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Sample records for tetrapod enamel structure

  1. Amelotin Gene Structure and Expression during Enamel Formation in the Opossum Monodelphis domestica.

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    Barbara Gasse

    Full Text Available Amelotin (AMTN is an ameloblast-secreted protein that belongs to the secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein family, which also includes the enamel matrix proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin and enamelin. Although AMTN is supposed to play an important role in enamel formation, data were long limited to the rodents, in which it is expressed during the maturation stage. Recent comparative studies in sauropsids and amphibians revealed that (i AMTN was expressed earlier, i.e. as soon as ameloblasts are depositing the enamel matrix, and (ii AMTN structure was different, a change which mostly resulted from an intraexonic splicing in the large exon 8 of an ancestral mammal. The present study was performed to know whether the differences in AMTN structure and expression in rodents compared to non-mammalian tetrapods dated back to an early ancestral mammal or were acquired later in mammalian evolution. We sequenced, assembled and screened the jaw transcriptome of a neonate opossum Monodelphis domestica, a marsupial. We found two AMTN transcripts. Variant 1, representing 70.8% of AMTN transcripts, displayed the structure known in rodents, whereas variant 2 (29.2% exhibited the nonmammalian tetrapod structure. Then, we studied AMTN expression during amelogenesis in a neonate specimen. We obtained similar data as those reported in rodents. These findings indicate that more than 180 million years ago, before the divergence of marsupials and placentals, changes occurred in AMTN function and structure. The spatiotemporal expression was delayed to the maturation stage of amelogenesis and the intraexonic splicing gave rise to isoform 1, encoded by variant 1 and lacking the RGD motif. The ancestral isoform 2, housing the RGD, was initially conserved, as demonstrated here in a marsupial, then secondarily lost in the placental lineages. These findings bring new elements towards our understanding of the non-prismatic to prismatic enamel transition that occurred at

  2. Enamel proteins mitigate mechanical and structural degradations in mature human enamel during acid attack

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    Lubarsky, Gennady V.; Lemoine, Patrick; Meenan, Brian J.; Deb, Sanjukta; Mutreja, Isha; Carolan, Patrick; Petkov, Nikolay

    2014-04-01

    A hydrazine deproteination process was used to investigate the role of enamel proteins in the acid erosion of mature human dental enamel. Bright field high resolution transmission electron micrographs and x-ray diffraction analysis show no crystallographic changes after the hydrazine treatment with similar nanoscale hydroxyapatite crystallite size and orientation for sound and de-proteinated enamel. However, the presence of enamel proteins reduces the erosion depth, the loss of hardness and the loss of structural order in enamel, following exposure to citric acid. Nanoindentation creep is larger for sound enamel than for deproteinated enamel but it reduces in sound enamel after acid attack. These novel results are consistent with calcium ion-mediated visco-elasticty in enamel matrix proteins as described previously for nacre, bone and dental proteins. They are also in good agreement with a previous double layer force spectroscopy study by the authors which found that the proteins electrochemically buffer enamel against acid attack. Finally, this suggests that acid attack, and more specifically dental erosion, is influenced by ionic permeation through the enamel layer and that it is mitigated by the enamel protein matrix.

  3. Enamel structural changes induced by hydrochloric and phosphoric acid treatment.

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    Bertacci, Angelica; Lucchese, Alessandra; Taddei, Paola; Gherlone, Enrico F; Chersoni, Stefano

    2014-12-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate enamel acid-induced structural changes after 2 different treatments, by means of Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy analyses, and to correlate these findings with permeability measured as fluid discharge from outer enamel. Two different treatments were investigated: 10 enamel slices were etched with 15% hydrochloric acid (HCl) for 120 seconds and 10 slices with 37% phosphoric acid gel (H3PO4) for 30 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds and then air-dried for 20 seconds. Powders of enamel treated as previously described were produced. Replicas of enamel subjected to the same treatments were obtained to evaluate the presence of fluid droplets on enamel surface. Raman and IR spectroscopy showed that the treatment with both hydrochloric and phosphoric acids induced a decrease in the carbonate content of the enamel apatite. At the same time, both acids induced the formation of HPO42- ions. After H3PO4 treatment, the bands due to the organic component of enamel decreased in intensity, while they increased after HCl treatment. Replicas of H3PO4 treated enamel showed a strongly reduced permeability. Replicas of HCl 15% treated samples showed a maintained permeability. A decrease of the enamel organic component, as resulted after H3PO4 treatment, involves a decrease in enamel permeability, while the increase of the organic matter (achieved by HCl treatment) still maintains enamel permeability.The results suggested a correlation between organic matter and enamel permeability. Permeability was affected by etching technique and could be involved in marginal seal, gap and discoloration at the enamel interface, still causes of restoration failure.

  4. Towards enamel biomimetics: Structure, mechanical properties and biomineralization of dental enamel

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    Fong, Hanson Kwok

    Dental enamel is the most mineralized tissue in the human body. This bioceramic, composed largely of hydroxyapatite (HAp), is also one of the most durable tissues despite a lifetime of masticatory loading and bacterial attack. The biosynthesis of enamel, which occurs in physiological conditions is a complex orchestration of protein assembly and mineral formation. The resulting product is the hardest tissue in the vertebrate body with the longest and most organized arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals known to biomineralizing systems. Detail understanding of the structure of enamel in relationship to its mechanical function and the biomineralization process will provide a framework for enamel regeneration as well as potential lessons in the design of engineering materials. The objective of this study, therefore, is twofold: (1) establish the structure-function relationship of enamel as well as the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ) and (2) determine the effect of proteins on the enamel biomineralization process. A hierarchy in the enamel structure was established by means of various microscopy techniques (e.g. SEM, TEM, AFM). Mechanical properties (hardness and elastic modulus) associated with the microstructural features were also determined by nanoindentation. Furthermore, the DEJ was found to have a width in the range of micrometers to 10s of micrometers with continuous change in structure and mechanical properties. Indentation tests and contact fatigue tests using a spherical indenter have revealed that the structural features in the enamel and the DEJ played important roles in containing crack propagation emanating from the enamel tissue. To further understand the effect of this protein on the biominerailzation process, we have studied genetically engineered animals that express altered amelogenin which lack the known self-assembly properties. This in vivo study has revealed that, without the proper self-assembly of the amelogenin protein as demonstrated by the

  5. Crystal Initiation Structures in Developing Enamel: Possible Implications for Caries Dissolution of Enamel Crystals

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    Colin Robinson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of developing enamel crystals using Atomic and Chemical Force Microscopy (AFM, CFM have revealed a subunit structure. Subunits were seen in height images as collinear swellings about 30 nM in diameter on crystal surfaces. In friction mode they were visible as positive regions. These were similar in size (30–50 nM to collinear spherical structures, presumably mineral matrix complexes, seen in developing enamel using a freeze fracturing/freeze etching procedure. More detailed AFM studies on mature enamel suggested that the 30–50 nM structures were composed of smaller units, ~10–15 nM in diameter. These were clustered in hexagonal or perhaps a spiral arrangement. It was suggested that these could be the imprints of initiation sites for mineral precipitation. The investigation aimed at examining original freeze etched images at high resolution to see if the smaller subunits observed using AFM in mature enamel were also present in developing enamel i.e., before loss of the organic matrix. The method used was freeze etching. Briefly samples of developing rat enamel were rapidly frozen, fractured under vacuum, and ice sublimed from the fractured surface. The fractured surface was shadowed with platinum or gold and the metal replica subjected to high resolution TEM. For AFM studies high-resolution tapping mode imaging of human mature enamel sections was performed in air under ambient conditions at a point midway between the cusp and the cervical margin. Both AFM and freeze etch studies showed structures 30–50 nM in diameter. AFM indicated that these may be clusters of somewhat smaller structures ~10–15 nM maybe hexagonally or spirally arranged. High resolution freeze etching images of very early enamel showed ~30–50 nM spherical structures in a disordered arrangement. No smaller units at 10–15 nM were clearly seen. However, when linear arrangements of 30–50 nM units were visible the picture was more complex but also

  6. Design Formula for Breakage of Tetrapods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Jensen, Jacob Birk; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a design formula for Tetrapod armour on a 1:1.5 slope exposed to head-on random wave attack. The formula predicts the relative number of broken Tetrapods as function of: the mass of the Tetrapods, the concrete tensile strength and the wave height in front of the structure. Thus...

  7. Crystal structure of human tooth enamel studied by neutron diffraction

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    Ouladdiaf, Bachir; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Goutaudier, Christelle; Ouladdiaf, Selma; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Pradelle, Nelly; Colon, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structure of human tooth enamel was investigated using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. Excellent agreement between observed and refined patterns is obtained, using the hexagonal hydroxyapatite model for the tooth enamel, where a large hydroxyl deficiency ˜70% is found in the 4e site. Rietveld refinements method combined with the difference Fourier maps have revealed, however, that the hydroxyl ions are not only disordered along the c-axis but also within the basal plane. Additional H ions located at the 6h site and forming HPO42- anions were found.

  8. [The physiological and pathological role of some organic dentine and enamel structures].

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    István, Bocskay; Viktor, Waldhofer

    2005-08-01

    The enamel is the toughest human tissue. The major component of the inorganic part is hydroxyl apatite (90-92%). The organic part of enamel is formed by proteins, proteoglycans and lipoids, and represents only 1-2% of the entire weight. The organic components are organized, forming histological structures like enamel lamellae, enamel rods sheaths, enamel spindles and tufts. The authors, with the aid of the scanning electron microscope and histochemical staining, have demonstrated that enamel lamellae presented a true histological structure, contrary to some opinions that consider this entities developmental failures or simple cracks. In the opinion of the authors, these lamellae confer elasticity to the enamel when exposed to lateral or tangential forces, or even torque. The lamellae are also considered pathways for the progression of dental caries. The dentine-enamel junction is another non-mineralized tooth-structure which functions like an elastic support for the tough enamel, opposing unfortunately a very low resistance in the face of dental caries progression. In such cases we talk about secondary enamel caries. The dentinal tubules with the organic structures inside are essential in maintaining the vitality of the dentine and enamel; but in pathological circumstances they represent pathways for pathological stimuli heading toward the pulp, and they are the weakest points in front of caries progression.

  9. Structural Morphology of Molars in Large Mammalian Herbivores: Enamel Content Varies between Tooth Positions.

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    Daniela E Winkler

    Full Text Available The distribution of dental tissues in mammalian herbivores can be very different from taxon to taxon. While grazers tend to have more elaborated and complexly folded enamel ridges, browsers have less complex enamel ridges which can even be so far reduced that they are completely lost. The gradient in relative enamel content and complexity of structures has so far not been addressed within a single species. However, several studies have noted tooth position specific wear rates in small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs which may be related to individual tooth morphology. We investigate whether differentiated enamel content by tooth position is also to be found in large herbivores. We use CT-scanning techniques to quantify relative enamel content in upper and lower molar teeth of 21 large herbivorous mammal species. By using a broad approach and including both perissodactyls and artiodactyls, we address phylogenetic intraspecific differences in relative enamel content. We find that enamel is highly unevenly distributed among molars (upper M1, M2, M3 and lower m1, m2, m3 in most taxa and that relative enamel content is independent of phylogeny. Overall, relative enamel content increases along the molar tooth row and is significantly higher in lower molars compared to upper molars. We relate this differential enamel content to prolonged mineralisation in the posterior tooth positions and suggest a compensatory function of m3 and M3 for functional losses of anterior teeth.

  10. Structural Morphology of Molars in Large Mammalian Herbivores: Enamel Content Varies between Tooth Positions.

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    Winkler, Daniela E; Kaiser, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of dental tissues in mammalian herbivores can be very different from taxon to taxon. While grazers tend to have more elaborated and complexly folded enamel ridges, browsers have less complex enamel ridges which can even be so far reduced that they are completely lost. The gradient in relative enamel content and complexity of structures has so far not been addressed within a single species. However, several studies have noted tooth position specific wear rates in small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs) which may be related to individual tooth morphology. We investigate whether differentiated enamel content by tooth position is also to be found in large herbivores. We use CT-scanning techniques to quantify relative enamel content in upper and lower molar teeth of 21 large herbivorous mammal species. By using a broad approach and including both perissodactyls and artiodactyls, we address phylogenetic intraspecific differences in relative enamel content. We find that enamel is highly unevenly distributed among molars (upper M1, M2, M3 and lower m1, m2, m3) in most taxa and that relative enamel content is independent of phylogeny. Overall, relative enamel content increases along the molar tooth row and is significantly higher in lower molars compared to upper molars. We relate this differential enamel content to prolonged mineralisation in the posterior tooth positions and suggest a compensatory function of m3 and M3 for functional losses of anterior teeth.

  11. A Devonian tetrapod-like fish reveals substantial parallelism in stem tetrapod evolution.

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    Zhu, Min; Ahlberg, Per E; Zhao, Wen-Jin; Jia, Lian-Tao

    2017-10-01

    The fossils assigned to the tetrapod stem group document the evolution of terrestrial vertebrates from lobe-finned fishes. During the past 18 years the phylogenetic structure of this stem group has remained remarkably stable, even when accommodating new discoveries such as the earliest known stem tetrapod Tungsenia and the elpistostegid (fish-tetrapod intermediate) Tiktaalik. Here we present a large lobe-finned fish from the Late Devonian period of China that disrupts this stability. It combines characteristics of rhizodont fishes (supposedly a basal branch in the stem group, distant from tetrapods) with derived elpistostegid-like and tetrapod-like characters. This mélange of characters may reflect either detailed convergence between rhizodonts and elpistostegids plus tetrapods, under a phylogenetic scenario deduced from Bayesian inference analysis, or a previously unrecognized close relationship between these groups, as supported by maximum parsimony analysis. In either case, the overall result reveals a substantial increase in homoplasy in the tetrapod stem group. It also suggests that ecological diversity and biogeographical provinciality in the tetrapod stem group have been underestimated.

  12. Optimized performances of tetrapod-like ZnO nanostructures for a triode structure field emission planar light source.

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    Chen, Yiren; Hu, Liqin; Song, Hang; Jiang, Hong; Li, Dabing; Miao, Guoqing; Li, Zhiming; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zhiwei; Guo, Tailiang

    2014-11-21

    Tetrapod-like ZnO (T-ZnO) nanostructures were synthesized by a simple vapor phase oxidation method without any catalysts or additives. We optimized the performances of T-ZnO nanostructures by adjusting the partial pressure of Zn vapour in the total pressure of the quartz chamber and obtained T-ZnO nanostructure materials of high purity, uniform morphology and size and high aspect ratio with a low turn-on electric field of 2.75 V μm(-1), a large field enhancement factor of 3410 and good field emission stability for more than 70 hour continuous emission. Besides, based on the optimized T-ZnO, we developed metal grid mask-assisted water-based electrostatic spraying technology, and fabricated a large-scale, pollution-free, hole-shaped array T-ZnO nanostructure cathode used in a triode structure field emission planar light source. The controllable performances of the triode device were intensively investigated and the results showed that the triode device uniformly illuminated with a luminous intensity as high as 8000 cd m(-2) under the conditions of 200 V grid voltage and 3300 V anode voltage. The research in this paper will benefit the development of a high performance planar light source based on T-ZnO nanostructures.

  13. Surface Structure Study of Crystal Hydroxy-Apatite from Fluorosis Enamels

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    Abdillah Imron Nasution

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluorosis is a condition due to ingestion of excessive amounts of fluor which can cause the change in tooth structure and strength. However, there is still lack of explanation on the surface structure of crystal hydroxyapatite that influences the microscopic characteristic of fluorosis enamel. Objectives: To investigate the surface structure of crystal hydroxy-apatite in fluorosis enamel. Materials and Methods: Determination of fluor concentration and the surface structure of normal and fluorosis enamel specimen were carried out by using Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Disperse X-Ray (SEM/EDX. Results: Fluor concentration of fluorosis enamel was significantly higher with increased surface roughness and porosity than normal enamel. SEM observation also showed gaps areas between enamel rods and visible aprismatic zone in some regions. Conclusion: High level of fluor concentration on fluorosis enamel indicated the subtitution of OH- by F- increasing the surface roughness of enamel surface.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i3.100

  14. Near-surface structural examination of human tooth enamel subject to in vitro demineralization and remineralization

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    Gaines, Carmen Veronica

    The early stages of chemical tooth decay are governed by dynamic processes of demineralization and remineralization of dental enamel that initiates along the surface of the tooth. Conventional diagnostic techniques lack the spatial resolution required to analyze near-surface structural changes in enamel at the submicron level. In this study, slabs of highly-polished, decay-free human enamel were subjected to 0.12M EDTA and buffered lactic acid demineralizing agents and MI Paste(TM) and calcifying (0.1 ppm F) remineralizing treatments in vitro. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), a technique typically used for thin film analysis, provided depth profiles of crystallinity changes in surface enamel with a resolution better than 100 nm. In conjunction with nanoindentation, a technique gaining acceptance as a means of examining the mechanical properties of sound enamel, these results were corroborated with well-established microscopy and Raman techniques to assess the nanohardness, morphologies and chemical nature of treated enamel. Interestingly, the average crystallite size of surface enamel along its c-axis dimension increased by nearly 40% after a 60 min EDTA treatment as detected by GIXD. This result was in direct contrast to the obvious surface degradation observed by microscopic and confocal Raman imaging. A decrease in nanohardness from 4.86 +/- 0.44 GPa to 0.28 +/- 0.10 GPa was observed. Collective results suggest that mineral dissolution characteristics evident on the micron scale may not be fully translated to the nanoscale in assessing the integrity of chemically-modified tooth enamel. While an intuitive decrease in enamel crystallinity was observed with buffered lactic acid-treated samples, demineralization was too slow to adequately quantify the enamel property changes seen. MI Paste(TM) treatment of EDTA-demineralized enamel showed preferential growth along the a-axis direction. Calcifying solution treatments of both demineralized sample types

  15. Surface Structure Study of Crystal Hydroxy-Apatite from Fluorosis Enamels

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    Abdillah Imron Nasution; Harun Asyiq Gunawan; Sri Angky Soekanto

    2013-01-01

    Fluorosis is a condition due to ingestion of excessive amounts of fluor which can cause the change in tooth structure and strength. However, there is still lack of explanation on the surface structure of crystal hydroxyapatite that influences the microscopic characteristic of fluorosis enamel. Objectives: To investigate the surface structure of crystal hydroxy-apatite in fluorosis enamel. Materials and Methods: Determination of fluor concentration and the surface structure of normal and fluor...

  16. Comparative studies between mice molars and incisors are required to draw an overview of enamel structural complexity

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    MICHEL eGOLDBERG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the field of dentistry, the murine incisor has long been considered as an outstanding model to study amelogenesis. However, it clearly appears that enamel from wild type mouse incisors and molars presents several structural differences. In incisor, exclusively radial enamel is observed. In molars, enamel displays a high level of complexity since the inner part is lamellar whereas the outer enamel shows radial and tangential structures. Recently, the serotonin 2B receptor (5-HT2BR was shown to be involved in ameloblast function and enamel mineralization. The incisors from 5HT2BR knockout (KO mice exhibit mineralization defects mostly in the outer maturation zone and porous matrix network in the inner zone. In the molars, the mutation affects both secretory and maturation stages of amelogenesis since pronounced alterations concern overall enamel structures. Molars from 5HT2BR KO mice display reduction in enamel thickness, alterations of inner enamel architecture including defects in Hunter-Schreger Bands arrangements, and altered maturation of the outer radial enamel. Differences of enamel structure were also observed between incisor and molar from other KO mice depleted for genes encoding enamel extracellular matrix proteins.

  17. Structure and scale of the mechanics of mammalian dental enamel viewed from an evolutionary perspective.

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    Lucas, Peter W; Philip, Swapna M; Al-Qeoud, Dareen; Al-Draihim, Nuha; Saji, Sreeja; van Casteren, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian enamel, the contact dental tissue, is something of an enigma. It is almost entirely made of hydroxyapatite, yet exhibits very different mechanical behavior to a homogeneous block of the same mineral. Recent approaches suggest that its hierarchical composite form, similar to other biological hard tissues, leads to a mechanical performance that depends very much on the scale of measurement. The stiffness of the material is predicted to be highest at the nanoscale, being sacrificed to produce a high toughness at the largest scale, that is, at the level of the tooth crown itself. Yet because virtually all this research has been conducted only on human (or sometimes "bovine") enamel, there has been little regard for structural variation of the tissue considered as evolutionary adaptation to diet. What is mammalian enamel optimized for? We suggest that there are competing selective pressures. We suggest that the structural characteristics that optimize enamel to resist large-scale fractures, such as crown failures, are very different to those that resist wear (small-scale fracture). While enamel is always designed for damage tolerance, this may be suboptimal in the enamel of some species, including modern humans (which have been the target of most investigations), in order to counteract wear. The experimental part of this study introduces novel techniques that help to assess resistance at the nanoscale. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Femtosecond laser surface structuring technique for making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting

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    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-12-01

    It is known that good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is a key factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. Here, we report on a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this new approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of femtosecond laser-produced parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  19. Cubatic phase for tetrapods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaak, R.; Mulder, B.M.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the phase behavior of tetrapods, hard nonconvex bodies formed by four rods connected under tetrahedral angles. We predict that, depending on the relative lengths of the rods these particles can form a uniaxial nematic phase, and more surprisingly they can exhibit a cubatic phase, a

  20. Morphology and structure of polymer layers protecting dental enamel against erosion.

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    Beyer, Markus; Reichert, Jörg; Sigusch, Bernd W; Watts, David C; Jandt, Klaus D

    2012-10-01

    Human dental erosion caused by acids is a major factor for tooth decay. Adding polymers to acidic soft drinks is one important approach to reduce human dental erosion caused by acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the thickness and the structure of polymer layers adsorbed in vitro on human dental enamel from polymer modified citric acid solutions. The polymers propylene glycol alginate (PGA), highly esterified pectin (HP) and gum arabic (GA) were used to prepare polymer modified citric acids solutions (PMCAS, pH 3.3). With these PMCAS, enamel samples were treated for 30, 60 and 120s respectively to deposit polymer layers on the enamel surface. Profilometer scratches on the enamel surface were used to estimate the thickness of the polymer layers via atomic force microscopy (AFM). The composition of the deposited polymer layers was investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition the polymer-enamel interaction was investigated with zeta-potential measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It has been shown that the profilometer scratch depth on the enamel with deposited polymers was in the range of 10nm (30s treatment time) up to 25nm (120s treatment time). Compared to this, the unmodified CAS-treated surface showed a greater scratch depth: from nearly 30nm (30s treatment time) up to 60nm (120s treatment time). Based on XPS measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and zeta-potential measurements, a model was hypothesized which describes the layer deposited on the enamel surface as consisting of two opposing gradients of polymer molecules and hydroxyapatite (HA) particles. In this study, the structure and composition of polymer layers deposited on in vitro dental enamel during treatment with polymer modified citric acid solutions were investigated. Observations are consistent with a layer consisting of two opposing gradients of hydroxyapatite particles and polymer molecules. This leads to reduced erosive effects of

  1. Devonian tetrapod from western Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, G.; Ahlberg, P.E.; Blieck, A.; Blom, H.; Clack, J.A.; Poty, E.; Thorez, J.; Janvier, P.

    2004-01-01

    Several discoveries of Late Devonian tetrapods (limbed vertebrates) have been made during the past two decades but each has been confined to one locality. Here we describe a tetrapod jaw of about 365 million years (Myr) old from the Famennian of Belgium, which is the first from western continental Europe. The jaw closely resembles that of Ichthyostega, a Famennian tetrapod hitherto known only from Greenland. The environment of this fossil provides information about the conditions that prevail...

  2. Early tetrapod relationships revisited.

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    Ruta, Marcello; Coates, Michael I; Quicke, Donald L J

    2003-05-01

    In an attempt to investigate differences between the most widely discussed hypotheses of early tetrapod relationships, we assembled a new data matrix including 90 taxa coded for 319 cranial and postcranial characters. We have incorporated, where possible, original observations of numerous taxa spread throughout the major tetrapod clades. A stem-based (total-group) definition of Tetrapoda is preferred over apomorphy- and node-based (crown-group) definitions. This definition is operational, since it is based on a formal character analysis. A PAUP* search using a recently implemented version of the parsimony ratchet method yields 64 shortest trees. Differences between these trees concern: (1) the internal relationships of aïstopods, the three selected species of which form a trichotomy; (2) the internal relationships of embolomeres, with Archeria crassidisca and Pholiderpeton scut collapsed in a trichotomy with a clade formed by Anthracosaurus russelli and Pholiderpeton attheyi; (3) the internal relationships of derived dissorophoids, with four amphibamid species forming an unresolved node with a clade consisting of micromelerpetontids and branchiosaurids and a clade consisting of albanerpetontids plus basal crown-group lissamphibians; (4) the position of albenerpetontids and Eocaecilia micropoda, which form an unresolved node with a trichotomy subtending Karaurus sharovi, Valdotriton gracilis and Triadobatrachus massinoti; (5) the branching pattern of derived diplocaulid nectrideans, with Batrachiderpeton reticulatum and Diceratosaurus brevirostris collapsed in a trichotomy with a clade formed by Diplocaulus magnicornis and Diploceraspis burkei. The results of the original parsimony run--as well as those retrieved from several other treatments of the data set (e.g. exclusion of postcranial and lower jaw data; character reweighting; reverse weighting)--indicate a deep split of early tetrapods between lissamphibian- and amniote-related taxa. Colosteids, Crassigyrinus

  3. Ventastega curonica and the origin of tetrapod morphology.

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    Ahlberg, Per E; Clack, Jennifer A; Luksevics, Ervīns; Blom, Henning; Zupiņs, Ivars

    2008-06-26

    The gap in our understanding of the evolutionary transition from fish to tetrapod is beginning to close thanks to the discovery of new intermediate forms such as Tiktaalik roseae. Here we narrow it further by presenting the skull, exceptionally preserved braincase, shoulder girdle and partial pelvis of Ventastega curonica from the Late Devonian of Latvia, a transitional intermediate form between the 'elpistostegids' Panderichthys and Tiktaalik and the Devonian tetrapods (limbed vertebrates) Acanthostega and Ichthyostega. Ventastega is the most primitive Devonian tetrapod represented by extensive remains, and casts light on a part of the phylogeny otherwise only represented by fragmentary taxa: it illuminates the origin of principal tetrapod structures and the extent of morphological diversity among the transitional forms.

  4. Structural adaptation of tooth enamel protein amelogenin in the presence of SDS micelles.

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    Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Lokappa, Sowmya Bekshe; Ndao, Moise; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2014-05-01

    Amelogenin, the major extracellular matrix protein of developing tooth enamel is intrinsically disordered. Through its interaction with other proteins and mineral, amelogenin assists enamel biomineralization by controlling the formation of highly organized enamel crystal arrays. We used circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopy to investigate the folding propensity of recombinant porcine amelogenin rP172 following its interaction with SDS, at levels above critical micelle concentration. The rP172-SDS complex formation was confirmed by DLS, while an increase in the structure moiety of rP172 was noted through CD and fluorescence experiments. Fluorescence quenching analyses performed on several rP172 mutants where all but one Trp was replaced by Tyr at different sequence regions confirmed that the interaction of amelogenin with SDS micelles occurs via the N-terminal region close to Trp25 where helical segments can be detected by NMR. NMR spectroscopy and structural refinement calculations using CS-Rosetta modeling confirm that the highly conserved N-terminal domain is prone to form helical structure when bound to SDS micelles. Our findings reported here reveal interactions leading to significant changes in the secondary structure of rP172 upon treatment with SDS. These interactions may reflect the physiological relevance of the flexible nature of amelogenin and its sequence specific helical propensity that might enable it to structurally adapt with charged and potential targets such as cell surface, mineral, and other proteins during enamel biomineralization. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A uniquely specialized ear in a very early tetrapod.

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    Clack, J A; Ahlberg, P E; Finney, S M; Dominguez Alonso, P; Robinson, J; Ketcham, R A

    2003-09-04

    The Late Devonian genus Ichthyostega was for many decades the earliest known tetrapod, and the sole representative of a transitional form between a fish and a land vertebrate. However, despite being known since 1932 (ref. 1) from a large collection of specimens, its morphology remained enigmatic and not what was expected of a very primitive tetrapod. Its apparent specializations led it to be considered as a "blind offshoot" or "sidebranch" off the tetrapod family tree, and recent cladistic analyses have disagreed about its exact phylogenetic position within the tetrapod stem group. In particular, its braincase and ear region defied interpretation, such that conventional anatomical terms seemed inapplicable. Using new material collected in 1998 (ref. 9), preparation of earlier-collected material, and high-resolution computed tomography scanning, here we identify and interpret these problematic anatomical structures. They can now be seen to form part of a highly specialized ear, probably a hearing device for use in water. This represents a structurally and functionally unique modification of the tetrapod otic region, unlike anything seen in subsequent tetrapod evolution. The presence of deeply grooved gill bars as in its contemporary Acanthostega suggest that Ichthyostega may have been more aquatically adapted than previously believed.

  6. Salamander Hox clusters contain repetitive DNA and expanded non-coding regions: a typical Hox structure for non-mammalian tetrapod vertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Stephen Randal; Putta, Srikrishna; Walker, John A; Smith, Jeramiah J; Maki, Nobuyasu; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2013-04-05

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that regulate embryonic and post-embryonic developmental processes. The expression of Hox genes is regulated in part by the tight, spatial arrangement of conserved coding and non-coding sequences. The potential for evolutionary changes in Hox cluster structure is thought to be low among vertebrates; however, recent studies of a few non-mammalian taxa suggest greater variation than originally thought. Using next generation sequencing of large genomic fragments (>100 kb) from the red spotted newt (Notophthalamus viridescens), we found that the arrangement of Hox cluster genes was conserved relative to orthologous regions from other vertebrates, but the length of introns and intergenic regions varied. In particular, the distance between hoxd13 and hoxd11 is longer in newt than orthologous regions from vertebrate species with expanded Hox clusters and is predicted to exceed the length of the entire HoxD clusters (hoxd13-hoxd4) of humans, mice, and frogs. Many repetitive DNA sequences were identified for newt Hox clusters, including an enrichment of DNA transposon-like sequences relative to non-coding genomic fragments. Our results suggest that Hox cluster expansion and transposon accumulation are common features of non-mammalian tetrapod vertebrates.

  7. Crystalline structure of human enamel irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, L.; Rosa, K.; da Ana, P. A.; Zezell, D. M.; Craievich, A. F.; Kellermann, G.

    2009-02-01

    The Er,Cr:YSGG system is commonly employed in tissue removal, but recently it has also been clinically evaluated for caries prevention. The present work explains the clinical and pre-clinical observations on the basis of the crystallographic changes that this laser can produce in the dental enamel. The analyzed samples were obtained from sound human third molar teeth. The laser irradiation was conducted with a Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 12.5 mJ/pulse, 0.25 W, and 2.8 J/cm2. The laser device operates at a wavelength of 2.79 μm, and the pulse width duration is 140 μs, with a repetition rate of 20 Hz of spot size of 750 μm. The crystalline structure of the samples was evaluated by X-ray diffraction at a synchrotron beamline The X-ray beam was configured at a grazing angle, to maximize the surface diffraction signal and to better detect the possible new crystallographic phase produced after the laser irradiation. It was observed that the crystallographic structure tetracalcium phosphate (TetCP, JCPDF 25-1137) exhibits several peaks that match more precisely with the new experimental peaks of the irradiated enamel. The present results suggesting the coexistence of tetracalcium phosphate with hydroxyapatite in enamel irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser and can be the answer to the clinical and pre-clinical observations reported in the literature.

  8. Short exposure to high levels of fluoride induces stage-dependent structural changes in ameloblasts and enamel mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyaruu, D M; Bervoets, T J M; Bronckers, A L J J

    2006-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the sensitivity of forming dental enamel to fluoride (F-) is ameloblast developmental stage-dependent and that enamel mineralization disturbances at the surface of fluorotic enamel are caused by damage to late-secretory- and transitional-stage ameloblasts. Four-day-old hamsters received a single intraperitoneal dose of 2.5-20 mg NaF/kg body weight and were examined, 24 h later, by histology and histochemistry. A single dose of >or=5 mg of NaF/kg induced the formation of a hyper- followed by a hypomineralized band in the secretory enamel, without changing the ameloblast structure. At 10 mg of NaF/kg, cystic lesions became apparent under isolated populations of distorted late-secretory- and transitional-stage ameloblasts. Staining with von Kossa stain showed that the enamel under these lesions was hypermineralized. At 20 mg of NaF/kg, cystic lesions containing necrotic cells were also found in the early stages of secretory amelogenesis and were also accompanied with hypermineralization of the enamel surface. We concluded that the sensitivity to F- is ameloblast developmental stage-dependent. Groups of transitional ameloblasts are most sensitive, followed by those at early secretory stages. These data suggest that a F-induced increase in cell death in the transitional-stage ameloblasts accompanies the formation of cystic lesions, which may explain the formation of enamel pits seen clinically in erupted teeth.

