-15

    Diisocyanates are highly reactive chemical compounds widely used in the manufacture of polyurethanes. Although diisocyanates have been identified as causative agents of allergic respiratory diseases, the specific mechanism by which these diseases occur is largely unknown. To better understand the chemical species produced when diisocyanates react with protein, tandem mass spectrometry was employed to unambiguously identify the binding sites of the industrially important isomers, 2,4- and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate, on human serum albumin at varying diisocyanate/protein ratios. The 2,4-isomer results in approximately 2-fold higher conjugation product ion abundances than does the 2,6-isomer, suggesting that the 2,4-isomer has a higher reactivity toward albumin. Both isomers preferentially react with the N-terminal amine of the protein and the ε-NH(2) of lysine. At a low (1:2) diisocyanate/protein ratio, five binding sites are identified, whereas at a high (40:1) ratio, near-stoichiometric conjugation is observed with a maximum of 37 binding sites identified. Binding sites observed at the lowest conjugation ratios are conserved at higher binding ratios, suggesting a subset of 5-10 preferential binding sites on albumin. Diisocyanate-protein conjugation results in a variety of reaction products, including intra- and intermolecular crosslinking, diisocyanate self-polymerization, and diisocyanate hydrolysis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Oligomycin frames a common drug-binding site in the ATP synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Jindrich; Osowski, Daniel; Walters, D. Eric; Mueller, David M. (Rosalind)

    2015-12-01

    We report the high-resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) crystal structure of oligomycin bound to the subunit c10 ring of the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Oligomycin binds to the surface of the c10 ring making contact with two neighboring molecules at a position that explains the inhibitory effect on ATP synthesis. The carboxyl side chain of Glu59, which is essential for proton translocation, forms an H-bond with oligomycin via a bridging water molecule but is otherwise shielded from the aqueous environment. The remaining contacts between oligomycin and subunit c are primarily hydrophobic. The amino acid residues that form the oligomycin-binding site are 100% conserved between human and yeast but are widely different from those in bacterial homologs, thus explaining the differential sensitivity to oligomycin. Prior genetics studies suggest that the oligomycin-binding site overlaps with the binding site of other antibiotics, including those effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thereby frames a common 'drug-binding site.' We anticipate that this drug-binding site will serve as an effective target for new antibiotics developed by rational design.

  8. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  9. Severe MgADP inhibition of Bacillus subtilis F1-ATPase is not due to the absence of nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic nucleotide binding sites.

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    Toru Ishikawa

    Full Text Available F1-ATPase from Bacillus subtilis (BF1 is severely suppressed by the MgADP inhibition. Here, we have tested if this is due to the loss of nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic site that is required for the activation. Measurements with a tryptophan mutant of BF1 indicated that the noncatalytic sites could bind ATP normally. Furthermore, the mutant BF1 that cannot bind ATP to the noncatalytic sites showed much lower ATPase activity. It was concluded that the cause of strong MgADP inhibition of BF1 is not the weak nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic sites but the other steps required for the activation.

  10. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Maurer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK, but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data.

  11. Modification of the loops in the ligand-binding site turns avidin into a steroid-binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulomaa Markku S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered proteins, with non-immunoglobulin scaffolds, have become an important alternative to antibodies in many biotechnical and therapeutic applications. When compared to antibodies, tailored proteins may provide advantageous properties such as a smaller size or a more stable structure. Results Avidin is a widely used protein in biomedicine and biotechnology. To tailor the binding properties of avidin, we have designed a sequence-randomized avidin library with mutagenesis focused at the loop area of the binding site. Selection from the generated library led to the isolation of a steroid-binding avidin mutant (sbAvd-1 showing micromolar affinity towards testosterone (Kd ~ 9 μM. Furthermore, a gene library based on the sbAvd-1 gene was created by randomizing the loop area between β-strands 3 and 4. Phage display selection from this library led to the isolation of a steroid-binding protein with significantly decreased biotin binding affinity compared to sbAvd-1. Importantly, differential scanning calorimetry and analytical gel-filtration revealed that the high stability and the tetrameric structure were preserved in these engineered avidins. Conclusions The high stability and structural properties of avidin make it an attractive molecule for the engineering of novel receptors. This methodology may allow the use of avidin as a universal scaffold in the development of novel receptors for small molecules.

  12. Ivermectin binding sites in human and invertebrate Cys-loop receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy Peter; Lynch, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    Ivermectin is a gold standard antiparasitic drug that has been used successfully to treat billions of humans, livestock and pets. Until recently, the binding site on its Cys-loop receptor target had been a mystery. Recent protein crystal structures, site-directed mutagenesis data and molecular...... for a wide variety of human neurological disorders....

  13. Pseudoallosteric modulation by (+)-MK801 of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate)-coupled phencyclidine binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, A.A.; Monn, J.A.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C.; Rothman, R.B. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Two high affinity phencyclidine (PCP) binding sites, labeled by ({sup 3}H)1-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine (({sup 3}H)TCP), have been identified in guinea pig brain, with one site coupled to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (site 1) and the other site associated with the dopamine reuptake carrier complex (site 2). In this study, PCP enhanced the dissociation of ({sup 3}H)TCP from PCP site 1 and site 2, while (+){minus}MK801 only enhanced dissociation of ({sup 3}H)TCP from PCP site 1. Although additional studies will be required to determine the exact mechanism(s) of these effects, these data demonstrate that the interactions of PCP with both site 1 and site 2 are more complex than previously appreciated.

  14. Characterization of an intracellular hyaluronic acid binding site in isolated rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, S.J.; Raja, R.H.; Weigel, P.H. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

    1990-11-13

    125I-HA, prepared by chemical modification at the reducing sugar, specifically binds to rat hepatocytes in suspension or culture. Intact hepatocytes have relatively few surface 125I-HA binding sites and show low specific binding. However, permeabilization of hepatocytes with the nonionic detergent digitonin results in increased specific 125I-HA binding (45-65%) and a very large increase in the number of specific 125I-HA binding sites. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium 125I-HA binding to permeabilized hepatocytes in suspension at 4 degrees C indicates a Kd = 1.8 x 10(-7) M and 1.3 x 10(6) molecules of HA (Mr approximately 30,000) bound per cell at saturation. Hepatocytes in primary culture for 24 h show the same affinity but the total number of HA molecules bound per cell at saturation decreases to approximately 6.2 x 10(5). Increasing the ionic strength above physiologic concentrations decreases 125I-HA binding to permeable cells, whereas decreasing the ionic strength above causes an approximately 4-fold increase. The divalent cation chelator EGTA does not prevent binding nor does it release 125I-HA bound in the presence of 2 mM CaCl2, although higher divalent cation concentrations stimulate 125I-HA binding. Ten millimolar CaCl2 or MnCl2 increases HA binding 3-6-fold compared to EGTA-treated cells. Ten millimolar MgCl2, SrCl2, or BaCl2 increased HA binding by 2-fold. The specific binding of 125I-HA to digitonin-treated hepatocytes at 4{degrees}C increased greater than 10-fold at pH 5.0 as compared to pH 7.

  15. Endogenously generated plasmin at the vascular wall injury site amplifies lysine binding site-dependent plasminogen accumulation in microthrombi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of hemostasis; however, it remains unclear how and when the system is triggered to induce thrombolysis. Using intra-vital confocal fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the process of plasminogen binding to laser-induced platelet-rich microthrombi generated in the mesenteric vein of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. The accumulation of GFP-expressing platelets as well as exogenously infused Alexa Fluor 568-labeled Glu-plasminogen (Glu-plg on the injured vessel wall was assessed by measuring the increase in the corresponding fluorescence intensities. Glu-plg accumulated in a time-dependent manner in the center of the microthrombus, where phosphatidylserine is exposed on platelet surfaces and fibrin formation takes place. The rates of binding of Glu-plg in the presence of ε-aminocaproic acid and carboxypeptidase B, as well as the rates of binding of mini-plasminogen lacking kringle domains 1-4 and lysine binding sites, were significantly lower than that of Glu-plg alone, suggesting that the binding was dependent on lysine binding sites. Furthermore, aprotinin significantly suppressed the accumulation of Glu-plg, suggesting that endogenously generated plasmin activity is a prerequisite for the accumulation. In spite of the endogenous generation of plasmin and accumulation of Glu-plg in the center of microthrombi, the microthrombi did not change in size during the 2-hour observation period. When human tissue plasminogen activator was administered intravenously, Glu-plg further accumulated and the microthrombi were lysed. Glu-plg appeared to accumulate in the center of microthrombi in the early phase of microthrombus formation, and plasmin activity and lysine binding sites were required for this accumulation.

  16. Regression applied to protein binding site prediction and comparison with classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giard, Joachim; Ambroise, Jérôme; Gala, Jean-Luc; Macq, Benoît

    2009-09-03

    The structural genomics centers provide hundreds of protein structures of unknown function. Therefore, developing methods enabling the determination of a protein function automatically is imperative. The determination of a protein function can be achieved by studying the network of its physical interactions. In this context, identifying a potential binding site between proteins is of primary interest. In the literature, methods for predicting a potential binding site location generally are based on classification tools. The aim of this paper is to show that regression tools are more efficient than classification tools for patches based binding site predictors. For this purpose, we developed a patches based binding site localization method usable with either regression or classification tools. We compared predictive performances of regression tools with performances of machine learning classifiers. Using leave-one-out cross-validation, we showed that regression tools provide better predictions than classification ones. Among regression tools, Multilayer Perceptron ranked highest in the quality of predictions. We compared also the predictive performance of our patches based method using Multilayer Perceptron with the performance of three other methods usable through a web server. Our method performed similarly to the other methods. Regression is more efficient than classification when applied to our binding site localization method. When it is possible, using regression instead of classification for other existing binding site predictors will probably improve results. Furthermore, the method presented in this work is flexible because the size of the predicted binding site is adjustable. This adaptability is useful when either false positive or negative rates have to be limited.

  17. Regression applied to protein binding site prediction and comparison with classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gala Jean-Luc

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural genomics centers provide hundreds of protein structures of unknown function. Therefore, developing methods enabling the determination of a protein function automatically is imperative. The determination of a protein function can be achieved by studying the network of its physical interactions. In this context, identifying a potential binding site between proteins is of primary interest. In the literature, methods for predicting a potential binding site location generally are based on classification tools. The aim of this paper is to show that regression tools are more efficient than classification tools for patches based binding site predictors. For this purpose, we developed a patches based binding site localization method usable with either regression or classification tools. Results We compared predictive performances of regression tools with performances of machine learning classifiers. Using leave-one-out cross-validation, we showed that regression tools provide better predictions than classification ones. Among regression tools, Multilayer Perceptron ranked highest in the quality of predictions. We compared also the predictive performance of our patches based method using Multilayer Perceptron with the performance of three other methods usable through a web server. Our method performed similarly to the other methods. Conclusion Regression is more efficient than classification when applied to our binding site localization method. When it is possible, using regression instead of classification for other existing binding site predictors will probably improve results. Furthermore, the method presented in this work is flexible because the size of the predicted binding site is adjustable. This adaptability is useful when either false positive or negative rates have to be limited.

  18. Binding site of ribosomal proteins on prokaryotic 5S ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1982-01-01

    The binding sites of ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 on 5S RNA from Escherichia coli were probed with ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom endonuclease. The results for the protein-RNA complexes, which were compared with those for the free RNA [Douthwaite, S......., & Garrett, R. A. (1981) Biochemistry 20, 7301--7307], reveal an extensive interaction site for protein L18 and a more localized one for L25. Generally comparable results, with a few important differences, were obtained in a study of the binding sites of the two E. coli proteins on Bacillus...

  19. p53 binding sites in normal and cancer cells are characterized by distinct chromatin context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Feifei; LoVerso, Peter R; Fisk, Jeffrey N; Zhurkin, Victor B; Cui, Feng

    2017-08-18

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 interacts with DNA in a sequence-dependent manner. Thousands of p53 binding sites have been mapped genome-wide in normal and cancer cells. However, the way p53 selectively binds its cognate sites in different types of cells is not fully understood. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of 25 published p53 cistromes and identified 3,551 and 6,039 'high-confidence' binding sites in normal and cancer cells, respectively. Our analysis revealed 2 distinct epigenetic features underlying p53-DNA interactions in vivo. First, p53 binding sites are associated with transcriptionally active histone marks (H3K4me3 and H3K36me3) in normal-cell chromatin, but with repressive histone marks (H3K27me3) in cancer-cell chromatin. Second, p53 binding sites in cancer cells are characterized by a lower level of DNA methylation than their counterparts in normal cells, probably related to global hypomethylation in cancers. Intriguingly, regardless of the cell type, p53 sites are highly enriched in the endogenous retroviral elements of the ERV1 family, highlighting the importance of this repeat family in shaping the transcriptional network of p53. Moreover, the p53 sites exhibit an unusual combination of chromatin patterns: high nucleosome occupancy and, at the same time, high sensitivity to DNase I. Our results suggest that p53 can access its target sites in a chromatin environment that is non-permissive to most DNA-binding transcription factors, which may allow p53 to act as a pioneer transcription factor in the context of chromatin.

  20. Autoradiographic demonstration of oxytocin-binding sites in the macula densa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeckel, M.E.; Freund-Mercier, M.J. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Strasbourg (France))

    1989-08-01

    Specific oxytocin (OT)-binding sites were localized in the rat kidney with use of a selective {sup 125}I-labeled OT antagonist ({sup 125}I-OTA). High concentrations of OT binding sites were detected on the juxtaglomerular apparatus with use of the conventional film autoradiographic technique. No labeling occurred on other renal structures. The cellular localization of the OT binding sites within the juxtaglomerular apparatus was studied in light microscope autoradiography, on semithin sections from paraformaldehyde-fixed kidney slices incubated in the presence of {sup 125}I-OTA. These preparations revealed selective labeling of the macula densa, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. Control experiments showed first that {sup 125}I-OTA binding characteristics were not noticeably altered by prior paraformaldehyde fixation of the kidneys and second that autoradiographic detection of the binding sites was not impaired by histological treatments following binding procedures. In view of the role of the macula densa in the tubuloglomerular feedback, the putative OT receptors of this structure might mediate the stimulatory effect of OT on glomerular filtration.

  1. Mapping the binding site for gossypol-like inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Rebecca; Schambach, Felix; Read, Jon; Cameron, Angus; Sessions, Richard B; Vivas, Livia; Easton, Anna; Croft, Simon L; Brady, R Leo

    2005-08-01

    Gossypol is a di-sesquiterpene natural-product in the form of a functionalised binaphthyl and is isolated from cotton plants. The compound has long been known to exhibit anti-malarial and other biological activities. Previous studies have indicated that compounds of this type target Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (pfLDH), an essential enzyme for energy generation within the parasite. In this study, we report that simple naphthalene-based compounds, the core of the gossypol structure, exhibit weak inhibition of the parasite lactate dehydrogenase. Crystal structures of the complexes formed by binding of these naphthalene-based compounds to their target enzyme have been used to delineate the molecular features likely to form the gossypol binding site. Two modes of binding are observed: one overlapping the pyruvate but not the co-factor site, the other bridging the binding sites for the co-factor nicontinamide group and pyruvate substrate. This latter site encompasses molecular features unique to Plasmodium forms of LDH and is likely to represent the mode of binding for gossypol derivatives that show selectivity for the parasite enzymes. We also report a substrate analogue that unexpectedly binds within the adenine pocket of the co-factor groove. Although these core pharmacophore-like molecules only exhibit low levels of inhibitory activity, these molecular snapshots provide a rational basis for renewed structure-based development of naphthalene-based compounds as anti-malarial agents.

  2. The ribosome modulation factor (RMF) binding site on the 100S ribosome of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hideji; Maki, Yasushi; Kato, Hisako; Fujisawa, Hisao; Izutsu, Kaori; Wada, Chieko; Wada, Akira

    2002-12-01

    During the stationary growth phase, Escherichia coli 70S ribosomes are converted to 100S ribosomes, and translational activity is lost. This conversion is caused by the binding of the ribosome modulation factor (RMF) to 70S ribosomes. In order to elucidate the mechanisms by which 100S ribosomes form and translational inactivation occurs, the shape of the 100S ribosome and the RMF ribosomal binding site were investigated by electron microscopy and protein-protein cross-linking, respectively. We show that (i) the 100S ribosome is formed by the dimerization of two 70S ribosomes mediated by face-to-face contacts between their constituent 30S subunits, and (ii) RMF binds near the ribosomal proteins S13, L13, and L2. The positions of these proteins indicate that the RMF binding site is near the peptidyl transferase center or the P site (peptidyl-tRNA binding site). These observations are consistent with the translational inactivation of the ribosome by RMF binding. After the "Recycling" stage, ribosomes can readily proceed to the "Initiation" stage during exponential growth, but during stationary phase, the majority of 70S ribosomes are stored as 100S ribosomes and are translationally inactive. We suggest that this conversion of 70S to 100S ribosomes represents a newly identified stage of the ribosomal cycle in stationary phase cells, and we have termed it the "Hibernation" stage.

  3. Characterisation of the human NMDA receptor subunit NR3A glycine binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A; Duan, J; Mo-Boquist, L-L

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we characterise the binding site of the human N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR3A. Saturation radioligand binding of the NMDA receptor agonists [(3)H]-glycine and [(3)H]-glutamate showed that only glycine binds to human NR3A (hNR3A) with high affinity (K(d)=535nM (277...... NR1 glycine site agonist d-serine and partial agonist HA-966 (3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one), similarly to glycine displaced [(3)H]-glycine monophasically, suggesting a single common binding site. However, neither the partial agonist d-cycloserine nor the antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid displaced...... [(3)H]-glycine. Using homology modelling, a model of the NR3A binding pocket was generated which we suggest can be used to identify candidate agonists and antagonists. Our data show that glycine is a ligand, and most probably the endogenous ligand, for native NR3A at a binding site with unique...

  4. SpliceAid-F: a database of human splicing factors and their RNA-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; D'Antonio, Mattia; D'Onorio De Meo, Paolo; Paoletti, Daniele; Castrignanò, Tiziana; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Picardi, Ernesto; Zambelli, Federico; Principato, Giovanni; Pavesi, Giulio; Pesole, Graziano

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of all the factors involved in splicing, both proteins and RNAs, and of their interaction network is crucial for reaching a better understanding of this process and its functions. A large part of relevant information is buried in the literature or collected in various different databases. By hand-curated screenings of literature and databases, we retrieved experimentally validated data on 71 human RNA-binding splicing regulatory proteins and organized them into a database called 'SpliceAid-F' (http://www.caspur.it/SpliceAidF/). For each splicing factor (SF), the database reports its functional domains, its protein and chemical interactors and its expression data. Furthermore, we collected experimentally validated RNA-SF interactions, including relevant information on the RNA-binding sites, such as the genes where these sites lie, their genomic coordinates, the splicing effects, the experimental procedures used, as well as the corresponding bibliographic references. We also collected information from experiments showing no RNA-SF binding, at least in the assayed conditions. In total, SpliceAid-F contains 4227 interactions, 2590 RNA-binding sites and 1141 'no-binding' sites, including information on cellular contexts and conditions where binding was tested. The data collected in SpliceAid-F can provide significant information to explain an observed splicing pattern as well as the effect of mutations in functional regulatory elements.

  5. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  6. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  7. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiur Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 and diazepam as site-2 specific probe. Results: Different analysis of binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin suggested two sets of association constants: high affinity association constant (k1 = 11.0 x 105 M-1 with low capacity (n1 = 2 and low affinity association (k2 = 4.0×105 M-1 constant with high capacity (n2 = 8 at pH 7.4 and 27°C. During concurrent administration of palmitic acid and metoprolol succinate in presence or absence of ranitidine or diazepam, it was found that palmitic acid displaced metoprolol succinate from its binding site on BSA resulting reduced binding of metoprolol succinate to BSA. The increment in free fraction of metoprolol succinate was from 26.27% to 55.08% upon the addition of increased concentration of palmitic acid at a concentration of 0×10-5 M to 16×10-5 M. In presence of ranitidine and diazepam, palmitic acid further increases the free fraction of metoprolol succinate from 33.05% to 66.95% and 40.68% to 72.88%, respectively. Conclusion: This data provided the evidence of interaction at higher concentration of palmitic acid at the binding sites on BSA, which might change the pharmacokinetic properties of metoprolol succinate.

  8. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  9. A web server for analysis, comparison and prediction of protein ligand binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-03-25

    One of the major challenges in the field of system biology is to understand the interaction between a wide range of proteins and ligands. In the past, methods have been developed for predicting binding sites in a protein for a limited number of ligands. In order to address this problem, we developed a web server named 'LPIcom' to facilitate users in understanding protein-ligand interaction. Analysis, comparison and prediction modules are available in the "LPIcom' server to predict protein-ligand interacting residues for 824 ligands. Each ligand must have at least 30 protein binding sites in PDB. Analysis module of the server can identify residues preferred in interaction and binding motif for a given ligand; for example residues glycine, lysine and arginine are preferred in ATP binding sites. Comparison module of the server allows comparing protein-binding sites of multiple ligands to understand the similarity between ligands based on their binding site. This module indicates that ATP, ADP and GTP ligands are in the same cluster and thus their binding sites or interacting residues exhibit a high level of similarity. Propensity-based prediction module has been developed for predicting ligand-interacting residues in a protein for more than 800 ligands. In addition, a number of web-based tools have been integrated to facilitate users in creating web logo and two-sample between ligand interacting and non-interacting residues. In summary, this manuscript presents a web-server for analysis of ligand interacting residue. This server is available for public use from URL http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/lpicom .

  10. Diazepam-bound GABAA receptor models identify new benzodiazepine binding-site ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lars; de Graaf, Chris; Sieghart, Werner; Varagic, Zdravko; Mörzinger, Martina; de Esch, Iwan J P; Ecker, Gerhard F; Ernst, Margot

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines exert their anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, muscle-relaxant and sedative-hypnotic properties by allosterically enhancing the action of GABA at GABAA receptors via their benzodiazepine-binding site. Although these drugs have been used clinically since 1960, the molecular basis of this interaction is still not known. By using multiple homology models and an un biased docking protocol, we identified a binding hypothesis for the diazepam-bound structure of the benzodiazepine site, which was confirmed by experimental evidence. Moreover, two independent virtual screening approaches based on this structure identified known benzodiazepine-site ligands from different structural classes and predicted potential new ligands for this site. Receptor-binding assays and electrophysiological studies on recombinant receptors confirmed these predictions and thus identified new chemotypes for the benzodiazepine-binding site. Our results support the validity of the diazepam-bound structure of the benzodiazepine-binding pocket, demonstrate its suitability for drug discovery and pave the way for structure-based drug design. PMID:22446838

  11. Structure-based de novo prediction of zinc-binding sites in proteins of unknown function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Xu, Meng; Liang, Zhi; Ding, Bo; Niu, Liwen; Liu, Haiyan; Teng, Maikun

    2011-05-01

    Zinc-binding proteins are the most abundant metallo-proteins in Protein Data Bank (PDB). Accurate prediction of zinc-binding sites in proteins of unknown function may provide important clues for the inference of protein function. As zinc binding is often associated with characteristic 3D arrangements of zinc ligand residues, its prediction may benefit from using not only the sequence information but also the structure information of proteins. In this work, we present a structure-based method, TEMSP (3D TEmplate-based Metal Site Prediction), to predict zinc-binding sites. TEMSP significantly improves over previously reported best methods in predicting as many as possible true ligand residues for zinc with minimum overpredictions: if only those results in which all zinc ligand residues have been correctly predicted are defined as true positives, our method improves sensitivity from less than 30% to above 60%, and selectivity from around 25% to 80%. These results are for predictions based on apo state structures. In addition, the method can predict the zinc-bound local structures reliably, generating predictions useful for function inference. We applied TEMSP to 1888 protein structures of the 'Unknown Function' class in the PDB database. A number of zinc-binding sites have been discovered de novo, i.e. based solely on the protein structures. Using the predicted local structures of these sites, possible functional roles were analyzed. TEMSP is freely available from http://netalign.ustc.edu.cn/temsp/.

  12. Validating metal binding sites in macromolecule structures using the CheckMyMetal web server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chordia, Mahendra D.; Cooper, David R.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Müller, Peter; Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Metals play vital roles in both the mechanism and architecture of biological macromolecules. Yet structures of metal-containing macromolecules where metals are misidentified and/or suboptimally modeled are abundant in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This shows the need for a diagnostic tool to identify and correct such modeling problems with metal binding environments. The "CheckMyMetal" (CMM) web server (http://csgid.org/csgid/metal_sites/) is a sophisticated, user-friendly web-based method to evaluate metal binding sites in macromolecular structures in respect to 7350 metal binding sites observed in a benchmark dataset of 2304 high resolution crystal structures. The protocol outlines how the CMM server can be used to detect geometric and other irregularities in the structures of metal binding sites and alert researchers to potential errors in metal assignment. The protocol also gives practical guidelines for correcting problematic sites by modifying the metal binding environment and/or redefining metal identity in the PDB file. Several examples where this has led to meaningful results are described in the anticipated results section. CMM was designed for a broad audience—biomedical researchers studying metal-containing proteins and nucleic acids—but is equally well suited for structural biologists to validate new structures during modeling or refinement. The CMM server takes the coordinates of a metal-containing macromolecule structure in the PDB format as input and responds within a few seconds for a typical protein structure modeled with a few hundred amino acids. PMID:24356774

  13. Novel approach for selecting the best predictor for identifying the binding sites in DNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, R; Ahmad, Shandar; Gromiha, M Michael

    2013-09-01

    Protein-DNA complexes play vital roles in many cellular processes by the interactions of amino acids with DNA. Several computational methods have been developed for predicting the interacting residues in DNA-binding proteins using sequence and/or structural information. These methods showed different levels of accuracies, which may depend on the choice of data sets used in training, the feature sets selected for developing a predictive model, the ability of the models to capture information useful for prediction or a combination of these factors. In many cases, different methods are likely to produce similar results, whereas in others, the predictors may return contradictory predictions. In this situation, a priori estimates of prediction performance applicable to the system being investigated would be helpful for biologists to choose the best method for designing their experiments. In this work, we have constructed unbiased, stringent and diverse data sets for DNA-binding proteins based on various biologically relevant considerations: (i) seven structural classes, (ii) 86 folds, (iii) 106 superfamilies, (iv) 194 families, (v) 15 binding motifs, (vi) single/double-stranded DNA, (vii) DNA conformation (A, B, Z, etc.), (viii) three functions and (ix) disordered regions. These data sets were culled as non-redundant with sequence identities of 25 and 40% and used to evaluate the performance of 11 different methods in which online services or standalone programs are available. We observed that the best performing methods for each of the data sets showed significant biases toward the data sets selected for their benchmark. Our analysis revealed important data set features, which could be used to estimate these context-specific biases and hence suggest the best method to be used for a given problem. We have developed a web server, which considers these features on demand and displays the best method that the investigator should use. The web server is freely available at

  14. The Adenovirus Type 3 Dodecahedron's RGD Loop Comprises an HSPG Binding Site That Influences Integrin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gout

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human type 3 adenovirus dodecahedron (a virus like particle made of twelve penton bases features the ability to enter cells through Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans (HSPGs and integrins interaction and is used as a versatile vector to deliver DNA or proteins. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the pseudoviral particle with Heparan Sulphate (HS oligosaccharide shows an extradensity on the RGD loop. A set of mutants was designed to study the respective roles of the RGD sequence (RGE mutant and of a basic sequence located just downstream. Results showed that the RGE mutant binding to the HS deficient CHO-2241 cells was abolished and unexpectedly, mutation of the basic sequence (KQKR to AQAS dramatically decreased integrin recognition by the viral pseudoparticle. This basic sequence is thus involved in integrin docking, showing a close interplay between HSPGs and integrin receptors.

  15. Conformational and physicochemical DNA features specific for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, J V; Ponomarenko, M P; Frolov, A S; Vorobyev, D G; Overton, G C; Kolchanov, N A

    1999-01-01

    A reliable recognition of transcription factor binding sites is essential for analysis of regulatory genomic sequences. The experimental data make evident an important role of DNA conformational features for site functioning. However, Internet-available tools for revealing conformational and physicochemical DNA features significant for the site functioning and subsequent use of these features for site recognition have not been developed up to now. We suggest an approach for revealing significant conformational and physicochemical properties of functional sites implemented in the database B-DNA-VIDEO. This database is designed to study the sets of various transcription factor binding sites, providing evidence that transcription factor binding sites are characterized by specific sets of significant conformational and physicochemical DNA properties. For a fixed site, by using the B-DNA features selected for this site recognition, the C-program recognizing this site may be generated, control tested and stored in the database B-DNA-VIDEO. Each B-DNA-VIDEO entry links to the Web-applet recognizing the site, whose significant B-DNA features are stored in this entry as the 'site recognition programs'. The pairwise linked entry-applet pairs are compiled within the B-DNA-VIDEO system, which is simultaneously the database and the program tools package applicable immediately for recognizing the sites stored in the database. Indeed, this is the novelty. Hence, B-DNA-VIDEO is the Web resource of both 'searching for static data' and 'active computation' type, that is why it was called an 'activated database'. B-DNA-VIDEO is available at http://wwwmgs.bionet.nsc.ru/systems/BDNAVideo/ and the mirror site at http://www.cbil.upenn.edu/mgs/systems/c onsfreq/.

  16. Modular insulators: genome wide search for composite CTCF/thyroid hormone receptor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Weth

    Full Text Available The conserved 11 zinc-finger protein CTCF is involved in several transcriptional mechanisms, including insulation and enhancer blocking. We had previously identified two composite elements consisting of a CTCF and a TR binding site at the chicken lysozyme and the human c-myc genes. Using these it has been demonstrated that thyroid hormone mediates the relief of enhancer blocking even though CTCF remains bound to its binding site. Here we wished to determine whether CTCF and TR combined sites are representative of a general feature of the genome, and whether such sites are functional in regulating enhancer blocking. Genome wide analysis revealed that about 18% of the CTCF regions harbored at least one of the four different palindromic or repeated sequence arrangements typical for the binding of TR homodimers or TR/RXR heterodimers. Functional analysis of 10 different composite elements of thyroid hormone responsive genes was performed using episomal constructs. The episomal system allowed recapitulating CTCF mediated enhancer blocking function to be dependent on poly (ADP-ribose modification and to mediate histone deacetylation. Furthermore, thyroid hormone sensitive enhancer blocking could be shown for one of these new composite elements. Remarkably, not only did the regulation of enhancer blocking require functional TR binding, but also the basal enhancer blocking activity of CTCF was dependent on the binding of the unliganded TR. Thus, a number of composite CTCF/TR binding sites may represent a subset of other modular CTCF composite sites, such as groups of multiple CTCF sites or of CTCF/Oct4, CTCF/Kaiso or CTCF/Yy1 combinations.

  17. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular TH-naloxone binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, A.E.; Wooten, G.F.

    1987-07-27

    The binding of the opiate antagonist TH-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, TH-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables.

  18. 3D-QSAR model of flavonoids binding at benzodiazepine site in GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X; Liu, T; Gu, J; Luo, X; Ji, R; Cao, Y; Xue, H; Wong, J T; Wong, B L; Pei, G; Jiang, H; Chen, K

    2001-06-07

    With flavone as a structural template, three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies and ab initio calculations were performed on a series of flavonoids. A reasonable pharmacophore model was built through CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR analyses and electrostatic potential calculations. A plausible binding mode for flavonoids with GABA(A) receptors was rationalized. On the basis of the commonly recognized binding site, the specific S1 and S2 subsites relating to substituent positions were proposed. The different binding affinities could be explained according to the frontier orbitals and electrostatic potential (ESP) maps. The ESP could be used as a novel starting point for designing more selective BZ-binding-site ligands.

  19. A pseudoreceptor modelling study of the varicella-zoster virus and human thymidine kinase binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenidge, Paulette A.; Merz, Alfred; Folkers, Gerd

    1995-12-01

    A representative range of pyrimidine nucleoside analogues that are known to inhibit herpes simplex virus (HSV) replication have been used to construct receptor binding site models for the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), thymidine kinase (TK) and human TK1. Given a set of interacting ligands, superimposed in such a manner as to define a pharmacophore, the pseudoreceptor modelling technique Yak provides a means of building binding site models of macromolecules for which no three-dimensional experimental structures are available. Once the models have been evaluated by their ability to reproduce experimental binding data [Vedani et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 117 (1995) 4987], they can be used for predictive purposes. Calculated and experimental values of relative binding affinity are compared. Our models suggest that the substitution of one residue may be sufficient to determine ligand subtype affinity.

  20. LigASite - a database of biologically relevant binding sites in proteins with known apo-structures

    OpenAIRE

    Dessailly, B. H.; Lensink, M. F.; Orengo, C. A.; Wodak, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Better characterization of binding sites in proteins and the ability to accurately predict their location and energetic properties are major challenges which, if addressed, would have many valuable practical applications. Unfortunately, reliable benchmark datasets of binding sites in proteins are still sorely lacking. Here, we present LigASite ('LIGand Attachment SITE'), a gold-standard dataset of binding sites in 550 proteins of known structures. LigASite consists exclusively of biologically...

  1. Discovering structural motifs using a structural alphabet: Application to magnesium-binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Carmay

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many metalloproteins, sequence motifs characteristic of metal-binding sites have not been found or are so short that they would not be expected to be metal-specific. Striking examples of such metalloproteins are those containing Mg2+, one of the most versatile metal cofactors in cellular biochemistry. Even when Mg2+-proteins share insufficient sequence homology to identify Mg2+-specific sequence motifs, they may still share similarity in the Mg2+-binding site structure. However, no structural motifs characteristic of Mg2+-binding sites have been reported. Thus, our aims are (i to develop a general method for discovering structural patterns/motifs characteristic of ligand-binding sites, given the 3D protein structures, and (ii to apply it to Mg2+-proteins sharing 2+-structural motifs are identified as recurring structural patterns. Results The structural alphabet-based motif discovery method has revealed the structural preference of Mg2+-binding sites for certain local/secondary structures: compared to all residues in the Mg2+-proteins, both first and second-shell Mg2+-ligands prefer loops to helices. Even when the Mg2+-proteins share no significant sequence homology, some of them share a similar Mg2+-binding site structure: 4 Mg2+-structural motifs, comprising 21% of the binding sites, were found. In particular, one of the Mg2+-structural motifs found maps to a specific functional group, namely, hydrolases. Furthermore, 2 of the motifs were not found in non metalloproteins or in Ca2+-binding proteins. The structural motifs discovered thus capture some essential biochemical and/or evolutionary properties, and hence may be useful for discovering proteins where Mg2+ plays an important biological role. Conclusion The structural motif discovery method presented herein is general and can be applied to any set of proteins with known 3D structures. This new method is timely considering the increasing number of structures for

  2. The binding sites for benztropines and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Heidi Bisgaard; Larsen, M Andreas B; Mazier, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Analogs of benztropines (BZTs) are potent inhibitors of the dopamine transporter (DAT) but are less effective than cocaine as behavioral stimulants. As a result, there have been efforts to evaluate these compounds as leads for potential medication for cocaine addiction. Here we use computational...... with a larger decrease in the affinity for BZT than for JHW007. Summarized, our data suggest that BZTs display a classical competitive binding mode with binding sites overlapping those of cocaine and dopamine....