  9. Testing the Effect of Aggressive Beverage on the Damage of Enamel Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutovac, Mitar; Popova, Olga V.; Macanovic, Gordana; Kristina, Radoman; Lutovac, Bojana; Ketin, Sonja; Biocanin, Rade

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dental erosion is a common problem in modern societies, owing to the increased consumption of acid drinks such as soft drinks, sports drinks, fruit juice. Examining the enamel surface with the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) enables more precise registering and defining the changes of enamel surface structure and microhardness. This method can be used to compare the efficiency of application of different preventive and therapy materials and medicaments in dentistry. The chronic regular consumption of low pH cola drinks encouraged the erosion of the teeth. The loss of anatomy and sensitivity are direct results of acid cola dissolving coronal tooth material. Under the influence of coca cola, a change of crystal structure and nanomorphology on enamel surface occurs. AIM: This paper reflects dental damage from abusive cola drinking, and the clinical presentation can be explained from data presented in this thesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The trial was conducted on a total of 40 extracted teeth which were divided into two groups treated with the solution of coca cola during 5 minutes, and then prepared and tested with a standard AFM procedure, type SPM-5200. Quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the roughness parameters (Ra) of the treated and non-treated sample. RESULTS: Based on the test of a hypothesis of the existence of differences between the treated and untreated sample, with an application of a t-test, it is shown that there are statistically highly significant differences between Ra of the treated sample with a 5-minute treatment of coca cola and Ra of the same sample without the treatment. CONCLUSION: Use of AFM enables successful monitoring of changes on enamel surface as well as the interpretation of the ultrastructural configuration of the crystal stage and the damage created under the influence of different external factors.

  10. Testing the Effect of Aggressive Beverage on the Damage of Enamel Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitar Lutovac

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dental erosion is a common problem in modern societies, owing to the increased consumption of acid drinks such as soft drinks, sports drinks, fruit juice. Examining the enamel surface with the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM enables more precise registering and defining the changes of enamel surface structure and microhardness. This method can be used to compare the efficiency of application of different preventive and therapy materials and medicaments in dentistry. The chronic regular consumption of low pH cola drinks encouraged the erosion of the teeth. The loss of anatomy and sensitivity are direct results of acid cola dissolving coronal tooth material. Under the influence of coca cola, a change of crystal structure and nanomorphology on enamel surface occurs. AIM: This paper reflects dental damage from abusive cola drinking, and the clinical presentation can be explained from data presented in this thesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The trial was conducted on a total of 40 extracted teeth which were divided into two groups treated with the solution of coca cola during 5 minutes, and then prepared and tested with a standard AFM procedure, type SPM-5200. Quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the roughness parameters (Ra of the treated and non-treated sample. RESULTS: Based on the test of a hypothesis of the existence of differences between the treated and untreated sample, with an application of a t-test, it is shown that there are statistically highly significant differences between Ra of the treated sample with a 5-minute treatment of coca cola and Ra of the same sample without the treatment. CONCLUSION: Use of AFM enables successful monitoring of changes on enamel surface as well as the interpretation of the ultrastructural configuration of the crystal stage and the damage created under the influence of different external factors.

  11. Testing the Effect of Aggressive Beverage on the Damage of Enamel Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutovac, Mitar; Popova, Olga V; Macanovic, Gordana; Kristina, Radoman; Lutovac, Bojana; Ketin, Sonja; Biocanin, Rade

    2017-12-15

    Dental erosion is a common problem in modern societies, owing to the increased consumption of acid drinks such as soft drinks, sports drinks, fruit juice. Examining the enamel surface with the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) enables more precise registering and defining the changes of enamel surface structure and microhardness. This method can be used to compare the efficiency of application of different preventive and therapy materials and medicaments in dentistry. The chronic regular consumption of low pH cola drinks encouraged the erosion of the teeth. The loss of anatomy and sensitivity are direct results of acid cola dissolving coronal tooth material. Under the influence of coca cola, a change of crystal structure and nanomorphology on enamel surface occurs. This paper reflects dental damage from abusive cola drinking, and the clinical presentation can be explained from data presented in this thesis. The trial was conducted on a total of 40 extracted teeth which were divided into two groups treated with the solution of coca cola during 5 minutes, and then prepared and tested with a standard AFM procedure, type SPM-5200. Quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the roughness parameters (Ra) of the treated and non-treated sample. Based on the test of a hypothesis of the existence of differences between the treated and untreated sample, with an application of a t-test, it is shown that there are statistically highly significant differences between Ra of the treated sample with a 5-minute treatment of coca cola and Ra of the same sample without the treatment. Use of AFM enables successful monitoring of changes on enamel surface as well as the interpretation of the ultrastructural configuration of the crystal stage and the damage created under the influence of different external factors.

  12. Investigation of 16% carbamide-peroxide on the structure and properties and effect return enamel staining teeth whitening after their

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matvijenko Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most tooth whitening is a procedure that removes stains and various discolorations of tooth surface. Discoloration of teeth may be endogenous and exogenous nature. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of bleaching combined with daily use of drinks that cause tooth discoloration. Evaluated the changes in surface structure of enamel, and changes in hardness after bleaching. Were 20 extracted teeth. The teeth are marked with longitudinal lines halves (medial vestibular and distal surfaces. Tretitana mesial half of the 16% carbamide peroxide, a distal was left as control. NDT device HL-400DL, duroskopskom method of enamel hardness was measured before treatment, after treatment and after remineralization. Olympus inverted microscope GX41 enamel structures were observed in the treated and control half of the tooth. After bleaching there is a difference compared to the untreated surface, that surface is bleached a few shades lighter, but after the use of coffee and soft drinks teeth back to the original dark color. Enamel microhardness after the treatment is somewhat small but not significant. With a magnification of 2000x and see the structural changes in enamel. Tooth whitening, but that the remineralization and the abstinence from prebojenih beverages and tobacco.

  13. Structural evolution and tissue-specific expression of tetrapod-specific second isoform of secretory pathway Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestov, Nikolay B., E-mail: korn@mail.ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Kostina, Maria B. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Korneenko, Tatyana V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Shakhparonov, Mikhail I. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Modyanov, Nikolai N., E-mail: nikolai.modyanov@utoledo.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, 3000 Arlington Ave., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full-length secretory pathway Ca-ATPase (SPCA2) cloned from rat duodenum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATP2C2 gene (encoding SPCA2) exists only in genomes of Tetrapoda. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rat and pig SPCA2 are expressed in intestines, lung and some secretory glands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcellular localization of SPCA2 may depend on tissue type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In rat duodenum, SPCA2 is localized in plasma membrane-associated compartments. -- Abstract: Secretory pathway Ca-ATPases are less characterized mammalian calcium pumps than plasma membrane Ca-ATPases and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPases. Here we report analysis of molecular evolution, alternative splicing, tissue-specific expression and subcellular localization of the second isoform of the secretory pathway Ca-ATPase (SPCA2), the product of the ATP2C2 gene. The primary structure of SPCA2 from rat duodenum deduced from full-length transcript contains 944 amino acid residues, and exhibits 65% sequence identity with known SPCA1. The rat SPCA2 sequence is also highly homologous to putative human protein KIAA0703, however, the latter seems to have an aberrant N-terminus originating from intron 2. The tissue-specificity of SPCA2 expression is different from ubiquitous SPCA1. Rat SPCA2 transcripts were detected predominantly in gastrointestinal tract, lung, trachea, lactating mammary gland, skin and preputial gland. In the newborn pig, the expression profile is very similar with one remarkable exception: porcine bulbourethral gland gave the strongest signal. Upon overexpression in cultured cells, SPCA2 shows an intracellular distribution with remarkable enrichment in Golgi. However, in vivo SPCA2 may be localized in compartments that differ among various tissues: it is intracellular in epidermis, but enriched in plasma membranes of the intestinal epithelium. Analysis of SPCA2 sequences from various vertebrate species argue that ATP2C2

  14. Identification of surface domain structure on enamel crystals using polyamidoamine dendrimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haifeng; Clarkson, Brian H.; Orr, Bradford; Majoros, Istvan; Banaszak Holl, Mark M.

    2002-03-01

    The control of hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation and crystal growth is central to the mineralization and remineralization of enamel and dentin of teeth. However, the precise biomolecular mechanisms involved remain obscure. The intimate association between the crystal's surface and extracellular protein components implies a modulating role for organic crystal interactions probably mediated via specific crystal surface domains. These include lattice defects and specific stereochemical arrays on associated organic molecules. The nature of protein-crystal interaction depends upon the physical forces of attraction / repulsion between specific biomolecular groups and crystal surface domains. The proposed study is to utilize specific polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers, also known as “artificial proteins”, acting as nanoprobe. These will be used to probe specific surface domain on the surface of the naturally derived crystals of hydroxyapatite and to determine how control of growth and dissolution may be affected at the biomolecular level. The hydroxyapatite crystals are extracted from the maturation stage enamel of rats. Three types of PAMAM dendrimers, respectively with amine-, carboxylic acid and methyl-capped surface, will be applied in the study. The dendrimer binding on the surface of the hydoxyapatite crystals will be characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The different dendrimer binding on the crystals will disclose the specific surface domain structure on the crystals, which is assumed to be important in binding the extracellular protein.

  15. Three-dimensional limb joint mobility in the early tetrapod Ichthyostega.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Stephanie E; Clack, Jennifer A; Hutchinson, John R

    2012-06-28

    The origin of tetrapods and the transition from swimming to walking was a pivotal step in the evolution and diversification of terrestrial vertebrates. During this time, modifications of the limbs—particularly the specialization of joints and the structures that guide their motions—fundamentally changed the ways in which early tetrapods could move. Nonetheless, little is known about the functional consequences of limb anatomy in early tetrapods and how that anatomy influenced locomotion capabilities at this very critical stage in vertebrate evolution. Here we present a three-dimensional reconstruction of the iconic Devonian tetrapod Ichthyostega and a quantitative and comparative analysis of limb mobility in this early tetrapod. We show that Ichthyostega could not have employed typical tetrapod locomotory behaviours, such as lateral sequence walking. In particular, it lacked the necessary rotary motions in its limbs to push the body off the ground and move the limbs in an alternating sequence. Given that long-axis rotation was present in the fins of tetrapodomorph fishes, it seems that either early tetrapods evolved through an initial stage of restricted shoulder and hip joint mobility or that Ichthyostega was unique in this respect. We conclude that early tetrapods with the skeletal morphology and limb mobility of Ichthyostega were unlikely to have made some of the recently described Middle Devonian trackways.

  16. Observations on the structural features and characteristics of biological apatite crystals. 2. Observation on the ultrastructure of human enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, T; Yamashita, Y; Terashima, T

    1992-12-01

    In a series of studies to investigate the structural features of biological crystals, using an electron microscope, we examined the ultrastructure of human enamel crystals at near atomic resolution through the cross and longitudinal sections of the crystals. The materials used for this study were the middle layer of the noncarious enamel from freshly extracted human erupted permanent molars. The small cubes of the enamel were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and embedded in epoxy resin using the routine methods. The ultrathin sections were cut with a diamond knife without decalcification. The sections were examined with HITACHI H-500 and H-700 types of transmission electron microscopes operated at 125-200 kV. Each crystal was observed at the initial magnification of 300,000 times and at the final magnification of 10,000,000 times and over. Using this approach, the authors have been able to show the configuration of the hydroxyapatite in the cross and longitudinal sections of the enamel crystals and observe the basic hexagonal pattern of the unit cell viewed down the c-axis. The authors sincerely believe that the electron micrograph shown in this report is the first atomic image to be obtained from a hydroxyapatite crystal from the human enamel, using the sections.

  17. Histological structures and acidic etching sensitivities of the enamels at the occlusal pit parts in the deciduous and permanent teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Masashi [Department of Dental Hygiene, Nippon Dental University College at Niigata, Niigata 951-8580 (Japan)]. E-mail: masashi@ngt.ndu.ac.jp; Zheng, Jinhua [Department of Oral Anatomy, School of Dentistry at Niigata, Nippon Dental University, Niigata 951-8580 (Japan); Mori, Kazuhisa [Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dentistry at Niigata, Nippon Dental University, Niigata 951-8580 (Japan); Mataga, Izumi [Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dentistry at Niigata, Nippon Dental University, Niigata 951-8580 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kan [Department of Oral Anatomy, School of Dentistry at Niigata, Nippon Dental University, Niigata 951-8580 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare the histological structures and acidic etching sensitivities of the enamels at the occlusal pit parts between the deciduous molars and permanent molars. They were observed by the polarizing and scanning electron microscopies. The enamel rods were less made slender by EDTA etching and the outlines of the apatite crystals, constituting the enamel rods, were clearer at the occlusal pit part of the deciduous molar than that of the permanent molar in reverse of that at the cusp part. It is thought that the enamel at the occlusal pit part of the permanent molar is more easily decayed by the dental caries than that of the deciduous molar because the former is more easily decayed by the acidic etching than the latter in reverse at the cusp part. It is considered that the thin superficialmost layer of the enamel at the occlusal pit part of the permanent molar has originally higher degree of resistance to the dental caries.

  18. [Peculiarities of the morphological structure of the inorganic component of human dental enamel and dentin at nano-level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, I N; Goncharov, V D; Kipchuk, A V; Bobrova, Ye A

    2014-01-01

    Using the polished sections of 20 permanent human molars and premolars, the regimes of probe atomic force microscopy were assessed that permit the definition of the size, shape, spatial configuration of the structure-forming hydroxyapatite crystals of enamel and dentin inorganic component. It was found that the major part of enamel crystals had the size of 40-60 nm and were more flattened. Dentin crystal average size was equal to 60-80 nm. Microspaces between them had the shape of rotational ellipsoid sized 120 nm by 60 nm.

  19. Enamel microabrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhazindar, M M; Welbury, R R

    2000-05-01

    A significant number of patients complain of discoloured teeth. The enamel microabrasion technique described in this article is a simple conservative method for improving the appearance of discoloured enamel.

  20. Microchemical and structural regular variability of apatites in 'overbuilt' enamel and dentin of human molar teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuczumow, A., E-mail: kuczon@kul.lublin.pl [Department of Chemistry, Lublin Catholic University, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Nowak, J. [Department of Chemistry, Lublin Catholic University, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); ChaLas, R. [Department of Conservative Medicine, Lublin Medical University, 20-081 Lublin (Poland)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of a recent paper was to recognize the chemical and structural changes in apatites, which form both the enamel and the dentin of the human tooth. The aim was achieved by scrutinizing the linear elemental profiles along the cross-sections of human molar teeth. Essentially, the task was accomplished with the application of the Electron Probe Microanalysis method and with some additional studies by Micro-Raman spectrometry. All the trends in linear profiles were strictly determined. In the enamel zone they were either increasing or decreasing curves of exponential character. The direction of the investigations was to start with the tooth surface and move towards the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ). The results of the elemental studies were more visible when the detected material was divided, in an arbitrary way, into the prevailing 'core' enamel ({approx}93.5% of the total mass) and the remaining 'overbuilt' enamel. The material in the 'core' enamel was fully stable, with clearly determined chemical and mechanical features. However, the case was totally different in the 'overbuilt enamel', with dynamic changes in the composition. In the 'overbuilt' layer Ca, P, Cl and F profiles present the decaying distribution curves, whereas Mg, Na, K and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} present the growing ones. Close to the surface of the tooth the mixture of hydroxy-, chlor- and fluor-apatite is formed, which is much more resistant than the rest of the enamel. On passing towards the DEJ, the apatite is enriched with Na, Mg and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. In this location, three of six phosphate groups were substituted with carbonate groups. Simultaneously, Mg is associated with the hydroxyl groups around the hexad axis. In this way, the mechanisms of exchange reactions were established. The crystallographic structures were proposed for new phases located close to DEJ. In the dentin zone, the variability of elemental profiles looks different, with

  1. Otolithic apparatus of tetrapods after space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychakov, Dmitri

    In vertebrates the otolithic membrane is formed of three components: the gelatinous layer, the subcupular meshwork and the otolithic apparatus (Fermin et al., 1998; Lim, 1974; Lindeman, 1969; Lychakov, 1988, 2002). The otolithic apparatus consists of a set of small crystalline otoconia (Tetrapoda), or a single large crystalline otolith (Teleostei). Despite similar functions, the otoconia (Tetrapoda) and otolith otolithic apparatus differ significantly in their embryogenesis, postembryonic growth, chemical composition, etc. It may be suggested that the gravitational challenges may have different effects on otoconia or otoliths. Unfortunately, we have only a few quantitative data on structural adaptation of tetrapod otolithic apparatus to microgravity (Lychakov, 2002; Lychakov, Lavrova,1985; Wiederhold et al., 1997). The BION-M1 provides an opportunity for a quantitative morphological analysis of otolithic apparatus of adult mice exposed to 30 days in a biosatellite on orbit. We expect to analyse otoconia of utriculus and sacculus. Our principal aims are to investigate the morphological characteristics of otoconia. We expect to get novel insights in microgravity induced otoconia adaptation of tetrapods. This work was partly supported by Russian grant RFFI 14-04-00601.

  2. Palaeogeography: Devonian tetrapod from western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Gaël; Ahlberg, Per E; Blieck, Alain; Blom, Henning; Clack, Jennifer A; Poty, Edouard; Thorez, Jacques; Janvier, Philippe

    2004-01-29

    Several discoveries of Late Devonian tetrapods (limbed vertebrates) have been made during the past two decades, but each has been confined to one locality. Here we describe a tetrapod jaw of about 365 million years (Myr) old from the Famennian of Belgium, which is the first from western continental Europe. The jaw closely resembles that of Ichthyostega, a Famennian tetrapod hitherto known only from Greenland. The environment of this fossil provides information about the conditions that prevailed just before the virtual disappearance of tetrapods from the fossil record for 20 Myr.

  3. Observations on structural features and characteristics of biological apatite crystals. 8. Observation on fusion of human enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, T; Yamashita, Y; Terashima, T

    1993-12-01

    In a series of studies to investigate the basic structural features and characteristics of the biological apatite crystals, using a transmission electron microscope, we examined the ultrastructure of the human enamel, dentin, and bone crystals at near atomic resolution and showed the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure through the cross and longitudinal sections of the crystals. Subsequently, based on the results of the observations by the authors of the ultrastructure of the tooth and bone, using the same approach, we have been able to directly examine the images of the lattice imperfections in the human tooth and bone crystals, such as the point defect structure, line defect, and face defect, in the crystals. In this report, we describe the images of the crystal fusion obtained by using the same approach from the sections of the human enamel crystals. The materials used for this study were the noncarious enamel from the freshly extracted human erupted lower first molars. The small cubes of the material were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and embedded in epoxy resin using the routine methods. The ultrathin sections were cut with a diamond knife without decalcification. The sections were examined with the HITACHI H-800 H and H-9000 type transmission electron microscopes operated at 200 kV and 300 kV. Each crystal was observed at an initial magnification of 300,000 times and at a final magnification of 10,000,000 times and over. We are, therefore, able to confirm that the fusion between the adjacent crystals can occur at some time during the life history of the human enamel. We sincerely believe that the electron micrographs shown in this report are the first to show the ultrastructures of the crystal fusion in the human enamel crystals at near atomic resolution.

  4. Barrier formation: potential molecular mechanism of enamel fluorosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; Denbesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested

  5. Fine Structure of Susceptible Enamel Lamellae against Dentin Caries in the Fissures of Rat Molar Teeth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tetsuo KODAKA; Masayuki ABE; Shohei HIGASHI

    1997-01-01

    .... In this study, we observed enamel lamellae in the fissures of caries-free molar teeth of rats, 2 and 4 weeks after birth, by transmitted light microscopy with decalcified sections and by scanning...

  6. Numerical wave interaction with tetrapods breakwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dentale Fabio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides some results of a new procedure to analyze the hydrodynamic aspects of the interactions between maritime emerged breakwaters and waves by integrating CAD and CFD. The structure is modeled in the numerical domain by overlapping individual three-dimensional elements (Tetrapods, very much like the real world or physical laboratory testing. Flow of the fluid within the interstices among concrete blocks is evaluated by integrating the RANS equations. The aim is to investigate the reliability of this approach as a design tool. Therefore, for the results' validation, the numerical run-up and reflection effects on virtual breakwater were compared with some empirical formulae and some similar laboratory tests. Here are presented the results of a first simple validation procedure. The validation shows that, at present, this innovative approach can be used in the breakwater design phase for comparison between several design solutions with a significant minor cost.

  7. Numerical wave interaction with tetrapods breakwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Dentale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides some results of a new procedure to analyze the hydrodynamic aspects of the interactions between maritime emerged breakwaters and waves by integrating CAD and CFD. The structure is modeled in the numerical domain by overlapping individual three-dimensional elements (Tetrapods, very much like the real world or physical laboratory testing. Flow of the fluid within the interstices among concrete blocks is evaluated by integrating the RANS equations. The aim is to investigate the reliability of this approach as a design tool. Therefore, for the results’ validation, the numerical run-up and reflection effects on virtual breakwater were compared with some empirical formulae and some similar laboratory tests. Here are presented the results of a first simple validation procedure. The validation shows that, at present, this innovative approach can be used in the breakwater design phase for comparison between several design solutions with a significant minor cost.

  8. East Greenland tetrapods are Devonian in age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. E. A.; Astin, T. R.; Clack, J. A.

    1999-07-01

    Palynological dates unambiguously resolve the stratigraphic age of the East Greenland sedimentary rocks containing the earliest well-preserved tetrapod remains. This is the first time that spore samples have been discovered in the sedimentary succession that has yielded Acanthostega and Ichthyostega, two tetrapods that are regarded as critically important taxa for our understanding of the origin and early evolution of the tetrapods. These palynological assemblages conclusively show that the rocks are Devonian in age. The evidence resolves a 60-year-old dispute regarding the age of these rocks and contradicts a recent controversial study suggesting a much younger (Carboniferous, Viséan) age for these tetrapods. Spore samples bracketing the in situ occurrences of both tetrapod genera place them securely within the Famennian Age of the Devonian Period and at least as old as Famennian 2b. The ages of all known Devonian tetrapods are reviewed and related to a common palynological standard. This review places Ichthyostega and Acanthostega as the earliest of the Famennian tetrapods.

  9. Vertebral architecture in the earliest stem tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Stephanie E; Ahlberg, Per E; Hutchinson, John R; Molnar, Julia L; Sanchez, Sophie; Tafforeau, Paul; Clack, Jennifer A

    2013-02-14

    The construction of the vertebral column has been used as a key anatomical character in defining and diagnosing early tetrapod groups. Rhachitomous vertebrae--in which there is a dorsally placed neural arch and spine, an anteroventrally placed intercentrum and paired, posterodorsally placed pleurocentra--have long been considered the ancestral morphology for tetrapods. Nonetheless, very little is known about vertebral anatomy in the earliest stem tetrapods, because most specimens remain trapped in surrounding matrix, obscuring important anatomical features. Here we describe the three-dimensional vertebral architecture of the Late Devonian stem tetrapod Ichthyostega using propagation phase-contrast X-ray synchrotron microtomography. Our scans reveal a diverse array of new morphological, and associated developmental and functional, characteristics, including a possible posterior-to-anterior vertebral ossification sequence and the first evolutionary appearance of ossified sternal elements. One of the most intriguing features relates to the positional relationships between the vertebral elements, with the pleurocentra being unexpectedly sutured or fused to the intercentra that directly succeed them, indicating a 'reverse' rhachitomous design. Comparison of Ichthyostega with two other stem tetrapods, Acanthostega and Pederpes, shows that reverse rhachitomous vertebrae may be the ancestral condition for limbed vertebrates. This study fundamentally revises our current understanding of vertebral column evolution in the earliest tetrapods and raises questions about the presumed vertebral architecture of tetrapodomorph fish and later, more crownward, tetrapods.

  10. Pentastomids and the tetrapod lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, J; Henderson, R J

    1999-01-01

    Pentastomids comprise a highly specialized taxon of arthropod-like parasites that probably became adapted to the lungs of amphibians and reptiles early in their long evolutionary history. Few other macroparasites exploit this particular niche. Pentastomids are often large, long-lived and yet they cause little observable pathology in lungs, despite being haematophagous. The lungs of all tetrapods are lined with pulmonary surfactant, a remarkable biological material consisting of a complex mixture of phospholipids, neutral lipids and proteins that has the unique ability to disperse over the air-liquid lining of the lung. In the lower tetrapods it acts as an anti-glue preventing adhesion of respiratory surfaces when lungs collapse during swallowing prey or upon expiration. In mammals, pulmonary surfactant also plays a critical role regulating the activity of alveolar macrophages, the predominant phagocytes of the lower airways and alveoli. This review outlines the evidence suggesting that lung-dwelling pentastomids, and also nymphs encysted in the tissues of mammalian intermediate hosts, evade immune surveillance and reduce inflammation by coating the chitinous cuticle with a their own stage-specific surfactant. The lipid composition of surfactant derived from lung instars of the pentastomid Porocephalus crotali cultured in vitro is very similar to that recovered from the lung of its snake host. Pentastomid surfactant, visualised as lamellate droplets within sub-parietal cells, is delivered to the cuticle via chitin-lined efferent ducts that erupt at a surface density of < 400 mm(-2). The fidelity of the system, which ensures that every part of the cuticle surface is membrane-coated, testifies to its strategic importance. Two other extensive glands discharge membrane-associated (hydrophobic?) proteins onto the hooks and head; some have been purified and partly characterized but their role in minimising inflammatory responses is, as yet, undetermined.

  11. Effect of two kinds of iron drops on the discoloration, atomic absorption and structural changes of primary teeth enamel

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    Mehran M.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Black staining after taking iron drops on the primary teeth is always concern of parents. There is not an exact explanation for the mechanism of iron black staining. The purpose of this study was to compare tooth discolorations, atomic absorption and structural changes of primary teeth enamel caused by two kinds of iron drops[ Kharazmi(Iran and Fer-in-sol(USA]. "nMaterials and Methods: In this ex-vivo study, 93 sound primary teeth in normal color range were divided into five groups. Two groups of samples were immersed into the Artificial Caries Challenge(ACC for two weeks before getting exposured to iron drops: Group 1 Control(NS: sound enamel teeth which were kept in Normal Saline environment(NS(13teeth. Group 2 (NS-KH: NS, kharazmi iron drop (20 teeth. Group 3 (ACC-KH: ACC, Kharazmi iron drop (20teeth. Group 4 (NS-F-in-S: NS, Fer-in-Sol iron drop (20teeth. Group 5 (ACC-F-in-S: ACC, Fer-in-Sol iron drop. Visual tooth discolorations were determined by a specialist in operative dentistry who was not aware of experimental groups. The iron concentration was measured by ICP system (Vista-pro, Australia and the structural changes were studied by SEM (Philips, Netherland. The data of discoloration were studied with Kruskal-Wallis test and multiple comparison using Bonferroni type test, and with the data of atomic absorption were studied with oneway ANOVA test and Tukey HSD test. "nResults: The discoloration in the teeth immersed into the ACC (ACC-KH, ACC-F-in-S was more severe than the sound enamel surface (NS-KH, NS-F-IN-S (p<0.001 and Kharazmi iron drop caused more discoloration in the teeth immersed into the ACC (p=0.018. The teeth immersed into the ACC, absorbed more iron than the sound enamel surface (p<0.001 and also the teeth immersed into the ACC absorbed more Kharazmi iron drop (p<0.001. In the Scanning Electron Microscopy study, at low magnification in the sound teeth the perikymata was arranged regular. At low

  12. Microhardness, Structure, and Morphology of Primary Enamel after Phosphoric Acid, Self-Etching Adhesive, and Er:YAG Laser Etching

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    María del Carmen Zoila Alcantara-Galeana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Phosphoric acid is the traditional etching agent; self-etching adhesives and Er:YAG laser are alternative methods. Knowledge of deciduous enamel etching is required. Aim. To evaluate primary enamel microhardness, structure, and morphology after phosphoric acid, self-etching, and Er:YAG laser etching. Design. Seventy primary incisors were assigned to five groups (n=14: I (control, II (35% phosphoric acid, III (self-etching adhesive, IV (Er:YAG laser at 15 J/cm2, and V (Er:YAG laser at 19.1 J/cm2. Microhardness was evaluated by Vickers indentation. Chemical composition was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, Mann–Whitney U, and Pearson bivariate correlation were employed (α=0.05. Results. Vickers microhardness showed differences and no correlation with Ca/P ratio. Group II showed differences in carbon, oxygen, and phosphorus atomic percent and group V in Ca/P ratio. Morphological changes included exposed prisms, fractures, craters, and fusion. Conclusions. Enamel treated with phosphoric acid showed different chemical characterization among groups. Self-etching and Er:YAG laser irradiation at 19.1 J/cm2 showed similar microhardness and chemical characterization. Er:YAG laser irradiation at 15 J/cm2 maintained microhardness as untreated enamel. Er:YAG laser irradiation at 19.1 J/cm2 enhanced mineral content. Morphological retentive changes were specific to each type of etching protocol.

  13. Tetrapodal molecular switches and motors: synthesis and photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuang-Yen; Wezenberg, Sander J; Carroll, Gregory T; London, Gábor; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pijper, Thomas C; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-08-01

    The design, synthesis, and dynamic behavior of a series of novel tetrapodal molecular switches and motors containing common functional groups for attachment to various inorganic and organic surfaces are presented. Using a Diels-Alder reaction, an anthracene unit with four functionalized alkyl substituents ("legs") was coupled to maleimide-functionalized molecular switches or motors under ambient conditions. Terminal functional groups at the "legs" include thioacetates and azides, making these switches and motors ideal candidates for attachment to metallic or alkyne-functionalized surfaces. UV/vis absorption spectroscopy shows that the molecular switches and motors retain their ability to undergo reversible photoinduced and/or thermally induced structural changes after attachment to the tetrapodal anthracene.

  14. Forelimb-hindlimb developmental timing changes across tetrapod phylogeny

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    Selwood Lynne

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetrapods exhibit great diversity in limb structures among species and also between forelimbs and hindlimbs within species, diversity which frequently correlates with locomotor modes and life history. We aim to examine the potential relation of changes in developmental timing (heterochrony to the origin of limb morphological diversity in an explicit comparative and quantitative framework. In particular, we studied the relative time sequence of development of the forelimbs versus the hindlimbs in 138 embryos of 14 tetrapod species spanning a diverse taxonomic, ecomorphological and life-history breadth. Whole-mounts and histological sections were used to code the appearance of 10 developmental events comprising landmarks of development from the early bud stage to late chondrogenesis in the forelimb and the corresponding serial homologues in the hindlimb. Results An overall pattern of change across tetrapods can be discerned and appears to be relatively clade-specific. In the primitive condition, as seen in Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes, the forelimb/pectoral fin develops earlier than the hindlimb/pelvic fin. This pattern is either retained or re-evolved in eulipotyphlan insectivores (= shrews, moles, hedgehogs, and solenodons and taken to its extreme in marsupials. Although exceptions are known, the two anurans we examined reversed the pattern and displayed a significant advance in hindlimb development. All other species examined, including a bat with its greatly enlarged forelimbs modified as wings in the adult, showed near synchrony in the development of the fore and hindlimbs. Conclusion Major heterochronic changes in early limb development and chondrogenesis were absent within major clades except Lissamphibia, and their presence across vertebrate phylogeny are not easily correlated with adaptive phenomena related to morphological differences in the adult fore- and hindlimbs. The apparently conservative nature of this

  15. Forelimb-hindlimb developmental timing changes across tetrapod phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bininda-Emonds, Olaf R P; Jeffery, Jonathan E; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R; Hanken, James; Colbert, Matthew; Pieau, Claude; Selwood, Lynne; Ten Cate, Carel; Raynaud, Albert; Osabutey, Casmile K; Richardson, Michael K

    2007-10-01

    Tetrapods exhibit great diversity in limb structures among species and also between forelimbs and hindlimbs within species, diversity which frequently correlates with locomotor modes and life history. We aim to examine the potential relation of changes in developmental timing (heterochrony) to the origin of limb morphological diversity in an explicit comparative and quantitative framework. In particular, we studied the relative time sequence of development of the forelimbs versus the hindlimbs in 138 embryos of 14 tetrapod species spanning a diverse taxonomic, ecomorphological and life-history breadth. Whole-mounts and histological sections were used to code the appearance of 10 developmental events comprising landmarks of development from the early bud stage to late chondrogenesis in the forelimb and the corresponding serial homologues in the hindlimb. An overall pattern of change across tetrapods can be discerned and appears to be relatively clade-specific. In the primitive condition, as seen in Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes, the forelimb/pectoral fin develops earlier than the hindlimb/pelvic fin. This pattern is either retained or re-evolved in eulipotyphlan insectivores (= shrews, moles, hedgehogs, and solenodons) and taken to its extreme in marsupials. Although exceptions are known, the two anurans we examined reversed the pattern and displayed a significant advance in hindlimb development. All other species examined, including a bat with its greatly enlarged forelimbs modified as wings in the adult, showed near synchrony in the development of the fore and hindlimbs. Major heterochronic changes in early limb development and chondrogenesis were absent within major clades except Lissamphibia, and their presence across vertebrate phylogeny are not easily correlated with adaptive phenomena related to morphological differences in the adult fore- and hindlimbs. The apparently conservative nature of this trait means that changes in chondrogenetic patterns may serve

  16. TRANSIENT AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE IN FORMING ENAMEL

    OpenAIRE

    Beniash, Elia; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Lam, Raymond S.K.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, begins as a three-dimensional network of nanometer size mineral particles, suspended in a protein gel. This mineral network serves as a template for mature enamel formation. To further understand the mechanisms of enamel formation we characterized the forming enamel mineral at an early secretory stage using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectromicroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FTIR microspectroscopy and polarized light m...

  17. Dental enamel structure is altered by expression of dominant negative RhoA in ameloblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Pugach, Megan K; Kuehl, Melissa A; Peng, Li; Bouchard, Jessica; Hwang, Soon Y; Gibson, Carolyn W

    2011-01-01

    Using in vitrotooth germ cultures and analysis by confocal microscopy, ameloblasts treated with sodium fluoride were found to have elevated amounts of filamentous actin. Because this response is reduced by inhibitors of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway, we generated mice that express dominant negative RhoA (RhoA(DN)) in ameloblasts for in vivo analysis. Expression of the EGFP-RhoA(DN) fusion protein was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, and teeth were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The 3 strains expressed at either low (TgEGFP-RhoA(DN)-8), intermediate (TgEGFP-RhoA(DN)-2), or high (TgEGFP-RhoA(DN)-13) levels, and the molar teeth from the 3 strains had enamel hypoplasia and surface defects. We conclude that RhoA(DN) expressed in ameloblasts interferes with normal enamel development through the pathway that is induced by sodium fluoride. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Modification of dentin surface to enamel-like structure: A potential strategy for improving dentin bonding durability, desensitizing and self-repairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongye Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Current theories of dentin bonding are based on the concept of "hybrid layer". However, the histological complexity of dentin, as well as the vulnerability of the hybrid layer, goes against the long-term effect of dentin bonding. At the same time, post-operative sensitivity is more likely to occur after traditional adhesive restoration. The Hypothesis: Compared to dentin bonding, enamel bonding exhibits a more optimal immediate and long-term performance, owing to its higher degree of mineralization, well-arranged enamel crystals and the porous structure after etching. Moreover, "enamel hypersensitivity" is never going to happen due to the lack of tubules existing in dentin. In light of this phenomenon, we brought up the concept and the proposal method to form an "enamel-like" dentin, simulating enamel structure to achieve satisfying durability of dentin bonding and obtain good performance for preventing post-operative sensitivity. With the application of mesoporous silicon bi-directionally binding to hydroxyapatite of dentin itself and hydroxyapatite nanorods synthetized in vitro, we may be able to form an enamel-like "functional layer" via ion-regulating self-assembly. Evaluation of Hypothesis: This paper explains how to achieve dentin enamel-like modification by chemical methods, especially, details the strategies and possible mechanisms of the hypothesis. Validation of the hypothesis is more likely to eliminate the adverse effect of dentinal fluid, improve long-term performance of dentin bonding, offer strategies for desensitizing treatment and self-repairing carious-affected dentin, and furthermore, provide the possibility to introduce new theories of dentin bonding.

  19. Molecules, fossils, and the origin of tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A; Dolven, S I

    1992-08-01

    Since the discovery of the coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae, more than 50 years ago, paleontologists and comparative morphologists have debated whether coelacanths or lungfishes, two groups of lobe-finned fishes, are the closest living relatives of land vertebrates (Tetrapoda). Previously, Meyer and Wilson (1990) determined partial DNA sequences from two conservative mitochondrial genes and found support for a close relationship of lungfishes to tetrapods. We present additional DNA sequences from the 12S rRNA mitochondrial gene for three species of the two lineages of lungfishes that were not represented in the first study: Protopterus annectens and Protopterus aethiopicus from Africa and Neoceratodus forsteri (kindly provided by B. Hedges and L. Maxson) from Australia. This extended data set tends to group the two lepidosirenid lungfish lineages (Lepidosiren and Protopterus) with Neoceratodus as their sister group. All lungfishes seem to be more closely related to tetrapods than the coelacanth is. This result appears to rule out the possibility that the coelacanth lineage gave rise to land vertebrates. The common ancestor of lungfishes and tetrapods might have possessed multiple morphological traits that are shared by lungfishes and tetrapods [Meyer and Wilson (1990) listed 14 such traits]. Those traits that seem to link Latimeria and tetrapods are arguably due to convergent evolution or reversals and not to common descent. In this way, the molecular tree facilitates an evolutionary interpretation of the morphological differences among the living forms. We recommended that the extinct groups of lobe-finned fishes be placed onto the molecular tree that has lungfishes and not the coelacanth more closely related to tetrapods. The placement of fossils would help to further interpret the sequence of morphological events and innovations associated with the origin of tetrapods but appears to be problematic because the quality of fossils is not always high enough, and

  20. Demineralization of Enamel in Primary Second Molars Related to Properties of the Enamel

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    N. Sabel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enamel structure is of importance in demineralization. Differences in porosity in enamel effect the rate of demineralization, seen between permanent and deciduous teeth. Individual differences have been shown in the mean mineral concentration values in enamel, the role of this in demineralization is not thoroughly investigated. The aim of this study was to study variations of depths of artificial lesions of demineralization and to analyze the depth in relation to variations in the chemical and mineral composition of the enamel. A demineralized lesion was created in second primary molars from 18 individuals. Depths of lesions were then related to individual chemical content of the enamel. Enamel responded to demineralization with different lesion depths and this was correlated to the chemical composition. The carbon content in sound enamel was shown to be higher where lesions developed deeper. The lesion was deeper when the degree of porosity of the enamel was higher.

  1. Phylogenetic and environmental context of a Tournaisian tetrapod fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, Jennifer A; Bennett, Carys E; Carpenter, David K; Davies, Sarah J; Fraser, Nicholas C; Kearsey, Timothy I; Marshall, John E A; Millward, David; Otoo, Benjamin K A; Reeves, Emma J; Ross, Andrew J; Ruta, Marcello; Smithson, Keturah Z; Smithson, Timothy R; Walsh, Stig A

    2016-12-05

    The end-Devonian to mid-Mississippian time interval has long been known for its depauperate palaeontological record, especially for tetrapods. This interval encapsulates the time of increasing terrestriality among tetrapods, but only two Tournaisian localities previously produced tetrapod fossils. Here we describe five new Tournaisian tetrapods (Perittodus apsconditus, Koilops herma, Ossirarus kierani, Diploradus austiumensis and Aytonerpeton microps) from two localities in their environmental context. A phylogenetic analysis retrieved three taxa as stem tetrapods, interspersed among Devonian and Carboniferous forms, and two as stem amphibians, suggesting a deep split among crown tetrapods. We also illustrate new tetrapod specimens from these and additional localities in the Scottish Borders region. The new taxa and specimens suggest that tetrapod diversification was well established by the Tournaisian. Sedimentary evidence indicates that the tetrapod fossils are usually associated with sandy siltstones overlying wetland palaeosols. Tetrapods were probably living on vegetated surfaces that were subsequently flooded. We show that atmospheric oxygen levels were stable across the Devonian/Carboniferous boundary, and did not inhibit the evolution of terrestriality. This wealth of tetrapods from Tournaisian localities highlights the potential for discoveries elsewhere.

  2. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-10-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01). During the course of erosion, the progression of all three evaluated parameters differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.001 for each). The deproteinated enamel lost its SMH and SRI faster, and released more calcium than the control group, but these differences were only significant at later stages of erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur.

  3. New Perspectives on the Evolution of Late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic Terrestrial Tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, T. S.

    Palaeobiology, like all sciences, progresses by a combination of the discovery of new information, in this case fossils, the application of new techniques, and the development of new concepts with which to generate novel kinds of hypotheses. Research in the field of Late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic terrestrial tetrapods has involved major advances in all three of these over the last decade or so. Several new discoveries fill in gaps in the evolution of higher tetrapod taxa such as Tetrapoda, Dicynodontia, and birds, while others add significantly to the understanding of patterns of faunal turnover and palaeo-community structure.

  4. Abiotic tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability—especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues—suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels—we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth’s normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  5. Observations on structural features and characteristics of biological apatite crystals. 5. Three-dimensional observation on ultrastructure of human enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, T; Yamashita, Y; Terashima, T

    1993-09-01

    In a series of studies to investigate the structural features of the biological crystals, such as the tooth and bone, using an electron microscope, we examined the ultrastructure of the enamel, dentin, and bone crystals at near atomic resolution and showed the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure through the cross and longitudinal sections of the crystals. Thereafter, based on the results of the observations by the authors of the ultrastructure of the tooth and bone crystals, thinking that it might be possible to conduct direct three-dimensional observation of the configuration composing the unit cell of the hydroxyapatite crystals, we conducted a study on this. These results indicated that it was possible to sterically observe the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure composing the enamel crystal. The materials used for this study were the middle layer of the noncarious enamel from the freshly extracted human erupted permanent molars. The small cubes of the enamel were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and embedded in epoxy resin using the routine methods. The ultrathin sections were cut with a diamond knife without decalcification and were examined with the HITACHI H-9000 H type transmission electron microscope operated at 300 kV. Each crystal was observed at an initial magnification of 500,000 times and at the final magnification of 10,000,000 times and over. We sincerely believe that the electron micrographs shown in this report are the first to show three-dimensionally the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure composing the crystal in the cross and longitudinal sections of an enamel crystal.

  6. Reconstructing pectoral appendicular muscle anatomy in fossil fish and tetrapods over the fins-to-limbs transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Julia L; Diogo, Rui; Hutchinson, John R; Pierce, Stephanie E

    2017-11-10

    The question of how tetrapod limbs evolved from fins is one of the great puzzles of evolutionary biology. While palaeontologists, developmental biologists, and geneticists have made great strides in explaining the origin and early evolution of limb skeletal structures, that of the muscles remains largely unknown. The main reason is the lack of consensus about appendicular muscle homology between the closest living relatives of early tetrapods: lobe-finned fish and crown tetrapods. In the light of a recent study of these homologies, we re-examined osteological correlates of muscle attachment in the pectoral girdle, humerus, radius, and ulna of early tetrapods and their close relatives. Twenty-nine extinct and six extant sarcopterygians were included in a meta-analysis using information from the literature and from original specimens, when possible. We analysed these osteological correlates using parsimony-based character optimization in order to reconstruct muscle anatomy in ancestral lobe-finned fish, tetrapodomorph fish, stem tetrapods, and crown tetrapods. Our synthesis revealed that many tetrapod shoulder muscles probably were already present in tetrapodomorph fish, while most of the more-distal appendicular muscles either arose later from largely undifferentiated dorsal and ventral muscle masses or did not leave clear correlates of attachment in these taxa. Based on this review and meta-analysis, we postulate a stepwise sequence of specific appendicular muscle acquisitions, splits, and fusions that led from the ancestral sarcopterygian pectoral fin to the ancestral tetrapod forelimb. This sequence largely agrees with previous hypotheses based on palaeontological and comparative work, but it is much more comprehensive in terms of both muscles and taxa. Combined with existing information about the skeletal system, our new synthesis helps to illuminate the genetic, developmental, morphological, functional, and ecological changes that were key components of the

  7. Devonian Terrestrial Revolution: the palaeoenvironment of the oldest known tetrapod tracks, Zachełmie Quarry, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedźwiedzki, G.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous trackways and isolated prints with digit impressions, which are similar to the foot anatomy of early tetrapods such as Ichthyostega, were found on the three dolomite bed-surfaces in the lower part of the Wojciechowice Formation exposed in the Zachełmie Quarry in the Holy Cross Mountains (south-central Poland), (Niedźwiedzki et al., 2010). The age of the tetrapod track-bearing strata is well-constrained, but the detailed sedimentology of the lower section with tetrapod ichnites is still under study. The Wojciechowice Formation represent one of the first carbonate stages of a transgressive succession that begins with Early Devonian continental to marginal marine clastics and culminates in the development of a Givetian coral-stromatoporoid carbonate platform. The tetrapod track-bearing complex is composed of grey to reddish, thin- to medium-bedded dolomitic shales and marly dolomite mudstones. These deposits from the tetrapod track-bearing horizon lack definitive marine body fossils, and may have formed in a marginal marine environment, e.g. around a coastal lagoon. Mudcracks, columnar peds, root traces, and microbially induced sedimentary structures were found in three distinct pedotypes of very weakly to weakly developed paleosols (Retallack, 2011). Conodonts of the costatus zone (mid-Eifelian) were found 20 m above the uppermost surface with tetrapod tracks in limestones of the upper Wojciechowice Formation, which contain also brachiopod and crinoidal debris. The overlying Kowala Formation is a marine coral limestone and dolostone. The parts of profile with tetrapod ichnites and invertebrate and conodont fossils contain also records of invertebrate traces. Seven ichnotaxa are distributed among four recognized ichnoassemblages. The recognized ichnocoenoses are typical for the shallow-marine (Cruziana ichnofacies) and land-water transitional (Skolithos/Psilonichnus ichnofacies) carbonate depositional environments. The ichnocoenoses are dominated by trace

  8. Mucosal immunoglobulins at respiratory surfaces mark an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhen; Takizawa, Fumio; Parra, David

    2016-01-01

    Gas-exchange structures are critical for acquiring oxygen, but they also represent portals for pathogen entry. Local mucosal immunoglobulin responses against pathogens in specialized respiratory organs have only been described in tetrapods. Since fish gills are considered a mucosal surface, we hy...

  9. Biogeography of Triassic tetrapods: evidence for provincialism and driven sympatric cladogenesis in the early evolution of modern tetrapod lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezcurra, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Triassic tetrapods are of key importance in understanding their evolutionary history, because several tetrapod clades, including most of their modern lineages, first appeared or experienced their initial evolutionary radiation during this Period. In order to test previous palaeobiogeographical hypotheses of Triassic tetrapod faunas, tree reconciliation analyses (TRA) were performed with the aim of recovering biogeographical patterns based on phylogenetic signals provided by a composite tree of Middle and Late Triassic tetrapods. The TRA found significant evidence for the presence of different palaeobiogeographical patterns during the analysed time spans. First, a Pangaean distribution is observed during the Middle Triassic, in which several cosmopolitan tetrapod groups are found. During the early Late Triassic a strongly palaeolatitudinally influenced pattern is recovered, with some tetrapod lineages restricted to palaeolatitudinal belts. During the latest Triassic, Gondwanan territories were more closely related to each other than to Laurasian ones, with a distinct tetrapod fauna at low palaeolatitudes. Finally, more than 75 per cent of the cladogenetic events recorded in the tetrapod phylogeny occurred as sympatric splits or within-area vicariance, indicating that evolutionary processes at the regional level were the main drivers in the radiation of Middle and Late Triassic tetrapods and the early evolution of several modern tetrapod lineages. PMID:20392730

  10. Biogeography of Triassic tetrapods: evidence for provincialism and driven sympatric cladogenesis in the early evolution of modern tetrapod lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezcurra, Martin D

    2010-08-22

    Triassic tetrapods are of key importance in understanding their evolutionary history, because several tetrapod clades, including most of their modern lineages, first appeared or experienced their initial evolutionary radiation during this Period. In order to test previous palaeobiogeographical hypotheses of Triassic tetrapod faunas, tree reconciliation analyses (TRA) were performed with the aim of recovering biogeographical patterns based on phylogenetic signals provided by a composite tree of Middle and Late Triassic tetrapods. The TRA found significant evidence for the presence of different palaeobiogeographical patterns during the analysed time spans. First, a Pangaean distribution is observed during the Middle Triassic, in which several cosmopolitan tetrapod groups are found. During the early Late Triassic a strongly palaeolatitudinally influenced pattern is recovered, with some tetrapod lineages restricted to palaeolatitudinal belts. During the latest Triassic, Gondwanan territories were more closely related to each other than to Laurasian ones, with a distinct tetrapod fauna at low palaeolatitudes. Finally, more than 75 per cent of the cladogenetic events recorded in the tetrapod phylogeny occurred as sympatric splits or within-area vicariance, indicating that evolutionary processes at the regional level were the main drivers in the radiation of Middle and Late Triassic tetrapods and the early evolution of several modern tetrapod lineages.

  11. Extreme Modification of the Tetrapod Forelimb in a Triassic Diapsid Reptile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Adam C; Turner, Alan H; Irmis, Randall B; Nesbitt, Sterling J; Smith, Nathan D

    2016-10-24

    The tetrapod forelimb is one of the most versatile structures in vertebrate evolution, having been co-opted for an enormous array of functions. However, the structural relationships between the bones of the forelimb have remained largely unchanged throughout the 375 million year history of Tetrapoda, with a radius and ulna made up of elongate, paralleling shafts contacting a series of shorter carpal bones. These features are consistent across nearly all known tetrapods, suggesting that the morphospace encompassed by these taxa is limited by some sort of constraint(s). Here, we report on a series of three-dimensionally preserved fossils of the small-bodied (<1 m) Late Triassic diapsid reptile Drepanosaurus, from the Chinle Formation of New Mexico, USA, which dramatically diverge from this pattern. Along with the crushed type specimen from Italy, these specimens have a flattened, crescent-shaped ulna with a long axis perpendicular to that of the radius and hyperelongate, shaft-like carpal bones contacting the ulna that are proximodistally longer than the radius. The second digit supports a massive, hooked claw. This condition has similarities to living "hook-and-pull" digging mammals and demonstrates that specialized, modern ecological roles had developed during the Triassic Period, over 200 million years ago. The forelimb bones in Drepanosaurus represent previously unknown morphologies for a tetrapod and, thus, a dramatic expansion of known tetrapod forelimb morphospace. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Intrinsically Disordered Enamel Matrix Protein Ameloblastin Forms Ribbon-like Supramolecular Structures via an N-terminal Segment Encoded by Exon 5*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Tomas; Osickova, Adriana; Sulc, Miroslav; Benada, Oldrich; Semeradtova, Alena; Rezabkova, Lenka; Veverka, Vaclav; Bednarova, Lucie; Maly, Jan; Macek, Pavel; Sebo, Peter; Slaby, Ivan; Vondrasek, Jiri; Osicka, Radim

    2013-01-01

    Tooth enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, is formed by the evolutionarily highly conserved biomineralization process that is controlled by extracellular matrix proteins. The intrinsically disordered matrix protein ameloblastin (AMBN) is the most abundant nonamelogenin protein of the developing enamel and a key element for correct enamel formation. AMBN was suggested to be a cell adhesion molecule that regulates proliferation and differentiation of ameloblasts. Nevertheless, detailed structural and functional studies on AMBN have been substantially limited by the paucity of the purified nondegraded protein. With this study, we have developed a procedure for production of a highly purified form of recombinant human AMBN in quantities that allowed its structural characterization. Using size exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron, and atomic force microscopy techniques, we show that AMBN self-associates into ribbon-like supramolecular structures with average widths and thicknesses of 18 and 0.34 nm, respectively. The AMBN ribbons exhibited lengths ranging from tens to hundreds of nm. Deletion analysis and NMR spectroscopy revealed that an N-terminal segment encoded by exon 5 comprises two short independently structured regions and plays a key role in self-assembly of AMBN. PMID:23782691

  13. Intrinsically disordered enamel matrix protein ameloblastin forms ribbon-like supramolecular structures via an N-terminal segment encoded by exon 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Tomas; Osickova, Adriana; Sulc, Miroslav; Benada, Oldrich; Semeradtova, Alena; Rezabkova, Lenka; Veverka, Vaclav; Bednarova, Lucie; Maly, Jan; Macek, Pavel; Sebo, Peter; Slaby, Ivan; Vondrasek, Jiri; Osicka, Radim

    2013-08-02

    Tooth enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, is formed by the evolutionarily highly conserved biomineralization process that is controlled by extracellular matrix proteins. The intrinsically disordered matrix protein ameloblastin (AMBN) is the most abundant nonamelogenin protein of the developing enamel and a key element for correct enamel formation. AMBN was suggested to be a cell adhesion molecule that regulates proliferation and differentiation of ameloblasts. Nevertheless, detailed structural and functional studies on AMBN have been substantially limited by the paucity of the purified nondegraded protein. With this study, we have developed a procedure for production of a highly purified form of recombinant human AMBN in quantities that allowed its structural characterization. Using size exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron, and atomic force microscopy techniques, we show that AMBN self-associates into ribbon-like supramolecular structures with average widths and thicknesses of 18 and 0.34 nm, respectively. The AMBN ribbons exhibited lengths ranging from tens to hundreds of nm. Deletion analysis and NMR spectroscopy revealed that an N-terminal segment encoded by exon 5 comprises two short independently structured regions and plays a key role in self-assembly of AMBN.

  14. Association of enamel microabrasion and bleaching: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Cristian; Dall'Agnol, Ariane Lima; Hirata, Ronaldo; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra

    2008-05-01

    Enamel microabrasion may be indicated for certain clinical situations, since it is a proven method for removing superficial intrinsic enamel discoloration defects such as fluorosis-like stains; in addition, it is safe, conservative, and easy to perform. However, this method removes enamel structure, causing teeth to become yellowish. This yellowing can be treated with enamel microabrasion and bleaching. This article describes and documents how these two methods were utilized to correct tooth color for a young patient.

  15. Empirical Formulae for Breakage of Dolosse and Tetrapods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; d'Angremond, K.; Meer, W. van der

    2000-01-01

    which allows studies of armour unit stresses by means of a load-cell technique. The technique necessitates impact load response calibration of the load-cell mounted model armour units against the equivalent response of prototype or large scale armour units. The procedure followed was presented...... by Burcharth and Liu Burcharth, H.F., Liu, Z., 1992. Design of Dolos armour units. In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Coastal Engineering, Venice, Italy.. and Burcharth Burcharth, H.F., 1993. Structural integrity and hydraulic stability of Dolos armour layers. Series Paper 9, published...... by the Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark, 1993.., who also presented design diagram for determination of breakage of Dolosse in trunk sections. The paper presentes an expansion of this work to include breakage of Dolosse in round-heads and Tetrapods in trunk sections. The paper presents...

  16. Enamel of primary teeth--morphological and chemical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is one of the most important structures of the tooth, both from a functional and esthetic point of view. Primary enamel carries registered information regarding metabolic and physiological events that occurred during the period around birth and the first year of life. Detailed knowledge of normal development and the structure of enamel is important for the assessment of mineralization defects. The aim of the thesis is to add more detailed information regarding the structure of primary enamel. The structural appearance of the neonatal line and the quantitative developmental enamel defect, enamel hypoplasia, was thoroughly investigated with a polarized light microscope, microradiography and scanning electron microscope. X-ray microanalysis of some elements was also performed across the enamel and the neonatal line. Postnatal mineralization of enamel at different ages and from different individuals was studied regarding the chemical content, by using secondary ion mass spectrometry. The enamel's response to demineralization was investigated in relation to the individual chemical content and the degree of mineralization of the enamel, by using polarized light microscope, microradiography, scanning electron microscope and X-ray microanalysis. The neonatal line is a hypomineralized structure seen as a step-like rupture in the enamel matrix. The neonatal line is due to disturbances in the enamel secretion stage. The enamel prisms in the postnatal enamel appeared to be smaller than the prenatal prisms. The hypoplasias showed a rough surface at the base and no aprismatic surface layer was seen in the defect. The enamel of the rounded border of hypoplasia appeared to be hypomineralized, with the bent prisms not being densely packed. Mineralization of enamel is a gradual process, still continuous at 6 months postnatally in the primary mandibular incisors. The thickness of the buccal enamel is reached at 3-4 months of age. Demineralization of enamel depends on the

  17. The dentino-enamel junction revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, M; Septier, D; Bourd, K; Hall, R; Jeanny, J C; Jonet, L; Colin, S; Tager, F; Chaussain-Miller, C; Garabédian, M; George, A; Goldberg, H; Menashi, S

    2002-01-01

    The dentino-enamel junction is not an simple inert interface between two mineralized structures. A less simplistic view suggests that the dentino-enamel junctional complex should also include the inner aprismatic enamel and the mantle dentin. At early stages of enamel formation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 is stored in and released from the inner aprismatic enamel, possibly under the control of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3. The concentration peak for MMP-2 and -9 observed in the mantle dentin coincided with a very low labeling for TIMP-1 and -2, favoring the cross-talk between mineralizing epithelial and connective structures, and as a consequence the translocation of enamel proteins toward odontoblasts and pulp cells, and vice versa, the translocation of dentin proteins toward secretory ameloblasts and cells of the enamel organ. Finally, in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, large interglobular spaces in the circumpulpal dentin were the major defect induced by the gene alteration, whereas the mantle dentin was constantly unaffected. Altogether, these data plead for the recognition of the dentino-enamel junctional complex as a specific entity bearing its own biological characteristics.

  18. The influence of size and structure of metal orthodontic bracket base on bond strength on tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The factors which may influence the bond strength of the applied orthodontic brackets on the tooth surface are the size and structure of the bracket base. Objective. The aim of the paper was to investigate the influence of size and shape of different types of brackets on bond strength on the enamel and analyze the remaining quality of adhesive material on the tooth surface after debonding of orthodontic brackets (adhesive remnant index - ARI. Methods. In this study, three types of metal brackets of different sizes and shapes of Dentaurum manufacturer were used (Utratrimm, Equilibrium 2, Discovery, Dentaurum, Inspringen, Germany. The brackets were applied onto the middle part of the anatomic crowns of buccal surfaces of 30 premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. In addition, the pre-treatment of teeth by 37% orthophosphoric acid and adhesive material System1+ (Dentaurum, Germany were used. Results. The mean value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Discovery type after debonding was 8.67±0.32 MPa, while the value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Equilibrium 2 type amounted to 8.62±0.22 MPa. The value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Ultratrimm type after debonding was 8.22±0.49 MPa. There were no statistical differences in the values of bond strength regarding all three groups of the investigated orthodontic brackets (F=4.56; p<0.05. Conclusion. The base size and design of metal orthodontic brackets did not play a significant role in bond strength, while the values of ARI index were identical in all three investigated groups.

  19. Contrasting developmental trajectories in the earliest known tetrapod forelimbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callier, Viviane; Clack, Jennifer A; Ahlberg, Per E

    2009-04-17

    Ichthyostega and Acanthostega are the earliest tetrapods known from multiple near-complete skeletons, with Acanthostega generally considered the more primitive. New material indicates differing ontogenetic trajectories for their forelimbs: In Ichthyostega, the pattern of muscle attachment processes on small humeri (upper arm bones) resembles that in "fish" members of the tetrapod stem group such as Tiktaalik, whereas large humeri approach (but fail to attain) the tetrapod crown-group condition; in Acanthostega, both small and large humeri exhibit the crown-group pattern. We infer that Ichthyostega underwent greater locomotory terrestrialization during ontogeny. The newly recognized primitive characteristics also suggest that Ichthyostega could be phylogenetically more basal than Acanthostega.

  20. Inference of the protokaryotypes of amniotes and tetrapods and the evolutionary processes of microchromosomes from comparative gene mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Uno

    Full Text Available Comparative genome analysis of non-avian reptiles and amphibians provides important clues about the process of genome evolution in tetrapods. However, there is still only limited information available on the genome structures of these organisms. Consequently, the protokaryotypes of amniotes and tetrapods and the evolutionary processes of microchromosomes in tetrapods remain poorly understood. We constructed chromosome maps of functional genes for the Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis, the Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis, and the Western clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis and compared them with genome and/or chromosome maps of other tetrapod species (salamander, lizard, snake, chicken, and human. This is the first report on the protokaryotypes of amniotes and tetrapods and the evolutionary processes of microchromosomes inferred from comparative genomic analysis of vertebrates, which cover all major non-avian reptilian taxa (Squamata, Crocodilia, Testudines. The eight largest macrochromosomes of the turtle and chicken were equivalent, and 11 linkage groups had also remained intact in the crocodile. Linkage groups of the chicken macrochromosomes were also highly conserved in X. tropicalis, two squamates, and the salamander, but not in human. Chicken microchromosomal linkages were conserved in the squamates, which have fewer microchromosomes than chicken, and also in Xenopus and the salamander, which both lack microchromosomes; in the latter, the chicken microchromosomal segments have been integrated into macrochromosomes. Our present findings open up the possibility that the ancestral amniotes and tetrapods had at least 10 large genetic linkage groups and many microchromosomes, which corresponded to the chicken macro- and microchromosomes, respectively. The turtle and chicken might retain the microchromosomes of the amniote protokaryotype almost intact. The decrease in number and/or disappearance of microchromosomes by repeated

  1. Morphological characteristics of primary enamel surfaces versus permanent enamel surfaces: SEM digital analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchese, A; Storti, E

    2011-09-01

    The morphology of permanent and primary enamel surface merits further analysis. The objective of this study was to illustrate a method of SEM digital image processing able to quantify and discriminate between the morphological characteristics of primary and permanent tooth enamel. Sixteen extracted teeth, 8 primary teeth and 8 permanent teeth, kept in saline solution, were analysed. The teeth were observed under SEM. The SEM images were analysed by means of digitally processed algorithms. The two algorithms used were: Local standard deviation to measure surface roughness with the roughness index (RI); Hough's theorem to identify linear structures with the linear structure index (LSI). The SEM images of primary teeth enamel show smooth enamel with little areas of irregularity. No linear structures are apparent. The SEM images of permanent enamel show a not perfectly smooth surface; there are furrows and irregularities of variable depth and width. In the clinical practice a number of different situations require the removal of a thin layer of enamel. Only a good morphological knowledge of both permanent and primary tooth enamel gives the opportunity to identify and exploit the effects of rotary tools on enamel, thus allowing for a correct finishing technique.

  2. The axial skeleton of the Devonian tetrapod Ichthyostega.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlberg, Per Erik; Clack, Jennifer A; Blom, Henning

    2005-09-01

    Ichthyostega was the first Devonian tetrapod to be subject to a whole-body reconstruction. It remains, together with Acanthostega, one of only two Devonian tetrapods for which near-complete postcranial material is available. It is thus crucially important for our understanding of the earliest stages of tetrapod evolution and terrestrialization. Here we show a new reconstruction of Ichthyostega based on extensive re-examination of original material and augmented by recently collected specimens. Our reconstruction differs substantially from those previously published and reveals hitherto unrecognized regionalization in the vertebral column. Ichthyostega is the earliest vertebrate to show obvious adaptations for non-swimming locomotion. Uniquely among early tetrapods, the presacral vertebral column shows pronounced regionalization of neural arch morphology, suggesting that it was adapted for dorsoventral rather than lateral flexion.

  3. Ventastega curonica and the origin of tetrapod morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlberg, Per; Clack, Jennifer; Luksevics, Ervins; Blom, Henning; Zupins, Ivars

    2008-01-01

    The gap in our understanding of the evolutionary transition from fish to tetrapod is beginning to close thanks to the discovery of new intermediate forms such as Tiktaalik roseae. Here we narrow it further by presenting the skull, exceptionally preserved braincase, shoulder girdle and partial pelvis of Ventastega curonica from the Late Devonian of Latvia, a transitional intermediate form between the 'elpistostegids' Panderichthys and Tiktaalik and the Devonian tetrapods (limbed vertebrates) A...

  4. Growth and structure of lamellar mixed crystals of octacalcium phosphate and apatite in a model system of enamel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Mayumi; Tohda, Hisako; Moriwaki, Yutaka

    1992-02-01

    Lamellar mixed crystals of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and apatite were synthesized in a model system of enamel formation in the presence of 1 ppm F - at 37°C and at pH 6.5. The crystal has long and thin plate-like morphology and contained a distinct OCP lamella in the center of the apatite matrix. The thickness of the OCP lamella in the a-axis direction is one to several unit cells. Some apatite crystals embed a central layer instead of the distinct OCP lamella. The OCP lamella and the central layer are parallel to the (100) plane of the apatite, while the c-axis of the OCP is parallel to the c-axis of the apatite. Analysis suggests that (1) F - causes the growth of apatite on OCP and regulates the formation of the lamellar mixed crystals of OCP and apatite, (2) the OCP lamella acts as a template for the subsequent epitaxial growth of apatite, and (3) the lamellar mixed crystals grow mainly in the c-axis direction of both the OCP and apatite. These results strongly support the idea that enamel crystals take a thin and long ribbon-like morphology when the initially formed OCP acts as a template for the subsequent growth of apatite in the enamel formation.

  5. Enamel microabrasion for aesthetic management of dental fluorosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pandey, Pallavi; Ansari, Afroz Alam; Moda, Preeti; Yadav, Madhulika

    2013-01-01

    .... The enamel microabrasion technique is a conservative method that improves the appearance of the teeth by restoring bright and superficial smoothness, without causing significant structural loss...

  6. Electrowetting on a dielectric surface roughened with zinc oxide tetrapod nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Wu, Jun

    2010-11-01

    Changing the contact angle between a solid substrate and a droplet with an external voltage is important in the field of microfluidics. On a flat surface, the range of the reversible contact angle is about 90°: from 30° to 120°. However, on a rough surface, such as superhydrophobic surface of carbon nanotube, carbon nanofibers, silicon nanowires, ZnO nanorods, etc., the reverse transition from the Wenzel state to Cassie state is usually prevented due to an energy barrier resulting in a lower contact angle range. In this paper, we described the electrowetting on a rough surface of ZnO tetrapods. The contact angle on ZnO tetrapod was as high as 155°, and a wide range of reversible contact angles actuated by an electric potential was observed. Electrolysis, which was a problem in previous research of nano-structured superhydrophobic surface, was avoided by applying a uniform dielectric layer between the conductive ITO and the ZnO tetrapods. The proposed method has potential applications in microfluidics devices with a large dynamic range of capillary force.