  3. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  4. Assessing the model transferability for prediction of transcription factor binding sites based on chromatin accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Zibetti, Cristina; Wan, Jun; Wang, Guohua; Blackshaw, Seth; Qian, Jiang

    2017-07-27

    Computational prediction of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in different cell types is challenging. Recent technology development allows us to determine the genome-wide chromatin accessibility in various cellular and developmental contexts. The chromatin accessibility profiles provide useful information in prediction of TF binding events in various physiological conditions. Furthermore, ChIP-Seq analysis was used to determine genome-wide binding sites for a range of different TFs in multiple cell types. Integration of these two types of genomic information can improve the prediction of TF binding events. We assessed to what extent a model built upon on other TFs and/or other cell types could be used to predict the binding sites of TFs of interest. A random forest model was built using a set of cell type-independent features such as specific sequences recognized by the TFs and evolutionary conservation, as well as cell type-specific features derived from chromatin accessibility data. Our analysis suggested that the models learned from other TFs and/or cell lines performed almost as well as the model learned from the target TF in the cell type of interest. Interestingly, models based on multiple TFs performed better than single-TF models. Finally, we proposed a universal model, BPAC, which was generated using ChIP-Seq data from multiple TFs in various cell types. Integrating chromatin accessibility information with sequence information improves prediction of TF binding.The prediction of TF binding is transferable across TFs and/or cell lines suggesting there are a set of universal "rules". A computational tool was developed to predict TF binding sites based on the universal "rules".

  5. Probing the orthosteric binding site of GABAA receptors with heterocyclic GABA carboxylic acid bioisosteres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jette G; Bergmann, Rikke; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl

    2013-01-01

    The ionotropic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) are widely distributed in the central nervous system where they play essential roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. A high degree of structural heterogeneity of the GABAAR has been revealed and extensive effort has been made to devel...... of interactions between the analogues and the binding pocket is leaving no room for substituents and underline the limited space in the GABAAR orthosteric binding site when in the agonist conformation....

  6. Identification of a binding site for quaternary amines in factor Xa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnaie, D; Arosio, D; Griffon, N; Rose, T; Rezaie, A R; Di Cera, E

    2000-05-09

    In the process of characterizing the Na(+)-binding properties of factor Xa, a specific inhibition of this enzyme by quaternary amines was identified, consistent with previous observations. The binding occurs with K(i) in the low millimolar range, with trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) showing the highest specificity. Binding of TMPA inhibits substrate hydrolysis in a competitive manner, does not inhibit the binding of p-aminobenzamidine to the S1 pocket, and is positively linked to Na(+) binding. Inhibition by TMPA is also seen in thrombin and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), though to a lesser extent compared to factor Xa. Computer modeling using the crystal structure of factor Xa suggests that TMPA binds to the S2/S3 specificity sites, with its hydrophobic moiety making van der Waals interactions with the side chains of Y99, F174, and W215, and the charged amine coupling electrostatically with the carboxylates of E97. Site-directed mutagenesis of factor Xa, thrombin, and tPA confirms the predictions drawn by docking calculations and reveal a dominant role for residue Y99. Binding of TMPA to factor Xa is drastically (25-fold) reduced by the Y99T replacement. Likewise, the Y99L substitution compromises binding of TMPA to tPA. On the other hand, the affinity of TMPA is enhanced 4-fold in thrombin with the substitution L99Y. The identification of a binding site for quaternary amines in factor Xa has a bearing on the rational design of selective inhibitors of this clotting enzyme.

  7. Cyclostreptin and microtubules: is a low-affinity binding site required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prussia, Andrew J; Yang, Yutao; Geballe, Matthew T; Snyder, James P

    2010-01-04

    Cyclostreptin (CS) is a recently discovered natural product with cytotoxic activity caused by microtubule stabilization. It is the only known microtubule-stabilizing agent (MSA) that covalently binds to tubulin. It also exhibits the fast-binding kinetics seen for other MSAs. Through careful peptide digestion and mass spectrometry analysis, Buey et al. found that two amino acids are labeled by CS: Asn228, near the known taxane-binding site, and Thr220, in the type I microtubule pore. This led Buey et al. to propose Thr220 resides at the site previously predicted to be a way station or low-affinity site. By using molecular dynamics simulations and structural considerations of the microtubule pore and tubulin dimer, we conclude that postulation of a low-affinity site is unnecessary to explain the available experimental data. An alternative explanation views the microtubule pore as a structural entity that presents a substantial kinetic barrier to ligand passage to the known taxane-binding site-an entry point to the microtubule lumen that becomes completely blocked if cyclostreptin is bound at Thr220. Simulations of the free dimer also suggest a common mechanism of microtubule stabilization for taxane site MSAs through their conformational effect on the M-loop. Such an effect explains the low tubulin polymerization caused by cyclostreptin in vitro despite its covalent attachment.

  8. Specific binding sites for alcohols and anesthetics on ligand-gated ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Maria Paola; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2000-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels are a target for inhaled anesthetics and alcohols in the central nervous system. The inhibitory strychnine-sensitive glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors are positively modulated by anesthetics and alcohols, and site-directed mutagenesis techniques have identified amino acid residues important for the action of volatile anesthetics and alcohols in these receptors. A key question is whether these amino acids are part of an alcohol/anesthetic-binding site. In the present study, we used an alkanethiol anesthetic to covalently label its binding site by mutating selected amino acids to cysteine. We demonstrated that the anesthetic propanethiol, or alternatively, propyl methanethiosulfonate, covalently binds to cysteine residues introduced into a specific second transmembrane site in glycine receptor and γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor subunits and irreversibly enhances receptor function. Moreover, upon permanent occupation of the site by propyl disulfide, the usual ability of octanol, enflurane, and isoflurane to potentiate the function of the ion channels was lost. This approach provides strong evidence that the actions of anesthetics in these receptors are due to binding at a single site. PMID:10908659

  9. Identification of a Second DNA Binding Site in the Human Rad52 Protein*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Wataru; Kagawa, Ako; Saito, Kengo; Ikawa, Shukuko; Shibata, Takehiko; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2008-01-01

    Rad52 plays essential roles in homology-dependent double-strand break repair. Various studies have established the functions of Rad52 in Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent repair processes. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of Rad52 in these processes remain unknown. In the present study we have identified a novel DNA binding site within Rad52 by a structure-based alanine scan mutagenesis. This site is closely aligned with the putative single-stranded DNA binding site determined previously. Mutations in this site impaired the ability of the Rad52-single-stranded DNA complex to form a ternary complex with double-stranded DNA and subsequently catalyze the formation of D-loops. We found that Rad52 introduces positive supercoils into double-stranded DNA and that the second DNA binding site is essential for this activity. Our findings suggest that Rad52 aligns two recombining DNA molecules within the first and second DNA binding sites to stimulate the homology search and strand invasion processes. PMID:18593704

  10. Characterization of the Adeno-Associated Virus 1 and 6 Sialic Acid Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Patel, Ami; Ng, Robert; Miller, Edward Blake; Halder, Sujata; McKenna, Robert; Asokan, Aravind; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-06-01

    The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), which are being developed as gene delivery vectors, display differential cell surface glycan binding and subsequent tissue tropisms. For AAV serotype 1 (AAV1), the first viral vector approved as a gene therapy treatment, and its closely related AAV6, sialic acid (SIA) serves as their primary cellular surface receptor. Toward characterizing the SIA binding site(s), the structure of the AAV1-SIA complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 3.0 Å. Density consistent with SIA was observed in a pocket located at the base of capsid protrusions surrounding icosahedral 3-fold axes. Site-directed mutagenesis substitution of the amino acids forming this pocket with structurally equivalent residues from AAV2, a heparan sulfate binding serotype, followed by cell binding and transduction assays, further mapped the critical residues conferring SIA binding to AAV1 and AAV6. For both viruses five of the six binding pocket residues mutated (N447S, V473D, N500E, T502S, and W503A) abolished SIA binding, whereas S472R increased binding. All six mutations abolished or decreased transduction by at least 50% in AAV1. Surprisingly, the T502S substitution did not affect transduction efficiency of wild-type AAV6. Furthermore, three of the AAV1 SIA binding site mutants-S472R, V473D, and N500E-escaped recognition by the anti-AAV1 capsid antibody ADK1a. These observations demonstrate that common key capsid surface residues dictate both virus binding and entry processes, as well as antigenic reactivity. This study identifies an important functional capsid surface "hot spot" dictating receptor attachment, transduction efficiency, and antigenicity which could prove useful for vector engineering. The adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector gene delivery system has shown promise in several clinical trials and an AAV1-based vector has been approved as the first gene therapy treatment. However, limitations still exist with respect to transduction efficiency and

  11. Radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine receptors and PK (peripheral benzodiazepine) binding sites -current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, V.W.; Osman, S.; Shah, F.; Turton, D.R.; Waters, S.L. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit); Halldin, C. (Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden)); Crouzel, C. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot); Barre, L. (CEA, CYCERON, Caen (France)); Nutt, D.J. (Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Medical Sciences)

    1993-05-01

    The status of the radiochemical development and biological evaluation of radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors and the so-called peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites, here discriminated and referred to as PK binding sites, is reviewed against current pharmacological knowledge, indicating those agents with present value and those with future potential. Practical recommendations are given for the preparation of two useful radioligands for PET studies, (N-methyl-[sup 11]C)flumazenil for central BZ receptors, and (N-methyl)-[sup 11]CPK 11195 for PK binding sites. Quality assurance and plasma metabolite analysis are also reviewed for these radioligands and practical recommendations are given on methodology for their performance. (author).

  12. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-02-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Amyloid tracers binding sites in autosomal dominant and sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ruiqing; Gillberg, Per-Göran; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Viitanen, Matti; Myllykangas, Liisa; Nennesmo, Inger; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2017-04-01

    Amyloid imaging has been integrated into diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD). How amyloid tracers binding differ for different tracer structures and amyloid-β aggregates in autosomal dominant AD (ADAD) and sporadic AD is unclear. Binding properties of different amyloid tracers were examined in brain homogenates from six ADAD with APPswe, PS1 M146V, and PS1 EΔ9 mutations, 13 sporadic AD, and 14 control cases. 3H-PIB, 3H-florbetaben, 3H-AZD2184, and BTA-1 shared a high- and a varying low-affinity binding site in the frontal cortex of sporadic AD. AZD2184 detected another binding site (affinity 33 nM) in the frontal cortex of ADAD. The 3H-AZD2184 and 3H-PIB binding were significantly higher in the striatum of ADAD compared to sporadic AD and control. Polyphenol resveratrol showed strongest inhibition on 3H-AZD84 binding followed by 3H-florbetaben and minimal on 3H-PIB. This study implies amyloid tracers of different structures detect different sites on amyloid-β fibrils or conformations. Copyright © 2016 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lipids Shape the Electron Acceptor-Binding Site of the Peripheral Membrane Protein Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costeira-Paulo, Joana; Gault, Joseph; Popova, Gergana; Ladds, Marcus J G W; van Leeuwen, Ingeborg M M; Sarr, Médoune; Olsson, Anders; Lane, David P; Laín, Sonia; Marklund, Erik G; Landreh, Michael

    2018-01-17

    The interactions between proteins and biological membranes are important for drug development, but remain notoriously refractory to structural investigation. We combine non-denaturing mass spectrometry (MS) with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to unravel the connections among co-factor, lipid, and inhibitor binding in the peripheral membrane protein dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), a key anticancer target. Interrogation of intact DHODH complexes by MS reveals that phospholipids bind via their charged head groups at a limited number of sites, while binding of the inhibitor brequinar involves simultaneous association with detergent molecules. MD simulations show that lipids support flexible segments in the membrane-binding domain and position the inhibitor and electron acceptor-binding site away from the membrane surface, similar to the electron acceptor-binding site in respiratory chain complex I. By complementing MS with MD simulations, we demonstrate how a peripheral membrane protein uses lipids to modulate its structure in a similar manner as integral membrane proteins. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Mutations at the Qo-Site of the Cytochrome bc1 Complex Strongly Affect Oxygen Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husen, Peter; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2017-01-01

    The homodimeric bc1 protein complex is embedded in membranes of mitochondria and photosynthetic bacteria, where it transports protons across the membrane to maintain an electrostatic potential used to drive ATP synthesis as part of the respiratory or photosynthetic pathways. The reaction cycle...... investigation employs molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of mutations in the Qo binding sites of the bc1 complex on the ability of oxygen molecules to migrate to and bind at various locations within the complex. It is found that the mutations strongly affect the ability of oxygen to bind...

  16. Computational prediction of cAMP receptor protein (CRP binding sites in cyanobacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhengchang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP, also known as catabolite gene activator protein (CAP, is an important transcriptional regulator widely distributed in many bacteria. The biological processes under the regulation of CRP are highly diverse among different groups of bacterial species. Elucidation of CRP regulons in cyanobacteria will further our understanding of the physiology and ecology of this important group of microorganisms. Previously, CRP has been experimentally studied in only two cyanobacterial strains: Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120; therefore, a systematic genome-scale study of the potential CRP target genes and binding sites in cyanobacterial genomes is urgently needed. Results We have predicted and analyzed the CRP binding sites and regulons in 12 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes using a highly effective cis-regulatory binding site scanning algorithm. Our results show that cyanobacterial CRP binding sites are very similar to those in E. coli; however, the regulons are very different from that of E. coli. Furthermore, CRP regulons in different cyanobacterial species/ecotypes are also highly diversified, ranging from photosynthesis, carbon fixation and nitrogen assimilation, to chemotaxis and signal transduction. In addition, our prediction indicates that crp genes in modern cyanobacteria are likely inherited from a common ancestral gene in their last common ancestor, and have adapted various cellular functions in different environments, while some cyanobacteria lost their crp genes as well as CRP binding sites during the course of evolution. Conclusion The CRP regulons in cyanobacteria are highly diversified, probably as a result of divergent evolution to adapt to various ecological niches. Cyanobacterial CRPs may function as lineage-specific regulators participating in various cellular processes, and are important in some lineages. However, they are dispensable in some other lineages. The

  17. Endocytosis of mannose-6-phosphate binding sites by mouse T-lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguignon, L Y; Balazovich, K; Suchard, S J; Hindsgaul, O; Pierce, M

    1986-04-01

    The endocytosis and intracellular transport of mannose-6-phosphate conjugated to bovine serum albumin (Man-6-P:BSA) by mouse T-lymphoma cells were investigated in detail using several methods of analysis, both morphological and biochemical. Man-6-P:BSA was labeled with fluorescein or 125I and used to locate both surface and intracellular Man-6-P binding sites by light or electron microscopy, respectively. Incubation of cells with either fluorescent- or 125I-labeled Man-6-P:BSA at 0 degree C revealed a uniform distribution of the Man-6-P binding sites over the cell surface. Competition experiments indicate that the Man-6-P:BSA binding sites on the cell surface are the same receptors that can recognize lysosomal hydrolases. After as little as 1 min incubation at 37 degrees C, endocytosis of Man-6-P binding sites was clearly observed to occur through regions of the plasma membrane and via vesicles that also bound anticlathrin antibody. After a 5-15-min incubation of cells at 37 degrees C, the internalized ligand was detected first in the cis region of the Golgi apparatus and then in the Golgi stacks using both autoradiography and immunocytochemistry to visualize the ligand. The appearance of Man-6-P:BSA in the Golgi region after 15-30 min was confirmed by subcellular fractionation, which demonstrated an accumulation of Man-6-P:BSA in light membrane fractions that corresponded with the Golgi fractions. After a 30-min incubation at 37 degrees C, the internalized Man-6-P binding sites were localized primarily in lysosomal structures whose membrane but not lumen co-stained for acid phosphatase. These results demonstrate a temporal participation of clathrin-containing coated vesicles during the initial endocytosis of Man-6-P binding sites and that one step in the Man-6-P:BSA transport pathway between plasma membrane and the lysosomal structure can involve a transit through the Golgi stacks.

  18. Cortisol decreases 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding sites in the duck thymus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, A.M.S.; Liu, Z.M.; Tang, F.; Pang, S.F. (Univ. of Hong Kong (China))

    1994-03-01

    The immunosuppressive effect of chronic glucocorticoid treatment on 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding in the duck thymus was studied. Two-week-old ducks were injected intraperitoneally with either 1 mg of cortisol per day (experimental group) or an equivalent volume of vehicle (control group) in the middle of the light period for seven days. 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding assays were performed on thymic membranes. Cortisol injection reduced the body weight gain, size of the bursa of Fabricius and absolute weights of the primary lymphoid organs but had no effect on the spleen weights. The relative weights of the spleen were increased while those of the primary lymphoid organs were unchanged. The density of the thymus 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding sites was decreased while the affinity was not affected. The modulation of the thymic 2[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin binding sites by changes in the immune status of the duck suggests that these binding sites represent physiologically relevant melatonin receptors and that melatonin exerts its action on the lymphoid tissues directly. The authors findings support the hypothesis that the thymus is the target site for the immunomodulatory interactions between the pineal melatonin and the adrenal steroids. A possible inhibitory influence of adrenal steroids on the immuno-enhancing effect of melatonin is also suggested. 34 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Nonequivalence of alpha-bungarotoxin binding sites in the native nicotinic receptor molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti-Tronconi, B.M.; Tang, F.; Walgrave, S.; Gallagher, W. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul (USA))

    1990-01-30

    In the native, membrane-bound form of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (M-AcChR) the two sites for the cholinergic antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BGT) have different binding properties. One site has high affinity, and the M-AcChR/alpha-BGT complexes thus formed dissociate very slowly, similar to the complexes formed with detergent-solubilized AcChR (S-AcChR). The second site has much lower affinity (KD approximately 59 +/- 35 nM) and forms quickly reversible complexes. The nondenaturing detergent Triton X-100 is known to solubilize the AcChR in a form unable, upon binding of cholinergic ligands, to open the ion channel and to become desensitized. Solubilization of the AcChR in Triton X-100 affects the binding properties of this second site and converts it to a high-affinity, slowly reversible site. Prolonged incubation of M-AcChR at 4 degrees C converts the low-affinity site to a high-affinity site similar to those observed in the presence of Triton X-100. Although the two sites have similar properties when the AcChR is solubilized in Triton X-100, their nonequivalence can be demonstrated by the effect on alpha-BGT binding of concanavalin A, which strongly reduces the association rate of one site only. The Bmax of alpha-BGT to either Triton-solubilized AcChR or M-AcChR is not affected by the presence of concanavalin A. Occupancy of the high-affinity, slowly reversible site in M-AcChR inhibits the Triton X-100 induced conversion to irreversibility of the second site. At difference with alpha-BGT, the long alpha-neurotoxin from Naja naja siamensis venom (alpha-NTX) binds with high affinity and in a very slowly reversible fashion to two sites in the M-AcChR. We confirm here that Triton-solubilized AcChR or M-AcChR binds in a very slowly reversible fashion the same amount of alpha-NTX.

  20. Characterization of a novel /sup 3/H-5-hydroxytryptamine binding site subtype in bovine brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuring, R.E.; Peroutka, S.J.

    1987-03-01

    /sup 3/H-5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) binding sites were analyzed in bovine brain membranes. The addition of either the 5-HT1A-selective drug 8-OH-DPAT (100 nM) or the 5-HT1C-selective drug mesulergine (100 nM) to the assay resulted in a 5-10% decrease in specific /sup 3/H-5-HT binding. Scatchard analysis revealed that the simultaneous addition of both drugs decreased the Bmax of /sup 3/H-5-HT binding by 10-15% without affecting the KD value (1.8 +/- 0.3 nM). Competition studies using a series of pharmacologic agents revealed that the sites labeled by /sup 3/H-5-HT in bovine caudate in the presence of 100 nM 8-OH-DPAT and 100 nM mesulergine appear to be homogeneous. 5-HT1A selective agents such as 8-OH-DPAT, ipsapirone, and buspirone display micromolar affinities for these sites. RU 24969 and (-)pindolol are approximately 2 orders of magnitude less potent at these sites than at 5-HT1B sites which have been identified in rat brain. Agents displaying nanomolar potencies for 5-HT1C sites such as mianserin and mesulergine are 2-3 orders of magnitude less potent at the /sup 3/H-5-HT binding sites in bovine caudate. In addition, both 5-HT2- and 5-HT3-selective agents are essentially inactive at these binding sites. These /sup 3/H-5-HT sites display nanomolar affinity for 5-carboxyamidotryptamine, 5-methoxytryptamine, metergoline, and 5-HT. Apparent Ki values of 10-100 nM are obtained for d-LSD, RU 24969, methiothepin, tryptamine, methysergide, and yohimbine, whereas I-LSD and corynanthine are significantly less potent. In addition, these /sup 3/H-5-HT labeled sites are regulated by guanine nucleotides and calcium. Regional studies indicate that this class of sites is most dense in the basal ganglia but exists in all regions of bovine brain. These data therefore demonstrate the presence of a homogeneous class of 5-HT1 binding sites in bovine caudate that is pharmacologically distinct from previously defined 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1C, 5-HT2, and 5-HT3 receptor subtypes

  1. Binding site of ribosomal proteins on prokaryotic 5S ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1982-01-01

    The binding sites of ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 on 5S RNA from Escherichia coli were probed with ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom endonuclease. The results for the protein-RNA complexes, which were compared with those for the free RNA [Douthwaite, S., & Garr......The binding sites of ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 on 5S RNA from Escherichia coli were probed with ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom endonuclease. The results for the protein-RNA complexes, which were compared with those for the free RNA [Douthwaite, S...

  2. Characterization of the Adeno-Associated Virus 1 and 6 Sialic Acid Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Patel, Ami; Ng, Robert; Miller, Edward Blake; Halder, Sujata; McKenna, Robert; Asokan, Aravind; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-01-01

    The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), which are being developed as gene delivery vectors, display differential cell surface glycan binding and subsequent tissue tropisms. For AAV serotype 1 (AAV1), the first viral vector approved as a gene therapy treatment, and its closely related AAV6, sialic acid (SIA) serves as their primary cellular surface receptor. Toward characterizing the SIA binding site(s), the structure of the AAV1-SIA complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 3.0 Å. Densi...

  3. Site-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation: a selective method to individually analyze neighboring transcription factor binding sites in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuch Ronaldo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites (TFBSs play a central role in the regulation of gene expression. It is therefore vital to know how the allocation pattern of TFBSs affects the functioning of any particular gene in vivo. A widely used method to analyze TFBSs in vivo is the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. However, this method in its present state does not enable the individual investigation of densely arranged TFBSs due to the underlying unspecific DNA fragmentation technique. This study describes a site-specific ChIP which aggregates the benefits of both EMSA and in vivo footprinting in only one assay, thereby allowing the individual detection and analysis of single binding motifs. Findings The standard ChIP protocol was modified by replacing the conventional DNA fragmentation, i. e. via sonication or undirected enzymatic digestion (by MNase, through a sequence specific enzymatic digestion step. This alteration enables the specific immunoprecipitation and individual examination of occupied sites, even in a complex system of adjacent binding motifs in vivo. Immunoprecipitated chromatin was analyzed by PCR using two primer sets - one for the specific detection of precipitated TFBSs and one for the validation of completeness of the enzyme digestion step. The method was established exemplary for Sp1 TFBSs within the egfr promoter region. Using this site-specific ChIP, we were able to confirm four previously described Sp1 binding sites within egfr promoter region to be occupied by Sp1 in vivo. Despite the dense arrangement of the Sp1 TFBSs the improved ChIP method was able to individually examine the allocation of all adjacent Sp1 TFBS at once. The broad applicability of this site-specific ChIP could be demonstrated by analyzing these SP1 motifs in both osteosarcoma cells and kidney carcinoma tissue. Conclusions The ChIP technology is a powerful tool for investigating transcription factors in vivo, especially

  4. Identification of the quinolinedione inhibitor binding site in Cdc25 phosphatase B through docking and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yushu; van der Kamp, Marc; Malaisree, Maturos; Liu, Dan; Liu, Yi; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2017-10-01

    Cdc25 phosphatase B, a potential target for cancer therapy, is inhibited by a series of quinones. The binding site and mode of quinone inhibitors to Cdc25B remains unclear, whereas this information is important for structure-based drug design. We investigated the potential binding site of NSC663284 [DA3003-1 or 6-chloro-7-(2-morpholin-4-yl-ethylamino)-quinoline-5, 8-dione] through docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Of the two main binding sites suggested by docking, the molecular dynamics simulations only support one site for stable binding of the inhibitor. Binding sites in and near the Cdc25B catalytic site that have been suggested previously do not lead to stable binding in 50 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In contrast, a shallow pocket between the C-terminal helix and the catalytic site provides a favourable binding site that shows high stability. Two similar binding modes featuring protein-inhibitor interactions involving Tyr428, Arg482, Thr547 and Ser549 are identified by clustering analysis of all stable MD trajectories. The relatively flexible C-terminal region of Cdc25B contributes to inhibitor binding. The binding mode of NSC663284, identified through MD simulation, likely prevents the binding of protein substrates to Cdc25B. The present results provide useful information for the design of quinone inhibitors and their mechanism of inhibition.

  5. Identification of the quinolinedione inhibitor binding site in Cdc25 phosphatase B through docking and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yushu; van der Kamp, Marc; Malaisree, Maturos; Liu, Dan; Liu, Yi; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2017-11-01

    Cdc25 phosphatase B, a potential target for cancer therapy, is inhibited by a series of quinones. The binding site and mode of quinone inhibitors to Cdc25B remains unclear, whereas this information is important for structure-based drug design. We investigated the potential binding site of NSC663284 [DA3003-1 or 6-chloro-7-(2-morpholin-4-yl-ethylamino)-quinoline-5, 8-dione] through docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Of the two main binding sites suggested by docking, the molecular dynamics simulations only support one site for stable binding of the inhibitor. Binding sites in and near the Cdc25B catalytic site that have been suggested previously do not lead to stable binding in 50 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In contrast, a shallow pocket between the C-terminal helix and the catalytic site provides a favourable binding site that shows high stability. Two similar binding modes featuring protein-inhibitor interactions involving Tyr428, Arg482, Thr547 and Ser549 are identified by clustering analysis of all stable MD trajectories. The relatively flexible C-terminal region of Cdc25B contributes to inhibitor binding. The binding mode of NSC663284, identified through MD simulation, likely prevents the binding of protein substrates to Cdc25B. The present results provide useful information for the design of quinone inhibitors and their mechanism of inhibition.

  6. Solubilization of phencyclidine receptors from rat cerebral cortex in an active ligand binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McVittie, L.D.; Sibley, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    A phencyclidine (PCP) receptor binding site has been solubilized in an active ligand-binding state from rat cerebral cortical membranes with sodium deoxycholate. Optimal receptor solubilization occurs at a detergent/protein ratio of 0.5 (w/w); for 5 mg protein/ml solubilized with 0.25% sodium deoxycholate, about 60% of the protein and 25% of the receptor is solubilized. Specific binding of either (/sup 3/H)-N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine ((/sup 3/H)TCP) or (/sup 3/H)MK-801 is measurable by filtration through Sephadex G-50 columns or glass fiber filters; more than 60% of the binding activity is stable after 48 h at 4/degrees/C. In the presence of detergent, (/sup 3/H)TCP binding exhibits a K/sub d/ of 250 nM, a B/sub max/ of 0.56 pmol/mg protein, and a pharmacological profile consistent with that of the membrane-bound PCP receptor, although most drugs bind with affinities 2 to 8 fold lower than in membranes. Upon reduction of detergent concentration, binding parameters approximate those for the membrane-bound receptor (/sup 3/H)TCP binding: K/sub d/ = 48 nM, M/sub max/ = 1.13 pmol/mg protein.

  7. Evolution of allosteric citrate binding sites on 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Usenik

    Full Text Available As an important part of metabolism, metabolic flux through the glycolytic pathway is tightly regulated. The most complex control is exerted on 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK1 level; this control overrules the regulatory role of other allosteric enzymes. Among other effectors, citrate has been reported to play a vital role in the suppression of this enzyme's activity. In eukaryotes, amino acid residues forming the allosteric binding site for citrate are found both on the N- and the C-terminal region of the enzyme. These site has evolved from the phosphoenolpyruvate/ADP binding site of bacterial PFK1 due to the processes of duplication and tandem fusion of prokaryotic ancestor gene followed by the divergence of the catalytic and effector binding sites. Stricter inhibition of the PFK1 enzyme was needed during the evolution of multi-cellular organisms, and the most stringent control of PFK1 by citrate occurs in vertebrates. By substituting a single amino acid (K557R or K617A as a component of the allosteric binding site in the C-terminal region of human muscle type PFK-M with a residue found in the corresponding site of a fungal enzyme, the inhibitory effect of citrate was attenuated. Moreover, the proteins carrying these single mutations enabled growth of E. coli transformants encoding mutated human PFK-M in a glucose-containing medium that did not support the growth of E. coli transformed with native human PFK-M. Substitution of another residue at the citrate-binding site (D591V of human PFK-M resulted in the complete loss of activity. Detailed analyses revealed that the mutated PFK-M subunits formed dimers but were unable to associate into the active tetrameric holoenzyme. These results suggest that stricter control over glycolytic flux developed in metazoans, whose somatic cells are largely characterized by slow proliferation.

  8. Characterization of DNA binding sites of the ComE response regulator from Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, David C I; Downey, Jennifer S; Ayala, Eduardo A; Kreth, Jens; Mair, Richard; Senadheera, Dilani B; Qi, Fengxia; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G; Shi, Wenyuan; Goodman, Steven D

    2011-07-01

    In Streptococcus mutans, both competence and bacteriocin production are controlled by ComC and the ComED two-component signal transduction system. Recent studies of S. mutans suggested that purified ComE binds to two 11-bp direct repeats in the nlmC-comC promoter region, where ComE activates nlmC and represses comC. In this work, quantitative binding studies and DNase I footprinting analysis were performed to calculate the equilibrium dissociation constant and further characterize the binding site of ComE. We found that ComE protects sequences inclusive of both direct repeats, has an equilibrium dissociation constant in the nanomolar range, and binds to these two direct repeats cooperatively. Furthermore, similar direct repeats were found upstream of cslAB, comED, comX, ftf, vicRKX, gtfD, gtfB, gtfC, and gbpB. Quantitative binding studies were performed on each of these sequences and showed that only cslAB has a similar specificity and high affinity for ComE as that seen with the upstream region of comC. A mutational analysis of the binding sequences showed that ComE does not require both repeats to bind DNA with high affinity, suggesting that single site sequences in the genome may be targets for ComE-mediated regulation. Based on the mutational analysis and DNase I footprinting analysis, we propose a consensus ComE binding site, TCBTAAAYSGT.

  9. PIP(2)-binding site in Kir channels: definition by multiscale biomolecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfeld, Phillip J; Hopkinson, Richard; Ashcroft, Frances M; Sansom, Mark S P

    2009-11-24

    Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP(2)) is an activator of mammalian inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels. Multiscale simulations, via a sequential combination of coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics, enabled exploration of the interactions of PIP(2) molecules within the inner leaflet of a lipid bilayer membrane with possible binding sites on Kir channels. Three Kir channel structures were investigated: X-ray structures of KirBac1.1 and of a Kir3.1-KirBac1.3 chimera and a homology model of Kir6.2. Coarse-grained simulations of the Kir channels in PIP(2)-containing lipid bilayers identified the PIP(2)-binding site on each channel. These models of the PIP(2)-channel complexes were refined by conversion to an atomistic representation followed by molecular dynamics simulation in a lipid bilayer. All three channels were revealed to contain a conserved binding site at the N-terminal end of the slide (M0) helix, at the interface between adjacent subunits of the channel. This binding site agrees with mutagenesis data and is in the proximity of the site occupied by a detergent molecule in the Kir chimera channel crystal. Polar contacts in the coarse-grained simulations corresponded to long-lived electrostatic and H-bonding interactions between the channel and PIP(2) in the atomistic simulations, enabling identification of key side chains.

  10. Germline V-genes sculpt the binding site of a family of antibodies neutralizing human cytomegalovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Christy A.; Bryson, Steve; McLean, Gary R.; Creagh, A. Louise; Pai, Emil F.; Schrader, John W. (Toronto); (UBC)

    2008-10-17

    Immunoglobulin genes are generated somatically through specialized mechanisms resulting in a vast repertoire of antigen-binding sites. Despite the stochastic nature of these processes, the V-genes that encode most of the antigen-combining site are under positive evolutionary selection, raising the possibility that V-genes have been selected to encode key structural features of binding sites of protective antibodies against certain pathogens. Human, neutralizing antibodies to human cytomegalovirus that bind the AD-2S1 epitope on its gB envelope protein repeatedly use a pair of well-conserved, germline V-genes IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Here, we present crystallographic, kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the binding site of such an antibody and that of its primary immunoglobulin ancestor. These show that these germline V-genes encode key side chain contacts with the viral antigen and thereby dictate key structural features of the hypermutated, high-affinity neutralizing antibody. V-genes may thus encode an innate, protective immunological memory that targets vulnerable, invariant sites on multiple pathogens.

  11. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  12. Calcium-binding properties of a calcium-dependent protein kinase from Plasmodium falciparum and the significance of individual calcium-binding sites for kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Pokutta, S; Maurer, P; Lindt, M; Franklin, R M; Kappes, B

    1994-03-29

    Calcium-dependent protein kinase from Plasmodium falciparum (PfCPK) is a multidomain protein composed of an N-terminal kinase domain connected via a linker region to a C-terminal CaM-like calcium-binding domain. The kinase can be activated by Ca2+ alone and associates with 45Ca2+. Here we describe the calcium-binding properties of the kinase and the significance of the individual calcium-binding sites with respect to enzymatic activation, as well as the Ca(2+)-induced conformational change as detected by circular dichroism. As predicted from the cDNA sequence, the kinase has four EF-hand calcium-binding sites in the C-terminal domain. To understand the roles of the individual calcium-binding sites, two series of mutations were generated at the individual EF-hand motifs. The highly conserved glutamic acid residue at position 12 in each calcium-binding loop was mutated to either lysine or glutamine, and therefore a total of eight mutants were generated. Either of these mutations (to lysine or glutamine) is sufficient to eliminate calcium binding at the mutated site. Sites I and II appear to be crucial for both Ca(2+)-induced conformational change and enzymatic activation. Whereas mutations at site II almost completely abolish kinase activity, mutations at site I are also deleterious and dramatically reduce the sensitivity of the Ca(2+)-induced conformational change and the Ca(2+)-dependent activation. Mutations at sites III and IV have minor effects.

  13. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  14. De-novo discovery of differentially abundant transcription factor binding sites including their positional preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilwagen, Jens; Grau, Jan; Paponov, Ivan A; Posch, Stefan; Strickert, Marc; Grosse, Ivo

    2011-02-10

    Transcription factors are a main component of gene regulation as they activate or repress gene expression by binding to specific binding sites in promoters. The de-novo discovery of transcription factor binding sites in target regions obtained by wet-lab experiments is a challenging problem in computational biology, which has not been fully solved yet. Here, we present a de-novo motif discovery tool called Dispom for finding differentially abundant transcription factor binding sites that models existing positional preferences of binding sites and adjusts the length of the motif in the learning process. Evaluating Dispom, we find that its prediction performance is superior to existing tools for de-novo motif discovery for 18 benchmark data sets with planted binding sites, and for a metazoan compendium based on experimental data from micro-array, ChIP-chip, ChIP-DSL, and DamID as well as Gene Ontology data. Finally, we apply Dispom to find binding sites differentially abundant in promoters of auxin-responsive genes extracted from Arabidopsis thaliana microarray data, and we find a motif that can be interpreted as a refined auxin responsive element predominately positioned in the 250-bp region upstream of the transcription start site. Using an independent data set of auxin-responsive genes, we find in genome-wide predictions that the refined motif is more specific for auxin-responsive genes than the canonical auxin-responsive element. In general, Dispom can be used to find differentially abundant motifs in sequences of any origin. However, the positional distribution learned by Dispom is especially beneficial if all sequences are aligned to some anchor point like the transcription start site in case of promoter sequences. We demonstrate that the combination of searching for differentially abundant motifs and inferring a position distribution from the data is beneficial for de-novo motif discovery. Hence, we make the tool freely available as a component of the open

  15. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  16. A Large-Scale Assessment of Nucleic Acids Binding Site Prediction Programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Miao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Computational prediction of nucleic acid binding sites in proteins are necessary to disentangle functional mechanisms in most biological processes and to explore the binding mechanisms. Several strategies have been proposed, but the state-of-the-art approaches display a great diversity in i the definition of nucleic acid binding sites; ii the training and test datasets; iii the algorithmic methods for the prediction strategies; iv the performance measures and v the distribution and availability of the prediction programs. Here we report a large-scale assessment of 19 web servers and 3 stand-alone programs on 41 datasets including more than 5000 proteins derived from 3D structures of protein-nucleic acid complexes. Well-defined binary assessment criteria (specificity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy… are applied. We found that i the tools have been greatly improved over the years; ii some of the approaches suffer from theoretical defects and there is still room for sorting out the essential mechanisms of binding; iii RNA binding and DNA binding appear to follow similar driving forces and iv dataset bias may exist in some methods.