  7. Large-scale uniform ZnO tetrapods on catalyst free glass substrate by thermal evaporation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsultany, Forat H., E-mail: foratusm@gmail.com [School of Physics, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Hassan, Z. [Institute of Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (INOR), USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Ahmed, Naser M. [School of Physics, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Investigate the growth of ZnO-Ts on glass substrate by thermal evaporation method. • Glass substrate without any catalyst or a seed layer. • The morphology was controlled by adjusting the temperature of the material and the substrate. • Glass substrate was placed vertically in the quartz tube. - Abstract: Here, we report for the first time the catalyst-free growth of large-scale uniform shape and size ZnO tetrapods on a glass substrate via thermal evaporation method. Three-dimensional networks of ZnO tetrapods have needle–wire junctions, an average leg length of 2.1–2.6 μm, and a diameter of 35–240 nm. The morphology and structure of ZnO tetrapods were investigated by controlling the preparation temperature of each of the Zn powder and the glass substrate under O{sub 2} and Ar gases. Studies were carried out on ZnO tetrapods using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, UV–vis spectrophotometer, and a photoluminescence. The results showed that the sample grow in the hexagonal wurtzite structure with preferentially oriented along (002) direction, good crystallinity and high transmittance. The band gap value is about 3.27 eV. Photoluminescence spectrum exhibits a very sharp peak at 378 nm and a weak broad green emission.

  8. Endocytosis and Enamel Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong-Dat Pham

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Enamel formation requires consecutive stages of development to achieve its characteristic extreme mineral hardness. Mineralization depends on the initial presence then removal of degraded enamel proteins from the matrix via endocytosis. The ameloblast membrane resides at the interface between matrix and cell. Enamel formation is controlled by ameloblasts that produce enamel in stages to build the enamel layer (secretory stage and to reach final mineralization (maturation stage. Each stage has specific functional requirements for the ameloblasts. Ameloblasts adopt different cell morphologies during each stage. Protein trafficking including the secretion and endocytosis of enamel proteins is a fundamental task in ameloblasts. The sites of internalization of enamel proteins on the ameloblast membrane are specific for every stage. In this review, an overview of endocytosis and trafficking of vesicles in ameloblasts is presented. The pathways for internalization and routing of vesicles are described. Endocytosis is proposed as a mechanism to remove debris of degraded enamel protein and to obtain feedback from the matrix on the status of the maturing enamel.

  9. Endocytosis and Enamel Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Cong-Dat; Smith, Charles E.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Hu, Jan C-C.; Simmer, James P.; Chun, Yong-Hee P.

    2017-01-01

    Enamel formation requires consecutive stages of development to achieve its characteristic extreme mineral hardness. Mineralization depends on the initial presence then removal of degraded enamel proteins from the matrix via endocytosis. The ameloblast membrane resides at the interface between matrix and cell. Enamel formation is controlled by ameloblasts that produce enamel in stages to build the enamel layer (secretory stage) and to reach final mineralization (maturation stage). Each stage has specific functional requirements for the ameloblasts. Ameloblasts adopt different cell morphologies during each stage. Protein trafficking including the secretion and endocytosis of enamel proteins is a fundamental task in ameloblasts. The sites of internalization of enamel proteins on the ameloblast membrane are specific for every stage. In this review, an overview of endocytosis and trafficking of vesicles in ameloblasts is presented. The pathways for internalization and routing of vesicles are described. Endocytosis is proposed as a mechanism to remove debris of degraded enamel protein and to obtain feedback from the matrix on the status of the maturing enamel. PMID:28824442

  10. Amelogenin-Ameloblastin Spatial Interaction around Maturing Enamel Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, P.; Prajapati, S.; Bapat, R.; Moradian-Oldak, J.

    2016-01-01

    Amelogenin and ameloblastin are 2 extracellular matrix proteins that are essential for the proper development of enamel. We recently reported that amelogenin and ameloblastin colocalized during the secretory stage of enamel formation when nucleation of enamel crystallites occurs. Direct interactions between the 2 proteins have been also demonstrated in our in vitro studies. Here, we explore interactions between their fragments during enamel maturation. We applied in vivo immunofluorescence imaging, quantitative co-localization analysis, and a new FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) technique to demonstrate ameloblastin and amelogenin interaction in the maturing mouse enamel. Using immunochemical analysis of protein samples extracted from 8-d-old (P8) first molars from mice as a model for maturation-stage enamel, we identified the ~17-kDa ameloblastin (Ambn-N) and the TRAP (tyrosine-rich amelogenin peptide) fragments. We used Ambn-N18 and Ambn-M300 antibodies raised against the N-terminal and C-terminal segments of ameloblastin, as well as Amel-FL and Amel-C19 antibodies against full-length recombinant mouse amelogenin (rM179) and C-terminal amelogenin, respectively. In transverse sections, co-localization images of N-terminal fragments of amelogenin and ameloblastin around the prism boundary revealed the “fish net” pattern of the enamel matrix. Using in vivo FRET microscopy, we further demonstrated spatial interactions between amelogenin and ameloblastin N-terminal fragments. In the maturing mouse enamel, the association of these residual protein fragments created a discontinuity between enamel rods, which we suggest is important for support and maintenance of enamel rods and eventual contribution to unique enamel mechanical properties. We present data that support cooperative functions of enamel matrix proteins in mediating the structural hierarchy of enamel and that contribute to our efforts to design and develop enamel biomimetic material. PMID

  11. Enamelin Directs Crystallite Organization at the Enamel-Dentine Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, S; Al-Jawad, M

    2016-05-01

    Enamel is an acellular material formed by the intricate process of amelogenesis. Disruption caused at the initial stages of development, by means of mutations in the ENAM gene encoding the enamelin protein, results in enamel hypoplasia. Little is known about the consequence of ENAM mutation on the enamel structure at a crystallographic level. The aim of this study was to characterize the structure of ENAM-mutated enamel to develop a deeper understanding of the role of enamelin protein during formation with regard to crystal organization. Synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction (SXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used to measure and correlate enamel crystallography and microstructure in hypoplastic and healthy enamel. Rietveld refinement carried out on 2-dimensional diffraction patterns, collected from the Advanced Photon Source, were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture) within the labial regions of each tooth slice and then correlated with the local microstructure. In general, healthy deciduous incisors displayed a higher degree of crystal organization across the labial surface in comparison with the hypoplastic enamel. ENAM plays the greatest functional role at the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ), as it was the region that exhibited lowest texture relative to unaffected controls. Other areas within the tooth, however, such as the cusp tip, displayed greater organization in line with healthy enamel, suggesting its effects are restricted to the early stages of enamel secretion. Observed clinically, the surface of ENAM-mutated hypoplastic enamel can appear to be normal, yet severe sub-nano and microstructural defects appear beneath the subsurface layer. Quantitative characterization of the crystallographic properties from enamel with known genotype expands the understanding of enamel formation processes and can aid better clinical diagnosis and tailor-made treatment. © International & American Associations for

  12. Appositional enamel growth in molars of South African fossil hominids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Bromage, Timothy G

    2006-01-01

    Enamel is formed incrementally by the secretory activity of ameloblast cells. Variable stages of secretion result in the formation of structures known as cross striations along enamel prisms, for which experimental data demonstrate a correspondence with daily periods of secretion. Patterns of variation in this daily growth are important to understanding mechanisms of tooth formation and the development of enamel thickness. Transmitted light microscopy (TLM) of histological ground sections and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of bulk specimens or their surface replicas are the usual methods for investigating cross striations. However, these methods pose some constraints on the study of these features in Plio-Pleistocene hominid enamel, the specimens of which may only rarely be sectioned for TLM or examined on only their most superficial surfaces for SEM. The recent development of portable confocal scanning optical microscopy (PCSOM) resolves some of the restrictions on fractured enamel surfaces, allowing the visualization of cross striations by direct examination. This technology has been applied here to the study of Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus hominid molars from the Plio-Pleistocene of South Africa. We hypothesize that these taxa have increased enamel appositional rates compared with modern humans, because despite having thicker enamelled molars (particularly P. robustus), the enamel crowns of these fossil taxa take an equivalent or reduced amount of time to form. Cross striations were measured in cuspal, lateral and cervical regions of the enamel crowns, and, within each region, the inner, middle and outer zones. Values obtained for A. africanus outer zones of the enamel crown are, in general, lower than those for P. robustus, indicating faster forming enamel in the latter, while both taxa show higher rates of enamel growth than modern humans and the African great apes. This demonstrates a relatively high degree of variability in the

  13. Enamelin is critical for ameloblast integrity and enamel ultrastructure formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan C-C Hu

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human enamelin gene cause autosomal dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta in which the affected enamel is thin or absent. Study of enamelin knockout NLS-lacZ knockin mice revealed that mineralization along the distal membrane of ameloblast is deficient, resulting in no true enamel formation. To determine the function of enamelin during enamel formation, we characterized the developing teeth of the Enam-/- mice, generated amelogenin-driven enamelin transgenic mouse models, and then introduced enamelin transgenes into the Enam-/- mice to rescue enamel defects. Mice at specific stages of development were subjected to morphologic and structural analysis using β-galactosidase staining, immunohistochemistry, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Enamelin expression was ameloblast-specific. In the absence of enamelin, ameloblasts pathology became evident at the onset of the secretory stage. Although the aggregated ameloblasts generated matrix-containing amelogenin, they were not able to create a well-defined enamel space or produce normal enamel crystals. When enamelin is present at half of the normal quantity, enamel was thinner with enamel rods not as tightly arranged as in wild type suggesting that a specific quantity of enamelin is critical for normal enamel formation. Enamelin dosage effect was further demonstrated in transgenic mouse lines over expressing enamelin. Introducing enamelin transgene at various expression levels into the Enam-/- background did not fully recover enamel formation while a medium expresser in the Enam+/- background did. Too much or too little enamelin abolishes the production of enamel crystals and prism structure. Enamelin is essential for ameloblast integrity and enamel formation.

  14. Enamelin is critical for ameloblast integrity and enamel ultrastructure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jan C-C; Hu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yuhe; Smith, Charles E; Lertlam, Rangsiyakorn; Wright, John Timothy; Suggs, Cynthia; McKee, Marc D; Beniash, Elia; Kabir, M Enamul; Simmer, James P

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human enamelin gene cause autosomal dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta in which the affected enamel is thin or absent. Study of enamelin knockout NLS-lacZ knockin mice revealed that mineralization along the distal membrane of ameloblast is deficient, resulting in no true enamel formation. To determine the function of enamelin during enamel formation, we characterized the developing teeth of the Enam-/- mice, generated amelogenin-driven enamelin transgenic mouse models, and then introduced enamelin transgenes into the Enam-/- mice to rescue enamel defects. Mice at specific stages of development were subjected to morphologic and structural analysis using β-galactosidase staining, immunohistochemistry, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Enamelin expression was ameloblast-specific. In the absence of enamelin, ameloblasts pathology became evident at the onset of the secretory stage. Although the aggregated ameloblasts generated matrix-containing amelogenin, they were not able to create a well-defined enamel space or produce normal enamel crystals. When enamelin is present at half of the normal quantity, enamel was thinner with enamel rods not as tightly arranged as in wild type suggesting that a specific quantity of enamelin is critical for normal enamel formation. Enamelin dosage effect was further demonstrated in transgenic mouse lines over expressing enamelin. Introducing enamelin transgene at various expression levels into the Enam-/- background did not fully recover enamel formation while a medium expresser in the Enam+/- background did. Too much or too little enamelin abolishes the production of enamel crystals and prism structure. Enamelin is essential for ameloblast integrity and enamel formation.

  15. A histological study of the organic elements in the human enamel focusing on the extent of the odontoblast process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Y; Iwai-Liao, Y; Higashi, Y

    1998-03-01

    Topographic and tomographic studies were conducted on the organic elements occluded in the enamel of premolars removed from young orthodontic patients by using light (transmitted) microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on ultrathin sections and freeze-etching replicas, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) X-ray microscope (EDX) analysis. The present fine structure study aimed in particular to determine the fine structure of the enamel spindle and the extent of the odontoblast process. Organic elements in the ground-sectioned enamel corresponding to simple projections and enamel rods/spindles, enamel tufts and lamellae were identified by conventional light microscopy and subsequently examined by CLSM. Both light microscopy and CLSM indicated that a number of enamel spindles were measured about 50 microns in length, some 4-7 microns in thickness and were mostly confined to the cuspal summits and conformed to previous descriptions. SEM examination revealed some simple projections extending from the dentine into the enamel as well as clearly identifiable enamel spindles; the enamel spindles were structures intervening enamel prisms and showing morphological complexity by branching and convergence of the distal endings of the invading organic structure from dentinal tubules. EDX-analysis revealed that enamel tufts, lamellae, and spindles contained less phosphorus and calcium elements than enamel prisms. The enamel spindles had a higher content than tufts or lamellae, but this may be the result of contamination from surrounding enamel. Both conventional ultrathin-section and freeze-etching replica TEM evaluation of the dentino-enamel boundaries in particular suggested that simple projections and enamel rods/spindles were extensions of the odontoblast processes trapped in the enamel during early amelogenesis. In contrast, both SEM and TEM observations failed to identify dentinal

  16. Optical properties of tetrapod nanostructured zinc oxide by chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tetrapod nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique. This work studies the effects of annealing temperature ranging from 100–500 ºC towards its physical and optical properties. FESEM images ...

  17. ZnO Tetrapods: Synthesis and Applications in Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luting Yan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO tetrapods have received much interest due to their unique morphology, that is, four arms con‐ nected to one centre. Tetrapod networks possess the excellent electronic properties of the ZnO semiconductor, which is attractive for photoelectrode materials in energy- conversion devices because of their advantages in electron extraction and transportation. In this review, we have discussed recent advancements in the field of ZnO tetrapod synthesis, including vapour transport synthesis and the wet chemical method, together with their advantages and disadvantages in terms of morphology control and yield regulation. The developments and improvements in the applications of ZnO nanotetrapods in photovoltaics, including dye-sensitized solar cells and polymer solar cells, are also described. Our aim is to give readers a compre‐ hensive and critical overview of this unique morphology of ZnO, including synthesis control and growth mechanism, and to understand the role of this particular morphology in the development of solar cells. The future research directions in ZnO tetrapods-based solar cell are also discussed.

  18. Checklist of marine tetrapods (reptiles, seabirds, and mammals) of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Güçlüsoy, Harun; KARAUZ, Emine Sühendan; KIRAÇ, Cem Orkun; BİLECENOĞLU, Murat

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of a total of 61 marine tetrapod species is presented in this paper, including 3 sea turtles, 43 sea birds, and 15 marine mammals. Distribution of each reported species along the Black Sea, Sea of Marmara, Aegean, and Levantine coasts of Turkey is mentioned, associated with key references.

  19. The evolution of tetrapod ears and the fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, J A

    1997-01-01

    In the earliest tetrapods, the fenestra vestibuli was a large hole in the braincase wall bounded by bones of different embryological origins: the otic capsule and occipital arch components, and also, in all except the Devonian Acanthostega, the dermal parasphenoid. This means that the hole lay along the line of the embryonic metotic fissure. Early tetrapod braincases were poorly ossified internally, and no specialized opening for a perilymphatic duct is evident. It is arguable that the earliest tetrapods had neither a perilympllatic duct crossing the otic capsule nor a specialized auditory receptor in a separate lagenar pouch. The primitive tetrapod condition is found in the earliest amniotes, and the separate development of (1) a fenestra vestibuli confined to the limits of the otic capsule, (2) a specialized pressure relief window also derived from components on the line of the metolic fissure, (3) a nonstructural, vibratory stapes and (4) increased internal ossification of the internal walls of the otic capsule, can be traced separately in synapsids, lepidosauromorph diapsids, archosauromorph diapsids, probably turtles, and amphibians. This suggests separate development of true tympanic ears in each of these groups. Developments indicating the existence of a true tympanic ear in amniotes are first found in animals from the Triassic period, and a correlation with the evolution of insect sound production is suggested.

  20. Tetrapodal Molecular Switches and Motors : Synthesis and Photochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Kuang-Yen; Wezenberg, Sander J.; Carroll, Gregory T.; London, Gabor; Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Pijper, Thomas C.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2014-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and dynamic behavior of a series of novel tetrapodal molecular switches and motors containing common functional groups for attachment to various inorganic and organic surfaces are presented. Using a Diels-Alder reaction, an anthracene unit with four functionalized alkyl

  1. Helium ion microscopy of enamel crystallites and extracellular tooth enamel matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlack, Felicitas B.; Huynh, Chuong; Marshman, Jeffrey; Goetze, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    An unresolved problem in tooth enamel studies has been to analyze simultaneously and with sufficient spatial resolution both mineral and organic phases in their three dimensional (3D) organization in a given specimen. This study aims to address this need using high-resolution imaging to analyze the 3D structural organization of the enamel matrix, especially amelogenin, in relation to forming enamel crystals. Chemically fixed hemi-mandibles from wild type mice were embedded in LR White acrylic resin, polished and briefly etched to expose the organic matrix in developing tooth enamel. Full-length amelogenin was labeled with specific antibodies and 10 nm immuno-gold. This allowed us to use and compare two different high-resolution imaging techniques for the analysis of uncoated samples. Helium ion microscopy (HIM) was applied to study the spatial organization of organic and mineral structures, while field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) in various modes, including backscattered electron detection, allowed us to discern the gold-labeled proteins. Wild type enamel in late secretory to early maturation stage reveals adjacent to ameloblasts a lengthwise parallel alignment of the enamel matrix proteins, including full-length amelogenin proteins, which then transitions into a more heterogeneous appearance with increasing distance from the mineralization front. The matrix adjacent to crystal bundles forms a smooth and lacey sheath, whereas between enamel prisms it is organized into spherical components that are interspersed with rod-shaped protein. These findings highlight first, that the heterogeneous organization of the enamel matrix can be visualized in mineralized en bloc samples. Second, our results illustrate that the combination of these techniques is a powerful approach to elucidate the 3D structural organization of organic matrix molecules in mineralizing tissue in nanometer resolution. PMID:25346697

  2. Helium ion microscopy of enamel crystallites and extracellular tooth enamel matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlack, Felicitas B; Huynh, Chuong; Marshman, Jeffrey; Goetze, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    An unresolved problem in tooth enamel studies has been to analyze simultaneously and with sufficient spatial resolution both mineral and organic phases in their three dimensional (3D) organization in a given specimen. This study aims to address this need using high-resolution imaging to analyze the 3D structural organization of the enamel matrix, especially amelogenin, in relation to forming enamel crystals. Chemically fixed hemi-mandibles from wild type mice were embedded in LR White acrylic resin, polished and briefly etched to expose the organic matrix in developing tooth enamel. Full-length amelogenin was labeled with specific antibodies and 10 nm immuno-gold. This allowed us to use and compare two different high-resolution imaging techniques for the analysis of uncoated samples. Helium ion microscopy (HIM) was applied to study the spatial organization of organic and mineral structures, while field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) in various modes, including backscattered electron detection, allowed us to discern the gold-labeled proteins. Wild type enamel in late secretory to early maturation stage reveals adjacent to ameloblasts a lengthwise parallel alignment of the enamel matrix proteins, including full-length amelogenin proteins, which then transitions into a more heterogeneous appearance with increasing distance from the mineralization front. The matrix adjacent to crystal bundles forms a smooth and lacey sheath, whereas between enamel prisms it is organized into spherical components that are interspersed with rod-shaped protein. These findings highlight first, that the heterogeneous organization of the enamel matrix can be visualized in mineralized en bloc samples. Second, our results illustrate that the combination of these techniques is a powerful approach to elucidate the 3D structural organization of organic matrix molecules in mineralizing tissue in nanometer resolution.

  3. A Diverse Tetrapod Fauna at the Base of 'Romer's Gap'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jason S.; Smithson, Tim; Mansky, Chris F.; Meyer, Taran; Clack, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The lack of fossil tetrapod bearing deposits in the earliest Carboniferous (‘Romer’s Gap’) has provoked some recent discussions regarding the proximal cause, with three explanations being offered: environmental, taphonomic, and collection failure. One of the few, and earliest, windows into this time is the locality of Blue Beach exposed in the Tournaisian deposits at Horton Bluff lying along the Avon River near Hantsport, Nova Scotia, Canada. This locality has long been known but, because the fossils were deposited in high energy settings they are almost always disarticulated, so the fauna has not been described in detail. Recent intensive collection has revealed a diverse assemblage of material, including for the first time associated elements, which permits an evaluation of the faunal constituents at the locality. Although not diagnosable to a fine taxonomic level, sufficient apomorphies are present to identify representatives from numerous clades known from more complete specimens elsewhere. The evidence suggests a diverse fauna was present, including whatcheeriids and embolomeres. A single humerus previously had been attributed to a colosteid, but there is some uncertainty with this identification. Additional elements suggest the presence of taxa otherwise only known from the late Devonian. Depositional biases at the locality favor tetrapod fossils from larger individuals, but indirect evidence from trackways and tantalizing isolated bones evidences the presence of small taxa that remain to be discovered. The fossils from Blue Beach demonstrate that when windows into the fauna of ‘Romer’s Gap’ are found a rich diversity of tetrapods will be shown to be present, contra arguments that suggested this hiatus in the fossil record was due to extrinsic factors such as atmospheric oxygen levels. They also show that the early tetrapod fauna is not easily divisible into Devonian and Carboniferous faunas, suggesting that some tetrapods passed through the end

  4. A Diverse Tetrapod Fauna at the Base of 'Romer's Gap'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Anderson

    Full Text Available The lack of fossil tetrapod bearing deposits in the earliest Carboniferous ('Romer's Gap' has provoked some recent discussions regarding the proximal cause, with three explanations being offered: environmental, taphonomic, and collection failure. One of the few, and earliest, windows into this time is the locality of Blue Beach exposed in the Tournaisian deposits at Horton Bluff lying along the Avon River near Hantsport, Nova Scotia, Canada. This locality has long been known but, because the fossils were deposited in high energy settings they are almost always disarticulated, so the fauna has not been described in detail. Recent intensive collection has revealed a diverse assemblage of material, including for the first time associated elements, which permits an evaluation of the faunal constituents at the locality. Although not diagnosable to a fine taxonomic level, sufficient apomorphies are present to identify representatives from numerous clades known from more complete specimens elsewhere. The evidence suggests a diverse fauna was present, including whatcheeriids and embolomeres. A single humerus previously had been attributed to a colosteid, but there is some uncertainty with this identification. Additional elements suggest the presence of taxa otherwise only known from the late Devonian. Depositional biases at the locality favor tetrapod fossils from larger individuals, but indirect evidence from trackways and tantalizing isolated bones evidences the presence of small taxa that remain to be discovered. The fossils from Blue Beach demonstrate that when windows into the fauna of 'Romer's Gap' are found a rich diversity of tetrapods will be shown to be present, contra arguments that suggested this hiatus in the fossil record was due to extrinsic factors such as atmospheric oxygen levels. They also show that the early tetrapod fauna is not easily divisible into Devonian and Carboniferous faunas, suggesting that some tetrapods passed through

  5. A Diverse Tetrapod Fauna at the Base of 'Romer's Gap'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jason S; Smithson, Tim; Mansky, Chris F; Meyer, Taran; Clack, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The lack of fossil tetrapod bearing deposits in the earliest Carboniferous ('Romer's Gap') has provoked some recent discussions regarding the proximal cause, with three explanations being offered: environmental, taphonomic, and collection failure. One of the few, and earliest, windows into this time is the locality of Blue Beach exposed in the Tournaisian deposits at Horton Bluff lying along the Avon River near Hantsport, Nova Scotia, Canada. This locality has long been known but, because the fossils were deposited in high energy settings they are almost always disarticulated, so the fauna has not been described in detail. Recent intensive collection has revealed a diverse assemblage of material, including for the first time associated elements, which permits an evaluation of the faunal constituents at the locality. Although not diagnosable to a fine taxonomic level, sufficient apomorphies are present to identify representatives from numerous clades known from more complete specimens elsewhere. The evidence suggests a diverse fauna was present, including whatcheeriids and embolomeres. A single humerus previously had been attributed to a colosteid, but there is some uncertainty with this identification. Additional elements suggest the presence of taxa otherwise only known from the late Devonian. Depositional biases at the locality favor tetrapod fossils from larger individuals, but indirect evidence from trackways and tantalizing isolated bones evidences the presence of small taxa that remain to be discovered. The fossils from Blue Beach demonstrate that when windows into the fauna of 'Romer's Gap' are found a rich diversity of tetrapods will be shown to be present, contra arguments that suggested this hiatus in the fossil record was due to extrinsic factors such as atmospheric oxygen levels. They also show that the early tetrapod fauna is not easily divisible into Devonian and Carboniferous faunas, suggesting that some tetrapods passed through the end Devonian

  6. Targeted overexpression of amelotin disrupts the microstructure of dental enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo S Lacruz

    Full Text Available We have previously identified amelotin (AMTN as a novel protein expressed predominantly during the late stages of dental enamel formation, but its role during amelogenesis remains to be determined. In this study we generated transgenic mice that produce AMTN under the amelogenin (Amel gene promoter to study the effect of AMTN overexpression on enamel formation in vivo. The specific overexpression of AMTN in secretory stage ameloblasts was confirmed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The gross histological appearance of ameloblasts or supporting cellular structures as well as the expression of the enamel proteins amelogenin (AMEL and ameloblastin (AMBN was not altered by AMTN overexpression, suggesting that protein production, processing and secretion occurred normally in transgenic mice. The expression of Odontogenic, Ameloblast-Associated (ODAM was slightly increased in secretory stage ameloblasts of transgenic animals. The enamel in AMTN-overexpressing mice was much thinner and displayed a highly irregular surface structure compared to wild type littermates. Teeth of transgenic animals underwent rapid attrition due to the brittleness of the enamel layer. The microstructure of enamel, normally a highly ordered arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals, was completely disorganized. Tomes' process, the hallmark of secretory stage ameloblasts, did not form in transgenic mice. Collectively our data demonstrate that the overexpression of amelotin has a profound effect on enamel structure by disrupting the formation of Tomes' process and the orderly growth of enamel prisms.

  7. Targeted overexpression of amelotin disrupts the microstructure of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Nakayama, Yohei; Holcroft, James; Nguyen, Van; Somogyi-Ganss, Eszter; Snead, Malcolm L; White, Shane N; Paine, Michael L; Ganss, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We have previously identified amelotin (AMTN) as a novel protein expressed predominantly during the late stages of dental enamel formation, but its role during amelogenesis remains to be determined. In this study we generated transgenic mice that produce AMTN under the amelogenin (Amel) gene promoter to study the effect of AMTN overexpression on enamel formation in vivo. The specific overexpression of AMTN in secretory stage ameloblasts was confirmed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The gross histological appearance of ameloblasts or supporting cellular structures as well as the expression of the enamel proteins amelogenin (AMEL) and ameloblastin (AMBN) was not altered by AMTN overexpression, suggesting that protein production, processing and secretion occurred normally in transgenic mice. The expression of Odontogenic, Ameloblast-Associated (ODAM) was slightly increased in secretory stage ameloblasts of transgenic animals. The enamel in AMTN-overexpressing mice was much thinner and displayed a highly irregular surface structure compared to wild type littermates. Teeth of transgenic animals underwent rapid attrition due to the brittleness of the enamel layer. The microstructure of enamel, normally a highly ordered arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals, was completely disorganized. Tomes' process, the hallmark of secretory stage ameloblasts, did not form in transgenic mice. Collectively our data demonstrate that the overexpression of amelotin has a profound effect on enamel structure by disrupting the formation of Tomes' process and the orderly growth of enamel prisms.

  8. Environmental influences in the evolution of tetrapod hearing sensitivity and middle ear tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridi-Papp, Marcos; Narins, Peter M

    2009-12-01

    Vertebrates inhabit and communicate acoustically in most natural environments. We review the influence of environmental factors on the hearing sensitivity of terrestrial vertebrates, and on the anatomy and mechanics of the middle ears. Evidence suggests that both biotic and abiotic environmental factors affect the evolution of bandwidth and frequency of peak sensitivity of the hearing spectrum. Relevant abiotic factors include medium type, temperature, and noise produced by nonliving sources. Biotic factors include heterospecific, conspecific, or self-produced sounds that animals are selected to recognize, and acoustic interference by sounds that other animals generate. Within each class of tetrapods, the size of the middle ear structures correlates directly to body size and inversely to frequency of peak sensitivity. Adaptation to the underwater medium in cetaceans involved reorganization of the middle ear for novel acoustic pathways, whereas adaptation to subterranean life in several mammals resulted in hypertrophy of the middle ear ossicles to enhance their inertial mass for detection of seismic vibrations. The comparative approach has revealed a number of generalities about the effect of environmental factors on hearing performance and middle ear structure across species. The current taxonomic sampling of the major tetrapod groups is still highly unbalanced and incomplete. Future expansion of the comparative evidence should continue to reveal general patterns and novel mechanisms.

  9. IR laser ablation of dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    An overview of the basic mechanisms of IR laser ablation of dental enamel is presented. Enamel is a highly structured tissue consisting of an heterogeneous distribution of water, mineral, protein and lipid. Absorption bands of water and carbonated hydroxyapatite can be selectively targeted from 2.7 to 11-micrometer via several laser wavelengths. Mechanistic differences in the nature of ablation and the varying surface morphology produced can be explained by the microstructure of the tissue. Suggested criteria for the choice of the optimum laser parameters for clinical use, the influence of plasma shielding and the role of exogenous water on the mechanism of ablation are discussed.

  10. [Enamel and dentin under the ultrasonic microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gente, M; Matthaei, E; Mayr, P; Schwarzmann, V

    1989-01-01

    Ultrasonic reflection scanning microscopy is a new method for imaging the known structures of dental hard tissues on the basis of a simple specimen preparation. The specimens are scanned in a physiologic humid environment. Particularly high-contrast images are obtained from enamel tufts and lamellae, dentin tubules and interglobular dentin.

  11. Confusing dinosaurs with mammals: tetrapod phylogenetics and anatomical terminology in the world of homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jerald D

    2004-12-01

    At present, three different systems of anatomical nomenclature are available to researchers describing new tetrapod taxa: a nonstandardized traditional system erected in part by Sir Richard Owen and subsequently elaborated by Alfred Romer; a standardized system created for avians, the Nomina Anatomica Avium (NAA); and a standardized system for extant (crown-group) mammals, the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (NAV). Conserved homologous structures widely distributed within the Tetrapoda are often granted different names in each system. The recent shift toward a phylogenetic system based on homology requires a concomitant shift toward a single nomenclatural system also based on both evolutionary and functional morphological homology. Standardized terms employed in the NAA and NAV should be perpetuated as far as possible basally in their respective phylogenies. Thus, NAA terms apply to nonavian archosaurs (or even all diapsids) and NAV terms apply to noncrown-group mammals and more basal synapsids. Taxa equally distant from both avians and crown-group mammals may maintain the traditional nonstandardized terminology until a universal anatomical nomenclature for all tetrapods is constructed. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. A tetrapod-like repertoire of innate immune receptors and effectors for coelacanths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudinot, Pierre; Zou, Jun; Ota, Tatsuya; Buonocore, Francesco; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Canapa, Adriana; Cannon, John; Litman, Gary; Hansen, John D.

    2014-01-01

    The recent availability of both robust transcriptome and genome resources for coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) has led to unique discoveries for coelacanth immunity such as the lack of IgM, a central component of adaptive immunity. This study was designed to more precisely address the origins and evolution of gene families involved in the initial recognition and response to microbial pathogens, which effect innate immunity. Several multigene families involved in innate immunity are addressed, including: Toll-like receptors (TLRs), retinoic acid inducible gene 1 (RIG1)-like receptors (RLRs), the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLRs), diverse immunoglobulin domain-containing proteins (DICP) and modular domain immune-type receptors (MDIRs). Our analyses also include the tripartite motif-containing proteins (TRIM), which are involved in pathogen recognition as well as the positive regulation of antiviral immunity. Finally, this study addressed some of the downstream effectors of the antimicrobial response including IL-1 family members, type I and II interferons (IFN) and IFN-stimulated effectors (ISGs). Collectively, the genes and gene families in coelacanth that effect innate immune functions share characteristics both in content, structure and arrangement with those found in tetrapods but not in teleosts. The findings support the sister group relationship of coelacanth fish with tetrapods.

  13. Tetrapod-like pelvic girdle in a walking cavefish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammang, Brooke E.; Suvarnaraksha, Apinun; Markiewicz, Julie; Soares, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have adapted a number of different behaviors to move out of the water, but none have been described as being able to walk on land with a tetrapod-like gait. Here we show that the blind cavefish Cryptotora thamicola walks and climbs waterfalls with a salamander-like diagonal-couplets lateral sequence gait and has evolved a robust pelvic girdle that shares morphological features associated with terrestrial vertebrates. In all other fishes, the pelvic bones are suspended in a muscular sling or loosely attached to the pectoral girdle anteriorly. In contrast, the pelvic girdle of Cryptotora is a large, broad puboischiadic plate that is joined to the iliac process of a hypertrophied sacral rib; fusion of these bones in tetrapods creates an acetabulum. The vertebral column in the sacral area has large anterior and posterior zygapophyses, transverse processes, and broad neural spines, all of which are associated with terrestrial organisms. The diagonal-couplet lateral sequence gait was accomplished by rotation of the pectoral and pelvic girdles creating a standing wave of the axial body. These findings are significant because they represent the first example of behavioural and morphological adaptation in an extant fish that converges on the tetrapodal walking behaviour and morphology. PMID:27010864

  14. Study of tetrapodal ZnO-PDMS composites: a comparison of fillers shapes in stiffness and hydrophobicity improvements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jin

    Full Text Available ZnO particles of different size and structures were used as fillers to modify the silicone rubber, in order to reveal the effect of the filler shape in the polymer composites. Tetrapodal shaped microparticles, short microfibers/whiskers, and nanosized spherical particles from ZnO have been used as fillers to fabricate the different ZnO-Silicone composites. The detailed microstructures of the fillers as well as synthesized composites using scanning electron microscopy have been presented here. The tensile elastic modulus and water contact angle, which are important parameters for bio-mimetic applications, of fabricated composites with different fillers have been measured and compared. Among all three types of fillers, tetrapodal shaped ZnO microparticles showed the best performance in terms of increase in hydrophobicity of material cross-section as well as the stiffness of the composites. It has been demonstrated that the tetrapodal shaped microparticles gain their advantage due to the special shape, which avoids agglomeration problems as in the case for nanoparticles, and the difficulty of achieving truly random distribution for whisker fillers.

  15. Enhanced performance of hybrid solar cells using longer arms of quantum cadmium selenide tetrapods

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that enhanced device performance of hybrid solar cells based on tetrapod (TP)-shaped cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and conjugated polymer of poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) can be obtained by using longer armed tetrapods which aids in better spatial connectivity, thus decreasing charge hopping events which lead to better charge transport. Longer tetrapods with 10 nm arm length lead to improved power conversion efficiency of 1.12% compared to 0.80% of device having 5 nm short-armed tetrapods:P3HT photoactive blends.

  16. Systems and methods of detecting force and stress using tetrapod nanocrystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Charina L.; Koski, Kristie J.; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2013-08-20

    Systems and methods of detecting force on the nanoscale including methods for detecting force using a tetrapod nanocrystal by exposing the tetrapod nanocrystal to light, which produces a luminescent response by the tetrapod nanocrystal. The method continues with detecting a difference in the luminescent response by the tetrapod nanocrystal relative to a base luminescent response that indicates a force between a first and second medium or stresses or strains experienced within a material. Such systems and methods find use with biological systems to measure forces in biological events or interactions.

  17. The role of enamel crystallography on tooth shade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eimar, Hazem; Marelli, Benedetto; Nazhat, Showan N; Abi Nader, Samer; Amin, Wala M; Torres, Jesus; de Albuquerque, Rubens F; Tamimi, Faleh

    2011-12-01

    Tooth shade is influenced by a combination of extrinsic-stains that are adsorbed to the enamel surface and by its intrinsic-shade resulting from the interaction of light with tooth structures. This study was designed to investigate how the variations in enamel ultrastructure may affect tooth optical properties. One-hundred extracted teeth were collected from adult patients attending McGill-Undergraduate Dental Clinics. Shade-spectrophotometry, FTIR and XRD were used to assess tooth shade, enamel chemical composition and crystallography. The data obtained was analysed for Pearson correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. The statistical significance was set at P enamel hydroxyapatite (HA) crystal size (R = -0.358; B = -0.866; P = 0.007), tooth chroma was associated with enamel HA carbonization (R = -0.419; B = -99.06; P = 0.005), and tooth lightness was associated with both enamel HA crystal size (R = -0.313; B = -1.052; P = 0.019) and the degree of HA carbonization (R = -0.265; B=-57.95; P = 0.033). Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the size of enamel HA crystals and the relative content of mineral carbonate were the most important predictors for tooth shade lightness (P = 0.018) and chroma (P=0.008), respectively. In contrast, enamel organic content had no correlation with tooth shade. In the present study we have revealed that the tooth shade is regulated by the size of their HA enamel crystals. On the other hand, variation in the degree of enamel HA carbonization can also affect the tooth shade. These findings are of great relevance in dentistry since it provides better understanding of tooth aesthetics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. On the critical parameters that regulate the deformation behaviour of tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zonghan; Swain, Michael; Munroe, Paul; Hoffman, Mark

    2008-06-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest tissue in the human body with a complex hierarchical structure. Enamel hypomineralisation--a developmental defect--has been reported to cause a marked reduction in the mechanical properties of enamel and loss of dental function. We discover a distinctive difference in the inelastic deformation mechanism between sound and hypomineralised enamels that is apparently controlled by microstructural variation. For sound enamel, when subjected to mechanical forces the controlling deformation mechanism was distributed shearing within nanometre thick protein layer between its constituent mineral crystals; whereas for hypomineralised enamel microcracking and subsequent crack growth were more evident in its less densely packed microstructure. We develop a mechanical model that not only identifies the critical parameters, i.e., the thickness and shear properties of enamels, that regulate the mechanical behaviour of enamel, but also explains the degradation of hypomineralised enamel as manifested by its lower resistance to deformation and propensity for catastrophic failure. With support of experimental data, we conclude that for sound enamel an optimal microstructure has been developed that endows enamel with remarkable structural integrity for durable mechanical function.

  19. Changes in surface content and crystal structure after fluoride gel or hydroxyapatite paste application on stripped enamel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Sang-Cheol; Hong, Hyun-Sil; Hwang, Young-Cheol

    2008-01-01

    .... Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to compare the change of surface contents and crystal structures before and after the application of fluoride gel or hydroxyapatite paste...

  20. Crystallographic structure of human tooth enamel by electron microscopy and x‐ray diffraction: hexagonal or monoclinic?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    REYES‐GASGA, J; MARTÍNEZ‐PIÑEIRO, E.L; BRÈS, É.F

    2012-01-01

    Recently reports on the major stability of the monoclinic phase of hydroxyapatite compared with the hexagonal phase have established it as the most observable structure of hydroxyapatite in natural...

  1. Structure and composition of enamel and dentin after thermal treatment or infrared laser irradiation; Estrutura e composicao do esmalte e da dentina tratados termicamente ou irradiados com lasers emissores no infravermelho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Luciano

    2004-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to identify the crystallographic structure, optical properties, chemical composition and electron paramagnetic signals that laser irradiation or oven heating produces on the tissue. The thermal treatment was conducted in oven with temperature range below 1000 deg C and the laser irradiation with holmium (Ho:YLF - 2,065 {mu}m) and erbium (Er:YAG - 2,94 {mu}m) laser. The tissue characterization was carried out with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet and visible transmission spectroscopy, light microscopy, infrared transmission/reflection spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance. The holmium irradiated enamel (600-800 J/cm{sup 2}) shows the presence of tetracalcium phosphate that coexists with the natural phase (hydroxyapatite). The irradiated dentin shows only the sharper diffraction peaks of the natural phase. The narrows peaks, observed after irradiation, could be assigned to the dentin crystal growth and impurities elimination. Tissue discoloration is observed after thermal treatment with temperatures above 100 deg C. Heated enamel become white-opaque and the origin is assigned to the water elimination, which promotes higher light scattering by the prismatic structure. On the other hand, heated dentin, with similar temperatures becomes brown. The dentin browning changes with the temperature and shown two peaks, at 375 deg C and 700 deg C. The peak at 375 deg C is assigned to the collagen structure degradation and at 700 deg C to the cyanate formation. The dentin discoloration produced with temperatures below 200 deg C is reversible after the tissue hydration. Both enamel and dentin discoloration are also observed in erbium irradiated tissues. Thermal treatments, heating in oven or laser irradiation, change mainly the organic matrix composition and water present in the tissues. The inorganic matrix is more stable and its radicals are changed, with more predominance, only at temperatures higher than

  2. Type VII Collagen is Enriched in the Enamel Organic Matrix Associated with the Dentin-Enamel Junction of Mature Human Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jacob D.; Walker, Mary P.; Mousa, Ahmad; Wang, Yong; Gorski, Jeff P.

    2014-01-01

    The inner enamel region of erupted teeth is known to exhibit higher fracture toughness and crack growth resistance than bulk phase enamel. However, an explanation for this behavior has been hampered by the lack of compositional information for the residual enamel organic matrix. Since enamel-forming ameloblasts are known to express type VII collagen and type VII collagen null mice display abnormal amelogenesis, the aim of this study was to determine whether type VII collagen is a component of the enamel organic matrix at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) of mature human teeth. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of demineralized tooth sections localized type VII collagen to the organic matrix surrounding individual enamel rods near the DEJ. Morphologically, immunoreactive type VII collagen helical-bundles resembled the gnarled-pattern of enamel rods detected by Coomassie Blue staining. Western blotting of whole crown or enamel matrix extracts also identified characteristic Mr=280 and 230 kDa type VII dimeric forms, which resolved into 75 and 25 kDa bands upon reduction. As expected, the collagenous domain of type VII collagen was resistant to pepsin digestion, but was susceptible to purified bacterial collagenase. These results demonstrate the inner enamel organic matrix in mature teeth contains macromolecular type VII collagen. Based on its physical association with the DEJ and its well-appreciated capacity to complex with other collagens, we hypothesize that enamel embedded type VII collagen fibrils may contribute not only to the structural resilience of enamel, but may also play a role in bonding enamel to dentin. PMID:24594343

  3. SEM Analysis of Tooth Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Azinović, Zoran; Keros, Jadranka; Buković, Dino; Azinović, Ana

    2003-01-01

    SEM analysis contains researches of tooth enamel surfaces of two populations. First group of samples is tooth enamel of prehistorically ancestor from Vu~edol and the second group of samples is enamel of modern Croatian citizen. Even on small number of human teeth samples from cooperage site of Vu~edol (3,000 BC) and today’s Croatian people, we can conclude about chewing biometry of prehistorically ancestors and today’s modern Croatian people, comparing interspecifically the mor...

  4. Hipoplasia Enamel Pada Penderita Penyakit Eksantema

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi saputri

    2008-01-01

    Hipoplasia enamel merupakan gangguan pada masa pemhentukan matriks organik yang menyebabkan gangguan struktur pada enamel sehingga secara klinis terlihat pada suatu bagian dari gigi tidak terbentuk enamel dan kadang-kadang sama sekali tidak terbentuk enamel, serta diikuti dengan perubahan warna pada gigi. Dikenal berbagai faktor penyebab hipoplasia enamel, salah satunya adalah penyakit eksantema yaitu menyebabkan infeksi pada bayi dan anak-anak. Gambaran histopatologis hipoplasia enamel adala...

  5. Parabens do not increase fluoride uptake by dental enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Silva Tramontino

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether methylparaben and propylparaben, which present a similar chemical structure, increase fluoride uptake by demineralized dental enamel when present in buffered solutions. Methods: The study comprised an in vitro experiment using blocks of bovine dental enamel with artificial carious lesions. Enamel blocks were exposed to the following treatment (n=12: fluoride solution (200 ppm fluoride - control; solution containing fluoride and 13 mM methylparaben; solution containing fluoride and 13 mM propylparaben in 35% propylene glycol; solution containing fluoride in 35% propylene glycol. All solutions were buffered (0.01 M cacodilate and the pH was adjusted to 6.27. The blocks were exposed to the treatment solutions in the proportion of 2 ml per mm2 of exposed enamel area and fluoride formed was estimated after removing an enamel layer by acid etching. Fluoride extracted was determined by ion specific electrode and the amount of enamel removed was estimated by phosphorus analysis. ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test were used for statistical analysis, with significance level at 5%. Results: The dental blocks of treatment groups containing both parabens and the control group presented similar fluoride concentration in enamel and no statistical difference was observed among them (p>0.05. The dental blocks of treatment group containing fluoride and propylene glycol showed the lowest value of fluoride present in enamel, which was significantly different from the control and fluoride and methylparaben groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: Methyl and propylparaben in a buffered solution do not enhance fluoride uptake by demineralized dental enamel.

  6. The palatal dentition of tetrapods and its functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ryoko; Evans, Susan E

    2017-01-01

    The presence of a palatal dentition is generally considered to be the primitive condition in amniotes, with each major lineage showing a tendency toward reduction. This study highlights the variation in palatal tooth arrangements and reveals clear trends within the evolutionary history of tetrapods. Major changes occurred in the transition between early tetrapods and amphibians on the one hand, and stem amniotes on the other. These changes reflect the function of the palatal dentition, which can play an important role in holding and manipulating food during feeding. Differences in the arrangement of palatal teeth, and in their pattern of loss, likely reflect differences in feeding strategy but also changes in the arrangement of cranial soft tissues, as the palatal dentition works best with a well-developed mobile tongue. It is difficult to explain the loss of palatal teeth in terms of any single factor, but palatal tooth patterns have the potential to provide new information on diet and feeding strategy in extinct taxa. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  7. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical

  8. Multiphoton imaging of the dentine-enamel junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloitre, Thierry; Panayotov, Ivan V; Tassery, Hervé; Gergely, Csilla; Levallois, Bernard; Cuisinier, Frédéric J G

    2013-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has been used to reveal structural details of dentine and enamel at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) based on their 2-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) emission and second harmonic generation (SHG). In dentine tubule 2PEF intensity varies due to protein content variation. Intertubular dentin produces both SHG and 2PEF signals. Tubules are surrounded by a thin circular zone with a lower SHG signal than the bulk dentine and the presence of collagen fibers perpendicular to the tubule longitudinal axis is indicated by strong SHG responses. The DEJ appears as a low intensity line on the 2PEF images and this was never previously reported. The SHG signal is completely absent for enamel and aprismatic enamel shows a homogeneous low 2PEF signal contrary to prismatic enamel. The SHG intensity of mantle dentine is increasing from the dentine-enamel junction in the first 12 μm indicating a progressive presence of fibrillar collagen and corresponding to the more external part of mantle dentine where matrix metallo-proteases accumulate. The high information content of multiphoton images confirms the huge potential of this method to investigate tooth structures in physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Trace elements can influence the physical properties of tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadimi, Elnaz; Eimar, Hazem; Marelli, Benedetto; Nazhat, Showan N; Asgharian, Masoud; Vali, Hojatollah; Tamimi, Faleh

    2013-01-01

    In previous studies, we showed that the size of apatite nanocrystals in tooth enamel can influence its physical properties. This important discovery raised a new question; which factors are regulating the size of these nanocrystals? Trace elements can affect crystallographic properties of synthetic apatite, therefore this study was designed to investigate how trace elements influence enamel's crystallographic properties and ultimately its physical properties. The concentration of trace elements in tooth enamel was determined for 38 extracted human teeth using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The following trace elements were detected: Al, K, Mg, S, Na, Zn, Si, B, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and Ti. Simple and stepwise multiple regression was used to identify the correlations between trace elements concentration in enamel and its crystallographic structure, hardness, resistance to crack propagation, shade lightness and carbonate content. The presence of some trace elements in enamel was correlated with the size (Pb, Ti, Mn) and lattice parameters (Se, Cr, Ni) of apatite nanocrystals. Some trace elements such as Ti was significantly correlated with tooth crystallographic structure and consequently with hardness and shade lightness. We conclude that the presence of trace elements in enamel could influence its physical properties.

  10. Enamel microabrasion: 10 years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P

    1995-01-01

    Enamel microabrasion was developed in the mid 1980's as a method of eliminating enamel discolouration defects and improving the appearance of teeth. Ten years after the method was developed, much has been learned about the best technique, long term results of treatment and microscopic changes to the enamel surface that have distinguishable clinical implications. In addition, certain patients can benefit from combined enamel microabrasion/tooth bleaching therapy that yields the most attractive cosmetic results. This article reviews the current status of enamel microabrasion one decade after its introduction to the profession. The latest treatment protocol is presented and photographic case histories document results of treatment. Clinical observations made over ten years are discussed.

  11. Tetrapod-like axial regionalization in an early ray-finned fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallan, Lauren Cole

    2012-01-01

    Tetrapods possess up to five morphologically distinct vertebral series: cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacral and caudal. The evolution of axial regionalization has been linked to derived Hox expression patterns during development and the demands of weight-bearing and walking on land. These evolutionary and functional explanations are supported by an absence of similar traits in fishes, living and extinct. Here, I show that, Tarrasius problematicus, a marine ray-finned fish from the Mississippian (Early Carboniferous; 359–318 Ma) of Scotland, is the first non-tetrapod known to possess tetrapod-like axial regionalization. Tarrasius exhibits five vertebral regions, including a seven-vertebrae ‘cervical’ series and a reinforced ‘sacrum’ over the pelvic area. Most vertebrae possess processes for intervertebral contact similar to tetrapod zygapophyses. The fully aquatic Tarrasius evolved these morphologies alongside other traits convergent with early tetrapods, including a naked trunk, and a single median continuous fin. Regional modifications in Tarrasius probably facilitated pelagic swimming, rather than a terrestrial lifestyle or walking gait, presenting an alternative scenario for the evolution of such traits in tetrapods. Axial regionalization in Tarrasius could indicate tetrapod-like Hox expression patterns, possibly representing the primitive state for jawed vertebrates. Alternately, it could signal a weaker relationship, or even a complete disconnect, between Hox expression domains and vertebrate axial plans. PMID:22628471

  12. Mechanical characterization of enamel coated steel bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the corrosion process of enamel-coated deformed rebar completely immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was evaluated : over a period of 84 days by EIS testing. Three types of enamel coating were investigated: pure enamel, 50/50 enamel coa...

  13. Making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting for enhanced adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-11-01

    Good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is an important factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. In this study, we developed a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  14. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belikov, A V; Skrypnik, A V; Shatilova, K V [St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-31

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained. (laser biophotonics)

  15. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, A. V.; Skrypnik, A. V.; Shatilova, K. V.

    2014-08-01

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained.

  16. Posttranslational Amelogenin Processing and Changes in Matrix Assembly during Enamel Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirali Pandya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular tooth enamel matrix is a unique, protein-rich environment that provides the structural basis for the growth of long and parallel oriented enamel crystals. Here we have conducted a series of in vivo and in vitro studies to characterize the changes in matrix shape and organization that take place during the transition from ameloblast intravesicular matrices to extracellular subunit compartments and pericrystalline sheath proteins, and correlated these changes with stages of amelogenin matrix protein posttranslational processing. Our transmission electron microscopic studies revealed a 2.5-fold difference in matrix subunit compartment dimensions between secretory vesicle and extracellular enamel protein matrix as well as conformational changes in matrix structure between vesicles, stippled materials, and pericrystalline matrix. Enamel crystal growth in organ culture demonstrated granular mineral deposits associated with the enamel matrix framework, dot-like mineral deposits along elongating initial enamel crystallites, and dramatic changes in enamel matrix configuration following the onset of enamel crystal formation. Atomic force micrographs provided evidence for the presence of both linear and hexagonal/ring-shaped full-length recombinant amelogenin protein assemblies on mica surfaces, while nickel-staining of the N-terminal amelogenin N92 His-tag revealed 20 nm diameter oval and globular amelogenin assemblies in N92 amelogenin matrices. Western blot analysis comparing loosely bound and mineral-associated protein fractions of developing porcine enamel organs, superficial and deep enamel layers demonstrated (i a single, full-length amelogenin band in the enamel organ followed by 3 kDa cleavage upon entry into the enamel layer, (ii a close association of 8–16 kDa C-terminal amelogenin cleavage products with the growing enamel apatite crystal surface, and (iii a remaining pool of N-terminal amelogenin fragments loosely retained

  17. A carapace-like bony 'body tube' in an early triassic marine reptile and the onset of marine tetrapod predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-hong; Motani, Ryosuke; Cheng, Long; Jiang, Da-yong; Rieppel, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Parahupehsuchus longus is a new species of marine reptile from the Lower Triassic of Yuan'an County, Hubei Province, China. It is unique among vertebrates for having a body wall that is completely surrounded by a bony tube, about 50 cm long and 6.5 cm deep, comprising overlapping ribs and gastralia. This tube and bony ossicles on the back are best interpreted as anti-predatory features, suggesting that there was predation pressure upon marine tetrapods in the Early Triassic. There is at least one sauropterygian that is sufficiently large to feed on Parahupehsuchus in the Nanzhang-Yuan'an fauna, together with six more species of potential prey marine reptiles with various degrees of body protection. Modern predators of marine tetrapods belong to the highest trophic levels in the marine ecosystem but such predators did not always exist through geologic time. The indication of marine-tetrapod feeding in the Nanzhang-Yuan'an fauna suggests that such a trophic level emerged for the first time in the Early Triassic. The recovery from the end-Permian extinction probably proceeded faster than traditionally thought for marine predators. Parahupehsuchus has superficially turtle-like features, namely expanded ribs without intercostal space, very short transverse processes, and a dorsal outgrowth from the neural spine. However, these features are structurally different from their turtle counterparts. Phylogeny suggests that they are convergent with the condition in turtles, which has a fundamentally different body plan that involves the folding of the body wall. Expanded ribs without intercostal space evolved at least twice and probably even more among reptiles.

  18. Stim1 Regulates Enamel Mineralization and Ameloblast Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Y; Haruyama, N; Nikaido, M; Nakanishi, M; Ryu, N; Oh-Hora, M; Kuremoto, K; Yoshizaki, K; Takano, Y; Takahashi, I

    2017-11-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channel genes ORAI1 and STIM1 abolish store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) and result in ectodermal dysplasia with amelogenesis imperfecta. However, because of the limited availability of patient tissue, analyses of enamel mineralization or possible changes in ameloblast function or morphology have not been possible. Here, we generated mice with ectodermal tissue-specific deletion of Stim1 ( Stim1 cKO [conditional knockout]), Stim2 ( Stim2 cKO), and Stim1 and Stim2 ( Stim1/2 cKO) and analyzed their enamel phenotypes as compared with those of control ( Stim1/2fl/fl) animals. Ablation of Stim1 and Stim1/2 but not Stim2 expression resulted in chalky enamel and severe attrition at the incisor tips and molar cusps. Stim1 and Stim1/2 cKO, but not Stim2 cKO, demonstrated inferior enamel mineralization with impaired structural integrity, whereas the shape of the teeth and enamel thickness appeared to be normal in all animals. The gene expression levels of the enamel matrix proteins Amelx and Ambn and the enamel matrix proteases Mmp20 and Klk4 were not altered by the abrogation of SOCE in Stim1/2 cKO mice. The morphology of ameloblasts during the secretory and maturation stages was not significantly altered in either the incisors or molars of the cKO animals. However, in Stim1 and Stim1/2 cKO incisors, the alternating modulation of maturation-stage ameloblasts between the smooth- and ruffle-ended cell types continued beyond the regular cycle and extended to the areas corresponding to the zone of postmodulation ameloblasts in the teeth of control animals. These results indicate that SOCE is essential for proper enamel mineralization, in which Stim1 plays a critical role during the maturation process.

  19. Triassic tetrapods from antarctica: evidence for continental drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, D H; Colbert, E H; Breed, W J; Jensen, J A; Powell, J S

    1970-09-18

    During the austral summer of 1969-1970 bones of Lower Triassic vertebrates were excavated from coarse quartzose sandstones forming stream channel deposits of the Fremouw Formation at Coalsack Bluff, in the Transantarctic Mountains of Antarctica. This is the first assemblage of fossil tetrapods of significant geologic age to be found on the Antarctic Continent. The fossils include labyrinthodont amphibians, presumed thecodont reptiles, and therapsid reptiles, including the definitive genus, Lystrosaurus. This genus is typical of the Lower Triassic of southern Africa, and is also found in India and China. Lystrosaurus and associated vertebrates found in Antarctica were land-living animals: therefore their presence on the South Polar Continent would seem to indicate the contiguity of Antarctica, Africa, and India in Early Triassic times.

  20. The origin of the tetrapod limb: from expeditions to enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Igor; Shubin, Neil H

    2013-07-01

    More than three centuries ago natural philosophers, and later anatomists, recognized a fundamental organization to the skeleton of tetrapod limbs. Composed of three segments, stylopod, zeugopod, and autopod, this pattern has served as the basis for a remarkably broad adaptive radiation from wings and flippers to hands and digging organs. A central area of inquiry has been tracing the origins of the elements of this Bauplan in the fins of diverse fish. Can equivalents of the three segments, and the developmental processes that pattern them, be seen in fish fins? In addition, if so, how do these data inform theories of the transformation of fins into limbs? Answers to these questions come from linking discoveries in paleontology with those of developmental biology and genetics. Burgeoning discoveries in the regulatory biology of developmental genes and in the genomics of diverse species offer novel data to investigate these classical questions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Patterns of morphological variation in enamel-dentin junction and outer enamel surface of human molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Wataru; Yano, Wataru; Nagaoka, Tomohito; Abe, Mikiko; Ohshima, Hayato; Nakatsukasa, Masato

    2014-06-01

    Tooth crown patterning is governed by the growth and folding of the inner enamel epithelium (IEE) and the following enamel deposition forms outer enamel surface (OES). We hypothesized that overall dental crown shape and covariation structure are determined by processes that configurate shape at the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ), the developmental vestige of IEE. This this hypothesis was tested by comparing patterns of morphological variation between EDJ and OES in human permanent maxillary first molar (UM1) and deciduous second molar (um2). Using geometric morphometric methods, we described morphological variation and covariation between EDJ and OES, and evaluated the strength of two components of phenotypic variability, canalization and morphological integration, in addition to the relevant evolutionary flexibility, i.e. the ability to respond to selective pressure. The strength of covariation between EDJ and OES was greater in um2 than in UM1, and the way that multiple traits covary between EDJ and OES was different between these teeth. The variability analyses showed that EDJ had less shape variation and a higher level of morphological integration than OES, which indicated that canalization and morphological integration acted as developmental constraints. These tendencies were greater in UM1 than in um2. On the other hand, EDJ and OES had a comparable level of evolvability in these teeth. Amelogenesis could play a significant role in tooth shape and covariation structure, and its influence was not constant among teeth, which may be responsible for the differences in the rate and/or period of enamel formation. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  2. Enamel ultrastructure of fossil and modern pinnipeds: evaluating hypotheses of feeding adaptations in the extinct walrus Pelagiarctos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Carolina; Boessenecker, Robert W.; Churchill, Morgan; Kieser, Jules

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the enamel ultrastructure in modern otariid pinnipeds and in the extinct walrus Pelagiarctos. Teeth of the New Zealand fur seal ( Arctocephalus forsteri), sea lion ( Phocarctos hookeri), and fossil walrus Pelagiarctos thomasi were embedded, sectioned, etched, and analyzed via scanning electron microscopy. The enamel of NZ otariids and Pelagiarctos was prismatic and moderately thick, measuring 150-450 μm on average. It consisted of transversely oriented Hunter-Schreger bands (HSBs) from the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) to near the outer surface, where it faded into prismless enamel less than 10 μm thick. The width of HSB was variable and averaged between 6 and 10 prisms, and they presented an undulating course both in longitudinal and cross sections. The overall organization of the enamel was similar in all teeth sampled; however, the enamel was thicker in canines and postcanines than in incisors. The crowns of all teeth sampled were uniformly covered by enamel; however, the grooved incisors lacked an enamel cover on the posterior side of the buccal face. Large tubules and tuft-like structures were seen at the EDJ. HSB enamel as well as tubules and tufts at the EDJ suggest increased occlusal loads during feeding, a biomechanical adaptation to avoid enamel cracking and failure. Despite overall simplification in tooth morphology and reduced mastication, the fossil and modern pinnipeds analyzed here retained the complex undulating HSB structure of other fossils and living Carnivora, while other marine mammals such as cetaceans developed simplified radial enamel.

  3. Dermal bone in early tetrapods: a palaeophysiological hypothesis of adaptation for terrestrial acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janis, Christine M; Devlin, Kelly; Warren, Daniel E; Witzmann, Florian

    2012-08-07

    The dermal bone sculpture of early, basal tetrapods of the Permo-Carboniferous is unlike the bone surface of any living vertebrate, and its function has long been obscure. Drawing from physiological studies of extant tetrapods, where dermal bone or other calcified tissues aid in regulating acid-base balance relating to hypercapnia (excess blood carbon dioxide) and/or lactate acidosis, we propose a similar function for these sculptured dermal bones in early tetrapods. Unlike the condition in modern reptiles, which experience hypercapnia when submerged in water, these animals would have experienced hypercapnia on land, owing to likely inefficient means of eliminating carbon dioxide. The different patterns of dermal bone sculpture in these tetrapods largely correlates with levels of terrestriality: sculpture is reduced or lost in stem amniotes that likely had the more efficient lung ventilation mode of costal aspiration, and in small-sized stem amphibians that would have been able to use the skin for gas exchange.

  4. Enamel Pearls Implications on Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Gonçalves Zenóbio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental anatomy is quite complex and diverse factors must be taken into account in its analysis. Teeth with anatomical variations present an increase in the rate of severity periodontal tissue destruction and therefore a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. In this context, this paper reviews the literature regarding enamel pearls and their implications in the development of severe localized periodontal disease as well as in the prognosis of periodontal therapy. Radiographic examination of a patient complaining of pain in the right side of the mandible revealed the presence of a radiopaque structure around the cervical region of lower right first premolar. Periodontal examination revealed extensive bone loss since probing depths ranged from 7.0 mm to 9.0 mm and additionally intense bleeding and suppuration. Surgical exploration detected the presence of an enamel pearl, which was removed. Assessment of the remaining supporting tissues led to the extraction of tooth 44. Local factors such as enamel pearls can lead to inadequate removal of the subgingival biofilm, thus favoring the establishment and progression of periodontal diseases.

  5. Enamel Pearls Implications on Periodontal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Vieira, Thaís Ribeiral; Bustamante, Roberta Paula Colen; Gomes, Hayder Egg; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarin

    2015-01-01

    Dental anatomy is quite complex and diverse factors must be taken into account in its analysis. Teeth with anatomical variations present an increase in the rate of severity periodontal tissue destruction and therefore a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. In this context, this paper reviews the literature regarding enamel pearls and their implications in the development of severe localized periodontal disease as well as in the prognosis of periodontal therapy. Radiographic examination of a patient complaining of pain in the right side of the mandible revealed the presence of a radiopaque structure around the cervical region of lower right first premolar. Periodontal examination revealed extensive bone loss since probing depths ranged from 7.0 mm to 9.0 mm and additionally intense bleeding and suppuration. Surgical exploration detected the presence of an enamel pearl, which was removed. Assessment of the remaining supporting tissues led to the extraction of tooth 44. Local factors such as enamel pearls can lead to inadequate removal of the subgingival biofilm, thus favoring the establishment and progression of periodontal diseases.

  6. Evolutionary redefinition of immunoglobulin light chain isotypes in tetrapods using molecular markers

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sabyasachi; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Klein, Jan; Nei, Masatoshi

    2008-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of Ig light chain (IGL) genes are difficult to resolve, because these genes are short and evolve relatively fast. Here, we classify the IGL sequences from 12 tetrapod species into three distinct groups (κ, λ, and σ isotypes) using conserved amino acid residues, recombination signal sequences, and genomic organization of IGL genes as cladistic markers. From the distribution of the markers we conclude that the earliest extant tetrapods, the amphibians, possess thr...

  7. A revision of tetrapod footprints from the late Carboniferous of the West Midlands, UK

    OpenAIRE

    Luke E. Meade; Andrew S. Jones; Richard J. Butler

    2016-01-01

    A series of sandstone slabs from Hamstead, Birmingham (West Midlands, UK), preserve an assemblage of tetrapod trackways and individual tracks from the Enville Member of the Salop Formation (late Carboniferous: late Moscovian?Kasimovian). This material has received limited previous study, despite being one of the few British sites to preserve Carboniferous tetrapod footprints. Here, we restudy and revise the taxonomy of this material, and document it using 3D models produced using photogrammet...

  8. Sequences, stratigraphy and scenarios: what can we say about the fossil record of the earliest tetrapods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Matt; Brazeau, Martin D

    2011-02-07

    Past research on the emergence of digit-bearing tetrapods has led to the widely accepted premise that this important evolutionary event occurred during the Late Devonian. The discovery of convincing digit-bearing tetrapod trackways of early Middle Devonian age in Poland has upset this orthodoxy, indicating that current scenarios which link the timing of the origin of digited tetrapods to specific events in Earth history are likely to be in error. Inspired by this find, we examine the fossil record of early digit-bearing tetrapods and their closest fish-like relatives from a statistical standpoint. We find that the Polish trackways force a substantial reconsideration of the nature of the early tetrapod record when only body fossils are considered. However, the effect is less drastic (and often not statistically significant) when other reliably dated trackways that were previously considered anachronistic are taken into account. Using two approaches, we find that 95 per cent credible and confidence intervals for the origin of digit-bearing tetrapods extend into the Early Devonian and beyond, spanning late Emsian to mid Ludlow. For biologically realistic diversity models, estimated genus-level preservation rates for Devonian digited tetrapods and their relatives range from 0.025 to 0.073 per lineage-million years, an order of magnitude lower than species-level rates for groups typically considered to have dense records. Available fossils of early digited tetrapods and their immediate relatives are adequate for documenting large-scale patterns of character acquisition associated with the origin of terrestriality, but low preservation rates coupled with clear geographical and stratigraphic sampling biases caution against building scenarios for the origin of digits and terrestrialization tied to the provenance of particular specimens or faunas.

  9. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopic investigation of enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina; Klingberg, Gunilla; Dietz, Wolfram; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental disturbance during enamel formation, defined as a macroscopic defect in the enamel, with a reduction of the enamel thickness with rounded, smooth borders. Information on the microstructural level is still limited, therefore further studies are of importance to better understand the mechanisms behind enamel hypoplasia. To study enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth by means of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Nineteen primary teeth with enamel hypoplasia were examined in a polarized light microscope and in a scanning electron microscope. The cervical and incisal borders of the enamel hypoplasia had a rounded appearance, as the prisms in the rounded cervical area of the hypoplasia were bent. The rounded borders had a normal surface structure whereas the base of the defects appeared rough and porous. Morphological findings in this study indicate that the aetiological factor has a short duration and affects only certain ameloblasts. The bottom of the enamel hypoplasia is porous and constitutes possible pathways for bacteria into the dentin.