  17. Deconstructing the DGAT1 enzyme: membrane interactions at substrate binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L S Lopes

    Full Text Available Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1 is a key enzyme in the triacylglyceride synthesis pathway. Bovine DGAT1 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane-bound protein associated with the regulation of fat content in milk and meat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction of DGAT1 peptides corresponding to putative substrate binding sites with different types of model membranes. Whilst these peptides are predicted to be located in an extramembranous loop of the membrane-bound protein, their hydrophobic substrates are membrane-bound molecules. In this study, peptides corresponding to the binding sites of the two substrates involved in the reaction were examined in the presence of model membranes in order to probe potential interactions between them that might influence the subsequent binding of the substrates. Whilst the conformation of one of the peptides changed upon binding several types of micelles regardless of their surface charge, suggesting binding to hydrophobic domains, the other peptide bound strongly to negatively-charged model membranes. This binding was accompanied by a change in conformation, and produced leakage of the liposome-entrapped dye calcein. The different hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions observed suggest the peptides may be involved in the interactions of the enzyme with membrane surfaces, facilitating access of the catalytic histidine to the triacylglycerol substrates.

  18. Evaluation of water displacement energetics in protein binding sites with grid cell theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerogiokas, G; Southey, M W Y; Mazanetz, M P; Heifetz, A; Hefeitz, A; Bodkin, M; Law, R J; Michel, J

    2015-04-07

    Excess free energies, enthalpies and entropies of water in protein binding sites were computed via classical simulations and Grid Cell Theory (GCT) analyses for three pairs of congeneric ligands in complex with the proteins scytalone dehydratase, p38α MAP kinase and EGFR kinase respectively. Comparative analysis is of interest since the binding modes for each ligand pair differ in the displacement of one binding site water molecule, but significant variations in relative binding affinities are observed. Protocols that vary in their use of restraints on protein and ligand atoms were compared to determine the influence of protein-ligand flexibility on computed water structure and energetics, and to assess protocols for routine analyses of protein-ligand complexes. The GCT-derived binding affinities correctly reproduce experimental trends, but the magnitude of the predicted changes in binding affinities is exaggerated with respect to results from a previous Monte Carlo Free Energy Perturbation study. Breakdown of the GCT water free energies into enthalpic and entropic components indicates that enthalpy changes dominate the observed variations in energetics. In EGFR kinase GCT analyses revealed that replacement of a pyrimidine by a cyanopyridine perturbs water energetics up three hydration shells away from the ligand.

  19. Insulin Mimetic Peptide Disrupts the Primary Binding Site of the Insulin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Callum F; Margetts, Mai B; Menting, John G; Smith, Nicholas A; Smith, Brian J; Ward, Colin W; Lawrence, Michael C

    2016-07-22

    Sets of synthetic peptides that interact with the insulin receptor ectodomain have been discovered by phage display and reported in the literature. These peptides were grouped into three classes termed Site 1, Site 2, and Site 3 based on their mutual competition of binding to the receptor. Further refinement has yielded, in particular, a 36-residue Site 2-Site 1 fusion peptide, S519, that binds the insulin receptor with subnanomolar affinity and exhibits agonist activity in both lipogenesis and glucose uptake assays. Here, we report three-dimensional crystallographic detail of the interaction of the C-terminal, 16-residue Site 1 component (S519C16) of S519 with the first leucine-rich repeat domain (L1) of the insulin receptor. Our structure shows that S519C16 binds to the same site on the L1 surface as that occupied by a critical component of the primary binding site, namely the helical C-terminal segment of the insulin receptor α-chain (termed αCT). In particular, the two phenylalanine residues within the FYXWF motif of S519C16 are seen to engage the insulin receptor L1 domain surface in a fashion almost identical to the respective αCT residues Phe(701) and Phe(705) The structure provides a platform for the further development of peptidic and/or small molecule agents directed toward the insulin receptor and/or the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel; (Harvard-Med); (EMBL)

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity. The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.

  1. Molecular environment of the phencyclidine binding site in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, A.L.; Wang, H.H. (Department of Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Phencyclidine is a highly specific noncompetitive inhibitor of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In a novel approach to study this site, a spin-labeled analogue of phencyclidine, 4-phenyl-4-(1-piperidinyl)-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinoxyl (PPT) was synthesized. The binding of PPT inhibits 86Rb flux (IC50 = 6.6 microM), and (3H)phencyclidine binding to both resting and desensitized acetylcholine receptor (IC50 = 17 microM and 0.22 microM, respectively). From an indirect Hill plot of the inhibition of (3H)phencyclidine binding by PPT, a Hill coefficient of approximately one was obtained in the presence of carbamylcholine and 0.8 in alpha-bungarotoxin-treated preparations. Taken together, these results indicate that PPT mimics phencyclidine in its ability to bind to the noncompetitive inhibitor site and is functionally active in blocking ion flux across the acetylcholine receptor channel. Analysis of the electron spin resonance signal of the bound PPT suggests that the environment surrounding the probe within the ion channel is hydrophobic, with a hydrophobicity parameter of 1.09. A dielectric constant for the binding site was estimated to be in the range of 2-3 units.

  2. Quantitative distribution of angiotensin II binding sites in rat brain by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saavedra, J.M.; Israel, A.; Plunkett, L.M.; Kurihara, M.; Shigematsu, K.; Correa, F.M.

    1986-07-01

    Angiotensin II binding sites were localized and quantified in individual brain nuclei from single rats by incubation of tissue sections with 1 nM /sup 125/I-(Sar1)-angiotensin II, (/sup 3/H)-Ultrofilm autoradiography, computerized microdensitometry and comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. High angiotensin II binding was present in the circumventricular organs (organon vasculosum laminae terminalis, organon subfornicalis and area postrema), in selected hypothalamic nuclei (nuclei suprachiasmatis, periventricularis and paraventricularis) and in the nucleus tractus olfactorii lateralis, the nucleus preopticus medianus, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and the nucleus tractus solitarii. High affinity (KA from 0.3 to 1.5 X 10(9) M-1) angiotensin II binding sites were demonstrated in the organon subfornicalis, the nucleus tractus solitarii and the area postrema after incubation of consecutive sections from single rat brains with /sup 125/I-(Sar1)-angiotensin II in concentrations from 100 pM to 5 nM. These results demonstrate and characterize brain binding sites for angiotensin II of variable high affinity binding both inside and outside the blood-brain barrier.

  3. Characterization of two heparan sulphate-binding sites in the mycobacterial adhesin Hlp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Previato Jose O

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histone-like Hlp protein is emerging as a key component in mycobacterial pathogenesis, being involved in the initial events of host colonization by interacting with laminin and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. In the present study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR was used to map the binding site(s of Hlp to heparan sulfate and identify the nature of the amino acid residues directly involved in this interaction. Results The capacity of a panel of 30 mer synthetic peptides covering the full length of Hlp to bind to heparin/heparan sulfate was analyzed by solid phase assays, NMR, and affinity chromatography. An additional active region between the residues Gly46 and Ala60 was defined at the N-terminal domain of Hlp, expanding the previously defined heparin-binding site between Thr31 and Phe50. Additionally, the C-terminus, rich in Lys residues, was confirmed as another heparan sulfate binding region. The amino acids in Hlp identified as mediators in the interaction with heparan sulfate were Arg, Val, Ile, Lys, Phe, and Thr. Conclusion Our data indicate that Hlp interacts with heparan sulfate through two distinct regions of the protein. Both heparan sulfate-binding regions here defined are preserved in all mycobacterial Hlp homologues that have been sequenced, suggesting important but possibly divergent roles for this surface-exposed protein in both pathogenic and saprophic species.

  4. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such as binding propensity, neighboring residues in the vicinity of binding sites, conservation score and conformational switching. Results We observed that the binding propensities of amino acid residues are specific for protein-protein complexes. Further, typical dipeptides and tripeptides showed high preference for binding, which is unique to protein-protein complexes. Most of the binding site residues are highly conserved among homologous sequences. Our analysis showed that 7% of residues changed their conformations upon protein-protein complex formation and it is 9.2% and 6.6% in the binding and non-binding sites, respectively. Specifically, the residues Glu, Lys, Leu and Ser changed their conformation from coil to helix/strand and from helix to coil/strand. Leu, Ser, Thr and Val prefer to change their conformation from strand to coil/helix. Conclusions The results obtained in this study will be helpful for understanding and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes.

  5. Pharmacological characterization of intracellular, membrane, and plasma binding sites for corticosterone in house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuner, Creagh W; Orchinik, Miles

    2009-09-01

    The diversity and specificity of glucocorticoid effects are dependent on cell-specific receptor mechanisms. Three known corticosteroid receptors mediate tissue effects of glucocorticoids in vertebrates: two intracellular receptors that act primarily as ligand-activated transcription factors, and a membrane-associated receptor. The intracellular receptor sub-types have been well characterized in mammals, however relatively little is known about them across non-mammalian vertebrates. The membrane-associated receptors are poorly characterized in most vertebrate taxa. To explore the basis for glucocorticoid action in birds, we pharmacologically characterized the three putative corticosteroid receptors in the brain, as well as a plasma corticosterone binding globulin, in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). We found that house sparrow brain cytosol contained two distinguishable binding sites for corticosterone. A high affinity, mineralocorticoid-like receptor had subnanomolar affinity for corticosterone (K(d) approximately 0.2 nM). However, this 'MR-like' high-affinity receptor did not bind RU28318 or canrenoic acid, two compounds that bind mammalian MR with high affinity. A lower-affinity, glucocorticoid-like receptor in brain cytosol bound corticosterone with an average K(d)=5.61 nM. This GR-like receptor showed subnanomolar affinity for RU 486. MR- and GR-like receptors were found in equal numbers in whole brain assays (average B(max)=69 and 62 fmol/mg protein, respectively). House sparrow brain membranes contain a single binding site specific for glucocorticoids, with characteristics consistent with a steroid/receptor interaction. Corticosterone affinity for this putative membrane receptor was approximately 24 nM, with apparent B(max)=177 fmol/mg protein. House sparrow plasma contained a single binding site for [(3)H]corticosterone. Specific binding to plasma sites was inhibited by glucocorticoids, progesterone, and testosterone. Testosterone binding to this

  6. LigASite—a database of biologically relevant binding sites in proteins with known apo-structures

    OpenAIRE

    Dessailly, Benoit H.; Lensink, Marc F.; Orengo, Christine A.; Wodak, Shoshana J.

    2007-01-01

    Better characterization of binding sites in proteins and the ability to accurately predict their location and energetic properties are major challenges which, if addressed, would have many valuable practical applications. Unfortunately, reliable benchmark datasets of binding sites in proteins are still sorely lacking. Here, we present LigASite (‘LIGand Attachment SITE’), a gold-standard dataset of binding sites in 550 proteins of known structures. LigASite consists exclusively of biologically...

  7. Modeling complex equilibria in isothermal titration calorimetry experiments: thermodynamic parameters estimation for a three-binding-site model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Vu H; Buscaglia, Robert; Chaires, Jonathan B; Lewis, Edwin A

    2013-03-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful technique that can be used to estimate a complete set of thermodynamic parameters (e.g., K(eq) (or ΔG), ΔH, ΔS, and n) for a ligand-binding interaction described by a thermodynamic model. Thermodynamic models are constructed by combining equilibrium constant, mass balance, and charge balance equations for the system under study. Commercial ITC instruments are supplied with software that includes a number of simple interaction models, for example, one binding site, two binding sites, sequential sites, and n-independent binding sites. More complex models, for example, three or more binding sites, one site with multiple binding mechanisms, linked equilibria, or equilibria involving macromolecular conformational selection through ligand binding, need to be developed on a case-by-case basis by the ITC user. In this paper we provide an algorithm (and a link to our MATLAB program) for the nonlinear regression analysis of a multiple-binding-site model with up to four overlapping binding equilibria. Error analysis demonstrates that fitting ITC data for multiple parameters (e.g., up to nine parameters in the three-binding-site model) yields thermodynamic parameters with acceptable accuracy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacological properties of cardiovascular histamine H1 receptor binding sites: characterisation with 2-phenylhistamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman-Krzan, M; Krzan, M; Schunack, W

    1997-04-01

    We determined and compared the molecular properties of histamine H1 receptor binding sites in bovine thoracic aorta smooth muscle and guinea pig myocardial membranes from ventricles with saturation and inhibition binding assay, using 3H-mepyramine to label the receptor and specific and selective H1 receptor agonists of the 2-phenylhistamine group as displacers of specific 3H-mepyramine binding. 3H-mepyramine binds in a saturable manner to a homogenous population of binding sites with a K(D) of 5.6 nM and a Bmax of 57 fmol/mg of protein in bovine aorta vascular smooth muscle membranes, whereas in the guinea pig myocardium high and low affinity 3H-mepyramine binding sites exist having the following molecular characteristics: a K(D) of 1.6 nM and a Bmax of 99 fmol/mg of protein (high affinity site) and a K(D) 15.0 nM and a Bmax of 466 fmol/mg of protein (low affinity site). Halogenated 2-phenylhistamines: 2-(3-fluoro-) (2-FPH), 2-(3-trifluoromethyl-) (2-triFMPH), 2-(3-chloro-) (2-CPH), 2-(3-bromo-) (2-BPH) and 2-(3-iodophenyl)histamine (2-IPH), which showed high selectivity and potency for H1 receptors in the functional pharmacological studies, were potent inhibitors of specific radioligand binding in comparison with histamine and parent nonhalogenated 2-phenylhistamine (2-PH). Their rank order of potencies and affinities differ significantly for the vascular and cardiac H1 receptor binding sites: Specific 3H-mepyramine binding to H1 receptors in bovine vascular smooth muscle membranes was displaced in a biphasic manner by 2-(3-fluoro-), 2-(3-trifluoromethyl-), 2-(3-chloro-), 2-(3-bromo-), 2-(3-iodophenyl)histamine and histamine. In guinea pig ventricular myocardium the rank order was 2-(3-iodo-), 2-(3-bromo-), histamine, 2-(3-chloro-), and 2-(3-fluorophenyl)histamine showing better correlation with the lipophilicity of the derivatives than in vascular tissue (order of lipophilicity: 2-triFMPH >2-IPH >2-BPH >2-CPH >2-FPH >2-PH). Displacement of the radioligand binding

  9. Influence of benzodiazepine binding site ligands on fear-conditioned contextual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorey, T M; Lin, R C; McBrady, B; He, X; Cook, J M; Lameh, J; Loew, G H

    2001-08-24

    Eight compounds that bind to the benzodiazepine binding site on the gamma-amino butyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptor were assessed for their influence on contextual memory, an aspect of memory affected in various cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Using a Pavlovian fear-conditioning paradigm, each ligand was evaluated in C57Bl/6 mice in regards to its direct affect on contextual memory and whether the ligand could attenuate scopolamine-induced contextual memory impairment. Of the eight ligands tested, one impaired contextual memory (agonist), six attenuated scopolamine-induced contextual memory impairment (inverse agonists), and one antagonized the ability of an inverse agonist to attenuate scopolamine-induced contextual memory impairment. Hence, further demonstrating the bi-directional influence benzodiazepine binding site ligands are able to exert on memory modulation. This study serves as an initial starting point in the development of pharmacological tools to be used in deciphering how GABA(A) receptors influence contextual memory.

  10. The role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Karapetyan, Sargis

    2015-01-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ul...

  11. Angiotensin II binding sites in the conduction system of rat hearts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K.; Gutkind, J.S.; Saavedra, J.M. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1987-12-01

    Angiotensin II binding sites were localized and quantified in the conduction system of the rat heart by autoradiography in combination with computerized microdensitometry. Tissue sections, containing cardiac vagus ganglia, sinus node, and atrioventricular node, were incubated with {sup 125}I-Sar{sup 1}-angiotensin II to generate autoradiograms that were compared with other autoradiograms from {sup 125}I-labeled standards. Angiotensin II binding sites were highly localized in both the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes and in the cardiac vagus ganglia. In contrast, binding to the angiotensin converting enzyme, determined by incubation of adjacent tissue sections with the specific enzyme inhibitor {sup 125}I-351A, was very low in these areas but high in the cardiac endothelium. The results suggest that angiotensin II may have direct chronotropic effects through stimulation of specific receptors in the conduction system of the heart and in intrinsic parasympathetic ganglia.

  12. An in silico perspective on the toxicodynamic of tetrodotoxin and analogues - A tool for supporting the hazard identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellafiora, Luca; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall'Asta, Chiara

    2017-11-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin naturally found in terrestrial and marine animals targeting the voltage-gated sodium channels. Historically, TTX has raised food safety concerns mainly in the Asian countries due to the consumption of the typical pufferfish-derived delicacy fugu. However, the diffusion of TTX is getting wider today, reasonably threating in a close future a broader number of consumers than before. The understanding of TTX group toxicity is still incomplete as most of the analogues and metabolites found together with TTX are largely understudied. This prevents the establishment of a solid background for risk assessment and additional data have been claimed to timely foster the assessment of TTX toward a group-based approach. However, the high costs in sourcing TTX analogues make practically unfeasible the wide-scale assessment using experimental trials. The toxicological assessment in silico may succeed in extending data on compounds poorly affordable, hierarchizing compound to focus experiments and supporting the hazard identification. Therefore, the present work investigated the toxicodynamic of TTX, analogues and metabolites by using a molecular modeling approach. In the framework of the hazard identification, the model analyzed TTX analogues never tested before assessing qualitatively their potential toxicity in comparison to TTX. While the analogues from TTX bearing species appeared to be less toxic than TTX, some human metabolites showed a better interaction with the toxin binding site. Such results suggest that human metabolism may partially fail in preventing the interaction with the biological target. Therefore, the identification and assessment of human metabolites should be done to support the decision making process from a more informed perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Resistance to Linezolid Caused by Modifications at Its Binding Site on the Ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S.; Vester, Birte

    2012-01-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic in clinical use for the treatment of serious infections of resistant Gram-positive bacteria. It inhibits protein synthesis by binding to the peptidyl transferase center on the ribosome. Almost all known resistance mechanisms involve small alterations...... to the linezolid binding site, so this review will therefore focus on the various changes that can adversely affect drug binding and confer resistance. High-resolution structures of linezolid bound to the 50S ribosomal subunit show that it binds in a deep cleft that is surrounded by 23S rRNA nucleotides. Mutation...... of 23S rRNA has for some time been established as a linezolid resistance mechanism. Although ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 are located further away from the bound drug, mutations in specific regions of these proteins are increasingly being associated with linezolid resistance. However, very little...

  14. Azaflavones compared to flavones as ligands to the benzodiazepine binding site of brain GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard; Liljefors, Tommy

    2008-01-01

    A series of azaflavone derivatives and analogues were prepared and evaluated for their affinity to the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptor, and compared to their flavone counterparts. Three of the compounds, the azaflavones 9 and 12 as well as the new flavone 13, were also assayed...

  15. PDNAsite: Identification of DNA-binding Site from Protein Sequence by Incorporating Spatial and Sequence Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiyun; Xu, Ruifeng; He, Yulan; Lu, Qin; Wang, Hongpeng; Kong, Bing

    2016-06-10

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in many fundamental biological processes essential for cellular function. Most of the existing computational approaches employed only the sequence context of the target residue for its prediction. In the present study, for each target residue, we applied both the spatial context and the sequence context to construct the feature space. Subsequently, Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) was applied to remove the redundancies in the feature space. Finally, a predictor (PDNAsite) was developed through the integration of the support vector machines (SVM) classifier and ensemble learning. Results on the PDNA-62 and the PDNA-224 datasets demonstrate that features extracted from spatial context provide more information than those from sequence context and the combination of them gives more performance gain. An analysis of the number of binding sites in the spatial context of the target site indicates that the interactions between binding sites next to each other are important for protein-DNA recognition and their binding ability. The comparison between our proposed PDNAsite method and the existing methods indicate that PDNAsite outperforms most of the existing methods and is a useful tool for DNA-binding site identification. A web-server of our predictor (http://hlt.hitsz.edu.cn:8080/PDNAsite/) is made available for free public accessible to the biological research community.

  16. Alcohol-Binding Sites in Distinct Brain Proteins: The Quest for Atomic Level Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Slesinger, Paul A.; Davies, Daryl L.; Das, Joydip; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2011-01-01

    Defining the sites of action of ethanol on brain proteins is a major prerequisite to understanding the molecular pharmacology of this drug. The main barrier to reaching an atomic-level understanding of alcohol action is the low potency of alcohols, ethanol in particular, which is a reflection of transient, low-affinity interactions with their targets. These mechanisms are difficult or impossible to study with traditional techniques such as radioligand binding or spectroscopy. However, there has been considerable recent progress in combining X-ray crystallography, structural modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis to define the sites and mechanisms of action of ethanol and related alcohols on key brain proteins. We review such insights for several diverse classes of proteins including inwardly rectifying potassium, transient receptor potential, and neurotransmit-ter-gated ion channels, as well as protein kinase C epsilon. Some common themes are beginning to emerge from these proteins, including hydrogen bonding of the hydroxyl group and van der Waals interactions of the methylene groups of ethanol with specific amino acid residues. The resulting binding energy is proposed to facilitate or stabilize low-energy state transitions in the bound proteins, allowing ethanol to act as a “molecular lubricant” for protein function. We discuss evidence for characteristic, discrete alcohol-binding sites on protein targets, as well as evidence that binding to some proteins is better characterized by an interaction region that can accommodate multiple molecules of ethanol. PMID:21676006

  17. Increased number of ouabain binding sites in lymphocytes from borderline hypertensives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Pedersen, K E; Klitgaard, N A

    1989-01-01

    /or heredity. Four groups were evaluated; 28 normotensive (NTO) and 20 borderline hypertensive (BHO) offspring of hypertensives. Twelve borderline hypertensives (BH) and 28 normotensive subjects (NT) with normotensive parents. The number of ouabain binding sites were significantly increased in the borderline...... pressure disease or increased body mass....

  18. Selectivity of the surface binding site (SBS) on barley starch synthase I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Palcic, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Starch synthase I (SSI) from various sources has been shown to preferentially elongate branch chains of degree of polymerisation (DP) from 6–7 to produce chains of DP 8–12. In the recently determined crystal structure of barley starch synthase I (HvSSI) a so-called surface binding site (SBS) was ...

  19. Characterisation of the zebrafish serotonin transporter functionally links TM10 to the ligand binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kasper; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Wiborg, Ove

    2008-01-01

    and [(3)H]-escitalopram binding in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney cells; HEK-293-MSR. Residues responsible for altered affinities inhibitors were pinpointed by generating cross-species chimeras and subsequent point mutations by site directed mutagenesis. drSERT has a higher affinity...

  20. Longer peptide can be accommodated in the MHC class I binding site by a protrusion mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Holm, A

    2000-01-01

    and C termini of a bound peptide interact through hydrogen bonding networks to conserved residues at either end of the class I binding site. Accordingly, it is thought that the termini are fixed and that only minor variations in peptide size are possible through a central bulging mechanism. We find...

  1. Localization of the substrate binding site in the homodimeric mannitol transporter, EIImtl, of Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opacic, Milena; Vos, Erwin P. P.; Hesp, Ben H.; Broos, Jaap

    2010-01-01

    The mannitol transporter from Escherichia coli, EIImtl, belongs to a class of membrane proteins coupling the transport of substrates with their chemical modification. EIImtl is functional as a homodimer, and it harbors one high affinity mannitol-binding site in the membrane-embedded C domain

  2. Studies on ATP-diphosphohydrolase nucleotide-binding sites by intrinsic fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Kettlun

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Potato apyrase, a soluble ATP-diphosphohydrolase, was purified to homogeneity from several clonal varieties of Solanum tuberosum. Depending on the source of the enzyme, differences in kinetic and physicochemical properties have been described, which cannot be explained by the amino acid residues present in the active site. In order to understand the different kinetic behavior of the Pimpernel (ATPase/ADPase = 10 and Desirée (ATPase/ADPase = 1 isoenzymes, the nucleotide-binding site of these apyrases was explored using the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan. The intrinsic fluorescence of the two apyrases was slightly different. The maximum emission wavelengths of the Desirée and Pimpernel enzymes were 336 and 340 nm, respectively, suggesting small differences in the microenvironment of Trp residues. The Pimpernel enzyme emitted more fluorescence than the Desirée apyrase at the same concentration although both enzymes have the same number of Trp residues. The binding of the nonhydrolyzable substrate analogs decreased the fluorescence emission of both apyrases, indicating the presence of conformational changes in the neighborhood of Trp residues. Experiments with quenchers of different polarities, such as acrylamide, Cs+ and I- indicated the existence of differences in the nucleotide-binding site, as further shown by quenching experiments in the presence of nonhydrolyzable substrate analogs. Differences in the nucleotide-binding site may explain, at least in part, the kinetic differences of the Pimpernel and Desirée isoapyrases.

  3. Nucleotide binding to human UMP-CMP kinase using fluorescent derivatives -- a screening based on affinity for the UMP-CMP binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalis, Dimitri; Kumamoto, Hiroki; Amaya Velasco, Maria-Fernanda; Dugué, Laurence; Haouz, Ahmed; Alexandre, Julie Anne C; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Alzari, Pedro Maria; Pochet, Sylvie; Agrofoglio, Luigi André; Deville-Bonne, Dominique

    2007-07-01

    Methylanthraniloyl derivatives of ATP and CDP were used in vitro as fluorescent probes for the donor-binding and acceptor-binding sites of human UMP-CMP kinase, a nucleoside salvage pathway kinase. Like all NMP kinases, UMP-CMP kinase binds the phosphodonor, usually ATP, and the NMP at different binding sites. The reaction results from an in-line phosphotransfer from the donor to the acceptor. The probe for the donor site was displaced by the bisubstrate analogs of the Ap5X series (where X = U, dT, A, G), indicating the broad specificity of the acceptor site. Both CMP and dCMP were competitors for the acceptor site probe. To find antimetabolites for antivirus and anticancer therapies, we have developed a method of screening acyclic phosphonate analogs that is based on the affinity of the acceptor-binding site of the human UMP-CMP kinase. Several uracil vinylphosphonate derivatives had affinities for human UMP-CMP kinase similar to those of dUMP and dCMP and better than that of cidofovir, an acyclic nucleoside phosphonate with a broad spectrum of antiviral activities. The uracil derivatives were inhibitors rather than substrates of human UMP-CMP kinase. Also, the 5-halogen-substituted analogs inhibited the human TMP kinase less efficiently. The broad specificity of the enzyme acceptor-binding site is in agreement with a large substrate-binding pocket, as shown by the 2.1 A crystal structure.

  4. Conformational Sampling and Binding Site Assessment of Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 Ectodomain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Yie Yang

    Full Text Available Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 (ST2, a member of the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R family, activates type 2 immune responses to pathogens and tissue damage via binding to IL-33. Dysregulated responses contribute to asthma, graft-versus-host and autoinflammatory diseases and disorders. To study ST2 structure for inhibitor development, we performed the principal component (PC analysis on the crystal structures of IL1-1R1, IL1-1R2, ST2 and the refined ST2 ectodomain (ST2ECD models, constructed from previously reported small-angle X-ray scattering data. The analysis facilitates mapping of the ST2ECD conformations to PC subspace for characterizing structural changes. Extensive coverage of ST2ECD conformations was then obtained using the accelerated molecular dynamics simulations started with the IL-33 bound ST2ECD structure as instructed by their projected locations on the PC subspace. Cluster analysis of all conformations further determined representative conformations of ST2ECD ensemble in solution. Alignment of the representative conformations with the ST2/IL-33 structure showed that the D3 domain of ST2ECD (containing D1-D3 domains in most conformations exhibits no clashes with IL-33 in the crystal structure. Our experimental binding data informed that the D1-D2 domain of ST2ECD contributes predominantly to the interaction between ST2ECD and IL-33 underscoring the importance of the D1-D2 domain in binding. Computational binding site assessment revealed one third of the total detected binding sites in the representative conformations may be suitable for binding to potent small molecules. Locations of these sites include the D1-D2 domain ST2ECD and modulation sites conformed to ST2ECD conformations. Our study provides structural models and analyses of ST2ECD that could be useful for inhibitor discovery.

  5. Analysis of the Binding Sites of Porcine Sialoadhesin Receptor with PRRSV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV can infect pigs and cause enormous economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Porcine sialoadhesin (pSN and CD163 have been identified as key viral receptors on porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM, a main target cell infected by PRRSV. In this study, the protein structures of amino acids 1–119 from the pSN and cSN (cattle sialoadhesin N-termini (excluding the 19-amino acid signal peptide were modeled via homology modeling based on mSN (mouse sialoadhesin template structures using bioinformatics tools. Subsequently, pSN and cSN homology structures were superposed onto the mSN protein structure to predict the binding sites of pSN. As a validation experiment, the SN N-terminus (including the wild-type and site-directed-mutant-types of pSN and cSN was cloned and expressed as a SN-GFP chimera protein. The binding activity between SN and PRRSV was confirmed by WB (Western blotting, FAR-WB (far Western blotting, ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence assay. We found that the S107 amino acid residue in the pSN N-terminal played a crucial role in forming a special cavity, as well as a hydrogen bond for enhancing PRRSV binding during PRRSV infection. S107 may be glycosylated during PRRSV infection and may also be involved in forming the cavity for binding PRRSV along with other sites, including W2, Y44, S45, R97, R105, W106 and V109. Additionally, S107 might also be important for pSN binding with PRRSV. However, the function of these binding sites must be confirmed by further studies.

  6. Binding of polysaccharides to human galectin-3 at a noncanonical site in its carbohydrate recognition domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michelle C; Ippel, Hans; Suylen, Dennis; Klyosov, Anatole A; Traber, Peter G; Hackeng, Tilman; Mayo, Kevin H

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multifunctional lectin, unique to galectins by the presence of a long N-terminal tail (NT) off of its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Many previous studies have investigated binding of small carbohydrates to its CRD. Here, we used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((15)N-(1)H heteronuclear single quantum coherence data) to assess binding of (15)N-Gal-3 (and truncated (15)N-Gal-3 CRD) to several, relatively large polysaccharides, including eight varieties of galactomannans (GMs), as well as a β(1 → 4)-polymannan and an α-branched mannan. Overall, we found that these polysaccharides with a larger carbohydrate footprint interact primarily with a noncanonical carbohydrate-binding site on the F-face of the Gal-3 CRD β-sandwich, and to a less extent, if at all, with the canonical carbohydrate-binding site on the S-face. While there is no evidence for interaction with the NT itself, it does appear that the NT somehow mediates stronger interactions between the Gal-3 CRD and the GMs. Significant Gal-3 resonance broadening observed during polysaccharide titrations indicates that interactions occur in the intermediate exchange regime, and analysis of these data allows estimation of affinities and stoichiometries that range from 4 × 10(4) to 12 × 10(4) M(-1) per site and multiple sites per polysaccharide, respectively. We also found that lactose can still bind to the CRD S-face of GM-bound Gal-3, with the binding of one ligand attenuating affinity of the other. These data are compared with previous results on Gal-1, revealing differences and similarities. They also provide research direction to the development of these polysaccharides as galectin-targeting therapeutics in the clinic. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Dinucleotide weight matrices for predicting transcription factor binding sites: generalizing the position weight matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Siddharthan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBS in silico is key in understanding gene regulation. TFBS are string patterns that exhibit some variability, commonly modelled as "position weight matrices" (PWMs. Though convenient, the PWM has significant limitations, in particular the assumed independence of positions within the binding motif; and predictions based on PWMs are usually not very specific to known functional sites. Analysis here on binding sites in yeast suggests that correlation of dinucleotides is not limited to near-neighbours, but can extend over considerable gaps. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: I describe a straightforward generalization of the PWM model, that considers frequencies of dinucleotides instead of individual nucleotides. Unlike previous efforts, this method considers all dinucleotides within an extended binding region, and does not make an attempt to determine a priori the significance of particular dinucleotide correlations. I describe how to use a "dinucleotide weight matrix" (DWM to predict binding sites, dealing in particular with the complication that its entries are not independent probabilities. Benchmarks show, for many factors, a dramatic improvement over PWMs in precision of predicting known targets. In most cases, significant further improvement arises by extending the commonly defined "core motifs" by about 10 bp on either side. Though this flanking sequence shows no strong motif at the nucleotide level, the predictive power of the dinucleotide model suggests that the "signature" in DNA sequence of protein-binding affinity extends beyond the core protein-DNA contact region. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: While computationally more demanding and slower than PWM-based approaches, this dinucleotide method is straightforward, both conceptually and in implementation, and can serve as a basis for future improvements.

  8. Differential alterations of cortical glutamatergic binding sites in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalmers, D.T.; Dewar, D.; Graham, D.I.; Brooks, D.N.; McCulloch, J. (Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (England))

    1990-02-01

    Involvement of cortical glutamatergic mechanisms in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) has been investigated with quantitative ligand-binding autoradiography. The distribution and density of Na(+)-dependent glutamate uptake sites and glutamate receptor subtypes--kainate, quisqualate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate--were measured in adjacent sections of frontal cortex obtained postmortem from six patients with SDAT and six age-matched controls. The number of senile plaques was determined in the same brain region. Binding of D-(3H)aspartate to Na(+)-dependent uptake sites was reduced by approximately 40% throughout SDAT frontal cortex relative to controls, indicating a general loss of glutamatergic presynaptic terminals. (3H)Kainate receptor binding was significantly increased by approximately 70% in deep layers of SDAT frontal cortex compared with controls, whereas this binding was unaltered in superficial laminae. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.914) between kainate binding and senile plaque number in deep cortical layers. Quisqualate receptors, as assessed by 2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-(3H)methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid binding, were unaltered in SDAT frontal cortex compared with controls. There was a small reduction (25%) in N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive (3H)glutamate binding only in superficial cortical layers of SDAT brains relative to control subjects. (3H)Glutamate binding in SDAT subjects was unrelated to senile plaque number in superficial cortical layers (r = 0.104). These results indicate that in the presence of cortical glutamatergic terminal loss in SDAT plastic alterations occur in some glutamate receptor subtypes but not in others.