  10. Type VII collagen deficiency causes defective tooth enamel formation due to poor differentiation of ameloblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Hiroko; Akiyama, Masashi; Domon, Takanori; Nomura, Toshifumi; Shinkuma, Satoru; Ito, Kei; Asaka, Takuya; Sawamura, Daisuke; Uitto, Jouni; Uo, Motohiro; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen (COL7), a major component of anchoring fibrils in the epidermal basement membrane zone. Patients with RDEB present a low oral hygiene index and prevalent tooth abnormalities with caries. We examined the tooth enamel structure of an RDEB patient by scanning electron microscopy. It showed irregular enamel prisms, indicating structural enamel defects. To elucidate the pathomechanisms of enamel defects due to COL7 deficiency, we investigated tooth formation in Col7a1(-/-) and COL7-rescued humanized mice that we have established. The enamel from Col7a1(-/-) mice had normal surface structure. The enamel calcification and chemical composition of Col7a1(-/-) mice were similar to those of the wild type. However, transverse sections of teeth from the Col7a1(-/-) mice showed irregular enamel prisms, which were also observed in the RDEB patient. Furthermore, the Col7a1(-/-) mice teeth had poorly differentiated ameloblasts, lacking normal enamel protein-secreting Tomes' processes, and showed reduced mRNA expression of amelogenin and other enamel-related molecules. These enamel abnormalities were corrected in the COL7-rescued humanized mice expressing a human COL7A1 transgene. These findings suggest that COL7 regulates ameloblast differentiation and is essential for the formation of Tomes' processes. Collectively, COL7 deficiency is thought to disrupt epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, leading to defective ameloblast differentiation and enamel malformation in RDEB patients. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Whole-genome sequence of the Tibetan frog Nanorana parkeri and the comparative evolution of tetrapod genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Bo; Xiong, Zi-Jun; Xiang, Xue-Yan; Liu, Shi-Ping; Zhou, Wei-Wei; Tu, Xiao-Long; Zhong, Li; Wang, Lu; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhu, Chun-Ling; Yang, Min-Min; Chen, Hong-Man; Li, Fang; Zhou, Long; Feng, Shao-Hong; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Guo-Jie; Irwin, David; Hillis, David M; Murphy, Robert W; Yang, Huan-Ming; Che, Jing; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-03-17

    The development of efficient sequencing techniques has resulted in large numbers of genomes being available for evolutionary studies. However, only one genome is available for all amphibians, that of Xenopus tropicalis, which is distantly related from the majority of frogs. More than 96% of frogs belong to the Neobatrachia, and no genome exists for this group. This dearth of amphibian genomes greatly restricts genomic studies of amphibians and, more generally, our understanding of tetrapod genome evolution. To fill this gap, we provide the de novo genome of a Tibetan Plateau frog, Nanorana parkeri, and compare it to that of X. tropicalis and other vertebrates. This genome encodes more than 20,000 protein-coding genes, a number similar to that of Xenopus. Although the genome size of Nanorana is considerably larger than that of Xenopus (2.3 vs. 1.5 Gb), most of the difference is due to the respective number of transposable elements in the two genomes. The two frogs exhibit considerable conserved whole-genome synteny despite having diverged approximately 266 Ma, indicating a slow rate of DNA structural evolution in anurans. Multigenome synteny blocks further show that amphibians have fewer interchromosomal rearrangements than mammals but have a comparable rate of intrachromosomal rearrangements. Our analysis also identifies 11 Mb of anuran-specific highly conserved elements that will be useful for comparative genomic analyses of frogs. The Nanorana genome offers an improved understanding of evolution of tetrapod genomes and also provides a genomic reference for other evolutionary studies.

  12. Using shape to turn off blinking for two-colour multiexciton emission in CdSe/CdS tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nimai; Orfield, Noah J.; Wang, Feng; Hu, Zhongjian; Krishnamurthy, Sachidananda; Malko, Anton V.; Casson, Joanna L.; Htoon, Han; Sykora, Milan; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.

    2017-05-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures capable of emitting from two excited states and thereby of producing two photoluminescence colours are of fundamental and potential technological significance. In this limited class of nanocrystals, CdSe/CdS core/arm tetrapods exhibit the unusual trait of two-colour (red and green) multiexcitonic emission, with green emission from the CdS arms emerging only at high excitation fluences. Here we show that by synthetic shape-tuning, both this multi-colour emission process, and blinking and photobleaching behaviours of single tetrapods can be controlled. Specifically, we find that the properties of dual emission and single-nanostructure photostability depend on different structural parameters--arm length and arm diameter, respectively--but that both properties can be realized in the same nanostructure. Furthermore, based on results of correlated photoluminescence and transient absorption measurements, we conclude that hole-trap filling in the arms and partial state-filling in the core are necessary preconditions for the observation of multiexciton multi-colour emission.

  13. First occurrence of tetrapod footprints from the continental Triassic of the Sidi Said Maachou area (Western Meseta, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hminna, Abdelkbir; Voigt, Sebastian; Klein, Hendrik; Saber, Hafid; Schneider, Jörg W.; Hmich, Driss

    2013-04-01

    The Sidi Said Maachou area in the Moroccan western Meseta preserves a succession, up to 400 m thick, of hitherto poorly studied continental Triassic deposits. Recent detailed geological mapping proposes a lithostratigraphic subdivision of the predominantly red-coloured siliciclastic deposits into three formations. Laminated mudstones and fine-grained sandstones in the upper part of the Oued Oum Er Rbiaa Formation have the most interesting fossil content including plant impressions, rhizoliths, fish scales, and invertebrate and vertebrate traces. These biogenic remains are partially associated with tool marks, microbially induced sedimentary structures, oscillation ripples, desiccation cracks, and halite pseudomorphs, suggesting sedimentation in a playa-like, fluvio-lacustrine system under semiarid conditions. All tetrapod footprints from these beds are assigned to Brachychirotherium parvum and indistinguishable from other occurrences of the ichnogenus in Central Europe and North America. Supposed trackmakers are archosaurs of the crocodile stem-group (Crurotarsi) that were widely spread over Triassic Pangaea. Because Brachychirotherium is only known from Late Triassic (Carnian-Rhaetian) deposits, the same age is attributed to the footprint horizon of the Oued Oum Er Rbiaa Formation. This is the first record of Brachychirotherium on the African continent and the first record of Triassic tetrapod footprints in Morocco outside of the High Atlas.

  14. Variation in enamel development of South African fossil hominids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Rozzi, Fernando Ramirez; Bromage, Timothy G

    2006-12-01

    Dental tissues provide important insights into aspects of hominid palaeobiology that are otherwise difficult to obtain from studies of the bony skeleton. Tooth enamel is formed by ameloblasts, which demonstrate daily secretory rhythms developing tissue-specific structures known as cross striations, and longer period markings called striae of Retzius. These enamel features were studied in the molars of two well known South African hominid species, Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus. Using newly developed portable confocal microscopy, we have obtained cross striation periodicities (number of cross striations between adjacent striae) for the largest sample of hominid teeth reported to date. These data indicate a mean periodicity of seven days in these small-bodied hominids. Important differences were observed in the inferred mechanisms of enamel development between these taxa. Ameloblasts maintain high rates of differentiation throughout cervical enamel development in P. robustus but not in A. africanus. In our sample, there were fewer lateral striae of Retzius in P. robustus than in A. africanus. In a molar of P. robustus, lateral enamel formed in a much shorter time than cuspal enamel, and the opposite was observed in two molars of A. africanus. In spite of the greater occlusal area and enamel thickness of the molars of both fossil species compared with modern humans, the total crown formation time of these three fossil molars was shorter than the corresponding tooth type in modern humans. Our results provide support for previous conclusions that molar crown formation time was short in Plio-Pleistocene hominids, and strongly suggest the presence of different mechanisms of amelogenesis, and thus tooth development, in these taxa.

  15. The Importance of Serine Phosphorylation of Ameloblastin on Enamel Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, P.; Yan, W.; Tian, Y.; He, J.; Brookes, S.J.; Wang, X.

    2016-01-01

    FAM20C is a newly identified kinase on the secretory pathway responsible for the phosphorylation of serine residues in the Ser-x-Glu/pSer motifs in several enamel matrix proteins. Fam20C-knockout mice showed severe enamel defects very similar to those in the ameloblastin (Ambn)–knockout mice, implying that phosphoserines may have a critical role in AMBN function. To test this hypothesis, we generated amelogenin (Amel) promoter-driven Ambn-transgenic mice, in which Ser48, Ser226, and Ser227 were replaced by aspartic acid (designated as D-Tg) or alanines (designated as A-Tg). The negative charge of aspartic acid is believed to be able to mimic the phosphorylation state of serine, while alanine is a commonly used residue to substitute serine due to their similar structure. Using Western immunoblotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the authors identified transgenic lines expressing transgenes somewhat higher (Tg+) or much higher (Tg++) than endogenous Ambn. The lower incisors collected from 7-d-old and 7-wk-old mice were analyzed by histology, scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and Western immunoblotting to examine the morphology and microstructure changes in enamel, as well as the expression pattern of enamel matrix proteins. The A-Tg+ and A-Tg++ mice displayed severe enamel defects in spite of the expression level of transgenes, while the D-Tg+ and D-Tg++ mice showed minor to mild enamel defects, indicating that the D-Tg transgenes disturbed enamel formation less than the A-Tg transgenes did. Our results suggest that the phosphorylation state of serines is likely an essential component for the integrity of AMBN function. PMID:27470066

  16. Enamel Regeneration in Making a Bioengineered Tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruoshi; Zhou, Yachuan; Zhang, Binpeng; Shen, Jiefei; Gao, Bo; Xu, Xin; Ye, Ling; Zheng, Liwei; Zhou, Xuedong

    2015-01-01

    Overall enamel is the hard tissue overlying teeth that is vulnerable to caries, congenital defects, and damage due to trauma. Not only is enamel incapable of self-repair in most species, but it is also subject to attrition. Besides the use of artificial materials to restore enamel, enamel regeneration is a promising approach to repair enamel damage. In order to comprehend the progression and challenges in tissue-engineered enamel, this article elaborates alternative stem cells potential for enamel secretion and expounds fined strategies for enamel regeneration in bioengineered teeth. Consequently, more and more cell types have been induced to differentiate into ameloblasts and to secrete enamel, and an increasing number of reports have emerged to provide various potential approaches to induce cells to secrete enamel based on recombination experiments, artificial bioactive nano-materials, or gene manipulation. Accordingly, it is expected to further project more optimal conditions for enamel formation in bioengineering based on a more thorough knowledge of reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, by which the procedures of enamel regeneration are able to be practically recapitulated and widely spread for the potential clinical value of enamel repair.

  17. Mechanisms of Local Stress Sensing in Multifunctional Polymer Films Using Fluorescent Tetrapod Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Shilpa N; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Wu, Siva; Ercius, Peter; Powers, Alexander; Olson, Andrew C K; Du, Daniel X; Lin, Liwei; Govindjee, Sanjay; Wang, Lin-Wang; Xu, Ting; Alivisatos, A Paul; Ritchie, Robert O

    2016-08-10

    Nanoscale stress-sensing can be used across fields ranging from detection of incipient cracks in structural mechanics to monitoring forces in biological tissues. We demonstrate how tetrapod quantum dots (tQDs) embedded in block copolymers act as sensors of tensile/compressive stress. Remarkably, tQDs can detect their own composite dispersion and mechanical properties with a switch in optomechanical response when tQDs are in direct contact. Using experimental characterizations, atomistic simulations and finite-element analyses, we show that under tensile stress, densely packed tQDs exhibit a photoluminescence peak shifted to higher energies ("blue-shift") due to volumetric compressive stress in their core; loosely packed tQDs exhibit a peak shifted to lower energies ("red-shift") from tensile stress in the core. The stress shifts result from the tQD's unique branched morphology in which the CdS arms act as antennas that amplify the stress in the CdSe core. Our nanocomposites exhibit excellent cyclability and scalability with no degraded properties of the host polymer. Colloidal tQDs allow sensing in many materials to potentially enable autoresponsive, smart structural nanocomposites that self-predict impending fracture.

  18. The axolotl limb blastema: cellular and molecular mechanisms driving blastema formation and limb regeneration in tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Catherine; Bryant, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The axolotl is one of the few tetrapods that are capable of regenerating complicated biological structures, such as complete limbs, throughout adulthood. Upon injury the axolotl generates a population of regeneration‐competent limb progenitor cells known as the blastema, which will grow, establish pattern, and differentiate into the missing limb structures. In this review we focus on the crucial early events that occur during wound healing, the neural−epithelial interactions that drive the formation of the early blastema, and how these mechanisms differ from those of other species that have restricted regenerative potential, such as humans. We also discuss how the presence of cells from the different axes of the limb is required for the continued growth and establishment of pattern in the blastema as described in the polar coordinate model, and how this positional information is reprogrammed in blastema cells during regeneration. Multiple cell types from the mature limb stump contribute to the blastema at different stages of regeneration, and we discuss the contribution of these types to the regenerate with reference to whether they are “pattern‐forming” or “pattern‐following” cells. Lastly, we explain how an engineering approach will help resolve unanswered questions in limb regeneration, with the goal of translating these concepts to developing better human regenerative therapies. PMID:27499868

  19. Facile synthesis of Cu/tetrapod-like ZnO whisker compounds with enhanced photocatalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Liu, Huarong; Fan, Ximei

    2017-09-01

    Cu/tetrapod-like ZnO whisker (T-ZnOw) compounds were successfully synthesized using N2H4 \\cdot H2O as a reducing agent by a simple reduction method without any insert gas at room temperature. The crystal phase composition and morphology of the as-prepared samples were investigated by XRD, SEM and FESEM tests. The photocatalytic property of the as-prepared samples was detected by the degradation of methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution under UV irradiation. It can be found that Cu nanoparticles (CuNPs) dispersed on the surface of T-ZnOw increased with the increasing of Cu/Zn molar ratios (Cu/Zn MRs), and an octahedral structure of CuNPs was obtained when the sample was prepared with less than and equal to 7.30% Cu/Zn MR, but tended to a spherical or nanorod structure of CuNPs densely arranged on the surface of T-ZnOw, which is prepared by Cu/Zn MRs up to 22.00%. All the compounds exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity in decomposing of MO than T-ZnOw, the photocatalytic property of the samples increased with the increasing of Cu/Zn MRs up to 7.30%, while it decreases when further increasing the Cu/Zn MRs. The Schottky barrier of the Cu/T-ZnOw compound can effectively capture photoinduced electrons from the interface and enhanced the photocatalytic property of T-ZnOw.

  20. Four flippers or two? Tetrapodal swimming with an aquatic robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, John H; Schumacher, Joseph; Livingston, Nicholas; Kemp, Mathieu

    2006-03-01

    To understand how to modulate the behavior of underwater swimmers propelled by multiple appendages, we conducted surge maneuver experiments on our biologically-inspired robot, Madeleine. Robot Madeleine is a self-contained, self-propelled underwater vehicle with onboard processor, sensors and power supply. Madeleine's four flippers, oscillating in pitch, can be independently controlled, allowing us to test the impact of flipper phase on performance. We tested eight gaits, four four-flippered and four two-flippered. Gaits were selected to vary the phase, at either 0 or pi rad, between flippers on one side, producing a fore-aft interaction, or flippers on opposite sides, producing a port-starboard interaction. During rapid starting, top-speed cruising, and powered stopping, the power draw, linear acceleration and position of Madeleine were measured. Four-flippered gaits produced higher peak start accelerations than two, but did so with added power draw. During cruising, peak speeds did not vary by flipper number, but power consumption was double in four flippers compared to that of two flippers. Cost of transport (J N(-1) m(-1)) was lower for two-flippered gaits and compares favorably with that of aquatic tetrapods. Two four-flippered gaits produce the highest surge scope, a measure of the difference in peak forward and reverse acceleration. Thus four flippers produce superior surge behavior but do so at high cost; two flippers serve well for lost-cost cruising.

  1. The role of enamel proteins in protecting mature human enamel against acidic environments: a double layer force spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarsky, Gennady V; D'Sa, Raechelle A; Deb, Sanjukta; Meenan, Brian J; Lemoine, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Characterisation of the electrostatic properties of dental enamel is important for understanding the interfacial processes that occur on a tooth surface and how these relate to the natural ability of our teeth to withstand chemical attack from the acids in many soft drinks. Whereas, the role of the mineral component of the tooth enamel in providing this resistance to acid erosion has been studied extensively, the influence of proteins that are also present within the structure is not well understood. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of double-layer force spectroscopy to directly measure electrostatic forces on as received and hydrazine-treated (deproteinated) enamel surfaces in solutions with different pH to determine how the enamel proteins influence acid erosion surface potential and surface charge of human dental enamel. The deproteination of the treated samples was confirmed by the loss of the amide bands (~1,300-1,700 cm(-1)) in the FTIR spectrum of the sample. The force characteristics observed were found to agree with the theory of electrical double layer interaction under the assumption of constant potential and allowed the surface charge per unit area to be determined for the two enamel surfaces. The values and, importantly, the sign of these adsorbed surface charges indicates that the protein content of dental enamel contributes significantly to the electrostatic double layer formation near the tooth surface and in doing so can buffer the apatite crystals against acid attack. Moreover, the electrostatic interactions within this layer are a driving factor for the mineral transfer from the tooth surface and the initial salivary pellicle formation.

  2. Middle-Upper Triassic and Middle Jurassic tetrapod track assemblages of southern Tunisia, Sahara Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedźwiedzki, Grzegorz; Soussi, Mohamed; Boukhalfa, Kamel; Gierliński, Gerard D.

    2017-05-01

    Three tetrapod track assemblages from the early-middle Mesozoic of southern Tunisia are reported. The strata exposed at the Tejra 2 clay-pit near the Medenine and Rehach site, located in the vicinity of Kirchaou, contain the first tetrapod tracks found in the Triassic of Tunisia. The Middle Jurassic (early Aalenian) dinosaur tracks are reported from the Mestaoua plain near Tataouine. In the Middle Triassic outcrop of the Tejra 2 clay-pit, tridactyl tracks of small and medium-sized dinosauromorphs, were discovered. These tracks represent the oldest evidence of dinosaur-lineage elements in the Triassic deposits of Tunisia. Similar tracks have been described from the Middle Triassic of Argentina, France and Morocco. An isolated set of the manus and pes of a quadrupedal tetrapod discovered in Late Triassic Rehach tracksite is referred to a therapsid tracemaker. The Middle Jurassic deposits of the Mestaoua plain reveal small and large tridactyl theropod dinosaur tracks (Theropoda track indet. A-C). Based on comparison with the abundant record of Triassic tetrapod ichnofossils from Europe and North America, the ichnofauna described here indicates the presence of a therapsid-dinosauromorph ichnoassociation (without typical Chirotheriidae tracks) in the Middle and Late Triassic, which sheds light on the dispersal of the Middle-Upper Triassic tetrapod ichnofaunas in this part of Gondwana. The reported Middle Jurassic ichnofauna show close similarities to dinosaur track assemblages from the Lower and Middle Jurassic of northwestern Africa, North America, Europe and also southeastern Asia. Sedimentological and lithostratigraphic data of each new tracksite have been defined on published data and new observations. Taken together, these discoveries present a tantalizing window into the evolutionary history of tetrapods from the Triassic and Jurassic of southern Tunisia. Given the limited early Mesozoic tetrapod record from the region, these discoveries are of both temporal and

  3. Enamel cracks. The role of enamel lamellae in caries initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B N; Makinson, O F; Peters, M C

    1998-04-01

    Lamellae or cracks are distributed throughout tooth enamel in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. While earlier authors postulated that lamellae may be pathways of entry for caries, no evidence was adduced and the theory appears to have been discounted. The present study seeks to show that, at least in some cases, lamellae are permeable to dyes, may be associated with caries initiated in the dentine, supporting the hypothesis of Hardwick and Manly of lamellae penetration by Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli. The enamel lamellae are shown to be a permeable pathway allowing caries-producing bacteria access to the dentine-enamel junction. Caries can thus be established within the tooth without visible evidence at the surface.

  4. Enamel hypoplasia: A restorative approach (Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahriah Usman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental defect of the enamel that is produced by a disturbance in the formation of the organic enamel matrix, clinically visible as enamel defects on the tooth’s surface which resulted  in a decrease  of enamel quantity. This condition, not only cause tooth become more sensitive but also affect the aesthetic result of the defect. Enamel hypoplasia can be corrected with a variety of treatment options, one of them is porcelain veneer treatment. Porcelain veneer restorations can  rehabilitate aesthetic and functional. A 19 years woman, complained premolar discolored since several years ago. Preparation of porcelain veneers in the tooth with enamel hypoplasia. The purpose of this case report is to rehabilitated the aesthetic of enamel hypoplasia with indirect veneer restoration.

  5. Amelogenesis Imperfect, Enamel Hypoplasia and Fluorosis Dental - Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Magnani Bevilacqua

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The developmental disorders of enamel are abnormalities of structure which can affect both dentitions. These abnormalities include amelogenesis imperfecta, enamel hypoplasia and dental fluorosis. The amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary change and enamel hypoplasia is a quantitative defect of enamel that occurs as a result of systemic problems, local and also inherited factors, or even the combination of them. Dental fluorosis is a hypoplasia caused by the chronic ingestion of fluoride during odontogenesis. All these anomalies have similar clinical characteristics, and it is necessary to be careful in their assessment. It is extremely important to know these abnormalities to establish a differential diagnosis and, consequently, a treatment plan, which can be set for each situation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to review the literature regarding these three anomalies: amelogenesis imperfecta, enamel hypoplasia and dental fluorosis. It was concluded that to establish the differential diagnosis of these abnormalities as well as a proper treatment plan, it is indispensable the professional knowledge associated with the clinical examination. The examination has to consist of medical history and physical examination, and in some cases, x-ray examination.

  6. Intravesicular Phosphatase PHOSPHO1 Function in Enamel Mineralization and Prism Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirali Pandya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The transport of mineral ions from the enamel organ-associated blood vessels to the developing enamel crystals involves complex cargo packaging and carriage mechanisms across several cell layers, including the ameloblast layer and the stratum intermedium. Previous studies have established PHOSPHO1 as a matrix vesicle membrane-associated phosphatase that interacts with matrix vesicles molecules phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine to initiate apatite crystal formation inside of matrix vesicles in bone. In the present study, we sought to determine the function of Phospho1 during amelogenesis. PHOSPHO1 protein localization during amelogenesis was verified using immunohistochemistry, with positive signals in the enamel layer, ameloblast Tomes' processes, and in the walls of ameloblast secretory vesicles. These ameloblast secretory vesicle walls were also labeled for amelogenin and the exosomal protein marker HSP70 using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, PHOSPHO1 presence in the enamel organ was confirmed by Western blot. Phospho1−/− mice lacked sharp incisal tips, featured a significant 25% increase in total enamel volume, and demonstrated a significant 2-fold reduction in silver grain density of von Kossa stained ground sections indicative of reduced mineralization in the enamel layer when compared to wild-type mice (p < 0.001. Scanning electron micrographs of Phospho1−/− mouse enamel revealed a loss of the prominent enamel prism “picket fence” structure, a loss of parallel crystal organization within prisms, and a 1.56-fold increase in enamel prism width (p < 0.0001. Finally, EDS elemental analysis demonstrated a significant decrease in phosphate incorporation in the enamel layer when compared to controls (p < 0.05. Together, these data establish that the matrix vesicle membrane-associated phosphatase PHOSPHO1 is essential for physiological enamel mineralization. Our findings also suggest that intracellular ameloblast secretory

  7. Metabolism and Calcification of Bovine Tooth Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    高木, 亨; 田上, 順次; 中村, 聡; Tohru, Takagi; Junji, TAGAMI; Satoshi, Nakamura; 東京医科歯科大学歯学部 生化学講座; 東京医科歯科大学歯学部 歯科保存学第1講座; 東京医科歯科大学歯学部 医用器材研究所; Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Dentistry Tokyo Medical and Dental University; Department of Operative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry Tokyo Medical and Dental University; Institute of Medical and Dental Engineering, Faculty of Dentistry Tokyo Medical and Dental University

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mineralization mechanism in developing enamel using pH staining. Unerupted bovine teeth were used for the expriment. The activity of a proteolytic enzyme was evaluated against enamel protein obtainedfrom bovine enamel. Crystals in developing enamel, which were classlfied into neutral zone 1 and 2, acid zone 1 and 2, were investigated using infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and power X-ray diffractometry. Proteolytic enzyme showed the hig...

  8. Enamel microabrasion: new considerations in 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P; Segura, A; Donly, K J

    1993-10-01

    Enamel microabrasion is used to eliminate superficial enamel discoloration defects. This article presents a comprehensive review of the enamel microabrasion method and its results. Current technique and materials are described and six cases are used to illustrate various aspects of the procedure. The learning objective of this article is to familiarize the reader with the state-of-the-art of enamel microabrasion and to report the latest laboratory research in the field.

  9. The pelvic fin and girdle of Panderichthys and the origin of tetrapod locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Catherine A

    2005-12-22

    One of the most marked transformations in the vertebrate transition to land was that of fins to limbs. This transformation involved not only the generation of morphological novelties (digits, sacrum) but also a shift in locomotory dominance from the pectoral to the pelvic appendage. Despite its importance, the transformation from pelvic fin to hindlimb is the least studied and least well-documented part of this transformation, which is bracketed by the osteolepiform Eusthenopteron and the early tetrapods Ichthyostega and Acanthostega, but is not directly illuminated by any intermediate form. Panderichthys is the closest tetrapod relative currently represented by complete fossils, but its pelvic fin skeleton has not been described. Here, I present the only known articulated pelvic fin endoskeleton and associated partial pelvis of Panderichthys. The pelvic girdle is even less tetrapod-like than that of the osteolepiform Eusthenopteron, but the pelvic fin endoskeleton shares derived characteristics with basal tetrapods despite being more primitive than the pectoral fin of Panderichthys. The evolution of tetrapod locomotion appears to have passed through a stage of body-flexion propulsion, in which the pelvic fins played a relatively minor anchoring part, before the emergence of hindlimb-powered propulsion in the interval between Panderichthys and Acanthostega.

  10. Bone strain magnitude is correlated with bone strain rate in tetrapods: implications for models of mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, B R; Iriarte-Diaz, J; Blob, R W; Butcher, M T; Carrano, M T; Espinoza, N R; Main, R P; Ross, C F

    2015-07-07

    Hypotheses suggest that structural integrity of vertebrate bones is maintained by controlling bone strain magnitude via adaptive modelling in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased tissue-level strain magnitude and rate have both been identified as potent stimuli leading to increased bone formation. Mechanotransduction models hypothesize that osteocytes sense bone deformation by detecting fluid flow-induced drag in the bone's lacunar-canalicular porosity. This model suggests that the osteocyte's intracellular response depends on fluid-flow rate, a product of bone strain rate and gradient, but does not provide a mechanism for detection of strain magnitude. Such a mechanism is necessary for bone modelling to adapt to loads, because strain magnitude is an important determinant of skeletal fracture. Using strain gauge data from the limb bones of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, we identified strong correlations between strain rate and magnitude across clades employing diverse locomotor styles and degrees of rhythmicity. The breadth of our sample suggests that this pattern is likely to be a common feature of tetrapod bone loading. Moreover, finding that bone strain magnitude is encoded in strain rate at the tissue level is consistent with the hypothesis that it might be encoded in fluid-flow rate at the cellular level, facilitating bone adaptation via mechanotransduction. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation Of The Effect Of Different Methods Of Microabrasion And Polishing On Surface Roughness Of Dental Enamel.

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoldo, Carlos; Lima, Debora; Fragoso, Larissa; Ambrosano, Glaucia; Aguiar, Flavio; Lovadino, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Description of the Technique: The microabrasion technique of enamel consists of selectively abrading the discolored areas or causing superficial structural changes in a selective way. Objective: In microabrasion technique, abrasive products associated with acids are used, and the evaluation of enamel roughness after this treatment, as well as surface polishing, is necessary. This in-vitro study evaluated the enamel roughness after microabrasion, followed by different polishing techniques...

  12. Enamel ultrastructure in fossil cetaceans (Cetacea: Archaeoceti and Odontoceti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Carolina; Kieser, Jules A; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2015-01-01

    The transition from terrestrial ancestry to a fully pelagic life profoundly altered the body systems of cetaceans, with extreme morphological changes in the skull and feeding apparatus. The Oligocene Epoch was a crucial time in the evolution of cetaceans when the ancestors of modern whales and dolphins (Neoceti) underwent major diversification, but details of dental structure and evolution are poorly known for the archaeocete-neocete transition. We report the morphology of teeth and ultrastructure of enamel in archaeocetes, and fossil platanistoids and delphinoids, ranging from late Oligocene (Waitaki Valley, New Zealand) to Pliocene (Caldera, Chile). Teeth were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned in cross and longitudinal planes, polished, etched, and coated with gold palladium for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. SEM images showed that in archaeocetes, squalodontids and Prosqualodon (taxa with heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont teeth), the inner enamel was organized in Hunter-Schreger bands (HSB) with an outer layer of radial enamel. This is a common pattern in most large-bodied mammals and it is regarded as a biomechanical adaptation related to food processing and crack resistance. Fossil Otekaikea sp. and delphinoids, which were polydont and homodont, showed a simpler structure, with inner radial and outer prismless enamel. Radial enamel is regarded as more wear-resistant and has been retained in several mammalian taxa in which opposing tooth surfaces slide over each other. These observations suggest that the transition from a heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont dentition in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to homodont and polydont teeth in crownward odontocetes, was also linked to a marked simplification in the enamel Schmelzmuster. These patterns probably reflect functional shifts in food processing from shear-and-mastication in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to pierce-and-grasp occlusion in crownward odontocetes, with

  13. Enamel ultrastructure in fossil cetaceans (Cetacea: Archaeoceti and Odontoceti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Loch

    Full Text Available The transition from terrestrial ancestry to a fully pelagic life profoundly altered the body systems of cetaceans, with extreme morphological changes in the skull and feeding apparatus. The Oligocene Epoch was a crucial time in the evolution of cetaceans when the ancestors of modern whales and dolphins (Neoceti underwent major diversification, but details of dental structure and evolution are poorly known for the archaeocete-neocete transition. We report the morphology of teeth and ultrastructure of enamel in archaeocetes, and fossil platanistoids and delphinoids, ranging from late Oligocene (Waitaki Valley, New Zealand to Pliocene (Caldera, Chile. Teeth were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned in cross and longitudinal planes, polished, etched, and coated with gold palladium for scanning electron microscopy (SEM observation. SEM images showed that in archaeocetes, squalodontids and Prosqualodon (taxa with heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont teeth, the inner enamel was organized in Hunter-Schreger bands (HSB with an outer layer of radial enamel. This is a common pattern in most large-bodied mammals and it is regarded as a biomechanical adaptation related to food processing and crack resistance. Fossil Otekaikea sp. and delphinoids, which were polydont and homodont, showed a simpler structure, with inner radial and outer prismless enamel. Radial enamel is regarded as more wear-resistant and has been retained in several mammalian taxa in which opposing tooth surfaces slide over each other. These observations suggest that the transition from a heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont dentition in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to homodont and polydont teeth in crownward odontocetes, was also linked to a marked simplification in the enamel Schmelzmuster. These patterns probably reflect functional shifts in food processing from shear-and-mastication in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to pierce-and-grasp occlusion in crownward

  14. Recovery of crystallographic texture in remineralized dental enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samera Siddiqui

    Full Text Available Dental caries is the most prevalent disease encountered by people of all ages around the world. Chemical changes occurring in the oral environment during the caries process alter the crystallography and microstructure of dental enamel resulting in loss of mechanical function. Little is known about the crystallographic effects of demineralization and remineralization. The motivation for this study was to develop understanding of the caries process at the crystallographic level in order to contribute towards a long term solution. In this study synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning electron microscopy and scanning microradiography have been used to correlate enamel crystallography, microstructure and mineral concentration respectively in enamel affected by natural caries and following artificial demineralization and remineralization regimes. In particular, the extent of destruction and re-formation of this complex structure has been measured. 2D diffraction patterns collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture and position of the (002 Bragg reflection within selected regions of interest in each tooth slice, and then correlated with the microstructure and local mineral mass. The results revealed that caries and artificial demineralization cause a large reduction in crystallographic texture which is coupled with the loss of mineral mass. Remineralization restores the texture to the original level seen in healthy enamel and restores mineral density. The results also showed that remineralization promotes ordered formation of new crystallites and growth of pre-existing crystallites which match the preferred orientation of healthy enamel. Combining microstructural and crystallographic characterization aids the understanding of caries and erosion processes and assists in the progress towards developing therapeutic treatments to allow affected

  15. Hydroxyapatite-anchored dendrimer for in situ remineralization of human tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Duo; Yang, Jiaojiao; Li, Jiyao; Chen, Liang; Tang, Bei; Chen, Xingyu; Wu, Wei; Li, Jianshu

    2013-07-01

    In situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite (HA) on human tooth enamel surface induced by organic matrices is of great interest in the fields of material science and stomatology. In order to mimic the organic matrices induced biomineralization process in developing enamel and enhance the binding strength at the remineralization interface, carboxyl-terminated poly(amido amine) (PAMAM-COOH)-alendronate (ALN) conjugate (ALN-PAMAM-COOH) was synthesized and characterized. PAMAM-COOH has a highly ordered architecture and is capable of promoting the HA crystallization process. ALN is conjugated on PAMAM-COOH due to its specific adsorption on HA (the main component of tooth enamel), resulting in increased binding strength which is tight enough to resist phosphate buffered saline (PBS) rinsing as compared with that of PAMAM-COOH alone. While incubated in artificial saliva, ALN-PAMAM-COOH could induce in situ remineralization of HA on acid-etched enamel, and the regenerated HA has the nanorod-like crystal structure similar to that of human tooth enamel. The hardness of acid-etched enamel samples treated by ALN-PAMAM-COOH can recover up to 95.5% of the original value with strong adhesion force. In vivo experiment also demonstrates that ALN-PAMAM-COOH is effective in repairing acid-etched enamel in the oral cavity. Overall, these results suggest that ALN-PAMAM-COOH is highly promising as a restorative biomaterial for in situ remineralization of human tooth enamel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enamel microabrasion: a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P; Helpin, M L

    2000-01-01

    Enamel microabrasion is a proven method of removing superficial intrinsic enamel discoloration defects. The method is safe, easily performed, and causes no discomfort for the patient. A new commercially available microabrasion system has been introduced by Ultradent Products Inc. In addition, a new tooth isolation material is available, along with a visible light-activated in-office hydrogen peroxide solution. This article describes these new products and documents tooth-color correction for two young patients using this new tooth-color correction approach.