  9. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S. (Oregon HSU)

    2012-05-24

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  10. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S., E-mail: chapmami@ohsu.edu

    2012-02-05

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  11. BSSF: a fingerprint based ultrafast binding site similarity search and function analysis server

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hualiang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing and post-genomics projects such as structural genomics are extending the frontier of the study of sequence-structure-function relationship of genes and their products. Although many sequence/structure-based methods have been devised with the aim of deciphering this delicate relationship, there still remain large gaps in this fundamental problem, which continuously drives researchers to develop novel methods to extract relevant information from sequences and structures and to infer the functions of newly identified genes by genomics technology. Results Here we present an ultrafast method, named BSSF(Binding Site Similarity & Function, which enables researchers to conduct similarity searches in a comprehensive three-dimensional binding site database extracted from PDB structures. This method utilizes a fingerprint representation of the binding site and a validated statistical Z-score function scheme to judge the similarity between the query and database items, even if their similarities are only constrained in a sub-pocket. This fingerprint based similarity measurement was also validated on a known binding site dataset by comparing with geometric hashing, which is a standard 3D similarity method. The comparison clearly demonstrated the utility of this ultrafast method. After conducting the database searching, the hit list is further analyzed to provide basic statistical information about the occurrences of Gene Ontology terms and Enzyme Commission numbers, which may benefit researchers by helping them to design further experiments to study the query proteins. Conclusions This ultrafast web-based system will not only help researchers interested in drug design and structural genomics to identify similar binding sites, but also assist them by providing further analysis of hit list from database searching.

  12. Analysis and classification of DNA-binding sites in single-stranded and double-stranded DNA-binding proteins using protein information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Juan; Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Lida; Zhou, Xionghui

    2014-08-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) and double-stranded DNA-binding proteins (DSBs) play different roles in biological processes when they bind to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). However, the underlying binding mechanisms of SSBs and DSBs have not yet been fully understood. Here, the authors firstly constructed two groups of ssDNA and dsDNA specific binding sites from two non-redundant sets of SSBs and DSBs. They further analysed the relationship between the two classes of binding sites and a newly proposed set of features (residue charge distribution, secondary structure and spatial shape). To assess and utilise the predictive power of these features, they trained a classification model using support vector machine to make predictions about the ssDNA and the dsDNA binding sites. The author's analysis and prediction results indicated that the two classes of binding sites can be distinguishable by the three types of features, and the final classifier using all the features achieved satisfactory performance. In conclusion, the proposed features will deepen their understanding of the specificity of proteins which bind to ssDNA or dsDNA.

  13. Solubilization and characterization of haloperidol-sensitive (+)-( sup 3 H)SKF-10,047 binding sites (sigma sites) from rat liver membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, D.J.; Su, T.P. (National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The zwitterionic detergent 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylamino)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) produced optimal solubilization of (+)-({sup 3}H)SKF-10,047 binding sites from rat liver membranes at a concentration of 0.2%, well below the critical micellular concentration of the detergent. The pharmacological selectivity of the liver (+)-({sup 3}H)SKF-10,047 binding sites corresponds to that of sigma sites from rat and guinea pig brain. When the affinities of 18 different drugs at (+)-({sup 3}H)SKF-10,047 binding sites in membranes and solubilized preparations were compared, a correlation coefficient of 0.99 and a slope of 1.03 were obtained, indicating that the pharmacological selectivity of rat liver sigma sites is retained after solubilization. In addition, the binding of 20 nM ({sup 3}H)progesterone to solubilized rat liver preparations was found to exhibit a pharmacological selectivity appropriate for sigma sites. A stimulatory effect of phenytoin on (+)-({sup 3}H)SKF-10,047 binding to sigma sites persisted after solubilization. When the solubilized preparation was subjected to molecular sizing chromatography, a single peak exhibiting specific (+)-({sup 3}H)SKF-10,047 binding was obtained. The binding activity of this peak was stimulated symmetrically when assays were performed in the presence of 300 microM phenytoin. The molecular weight of the CHAPS-solubilized sigma site complex was estimated to be 450,000 daltons. After solubilization with CHAPS, rat liver sigma sites were enriched to 12 pmol/mg of protein. The present results demonstrate a successful solubilization of sigma sites from rat liver membranes and provide direct evidence that the gonadal steroid progesterone binds to sigma sites. The results also suggest that the anticonvulsant phenytoin binds to an associated allosteric site on the sigma site complex.

  14. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  15. The conserved WW-domain binding sites in Dystroglycan C-terminus are essential but partially redundant for Dystroglycan function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng W-M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dystroglycan (Dg is a transmembrane protein that is a part of the Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC which connects the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. The C-terminal end of Dg contains a number of putative SH3, SH2 and WW domain binding sites. The most C-terminal PPXY motif has been established as a binding site for Dystrophin (Dys WW-domain. However, our previous studies indicate that both Dystroglycan PPXY motives, WWbsI and WWbsII can bind Dystrophin protein in vitro. Results We now find that both WW binding sites are important for maintaining full Dg function in the establishment of oocyte polarity in Drosophila. If either WW binding site is mutated, the Dg protein can still be active. However, simultaneous mutations in both WW binding sites abolish the Dg activities in both overexpression and loss-of-function oocyte polarity assays in vivo. Additionally, sequence comparisons of WW binding sites in 12 species of Drosophila, as well as in humans, reveal a high level of conservation. This preservation throughout evolution supports the idea that both WW binding sites are functionally required. Conclusion Based on the obtained results we propose that the presence of the two WW binding sites in Dystroglycan secures the essential interaction between Dg and Dys and might further provide additional regulation for the cytoskeletal interactions of this complex.

  16. Identification of an allosteric binding site for RORγt inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheepstra, Marcel; Leysen, Seppe; van Almen, Geert C.; Miller, J. Richard; Piesvaux, Jennifer; Kutilek, Victoria; van Eenennaam, Hans; Zhang, Hongjun; Barr, Kenneth; Nagpal, Sunil; Soisson, Stephen M.; Kornienko, Maria; Wiley, Kristen; Elsen, Nathaniel; Sharma, Sujata; Correll, Craig C.; Trotter, B. Wesley; van der Stelt, Mario; Oubrie, Arthur; Ottmann, Christian; Parthasarathy, Gopal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-12-07

    RORγt is critical for the differentiation and proliferation of Th17 cells associated with several chronic autoimmune diseases. We report the discovery of a novel allosteric binding site on the nuclear receptor RORγt. Co-crystallization of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RORγt with a series of small-molecule antagonists demonstrates occupancy of a previously unreported allosteric binding pocket. Binding at this non-canonical site induces an unprecedented conformational reorientation of helix 12 in the RORγt LBD, which blocks cofactor binding. The functional consequence of this allosteric ligand-mediated conformation is inhibition of function as evidenced by both biochemical and cellular studies. RORγt function is thus antagonized in a manner molecularly distinct from that of previously described orthosteric RORγt ligands. This brings forward an approach to target RORγt for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of an unprecedented modality of pharmacological antagonism establishes a mechanism for modulation of nuclear receptors.

  17. In vivo receptor binding of opioid drugs at the mu site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, J.S.; Holford, N.H.; Sadee, W.

    1985-06-01

    The in vivo receptor binding of a series of opioid drugs was investigated in intact rats after s.c. administration of (/sup 3/H)etorphine tracer, which selectively binds to mu sites in vivo. Receptor binding was determined by a membrane filtration assay immediately after sacrifice of the animals and brain homogenization. Coadministration of unlabeled opioid drugs together with tracer led to a dose-dependent decrease of in vivo tracer binding. Estimates of the doses required to occupy 50% of the mu sites in vivo established the following potency rank order: diprenorphine, naloxone, buprenorphine, etorphine, levallorphan, cyclazocine, sufentanil, nalorphine, ethylketocyclazocine, ketocyclazocine, pentazocine, morphine. In vivo-in vitro differences among the relative receptor binding potencies were only partially accounted for by differences in their access to the brain and the regulatory effects of Na+ and GTP, which are expected to reduce agonist affinities in vivo. The relationship among mu receptor occupancy in vivo and pharmacological effects of the opioid drugs is described.

  18. Validation of binding of SE-75 labeled sucralfate to sites of gastrointestinal ulceration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, A.H.; Knight, L.C.; Kollman, M.; Krevsky, B.; Pleet, D.; D' Ercole, F.; Siegel, J.A.; Fisher, R.S.; Malmud, L.S.

    1985-05-01

    This study was performed to determine if and for how long sucralfate (SU) binds selectively to sites of gastro-intestinal (GI) ulceration. Se-Su was prepared by sulfating sucrose with tracer Se-75 and precipitating it as the basic Al salt. All patients (pts) had endoscopy to confirm the presence of either: esophagitis (n=5), gastritis (GA) (n=5), gastric ulcers (GU) (n=5), duodenal ulcers (DU) (n=5), or no ulceration (NU) (n=5). Following an overnight fast the pts swallowed 1 gm with 100 ..mu..Ci of Se-SU and were imaged continuously over 24 hours or until no activity remained in the upper GI tract. Pts with GU visually demonstrated focal SU binding at the ulcers for an average of 3.9 +- 1.1 hrs. with a mean GET of 68 +- 25 min. Mean GET for pts with DU was prolonged, 171 +- 63 min, however focal binding at duodenal ulcers was not seen. All pts with GA had diffuse retention of SU in the stomach with a mean GET of 118 +- 34 min. Focal binding of SU at all sites of esophagitis was seen with a T-1/2 of 65 +- 32 min at the ulcerations. In conclusion these data support the theory that the mechanism of ulcer healing with SU is related to its ability to adhere to the ulcer site forming a protective barrier. In addition Se-SU is a potential ulcer imaging agent which can be used to noninvasively assess healing.

  19. Vesicular glutamate transporters use flexible anion and cation binding sites for efficient accumulation of neurotransmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preobraschenski, Julia; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Jahn, Reinhard

    2014-12-17

    Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) accumulate the neurotransmitter glutamate in synaptic vesicles. Transport depends on a V-ATPase-dependent electrochemical proton gradient (ΔμH+) and requires chloride ions, but how chloride acts and how ionic and charge balance is maintained during transport is controversial. Using a reconstitution approach, we used an exogenous proton pump to drive VGLUT-mediated transport either in liposomes containing purified VGLUT1 or in synaptic vesicles fused with proton-pump-containing liposomes. Our data show that chloride stimulation can be induced at both sides of the membrane. Moreover, chloride competes with glutamate at high concentrations. In addition, VGLUT1 possesses a cation binding site capable of binding H+ or K+ ions, allowing for proton antiport or K+ / H+ exchange. We conclude that VGLUTs contain two anion binding sites and one cation binding site, allowing the transporter to adjust to the changing ionic conditions during vesicle filling without being dependent on other transporters or channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Binding and Signaling Studies Disclose a Potential Allosteric Site for Cannabidiol in Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Martínez-Pinilla

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of action of cannabidiol (CBD, the main non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa L., is not completely understood. First assumed that the compound was acting via cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2Rs it is now suggested that it interacts with non-cannabinoid G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; however, CBD does not bind with high affinity to the orthosteric site of any GPCR. To search for alternative explanations, we tested CBD as a potential allosteric ligand of CB2R. Radioligand and non-radioactive homogeneous binding, intracellular cAMP determination and ERK1/2 phosphorylation assays were undertaken in heterologous systems expressing the human version of CB2R. Using membrane preparations from CB2R-expressing HEK-293T (human embryonic kidney 293T cells, we confirmed that CBD does not bind with high affinity to the orthosteric site of the human CB2R where the synthetic cannabinoid, [3H]-WIN 55,212-2, binds. CBD was, however, able to produce minor but consistent reduction in the homogeneous binding assays in living cells using the fluorophore-conjugated CB2R-selective compound, CM-157. The effect on binding to CB2R-expressing living cells was different to that exerted by the orthosteric antagonist, SR144528, which decreased the maximum binding without changing the KD. CBD at nanomolar concentrations was also able to significantly reduce the effect of the selective CB2R agonist, JWH133, on forskolin-induced intracellular cAMP levels and on activation of the MAP kinase pathway. These results may help to understand CBD mode of action and may serve to revisit its therapeutic possibilities.

  1. [Functional characteristics of the individual genomic condensin binding sites of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using minichromosome mitotic segregation stability model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butylin, P A; Strunnikov, A V

    2008-01-01

    Proper chromatin compaction in mitosis (condensation) is required for equal chromosome distribution and precise genetic information inheritance. Protein complex named condensin is responsible for the mitotic condensation, it also individualizes chromosomes, and ensures chromatin separation between sister chromatids in mitosis as well as proper mitotic spindle tension. Mitotic condensin function depends on recognition of the specific binding sites on the chromosome. Mechanism of condensin binding on the individual sites of the mitotic chromosomes, as well as molecular anatomy of these sites remains to be unclear. Even less known is how condensin binding on the individual sites helps separating chromosomes in anaphase. In current paper using minichromosome test, we analyze seven individual condensin binding sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae found in previous all-genome CHIP on CHIP screening in our lab. This approach allowed us to find out what was the individual contribution of condensin binding sites in securing mitotic stability of the minichromosomes.

  2. Novel Vinculin Binding Site of the IpaA Invasin of Shigella*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Park, HaJeung; Valencia-Gallardo, Cesar; Sharff, Andrew; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Izard, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Internalization of Shigella into host epithelial cells, where the bacteria replicates and spreads to neighboring cells, requires a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) effector coined IpaA. IpaA binds directly to and activates the cytoskeletal protein vinculin after injection in the host cell cytosol, and this was previously thought to be directed by two amphipathic α-helical vinculin-binding sites (VBS) found in the C-terminal tail domain of IpaA. Here, we report a third VBS, IpaA-VBS3, that is lo...

  3. Determination of the binding sites for oxaliplatin on insulin using mass spectrometry-based approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charlotte; Sprenger, Richard R.; Stürup, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Using insulin as a model protein for binding of oxaliplatin to proteins, various mass spectrometric approaches and techniques were compared. Several different platinum adducts were observed, e.g. addition of one or two diaminocyclohexane platinum(II) (Pt(dach)) molecules. By top-down analysis...... were reduced. This led to the additional identification of cysteine6 on the A chain as a binding site along with histidine5 on the B chain. Digestion of insulin-oxaliplatin with endoproteinase Glu-C (GluC) followed by reduction led to the formation of five peptides with Pt(dach) attached...

  4. Structural basis of Ets1 cooperative binding to widely separated sites on promoter DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigar D Babayeva

    Full Text Available Ets1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors. Ets1 is expressed in autoinhibited form and its DNA binding depends on partner proteins bound to adjacent sequences or the relative positioning of a second Ets-binding site (EBS. The autoinhibition of Ets1 is mediated by structural coupling of regions flanking the DNA-binding domain. The NMR structure of Ets1 revealed that the inhibitory regions comprised of helices HI1 and HI2 and H4 are packed together on the Ets domain to form an inhibitory module. The crystal structure of Ets1 unexpectedly revealed a homodimer in which homodimerisation occurs via swapping of HI1 helices. Modeling of DNA binding indicates that the Ets1 dimer can bind to two antiparallel pieces of DNA. To verify this, we crystallized and solved the structure of the complex comprised of Ets1 dimer and two pieces of DNA. DNA binding by Ets1 dimer resulted in formation of additional intermolecular protein•DNA interactions, implying that the complex formation is cooperative.

  5. Structural basis of Ets1 cooperative binding to widely separated sites on promoter DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayeva, Nigar D; Baranovskaya, Oxana I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2012-01-01

    Ets1 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors. Ets1 is expressed in autoinhibited form and its DNA binding depends on partner proteins bound to adjacent sequences or the relative positioning of a second Ets-binding site (EBS). The autoinhibition of Ets1 is mediated by structural coupling of regions flanking the DNA-binding domain. The NMR structure of Ets1 revealed that the inhibitory regions comprised of helices HI1 and HI2 and H4 are packed together on the Ets domain to form an inhibitory module. The crystal structure of Ets1 unexpectedly revealed a homodimer in which homodimerisation occurs via swapping of HI1 helices. Modeling of DNA binding indicates that the Ets1 dimer can bind to two antiparallel pieces of DNA. To verify this, we crystallized and solved the structure of the complex comprised of Ets1 dimer and two pieces of DNA. DNA binding by Ets1 dimer resulted in formation of additional intermolecular protein•DNA interactions, implying that the complex formation is cooperative.

  6. Mutational Mapping and Modeling of the Binding Site for (S)-Citalopram in the Human Serotonin Transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Olsen, Lars; Hansen, Kasper B.

    2010-01-01

    , and (S)-citalopram, which are competitive inhibitors of the transport function. Knowledge of the molecular details of the antidepressant binding sites in SERT has been limited due to lack of structural data on SERT. Here, we present a characterization of the (S)-citalopram binding pocket in human SERT (h...... is functionally relevant from studying the effects of 64 point mutations around the putative substrate binding site. The mutational mapping also identify novel hSERT residues that are crucial for (S)-citalopram binding. The model defines the molecular determinants for (S)-citalopram binding to h...

  7. Binding Site Analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans NR4A Nuclear Receptor NHR-6 During Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Praslicka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the NR4A subfamily of nuclear receptors make up a highly conserved, functionally diverse group of transcription factors implicated in a multitude of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, metabolism and DNA repair. The gene nhr-6, which encodes the sole C.elegans NR4A nuclear receptor homolog, has a critical role in organogenesis and regulates the development of the spermatheca organ system. Our previous work revealed that nhr-6 is required for spermatheca cell divisions in late L3 and early L4 and spermatheca cell differentiation during the mid L4 stage. Here, we utilized chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq to identify NHR-6 binding sites during both the late L3/early L4 and mid L4 developmental stages. Our results revealed 30,745 enriched binding sites for NHR-6, ∼70% of which were within 3 kb upstream of a gene transcription start site. Binding sites for a cohort of candidate target genes with probable functions in spermatheca organogenesis were validated through qPCR. Reproductive and spermatheca phenotypes were also evaluated for these genes following a loss-of-function RNAi screen which revealed several genes with critical functions during spermatheca organogenesis. Our results uncovered a complex nuclear receptor regulatory network whereby NHR-6 regulates multiple cellular processes during spermatheca organogenesis.

  8. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla (NCSU); (MCW); (BU)

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  9. Structural insights into substrate and inhibitor binding sites in human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Pham, Khoa N.; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Karkashon, Shay; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Yeh, Syun-Ru (Einstein); (UCI)

    2017-11-22

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (hIDO1) is an attractive cancer immunotherapeutic target owing to its role in promoting tumoral immune escape. However, drug development has been hindered by limited structural information. Here, we report the crystal structures of hIDO1 in complex with its substrate, Trp, an inhibitor, epacadostat, and/or an effector, indole ethanol (IDE). The data reveal structural features of the active site (Sa) critical for substrate activation; in addition, they disclose a new inhibitor-binding mode and a distinct small molecule binding site (Si). Structure-guided mutation of a critical residue, F270, to glycine perturbs the Si site, allowing structural determination of an inhibitory complex, where both the Sa and Si sites are occupied by Trp. The Si site offers a novel target site for allosteric inhibitors and a molecular explanation for the previously baffling substrate-inhibition behavior of the enzyme. Taken together, the data open exciting new avenues for structure-based drug design.

  10. Mapping the Binding Site for Escitalopram and Paroxetine in the Human Serotonin Transporter Using Genetically Encoded Photo-Cross-Linkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Bang-Andersen, Benny

    2017-01-01

    In spite of the important role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in depression treatment, the molecular details of how antidepressant drugs bind are still not completely understood, in particular those related to potential high- and low-affinity binding sites in hSERT. Here, we utilize...... serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We find that the two antidepressant drugs exclusively cross-link to azF incorporated at the high-affinity binding site of hSERT, while cross-linking is not observed at the low-affinity binding site. Combined with previous homology models and recent structural data on h...

  11. eMatchSite: sequence order-independent structure alignments of ligand binding pockets in protein models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Brylinski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4-9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite.

  12. GALACTOSE-BINDING SITE IN ESCHERICHIA-COLI HEAT-LABILE ENTEROTOXIN (LT) AND CHOLERA-TOXIN (CT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MERRITT, EA; SIXMA, TK; KALK, KH; VANZANTEN, BAM; HOL, WGJ

    The galactose-binding site in cholera toxin and the closely related heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) from Escherichia coil is an attractive target for the rational design of potential anti-cholera drugs. In this paper we analyse the molecular structure of this binding site as seen in several crystal

  13. Analysis of surface binding sites (SBSs) in carbohydrate active enzymes with focus on glycoside hydrolase families 13 and 77

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Ruzanski, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Surface binding sites (SBSs) interact with carbohydrates outside of the enzyme active site. They are frequently situated on catalytic domains and are distinct from carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). SBSs are found in a variety of enzymes and often seen in crystal structures. Notably about half ...

  14. Discovery of a small-molecule HIV-1 integrase inhibitor-binding site | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lowest energy-binding conformation of an inhibitor bound to the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase core domain. The yellow region represents a unique allosteric binding site identified by affinity labeling and mass spectrometry and validated through mutagenesis. This site can provide a potential platform for the rational design of inhibitors selective for disruption of integrase multimerization.

  15. Irradiation of platelets with UV-B light exposes fibrinogen binding sites via an intracellular mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwijk Kooy, M. van; Borghuis, L.; Prooijen, H.C. van; Aarts-Riemens, M.I.; Akkerman, J.W.N. (Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis)

    1990-12-01

    This study provides evidence that UV-B induced aggregation is mediated by a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent process of fibrinogen binding to an intact glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex on platelet membranes. Although UV-induced platelet aggregation is independent of thromboxane A{sub 2} formation and ADP secretion, it requires metabolic energy, cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} and a low cyclic-AMP level. Thus, UV-B irradiation causes platelet aggregation by exposing fibrinogen binding sites via an intracellular mechanism. Since the amount of bound fibrinogen following UVI is relatively low (about 2300 molecules/platelet) and the binding remains reversible, its effect on platelet behaviour after transfusion may be minor. (author).

  16. Reverse structural genomics: an unusual flavin-binding site in a putative protease from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, Tanja; Eger, Elisabeth; Koop, Julia; Stipsits, Steve; Kinsland, Cynthia L; Ealick, Steven E; Macheroux, Peter

    2012-08-10

    The structure of a putative protease from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron features an unprecedented binding site for flavin mononucleotide. The flavin isoalloxazine ring is sandwiched between two tryptophan residues in the interface of the dimeric protein. We characterized the recombinant protein with regard to its affinity for naturally occurring flavin derivatives and several chemically modified flavin analogs. Dissociation constants were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The protein has high affinity to naturally occurring flavin derivatives, such as riboflavin, FMN, and FAD, as well as lumichrome, a photodegradation product of flavins. Similarly, chemically modified flavin analogs showed high affinity to the protein in the nanomolar range. Replacement of the tryptophan by phenylalanine gave rise to much weaker binding, whereas in the tryptophan to alanine variant, flavin binding was abolished. We propose that the protein is an unspecific scavenger of flavin compounds and may serve as a storage protein in vivo.

  17. Deciphering Cryptic Binding Sites on Proteins by Mixed-Solvent Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, S Roy; Hu, Hai Peng; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Sherman, Woody; Favia, Angelo D

    2017-06-26

    In recent years, molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in explicit mixed solvents have been applied to various problems in protein biophysics and drug discovery, including protein folding, protein surface characterization, fragment screening, allostery, and druggability assessment. In this study, we perform a systematic study on how mixtures of organic solvent probes in water can reveal cryptic ligand binding pockets that are not evident in crystal structures of apo proteins. We examine a diverse set of eight PDB proteins that show pocket opening induced by ligand binding and investigate whether solvent MD simulations on the apo structures can induce the binding site observed in the holo structures. The cosolvent simulations were found to induce conformational changes on the protein surface, which were characterized and compared with the holo structures. Analyses of the biological systems, choice of probes and concentrations, druggability of the resulting induced pockets, and application to drug discovery are discussed here.

  18. Developmental changes in the distribution of cecal lectin-binding sites of Balb-c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehrn, S; Breipohl, W; Lierse, W; Romaniuk, K; Young, W

    1992-01-01

    The existence of lectin-binding sites was investigated in the cecum of Balb-c mice at seven developmental stages ranging from 18 days post conception (p.c.) to 8 weeks after birth. Nine horseradish-peroxidase-conjugated lectins (concanavalin A, Triticum vulgaris, Dolichus biflorus, Helix pomatia, Arachis hypogaea, Glycine maximus, Lotus tetragonolobus, Ulex europaeus, Limulus polyphemus) were applied to 5- to 7-microns thin paraffin sections of Bouin-fixed tissue. After DAB staining the sections were evaluated by light microscopy. It was shown that each lectin exhibits a unique developmental pattern. The adult binding patterns were established at the age of 3-4 weeks with only minor changes occurring thereafter. Considerable differences in binding patterns occurred not only between lectins of different groups but also between lectins with the same nominal monosaccharide specificity.

  19. Human Ku70 protein binds hairpin RNA and double stranded DNA through two different sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisenko, Andrey N; Knyazhanskaya, Ekaterina S; Zatsepin, Timofey S; Gottikh, Marina B

    2017-01-01

    Human protein Ku usually functions in the cell as a complex of two subunits, Ku70 and Ku80. The Ku heterodimer plays a key role in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway by specifically recognizing the DNA ends at the site of the lesion. The binding of the Ku heterodimer to DNA has been well-studied, and its interactions with RNA have been also described. However, Ku70 subunit is known to have independent DNA binding capability, which is less characterized. RNA binding properties of Ku70 have not been yet specially studied. We have prepared recombinant full-length Ku70 and a set of its truncated mutants in E. coli, and studied their interactions with nucleic acids of various structures: linear single- and double-stranded DNA and RNA, as well as closed circular DNA and hairpin RNA. Ku70 has demonstrated a high affinity binding to double stranded DNA and hairpin RNA with a certain structure only. Interestingly, in contrast to the Ku heterodimer, Ku70 is found to interact with closed circular DNA. We also show for the first time that Ku70 employs two different sites for DNA and RNA binding. The double-stranded DNA is recognized by the C-terminal part of Ku70 including SAP domain as it has been earlier demonstrated, whereas hairpin RNA binding is provided by amino acids 251-438. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  20. The serotonin transporter in rhesus monkey brain: comparison of DASB and citalopram binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Zhizhen [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)]. E-mail: zhizhen_zeng@merck.com; Chen, T.-B. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Miller, Patricia J. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Dean, Dennis [Labeled Compound Synthesis Group, Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065-0900 (United States); Tang, Y.S. [Labeled Compound Synthesis Group, Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065-0900 (United States); Sur, Cyrille [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Williams, David L. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We have characterized the interaction of the serotonin transporter ligand [{sup 3}H]-N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio)-benzylamine (DASB) with rhesus monkey brain in vitro using tissue homogenate binding and autoradiographic mapping. [{sup 3}H]-DASB, a tritiated version of the widely used [{sup 11}C] positron emission tomography tracer, was found to selectively bind to a single population of sites with high affinity (K {sub d}=0.20{+-}0.04 nM). The serotonin transporter density (B {sub max}) obtained for rhesus frontal cortex was found to be 66{+-}8 fmol/mg protein using [{sup 3}H]-DASB, similar to the B {sub max} value obtained using the reference radioligand [{sup 3}H]-citalopram, a well-characterized and highly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (83{+-}22 fmol/mg protein). Specific binding sites of both [{sup 3}H]-DASB and [{sup 3}H]-citalopram were similarly and nonuniformly distributed throughout the rhesus central nervous system, in a pattern consistent with serotonin transporter localization reported for human brain. Regional serotonin transporter densities, estimated from optical densities of the autoradiographic images, were well correlated between the two radioligands. Finally, DASB and fluoxetine showed dose-dependent full inhibition of [{sup 3}H]-citalopram binding in a competition autoradiographic study, with K {sub i} values in close agreement with those obtained from rhesus brain homogenates. This side-by-side comparison of [{sup 3}H]-DASB and [{sup 3}H]-citalopram binding sites in rhesus tissue homogenates and in adjacent rhesus brain slices provides additional support for the use of [{sup 11}C]-DASB to assess the availability and distribution of serotonin transporters in nonhuman primates.

  1. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  2. A unified model of the GABA(A receptor comprising agonist and benzodiazepine binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Bergmann

    Full Text Available We present a full-length α(1β(2γ(2 GABA receptor model optimized for agonists and benzodiazepine (BZD allosteric modulators. We propose binding hypotheses for the agonists GABA, muscimol and THIP and for the allosteric modulator diazepam (DZP. The receptor model is primarily based on the glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl from C. elegans and includes additional structural information from the prokaryotic ligand-gated ion channel ELIC in a few regions. Available mutational data of the binding sites are well explained by the model and the proposed ligand binding poses. We suggest a GABA binding mode similar to the binding mode of glutamate in the GluCl X-ray structure. Key interactions are predicted with residues α(1R66, β(2T202, α(1T129, β(2E155, β(2Y205 and the backbone of β(2S156. Muscimol is predicted to bind similarly, however, with minor differences rationalized with quantum mechanical energy calculations. Muscimol key interactions are predicted to be α(1R66, β(2T202, α(1T129, β(2E155, β(2Y205 and β(2F200. Furthermore, we argue that a water molecule could mediate further interactions between muscimol and the backbone of β(2S156 and β(2Y157. DZP is predicted to bind with interactions comparable to those of the agonists in the orthosteric site. The carbonyl group of DZP is predicted to interact with two threonines α(1T206 and γ(2T142, similar to the acidic moiety of GABA. The chlorine atom of DZP is placed near the important α(1H101 and the N-methyl group near α(1Y159, α(1T206, and α(1Y209. We present a binding mode of DZP in which the pending phenyl moiety of DZP is buried in the binding pocket and thus shielded from solvent exposure. Our full length GABA(A receptor is made available as Model S1.

  3. LTRs of Endogenous Retroviruses as a Source of Tbx6 Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukuto Yasuhiko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons are abundant in mammalian genomes and can modulate the gene expression of surrounding genes by disrupting endogenous binding sites for transcription factors (TFs or providing novel TFs binding sites within retrotransposon sequences. Here, we show that a (C/TCACACCT sequence motif in ORR1A, ORR1B, ORR1C, and ORR1D, Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs of MaLR endogenous retrovirus (ERV, is the direct target of Tbx6, an evolutionary conserved family of T-box TFs. Moreover, by comparing gene expression between control mice (Tbx6 +/− and Tbx6-deficient mice (Tbx6 −/−, we demonstrate that at least four genes, Twist2, Pitx2, Oscp1, and Nfxl1, are down-regulated with Tbx6 deficiency. These results suggest that ORR1A, ORR1B, ORR1C and ORR1D may contribute to the evolution of mammalian embryogenesis.

  4. LTRs of endogenous retroviruses as a source of Tbx6 binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhiko, Yukuto; Hirabayashi, Yoko; Ono, Ryuichi

    2017-06-01

    Retrotransposons are abundant in mammalian genomes and can modulate the gene expression of surrounding genes by disrupting endogenous binding sites for transcription factors (TFs) or providing novel TFs binding sites within retrotransposon sequences. Here, we show that a (C/T)CACACCT sequence motif in ORR1A, ORR1B, ORR1C and ORR1D, Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs) of MaLR endogenous retrovirus (ERV), is the direct target of Tbx6, an evolutionary conserved family of T-box transcription factors. Moreover, by comparing gene expression between control mice (Tbx6 +/-) and Tbx6-deficient mice (Tbx6 -/-), we demonstrate that at least four genes, Twist2, Pitx2, Oscp1, and Nfxl1, are down-regulated with Tbx6 deficiency. These results suggest that ORR1A, ORR1B, ORR1C and ORR1D may contribute to the evolution of mammalian embryogenesis.

  5. Identification of novel allosteric modulator binding sites in NMDA receptors: A molecular modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Lucas T; Costa, Blaise M

    2015-09-01

    The dysfunction of N-methyl-d-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs), a subtype of glutamate receptors, is correlated with schizophrenia, stroke, and many other neuropathological disorders. However, not all NMDAR subtypes equally contribute towards these disorders. Since NMDARs composed of different GluN2 subunits (GluN2A-D) confer varied physiological properties and have different distributions in the brain, pharmacological agents that target NMDARs with specific GluN2 subunits have significant potential for therapeutic applications. In our previous research, we have identified a family of novel allosteric modulators that differentially potentiate and/or inhibit NMDARs of differing GluN2 subunit composition. To further elucidate their molecular mechanisms, in the present study, we have identified four potential binding sites for novel allosteric modulators by performing molecular modeling, docking, and in silico mutations. The molecular determinants of the modulator binding sites (MBS), analysis of particular MBS electrostatics, and the specific loss or gain of binding after mutations have revealed modulators that have strong potential affinities for specific MBS on given subunits and the role of key amino acids in either promoting or obstructing modulator binding. These findings will help design higher affinity GluN2 subunit-selective pharmaceuticals, which are currently unavailable to treat psychiatric and neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) can bind heparin and other glycosaminoglycans through its RNase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Marc; Nogués, M Victòria; Boix, Ester

    2011-01-01

    The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an eosinophil-secreted RNase involved in the immune host defense, with a cytotoxic activity against a wide range of pathogens. During inflammation and eosinophilia disorders, ECP is secreted to the inflammation area, where it would contribute to the immune response. ECP secretion causes also severe damage to the host own tissues. ECP presents a high affinity for heparin and this property might be crucial for its immunomodulating properties, antipathogen action, and its toxicity against eukaryotic cells. ECP, also known as human RNase 3, belongs to the mammalian RNase A superfamily and its RNase activity is required for some of its biological properties. We have now proven that ECP heparin binding affinity depends on its RNase catalytic site, as the enzymatic activity is blocked by heparin. We have applied molecular modeling to analyze ECP binding to heparin representative probes, and identified protein residues at the catalytic and substrate binding sites that could contribute to the interaction. ECP affinity for heparin and other negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) can explain not only its binding to the eukaryote cells glycocalix but also the reported high affinity for the specific carbohydrates at bacteria cell wall, promoting its antimicrobial action. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Nature and function of insulator protein binding sites in the Drosophila genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Yuri B; Linder-Basso, Daniela; Kharchenko, Peter V; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Kim, Maria; Li, Hua-Bing; Gorchakov, Andrey A; Minoda, Aki; Shanower, Gregory; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Riddle, Nicole C; Jung, Youngsook L; Gu, Tingting; Plachetka, Annette; Elgin, Sarah C R; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Park, Peter J; Savitsky, Mikhail; Karpen, Gary H; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2012-11-01

    Chromatin insulator elements and associated proteins have been proposed to partition eukaryotic genomes into sets of independently regulated domains. Here we test this hypothesis by quantitative genome-wide analysis of insulator protein binding to Drosophila chromatin. We find distinct combinatorial binding of insulator proteins to different classes of sites and uncover a novel type of insulator element that binds CP190 but not any other known insulator proteins. Functional characterization of different classes of binding sites indicates that only a small fraction act as robust insulators in standard enhancer-blocking assays. We show that insulators restrict the spreading of the H3K27me3 mark but only at a small number of Polycomb target regions and only to prevent repressive histone methylation within adjacent genes that are already transcriptionally inactive. RNAi knockdown of insulator proteins in cultured cells does not lead to major alterations in genome expression. Taken together, these observations argue against the concept of a genome partitioned by specialized boundary elements and suggest that insulators are reserved for specific regulation of selected genes.