  17. [Elemental analytical and quantitative morphometric determination of the synthetic resin residues and enamel avulsion after the removal of metal brackets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppenthal, T; Stratmann, U; Sergl, H G; Czech, D

    1992-04-01

    A number of clinical and experimental studies were performed to assess the quality of the enamel-adhesive-bracket bond. The aim was to present a combined method that enables the investigator both to examine the surface of metal brackets quantitative-morphometrically and to detect the presence of enamel particles. To this end, 38 metal brackets were examined in the scanning electron microscope. An EDAX-detecting unit was used to analyze morphologically conspicuous structures and identified them as enamel particles. The extent of adhesive remnants and enamel particles was quantified using the image analysis system IBAS. In 24 brackets (53%) bonding adhesive residue was found on the bracket base. In 18 brackets (47%) enamel particles were identified on the adhesive-bearing brackets. This method is easier to carry out and enables a more accurate quantification of enamel particles than the Adhesive Remnant Index. Since it can be applied universally to examine recommended improvements to adhesive technique, it facilitates their assessment.

  18. Wear of human enamel opposing monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, and composite resin: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripetchdanond, Jeerapa; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2014-11-01

    Demand is increasing for ceramic and composite resin posterior restorations. However, ceramics are recognized for their high abrasiveness to opposing dental structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear of enamel as opposed to dental ceramics and composite resin. Twenty-four test specimens (antagonists), 6 each of monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, composite resin, and enamel, were prepared into cylindrical rods. Enamel specimens were prepared from 24 extracted human permanent molar teeth. Enamel specimens were abraded against each type of antagonist with a pin-on-disk wear tester under a constant load of 25 N at 20 rpm for 4800 cycles. The maximum depth of wear (Dmax), mean depth of wear (Da), and mean surface roughness (Ra) of the enamel specimens were measured with a profilometer. All data were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA, followed by the Tukey test (α=.05). A paired t test was used to compare the Ra of enamel at baseline and after testing. The wear of both the enamel and antagonists was evaluated qualitatively with scanning electron microscopic images. No significant differences were found in enamel wear depth (Dmax, Da) between monolithic zirconia (2.17 ±0.80, 1.83 ±0.75 μm) and composite resin (1.70 ±0.92, 1.37 ±0.81 μm) or between glass ceramic (8.54 ±2.31, 7.32 ±2.06 μm) and enamel (10.72 ±6.31, 8.81 ±5.16 μm). Significant differences were found when the enamel wear depth caused by monolithic zirconia and composite resin was compared with that of glass ceramic and enamel (Pglass ceramic, and enamel (Pglass ceramic and enamel. All test materials except composite resin similarly increased the enamel surface roughness after wear testing. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of CO2 laser irradiation on tooth enamel coated with biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Julie; Featherstone, John D B; Le, Charles Q; Steinberg, Doron; Feuerstein, Osnat

    2014-03-01

    CO2 laser irradiation of tooth enamel can inhibit demineralization of tooth enamel, by changing enamel composition and resistance to acid attack. The aim of this work was to examine these effects of CO2 laser irradiation on enamel covered by biofilm. Streptococcus mutans was grown on bovine enamel surfaces for 48 hours to form a mature biofilm. Samples were irradiated by CO2 laser (wavelength of 10.6 µm) at a power of 0.08 W in a super-pulse mode for 1 second and 24 pulses/second, with an energy density of 0.77 J/cm(2) per pulse. Untreated controls and laser treated samples with and without biofilm were examined for the morphology of the biofilm and the enamel surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Structural biofilm viability was assessed using confocal laser scanning microscopy with live/dead staining. The biofilm was removed in a sonication water bath and the non-treated and irradiated enamel samples were chemically analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Irradiated samples showed a melt zone with micro-cracks in the center of the irradiating beam position, which was smaller when irradiated enamel was covered by biofilm. Confocal microscopy images demonstrated higher proportion of dead bacteria at the margins of the irradiated spot area, while at the spot center the bacteria were evaporated exposing the enamel surface to direct laser irradiation. EDS analysis showed an increase in Ca/P ratio after irradiation of enamel covered with biofilm. FTIR analysis showed an approximately 40% carbonate loss in the irradiated enamel samples, including those with biofilms. Biofilms protect enamel surfaces from possible morphological irradiation damage without interfering with the resultant chemical changes that may increase the enamel resistance to acid attack. Therefore, under certain exposure regimens that are thermally and mechanically safe for enamel, CO2 laser irradiation of

  20. Hierarchical microcrack model for materials exemplified at enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcoban, H; Yilmaz, E D; Schneider, G A

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates the mechanical properties of a material with hierarchically arranged microcracks. Hierarchically structured biomaterials such as enamel exhibit superior mechanical properties as being stiff and damage tolerant at the same time. The common mechanical explanation for this behavior is based on the hierarchically structured arrangement of hard minerals and soft organics and their cooperative deformation mechanisms. In situ mechanical experiments with mm-sized bovine enamel bending bars an scanning electron microscope reveal that enamel is able to withstand mechanical loading even if it contains microcracks on different lengths scales. To clarify this issue an analytical hierarchical microcrack model of non-interacting cracks is presented. The model predicts a decrease of the elastic modulus and the fracture strength with increasing levels of hierarchy. The fracture strain on the other hand may decrease or increase with the number of hierarchical levels, depending on the microcrack density. This simple hierarchical microcrack model is able to explain already published experiments with focused ion beam prepared μm-sized enamel cantilevers on different hierarchical levels. In addition it is shown that microcracking during loading in hierarchical materials may lead to substantial pseudoplastic behavior. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Basis of Human Enamel Defects

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    Chatzopoulos Georgios

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During eruption of teeth in the oral cavity, the effect of gene variations and environmental factors can result in morphological and structural changes in teeth. Amelogenesis imperfecta is a failure which is detected on the enamel of the teeth and clinical picture varies by the severity and type of the disease. Classification of the types of amelogenesis imperfecta is determined by histological, genetic, clinical and radiographic criteria. Specifically, there are 4 types of amelogenesis imperfecta (according to Witkop: hypoplastic form, hypo-maturation form, hypo-calcified form, and hypo-maturation/hypoplasia form with taurodontism and 14 subcategories. The diagnosis and classification of amelogenesis imperfecta has traditionally been based on clinical presentation or phenotype and the inheritance pattern. Several genes can be mutated and cause the disease. Millions of genes, possibly more than 10,000 genes produce proteins that regulate synthesis of enamel. Some of the genes and gene products that are likely associated with amelogenesis imperfecta are: amelogenin (AMELX, AMELY genes, ameloblastin (AMBN gene, enamelin (ENAM gene, enamelysin (MMP20 gene, kalikryn 4 (KLK 4 gene, tuftelins (Tuftelin gene, FAM83H (FAM83H gene and WDR72 (WDR72 gene. Particular attention should be given by the dentist in recognition and correlation of phenotypes with genotypes, in order to diagnose quickly and accurately such a possible disease and to prevent or treat it easily and quickly. Modern dentistry should restore these lesions in order to guarantee aesthetics and functionality, usually in collaboration with a group of dentists.

  2. Size, shape, and internal atomic ordering of nanocrystals by atomic pair distribution functions: a comparative study of gamma-Fe2O3 nanosized spheres and tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Valeri; Cozzoli, P Davide; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Cingolani, Roberto; Ren, Yang

    2009-10-14

    Due to their limited length of structural coherence nanocrystalline materials show very diffuse powder X-ray diffraction patterns that are difficult to interpret unambiguously. We demonstrate that a combination of high-energy X-ray powder diffraction and atomic pair distribution function analysis can be used to both assess the geometry (i.e., size and shape) and determine the internal atomic ordering of nanocrystalline materials in a straightforward way. As an example we consider cubic gamma-Fe(2)O(3) nanosized crystals shaped as spheres and tetrapods.

  3. Optical spectroscopy study of transparent noncarious human dentin and dentin-enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros G.; Balooch, Mehdi; Marshall, Grayson W.; Marshall, Sally J.; Gallagher, R. R.

    2000-03-01

    Improving our knowledge of the morphology, composition and properties of the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) is vital for the development of improved restorative materials and clinical placement techniques. Most studies of dental tissues have used light microscopy for characterization. In our investigation, the spectroscopic properties of normal and non-carious transparent human root dentin, and the dentin-enamel junction were investigated using emission imaging microscopy, and micro-spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal new information on the structural and biochemical characteristics of these dental tissues.

  4. Optical Spectroscopy Study of Transparent Non-Carious Human Dentin and Dentin-Enamel Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.W.; Marshall, S.J.; Gallagher, R.R.; Demos, S.

    1999-12-14

    Improving our knowledge of the morphology, composition and properties of the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) is vital for the development of improved restorative materials and clinical placement techniques. Most studies of dental tissues have used light microscopy for characterization. In our investigation, the spectroscopic properties of normal and non-carious transparent human root dentin, and the dentin-enamel junction were investigated using emission imaging microscopy, and micro-spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal new information on the structural and biochemical characteristics of these dental tissues.

  5. A minimally invasive procedure for esthetic achievement: enamel microabrasion of fluorosis stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Karen Muller; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Rocha, Rodney Garcia; Aranha, Ana Cecilia Correa

    2010-01-01

    Esthetic alterations (such as fluorosis) that result from intrinsic dental staining in enamel and dentin can be controlled or softened by noninvasive methods such as dental bleaching or enamel microabrasion. Part of the enamel is removed during microabrasion; however, this wear is clinically insignificant and does not harm the dental structure. This article presents a case in which the microabrasion technique was used to remove fluorosis staining. Based on the results of this case report, it can be concluded that this technique is efficient and can be considered a minimally invasive procedure.

  6. Identification of amelotin- and ODAM-interacting enamel matrix proteins using the yeast two-hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcroft, James; Ganss, Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    The formation of dental enamel is a prototype of functional tissue development through biomineralization. Amelotin (AMTN) is a recently discovered secreted enamel protein predominantly expressed during the maturation stage of enamel formation. It accumulates in a basal lamina-like structure at the interface between ameloblasts and enamel mineral and it co-localizes with another recently described enamel protein, odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM). The purpose of this study was to determine whether AMTN and ODAM bind to each other and/or to other well-established enamel matrix proteins. The coding sequences of all enamel proteins were cloned into appropriate vectors of the GAL4-based Matchmaker Gold Yeast Two-Hybrid System. The growth of yeast cells on selective media and color induction were used as indicators for reporter gene expression through protein-protein interactions in combinations of prey and bait constructs. We found that AMTN interacts with itself and with ODAM, but not with amelogenin (AMEL), ameloblastin (AMBN), or enamelin (ENAM). Using ODAM as bait, the interaction with AMTN was confirmed. Furthermore, ODAM was found to bind to itself and to AMBN, as well as weakly to AMEL but not to ENAM. We propose a model where the distinct expression of AMTN and ODAM and their interaction are involved in defining the enamel microstructure at the enamel surface. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  7. Sequestered defensive toxins in tetrapod vertebrates: principles, patterns, and prospects for future studies

    OpenAIRE

    Savitzky, Alan H.; Mori, Akira; Hutchinson, Deborah A.; Saporito, Ralph A.; Burghardt, Gordon M.; Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Meinwald, Jerrold

    2012-01-01

    Chemical defenses are widespread among animals, and the compounds involved may be either synthesized from nontoxic precursors or sequestered from an environmental source. Defensive sequestration has been studied extensively among invertebrates, but relatively few examples have been documented among vertebrates. Nonetheless, the number of described cases of defensive sequestration in tetrapod vertebrates has increased recently and includes diverse lineages of amphibians and reptiles (including...

  8. Lopingian tetrapod footprints from the Venetian Prealps, Italy: New discoveries in a largely incomplete panorama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Marchetti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available After new studies were carried out in the Lopingian Val Gardena Sandstone of northern Italy, in the Recoaro area (Venetian Prealps, NE Italy, the following tetrapod ichnotaxa are identified: cf. Capitosauroides isp., cf. Merifontichnus isp., Pachypes isp., Paradoxichnium isp., and Rynchosauroides isp., probably corresponding to ?parareptile, captorhinid eureptile, pareiasaurid parareptile, archosauromorph neodiapsid, and lacertoid neodiapsid trackmakers, respectively. An undetermined track shows features consistent with possible therapsid producers. These are the first possible records of Merifontichnus and Capitosauroides in the Lopingian (late Permian and one of the few records of Paradoxichnium worldwide. The paleoecology of the ichnoassociation highlights a relatively high diversity in the floodplain lithofacies, a monospecific association of Rhynchosauroides in distal floodplain/sabkha environments and the occurrence of Paradoxichnium isp. and cf. Capitosauroides only in the lagoon lithofacies, suggesting different habits of the trackmakers. The tetrapod ichnoassociation is characterized by eureptile and parareptile tracks, and differs from the classic Lopingian tetrapod ichnoassociation of the Dolomites mainly because of the absence of chirotheriid and small parareptile ichnotaxa. A comparison of the Italian tetrapod ichnoassociation with other Lopingian non-eolian ichnofaunas suggests a possible preference for marginal marine settings by the archosauromorph and therapsid trackmakers at low-latitudes of Pangaea.

  9. Evolutionary redefinition of immunoglobulin light chain isotypes in tetrapods using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabyasachi; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Klein, Jan; Nei, Masatoshi

    2008-10-28

    The phylogenetic relationships of Ig light chain (IGL) genes are difficult to resolve, because these genes are short and evolve relatively fast. Here, we classify the IGL sequences from 12 tetrapod species into three distinct groups (kappa, lambda, and sigma isotypes) using conserved amino acid residues, recombination signal sequences, and genomic organization of IGL genes as cladistic markers. From the distribution of the markers we conclude that the earliest extant tetrapods, the amphibians, possess three IGL isotypes: kappa, lambda, and sigma. Of these, two (kappa and lambda) are also found in reptiles and some mammals. The lambda isotype is found in all tetrapods tested to date, whereas the kappa isotype seems to have been lost at least in some birds and in the microbat. Conservation of the cladistic molecular markers suggests that they are associated with functional specialization of the three IGL isotypes. The genomic maps of IGL loci reveal multiple gene rearrangements that occurred in the evolution of tetrapod species. These rearrangements have resulted in interspecific variation of the genomic lengths of the IGL loci and the number and order of IGL constituent genes, but the overall organization of the IGL loci has not changed.

  10. Effect of different dental ceramic systems on the wear of human enamel: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandparsa, Roya; El Huni, Rabie M; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Johnson, Marc I

    2016-02-01

    The wear of tooth structure opposing different advanced dental ceramic systems requires investigation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the wear of advanced ceramic systems against human enamel antagonists. Four ceramic systems (IPS e.max Press, IPS e.max CAD, Noritake Super Porcelain EX-3, and LAVA Plus Zirconia) and 1 control group containing human enamel specimens were used in this study (n = 12). All specimens were fabricated as disks 11 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick. The mesiopalatal cusps of the maxillary third molars were prepared to serve as the enamel styluses. All specimens were embedded individually in 25 mm(3) autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks. Wear was measured with a cyclic loading machine and a newly designed wear simulator. All enamel styluses (cusps) were scanned using the Activity 880 digital scanner (SmartOptics). Data from the base line and follow-up scans were collected and compared with Qualify 2012 3-dimensional (3D) and 2D digital inspection software (Geomagic), which aligned the models and detected the geometric changes and the wear caused by the antagonist specimen. One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the collected data. After 125,000 bidirectional loading cycles, the mean loss of opposing enamel volume for the enamel disks in the control group was 37.08 μm(3), the lowest mean value for IPS e.max Press system was 39.75 μm(3); 40.58 μm(3) for IPS e.max CAD; 45.08 μm(3) for Noritake Super Porcelain EX-3 system; and 48.66 μm(3) for the Lava Plus Zirconia system. No statically significant differences were found among the groups in opposing enamel volume loss (P=.225) or opposing enamel height loss (P=.149). In terms of opposing enamel height loss, Lava Plus Zirconia system showed the lowest mean value of 27.5 μm. The mean value for the IPS e.max CAD system was 27.91 μm; 29.08 μm for the control enamel; 33.25 μm for the IPS e.max Press system; and 34.75 μm for the Noritake Super Porcelain EX-3 system. Within the

  11. Hexahedrally based crystals in human tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaka, T; Debari, K; Abe, M

    1992-01-01

    Mg-containing calcium phosphate crystals including pseudocuboidal, rhombohedral shapes and groupings of quadrangular blades cubically arranged were found in human tooth enamel by scanning electron microscopy and by electron probe microanalysis. In caries-free old enamel, these hexahedrally based crystals measuring 0.5-2.5 microns in length were observed in some crevices of tufts and lamellae. The crystals were rarely seen in the inner crevices of caries-free exfoliated deciduous enamel and none could be seen in sound young enamel. In brown-coloured old enamel possessing arrested caries with lamellae, some of the lamellae contained crystals measuring 0.1-1.5 mu in length adjacent to half-dissolved prisms. These crystals, identified as Mg-containing whitlockite, will grow during a long period after eruption of the tooth or during the enamel caries process.

  12. Diabetes detrimental effects on enamel and dentine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbassy, M A; Watari, I; Bakry, A S; Hamba, H; Hassan, Ali H; Tagami, J; Ono, T

    2015-05-01

    Understanding morphological changes and mineral content of tooth hard tissues may influence dental treatment. In this study, the effect of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) on tooth structure was examined. Experimental T1DM was induced in 3-week old male Wistar rats (n=10) by a single dose of 60mg/kg body weight of Streprozotocin. All rats were injected with calcein twice during the experiment and sacrificed at the age of 7 weeks old. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) was used to determine the mineral density and thickness of enamel and dentine. Also, a histomorphometery study was conducted to detect the rates of dentine mineral apposition and formation. The examined area was in the crown analogue of the rat mandibular incisor parallel to the long axis of the mesial surface of the first molar. All results were compared using Students' t-test (penamel and dentine thickness were significantly reduced (hypoplasia) and there was a significant reduction of the rate of dentine mineral apposition and formation, while there was no significant effect of the T1DM condition on the mineral density of enamel and dentine. T1DM has a detrimental influence on the formation of enamel and dentine in the early growth stage. T1DM condition may alter treatment planning of orthodontic treatment as it is associated with decreased enamel and dentin thickness that may affect teeth size and their resistance to caries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Enamel organ proteins as targets for antibodies in celiac disease: implications for oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sóñora, Cecilia; Arbildi, Paula; Rodríguez-Camejo, Claudio; Beovide, Verónica; Marco, Alicia; Hernández, Ana

    2016-02-01

    Enamel defects in permanent and deciduous teeth may be oral manifestations of celiac disease. Sometimes they are the only sign that points to this underdiagnosed autoimmune pathology. However, the etiology of these specific enamel defects remains unknown. Based on previously reported cross-reactivity of antibodies to gliadin with the enamel proteins, amelogenin and ameloblastin, we analyzed (using immunohistochemistry) the ability of anti-gliadin IgG, produced during untreated disease, to recognize enamel organ structures. We used swine germ teeth as a tissue model because they are highly homologous to human teeth in terms of proteins and development biology. Strong staining of the enamel matrix and of the layer of ameloblasts was observed with serum samples from women with celiac disease; high IgG reactivity was found against both gliadin peptides and enamel matrix protein extract, but there was no IgG reactivity against tissue antigens. In line with these findings, the gamma globulin fraction from gliadin-immunized BALB/c mice showed a similar staining pattern to that of amelogenin-specific staining. These results strongly suggest a pathological role for antibodies to gliadin in enamel defect dentition for both deciduous and permanent teeth, considering that IgG can be transported through the placenta during fetal tooth development. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  14. Near-Stasis in the Long-Term Diversification of Mesozoic Tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Roger B J; Butler, Richard J; Alroy, John; Mannion, Philip D; Carrano, Matthew T; Lloyd, Graeme T

    2016-01-01

    How did evolution generate the extraordinary diversity of vertebrates on land? Zero species are known prior to ~380 million years ago, and more than 30,000 are present today. An expansionist model suggests this was achieved by large and unbounded increases, leading to substantially greater diversity in the present than at any time in the geological past. This model contrasts starkly with empirical support for constrained diversification in marine animals, suggesting different macroevolutionary processes on land and in the sea. We quantify patterns of vertebrate standing diversity on land during the Mesozoic-early Paleogene interval, applying sample-standardization to a global fossil dataset containing 27,260 occurrences of 4,898 non-marine tetrapod species. Our results show a highly stable pattern of Mesozoic tetrapod diversity at regional and local levels, underpinned by a weakly positive, but near-zero, long-term net diversification rate over 190 million years. Species diversity of non-flying terrestrial tetrapods less than doubled over this interval, despite the origins of exceptionally diverse extant groups within mammals, squamates, amphibians, and dinosaurs. Therefore, although speciose groups of modern tetrapods have Mesozoic origins, rates of Mesozoic diversification inferred from the fossil record are slow compared to those inferred from molecular phylogenies. If high speciation rates did occur in the Mesozoic, then they seem to have been balanced by extinctions among older clades. An apparent 4-fold expansion of species richness after the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary deserves further examination in light of potential taxonomic biases, but is consistent with the hypothesis that global environmental disturbances such as mass extinction events can rapidly adjust limits to diversity by restructuring ecosystems, and suggests that the gradualistic evolutionary diversification of tetrapods was punctuated by brief but dramatic episodes of radiation.

  15. Near-Stasis in the Long-Term Diversification of Mesozoic Tetrapods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger B J Benson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available How did evolution generate the extraordinary diversity of vertebrates on land? Zero species are known prior to ~380 million years ago, and more than 30,000 are present today. An expansionist model suggests this was achieved by large and unbounded increases, leading to substantially greater diversity in the present than at any time in the geological past. This model contrasts starkly with empirical support for constrained diversification in marine animals, suggesting different macroevolutionary processes on land and in the sea. We quantify patterns of vertebrate standing diversity on land during the Mesozoic-early Paleogene interval, applying sample-standardization to a global fossil dataset containing 27,260 occurrences of 4,898 non-marine tetrapod species. Our results show a highly stable pattern of Mesozoic tetrapod diversity at regional and local levels, underpinned by a weakly positive, but near-zero, long-term net diversification rate over 190 million years. Species diversity of non-flying terrestrial tetrapods less than doubled over this interval, despite the origins of exceptionally diverse extant groups within mammals, squamates, amphibians, and dinosaurs. Therefore, although speciose groups of modern tetrapods have Mesozoic origins, rates of Mesozoic diversification inferred from the fossil record are slow compared to those inferred from molecular phylogenies. If high speciation rates did occur in the Mesozoic, then they seem to have been balanced by extinctions among older clades. An apparent 4-fold expansion of species richness after the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg boundary deserves further examination in light of potential taxonomic biases, but is consistent with the hypothesis that global environmental disturbances such as mass extinction events can rapidly adjust limits to diversity by restructuring ecosystems, and suggests that the gradualistic evolutionary diversification of tetrapods was punctuated by brief but dramatic episodes

  16. The greatest step in vertebrate history: a paleobiological review of the fish-tetrapod transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, John A; Gordon, Malcolm S

    2004-01-01

    Recent discoveries of previously unknown fossil forms have dramatically transformed understanding of many aspects of the fish-tetrapod transition. Newer paleobiological approaches have also contributed to changed views of which animals were involved and when, where, and how the transition occurred. This review summarizes major advances made and reevaluates alternative interpretations of important parts of the evidence. We begin with general issues and concepts, including limitations of the Paleozoic fossil record. We summarize important features of paleoclimates, paleoenvironments, paleobiogeography, and taphonomy. We then review the history of Devonian tetrapods and their closest stem group ancestors within the sarcopterygian fishes. It is now widely accepted that the first tetrapods arose from advanced tetrapodomorph stock (the elpistostegalids) in the Late Devonian, probably in Euramerica. However, truly terrestrial forms did not emerge until much later, in geographically far-flung regions, in the Lower Carboniferous. The complete transition occurred over about 25 million years; definitive emergences onto land took place during the most recent 5 million years. The sequence of character acquisition during the transition can be seen as a five-step process involving: (1) higher osteichthyan (tetrapodomorph) diversification in the Middle Devonian (beginning about 380 million years ago [mya]), (2) the emergence of "prototetrapods" (e.g., Elginerpeton) in the Frasnian stage (about 372 mya), (3) the appearance of aquatic tetrapods (e.g., Acanthostega) sometime in the early to mid-Famennian (about 360 mya), (4) the appearance of "eutetrapods" (e.g., Tulerpeton) at the very end of the Devonian period (about 358 mya), and (5) the first truly terrestrial tetrapods (e.g., Pederpes) in the Lower Carboniferous (about 340 mya). We discuss each of these steps with respect to inferred functional utility of acquired character sets. Dissociated heterochrony is seen as the most

  17. Enamel morphology after microabrasion with experimental compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Núbia I. P. Pini; Rafaela Costa; Carlos E. S. Bertoldo; Flavio H. B. Aguiar; José R Lovadino; Débora Alves Nunes Leite Lima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Enamel microabrasion is an esthetic treatment for removing superficial stains or defects of enamel. Aim: This study evaluated the roughness after enamel microabrasion using experimental microabrasive systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred and ten samples (5 × 5 mm) were obtained from bovine incisors and divided into 11 groups (n = 10) in accordance with the treatment: Microabrasion using 6.6% hydrochloric acid (HCl) or 35% phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) associated with aluminum ...

  18. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical characterization of ameloblast-enamel adhesion at maturation stage in amelogenesis in Macaca fuscata tooth germ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Maturation-stage ameloblasts are firmly bound to the tooth enamel by a basal lamina-like structure. The mechanism underlying this adhesion, however, remains to be fully clarified. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying adhesion between the basal lamina-like structure and the enamel in monkey tooth germ. High-resolution immunogold labeling was performed to localize amelotin and laminin 332 at the interface between ameloblasts and tooth enamel. Minute, electron-dense strands were observed on the enamel side of the lamina densa, extending into the degrading enamel matrix to produce a well-developed fibrous layer (lamina fibroreticularis). In un-demineralized tissue sections, mineral crystals smaller than those in the bulk of the enamel were observed adhering to these strands where they protruded into the surface enamel. Immunogold particles reactive for amelotin were preferentially localized on these strands in the fibrous layer. On the other hand, those for laminin 332 were localized solely in the lamina densa; none were observed in the fibrous layer. These results suggest that the fibrous layer of the basal lamina-like structure is partly composed of amelotin molecules, and that these molecules facilitate ameloblast-enamel adhesion by promoting mineralization of the fibrous layer during the maturation stage of amelogenesis.

  19. Enamel microabrasion: observations after 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P

    1997-04-01

    Enamel microabrasion has become accepted as a conservative, nonrestorative method of improving the appearance of teeth with superficial dysmineralization and decalcification defects. This article reviews the technique of enamel microabrasion using a commercially available compound of hydrochloric acid and fine-grit silicon carbide particles in a water-soluble paste. It also describes a method of combining enamel microabrasion with carbamide peroxide home bleaching. Finally, it presents the cases of representative patients who underwent enamel microabrasion (alone or in combination with dental bleaching).

  20. Enamel surface changes caused by hydrogen sulfide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamaguchi, Takao; Hanabusa, Masao; Hosoya, Noriyasu; Chiba, Toshie; Yoshida, Takumasa; Morito, Akiyuki

    2015-01-01

    ..., and enhancing the production of matrix metalloproteinases in gingival connective tissue. Nonetheless, the effects on the enamel of direct exposure to VSCs within the oral cavity remain unclear...

  1. Properties of tooth enamel in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James J-W; Morris, Dylan; Constantino, Paul J; Lucas, Peter W; Smith, Tanya M; Lawn, Brian R

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study has been made of human and great ape molar tooth enamel. Nanoindentation techniques are used to map profiles of elastic modulus and hardness across sections from the enamel-dentin junction to the outer tooth surface. The measured data profiles overlap between species, suggesting a degree of commonality in material properties. Using established deformation and fracture relations, critical loads to produce function-threatening damage in the enamel of each species are calculated for characteristic tooth sizes and enamel thicknesses. The results suggest that differences in load-bearing capacity of molar teeth in primates are less a function of underlying material properties than of morphology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The evolution of dinosaur tooth enamel microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sunny H

    2011-02-01

    The evolution of tooth enamel microstructure in both extinct and extant mammalian groups has been extensively documented, but is poorly known in reptiles, including dinosaurs. Previous intensive sampling of dinosaur tooth enamel microstructure revealed that: (1) the three-dimensional arrangement of enamel types and features within a tooth-the schmelzmuster-is most useful in diagnosing dinosaur clades at or around the family level; (2) enamel microstructure complexity is correlated with tooth morphology complexity and not necessarily with phylogenetic position; and (3) there is a large amount of homoplasy within Theropoda but much less within Ornithischia. In this study, the examination of the enamel microstructure of 28 additional dinosaur taxa fills in taxonomic gaps of previous studies and reinforces the aforementioned conclusions. Additionally, these new specimens reveal that within clades such as Sauropodomorpha, Neotheropoda, and Euornithopoda, the more basal taxa have simpler enamel that is a precursor to the more complex enamel of more derived taxa and that schmelzmusters evolve in a stepwise fashion. In the particularly well-sampled clade of Euornithopoda, correlations between the evolution of dental and enamel characters could be drawn. The ancestral schmelzmuster for Genasauria remains ambiguous due to the dearth of basal ornithischian teeth available for study. These new specimens provide new insights into the evolution of tooth enamel microstructure in dinosaurs, emphasizing the importance of thorough sampling within broadly inclusive clades, especially among their more basal members. © 2010 The Author. Biological Reviews © 2010 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  3. Can demineralized enamel surfaces be bonded safely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Mehmet; Baka, Zeliha Muge; Ileri, Zehra; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate and compare the effects of enamel demineralization, microabrasion therapy and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) application on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel surfaces and enamel color. Eighty freshly extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were allocated to one of the four groups. Brackets were bonded directly to non-demineralized enamel surfaces in Group I (control group), directly to the demineralized enamel surfaces in Group II, to demineralized enamel surfaces after CPP-ACP application in Group III and to demineralized enamel surfaces after microabrasion therapy in Group IV. The samples were stored in water for 24 h at 37°C and then underwent thermocycling. The SBS in megapascals (MPa) was determined by a shear test with 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed and failure types were classified with modified adhesive remnant index scores. The data were analyzed with one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA), Tukey and chi-square tests at the α = 0.05 level. Significant differences were found among the four groups (F = 21.57, p microabrasion therapy and CPP-ACP application affected enamel color significantly. CPP-ACP application and microabrasion therapy are able to increase the decreased SBS of orthodontic brackets because of enamel demineralization.

  4. The hexagonal lattice marks in the muroids rodent explain molar-cusp enamel line

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Bustos, A.

    2011-01-01

    The crown enamel line of muroids rodent has geometric traces that coincide exactly with an equilateral triangular lattice. This finding helps to explain the muroids dental pattern from a novel perspective in molar morphology that it is based on hexagonal structures. The adult traces imply that the morphology of the teeth mammals is consequence of a morphogenetic process. This is the study of the hexagonal lattice marks observed in the enamel line, and therefore called odontohexasymmetry. ...