  8. Nature and function of insulator protein binding sites in the Drosophila genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Yuri B.; Linder-Basso, Daniela; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Kim, Maria; Li, Hua-Bing; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Minoda, Aki; Shanower, Gregory; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Riddle, Nicole C.; Jung, Youngsook L.; Gu, Tingting; Plachetka, Annette; Elgin, Sarah C.R.; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Park, Peter J.; Savitsky, Mikhail; Karpen, Gary H.; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin insulator elements and associated proteins have been proposed to partition eukaryotic genomes into sets of independently regulated domains. Here we test this hypothesis by quantitative genome-wide analysis of insulator protein binding to Drosophila chromatin. We find distinct combinatorial binding of insulator proteins to different classes of sites and uncover a novel type of insulator element that binds CP190 but not any other known insulator proteins. Functional characterization of different classes of binding sites indicates that only a small fraction act as robust insulators in standard enhancer-blocking assays. We show that insulators restrict the spreading of the H3K27me3 mark but only at a small number of Polycomb target regions and only to prevent repressive histone methylation within adjacent genes that are already transcriptionally inactive. RNAi knockdown of insulator proteins in cultured cells does not lead to major alterations in genome expression. Taken together, these observations argue against the concept of a genome partitioned by specialized boundary elements and suggest that insulators are reserved for specific regulation of selected genes. PMID:22767387

  9. Fluconazole Binding and Sterol Demethylation in Three CYP51 Isoforms Indicate Differences in Active Site Topology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellamine, A.; Lepesheva, Galina I.; Waterman, Mike (Vanderbilt)

    2010-11-16

    14{alpha}-Demethylase (CYP51) is a key enzyme in all sterol biosynthetic pathways (animals, fungi, plants, protists, and some bacteria), catalyzing the removal of the C-14 methyl group following cyclization of squalene. Based on mutations found in CYP51 genes from Candida albicans azole-resistant isolates obtained after fluconazole treatment of fungal infections, and using site-directed mutagenesis, we have found that fluconazole binding and substrate metabolism vary among three different CYP51 isoforms: human, fungal, and mycobacterial. In C. albicans, the Y132H mutant from isolates shows no effect on fluconazole binding, whereas the F145L mutant results in a 5-fold increase in its IC{sub 50} for fluconazole, suggesting that F145 (conserved only in fungal 14{alpha}-demethylases) interacts with this azole. In C. albicans, F145L accounts, in part, for the difference in fluconazole sensitivity reported between mammals and fungi, providing a basis for treatment of fungal infections. The C. albicans Y132H and human Y145H CYP51 mutants show essentially no effect on substrate metabolism, but the Mycobacterium tuberculosis F89H CYP51 mutant loses both its substrate binding and metabolism. Because these three residues align in the three isoforms, the results indicate that their active sites contain important structural differences, and further emphasize that fluconazole and substrate binding are uncoupled properties.

  10. CSI-Tree: a regression tree approach for modeling binding properties of DNA-binding molecules based on cognate site identification (CSI) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleş, Sündüz; Warren, Christopher L; Carlson, Clayton D; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2008-06-01

    The identification and characterization of binding sites of DNA-binding molecules, including transcription factors (TFs), is a critical problem at the interface of chemistry, biology and molecular medicine. The Cognate Site Identification (CSI) array is a high-throughput microarray platform for measuring comprehensive recognition profiles of DNA-binding molecules. This technique produces datasets that are useful not only for identifying binding sites of previously uncharacterized TFs but also for elucidating dependencies, both local and nonlocal, between the nucleotides at different positions of the recognition sites. We have developed a regression tree technique, CSI-Tree, for exploring the spectrum of binding sites of DNA-binding molecules. Our approach constructs regression trees utilizing the CSI data of unaligned sequences. The resulting model partitions the binding spectrum into homogeneous regions of position specific nucleotide effects. Each homogeneous partition is then summarized by a position weight matrix (PWM). Hence, the final outcome is a binding intensity rank-ordered collection of PWMs each of which spans a different region in the binding spectrum. Nodes of the regression tree depict the critical position/nucleotide combinations. We analyze the CSI data of the eukaryotic TF Nkx-2.5 and two engineered small molecule DNA ligands and obtain unique insights into their binding properties. The CSI tree for Nkx-2.5 reveals an interaction between two positions of the binding profile and elucidates how different nucleotide combinations at these two positions lead to different binding affinities. The CSI trees for the engineered DNA ligands exhibit a common preference for the dinucleotide AA in the first two positions, which is consistent with preference for a narrow and relatively flat minor groove. We carry out a reanalysis of these data with a mixture of PWMs approach. This approach is an advancement over the simple PWM model and accommodates position

  11. γ-Secretase Modulator (GSM) Photoaffinity Probes Reveal Distinct Allosteric Binding Sites on Presenilin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakov, Nikolay; Murrey, Heather E.; Crump, Christina J.; Pettersson, Martin; Ballard, T. Eric; am Ende, Christopher W.; Ahn, Kwangwook; Li, Yue-Ming; Bales, Kelly R.; Johnson, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    γ-Secretase is an intramembrane aspartyl protease that cleaves the amyloid precursor protein to produce neurotoxic β-amyloid peptides (i.e. Aβ42) that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Small molecule γ-secretase modulators (GSMs) have emerged as potential disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer disease because they reduce the formation of Aβ42 while not blocking the processing of γ-secretase substrates. We developed clickable GSM photoaffinity probes with the goal of identifying the target of various classes of GSMs and to better understand their mechanism of action. Here, we demonstrate that the photoaffinity probe E2012-BPyne specifically labels the N-terminal fragment of presenilin-1 (PS1-NTF) in cell membranes as well as in live cells and primary neuronal cultures. The labeling is competed in the presence of the parent imidazole GSM E2012, but not with acid GSM-1, allosteric GSI BMS-708163, or substrate docking site peptide inhibitor pep11, providing evidence that these compounds have distinct binding sites. Surprisingly, we found that the cross-linking of E2012-BPyne to PS1-NTF is significantly enhanced in the presence of the active site-directed GSI L-685,458 (L458). In contrast, L458 does not affect the labeling of the acid GSM photoprobe GSM-5. We also observed that E2012-BPyne specifically labels PS1-NTF (active γ-secretase) but not full-length PS1 (inactive γ-secretase) in ANP.24 cells. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that multiple binding sites within the γ-secretase complex exist, each of which may contribute to different modes of modulatory action. Furthermore, the enhancement of PS1-NTF labeling by E2012-BPyne in the presence of L458 suggests a degree of cooperativity between the active site of γ-secretase and the modulatory binding site of certain GSMs. PMID:23396974

  12. γ-Secretase modulator (GSM) photoaffinity probes reveal distinct allosteric binding sites on presenilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakov, Nikolay; Murrey, Heather E; Crump, Christina J; Pettersson, Martin; Ballard, T Eric; Am Ende, Christopher W; Ahn, Kwangwook; Li, Yue-Ming; Bales, Kelly R; Johnson, Douglas S

    2013-04-05

    γ-Secretase is an intramembrane aspartyl protease that cleaves the amyloid precursor protein to produce neurotoxic β-amyloid peptides (i.e. Aβ42) that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Small molecule γ-secretase modulators (GSMs) have emerged as potential disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer disease because they reduce the formation of Aβ42 while not blocking the processing of γ-secretase substrates. We developed clickable GSM photoaffinity probes with the goal of identifying the target of various classes of GSMs and to better understand their mechanism of action. Here, we demonstrate that the photoaffinity probe E2012-BPyne specifically labels the N-terminal fragment of presenilin-1 (PS1-NTF) in cell membranes as well as in live cells and primary neuronal cultures. The labeling is competed in the presence of the parent imidazole GSM E2012, but not with acid GSM-1, allosteric GSI BMS-708163, or substrate docking site peptide inhibitor pep11, providing evidence that these compounds have distinct binding sites. Surprisingly, we found that the cross-linking of E2012-BPyne to PS1-NTF is significantly enhanced in the presence of the active site-directed GSI L-685,458 (L458). In contrast, L458 does not affect the labeling of the acid GSM photoprobe GSM-5. We also observed that E2012-BPyne specifically labels PS1-NTF (active γ-secretase) but not full-length PS1 (inactive γ-secretase) in ANP.24 cells. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that multiple binding sites within the γ-secretase complex exist, each of which may contribute to different modes of modulatory action. Furthermore, the enhancement of PS1-NTF labeling by E2012-BPyne in the presence of L458 suggests a degree of cooperativity between the active site of γ-secretase and the modulatory binding site of certain GSMs.

  13. Second Sialic Acid Binding Site in Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase: Implications for Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitsev, Viatcheslav; von Itzstein, Mark; Groves, Darrin; Kiefel, Milton; Takimoto, Toru; Portner, Allen; Taylor, Garry

    2004-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are the leading cause of respiratory disease in children. Several paramyxoviruses possess a surface glycoprotein, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), that is involved in attachment to sialic acid receptors, promotion of fusion, and removal of sialic acid from infected cells and progeny virions. Previously we showed that Newcastle disease virus (NDV) HN contained a pliable sialic acid recognition site that could take two states, a binding state and a catalytic state. Here we ...

  14. Substance P receptor binding sites are expressed by glia in vivo after neuronal injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Mantyh, P W; Johnson, D J; Boehmer, C G; Catton, M D; Vinters, H V; Maggio, J E; Too, H P; Vigna, S R

    1989-01-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, we examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide ...

  15. Combining features in a graphical model to predict protein binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierschin, Torsten; Wang, Keyu; Welter, Marlon; Waack, Stephan; Stanke, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Large efforts have been made in classifying residues as binding sites in proteins using machine learning methods. The prediction task can be translated into the computational challenge of assigning each residue the label binding site or non-binding site. Observational data comes from various possibly highly correlated sources. It includes the structure of the protein but not the structure of the complex. The model class of conditional random fields (CRFs) has previously successfully been used for protein binding site prediction. Here, a new CRF-approach is presented that models the dependencies of residues using a general graphical structure defined as a neighborhood graph and thus our model makes fewer independence assumptions on the labels than sequential labeling approaches. A novel node feature "change in free energy" is introduced into the model, which is then denoted by ΔF-CRF. Parameters are trained with an online large-margin algorithm. Using the standard feature class relative accessible surface area alone, the general graph-structure CRF already achieves higher prediction accuracy than the linear chain CRF of Li et al. ΔF-CRF performs significantly better on a large range of false positive rates than the support-vector-machine-based program PresCont of Zellner et al. on a homodimer set containing 128 chains. ΔF-CRF has a broader scope than PresCont since it is not constrained to protein subgroups and requires no multiple sequence alignment. The improvement is attributed to the advantageous combination of the novel node feature with the standard feature and to the adopted parameter training method. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Low affinity glucocorticoid binding site ligands as potential anti-fibrogenics

    OpenAIRE

    Marek, Carylyn J; Wallace, Karen; Durward, Elaine; Koruth, Matthew; Leel, Val; Leiper, Lucy J.; Wright, Matthew C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonists inhibit liver fibrosis. However, the rodent PXR activator pregnenolone 16? carbonitrile (PCN) blocks, in vitro, hepatic stellate cell-to-myofibroblast trans-differentiation and proliferation in cells from mice with a disrupted PXR gene, suggesting there is an additional anti-fibrogenic drug target for PCN. The role of the low affinity glucocorticoid binding site (LAGS) ? which may be identical or associated with the progesterone receptor membrane ...

  17. Quantitative modeling of gene expression using DNA shape features of binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Pei-Chen; Sinha, Saurabh

    2016-07-27

    Prediction of gene expression levels driven by regulatory sequences is pivotal in genomic biology. A major focus in transcriptional regulation is sequence-to-expression modeling, which interprets the enhancer sequence based on transcription factor concentrations and DNA binding specificities and predicts precise gene expression levels in varying cellular contexts. Such models largely rely on the position weight matrix (PWM) model for DNA binding, and the effect of alternative models based on DNA shape remains unexplored. Here, we propose a statistical thermodynamics model of gene expression using DNA shape features of binding sites. We used rigorous methods to evaluate the fits of expression readouts of 37 enhancers regulating spatial gene expression patterns in Drosophila embryo, and show that DNA shape-based models perform arguably better than PWM-based models. We also observed DNA shape captures information complimentary to the PWM, in a way that is useful for expression modeling. Furthermore, we tested if combining shape and PWM-based features provides better predictions than using either binding model alone. Our work demonstrates that the increasingly popular DNA-binding models based on local DNA shape can be useful in sequence-to-expression modeling. It also provides a framework for future studies to predict gene expression better than with PWM models alone. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Identification of critical residues in loop E in the 5-HT3ASR binding site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthalagi Mani

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serotonin type 3 receptor (5-HT3R is a member of a superfamily of ligand gated ion channels. All members of this family share a large degree of sequence homology and presumably significant structural similarity. A large number of studies have explored the structure-function relationships of members of this family, particularly the nicotinic and GABA receptors. This information can be utilized to gain additional insights into specific structural and functional features of other receptors in this family. Results Thirteen amino acids in the mouse 5-HT3ASR that correspond to the putative E binding loop of the nicotinic α7 receptor were chosen for mutagenesis. Due to the presence of a highly conserved glycine in this region, it has been suggested that this binding loop is comprised of a hairpin turn and may form a portion of the ligand-binding site in this ion channel family. Mutation of the conserved glycine (G147 to alanine eliminated binding of the 5-HT3R antagonist [3H]granisetron. Three tyrosine residues (Y140, Y142 and Y152 also significantly altered the binding of 5-HT3R ligands. Mutations in neighboring residues had little or no effect on binding of these ligands to the 5-HT3ASR. Conclusion Our data supports a role for the putative E-loop region of the 5-HT3R in the binding of 5-HT, mCPBG, d-tc and lerisetron. 5-HT and mCPBG interact with Y142, d-tc with Y140 and lerisetron with both Y142 and Y152. Our data also provides support for the hypothesis that this region of the receptor is present in a loop structure.

  19. Preferable binding site of gas molecules on graphene nanoribbon with Stone-Wales defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzar, Zuriana; Johari, Zaharah; Sakina, S. H.; Alias, N. E.; Abidin, M. S. Z.

    2017-02-01

    The issue of sensitivity of sensing device has focused on the development of sensing devices by using new materials, such as graphene. The gas molecules in different positions such as on, near and far from the defect are placed in the same binding site in two graphene configurations for fair comparison. The interaction between two different graphene configurations such as (pristine armchair graphene nanoribbon (P-AGNR) and Stone-Wales defect on graphene surface (SW-AGNR)) with gas molecules (e.g. O2, N2 and NH3) have been investigated to observe the preferential position site of adsorbate gas molecules. The preferable position sites are investigated by using Extended-Huckel Theory. It is found that, the electronic properties of each configuration are strongly depends on the position of gas molecules and graphene system. Meanwhile, the binding site of the gas molecules on the defective site of graphene surface is a significant factor in determining the sensing behavior of graphene based gas defection device.

  20. Composite Structural Motifs of Binding Sites for Delineating Biological Functions of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Akira R.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Most biological processes are described as a series of interactions between proteins and other molecules, and interactions are in turn described in terms of atomic structures. To annotate protein functions as sets of interaction states at atomic resolution, and thereby to better understand the relation between protein interactions and biological functions, we conducted exhaustive all-against-all atomic structure comparisons of all known binding sites for ligands including small molecules, proteins and nucleic acids, and identified recurring elementary motifs. By integrating the elementary motifs associated with each subunit, we defined composite motifs that represent context-dependent combinations of elementary motifs. It is demonstrated that function similarity can be better inferred from composite motif similarity compared to the similarity of protein sequences or of individual binding sites. By integrating the composite motifs associated with each protein function, we define meta-composite motifs each of which is regarded as a time-independent diagrammatic representation of a biological process. It is shown that meta-composite motifs provide richer annotations of biological processes than sequence clusters. The present results serve as a basis for bridging atomic structures to higher-order biological phenomena by classification and integration of binding site structures. PMID:22347478

  1. Myelin 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase: active-site ligand binding and molecular conformation.

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    Matti Myllykoski

    Full Text Available The 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase is a highly abundant membrane-associated enzyme in the myelin sheath of the vertebrate nervous system. CNPase is a member of the 2H phosphoesterase family and catalyzes the formation of 2'-nucleotide products from 2',3'-cyclic substrates; however, its physiological substrate and function remain unknown. It is likely that CNPase participates in RNA metabolism in the myelinating cell. We solved crystal structures of the phosphodiesterase domain of mouse CNPase, showing the binding mode of nucleotide ligands in the active site. The binding mode of the product 2'-AMP provides a detailed view of the reaction mechanism. Comparisons of CNPase crystal structures highlight flexible loops, which could play roles in substrate recognition; large differences in the active-site vicinity are observed when comparing more distant members of the 2H family. We also studied the full-length CNPase, showing its N-terminal domain is involved in RNA binding and dimerization. Our results provide a detailed picture of the CNPase active site during its catalytic cycle, and suggest a specific function for the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain.

  2. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  3. Predicting DNA-binding sites of proteins from amino acid sequence

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    Wu Feihong

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the molecular details of protein-DNA interactions is critical for deciphering the mechanisms of gene regulation. We present a machine learning approach for the identification of amino acid residues involved in protein-DNA interactions. Results We start with a Naïve Bayes classifier trained to predict whether a given amino acid residue is a DNA-binding residue based on its identity and the identities of its sequence neighbors. The input to the classifier consists of the identities of the target residue and 4 sequence neighbors on each side of the target residue. The classifier is trained and evaluated (using leave-one-out cross-validation on a non-redundant set of 171 proteins. Our results indicate the feasibility of identifying interface residues based on local sequence information. The classifier achieves 71% overall accuracy with a correlation coefficient of 0.24, 35% specificity and 53% sensitivity in identifying interface residues as evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation. We show that the performance of the classifier is improved by using sequence entropy of the target residue (the entropy of the corresponding column in multiple alignment obtained by aligning the target sequence with its sequence homologs as additional input. The classifier achieves 78% overall accuracy with a correlation coefficient of 0.28, 44% specificity and 41% sensitivity in identifying interface residues. Examination of the predictions in the context of 3-dimensional structures of proteins demonstrates the effectiveness of this method in identifying DNA-binding sites from sequence information. In 33% (56 out of 171 of the proteins, the classifier identifies the interaction sites by correctly recognizing at least half of the interface residues. In 87% (149 out of 171 of the proteins, the classifier correctly identifies at least 20% of the interface residues. This suggests the possibility of using such classifiers to identify

  4. Role of site-specific binding to plasma albumin in drug availability to brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandula, Haritha; Parepally, Jagan Mohan R; Feng, Rose; Smith, Quentin R

    2006-05-01

    Many studies have reported greater drug uptake into brain than that predicted based upon existing models using the free fraction (f(u)) of drug in arterial serum. To explain this difference, circulating plasma proteins have been suggested to interact with capillary membrane in vivo to produce a conformational change that favors net drug dissociation and elevation of f(u). Albumin, the principal binding protein in plasma, has two main drug binding sites, Sudlow I and II. We tested this hypothesis using drugs that bind selectively to either site I (warfarin) or site II (ibuprofen), as well as mixed ligands that have affinity for both sites (tolbutamide and valproate). Brain uptake was determined in the presence and absence of albumin using the in situ rat brain perfusion technique. Unidirectional brain uptake transfer constants (K(in)) were measured and compared with those predicted using the modified Kety-Crone-Renkin model: K(in) = F(1-e(-f(u) x PS(u)/F)), where F is perfusion flow and PS(u) is the permeability-surface area product to free drug of brain capillaries. The results demonstrated good agreement between measured and predicted K(in) over a 100-fold range in perfusion fluid albumin concentration using albumin from three different species (i.e., human, bovine, and rat), as well as whole-rat serum. K(in) decreased in the presence of albumin in direct proportion to perfusion fluid f(u) with constant PS(u). The results show that brain uptake of selected Sudlow site I and II ligands matches that predicted by the modified Kety-Crone-Renkin model with no evidence for enhanced dissociation.

  5. Form, symmetry and packing of biomacromolecules. III. Antigenic, receptor and contact binding sites in picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, A

    2011-03-01

    The relation between serotype differentiation and crystallographic symmetry, revealed by the contact fingerprint diagrams investigated in Part II [Janner (2010). Acta Cryst. A66, 312-326] for the human rhinovirus, is extended to the Picornaviridae family. The approach, outlined in Part I [Janner (2010). Acta Cryst. A66, 301-311] and Part II for biomacromolecules packed in a crystal and based on concepts such as packing lattice, kissing points and crystal-packing parameters, can directly be applied to the picornaviruses. In particular, the contact fingerprint diagrams of 20 different virus strains have been derived. In these cases, as for the rhinovirus, these diagrams are serotype/strain specific, justifying the name fingerprint. The molecular basis for the serotype variability, and the associated conservation requirements, is usually analysed by considering antigenic sites, where capsid residues bind with antibodies, and receptor sites, where other residues bind with molecular receptors of the host cell membrane. Both the antigenic variation and the receptor conservation allow repeated infection of the host cells of the given animals. The graphical description of these sites is usually done by footprints and roadmap diagrams, mapping properties of the capsid surface and using the icosahedral symmetry of the capsid. The alternative fingerprint diagrammatic description, based on the crystal symmetry, adopted in Part II for the contact sites, where a capsid is bound to the next one in the crystal packing, is extended to the antigenic and receptor binding sites. Again, the antigenic/receptor fingerprints are specific, at least for the nine picornaviruses investigated so far, despite the more than a factor of ten larger coarse graining with respect to the corresponding footprint and roadmap diagrams. The latter are based on a grid spacing of about 2 Å, whereas the spacing implied by the packing-lattice approximation adopted in fingerprints varies typically from 20 to

  6. Polymorphisms in lipid metabolism related miRNA binding sites and risk of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing; Zhao, Xu; Xu, Kang; Li, Qian; Cheng, Jinluo; Gao, Yanqin; Du, Juan; Shi, Hui; Zhou, Ling

    2013-10-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate posttranscriptional gene expression usually by binding to 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of target message RNAs (mRNAs). Previous studies have demonstrated that SNPs within miRNA target sites could modulate miRNA-mRNA interaction to affect the regulation of target genes and the individual's diseases. So far, little is known about the relationship of miRNA binding site polymorphisms with the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the general population. Therefore, we conducted a case-control study in Chinese Han population to evaluate the association between SNPs within miRNA binding sites and risk of MetS. 8 SNPs in miRNA binding sites with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of ≥ 0.05 in the Chinese Han population were selected by bioinformatics software. TaqMan ®assay was performed to test the genotypes in MetS patients (n=1026) and normal controls (n=1032). We found rs5750146 (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=1.24 for GA/AA, P=0.023, compared with GG), rs5999924 (adjusted OR=1.22 for AT/TT, P=0.038, compared with AA) in the APOL6 3'UTR were identified to correlate with MetS in the total sample and females. Rs11724758 (adjusted OR=0.65 for AA, P=0.002, compared with GG) in the FABP2 3'UTR was found to correlate with MetS in the total sample and males. Correlations between FABP2 rs11724758 polymorphisms and components of MetS reveal that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) levels are significantly higher in FABP2 rs11724758 AA genotype carrier compared with noncarriers, whereas triglycerides (TG) and fasting plasma glucose (FG) were to be significantly lower in the AA genotype carrier. These findings indicate that these three polymorphisms which located at the predicted miRNAs binding sites were identified to contribute to susceptibility to MetS in the Chinese Han population. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of Propofol Binding Sites in a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor with a Photoreactive Propofol Analog*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakar, Selwyn S.; Dailey, William P.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-01

    Propofol, a widely used intravenous general anesthetic, acts at anesthetic concentrations as a positive allosteric modulator of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors and at higher concentration as an inhibitor of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we characterize propofol binding sites in a muscle-type nAChR by use of a photoreactive analog of propofol, 2-isopropyl-5-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]phenol (AziPm). Based upon radioligand binding assays, AziPm stabilized the Torpedo nAChR in the resting state, whereas propofol stabilized the desensitized state. nAChR-rich membranes were photolabeled with [3H]AziPm, and labeled amino acids were identified by Edman degradation. [3H]AziPm binds at three sites within the nAChR transmembrane domain: (i) an intrasubunit site in the δ subunit helix bundle, photolabeling in the nAChR desensitized state (+agonist) δM2-18′ and two residues in δM1 (δPhe-232 and δCys-236); (ii) in the ion channel, photolabeling in the nAChR resting, closed channel state (−agonist) amino acids in the M2 helices (αM2-6′, βM2-6′ and -13′, and δM2-13′) that line the channel lumen (with photolabeling reduced by >90% in the desensitized state); and (iii) at the γ-α interface, photolabeling αM2-10′. Propofol enhanced [3H]AziPm photolabeling at αM2-10′. Propofol inhibited [3H]AziPm photolabeling within the δ subunit helix bundle at lower concentrations (IC50 = 40 μm) than it inhibited ion channel photolabeling (IC50 = 125 μm). These results identify for the first time a single intrasubunit propofol binding site in the nAChR transmembrane domain and suggest that this is the functionally relevant inhibitory binding site. PMID:23300078

  8. Nonbinding site-directed mutants of transferrin binding protein B exhibit enhanced immunogenicity and protective capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandoloso, Rafael; Martínez-Martínez, Sonia; Calmettes, Charles; Fegan, Jamie; Costa, Estela; Curran, Dave; Yu, Rong-Hua; Gutiérrez-Martín, César B; Rodríguez-Ferri, Elías F; Moraes, Trevor F; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2015-03-01

    Host-adapted Gram-negative bacterial pathogens from the Pasteurellaceae, Neisseriaceae, and Moraxellaceae families normally reside in the upper respiratory or genitourinary tracts of their hosts and rely on utilizing iron from host transferrin (Tf) for growth and survival. The surface receptor proteins that mediate this critical iron acquisition pathway have been proposed as ideal vaccine targets due to the critical role that they play in survival and disease pathogenesis in vivo. In particular, the surface lipoprotein component of the receptor, Tf binding protein B (TbpB), had received considerable attention as a potential antigen for vaccines in humans and food production animals but this has not translated into the series of successful vaccine products originally envisioned. Preliminary immunization experiments suggesting that host Tf could interfere with development of the immune response prompted us to directly address this question with site-directed mutant proteins defective in binding Tf. Site-directed mutants with dramatically reduced binding of porcine transferrin and nearly identical structure to the native proteins were prepared. A mutant Haemophilus parasuis TbpB was shown to induce an enhanced B-cell and T-cell response in pigs relative to native TbpB and provide superior protection from infection than the native TbpB or a commercial vaccine product. The results indicate that binding of host transferrin modulates the development of the immune response against TbpBs and that strategies designed to reduce or eliminate binding can be used to generate superior antigens for vaccines. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Wide-scale analysis of human functional transcription factor binding reveals a strong bias towards the transcription start site.

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    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors (TF regulate expression by binding to specific DNA sequences. A binding event is functional when it affects gene expression. Functionality of a binding site is reflected in conservation of the binding sequence during evolution and in over represented binding in gene groups with coherent biological functions. Functionality is governed by several parameters such as the TF-DNA binding strength, distance of the binding site from the transcription start site (TSS, DNA packing, and more. Understanding how these parameters control functionality of different TFs in different biological contexts is a must for identifying functional TF binding sites and for understanding regulation of transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a novel method to screen the promoters of a set of genes with shared biological function (obtained from the functional Gene Ontology (GO classification against a precompiled library of motifs, and find those motifs which are statistically over-represented in the gene set. More than 8,000 human (and 23,000 mouse genes, were assigned to one of 134 GO sets. Their promoters were searched (from 200 bp downstream to 1,000 bp upstream the TSS for 414 known DNA motifs. We optimized the sequence similarity score threshold, independently for every location window, taking into account nucleotide heterogeneity along the promoters of the target genes. The method, combined with binding sequence and location conservation between human and mouse, identifies with high probability functional binding sites for groups of functionally-related genes. We found many location-sensitive functional binding events and showed that they clustered close to the TSS. Our method and findings were tested experimentally. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified reliably functional TF binding sites. This is an essential step towards constructing regulatory networks. The promoter region proximal to the TSS is of central

  10. GFI1B controls its own expression binding to multiple sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita, Eduardo; Villegas, Ana; Iborra, Francisco; Hernández, Aurora

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors play essential roles in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. This is the case for the growth factor independent 1b (GFI1B) transcription factor, which is required for erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation and over-expressed in leukemic patients and cell lines. To investigate GFI1B regulation, we searched for multispecies conserved non-coding elements between GFI1B and neighboring genes. We used a formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE) assay and DNase1 hypersensitivity to assess the chromatin conformation of these sites. Next, we analyzed transcription factor binding and histone modifications at the GFI1B locus including the conserved non-coding elements by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Finally, we studied the interaction of the GFI1B promoter and the conserved non-coding elements with the chromatin conformation capture technique and used immunofluorescence to evaluate GFI1B levels in individual cells. We localized several conserved non-coding elements containing multiple erythroid specific transcription factor binding sites at the GFI1B locus. In GFI1B-expressing cells a subset of these conserved non-coding elements and the promoter adopt a close spatial conformation, localize with open chromatin sites, harbor chromatin modifications associated with gene activation and bind multiple transcription factors and co-repressors. Conclusions Our findings indicate that GFI1B regulatory elements behave as activators and repressors. Different protein levels within a cell population suggest that cells must activate and repress GFI1B continuously to control its final level. These data are consistent with a model of GFI1B regulation in which GFI1B binds to its own promoter and to the conserved non-coding elements as its levels rise. This would attract repressor complexes that progressively down-regulate the gene. GFI1B expression would decrease until a stage at which the activating complexes predominate and

  11. Tentative identification of the second substrate binding site in Arabidopsis phytochelatin synthase.

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    Ju-Chen Chia

    Full Text Available Phytochelatin synthase (PCS uses the substrates glutathione (GSH, γGlu-Cys-Gly and a cadmium (Cd-bound GSH (Cd∙GS2 to produce the shortest phytochelatin product (PC2, (γGlu-Cys2-Gly through a ping-pong mechanism. The binding of the 2 substrates to the active site, particularly the second substrate binding site, is not well-understood. In this study, we generated a structural model of the catalytic domain of Arabidopsis AtPCS1 (residues 12-218 by using the crystal structure of the γGlu-Cys acyl-enzyme complex of the PCS of the cyanobacterium Nostoc (NsPCS as a template. The modeled AtPCS1 revealed a cavity in proximity to the first substrate binding site, consisting of 3 loops containing several conserved amino acids including Arg152, Lys185, and Tyr55. Substitutions of these amino acids (R152K, K185R, or double mutation resulted in the abrogation of enzyme activity, indicating that the arrangement of these 2 positive charges is crucial for the binding of the second substrate. Recombinant AtPCS1s with mutations at Tyr55 showed lower catalytic activities because of reduced affinity (3-fold for Y55W for the Cd∙GS2, further suggesting the role of the cation-π interaction in recognition of the second substrate. Our study results indicate the mechanism for second substrate recognition in PCS. The integrated catalytic mechanism of PCS is further discussed.

  12. Deciphering common recognition principles of nucleoside mono/di and tri-phosphates binding in diverse proteins via structural matching of their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavat, Raghu; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2017-09-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) ligands are of high biological importance and are essential for all life forms. A pre-requisite for them to participate in diverse biochemical processes is their recognition by diverse proteins. It is thus of great interest to understand the basis for such recognition in different proteins. Towards this, we have used a structural bioinformatics approach and analyze structures of 4677 NTP complexes available in Protein Data Bank (PDB). Binding sites were extracted and compared exhaustively using PocketMatch, a sensitive in-house site comparison algorithm, which resulted in grouping the entire dataset into 27 site-types. Each of these site-types represent a structural motif comprised of two or more residue conservations, derived using another in-house tool for superposing binding sites, PocketAlign. The 27 site-types could be grouped further into 9 super-types by considering partial similarities in the sites, which indicated that the individual site-types comprise different combinations of one or more site features. A scan across PDB using the 27 structural motifs determined the motifs to be specific to NTP binding sites, and a computational alanine mutagenesis indicated that residues identified to be highly conserved in the motifs are also most contributing to binding. Alternate orientations of the ligand in several site-types were observed and rationalized, indicating the possibility of some residues serving as anchors for NTP recognition. The presence of multiple site-types and the grouping of multiple folds into each site-type is strongly suggestive of convergent evolution. Knowledge of determinants obtained from this study will be useful for detecting function in unknown proteins. Proteins 2017; 85:1699-1712. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Identification of Host Insulin Binding Sites on Schistosoma japonicum Insulin Receptors.

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    Rachel J Stephenson

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum insulin receptors (SjIRs have been identified as encouraging vaccine candidates. Interrupting or blocking the binding between host insulin and the schistosome insulin receptors (IRs may result in reduced glucose uptake leading to starvation and stunting of worms with a reduction in egg output. To further understand how schistosomes are able to exploit host insulin for development and growth, and whether these parasites and their mammalian hosts compete for the same insulin source, we identified insulin binding sites on the SjIRs. Based on sequence analysis and the predicted antigenic structure of the primary sequences of the SjIRs, we designed nine and eleven peptide analogues from SjIR-1 and SjIR-2, respectively. Using the Octet RED system, we identified analogues derived from SjIR-1 (10 and SjIR-2 (20, 21 and 22 with insulin-binding sequences specific for S. japonicum. Nevertheless, the human insulin receptor (HIR may compete with the SjIRs in binding human insulin in other positions which are important for HIR binding to insulin. However, no binding occurred between insulin and parasite analogues derived from SjIR-1 (2, 7 and 8 and SjIR-2 (14, 16 and 18 at the same locations as HIR sequences which have been shown to have strong insulin binding affinities. Importantly, we found two analogues (1 and 3, derived from SjIR-1, and two analogues (13 and 15 derived from SjIR-2, were responsible for the major insulin binding affinity in S. japonicum. These peptide analogues were shown to have more than 10 times (in KD value stronger binding capacity for human insulin compared with peptides derived from the HIR in the same sequence positions. Paradoxically, analogues 1, 3, 13 and 15 do not appear to contain major antigenic determinants which resulted in poor antibody responses to native S. japonicum protein. This argues against their future development as peptide-vaccine candidates.

  14. The chromosomal high-affinity binding sites for the Drosophila dosage compensation complex.

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    Tobias Straub

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dosage compensation in male Drosophila relies on the X chromosome-specific recruitment of a chromatin-modifying machinery, the dosage compensation complex (DCC. The principles that assure selective targeting of the DCC are unknown. According to a prevalent model, X chromosome targeting is initiated by recruitment of the DCC core components, MSL1 and MSL2, to a limited number of so-called "high-affinity sites" (HAS. Only very few such sites are known at the DNA sequence level, which has precluded the definition of DCC targeting principles. Combining RNA interference against DCC subunits, limited crosslinking, and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to probing high-resolution DNA microarrays, we identified a set of 131 HAS for MSL1 and MSL2 and confirmed their properties by various means. The HAS sites are distributed all over the X chromosome and are functionally important, since the extent of dosage compensation of a given gene and its proximity to a HAS are positively correlated. The sites are mainly located on non-coding parts of genes and predominantly map to regions that are devoid of nucleosomes. In contrast, the bulk of DCC binding is in coding regions and is marked by histone H3K36 methylation. Within the HAS, repetitive DNA sequences mainly based on GA and CA dinucleotides are enriched. Interestingly, DCC subcomplexes bind a small number of autosomal locations with similar features.

  15. Spatial Analysis and Quantification of the Thermodynamic Driving Forces in Protein-Ligand Binding: Binding Site Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provides an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both non-polar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the “hydrophobic effect”. Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. Notable is the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  16. Interaction of mono- and dianions with cyanase: evidence for apparent half-site binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P M; Johnson, W V; Endrizzi, J A; Little, R M; Korte, J J

    1987-06-30

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes bicarbonate-dependent hydrolysis of cyanate. The dianions oxalate, oxalacetate, and malonate are slow-binding inhibitors of cyanase, and some monoanions such as azide and chloride also inhibit cyanase activity [Anderson, P. M., & Little, R. M. (1986) Biochemistry 25, 1621-1626]. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of selected dianions and monoanions by kinetic and equilibrium dialysis binding studies in an effort to obtain information about the active site and catalytic mechanism. Measurement of the effectiveness of 30 different dianions as inhibitors of cyanase showed a significant degree of structural and/or isomeric specificity and considerable variation with respect to the slow-binding nature of the inhibition. Oxalate and oxalacetate both show extreme slow-binding inhibition at very low concentrations. Kinetic studies of the rate of inhibition of cyanase by oxalate showed that the reaction is pseudo first order with respect to oxalate concentration and the results are consistent with a pathway in which oxalate forms a complex with the enzyme in a rapid initial reversible step followed by a slow isomerization step leading to a complex with a very low dissociation constant. The rate of inhibition is significantly reduced by the presence of relatively low concentrations of either azide (analogue of cyanate) or bicarbonate. Equilibrium dialysis binding studies showed that the stoichiometry of binding at saturation for oxalate, malonate, chloride, and bicarbonate is about 0.5 mol of ligand bound/mol of subunit for each compound.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. PET study of carbon-11-PK 11195 binding to peripheral type benzodiazepine sites in glioblastoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappata, S.; Cornu, P.; Samson, Y.; Prenant, C.; Benavides, J.; Scatton, B.; Crouzel, C.; Hauw, J.J.; Syrota, A. (INSERM U. 334 Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Paris (France))

    1991-08-01

    The utility of the peripheral type benzodiazepine site ligand 11C-PK 11195, for imaging human glioma in conjunction with Positron Emission Tomography, relies on a high specific binding of the tracer to tumoral peripheral type benzodiazepines sites. In a patient with glioblastoma, the authors found that 11C-PK 11195 binding was two-fold higher in the tumor than in normal gray matter and that 30% of tumoral binding could be displaced by a large excess of unlabeled drug. These findings suggest that tumoral retention of the ligand is due, in part, to specific binding.

  18. Myelin-associated Glycoprotein Interacts with Neurons via a Sialic Acid Binding Site at ARG118 and a Distinct Neurite Inhibition Site

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Song; Shen, Ying Jing; DeBellard, Maria Elena; Mukhopadhyay, Gitali; Salzer, James L.; Crocker, Paul R.; Filbin, Marie T.

    1997-01-01

    Inhibitory components in myelin are largely responsible for the lack of regeneration in the mammalian CNS. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a sialic acid binding protein and a component of myelin, is a potent inhibitor of neurite outgrowth from a variety of neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that MAG's sialic acid binding site is distinct from its neurite inhibitory activity. Alone, sialic acid–dependent binding of MAG to neurons is insufficient to effect inhibition of axon...

  19. Identification of tubulin drug binding sites and prediction of relative differences in binding affinities to tubulin isotypes using digital signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Huzil, J Torin; Freedman, Holly; Ramachandran, Parameswaran; Antoniou, Andreas; Tuszynski, Jack A; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2008-11-01

    Microtubules are involved in numerous cellular processes including chromosome segregation during mitosis and, as a result, their constituent protein, tubulin, has become a successful target of several chemotherapeutic drugs. In general, these drugs bind indiscriminately to tubulin within both cancerous and healthy cells, resulting in unwanted side effects. However, differences between beta-tubulin isotypes expressed in a wide range of cell types may aid in the development of anti-tubulin drugs having increased specificity for only certain types of cells. Here, we describe a digital signal processing (DSP) method that is capable of predicting hot spots for the tubulin family of proteins as well as determining relative differences in binding affinities to these hot spots based only on the primary sequence of 10 human tubulin isotypes. Due to the fact that several drug binding sites have already been characterized within beta-tubulin, we are able to correlate hot spots with the binding sites for known chemotherapy drugs. We have also verified the accuracy of this method using the correlation between the binding affinities of characterized drugs and the tubulin isotypes. Additionally, the DSP method enables the rapid estimation of relative differences in binding affinities within the binding sites of tubulin isotypes that are yet to be experimentally determined.

  20. Identification of several potential chromatin binding sites of HOXB7 and its downstream target genes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Henna; Lepikhova, Tatiana; Sahu, Biswajyoti; Pehkonen, Henna; Pihlajamaa, Päivi; Louhimo, Riku; Gao, Ping; Wei, Gong-Hong; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Jänne, Olli A; Monni, Outi

    2015-11-15

    HOXB7 encodes a transcription factor that is overexpressed in a number of cancers and encompasses many oncogenic functions. Previous results have shown it to promote cell proliferation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, DNA repair and cell survival. Because of its role in many cancers and tumorigenic processes, HOXB7 has been suggested to be a potential drug target. However, HOXB7 binding sites on chromatin and its targets are poorly known. The aim of our study was to identify HOXB7 binding sites on breast cancer cell chromatin and to delineate direct target genes located nearby these binding sites. We found 1,504 HOXB7 chromatin binding sites in BT-474 breast cancer cell line that overexpresses HOXB7. Seventeen selected binding sites were validated by ChIP-qPCR in several breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we analyzed expression of a large number of genes located nearby HOXB7 binding sites and found several new direct targets, such as CTNND2 and SCGB1D2. Identification of HOXB7 chromatin binding sites and target genes is essential to understand better the role of HOXB7 in breast cancer and mechanisms by which it regulates tumorigenic processes. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  1. Tb3+-cleavage assays reveal specific Mg2+ binding sites necessary to pre-fold the btuB riboswitch for AdoCbl binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Pallavi K.; Gallo, Sofia; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2017-03-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that bind specific metabolites in order to regulate the gene expression involved in controlling the cellular concentration of the respective molecule or ion. Ligand recognition is mostly facilitated by Mg2+ mediated pre-organization of the riboswitch to an active tertiary fold. To predict these specific Mg2+ induced tertiary interactions of the btuB riboswitch from E. coli, we here report Mg2+ binding pockets in its aptameric part in both, the ligand-free and the ligand-bound form. An ensemble of weak and strong metal ion binding sites distributed over the entire aptamer was detected by terbium(III) cleavage assays, Tb3+ being an established Mg2+ mimic. Interestingly many of the Mn+ (n = 2 or 3) binding sites involve conserved bases within the class of coenzyme B12-binding riboswitches. Comparison with the published crystal structure of the coenzyme B12 riboswitch of S. thermophilum aided in identifying a common set of Mn+ binding sites that might be crucial for tertiary interactions involved in the organization of the aptamer. Our results suggest that Mn+ binding at strategic locations of the btuB riboswitch indeed facilitates the assembly of the binding pocket needed for ligand recognition. Binding of the specific ligand, coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl), to the btuB aptamer does however not lead to drastic alterations of these Mn+ binding cores, indicating the lack of a major rearrangement within the three-dimensional structure of the RNA. This finding is strengthened by Tb3+ mediated footprints of the riboswitch's structure in its ligand-free and ligand-bound state indicating that AdoCbl indeed induces local changes rather than a global structural rearrangement.

  2. Coactivation of GR and NFKB alters the repertoire of their binding sites and target genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nagesha A.S.; McCalman, Melysia T.; Moulos, Panagiotis; Francoijs, Kees-Jan; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis; Kolisis, Fragiskos N.; Alexis, Michael N.; Mitsiou, Dimitra J.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) exerts anti-inflammatory action in part by antagonizing proinflammatory transcription factors such as the nuclear factor kappa-b (NFKB). Here, we assess the crosstalk of activated GR and RELA (p65, major NFKB component) by global identification of their binding sites and target genes. We show that coactivation of GR and p65 alters the repertoire of regulated genes and results in their association with novel sites in a mutually dependent manner. These novel sites predominantly cluster with p65 target genes that are antagonized by activated GR and vice versa. Our data show that coactivation of GR and NFKB alters signaling pathways that are regulated by each factor separately and provide insight into the networks underlying the GR and NFKB crosstalk. PMID:21750107

  3. Determination of types and binding sites of advanced glycation end products for substance P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Clavijo, Andrea F; Barrow, Mark P; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J; O'Connor, Peter B

    2012-12-18

    Glycation by endogenous dicarbonyl metabolites such as glyoxal is an important spontaneous post-translational (PTM) modification of peptides and proteins associated with structural and functional impairment. The aim of this study was to investigate types and site of PTM of glyoxal-derived advanced glycation end-products-in the neuropeptide substance P by ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR), mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. The main site of PTM by glyoxal was the side chain guanidine moiety of the arginine residue. Binding site identification has been achieved by electron capture dissociation, double-resonance electron capture dissociation, and collision-activated dissociation, with assignment of the modified amino acid residue with mass error <1 ppm.

  4. Automatic generation of 3D motifs for classification of protein binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzyk Pawel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since many of the new protein structures delivered by high-throughput processes do not have any known function, there is a need for structure-based prediction of protein function. Protein 3D structures can be clustered according to their fold or secondary structures to produce classes of some functional significance. A recent alternative has been to detect specific 3D motifs which are often associated to active sites. Unfortunately, there are very few known 3D motifs, which are usually the result of a manual process, compared to the number of sequential motifs already known. In this paper, we report a method to automatically generate 3D motifs of protein structure binding sites based on consensus atom positions and evaluate it on a set of adenine based ligands. Results Our new approach was validated by generating automatically 3D patterns for the main adenine based ligands, i.e. AMP, ADP and ATP. Out of the 18 detected patterns, only one, the ADP4 pattern, is not associated with well defined structural patterns. Moreover, most of the patterns could be classified as binding site 3D motifs. Literature research revealed that the ADP4 pattern actually corresponds to structural features which show complex evolutionary links between ligases and transferases. Therefore, all of the generated patterns prove to be meaningful. Each pattern was used to query all PDB proteins which bind either purine based or guanine based ligands, in order to evaluate the classification and annotation properties of the pattern. Overall, our 3D patterns matched 31% of proteins with adenine based ligands and 95.5% of them were classified correctly. Conclusion A new metric has been introduced allowing the classification of proteins according to the similarity of atomic environment of binding sites, and a methodology has been developed to automatically produce 3D patterns from that classification. A study of proteins binding adenine based ligands showed that

  5. Atypical SCH23390 binding sites are present on bovine adrenal medullary membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmer, M K; Senogles, S E

    2000-03-01

    D1-selective dopamine receptor agonists inhibit secretagogue-stimulated catecholamine secretion from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. The purpose of the studies reported here was to use the radiolabeled D1-selective dopamine receptor antagonist, SCH23390, to characterize putative D1-like dopamine receptors responsible for this effect. Characterization of SCH23390 binding sites demonstrated an unusual pharmacological profile inconsistent with classical D1-like receptors. [125I]SCH23390 bound to adrenal medullary membranes was competed for by nonradioactive iodo-SCH23390 (Kd = 490 +/- 50 nM), but not by (+)butaclamol. Other classical D1 antagonists had little, if any, effect. Competition with dopamine receptor agonists demonstrated a relative rank order of potency profile characteristic of D1-like dopamine receptors, however, K(i)s were higher than those found in other tissues. The K(i)s for competition of [125I]SCH23390 binding by Cl-APB and SKF38393 (16 and 118 microM, respectively) are nearly identical to the IC(50)s previously observed for inhibition of secretion (9 and 100 microM, respectively). Combined these data suggest that adrenal medullary membranes contain a novel SCH23390 binding site involved in the inhibition of secretion by D1-selective agonists.

  6. Structure of Dioclea virgata lectin: relations between carbohydrate binding site and nitric oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delatorre, P.; Gadelha, C.A.A.; Santi-Gadelha, T. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Nobrega, R.B.; Rocha, B.A.M.; Nascimento, K.S.; Naganao, C.S.; Sampaio, A.H.; Cavada, B.S. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Pires, A.F.; Assreuy, A.M.S. [Universidade Estadual do Ceara (UECE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. By binding to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface, lectins participate in a range of cellular processes without changing the properties of the carbohydrates involved. The lectin of Dioclea virgata (DvirL), both native and complexed with X-man, was submitted to X-ray diffraction analysis and the crystal structure was compared to that of other Diocleinae lectins in order to better understand differences in biological proper- ties, especially with regard to the ability of lectins to induce nitric oxide (NO) production. The DvirL diffraction analysis revealed that both the native crystal and the X-Man-complexed form are orthorhombic and belong to space group I222. The cell parameters were: a=65.4 , b=86.6 and c=90.2 (native structure), and a=61.89 , b=87.67 and c=88.78 (X-Man-complexed structure). An association was observed between the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the ability to induce NO production and the relative positions of Tyr12, Arg228 and Leu99. Thus, differences in biological activity induced by Diocleinae lectins are related to the configuration of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate binding site and to the structural conformation of subsequent regions capable of influencing site-ligand interactions. In conclusion, the ability of Diocleinae lectins to induce NO production depends on CRD configuration. (author)

  7. Hematoxylin staining technique to locate sites of aluminium binding in aquatic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havas, M.

    1986-10-01

    This paper describes a modified hematoxylin staining technique that can be used to locate sites of Al binding in freshwater plants and animals. This technique is fast, simple, and inexpensive to use. It is more reliable for organisms raised under controlled conditions, although it can be used on organisms isolated from the field. In the presence of Al, a purple stain appears which absorbs between 560 and 570 nm. This stain can be used as a live stain over the pH range of 3 to 9. The stain remains stable for at least 12 mo in alcohol-preserved specimens. Low concentrations of Fe (reddish-brown) and high concentrations of Pb (grey) and Cu (pink) can mask the reaction with Al (purple). Fluoride (10:1 molar ratio to Al), EDTA (1:1 ratio to Al), humic acid and PO/sub 4/ (1:10 ratio to Al) can prevent Al uptake or interfere with Al-hematein binding. Based on the technique described in this paper, sites of Al binding in aquatic plants and animals include: nucleus and cell wall of the green alga Mougeotia; cell wall of the aquatic moss Leptodictyum riparium; chloride cells, tip of the penis, and hind gut of the fairy shrimp, Branchinecta paludosa; and the anal papillae of the phantom midge, Chaoborus. 16 references.

  8. A hematoxylin staining technique to locate sites of aluminium binding in aquatic plants and animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havas, M.

    1986-10-01

    A modified hematoxylin staining technique that can be used to locate sites of Al binding in freshwater plants and animals is described. This technique is fast, simple, and inexpensive to use. It is more reliable for organisms raised under controlled conditions, although it can be used on organisms isolated from the field. In the presence of Al, a purple stain appears which absorbs between 560 and 570 nm. This stain can be used as a live stain over the pH range of 3 to 9. The stain remains stable for at least 12 mo in alcohol-preserved specimens. Low concentrations of Fe (reddish-brown) and high concentrations of Pb (grey) and Cu (pink) can mask the reaction with Al (purple). Fluoride (10:1 molar ratio to Al), EDTA (1:1 ratio to Al), humic acid and PO/sub 4/ (1:10 ratio to Al) can prevent Al uptake or interfere with Al-hematein binding. Based on the technique described in this paper, sites of Al binding in aquatic plants and animals include: nucleus and cell wall of the green alga Mougeotia; cell wall of the aquatic moss Leptodictyum riparium; chloride cells, tip of the penis, and hind gut of the fairy shrimp, Branchinecta paludosa; and the anal papillae of the phantom midge, Chaoborus. 16 refs.

  9. Competition for DNA binding sites using Promega DNA IQ™ paramagnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, Chantal J; De Moors, Anick

    2012-09-01

    The Promega DNA IQ™ system is easily amenable to automation and has been an integral part of standard operating procedures for many forensic laboratories including those of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) since 2004. Due to some failure to extract DNA from samples that should have produced DNA using our validated automated DNA IQ™-based protocol, the competition for binding sites on the DNA IQ™ magnetic beads was more closely examined. Heme from heavily blooded samples interfered slightly with DNA binding. Increasing the concentration of Proteinase K during lysis of these samples did not enhance DNA recovery. However, diluting the sample lysate following lysis prior to DNA extraction overcame the reduction in DNA yield and preserved portions of the lysates for subsequent manual or automated extraction. Dye/chemicals from black denim lysates competed for binding sites on the DNA IQ™ beads and significantly reduced DNA recovery. Increasing the size or number of black denim cuttings during lysis had a direct adverse effect on DNA yield from various blood volumes. The dilution approach was successful on these samples and permitted the extraction of high DNA yields. Alternatively, shortening the incubation time for cell lysis to 30 min instead of the usual overnight at 56 °C prevented competition from black denim dye/chemicals and increased DNA yields. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Salivary film expresses a complex, macromolecular binding site for Streptococcus sanguis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, K; Mailloux, L; Herzberg, M C

    2000-03-24

    Teeth in the oral cavity are coated with a salivary film or pellicle, which lacks apparent intermolecular organization. This heterogeneous film facilitates binding of early commensal colonizing bacteria, including Streptococcus sanguis. To test the hypothesis that sufficient intermolecular organization exists in salivary films to form binding sites for S. sanguis, an in vitro model of saliva-coated teeth was probed with murine anti-idiotypical monoclonal antibodies (mAb2, anti-ids). The anti-ids were harvested from hybridomas that were developed in response to first generation murine hybridomas that produced anti-S. sanguis adhesin monoclonal antibodies (mAb1). The anti-ids (i) reacted with experimental salivary films and inhibited S. sanguis adhesion in a dose-dependent fashion. In Western blots, the anti-ids (ii) recognized a high molecular weight salivary antigen and (iii) secretory IgA (sIgA) light chain and alpha-amylase. After isolation by gel filtration from whole saliva or mixed secretory IgA and alpha-amylase, the high molecular weight component, containing amylase activity and sIgA, bound to hydroxyapatite to promote adhesion of S. sanguis. Therefore, a complex enriched in secretory immunoglobulin A and alpha-amylase forms a S. sanguis-binding site.

  11. Capture-C reveals preformed chromatin interactions between HIF-binding sites and distant promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, James L; Salama, Rafik; Smythies, James; Choudhry, Hani; Davies, James Oj; Hughes, Jim R; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Mole, David R

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) directs an extensive transcriptional cascade that transduces numerous adaptive responses to hypoxia. Pan-genomic analyses, using chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript profiling, have revealed large numbers of HIF-binding sites that are generally associated with hypoxia-inducible transcripts, even over long chromosomal distances. However, these studies do not define the specific targets of HIF-binding sites and do not reveal how induction of HIF affects chromatin conformation over distantly connected functional elements. To address these questions, we deployed a recently developed chromosome conformation assay that enables simultaneous high-resolution analyses from multiple viewpoints. These assays defined specific long-range interactions between intergenic HIF-binding regions and one or more promoters of hypoxia-inducible genes, revealing the existence of multiple enhancer-promoter, promoter-enhancer, and enhancer-enhancer interactions. However, neither short-term activation of HIF by hypoxia, nor long-term stabilization of HIF in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-defective cells greatly alters these interactions, indicating that at least under these conditions, HIF can operate on preexisting patterns of chromatin-chromatin interactions that define potential transcriptional targets and permit rapid gene activation by hypoxic stress. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  12. Biocompatible medical implant materials with binding sites for a biodegradable drug-delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Dubai H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Haifa Al-Dubai1, Gisela Pittner1, Fritz Pittner1, Franz Gabor21Max F Perutz Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Feasibility studies have been carried out for development of a biocompatible coating of medical implant materials allowing the binding of biodegradable drug-delivery systems in a way that their reloading might be possible. These novel coatings, able to bind biodegradable nanoparticles, may serve in the long run as drug carriers to mediate local pharmacological activity. After biodegradation of the nanoparticles, the binding sites could be reloaded with fresh drug-delivering particles. As a suitable receptor system for the nanoparticles, antibodies are anchored. The design of the receptor is of great importance as any bio- or chemorecognitive interaction with other components circulating in the blood has to be avoided. Furthermore, the binding between receptor and the particles has to be strong enough to keep them tightly bound during their lifetime, but on the other hand allow reloading after final degradation of the particles. The nanoparticles suggested as a drug-delivery system for medical implants can be loaded with different pharmaceuticals such as antibiotics, growth factors, or immunosuppressives. This concept may enable the changing of medication, even after implantation of the medical device, if afforded by patients’ needs.Keywords: antibody immobilization, biocompatible coating, chitosan nanoparticles, drug targeting, medical device

  13. Effects of the cofactor binding sites on the activities of secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Xiangjun; Han, Jun; Ma, Sichun; Wang, Jianmei; Li, Xufeng; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    SADHs from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are enzymes that, together with various cofactors, catalyze the reversible reduction of carbonyl compounds to their corresponding alcohols. To explore how cofactors bind to SADH, TeSADH was cloned in this study, and Ser(199) and Arg(200) were replaced by Tyr and Asp, respectively. Both sites were expected to be inside or adjacent to the cofactor-binding domain according to computational a prediction. Analysis of TeSADH activities revealed that the enzymatic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the S199Y mutant was noticeably enhanced using by NADH, NADPH as cofactors, and similar with that of wild-type using by NADP(+), NAD(+). Conversely, the activity of the R200D mutant significantly decreased with all cofactors. Furthermore, in yeast, the S199Y mutant substantially elevated the ethanol concentration compared with the wild type. Molecular dynamics simulation results indicated the H-bonding network between TeSADH and the cofactors was stronger for the S199Y mutant and the binding energy was simultaneously increased. Moreover, the fluorescence results indicated the S199Y mutant exhibited an increased preference for NAD(P)H, binding with NAD(P)H more compactly compared with wild type. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Myelin-associated glycoprotein interacts with neurons via a sialic acid binding site at ARG118 and a distinct neurite inhibition site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S; Shen, Y J; DeBellard, M E; Mukhopadhyay, G; Salzer, J L; Crocker, P R; Filbin, M T

    1997-09-22

    Inhibitory components in myelin are largely responsible for the lack of regeneration in the mammalian CNS. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a sialic acid binding protein and a component of myelin, is a potent inhibitor of neurite outgrowth from a variety of neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that MAG's sialic acid binding site is distinct from its neurite inhibitory activity. Alone, sialic acid-dependent binding of MAG to neurons is insufficient to effect inhibition of axonal growth. Thus, while soluble MAG-Fc (MAG extracellular domain fused to Fc), a truncated form of MAG-Fc missing Ig-domains 4 and 5, MAG(d1-3)-Fc, and another sialic acid binding protein, sialoadhesin, each bind to neurons in a sialic acid- dependent manner, only full-length MAG-Fc inhibits neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that a second site must exist on MAG which elicits this response. Consistent with this model, mutation of arginine 118 (R118) in MAG to either alanine or aspartate abolishes its sialic acid-dependent binding. However, when expressed at the surface of either CHO or Schwann cells, R118-mutated MAG retains the ability to inhibit axonal outgrowth. Hence, MAG has two recognition sites for neurons, the sialic acid binding site at R118 and a distinct inhibition site which is absent from the first three Ig domains.

  15. Myelin-associated Glycoprotein Interacts with Neurons via a Sialic Acid Binding Site at ARG118 and a Distinct Neurite Inhibition Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Song; Shen, Ying Jing; DeBellard, Maria Elena; Mukhopadhyay, Gitali; Salzer, James L.; Crocker, Paul R.; Filbin, Marie T.

    1997-01-01

    Inhibitory components in myelin are largely responsible for the lack of regeneration in the mammalian CNS. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a sialic acid binding protein and a component of myelin, is a potent inhibitor of neurite outgrowth from a variety of neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that MAG's sialic acid binding site is distinct from its neurite inhibitory activity. Alone, sialic acid–dependent binding of MAG to neurons is insufficient to effect inhibition of axonal growth. Thus, while soluble MAG-Fc (MAG extracellular domain fused to Fc), a truncated form of MAG-Fc missing Ig-domains 4 and 5, MAG(d1-3)-Fc, and another sialic acid binding protein, sialoadhesin, each bind to neurons in a sialic acid– dependent manner, only full-length MAG-Fc inhibits neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that a second site must exist on MAG which elicits this response. Consistent with this model, mutation of arginine 118 (R118) in MAG to either alanine or aspartate abolishes its sialic acid–dependent binding. However, when expressed at the surface of either CHO or Schwann cells, R118-mutated MAG retains the ability to inhibit axonal outgrowth. Hence, MAG has two recognition sites for neurons, the sialic acid binding site at R118 and a distinct inhibition site which is absent from the first three Ig domains. PMID:9298990

  16. AutoSite: an automated approach for pseudo-ligands prediction—from ligand-binding sites identification to predicting key ligand atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Sanner, Michel F.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The identification of ligand-binding sites from a protein structure facilitates computational drug design and optimization, and protein function assignment. We introduce AutoSite: an efficient software tool for identifying ligand-binding sites and predicting pseudo ligand corresponding to each binding site identified. Binding sites are reported as clusters of 3D points called fills in which every point is labelled as hydrophobic or as hydrogen bond donor or acceptor. From these fills AutoSite derives feature points: a set of putative positions of hydrophobic-, and hydrogen-bond forming ligand atoms. Results: We show that AutoSite identifies ligand-binding sites with higher accuracy than other leading methods, and produces fills that better matches the ligand shape and properties, than the fills obtained with a software program with similar capabilities, AutoLigand. In addition, we demonstrate that for the Astex Diverse Set, the feature points identify 79% of hydrophobic ligand atoms, and 81% and 62% of the hydrogen acceptor and donor hydrogen ligand atoms interacting with the receptor, and predict 81.2% of water molecules mediating interactions between ligand and receptor. Finally, we illustrate potential uses of the predicted feature points in the context of lead optimization in drug discovery projects. Availability and Implementation: http://adfr.scripps.edu/AutoDockFR/autosite.html Contact: sanner@scripps.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27354702

  17. Impact of Alu repeats on the evolution of human p53 binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirotin Michael V

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 tumor suppressor protein is involved in a complicated regulatory network, mediating expression of ~1000 human genes. Recent studies have shown that many p53 in vivo binding sites (BSs reside in transposable repeats. The relationship between these BSs and functional p53 response elements (REs remains unknown, however. We sought to understand whether the p53 REs also reside in transposable elements and particularly in the most-abundant Alu repeats. Results We have analyzed ~160 functional p53 REs identified so far and found that 24 of them occur in repeats. More than half of these repeat-associated REs reside in Alu elements. In addition, using a position weight matrix approach, we found ~400,000 potential p53 BSs in Alu elements genome-wide. Importantly, these putative BSs are located in the same regions of Alu repeats as the functional p53 REs - namely, in the vicinity of Boxes A/A' and B of the internal RNA polymerase III promoter. Earlier nucleosome-mapping experiments showed that the Boxes A/A' and B have a different chromatin environment, which is critical for the binding of p53 to DNA. Here, we compare the Alu-residing p53 sites with the corresponding Alu consensus sequences and conclude that the p53 sites likely evolved through two different mechanisms - the sites overlapping with the Boxes A/A' were generated by CG → TG mutations; the other sites apparently pre-existed in the progenitors of several Alu subfamilies, such as AluJo and AluSq. The binding affinity of p53 to the Alu-residing sites generally correlates with the age of Alu subfamilies, so that the strongest sites are embedded in the 'relatively young' Alu repeats. Conclusions The primate-specific Alu repeats play an important role in shaping the p53 regulatory network in the context of chromatin. One of the selective factors responsible for the frequent occurrence of Alu repeats in introns may be related to the p53-mediated regulation of Alu

  18. Genome-wide redistribution of BRD4 binding sites in transformation resistant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS patients do not develop cancer despite a significant accumulation of DNA damage in their cells. We have recently reported that HGPS cells are refractory to experimental oncogenic transformation and we identified the bromodomain-containing 4 protein (BRD4 as a mediator of the transformation resistance. ChIP-sequencing experiments revealed distinct genome-wide binding patterns for BRD4 in HGPS cells when compared to control wild type cells. Here we provide a detailed description of the ChIP-seq dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE61325, the specific and common BRD4 binding sites between HGPS and control cells, and the data analysis procedure associated with the publication by Fernandez et al., 2014 in Cell Reports 9, 248-260 [1].

  19. Identification of Ubiquinol Binding Motifs at the Qo-Site of the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barragan, Angela M.; Crofts, Antony R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    all atom molecular dynamics and quantum chemical calculations to reveal the binding modes of quinol at the Qo-site of the bc1 complex from Rhodobacter capsulatus. The calculations suggest a novel configuration of amino acid residues responsible for quinol binding and support a mechanism for proton......Enzymes of the bc1 complex family power the biosphere through their central role in respiration and photosynthesis. These enzymes couple the oxidation of quinol molecules by cytochrome c to the transfer of protons across the membrane, to generate a proton-motive force that drives ATP synthesis. Key...... for the function of the bc1 complex is the initial redox process that involves a bifurcated electron transfer in which the two electrons from a quinol substrate are passed to different electron acceptors in the bc1 complex. The electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer. The overall mechanism of quinol...

  20. Surface binding sites (SBSs), mechanism and regulation of enzymes degrading amylopectin and α-limit dextrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Jonas W.

    2013-01-01

    into barley seed α-amylase 1 (AMY1) and limit dextrinase (LD) includes i. kinetics of bi-exponential amylopectin hydrolysis by AMY1, one reaction having low Km (8 μg/mL) and high kcat (57 s-1) and the other high Km (97 μg/mL) and low kcat (23 s-1). β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD) inhibits the first reaction by binding...... with domains including CBM21 present in other proteins and involved in various molecular interactions, but no binding site identity. LD is controlled by barley limit dextrinase inhibitor (LDI) which belongs to the cereal-type inhibitor family and forms a tight 1:1 complex with LD. iii. LDI in turn is regulated...

  1. Antibodies elicited by influenza virus hemagglutinin fail to bind to synthetic peptides representing putative antigenic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestorowicz, A; Tregear, G W; Southwell, C N; Martyn, J; Murray, J M; White, D O; Jackson, D C

    1985-02-01

    A number of peptides of the hemagglutinin (HA) of X-31 influenza virus have been synthesised. The amino acid sequences of some of these peptides represent regions of HA which have been postulated [Wiley et al., Nature, Lond. 289, 373-378 (1981)] to form the antigenic sites of this molecule. Animals were immunized with free peptide or peptide conjugated to a carrier and the resulting antisera examined for their capacities to bind to homologous peptide, whole HA, reduced and alkylated HA, and intact virus. Not all peptides examined in this way were immunogenic. Only antibodies raised against the C-terminus of HA1 peptide displayed binding to virus. This antiserum bound to the intact HA but not to the reduced and alkylated form of the molecule. These results raise questions as to the feasibility of using synthetic peptides of the influenza HA in short linear sequences to elicit neutralising antibody.

  2. Affinity polymers tailored for the protein A binding site of immunoglobulin G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latza, Patricia; Gilles, Patrick; Schaller, Torsten; Schrader, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Rational design in combination with a screening process was used to develop affinity polymers for a specific binding site on the surface of immunoglobulin G (IgG) proteins. The concept starts with the identification of critical amino acid residues on the protein interface and their topological arrangement. Appropriate binding monomers were subsequently synthesized. Together with a sugar monomer (2-5 equiv) for water solubility and a dansyl monomer (0.5 equiv) as a fluorescent label, they were subjected in aqueous solution to linear radical copolymerization in various compositions (e.g., azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN), homogeneous water/DMF mixtures). After ultrafiltration and lyophilization, colorless dry water-soluble powders were obtained. NMR spectroscopic and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) characterization indicated molecular weights between 30 and 500 kD and confirmed retention of monomer composition as well as the absence of monomers. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screen of the polymer libraries (20-50 members), few copolymers qualified as strong and selective binders for the protein A binding site on the Fc fragment of the antibody. Their monomer composition precisely reflected the critical amino acids found at the interface. The simple combination of a charged and a nonpolar binding monomer sufficed for selective submicromolar IgG recognition by the synthetic polymer. Affinities were confirmed by fluorescence titrations; they increased with decreasing salt load but remained largely unaltered at lowered pH. Other proteins, including those of similar size and isoelectric point (pI), were bound 10-1000 times less tightly. This example indicates that interaction domains in other proteins may also be targeted by synthetic polymers if their comonomer composition reflects the nature and arrangement of amino acid residues on the protein surface. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Oxytocin receptor binding sites in the periphery of the neonatal mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Greenwood

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OXT is a pleiotropic regulator of physiology and behavior. An emerging body of evidence demonstrates a role for OXT in the transition to postnatal life of the infant. To identify potential sites of OXT action via the OXT receptor (OXTR in the newborn mouse, we performed receptor autoradiography on 20 μm sagittal sections of whole postnatal day 0 male and female mice on a C57BL/6J background using the 125iodinated ornithine vasotocin analog ([125I]-OVTA radioligand. A competitive binding assay on both wild-type (WT and OXTR knockout (OXTR KO tissue was used to assess the selectivity of [125I]-OVTA for neonatal OXTR. Radioactive ligand (0.05 nM [125I]-OVTA was competed against concentrations of 0 nM, 10 nM, and 1000 nM excess unlabeled OXT. Autoradiographs demonstrated the high selectivity of the radioligand for infant peripheral OXTR. Specific ligand binding activity for OXTR was observed in the oronasal cavity, the eye, whisker pads, adrenal gland, and anogenital region in the neonatal OXTR WT mouse, but was absent in neonatal OXTR KO. Nonspecific binding was observed in areas with a high lipid content such as the scapular brown adipose tissue and the liver: in these regions, binding was present in both OXTR WT and KO mice, and could not be competed away with OXT in either WT or KO mice. Collectively, these data confirm novel OXT targets in the periphery of the neonate. These peripheral OXTR sites, coupled with the immaturity of the neonate's own OXT system, suggest a role for exogenous OXT in modulating peripheral physiology and development.

  4. The retrovirus HTLV-1 inserts an ectopic CTCF-binding site into the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satou, Yorifumi; Miyazato, Paola; Ishihara, Ko; Yaguchi, Hiroko; Melamed, Anat; Miura, Michi; Fukuda, Asami; Nosaka, Kisato; Watanabe, Takehisa; Rowan, Aileen G; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-03-15

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that causes malignant and inflammatory diseases in ∼10% of infected people. A typical host has between 10(4) and 10(5) clones of HTLV-1-infected T lymphocytes, each clone distinguished by the genomic integration site of the single-copy HTLV-1 provirus. The HTLV-1 bZIP (HBZ) factor gene is constitutively expressed from the minus strand of the provirus, whereas plus-strand expression, required for viral propagation to uninfected cells, is suppressed or intermittent in vivo, allowing escape from host immune surveillance. It remains unknown what regulates this pattern of proviral transcription and latency. Here, we show that CTCF, a key regulator of chromatin structure and function, binds to the provirus at a sharp border in epigenetic modifications in the pX region of the HTLV-1 provirus in T cells naturally infected with HTLV-1. CTCF is a zinc-finger protein that binds to an insulator region in genomic DNA and plays a fundamental role in controlling higher order chromatin structure and gene expression in vertebrate cells. We show that CTCF bound to HTLV-1 acts as an enhancer blocker, regulates HTLV-1 mRNA splicing, and forms long-distance interactions with flanking host chromatin. CTCF-binding sites (CTCF-BSs) have been propagated throughout the genome by transposons in certain primate lineages, but CTCF binding has not previously been described in present-day exogenous retroviruses. The presence of an ectopic CTCF-BS introduced by the retrovirus in tens of thousands of genomic locations has the potential to cause widespread abnormalities in host cell chromatin structure and gene expression.

  5. A machine learning strategy to identify candidate binding sites in human protein-coding sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leong Bernard

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The splicing of RNA transcripts is thought to be partly promoted and regulated by sequences embedded within exons. Known sequences include binding sites for SR proteins, which are thought to mediate interactions between splicing factors bound to the 5' and 3' splice sites. It would be useful to identify further candidate sequences, however identifying them computationally is hard since exon sequences are also constrained by their functional role in coding for proteins. Results This strategy identified a collection of motifs including several previously reported splice enhancer elements. Although only trained on coding exons, the model discriminates both coding and non-coding exons from intragenic sequence. Conclusion We have trained a computational model able to detect signals in coding exons which seem to be orthogonal to the sequences' primary function of coding for proteins. We believe that many of the motifs detected here represent binding sites for both previously unrecognized proteins which influence RNA splicing as well as other regulatory elements.

  6. An FTIR investigation of flanking sequence effects on the structure and flexibility of DNA binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Talia R; Fong, Kimberly K; Jordan, Brian; Lek, Janista C; Levitan, Rachel; Mitchell, Patrick S; Wood, Corrina; Hatcher, Mary E

    2009-02-17

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and a library of FTIR marker bands have been used to examine the structure and relative flexibilities conferred by different flanking sequences on the EcoRI binding site. This approach allowed us to examine unique peaks and subtle changes in the spectra of d(AAAGAATTCTTT)(2), d(TTCGAATTCGAA)(2), and d(CGCGAATTCGCG)(2) and thereby identify local changes in base pairing, base stacking, backbone conformation, glycosidic bond rotation, and sugar puckering in the studied sequences. The changes in flanking sequences induce differences in the sugar puckers, glycosidic bond rotation, and backbone conformations. Varying levels of local flexibility are observed within the sequences in agreement with previous biological activity assays. The results also provide supporting evidence for the presence of a splay in the G(4)-C(9) base pair of the EcoRI binding site and a potential pocket of flexibility at the G(4) cleavage site that have been proposed in the literature. In sum, we have demonstrated that FTIR is a powerful methodology for studying the effect of flanking sequences on DNA structure and flexibility, for it can provide information about the local structure of the nucleic acid and the overall relative flexibilities conferred by different flanking sequences.

  7. Common structural features of cholesterol binding sites in crystallized soluble proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alejandro M

    2017-06-01

    Cholesterol-protein interactions are essential for the architectural organization of cell membranes and for lipid metabolism. While cholesterol-sensing motifs in transmembrane proteins have been identified, little is known about cholesterol recognition by soluble proteins. We reviewed the structural characteristics of binding sites for cholesterol and cholesterol sulfate from crystallographic structures available in the Protein Data Bank. This analysis unveiled key features of cholesterol-binding sites that are present in either all or the majority of sites: i ) the cholesterol molecule is generally positioned between protein domains that have an organized secondary structure; ii ) the cholesterol hydroxyl/sulfo group is often partnered by Asn, Gln, and/or Tyr, while the hydrophobic part of cholesterol interacts with Leu, Ile, Val, and/or Phe; iii ) cholesterol hydrogen-bonding partners are often found on α-helices, while amino acids that interact with cholesterol's hydrophobic core have a slight preference for β-strands and secondary structure-lacking protein areas; iv ) the steroid's C21 and C26 constitute the "hot spots" most often seen for steroid-protein hydrophobic interactions; v ) common "cold spots" are C8-C10, C13, and C17, at which contacts with the proteins were not detected. Several common features we identified for soluble protein-steroid interaction appear evolutionarily conserved. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. DNA Sequence Constraints Define Functionally Active Steroid Nuclear Receptor Binding Sites in Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, Laurel A; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Burkholder, Adam B; McDonnell, Donald P; Korach, Kenneth S

    2017-10-01

    Gene regulatory programs are encoded in the sequence of the DNA. Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, millions of gene regulatory elements have been identified in the human genome. Understanding how each of those sites functionally contributes to gene regulation, however, remains a challenge for nearly every field of biology. Transcription factors influence cell function by interpreting information contained within cis-regulatory elements in chromatin. Whereas chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing has been used to identify and map transcription factor-DNA interactions, it has been difficult to assign functionality to the binding sites identified. Thus, in this study, we probed the transcriptional activity, DNA-binding competence, and functional activity of select nuclear receptor mutants in cellular and animal model systems and used this information to define the sequence constraints of functional steroid nuclear receptor cis-regulatory elements. Analysis of the architecture within sNR chromatin interacting sites revealed that only a small fraction of all sNR chromatin-interacting events is associated with transcriptional output and that this functionality is restricted to elements that vary from the consensus palindromic elements by one or two nucleotides. These findings define the transcriptional grammar necessary to predict functionality from regulatory sequences, with a multitude of future implications. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  9. Lack of Ligand-Selective Binding of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor to Putative DNA Binding Sites Regulating Expression of Bax and Paraoxonase 1 Genes

    OpenAIRE

    DeGroot, Danica E.; Hayashi, Ai; Michael S Denison

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions ...

  10. Specific /sup 3/H-DMCM binding to a non-benzodiazepine binding site after silver ion treatment of rat brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honore, T.; Nielsen, M.; Braestrup, C.

    1984-11-26

    Specific binding of the BZ-receptor ligand /sup 3/H-DMCM to rat cortical membranes was dramatically enhanced by preincubation of the homogenate with 0.1 mM silver (Ag/sup +/) nitrate. The binding was completely inhibited by midazolam. Nevertheless, the pharmacological specificity of the Ag/sup +/-enhanced /sup 3/H-DMCM binding was different from that of BZ-receptors. Furthermore, the B/sub max/ value, the regional distribution and the molecular target size determined by radiation inactivation analysis of the Ag/sup +/-enhanced binding site were different from those of BZ-receptors. The results indicate that Ag/sup +/-enhanced /sup 3/H-DMCM binding represent a high affinity metal complex formation between /sup 3/H-DMCM and an unknown brain specific protein of approximately 100,000 daltons molecular weight. 11 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  11. The binding site for neohesperidin dihydrochalcone at the human sweet taste receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratochwil Nicole A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in sweet taste perception among species depend on structural variations of the sweet taste receptor. The commercially used isovanillyl sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone activates the human but not the rat sweet receptor TAS1R2+TAS1R3. Analysis of interspecies combinations and chimeras of rat and human TAS1R2+TAS1R3 suggested that the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 is crucial for the activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Results By mutational analysis combined with functional studies and molecular modeling we identified a set of different amino acid residues within the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 that forms the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding pocket. Sixteen amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains 2 to 7 and one in the extracellular loop 2 of hTAS1R3 influenced the receptor's response to neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Some of these seventeen residues are also part of the binding sites for the sweetener cyclamate or the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. In line with this observation, lactisole inhibited activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate competitively, whereas receptor activation by aspartame, a sweetener known to bind to the N-terminal domain of TAS1R2, was allosterically inhibited. Seven of the amino acid positions crucial for activation of hTAS1R2+hTAS1R3 by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are thought to play a role in the binding of allosteric modulators of other class C GPCRs, further supporting our model of the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone pharmacophore. Conclusion From our data we conclude that we identified the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding site at the human sweet taste receptor, which overlaps with those for the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. This readily delivers a molecular explanation of our finding that lactisole is a competitive inhibitor of the receptor

  12. Characterization of saturable binding sites for circulating pancreatic polypeptide in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitcomb, D.C.; Taylor, I.L.; Vigna, S.R. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) inhibits pancreatic exocrine secretion by indirect mechanisms that may be centrally mediated. The central site of action of PP that results in inhibition of pancreatic secretion has not been identified. Using autoradiography to identify 125I-PP binding to frozen sections of rat brain, we have identified saturable, high-affinity PP receptors in high concentrations in the interpenduncular nucleus, area postrema (AP), nucleus tractus solitarius, and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. The PP receptor differs from neuropeptide Y and peptide YY receptors in its binding specificity and location. Because PP is not produced in the brain, and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) excludes circulating peptides from most areas in the brain, we employed an in vivo radioreceptor assay to determine whether circulating PP binds to areas such as the AP that has both an incomplete BBB and a high concentration of PP receptors. 125I-PP and 131I-bovine serum albumin were infused simultaneously into rats through a peripheral vein with or without excess unlabeled PP. After 10 min, rats were killed and the brains were removed and cut into eight regions based on the autoradiographic localization of PP receptors. There was a significant (P less than 0.02) increase in saturable radiolabeled PP accumulation in the region that included the AP, demonstrating that circulating PP can bind to this area of the brain in vivo. PP is released into the circulation after a meal via mechanisms that exhibit vagal and cholinergic dependence. We speculate that PP completes a feedback loop by binding to receptors in the AP and interacting with the adjacent vagal nuclei to inhibit vagal activity.

  13. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Veerabasappa T

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2, present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS. The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors.

  14. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Grazyna; Gowda, Veerabasappa T; Maroun, Rachid C

    2007-12-06

    The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2), present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL) at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i) presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii) natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii) coagulation factors present in human blood. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa) via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-beta-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS). The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors.

  15. Binding site structure of one LRP-RAP complex: implications for a common ligand-receptor binding motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gitte A; Andersen, Olav M; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2006-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) interacts with more than 30 ligands of different sizes and structures that can all be replaced by the receptor-associated protein (RAP). The double module of complement type repeats, CR56, of LRP binds many ligands including all three...... domains of RAP and alpha2-macroglobulin, which promotes the catabolism of the Abeta-peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. To understand the receptor-ligand cross-talk, the NMR structure of CR56 has been solved and ligand binding experiments with RAP domain 1 (RAPd1) have been performed. From chemical...... shift perturbations of both binding partners upon complex formation, a HADDOCK model of the complex between CR56 and RAPd1 has been obtained. The binding residues are similar to a common binding motif suggested from alpha2-macroglobulin binding studies and provide evidence for an understanding...

  16. Factor XI anion-binding sites are required for productive interactions with polyphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Y; Verhamme, I M; Smith, S A; Cheng, Q; Sun, M; Sheehan, J P; Morrissey, J H; Gailani, D

    2013-11-01

    Conversion of factor XI (FXI) to FXIa is enhanced by polymers of inorganic phosphate (polyP). This process requires FXI to bind to polyP. Each FXIa subunit contains anion-binding sites (ABSs) on the apple 3 (A3) and catalytic domains that are required for normal heparin-mediated enhancement of FXIa inhibition by antithrombin. To determine the importance of FXI ABSs to polyP enhancement of FXI activation. Recombinant FXI variants lacking one or both ABSs were tested in polyP-dependent purified protein systems, plasma clotting assays, and a murine thrombosis model. In the presence of polyP, activation rates for FXI lacking either ABS were reduced compared with wild-type FXI, and FXI lacking both sites had an even greater defect. In contrast to heparin, polyP binding to FXIa did not enhance inhibition by antithrombin and did not interfere with FXIa activation of FIX. FXI lacking one or both ABSs does not reconstitute FXI-deficient plasma as well as wild-type FXI when polyP was used to initiate coagulation. In FXI-deficient mice, FXI lacking one or more ABSs was inferior to wild-type FXI in supporting arterial thrombus formation. The ABSs on FXIa that are required for expression of heparin's cofactor activity during protease inhibition by antithrombin are also required for expression of polyP cofactor activity during FXI activation. These sites may contribute to FXI-dependent thrombotic processes. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. The receptor-binding site of the measles virus hemagglutinin protein itself constitutes a conserved neutralizing epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Maino; Ohno, Shinji; Sakai, Kouji; Ito, Yuri; Fukuhara, Hideo; Komase, Katsuhiro; Brindley, Melinda A; Rota, Paul A; Plemper, Richard K; Maenaka, Katsumi; Takeda, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    Here, we provide direct evidence that the receptor-binding site of measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin protein itself forms an effective conserved neutralizing epitope (CNE). Several receptor-interacting residues constitute the CNE. Thus, viral escape from neutralization has to be associated with loss of receptor-binding activity. Since interactions with both the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) and nectin4 are critical for MV pathogenesis, its escape, which results from loss of receptor-binding activity, should not occur in nature.

  18. Composite organization of the cobalamin binding and cubilin recognition sites of intrinsic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Fedosova, Natalya U; Berglund, Lars

    2005-01-01

    of the ligand. Each isolated fragment of IF was tested for the binding to the specific receptor cubilin in the presence or absence of Cbl. Neither apo nor holo forms of IF(20) and IF(30) were recognized by the receptor. When two fragments were mixed and incubated with Cbl, they associated into a stable complex......, IF(30+20).Cbl, which bound to cubilin as well as the noncleaved IF(50).Cbl complex. We suggest that formation of the cubilin recognition site on IF is caused by assembly of two distant domains, which allows the saturated protein to be recognized by the receptor. The obtained parameters for ligand...

  19. A role for the weak DnaA binding sites in bacterial replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    DnaA initiates the chromosomal DNA replication in nearly all bacteria, and replication origins are characterized by binding sites for the DnaA protein (DnaA-boxes) along with an ‘AT-rich’ region. However, great variation in number, spatial organization and specificity of DnaA-boxes is observed...... between species. In the study by Taylor et al. (2011), new and unexpectedly weak DnaA-boxes were identified within the Caulobacter crescentus origin of replication (Cori). The position of weak and stronger DnaA-boxes follows a pattern seen in Escherichia coli oriC. This raises the possibility...

  20. Asap: a framework for over-representation statistics for transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, Troels T; Frellsen, Jes; Moltke, Ida

    2008-01-01

    -founded choice. METHODOLOGY: We introduce a software package, Asap, for fast searching with position weight matrices that include several standard methods for assessing over-representation. We have compared the ability of these methods to detect over-represented transcription factor binding sites in artificial...... than more naïve scanning algorithms when searching with many weight matrices in large sequence sets. When comparing the various statistics, we show that those based on binomial over-representation and Fisher's exact test performs almost equally good and better than the others. An online server...

  1. ProBiS-ligands: a web server for prediction of ligands by examination of protein binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, Janez; Janežič, Dušanka

    2014-07-01

    The ProBiS-ligands web server predicts binding of ligands to a protein structure. Starting with a protein structure or binding site, ProBiS-ligands first identifies template proteins in the Protein Data Bank that share similar binding sites. Based on the superimpositions of the query protein and the similar binding sites found, the server then transposes the ligand structures from those sites to the query protein. Such ligand prediction supports many activities, e.g. drug repurposing. The ProBiS-ligands web server, an extension of the ProBiS web server, is open and free to all users at http://probis.cmm.ki.si/ligands. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Dopaminergic control of 125I-labeled neurotensin binding site density in corticolimbic structures of the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, D.; Tassin, J.P.; Studler, J.M.; Dana, C.; Kitabgi, P.; Vincent, J.P.; Glowinski, J.; Rostene, W.

    1986-08-01

    In the rat brain, destruction of dopaminergic cell groups by injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the ventral mesencephalic tegmentum results in large decreases in the number of neurotensin binding sites in the mesencephalon and the striatum. In contrast, these lesions produce an increase in the number of /sup 125/I-labeled neurotensin binding sites in the lateral part of the prefrontal cortex despite a large decrease in cortical dopamine levels. Increases in the number of /sup 125/I-labeled neurotensin binding sites in this cortical area as well as in the entorhinal cortex, the nucleus accumbens, and the central part of the striatum were also obtained after chronic blockade of dopamine neurotransmission by a long-acting neuroleptic pipotiazine palmitic ester. We propose that dopamine inputs regulate the density of postsynaptic neurotensin binding sites through cortical and subcortical dopamine receptors. Therefore, some of the clinical effects of neuroleptics in schizophrenic patients could be partly related to changes in neurotensin neurotransmission.

  3. Interactome-Wide Prediction of Protein-Protein Binding Sites Reveals Effects of Protein Sequence Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentim, F.L.; Neven, F.; Boyen, P.; Dijk, van A.D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The specificity of protein-protein interactions is encoded in those parts of the sequence that compose the binding interface. Therefore, understanding how changes in protein sequence influence interaction specificity, and possibly the phenotype, requires knowing the location of binding sites in

  4. The characterization of a novel S100A1 binding site in the N-terminus of TRPM1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirků, M.; Lánský, Z.; Bednárová, Lucie; Šulc, M.; Monincová, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Vyklický, L.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Teisinger, J.; Boušová, Kristýna

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 78, Sep (2016), s. 186-193 ISSN 1357-2725 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : TRPM1 channel * binding site * calcium-binding protein S100A1 * steady-state fluorescence anisotropy * molecular modeling * circular dichroism Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.505, year: 2016

  5. Removal of toxin (tetrodotoxin) from puffer ovary by traditional fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anraku, Kensaku; Nonaka, Kiku; Yamaga, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Shin, Min-Chul; Wakita, Masahito; Hamamoto, Ayaka; Akaike, Norio

    2013-01-18

    The amounts of puffer toxin (tetrodotoxin, TTX) extracted from the fresh and the traditional Japanese salted and fermented "Nukazuke" and "Kasuzuke" ovaries of Takifugu stictonotus (T. stictonotus) were quantitatively analyzed in the voltage-dependent sodium current (I(Na)) recorded from mechanically dissociated single rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. The amount of TTX contained in "Nukazuke" and "Kasuzuke" ovaries decreased to 1/50-1/90 times of that of fresh ovary during a salted and successive fermented period over a few years. The final toxin concentration after fermentation was almost close to the TTX level extracted from T. Rubripes" fresh muscle that is normally eaten. It was concluded that the fermented "Nukazuke" and "Kasuzuke" ovaries of puffer fish T. Stictonotus are safe and harmless as food.

  6. Removal of Toxin (Tetrodotoxin from Puffer Ovary by Traditional Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Akaike

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The amounts of puffer toxin (tetrodotoxin, TTX extracted from the fresh and the traditional Japanese salted and fermented “Nukazuke” and “Kasuzuke” ovaries of Takifugu stictonotus (T. stictonotus were quantitatively analyzed in the voltage-dependent sodium current (INa recorded from mechanically dissociated single rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. The amount of TTX contained in “Nukazuke” and “Kasuzuke” ovaries decreased to 1/50–1/90 times of that of fresh ovary during a salted and successive fermented period over a few years. The final toxin concentration after fermentation was almost close to the TTX level extracted from T. Rubripes” fresh muscle that is normally eaten. It was concluded that the fermented “Nukazuke” and “Kasuzuke” ovaries of puffer fish T. Stictonotus are safe and harmless as food.

  7. Comparison of in silico tools for binding site prediction applied for structure-based design of autolysin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaut, T; Borišek, J; Novič, M; Turk, D

    2016-07-01

    Autolysin E (AtlE) is a bacteriolytic enzyme which plays an important role in division and growth of bacterial cells and therefore represents a promising potential drug target. Its 3D structure has been recently elucidated. We used in silico prediction tools to study substrate or ligand (inhibitor) binding regions of AtlE. We applied several freely available tools and a commercial tool for binding site identification and compared results of the prediction. Calculation time, number of predictions and output data provided by specific software vary according to the different approaches utilized by specific method categories. Despite different approaches, binding sites in similar locations on the protein were predicted. Specific amino acid residues that form these binding sites were predicted as binding residues. The predicted residues, especially those with predicted highest conservation score, could theoretically have catalytic and binding properties. According to our results, we assume that E138, which has the highest conservation score, is the catalytic residue and F161, G162 and Y224, which are also highly conserved, are responsible for substrate binding. Ligands developed with binding specificity towards these residues could inhibit the catalysis and binding of the substrate of AtlE. The molecules with inhibitory potency could therefore represent potential new antibacterial agents.

  8. Disease variants alter transcription factor levels and methylation of their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonder, Marc Jan; Luijk, René; Zhernakova, Daria V; Moed, Matthijs; Deelen, Patrick; Vermaat, Martijn; van Iterson, Maarten; van Dijk, Freerk; van Galen, Michiel; Bot, Jan; Slieker, Roderick C; Jhamai, P Mila; Verbiest, Michael; Suchiman, H Eka D; Verkerk, Marijn; van der Breggen, Ruud; van Rooij, Jeroen; Lakenberg, Nico; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Kielbasa, Szymon M; Jonkers, Iris; van 't Hof, Peter; Nooren, Irene; Beekman, Marian; Deelen, Joris; van Heemst, Diana; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Tigchelaar, Ettje F; Swertz, Morris A; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Pool, René; van Dongen, Jenny; Hottenga, Jouke J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Schalkwijk, Casper G; van den Berg, Leonard H; van Zwet, Erik W; Mei, Hailiang; Li, Yang; Lemire, Mathieu; Hudson, Thomas J; Slagboom, P Eline; Wijmenga, Cisca; Veldink, Jan H; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Isaacs, Aaron; Jansen, Rick; van Meurs, Joyce B J; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Franke, Lude; Heijmans, Bastiaan T

    2017-01-01

    Most disease-associated genetic variants are noncoding, making it challenging to design experiments to understand their functional consequences. Identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) has been a powerful approach to infer the downstream effects of disease-associated variants, but most of these variants remain unexplained. The analysis of DNA methylation, a key component of the epigenome, offers highly complementary data on the regulatory potential of genomic regions. Here we show that disease-associated variants have widespread effects on DNA methylation in trans that likely reflect differential occupancy of trans binding sites by cis-regulated transcription factors. Using multiple omics data sets from 3,841 Dutch individuals, we identified 1,907 established trait-associated SNPs that affect the methylation levels of 10,141 different CpG sites in trans (false discovery rate (FDR) disease-associated variants.

  9. Discovery and characterization of surface binding sites in polysaccharide converting enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper

    Enzymes that act on various polysaccharides are widespread in any domain of life and they play a role in degradation, modification, and synthesis of carbohydrates. These carbohydrate active enzymes interact with their substrate (the polysaccharide) at the active site and often at so called subsites...... polysaccharide binding interactions to also occur at a distance from the active site. AnAbf62A-m2,3’s preferred substrate is wheat arabinoxylan having kcat and KM of 178 ± 26 s-1 and 4.90 ± 0.91 mg ml-1, respectively. While AnAbf62A-m2,3 from singly substituted xylose releases 1,2-linked at threefold higher rate...

  10. Mechanical Control of ATP Synthase Function: Activation Energy Difference between Tight and Loose Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2010-01-26

    Despite exhaustive chemical and crystal structure studies, the mechanistic details of how FoF1-ATP synthase can convert mechanical energy to chemical, producing ATP, are still not fully understood. On the basis of quantum mechanical calculations using a recent highresolution X-ray structure, we conclude that formation of the P-O bond may be achieved through a transition state (TS) with a planar PO3 - ion. Surprisingly, there is a more than 40 kJ/mol difference between barrier heights of the loose and tight binding sites of the enzyme. This indicates that even a relatively small change in active site conformation, induced by the γ-subunit rotation, may effectively block the back reaction in βTP and, thus, promote ATP. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  11. HOCOMOCO: A comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2012-11-21

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/ hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. The Author(s) 2012.

  12. HOCOMOCO: a comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Schaefer, Ulf; Kasianov, Artem S; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Bajic, Vladimir B; Makeev, Vsevolod J

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source.

  13. Intermolecular versus intramolecular interactions of the vinculin binding site 33 of talin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogesha, S.D.; SHarff, A.; Bricogne, G.; Izard, .T. (Globel Phasing); (Scripps)

    2012-03-13

    The cytoskeletal proteins talin and vinculin are localized at cell-matrix junctions and are key regulators of cell signaling, adhesion, and migration. Talin couples integrins via its FERM domain to F-actin and is an important regulator of integrin activation and clustering. The 220 kDa talin rod domain comprises several four- and five-helix bundles that harbor amphipathic {alpha}-helical vinculin binding sites (VBSs). In its inactive state, the hydrophobic VBS residues involved in binding to vinculin are buried within these helix bundles, and the mechanical force emanating from bound integrin receptors is thought necessary for their release and binding to vinculin. The crystal structure of a four-helix bundle of talin that harbors one of these VBSs, coined VBS33, was recently determined. Here we report the crystal structure of VBS33 in complex with vinculin at 2 {angstrom} resolution. Notably, comparison of the apo and vinculin bound structures shows that intermolecular interactions of the VBS33 {alpha}-helix with vinculin are more extensive than the intramolecular interactions of the VBS33 within the talin four-helix bundle.

  14. Kinetic evidence for an anion binding pocket in the active site of nitronate monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Kevin; Gadda, Giovanni

    2009-10-01

    A series of monovalent, inorganic anions and aliphatic aldehydes were tested as inhibitors for Hansenula mrakii and Neurospora crassa nitronate monooxygenase, formerly known as 2-nitropropane dioxygenase, to investigate the structural features that contribute to the binding of the anionic nitronate substrates to the enzymes. A linear correlation between the volumes of the inorganic anions and their effectiveness as competitive inhibitors of the enzymes was observed in a plot of pK(is)versus the ionic volume of the anion with slopes of 0.041+/-0.001 mM/A(3) and 0.027+/-0.001 mM/A(3) for the H. mrakii and N. crassa enzymes, respectively. Aliphatic aldehydes were weak competitive inhibitors of the enzymes, with inhibition constants that are independent of their alkyl chain lengths. The reductive half reactions of H. mrakii nitronate monooxygenase with primary nitronates containing two to four carbon atoms all showed apparent K(d) values of approximately 5 mM. These results are consistent with the presence of an anion binding pocket in the active site of nitronate monooxygenase that interacts with the nitro group of the substrate, and suggest a minimal contribution of the hydrocarbon chain of the nitronates to the binding of the ligands to the enzyme.

  15. Interaction of D-LSD with binding sites in brain: a study in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebersole, B.L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The localization of (/sup 3/H)-d-lysergic acid diethylamide ((/sup 3/H)LSD) binding sites in the mouse brain was compared in vivo and in vitro. Radioautography of brain sections incubated with (/sup 3/H)LSD in vitro revealed substantial specific (/sup 3/H)LSD binding in cortical layers III-IV and areas CA1 and dentate gyrus in hippocampus. In contrast, in brain sections from animals that received (/sup 3/H)LSD in vivo, binding in hippocampus was scant and diffuse, although the pattern of labeling in cortex was similar to that seen in vitro. The low specific binding in hippocampus relative to cortex was confirmed by homogenate filtration studies of brain areas from mice that received injections of (/sup 3/H)LSD. Time-course studies established that peak specific binding at ten minutes was the same in cortex and hippocampus. At all times, binding in hippocampus was about one-third of that in cortex; in contrast, the concentration of free (/sup 3/H)LSD did not vary between regions. This finding was unexpected, because binding studies in vitro in membrane preparations indicated that the density and affinity of (/sup 3/H)LSD binding sites were similar in both brain regions. Saturation binding studies in vivo showed that the lower amount of (/sup 3/H)LSD binding in hippocampus was attributable to a lower density of sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)LSD. The pharmacological identify of (/sub 3/H)LSD binding sites in vivo may be relevant to the hallucinogenic properties of LSD and of other related hallucinogens.

  16. The Antinociceptive Agent SBFI-26 Binds to Anandamide Transporters FABP5 and FABP7 at Two Different Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hao-Chi [Cryo-EM Structural; Tong, Simon [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States; Zhou, Yuchen [Department of Applied Mathematics; Elmes, Matthew W. [Department of Biochemistry and; Yan, Su [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States; Kaczocha, Martin [Department of Biochemistry and; Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook University, Stony; Deutsch, Dale G. [Department of Biochemistry and; Institute of Chemical Biology and; Rizzo, Robert C. [Department of Applied Mathematics; Institute of Chemical Biology and; Laufer; Ojima, Iwao [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, United States; Institute of Chemical Biology and; Li, Huilin [Cryo-EM Structural; Institute of Chemical Biology and

    2017-06-28

    Human FABP5 and FABP7 are intracellular endocannabinoid transporters. SBFI-26 is an α-truxillic acid 1-naphthyl monoester that competitively inhibits the activities of FABP5 and FABP7 and produces antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in mice. The synthesis of SBFI-26 yields several stereoisomers, and it is not known how the inhibitor binds the transporters. Here we report co-crystal structures of SBFI-26 in complex with human FABP5 and FABP7 at 2.2 and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. We found that only (S)-SBFI-26 was present in the crystal structures. The inhibitor largely mimics the fatty acid binding pattern, but it also has several unique interactions. Notably, the FABP7 complex corroborates key aspects of the ligand binding pose at the canonical site previously predicted by virtual screening. In FABP5, SBFI-26 was unexpectedly found to bind at the substrate entry portal region in addition to binding at the canonical ligand-binding pocket. Our structural and binding energy analyses indicate that both R and S forms appear to bind the transporter equally well. We suggest that the S enantiomer observed in the crystal structures may be a result of the crystallization process selectively incorporating the (S)-SBFI-26–FABP complexes into the growing lattice, or that the S enantiomer may bind to the portal site more rapidly than to the canonical site, leading to an increased local concentration of the S enantiomer for binding to the canonical site. Our work reveals two binding poses of SBFI-26 in its target transporters. This knowledge will guide the development of more potent FABP inhibitors based upon the SBFI-26 scaffold.

  17. Divergent evolution of human p53 binding sites: cell cycle versus apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica M Horvath

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor is a sequence-specific pleiotropic transcription factor that coordinates cellular responses to DNA damage and stress, initiating cell-cycle arrest or triggering apoptosis. Although the human p53 binding site sequence (or response element [RE] is well characterized, some genes have consensus-poor REs that are nevertheless both necessary and sufficient for transactivation by p53. Identification of new functional gene regulatory elements under these conditions is problematic, and evolutionary conservation is often employed. We evaluated the comparative genomics approach for assessing evolutionary conservation of putative binding sites by examining conservation of 83 experimentally validated human p53 REs against mouse, rat, rabbit, and dog genomes and detected pronounced conservation differences among p53 REs and p53-regulated pathways. Bona fide NRF2 (nuclear factor [erythroid-derived 2]-like 2 nuclear factor and NFkappaB (nuclear factor of kappa light chain gene enhancer in B cells binding sites, which direct oxidative stress and innate immunity responses, were used as controls, and both exhibited high interspecific conservation. Surprisingly, the average p53 RE was not significantly more conserved than background genomic sequence, and p53 REs in apoptosis genes as a group showed very little conservation. The common bioinformatics practice of filtering RE predictions by 80% rodent sequence identity would not only give a false positive rate of approximately 19%, but miss up to 57% of true p53 REs. Examination of interspecific DNA base substitutions as a function of position in the p53 consensus sequence reveals an unexpected excess of diversity in apoptosis-regulating REs versus cell-cycle controlling REs (rodent comparisons: p < 1.0 e-12. While some p53 REs show relatively high levels of conservation, REs in many genes such as BAX, FAS, PCNA, CASP6, SIVA1, and P53AIP1 show little if any homology to rodent sequences. This

  18. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2015-11-19

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences.

  19. High density of benzodiazepine binding sites in the substantia innominata of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarter, M.; Schneider, H.H.

    1988-07-01

    In order to study the neuronal basis of the pharmacological interactions between benzodiazepine receptor ligands and cortical cholinergic turnover, we examined the regional distribution of specific benzodiazepine binding sites using in vitro autoradiography. In the basal forebrain, the substantia innominata contained a high density of (/sup 3/H)lormetazepam (LMZ) binding sites (Bmax = 277 fmol/mg tissue; Kd = 0.55 nM). The label could be displaced by diazepam (IC50 = 100 nM), the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist beta-carboline ZK 93426 (45 nM) and the partial inverse agonist beta-carboline FG 7142 (540 nM). It is hypothesized that the amnesic effects of benzodiazepine receptor agonists are exerted through benzodiazepine receptors which are situated on cholinergic neurons in the substantia innominata and are involved in a tonic inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release. The benzodiazepine receptor antagonist ZK 93426 may exert its nootropic effects via benzodiazepine receptors in the substantia innominata and, consequently, by disinhibiting cortical acetylcholine release.

  20. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Nicole R.; Hecht, Karen A.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-01-08

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins incorporating a tetracysteine tag for site-directed labeling with biarsenical affinity probes and either EGFP or single chain antibody to test colocalization of probes with the EGFP-tagged recombinant protein or binding of biosilica-immobilized antibodies to large and small molecule antigens, respectively. Site-directed labeling with the biarsenical probes demonstrated colocalization with EGFP-encoded proteins in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting their use in studying biosilica maturation. Isolated biosilica transformed with a single chain antibody against either the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT) effectively bound the respective antigens. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime of the TNT surrogate Alexa Fluor 555-trinitrobenzene reflected the high binding specificity of the transformed isolated biosilica. These results demonstrated the potential use of biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies as binders for large and small molecule antigens in sensing and therapeutics.

  1. LIGSITEcsc: predicting ligand binding sites using the Connolly surface and degree of conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder Michael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying pockets on protein surfaces is of great importance for many structure-based drug design applications and protein-ligand docking algorithms. Over the last ten years, many geometric methods for the prediction of ligand-binding sites have been developed. Results We present LIGSITEcsc, an extension and implementation of the LIGSITE algorithm. LIGSITEcsc is based on the notion of surface-solvent-surface events and the degree of conservation of the involved surface residues. We compare our algorithm to four other approaches, LIGSITE, CAST, PASS, and SURFNET, and evaluate all on a dataset of 48 unbound/bound structures and 210 bound-structures. LIGSITEcsc performs slightly better than the other tools and achieves a success rate of 71% and 75%, respectively. Conclusion The use of the Connolly surface leads to slight improvements, the prediction re-ranking by conservation to significant improvements of the binding site predictions. A web server for LIGSITEcsc and its source code is available at scoppi.biotec.tu-dresden.de/pocket.

  2. NMR studies of the AMP-binding site and mechanism of adenylate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, D.C.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildvan, A.S.

    1987-03-24

    NMR has previously been used to determine the conformation of enzyme-bound MgATP and to locate the MgATP-binding site on adenylate kinase. To determine the conformation and location of the other substrate, AMP, distances have been measured from Cr/sup 3 +/AMPPCP, a linear competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP, to six protons and to the phosphorus atom of AMP on adenylate kinase, with the paramagnetic probe-T/sub 1/ method. Time-dependent nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) have been used to measure five interproton distances on enzyme-bound AMP. These distances were used to determine the conformation of bound AMP in addition to its position with respect to metal-ATP. Ten intermolecular NOEs, from protons of the enzyme to those of AMP, were detected, indicating the proximity of at least three hydrophobic amino acids to bound AMP. These constraints, together with the conformation of AMP and the intersubstrate distances, were used to position AMP into the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase. The AMP binding site is found to be near Leu-116, Arg-171, Val-173, Val-182, and Leu-190; all of these residues have been found to be invariant in muscle-type rabbit, calf, human, porcine.

  3. Mapping the Binding Site of BMS-708163 on γ-Secretase with Cleavable Photoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertsik, Natalya; Am Ende, Christopher W; Geoghegan, Kieran F; Nguyen, Chuong; Mukherjee, Paramita; Mente, Scot; Seneviratne, Uthpala; Johnson, Douglas S; Li, Yue-Ming

    2017-01-19

    γ-Secretase, a four-subunit transmembrane aspartic proteinase, is a highly valued drug target in Alzheimer's disease and cancer. Despite significant progress in structural studies, the respective molecular mechanisms and binding modes of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and modulators (GSMs) remain uncertain. Here, we developed biotinylated cleavable-linker photoprobes based on the BMS-708163 GSI to study its interaction with γ-secretase. Comparison of four cleavable linkers indicated that the hydrazine-labile N-1-(4,4-dimethyl-2,6-dioxocyclohexylidene)ethyl (Dde) linker was cleaved most efficiently to release photolabeled and affinity-captured presenilin-1 (PS1), the catalytic subunit of γ-secretase. Peptide mapping showed that the BMS-708163-based probe photoinserted at L282 of PS1. This insertion site was consistent with the results of molecular dynamics simulations of the γ-secretase complex with inhibitor. Taken together, this work reveals the binding site of a GSI and offers insights into the mechanism of action of this class of inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Yevshin, Ivan S; Soboleva, Anastasiia V; Kasianov, Artem S; Ashoor, Haitham; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Bajic, Vladimir B; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Kolpakov, Fedor A; Makeev, Vsevolod J

    2016-01-04

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Accuracy of protein-protein binding sites in high-throughput template-based modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petras J Kundrotas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of protein structures, particularly their binding sites, is essential for the success of modeling protein complexes. Computationally inexpensive methodology is required for genome-wide modeling of such structures. For systematic evaluation of potential accuracy in high-throughput modeling of binding sites, a statistical analysis of target-template sequence alignments was performed for a representative set of protein complexes. For most of the complexes, alignments containing all residues of the interface were found. The full interface alignments were obtained even in the case of poor alignments where a relatively small part of the target sequence (as low as 40% aligned to the template sequence, with a low overall alignment identity (<30%. Although such poor overall alignments might be considered inadequate for modeling of whole proteins, the alignment of the interfaces was strong enough for docking. In the set of homology models built on these alignments, one third of those ranked 1 by a simple sequence identity criteria had RMSD<5 A, the accuracy suitable for low-resolution template free docking. Such models corresponded to multi-domain target proteins, whereas for single-domain proteins the best models had 5 A

  6. Igs Expressed by Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells Show Limited Binding-Site Structure Variability

    KAUST Repository

    Marcatili, P.

    2013-05-01

    Ag selection has been suggested to play a role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) pathogenesis, but no large-scale analysis has been performed so far on the structure of the Ag-binding sites (ABSs) of leukemic cell Igs. We sequenced both H and L chain V(D)J rearrangements from 366 CLL patients and modeled their three-dimensional structures. The resulting ABS structures were clustered into a small number of discrete sets, each containing ABSs with similar shapes and physicochemical properties. This structural classification correlates well with other known prognostic factors such as Ig mutation status and recurrent (stereotyped) receptors, but it shows a better prognostic value, at least in the case of one structural cluster for which clinical data were available. These findings suggest, for the first time, to our knowledge, on the basis of a structural analysis of the Ab-binding sites, that selection by a finite quota of antigenic structures operates on most CLL cases, whether mutated or unmutated. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. GPU-based Point Cloud Superpositioning for Structural Comparisons of Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Matthias; Fober, Thomas; Freisleben, Bernd

    2016-11-07

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to solve the labeled point cloud superpositioning problem for performing structural comparisons of protein binding sites. The solution is based on a parallel evolution strategy that operates on large populations and runs on GPU hardware. The proposed evolution strategy reduces the likelihood of getting stuck in a local optimum of the multimodal real-valued optimization problem represented by labeled point cloud superpositioning. The performance of the GPU-based parallel evolution strategy is compared to a previously proposed CPU-based sequential approach for labeled point cloud superpositioning, indicating that the GPU-based parallel evolution strategy leads to qualitatively better results and significantly shorter runtimes, with speed improvements of up to a factor of 1,500 for large populations. Binary classification tests based on the ATP, NADH and FAD protein subsets of CavBase, a database containing putative binding sites, show average classification rate improvements from about 92% (CPU) to 96% (GPU). Further experiments indicate that the proposed GPU-based labeled point cloud superpositioning approach can be superior to traditional protein comparison approaches based on sequence alignments.

  8. ADAM13 cleavage of cadherin-11 promotes CNC migration independently of the homophilic binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Becker, Sarah F; Kashef, Jubin; Alfandari, Dominique

    2016-07-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile population of cells that is responsible for forming the face and jaw in all vertebrates and perturbing their migration can lead to craniofacial birth defects. Cell motility requires a dynamic modification of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. In the CNC, cleavage of the cell adhesion molecule cadherin-11 by ADAM13 is essential for cell migration. This cleavage generates a shed extracellular fragment of cadherin-11 (EC1-3) that possesses pro-migratory activity via an unknown mechanism. Cadherin-11 plays an important role in modulating contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) in the CNC to regulate directional cell migration. Here, we show that while the integral cadherin-11 requires the homophilic binding site to promote CNC migration in vivo, the EC1-3 fragment does not. In addition, we show that increased ADAM13 activity or expression of the EC1-3 fragment increases CNC invasiveness in vitro and blocks the repulsive CIL response in colliding cells. This activity requires the presence of an intact homophilic binding site on the EC1-3 suggesting that the cleavage fragment may function as a competitive inhibitor of cadherin-11 adhesion in CIL but not to promote cell migration in vivo. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. GTRD: a database of transcription factor binding sites identified by ChIP-seq experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevshin, Ivan; Sharipov, Ruslan; Valeev, Tagir; Kel, Alexander; Kolpakov, Fedor

    2017-01-04

    GTRD-Gene Transcription Regulation Database (http://gtrd.biouml.org)-is a database of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) identified by ChIP-seq experiments for human and mouse. Raw ChIP-seq data were obtained from ENCODE and SRA and uniformly processed: (i) reads were aligned using Bowtie2; (ii) ChIP-seq peaks were called using peak callers MACS, SISSRs, GEM and PICS; (iii) peaks for the same factor and peak callers, but different experiment conditions (cell line, treatment, etc.), were merged into clusters; (iv) such clusters for different peak callers were merged into metaclusters that were considered as non-redundant sets of TFBSs. In addition to information on location in genome, the sets contain structured information about cell lines and experimental conditions extracted from descriptions of corresponding ChIP-seq experiments. A web interface to access GTRD was developed using the BioUML platform. It provides: (i) browsing and displaying information; (ii) advanced search possibilities, e.g. search of TFBSs near the specified gene or search of all genes potentially regulated by a specified transcription factor; (iii) integrated genome browser that provides visualization of the GTRD data: read alignments, peaks, clusters, metaclusters and information about gene structures from the Ensembl database and binding sites predicted using position weight matrices from the HOCOMOCO database. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides bind with their hydrophobic parts to drug site II of human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivertsen, Annfrid; Isaksson, Johan; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S; Svenson, Johan; Svendsen, John-Sigurd; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2014-01-23

    Many biologically active compounds bind to plasma transport proteins, and this binding can be either advantageous or disadvantageous from a drug design perspective. Human serum albumin (HSA) is one of the most important transport proteins in the cardiovascular system due to its great binding capacity and high physiological concentration. HSA has a preference for accommodating neutral lipophilic and acidic drug-like ligands, but is also surprisingly able to bind positively charged peptides. Understanding of how short cationic antimicrobial peptides interact with human serum albumin is of importance for developing such compounds into the clinics. The binding of a selection of short synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) to human albumin with binding affinities in the μM range is described. Competitive isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and NMR WaterLOGSY experiments mapped the binding site of the CAPs to the well-known drug site II within subdomain IIIA of HSA. Thermodynamic and structural analysis revealed that the binding is exclusively driven by interactions with the hydrophobic moieties of the peptides, and is independent of the cationic residues that are vital for antimicrobial activity. Both of the hydrophobic moieties comprising the peptides were detected to interact with drug site II by NMR saturation transfer difference (STD) group epitope mapping (GEM) and INPHARMA experiments. Molecular models of the complexes between the peptides and albumin were constructed using docking experiments, and support the binding hypothesis and confirm the overall binding affinities of the CAPs. The biophysical and structural characterizations of albumin-peptide complexes reported here provide detailed insight into how albumin can bind short cationic peptides. The hydrophobic elements of the peptides studied here are responsible for the main interaction with HSA. We suggest that albumin binding should be taken into careful consideration in antimicrobial peptide

  11. Anti-opioid receptor antibody recognition of a binding site on brain and leukocyte opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, D J; DeCosta, B R; Kim, C H; Jacobson, A E; Bost, K L; Rice, K C; Blalock, J E

    1990-05-01

    Opioid receptors reportedly exist on neuronal tissue of central and peripheral origin as well as on cells of the immune system. Previously, an opioid receptor has been purified from the neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cell line, NG108-15 cells. In an effort to compare these results with opioid receptors isolated from primary neuronal tissue, we employed a methodology based on the molecular recognition theory to develop a monoclonal antibody which was used to isolate and biochemically characterize murine brain opioid receptors. We herein report the purification of an opioid receptor from mouse brain with a molecular weight of 65,000 daltons (range was 62-70 kD under reducing conditions) using a monoclonal antibody to an (the) opioid receptor. In situ labeling experiments with the delta-class selective opioid receptor affinity ligand, cis-(+)-3-methylfentanylisothiocyanate (SUPERFIT) of brain membrane confirmed these observations. Moreover, SUPERFIT, when coupled to the binding site, could block the recognition of the receptor by the monoclonal antibody. However, the selective, mu-class opioid receptor affinity reagent, 2-(p-ethoxybenzyl)-1-N,N-diethylaminoethyl-5-isothiocyanatobenz imidazole was ineffective at masking the binding site from recognition by the monoclonal antibody. Likewise, opioid-like receptors were purified from murine leukocytes which migrated at a molecular weight of 58,000 daltons under nonreducing conditions and 70,000 daltons under reducing conditions. In addition, immunoaffinity-purified receptor is shown to specifically bind the delta-class-selective opioid ligand, cis-(+)-3-methylfentanylisothiocyanate as well as the endogenous opioid peptides, beta-endorphin and [Met]-enkephalin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. FISim: A new similarity measure between transcription factor binding sites based on the fuzzy integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Carlos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory motifs describe sets of related transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs and can be represented as position frequency matrices (PFMs. De novo identification of TFBSs is a crucial problem in computational biology which includes the issue of comparing putative motifs with one another and with motifs that are already known. The relative importance of each nucleotide within a given position in the PFMs should be considered in order to compute PFM similarities. Furthermore, biological data are inherently noisy and imprecise. Fuzzy set theory is particularly suitable for modeling imprecise data, whereas fuzzy integrals are highly appropriate for representing the interaction among different information sources. Results We propose FISim, a new similarity measure between PFMs, based on the fuzzy integral of the distance of the nucleotides with respect to the information content of the positions. Unlike existing methods, FISim is designed to consider the higher contribution of better conserved positions to the binding affinity. FISim provides excellent results when dealing with sets of randomly generated motifs, and outperforms the remaining methods when handling real datasets of related motifs. Furthermore, we propose a new cluster methodology based on kernel theory together with FISim to obtain groups of related motifs potentially bound by the same TFs, providing more robust results than existing approaches. Conclusion FISim corrects a design flaw of the most popular methods, whose measures favour similarity of low information content positions. We use our measure to successfully identify motifs that describe binding sites for the same TF and to solve real-life problems. In this study the reliability of fuzzy technology for motif comparison tasks is proven.

  13. Characterization of the flavonoid-responsive regulator FrrA and its binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Mandy; Lang, Kathrin; Günther, Tobias; Bhandari, Anita; Weiss, Andy; Lulchev, Pavel; Szentgyörgyi, Erik; Kranzusch, Bianca; Göttfert, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Previous microarray analyses revealed that in Bradyrhizobium japonicum, about 100 genes are induced by genistein, an isoflavonoid secreted by soybean. This includes the three genes freC, freA, and freB (systematic designations bll4319, bll4320, and bll4321), which are likely to form a genistein-, daidzein-, and coumestrol-inducible operon and to encode a multidrug efflux system. Upstream of freCAB and in the opposite orientation, FrrA (systematic designation Blr4322), which has similarity to TetR-type regulators, is encoded. A deletion of frrA leads to increased expression of freB in the absence of an inducer. We identified the correct translational start codon of frrA and showed that the gene is inducible by genistein and daidzein. The protein, which was heterologously expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, binds to two palindrome-like DNA elements (operator A and operator B), which are located in the intergenic region between freC and frrA. The replacement of several nucleotides or the insertion of additional spacer nucleotides prevented binding. Binding of FrrA was also affected by the addition of genistein. By mapping the transcription start sites, we found that operator A covers the transcriptional start site of freC and operator B is probably located between the -35 regions of the two divergently oriented genes. Operator A seems to be conserved in a few similar gene constellations in other proteobacteria. Our data indicate that in B. japonicum, besides NodD1 (the LysR family) and NodVW (a two-component response regulator), a third regulator type (a TetR family member) which responds to the plant signal molecules genistein and daidzein exists.

  14. New binding site conformations of the dengue virus NS3 protease accessed by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo de Almeida

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is caused by four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (DENV1-4, and is estimated to affect over 500 million people every year. Presently, there are no vaccines or antiviral treatments for this disease. Among the possible targets to fight dengue fever is the viral NS3 protease (NS3PRO, which is in part responsible for viral processing and replication. It is now widely recognized that virtual screening campaigns should consider the flexibility of target protein by using multiple active conformational states. The flexibility of the DENV NS3PRO could explain the relatively low success of previous virtual screening studies. In this first work, we explore the DENV NS3PRO conformational states obtained from molecular dynamics (MD simulations to take into account protease flexibility during the virtual screening/docking process. To do so, we built a full NS3PRO model by multiple template homology modeling. The model comprised the NS2B cofactor (essential to the NS3PRO activation, a glycine flexible link and the proteolytic domain. MD simulations had the purpose to sample, as closely as possible, the ligand binding site conformational landscape prior to inhibitor binding. The obtained conformational MD sample was clustered into four families that, together with principal component analysis of the trajectory, demonstrated protein flexibility. These results allowed the description of multiple binding modes for the Bz-Nle-Lys-Arg-Arg-H inhibitor, as verified by binding plots and pair interaction analysis. This study allowed us to tackle protein flexibility in our virtual screening campaign against the dengue virus NS3 protease.

  15. Fine mapping of the amyloid β-protein binding site on myelin basic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarba, Annmarie E; Aucoin, Darryl; Hoos, Michael D; Smith, Steven O; Van Nostrand, William E

    2013-04-16

    The assembly and deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in brain is a key pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. Factors have been identified that can either promote or inhibit Aβ assembly in brain. We previously reported that myelin basic protein (MBP) is a potent inhibitor of Aβ fibrillar assembly [Hoos, M. D., et al. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9952-9961; Hoos, M. D., et al. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 4720-4727]. Moreover, the region on MBP responsible for this activity was localized to the 64 N-terminal amino acids (MBP1-64) [Liao, M. C., et al. (2010) J. Biol. Chem. 285, 35590-35598]. In the study presented here, we sought to further define the site on MBP1-64 involved in this activity. Deletion mapping studies showed that the C-terminal region (residues 54-64) is required for the ability of MBP1-64 to bind Aβ and inhibit fibril assembly. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed that amino acids K54, R55, G56, and K59 within MBP1-64 are important for both Aβ binding and inhibition of fibril assembly as assessed by solid phase binding, thioflavin T binding and fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy studies. Strong spectral shifts are observed by solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of specific N-terminal residues (E3, R5, D7, E11, and Q15) of Aβ42 upon the interaction with MBP1-64. Although the C-terminal region of MBP1-64 is required for interactions with Aβ, a synthetic MBP50-64 peptide was itself devoid of activity. These studies identify key residues in MBP and Aβ involved in their interactions and provide structural insight into how MBP regulates Aβ fibrillar assembly.

  16. Novel Vinculin Binding Site of the IpaA Invasin of Shigella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, HaJeung; Valencia-Gallardo, Cesar; Sharff, Andrew; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Izard, Tina (Globel Phasing); (Scripps); (CF)

    2012-10-25

    Internalization of Shigella into host epithelial cells, where the bacteria replicates and spreads to neighboring cells, requires a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) effector coined IpaA. IpaA binds directly to and activates the cytoskeletal protein vinculin after injection in the host cell cytosol, and this was previously thought to be directed by two amphipathic {alpha}-helical vinculin-binding sites (VBS) found in the C-terminal tail domain of IpaA. Here, we report a third VBS, IpaA-VBS3, that is located N-terminal to the other two VBSs of IpaA and show that one IpaA molecule can bind up to three vinculin molecules. Biochemical in vitro Shigella invasion assays and the 1.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the vinculin {center_dot} IpaA-VBS3 complex showed that IpaA-VBS3 is functionally redundant with the other two IpaA-VBSs in cell invasion and in activating the latent F-actin binding functions of vinculin. Multiple VBSs in IpaA are reminiscent of talin, which harbors 11 VBSs. However, most of the talin VBSs have low affinity and are buried in helix bundles, whereas all three of the VBSs of IpaA are high affinity, readily available, and in close proximity to each other in the IpaA structure. Although deletion of IpaA-VBS3 has no detectable effects on Shigella invasion of epithelial cells, deletion of all three VBSs impaired bacterial invasion to levels found in an ipaA null mutant strain. Thus, IpaA-directed mimicry of talin in activating vinculin occurs through three high affinity VBSs that are essential for Shigella pathogenesis.

  17. Novel Vinculin Binding Site of the IpaA Invasin of Shigella*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, HaJeung; Valencia-Gallardo, Cesar; Sharff, Andrew; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Izard, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Internalization of Shigella into host epithelial cells, where the bacteria replicates and spreads to neighboring cells, requires a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) effector coined IpaA. IpaA binds directly to and activates the cytoskeletal protein vinculin after injection in the host cell cytosol, and this was previously thought to be directed by two amphipathic α-helical vinculin-binding sites (VBS) found in the C-terminal tail domain of IpaA. Here, we report a third VBS, IpaA-VBS3, that is located N-terminal to the other two VBSs of IpaA and show that one IpaA molecule can bind up to three vinculin molecules. Biochemical in vitro Shigella invasion assays and the 1.6 Å crystal structure of the vinculin·IpaA-VBS3 complex showed that IpaA-VBS3 is functionally redundant with the other two IpaA-VBSs in cell invasion and in activating the latent F-actin binding functions of vinculin. Multiple VBSs in IpaA are reminiscent of talin, which harbors 11 VBSs. However, most of the talin VBSs have low affinity and are buried in helix bundles, whereas all three of the VBSs of IpaA are high affinity, readily available, and in close proximity to each other in the IpaA structure. Although deletion of IpaA-VBS3 has no detectable effects on Shigella invasion of epithelial cells, deletion of all three VBSs impaired bacterial invasion to levels found in an ipaA null mutant strain. Thus, IpaA-directed mimicry of talin in activating vinculin occurs through three high affinity VBSs that are essential for Shigella pathogenesis. PMID:21525010

  18. Identification and partial characterization of cytosolic progesterone-binding sites in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenasi, H; Hudnik-Plevnik, T

    1996-06-01

    Progesterone and some other steroids have been shown to induce a steroid 11alpha-hydroxylating enzyme system requiring cytochrome P450 in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans. In the present work, we attempted to find out whether the mycelial cytosol contained progesterone-binding sites (PBS) which could function as receptors for P450-inducing steroids and might, therefore, be included in the induction process. Two types of constitutive PBS, PBS-I and PBS-II, were identified in the cytosol pretreated with dextran-coated charcoal which removed the endogenous ligand. The protein nature of these binding activities was indicated by their susceptibility to trypsin and proteinase K digestion, heat denaturation, and their resistance to DNase. Progesterone binding was rapid, the maximal level being reached after 45 min of incubation at 22 degrees C. At this temperature, dissociation of progesterone from PBS-I proceeded with a t1/2 of 17 min and that from PBS-II with a t1/2 of 133 min. The apparent Kd of PBS-I determined by Scatchard analysis was 2.1-7.0 x 10(-9)M, and Bmax 36-218 fmol/mg protein. Bmax for PBS-II was >400 fmol/mg protein, whereas the value of Kd could not be determined accurately due to the sigmoidal nature of the association kinetics. The biological role of PBS-I in transcriptional regulation is suggested by the observation that this receptor-like protein contains a functional DNA-binding domain. A specific function of PBS-I in the induction of 11alpha-hydroxylase seems to be, however, questionable because of poor correlation between the affinity and the inducing capability of corresponding steroids.

  19. Binding site of ABC transporter homology models confirmed by ABCB1 crystal structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sager Georg

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters ABCB1, ABCC4 and ABCC5 are involved in resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Here we present molecular models of ABCB1, ABCC4 and ABCC5 by homology based on a wide open inward-facing conformation of Escherichia coli MsbA, which were constructed in order to elucidate differences in the electrostatic and molecular features of their drug recognition conformations. As a quality assurance of the methodology, the ABCB1 model was compared to an ABCB1 X-ray crystal structure, and with published cross-linking and site directed mutagenesis data of ABCB1. Amino acids Ile306 (TMH5, Ile340 (TMH6, Phe343 (TMH6, Phe728 (TMH7, and Val982 (TMH12, form a putative substrate recognition site in the ABCB1 model, which is confirmed by both the ABCB1 X-ray crystal structure and the site-directed mutagenesis studies. The ABCB1, ABCC4 and ABCC5 models display distinct differences in the electrostatic properties of their drug recognition sites.

  20. Circular dichroism study of the interaction between mutagens and bilirubin bound to different binding sites of serum albumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Sergey; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanová, Marie

    2014-05-21

    Although recent investigations have shown that bilirubin not only has a negative role in the organism but also exhibits significant antimutagenic properties, the mechanisms of interactions between bilirubin and mutagens are not clear. In this study, interaction between bilirubin bound to different binding sites of mammalian serum albumins with structural analogues of the mutagens 2-aminofluorene, 2,7-diaminofluorene and mutagen 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone were investigated by circular dichroism and absorption spectroscopy. Homological human and bovine serum albumins were used as chiral matrices, which preferentially bind different conformers of bilirubin in the primary binding sites and make it observable by circular dichroism. These molecular systems approximated a real system for the study of mutagens in blood serum. Differences between the interaction of bilirubin bound to primary and to secondary binding sites of serum albumins with mutagens were shown. For bilirubin bound to secondary binding sites with low affinity, partial displacement and the formation of self-associates were observed in all studied mutagens. The associates of bilirubin bound to primary binding sites of serum albumins are formed with 2-aminofluorene and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone. It was proposed that 2,7-diaminofluorene does not interact with bilirubin bound to primary sites of human and bovine serum albumins due to the spatial hindrance of the albumins binding domains. The spatial arrangement of the bilirubin bound to serum albumin along with the studied mutagens was modelled using ligand docking, which revealed a possibility of an arrangement of the both bilirubin and 2-aminofluorene and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone in the primary binding site of human serum albumin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Aleš; Bay, Tina; Wellendorph, Petrine; Kehler, Jan; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Frølund, Bente; Pedersen, Martin H.F.; Clausen, Rasmus P.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide. Screening of 1 against different CNS targets establishes a high selectivity and we demonstrate in vivo brain penetration. In vitro characterization of [3H]-1 binding shows high specificity to the high-affinity GHB binding sites. PMID:24053696

  2. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  3. Searching the protein structure database for ligand-binding site similarities using CPASS v.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caprez Adam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent analysis of protein sequences deposited in the NCBI RefSeq database indicates that ~8.5 million protein sequences are encoded in prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, where ~30% are explicitly annotated as "hypothetical" or "uncharacterized" protein. Our Comparison of Protein Active-Site Structures (CPASS v.2 database and software compares the sequence and structural characteristics of experimentally determined ligand binding sites to infer a functional relationship in the absence of global sequence or structure similarity. CPASS is an important component of our Functional Annotation Screening Technology by NMR (FAST-NMR protocol and has been successfully applied to aid the annotation of a number of proteins of unknown function. Findings We report a major upgrade to our CPASS software and database that significantly improves its broad utility. CPASS v.2 is designed with a layered architecture to increase flexibility and portability that also enables job distribution over the Open Science Grid (OSG to increase speed. Similarly, the CPASS interface was enhanced to provide more user flexibility in submitting a CPASS query. CPASS v.2 now allows for both automatic and manual definition of ligand-binding sites and permits pair-wise, one versus all, one versus list, or list versus list comparisons. Solvent accessible surface area, ligand root-mean square difference, and Cβ distances have been incorporated into the CPASS similarity function to improve the quality of the results. The CPASS database has also been updated. Conclusions CPASS v.2 is more than an order of magnitude faster than the original implementation, and allows for multiple simultaneous job submissions. Similarly, the CPASS database of ligand-defined binding sites has increased in size by ~ 38%, dramatically increasing the likelihood of a positive search result. The modification to the CPASS similarity function is effective in reducing CPASS similarity scores

  4. Pharmacologic characterization and autoradiographic distribution of binding sites for iodinated tachykinins in the rat central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, S.H.; Helke, C.J.; Burcher, E.; Shults, C.W.; O' Donohue, T.L.

    1986-11-01

    P-type, E-type, and K-type tachykinin binding sites have been identified in the mammalian CNS. These sites may be tachykinin receptors for which the mammalian neuropeptides substance P, neuromedin K, and substance K are the preferred natural agonists, respectively. In the present investigation, we have compared the pharmacology and the autoradiographic distribution of CNS binding sites for the iodinated (/sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter reagent) tachykinins substance P, eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K. Iodinated eledoisin and neuromedin K exhibited an E-type binding pattern in cortical membranes. Iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K each labeled sites that had a similar distribution but one that was considerably different from that of sites labeled by iodinated substance P. CNS regions where there were detectable densities of binding sites for iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K and few or no sites for iodinated substance P included cortical layers IV-VI, mediolateral septum, supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei, interpeduncular nucleus, ventral tegmental area, and substantia nigra pars compacta. Binding sites for SP were generally more widespread in the CNS. CNS regions where there was a substantial density of binding sites for iodinated substance P and few or no sites for iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K included cortical layers I and II, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, medial and lateral septum, endopiriform nucleus, rostral thalamus, medial and lateral preoptic nuclei, arcuate nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, dorsal parabrachial nucleus, parabigeminal nucleus, cerebellum, inferior olive, nucleus ambiguus, retrofacial and reticular nuclei, and spinal cord autonomic and somatic motor nuclei.

  5. Imaging the dopamine uptake site with ex vivo [18F]GBR 13119 binding autoradiography in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciliax, B J; Kilbourn, M R; Haka, M S; Penney, J B

    1990-08-01

    We studied the binding of [18F]GBR 13119 (1-[[(4-[18F]fluorophenyl) (phenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine) to rat brain with autoradiography after intravenous injection. The rank order of binding was dorsal striatum greater than nucleus accumbens = olfactory tubercle greater than substantia nigra = ventral tegmental area greater than other areas. Binding was blocked by prior injection of dopamine uptake blockers but not by injection of dopamine receptor antagonists or drugs that bind to the dialkylpiperazine site. Unilateral 6-hydroxy-dopamine lesions of dopamine neurons caused a marked decrease in striatal and nigral binding on the side of the lesion. We conclude that intravenous injection of [18F]GBR 13119 provides a useful marker of presynaptic dopamine uptake sites.

  6. Partial chemical characterization of cyclopyrrolones ((/sup 3/H) suriclone) and benzodiazepines ((/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam) binding site: Differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zundel, J.L.; Blanchard, J.C.; Julou, L.

    1985-06-10

    Rat hippocampus membranes were treated with several protein modifying reagents (iodoacetamide, N-ethylmaleimide, tetranitromethane and N-acetylimidazole). The effects of these treatments on the binding sites of cyclopyrrolones ((/sup 3/H) suriclone), a new chemical family of minor tranquilizers, and benzodiazepines ((/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam) were investigated. Here the authors show that both ligands are similarly sensitive to cysteine alkylation: (/sup 3/H) suriclone and (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam binding are reduced by iodoacetamide and slightly increased by N-ethylmaleimide. On the contrary they are clearly differentiated by tyrosine modification: (/sup 3/H) suriclone binding is not changed whereas (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam binding is increased by tetranitromethane and decreased by N-acetylimidazole. The present findings and published evidence suggest cyclopyrrolones and benzodiazepines bind to distinct sites or to different allosteric forms of the benzodiazepine receptor. 28 references, 6 figures.

  7. In vivo labelling in several rat tissues of 'peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benavides, J.; Guilloux, F.; Rufat, P.; Uzan, A.; Renault, C.; Dubroeucq, M.C.; Gueremy, C.; Le Fur, G. (Pharmuka Laboratoires, 92 - Gennevilliers (France))

    1984-03-16

    'Peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites in several rat tissues were labelled by intravenous injection of (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 and (/sup 3/H)RO5-4864. Binding was saturable in all tissues studied and regional distribution paralleled the in vitro binding. A similar potency order of displacing compounds was found in vivo and in vitro PK 11195 > PK 11211 > RO5-4864 > diazepam > dipyridamole > clonazepam. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to examine the effects of pharmacological manipulation on the binding sites in their native state. However, some properties (broader maximum during time course, higher percentage of particulate binding in the brain and independence of temperature) make (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 the most suitable ligand for this kind of studies.

  8. [125I]RTI-55 binding to cocaine-sensitive dopaminergic and serotonergic uptake sites in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, K Y; Kirkman, J A; Carroll, F I; Breese, G R; Duncan, G E

    1993-12-01

    [125I]RTI-55 is a newly synthesized cocaine congener that may offer advantages over other ligands previously used to examine cocaine binding sites. However, the in vitro pharmacological and anatomical characterization of [125I]RTI-55 binding sites has not been previously performed in human brain. To determine the specificity, stability, and feasibility of [125I]RTI-55 for use in radioligand binding assays in postmortem human tissue, a series of experiments were performed characterizing [125I]RTI-55 binding sites in human brain using homogenized membrane preparations and quantitative autoradiography. Analysis of the association, dissociation, and saturation data favored two-phase processes. A curve-fitting analysis of the data derived in saturation experiments found a high-affinity site with KD = 66 +/- 35 pM and Bmax = 13.2 +/- 10.1 pmol/g of tissue and a low-affinity site with KD = 1.52 +/- 0.55 nM and Bmax of 47.5 +/- 11.2 pmol/g of tissue. Competition by ligands known to bind to the dopamine transporter showed a rank order of RTI-55 > GBR-12909 > maxindol > WIN 35428 > = methylphenidate > (-)-cocaine > buproprion > (+)-amphetamine. Binding to serotonergic sites was evaluated in the midbrain. Results of the saturation experiment performed autoradiographically in the midbrain showed a single site with KD = 370 +/- 84 pM. It appears that [125I]RTI-55 should be useful in further studies of the regulation of cocaine binding sites using postmortem human specimens.

  9. Multiple Glycogen-binding Sites in Eukaryotic Glycogen Synthase Are Required for High Catalytic Efficiency toward Glycogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Chikwana, Vimbai M.; Contreras, Christopher J.; Davis, Keri D.; Wilson, Wayne A.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.; Hurley, Thomas D. (Indiana-Med); (Des Moines U)

    2012-12-10

    Glycogen synthase is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of glycogen and has an essential role in glucose homeostasis. The three-dimensional structures of yeast glycogen synthase (Gsy2p) complexed with maltooctaose identified four conserved maltodextrin-binding sites distributed across the surface of the enzyme. Site-1 is positioned on the N-terminal domain, site-2 and site-3 are present on the C-terminal domain, and site-4 is located in an interdomain cleft adjacent to the active site. Mutation of these surface sites decreased glycogen binding and catalytic efficiency toward glycogen. Mutations within site-1 and site-2 reduced the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by 40- and 70-fold, respectively. Combined mutation of site-1 and site-2 decreased the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by >3000-fold. Consistent with the in vitro data, glycogen accumulation in glycogen synthase-deficient yeast cells ({Delta}gsy1-gsy2) transformed with the site-1, site-2, combined site-1/site-2, or site-4 mutant form of Gsy2p was decreased by up to 40-fold. In contrast to the glycogen results, the ability to utilize maltooctaose as an in vitro substrate was unaffected in the site-2 mutant, moderately affected in the site-1 mutant, and almost completely abolished in the site-4 mutant. These data show that the ability to utilize maltooctaose as a substrate can be independent of the ability to utilize glycogen. Our data support the hypothesis that site-1 and site-2 provide a 'toehold mechanism,' keeping glycogen synthase tightly associated with the glycogen particle, whereas site-4 is more closely associated with positioning of the nonreducing end during catalysis.

  10. The heparin-binding site in tetranectin is located in the N-terminal region and binding does not involve the carbohydrate recognition domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentsen, R H; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Caterer, N R

    2000-01-01

    Tetranectin is a homotrimeric plasma and extracellular-matrix protein that binds plasminogen and complex sulphated polysaccharides including heparin. In terms of primary and tertiary structure, tetranectin is related to the collectin family of Ca(2+)-binding C-type lectins. Tetranectin is encoded...... in three exons. Exon 3 encodes the carbohydrate recognition domain, which binds to kringle 4 in plasminogen at low levels of Ca(2+). Exon 2 encodes an alpha-helix, which is necessary and sufficient to govern the trimerization of tetranectin by assembling into a triple-helical coiled-coil structural element....... Here we show that the heparin-binding site in tetranectin resides not in the carbohydrate recognition domain but within the N-terminal region, comprising the 16 amino acid residues encoded by exon 1. In particular, the lysine residues in the decapeptide segment KPKKIVNAKK (tetranectin residues 6...

  11. Autoradiographic imaging and quantification of the high-affinity GHB binding sites in rodent brain using (3)H-HOCPCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, A B; Bay, T; Villumsen, I S

    2016-01-01

    GHB (γ-hydroxybutyric acid) is a compound endogenous to mammalian brain with high structural resemblance to GABA. GHB possesses nanomolar-micromolar affinity for a unique population of binding sites, but the exact nature of these remains elusive. In this study we utilized the highly selective GHB......, (3)H-HOCPCA displays excellent signal-to-noise ratios using rodent brain autoradiography, which makes it a valuable ligand for anatomical quantification of native GHB binding site levels. Our data confirmed that (3)H-HOCPCA labels only the high-affinity specific GHB binding site, found in high...... brain development. Due to the high sensitivity of this radioligand, we were able to detect low levels of specific binding already at E15 in mouse brain, which increased progressively until adulthood. Collectively, we show that (3)H-HOCPCA is a highly sensitive radioligand, offering advantages over...

  12. Interaction of alpha-conotoxin ImII and its analogs with nicotinic receptors and acetylcholine-binding proteins: additional binding sites on Torpedo receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasheverov, I.E.; Zhmak, M.N.; Fish, A.; Rucktooa, P.; Khruschov, A.Y.; Osipov, A.V.; Ziganshin, R.H.; D'Hoedt, D.; Bertrand, D.; Sixma, T.K.; Smit, A.B.; Tsetlin, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    α-Conotoxins interact with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) at the sites for agonists/competitive antagonists. α-Conotoxins blocking muscle-type or α7 nAChRs compete with α-bungarotoxin. However, α-conotoxin ImII, a close homolog of the α7

  13. The role of CTCF binding sites in the 3’ immunoglobulin heavy chain regulatory region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara K Birshtein

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus undergoes a series of DNA rearrangements and modifications to achieve the construction and expression of individual antibody heavy chain genes in B cells. These events affect variable regions, through VDJ joining and subsequent somatic hypermutation, and constant regions through class switch recombination. Levels of IgH expression are also regulated during B cell development, resulting in high levels of secreted antibodies from fully-differentiated plasma cells. Regulation of these events has been attributed primarily to two cis-elements that work from long distances on their target sequences, i.e., an ~1 kb intronic enhancer, Eμ, located between the V region segments and the most 5′ constant region gene, Cμ; and an ~40 kb 3′ regulatory region (3′ RR that is located downstream of the most 3′ CH gene, Cα. The 3′ RR is a candidate for an end of B cell-specific regulation of the Igh locus. The 3′ RR contains several B cell-specific enhancers associated with DNase I hypersensitive sites (hs1-4, which are essential for class switch recombination and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. Downstream of this enhancer-containing region is a region of high-density CTCF binding sites, which extends through hs5, 6, and 7 and further downstream. CTCF, with its enhancer-blocking activities, has been associated with all mammalian insulators and implicated in multiple chromosomal interactions. Here we address the 3′ RR CTCF-binding region as a potential insulator of the Igh locus, an independent regulatory element and a predicted modulator of the activity of 3’ RR enhancers. Using chromosome conformation capture technology, chromatin immunoprecipitation and genetic approaches, we have found that the 3’ RR with its CTCF binding region interacts with target sequences in the VH, Eμ and CH regions through DNA looping as regulated by protein binding. This region impacts on B cell-specific Igh

  14. Requirement for an A-tract structure at the binding site of phage phi 29 transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1994-03-25

    The Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 transcriptional activator, protein p4, binds to the 5'-AACT-TTTT-15 base-pair spacer-AAAATGTT-3' inverted repeat. In this communication, we study the influence in protein p4 binding of the DNA helical structure within the protein p4 recognition sequences, 5'-AAAATAG-3'. Protein p4 could efficiently bind to a modified target in which the A-tracts had been changed into T-tracts (a different sequence with a similar structure). Binding was lost when the structure of the binding site was modified by an interrupting C residue. The results suggest that the DNA helical structure of the A-tracts is critica