  5. Polymer coated liposomes for dental drug delivery--interactions with parotid saliva and dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S; Hiorth, M; Rykke, M; Smistad, G

    2013-09-27

    The interactions between pectin coated liposomes and parotid saliva and dental enamel were studied to investigate their potential to mimic the protective biofilm formed naturally on tooth surfaces. Different pectin coated liposomes with respect to pectin type (LM-, HM- and AM-pectin) and concentration (0.05% and 0.2%) were prepared. Interactions between the pectin coated liposomes and parotid saliva were studied by turbidimetry and imaging by atomic force microscopy. The liposomes were adsorbed to hydroxyapatite (HA) and human dental enamel using phosphate buffer and parotid saliva as adsorption media. A continuous flow was imposed on the enamel surfaces for various time intervals to examine their retention on the dental enamel. The results were compared to uncoated, charged liposomes. No aggregation tendencies for the pectin coated liposomes and parotid saliva were revealed. This makes them promising as drug delivery systems to be used in the oral cavity. In phosphate buffer the adsorption to HA of pectin coated liposomes was significantly lower than the negative liposomes. The difference diminished in parotid saliva. Positive liposomes adsorbed better to the dental enamel than the pectin coated liposomes. However, when subjected to flow for 1h, no significant differences in the retention levels on the enamel were found between the formulations. For all formulations, more than 40% of the liposomes still remained on the enamel surfaces. At time point 20 min the retention of HM-pectin coated and positive liposomes were significantly higher. It was concluded that pectin coated liposomes can adsorb to HA as well as to the dental enamel. Their ability to retain on the enamel surfaces promotes the concept of using them as protective structures for the teeth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Acid resistance of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-treated and phosphoric acid-etched enamels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Kwon, Oh-Won; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2006-11-01

    To compare the effects of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser ablation and of phosphoric acid etching on the in vitro acid resistance of bovine enamel. Teeth were polished to make the surface flat. The polished enamel was either etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds or ablated with a single 33 J/cm2 pulse from an Er:YAG laser. The control specimens were free from acid etching and laser ablation. Changes in crystal structure, dissolved mineral (calcium [Ca] and phosphorus [P]) contents, and calcium distribution in the enamel subsurface after a pH-cycling process were evaluated. After laser treatment, poor crystal structures improved without forming any new phases, such as tricalcium phosphates. Among the tested enamels, dissolved mineral contents were significantly different (P phosphoric acid-etched enamels had the highest (Ca, 15.90 ppm; P, 7.33 ppm). The reduction rate and reduced depth of calcium content along the subsurface were lowest in Er:YAG laser-treated enamels. The Er:YAG laser-treated enamels are more acid resistant to acid attack than phosphoric acid-etched enamels.

  7. Age-related changes in tooth enamel as measured by electron microscopy: implications for porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsu, Saadet Saglam; Aka, P Sema; Kucukesmen, H Cenker; Kilicarslan, Mehmet A; Atakan, Cemal

    2005-10-01

    Available information on the dimensions of the enamel and pulp tissues of tooth structure, as well as their correlation with chronologic age, is limited. However, this information is a significant determinate in planning the tooth reduction for a porcelain laminate veneer (PLV) restoration. This study examined variations in tooth enamel thickness and its correlation with chronologic age as it relates to available tooth substrate for PLV restorations. Forty human maxillary central incisors extracted from patients within the age range of 30 to 69 years were used to evaluate the thickness of tooth layers. Measurements were made for the following tooth areas using scanning electron microscopy (SEM): facial enamel thickness at 1, 3, and 5 mm above the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), palatal enamel thickness at 5 mm above the CEJ, facial and palatal enamel thickness at the incisal edge, maximum facial-palatal (MFP) width at incisal edge, physiologic secondary dentin (PSD) height, facial-cervical enamel-pulp (FCEP) distance, and the incisal edge enamel-pulp (IEP) distance. The relationship between thickness and age was evaluated with a regression analysis (alpha=.05). Significant differences (Page. Outcome variables of enamel thickness related to age showed a steady decrease, beginning at approximately age 50. Mean values of facial enamel thickness at 1, 3, and 5 mm above the CEJ were 0.31 +/- 0.01, 0.54 +/- 0.01, and 0.75 +/- 0.02 mm, respectively, for the age range of 30 to 69 years. The thickness of maximum incisal width (R(2) = 0.95), PSD height (R(2) = 0.76), and IEP distance (R(2) = 0.99) indicated that all are subject to an increase in relation to age. Facial enamel thickness above the CEJ decreases, while MFP increases in relation to age. The PSD height and IEP distance also increased with age.

  8. FLUORESCENCE IN DISSOLVED FRACTIONS OF HUMAN ENAMEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAFSTROMBJORKMAN, U; SUNDSTROM, F; TENBOSCH, JJ

    Fluorescence induced by laser light is useful in early detection of enamel caries. The present work studied the fluorescence emission pattern in dissolved human enamel and in different molecular weight fractions obtained after gel chromatography or dialysis followed by ultrafiltration. For

  9. Enamel Regeneration - Current Progress and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baswaraj; H.K, Navin; K.B, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Dental Enamel is the outermost covering of teeth. It is hardest mineralized tissue present in the human body. Enamel faces the challenge of maintaining its integrity in a constant demineralization and remineralization within the oral environment and it is vulnerable to wear, damage, and decay. It cannot regenerate itself, because it is formed by a layer of cells that are lost after the tooth eruption. Conventional treatment relies on synthetic materials to restore lost enamel that cannot mimic natural enamel. With advances in material science and understanding of basic principles of organic matrix mediated mineralization paves a way for formation of synthetic enamel. The knowledge of enamel formation and understanding of protein interactions and their gene products function along with the isolation of postnatal stem cells from various sources in the oral cavity, and the development of smart materials for cell and growth factor delivery, makes possibility for biological based enamel regeneration. This article will review the recent endeavor on biomimetic synthesis and cell based strategies for enamel regeneration. PMID:25386548

  10. Enamel microabrasion for aesthetic management of dental fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Pallavi; Ansari, Afroz Alam; Moda, Preeti; Yadav, Madhulika

    2013-01-01

    Fluorosis has increased in recent times due to fluoridation of drinking water and addition of fluoride to various edible items, which leads to unaesthetic appearance of teeth visible at close quarters. The enamel microabrasion technique is a conservative method that improves the appearance of the teeth by restoring bright and superficial smoothness, without causing significant structural loss. The aim of this article is to describe an easy technique for managing mild to moderate dental fluoro...

  11. Laser treatment of enamel and dentine by different Er lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory B.; Belikov, Andrei V.; Erofeev, Andrew V.

    1994-09-01

    The results of primary comparative investigation of possible application of lasers based on four different Er-doped crystals (YAG, YLF, YSGG, YAP) are presented. The influence of laser wavelength and temporal structure of laser radiation on efficiency of hard tooth tissues treatment is considered. The experimental data on damage thresholds and efficiency of enamel and dentine removal under influence of submillisecond pulses of all four types of lasers are obtained.

  12. Enamel matrix protein derivatives: role in periodontal regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Rathva, Vandana J

    2011-01-01

    Vandana J RathvaDepartment of Periodontics, KM Shah Dental College and Hospital, Sumandeep University, Gujarat, IndiaAbstract: The role of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of lost periodontal structures, ie, new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. The outcome of basic research has pointed to the important role of enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in periodontal wound healing. Histologic results from animal and human studies have show...

  13. Modeling of the human enamel laser ablation process at the mesoscopic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Verde, Ana C.; Duarte Ramos, Marta Maria; Mendes Ribeiro, Ricardo; Stoneham, Marshall

    2003-06-01

    A mesoscopic simulation of the process of human enamel laser ablation by Er:YAG and CO2 lasers is being developed using the finite element method, taking into account the complex structure and chemical composition of this material. A geometric model that allows studying in detail the temperature, stress and displacement distribution within a few enamel rods is presented. The heat generation that takes place inside the enamel at the centre of the laser spot, caused by a non-ablative laser pulse emitted by CO2 and Er:YAG lasers, was simulated. The sensitivity of our model to the estimated material parameters was studied. Temperature, displacement and stress distribution maps obtained for both lasers are presented. These preliminary results suggest that the temperature distribution across the enamel rods is different in the two situations considered; thermally induced stresses in the material are higher in the regions that are richer in hydroxyapatite (HA), and the higher displacements are observed in the regions that are rich in water. The rod tails inside enamel present higher stresses in the direction perpendicular to the surface of enamel than the ones that are created at the surface of our simulated structure. We conclude that the mesostructure plays a crucial role in the accurate modelling of dental laser ablation.

  14. Analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns from fluorotic enamel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ana P.G.; Braz, Delson, E-mail: anapaulagalmeida@gmail.co [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Colaco, Marcos V.; Barroso, Regina C., E-mail: cely@uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Porto, Isabel M., E-mail: belporto@ig.com.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Gerlach, Raquel F., E-mail: rfgerlach@forp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Droppa Junior, Roosevelt, E-mail: rdroppa@lnls.b [Associacao Brasileira de Tecnologia de Luz Sincrotron (ABTLuS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basics physical-chemistry reactions of demineralisation and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The hexagonal symmetry seems to work well with the powder diffraction data, and the crystal structure of HAp is usually described in space group P63/m. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using technique Synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to determine the crystal structure and crystallinity of on fluoroapatite (FAp) crystal present in fluoritic enamel. All the scattering profile measurements was carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. (author)

  15. Mapping residual organics and carbonate at grain boundaries and in the amorphous interphase in mouse incisor enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyle M Gordon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental enamel has evolved to resist the most grueling conditions of mechanical stress, fatigue, and wear. Adding insult to injury, it is exposed to the frequently corrosive environment of the oral cavity. While its hierarchical structure is unrivaled in its mechanical resilience, heterogeneity in the distribution of magnesium ions and the presence of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP as an intergranular phase have recently been shown to increase the susceptibility of mouse enamel to acid attack. Herein we investigate the distribution of two important constituents of enamel, residual organic matter and inorganic carbonate. We find that organics, carbonate, and possibly water show distinct distribution patterns in the mouse enamel crystallites, at simple grain boundaries, and in the amorphous interphase at multiple grain boundaries. This has implications for the resistance to acid corrosion, mechanical properties, and the mechanism by which enamel crystals grow during amelogenesis.

  16. Reconstructing impairment of secretory ameloblast function in porcine teeth by analysis of morphological alterations in dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Carsten; Kierdorf, Uwe; Dobney, Keith; Ervynck, Anton; Vanpoucke, Sofie; Kierdorf, Horst

    2006-07-01

    We studied the relationship between the macroscopic appearance of hypoplastic defects in the dental enamel of wild boar and domestic pigs, and microstructural enamel changes, at both the light and the scanning electron microscopic levels. Deviations from normal enamel microstructure were used to reconstruct the functional and related morphological changes of the secretory ameloblasts caused by the action of stress factors during amelogenesis. The deduced reaction pattern of the secretory ameloblasts can be grouped in a sequence of increasingly severe impairments of cell function. The reactions ranged from a slight enhancement of the periodicity of enamel matrix secretion, over a temporary reduction in the amount of secreted enamel matrix, with reduction of the distal portion of the Tomes' process, to either a temporary or a definite cessation of matrix formation. The results demonstrate that analysis of structural changes in dental enamel allows a detailed reconstruction of the reaction of secretory ameloblasts to stress events, enabling an assessment of duration and intensity of these events. Analysing the deviations from normal enamel microstructure provides a deeper insight into the cellular changes underlying the formation of hypoplastic enamel defects than can be achieved by mere inspection of tooth surface characteristics alone.

  17. Cretaceous Small Scavengers: Feeding Traces in Tetrapod Bones from Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Valais, Silvina; Apesteguía, Sebastián; Garrido, Alberto C.

    2012-01-01

    Ecological relationships among fossil vertebrate groups are interpreted based on evidence of modification features and paleopathologies on fossil bones. Here we describe an ichnological assemblage composed of trace fossils on reptile bones, mainly sphenodontids, crocodyliforms and maniraptoran theropods. They all come from La Buitrera, an early Late Cretaceous locality in the Candeleros Formation of northwestern Patagonia, Argentina. This locality is significant because of the abundance of small to medium-sized vertebrates. The abundant ichnological record includes traces on bones, most of them attributable to tetrapods. These latter traces include tooth marks that provde evidence of feeding activities made during the sub-aerial exposure of tetrapod carcasses. Other traces are attributable to arthropods or roots. The totality of evidence provides an uncommon insight into paleoecological aspects of a Late Cretaceous southern ecosystem. PMID:22253800

  18. The aquatic tympanic ear: convergent adaptations for underwater hearing in three tetrapods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Wahlberg, Magnus; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    pressure, low particle motion medium, and the consequence is that an efficient underwater ear is sensitive to sound pressure. It is often stated that underwater hearing can work efficiently without a middle ear apparatus by bone conduction, since sound is transmitted from water to inner ear tissue...... with little loss. However, the sensitivity of such an ear is limited by the very low particle motion in water. We report on underwater hearing in tetrapods ranging from totally aquatic (the clawed frog Xenopus laevis) and mostly aquatic (the red-eared slider Trachemys scripta) to mostly terrestrial (the......All groups of tetrapods have members that adopt aquatic lifestyles with physiological adaptations also of their auditory system. Auditory sensitivity is affected by the different characteristic impedances in air and water caused by the differences in density and sound speed. Water is a high...

  19. Ultrastructure of early amelogenesis in wild-type, Amelx(-/-), and Enam(-/-) mice: enamel ribbon initiation on dentin mineral and ribbon orientation by ameloblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles E; Hu, Yuanyuan; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2016-11-01

    Dental enamel is comprised of highly organized, oriented apatite crystals, but how they form is unclear. We used focused ion beam (FIB) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate early enamel formation in 7-week-old incisors from wild-type, Amelx(-/-), and Enam(-/-) C56BL/6 mice. FIB surface imaging scans thicker samples so that the thin enamel ribbons do not pass as readily out of the plane of section, and generates serial images by a mill and view approach for computerized tomography. We demonstrate that wild-type enamel ribbons initiate on dentin mineral on the sides and tips of mineralized collagen fibers, and extend in clusters from dentin to the ameloblast membrane. The clustering suggested that groups of enamel ribbons were initiated and then extended by finger-like membrane processes as they retracted back into the ameloblast distal membrane. These findings support the conclusions that no organic nucleator is necessary for enamel ribbon initiation (although no ribbons form in the Enam(-/-) mice), and that enamel ribbons elongate along the ameloblast membrane and orient in the direction of its retrograde movement. Tomographic reconstruction videos revealed a complex of ameloblast membrane processes and invaginations associated with intercellular junctions proximal to the mineralization front and also highlighted interproximal extracellular enamel matrix accumulations proximal to the interrod growth sites, which we propose are important for expanding the interrod matrix and extending interrod enamel ribbons. Amelx(-/-) mice produce oriented enamel ribbons, but the ribbons fuse into fan-like structures. The matrix does not expand sufficiently to support formation of the Tomes process or establish rod and interrod organization. Amelogenin does not directly nucleate, shape, or orient enamel ribbons, but separates and supports the enamel ribbons, and expands the enamel matrix to accommodate continued ribbon elongation, retrograde ameloblast movement, and

  20. Evolution and Development of the Tetrapod Auditory System: an Organ of Corti-Centric Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Pan, Ning; Jahan, Israt; Duncan, Jeremy S.; Kopecky, Benjamin J.; Elliott, Karen L.; Kersigo, Jennifer; Yang, Tian

    2013-01-01

    The tetrapod auditory system transmits sound through the outer and middle ear to the organ of Corti or other sound pressure receivers of the inner ear where specialized hair cells translate vibrations of the basilar membrane into electrical potential changes that are conducted by the spiral ganglion neurons to the auditory nuclei. In other systems, notably the vertebrate limb, a detailed connection between the evolutionary variations in adaptive morphology and the underlying alterations in th...

  1. Cranial Morphology of the Carboniferous-Permian Tetrapod Brachydectes newberryi (Lepospondyli, Lysorophia): New Data from ?CT

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo, Jason D.; Anderson, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Lysorophians are a group of early tetrapods with extremely elongate trunks, reduced limbs, and highly reduced skulls. Since the first discovery of this group, general similarities in outward appearance between lysorophians and some modern lissamphibian orders (specifically Urodela and Gymnophiona) have been recognized, and sometimes been the basis for hypotheses of lissamphibian origins. We studied the morphology of the skull, with particular emphasis on the neurocranium, of a partial growth ...

  2. Tempo and Mode of the Evolution of Venom and Poison in Tetrapods

    OpenAIRE

    Richard J. Harris; Kevin Arbuckle

    2016-01-01

    Toxic weaponry in the form of venom and poison has evolved in most groups of animals, including all four major lineages of tetrapods. Moreover, the evolution of such traits has been linked to several key aspects of the biology of toxic animals including life-history and diversification. Despite this, attempts to investigate the macroevolutionary patterns underlying such weaponry are lacking. In this study we analyse patterns of venom and poison evolution across reptiles, amphibians, mammals, ...

  3. Tempo and Mode of the Evolution of Venom and Poison in Tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard J; Arbuckle, Kevin

    2016-06-23

    Toxic weaponry in the form of venom and poison has evolved in most groups of animals, including all four major lineages of tetrapods. Moreover, the evolution of such traits has been linked to several key aspects of the biology of toxic animals including life-history and diversification. Despite this, attempts to investigate the macroevolutionary patterns underlying such weaponry are lacking. In this study we analyse patterns of venom and poison evolution across reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and birds using a suite of phylogenetic comparative methods. We find that each major lineage has a characteristic pattern of trait evolution, but mammals and reptiles evolve under a surprisingly similar regime, whilst that of amphibians appears to be particularly distinct and highly contrasting compared to other groups. Our results also suggest that the mechanism of toxin acquisition may be an important distinction in such evolutionary patterns; the evolution of biosynthesis is far less dynamic than that of sequestration of toxins from the diet. Finally, contrary to the situation in amphibians, other tetrapod groups show an association between the evolution of toxic weaponry and higher diversification rates. Taken together, our study provides the first broad-scale analysis of macroevolutionary patterns of venom and poison throughout tetrapods.

  4. Diversity change during the rise of tetrapods and the impact of the 'Carboniferous rainforest collapse'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Emma M; Close, Roger A; Button, David J; Brocklehurst, Neil; Cashmore, Daniel D; Lloyd, Graeme T; Butler, Richard J

    2018-02-14

    The Carboniferous and early Permian were critical intervals in the diversification of early four-limbed vertebrates (tetrapods), yet the major patterns of diversity and biogeography during this time remain unresolved. Previous estimates suggest that global tetrapod diversity rose continuously across this interval and that habitat fragmentation following the 'Carboniferous rainforest collapse' (CRC) drove increased endemism among communities. However, previous work failed to adequately account for spatial and temporal biases in sampling. Here, we reassess early tetrapod diversity and biogeography with a new global species-level dataset using sampling standardization and network biogeography methods. Our results support a tight relationship between observed richness and sampling, particularly during the Carboniferous. We found that subsampled species richness initially increased into the late Carboniferous, then decreased substantially across the Carboniferous/Permian boundary before slowly recovering in the early Permian. Our analysis of biogeography does not support the hypothesis that the CRC drove endemism; instead, we found evidence for increased cosmopolitanism in the early Permian. While a changing environment may have played a role in reducing diversity in the earliest Permian, our results suggest that the CRC was followed by increased global connectivity between communities, possibly reflecting both reduced barriers to dispersal and the diversification of amniotes. © 2018 The Authors.

  5. Tempo and Mode of the Evolution of Venom and Poison in Tetrapods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Harris

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxic weaponry in the form of venom and poison has evolved in most groups of animals, including all four major lineages of tetrapods. Moreover, the evolution of such traits has been linked to several key aspects of the biology of toxic animals including life-history and diversification. Despite this, attempts to investigate the macroevolutionary patterns underlying such weaponry are lacking. In this study we analyse patterns of venom and poison evolution across reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and birds using a suite of phylogenetic comparative methods. We find that each major lineage has a characteristic pattern of trait evolution, but mammals and reptiles evolve under a surprisingly similar regime, whilst that of amphibians appears to be particularly distinct and highly contrasting compared to other groups. Our results also suggest that the mechanism of toxin acquisition may be an important distinction in such evolutionary patterns; the evolution of biosynthesis is far less dynamic than that of sequestration of toxins from the diet. Finally, contrary to the situation in amphibians, other tetrapod groups show an association between the evolution of toxic weaponry and higher diversification rates. Taken together, our study provides the first broad-scale analysis of macroevolutionary patterns of venom and poison throughout tetrapods.

  6. Origin of dental occlusion in tetrapods: signal for terrestrial vertebrate evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Robert R

    2006-05-15

    Evolutionary changes of the dentition in tetrapods can be associated with major events in the history of terrestrial vertebrates. Dental occlusion, the process by which teeth from the upper jaw come in contact with those in the lower jaw, appears first in the fossil record in amniotes and their close relatives near the Permo-Carboniferous boundary approximately 300 million years ago. This evolutionary innovation permitted a dramatic increase in the level of oral processing of food in these early tetrapods, and has been generally associated with herbivory. Whereas herbivory in extinct vertebrates is based on circumstantial evidence, dental occlusion provides direct evidence about feeding strategies because jaw movements can be reconstructed from the wear patterns of the teeth. Examination of the evolution of dental occlusion in Paleozoic tetrapods within a phylogenetic framework reveals that this innovation developed independently in several lineages of amniotes, and is represented by a wide range of dental and mandibular morphologies. Dental occlusion also developed within diadectomorphs, the sister taxon of amniotes. The independent, multiple acquisition of this feeding strategy represents an important signal in the evolution of complex terrestrial vertebrate communities, and the first steps in the profound changes in the pattern of trophic interactions in terrestrial ecosystems. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Tuataras and salamanders show that walking and running mechanics are ancient features of tetrapod locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Stephen M; McElroy, Eric J; Andrew Odum, R; Hornyak, Valerie A

    2006-01-01

    The lumbering locomotor behaviours of tuataras and salamanders are the best examples of quadrupedal locomotion of early terrestrial vertebrates. We show they use the same walking (out-of-phase) and running (in-phase) patterns of external mechanical energy fluctuations of the centre-of-mass known in fast moving (cursorial) animals. Thus, walking and running centre-of-mass mechanics have been a feature of tetrapods since quadrupedal locomotion emerged over 400 million years ago. When walking, these sprawling animals save external mechanical energy with the same pendular effectiveness observed in cursorial animals. However, unlike cursorial animals (that change footfall patterns and mechanics with speed), tuataras and salamanders use only diagonal couplet gaits and indifferently change from walking to running mechanics with no significant change in total mechanical energy. Thus, the change from walking to running is not related to speed and the advantage of walking versus running is unclear. Furthermore, lumbering mechanics in primitive tetrapods is reflected in having total mechanical energy driven by potential energy (rather than kinetic energy as in cursorial animals) and relative centre-of-mass displacements an order of magnitude greater than cursorial animals. Thus, large vertical displacements associated with lumbering locomotion in primitive tetrapods may preclude their ability to increase speed. PMID:16777753

  8. Radiation therapy alters microhardness and microstructure of enamel and dentin of permanent human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ligia Maria Napolitano; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia; Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Silva, Léa Assed Bezerra da; Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino de

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate, in vitro, the effects of ionizing radiation on the mechanical and micro-morphological properties of enamel and dentin of permanent teeth. Enamel and dentin microhardness (n=12 hemi-sections) was evaluated at three depths (superficial, middle and deep) prior to (control) and after every 10Gy radiation dose up to a cumulative dose of 60Gy by means of longitudinal microhardness. Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test at a significance level of 5%. Enamel and dentin morphology was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for semi-quantitative analysis (n=8 hemi-sections). Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's or Fisher exact tests at a significance level of 5%. The application of ionizing radiation did not change the overall enamel microhardness, although an increase in superficial enamel microhardness was observed. The micro-morphological analysis of enamel revealed that irradiation did not influence rod structure but interprismatic structure became more evident. Dentin microhardness decreased after 10, 20, 30, 50 and 60Gy cumulative doses (pmorphological analysis revealed fissures in the dentin structure, obliterated dentinal tubules and fragmentation of collagen fibers after 30 and 60Gy cumulative doses. Although ionizing radiation did not affect the enamel microhardness of permanent teeth as a whole, an increase in superficial enamel microhardness was observed. Dentin microhardness decreased after almost all radiation doses compared with the control, with the greatest reduction of microhardness in the middle depth region. The morphological alterations on enamel and dentin structures increased with the increase of the radiation dose, with a more evident interprismatic portion, presence of fissures and obliterated dentinal tubules, and progressive fragmentation of the collagen fibers. This study shows that irradiation affects microhardness and micro-morphology of enamel and dentin of permanent teeth. The

  9. Enamel matrix protein derivatives: role in periodontal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathva VJ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Vandana J RathvaDepartment of Periodontics, KM Shah Dental College and Hospital, Sumandeep University, Gujarat, IndiaAbstract: The role of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of lost periodontal structures, ie, new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. The outcome of basic research has pointed to the important role of enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD in periodontal wound healing. Histologic results from animal and human studies have shown that treatment with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. Moreover, clinical studies have indicated that treatment with EMD positively influences periodontal wound healing in humans. The goal of this paper is to review the existing literature on EMD.Keywords: enamel matrix protein derivative, Emdogain®, periodontal regeneration

  10. New discoveries of tetrapods (ichthyostegid-like and whatcheeriid-like) in the Famennian (Late Devonian) localities of Strud and Becco (Belgium)

    OpenAIRE

    Olive, Sébastien; Ahlberg, Per E.; Pernègre, Vincent N.; Poty, Édouard; Steurbaut, Étienne; Clément, Gaël

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The origin of tetrapods is one of the key events in vertebrate history. The oldest tetrapod body fossils are Late Devonian (Frasnian–Famennian) in age, most of them consisting of rare isolated bone elements. Here we describe tetrapod remains from two Famennian localities from Belgium: Strud, in the Province of Namur, and Becco, in the Province of Liège. The newly collected material consists of an isolated complete postorbital, fragments of two maxillae, and one putativ...

  11. In-vitro Thermal Maps to Characterize Human Dental Enamel and Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Paula; Brettle, David; Carmichael, Fiona; Clerehugh, Val

    2017-01-01

    The crown of a human tooth has an outer layer of highly-mineralized tissue called enamel, beneath which is dentin, a less-mineralized tissue which forms the bulk of the tooth-crown and root. The composition and structure of enamel and dentin are different, resulting in different thermal properties. This gives an opportunity to characterize enamel and dentin from their thermal properties and to visually present the findings as a thermal map. The thermal properties of demineralized enamel and dentin may also be sufficiently different from sound tissue to be seen on a thermal map, underpinning future thermal assessment of caries. The primary aim of this novel study was to produce a thermal map of a sound, human tooth-slice to visually characterize enamel and dentin. The secondary aim was to map a human tooth-slice with demineralized enamel and dentin to consider future diagnostic potential of thermal maps for caries-detection. Two human slices of teeth, one sound and one demineralized from a natural carious lesion, were cooled on ice, then transferred to a hotplate at 30°C where the rewarming-sequence was captured by an infra-red thermal camera. Calculation of thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity was undertaken, and two methods of data-processing used customized software to produce thermal maps from the thermal characteristic-time-to-relaxation and heat-exchange. The two types of thermal maps characterized enamel and dentin. In addition, sound and demineralized enamel and dentin were distinguishable within both maps. This supports thermal assessment of caries and requires further investigation on a whole tooth.

  12. In-vitro Thermal Maps to Characterize Human Dental Enamel and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Lancaster

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The crown of a human tooth has an outer layer of highly-mineralized tissue called enamel, beneath which is dentin, a less-mineralized tissue which forms the bulk of the tooth-crown and root. The composition and structure of enamel and dentin are different, resulting in different thermal properties. This gives an opportunity to characterize enamel and dentin from their thermal properties and to visually present the findings as a thermal map. The thermal properties of demineralized enamel and dentin may also be sufficiently different from sound tissue to be seen on a thermal map, underpinning future thermal assessment of caries. The primary aim of this novel study was to produce a thermal map of a sound, human tooth-slice to visually characterize enamel and dentin. The secondary aim was to map a human tooth-slice with demineralized enamel and dentin to consider future diagnostic potential of thermal maps for caries-detection. Two human slices of teeth, one sound and one demineralized from a natural carious lesion, were cooled on ice, then transferred to a hotplate at 30°C where the rewarming-sequence was captured by an infra-red thermal camera. Calculation of thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity was undertaken, and two methods of data-processing used customized software to produce thermal maps from the thermal characteristic-time-to-relaxation and heat-exchange. The two types of thermal maps characterized enamel and dentin. In addition, sound and demineralized enamel and dentin were distinguishable within both maps. This supports thermal assessment of caries and requires further investigation on a whole tooth.

  13. Type 1 diabetes mellitus effects on dental enamel formation revealed by microscopy and microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bruna Larissa Lago; Medeiros, Danila Lima; Soares, Ana Prates; Line, Sérgio Roberto Peres; Pinto, Maria das Graças Farias; Soares, Telma de Jesus; do Espírito Santo, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2017-12-14

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) largely affects children, occurring therefore at the same period of deciduous and permanent teeth development. The aim of this work was to investigate birefringence and morphology of the secretory stage enamel organic extracellular matrix (EOECM), and structural and mechanical features of mature enamel from T1DM rats. Adult Wistar rats were maintained alive for a period of 56 days after the induction of experimental T1DM with a single dose of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). After proper euthanasia of the animals, fixed upper incisors were accurately processed, and secretory stage EOECM and mature enamel were analyzed by transmitted polarizing and bright field light microscopies (TPLM and BFLM), energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microhardness testing. Bright field light microscopies and transmitted polarizing light microscopies showed slight morphological changes in the secretory stage EOECM from diabetic rats, which also did not exhibit statistically significant alterations in birefringence brightness when compared to control animals (P > .05). EDX analysis showed that T1DM induced statistically significant little increases in the amount of calcium and phosphorus in outer mature enamel (P  .05). T1DM also caused important ultrastructural alterations in mature enamel as revealed by SEM and induced a statistically significant reduction of about 13.67% in its microhardness at 80 μm from dentin-enamel junction (P enamel development, leading to alterations in mature enamel ultrastructure and in its mechanical features. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. MicroRNA 224 Regulates Ion Transporter Expression in Ameloblasts To Coordinate Enamel Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Zhou, Yachuan; Zhou, Xuedong; Sun, Feifei; Gao, Bo; Wan, Mian; Zhou, Xin; Sun, Jianxun; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Crane, Janet; Zheng, Liwei

    2015-08-01

    Enamel mineralization is accompanied by the release of protons into the extracellular matrix, which is buffered to regulate the pH value in the local microenvironment. The present study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA 224 (miR-224) as a regulator of SLC4A4 and CFTR, encoding the key buffering ion transporters, in modulating enamel mineralization. miR-224 was significantly downregulated as ameloblasts differentiated, in parallel with upregulation of SLC4A4 and CFTR. Overexpression of miR-224 downregulated SLC4A4 and CFTR expression in cultured human epithelial cells. A microRNA luciferase assay confirmed the specific binding of miR-224 to the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of SLC4A4 and CFTR mRNAs, thereby inhibiting protein translation. miR-224 agomir injection in mouse neonatal incisors resulted in normal enamel length and thickness, but with disturbed organization of the prism structure and deficient crystal growth. Moreover, the enamel Ca/P ratio and microhardness were markedly reduced after miR-224 agomir administration. These results demonstrate that miR-224 plays a pivotal role in fine tuning enamel mineralization by modulating SLC4A4 and CFTR to maintain pH homeostasis and support enamel mineralization. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Modulation of enamel matrix proteins on the formation and nano-assembly of hydroxyapatite in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hong, E-mail: tlihong@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Huang Weiya [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Taizhou, Taizhou University, Zhejiang 317000 (China); Zhang Yuanming [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Xue Bo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Wen Xuejun [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Natural enamel has a hierarchically nanoassembled architecture that is regulated by enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) during the formation of enamel crystals. To understand the role of EMPs on enamel mineralization, calcium phosphate (CaP) growth experiments in both the presence and absence of native rat EMPs in a single diffusion system were conducted. The morphology and organization of formed CaP crystals were examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), High-Resolution Transmission Microscopy (HRTEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). In the system containing the EMPs, hydroxyapatite (HAP) with hierarchical lamellar nanostructure can be formed and the aligned HAP assembly tightly bundled by 3-4 rod-like nanocrystals like an enamel prism. However, in the absence of EMPs, only a sheet-like structure of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) phase was presented. EMPs promote HAP formation and inhibit the growth of OCP on the (010) plane. It is discussed that the organized Amelogenin/Amorphous Calcium Phosphate might be the precursor to the bundled HAP crystal prism. The study benefits the understanding of biomineralization of tooth enamel. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An aligned hydroxyapatite crystal bundled by rod-like nanosize crystals was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An organized Amel/ACP would be the precursor of the bundled hydroxyapatite crystal prism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EMPs inhibit the growth of octacalcium phosphate in a defined plane.

  16. E-Cadherin Can Replace N-Cadherin during Secretory-Stage Enamel Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaomu; Bidlack, Felicitas B.; Stokes, Nicole; Bartlett, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background N-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule and deletion of N-cadherin in mice is embryonic lethal. During the secretory stage of enamel development, E-cadherin is down-regulated and N-cadherin is specifically up-regulated in ameloblasts when groups of ameloblasts slide by one another to form the rodent decussating enamel rod pattern. Since N-cadherin promotes cell migration, we asked if N-cadherin is essential for ameloblast cell movement during enamel development. Methodology/Principal Findings The enamel organ, including its ameloblasts, is an epithelial tissue and for this study a mouse strain with N-cadherin ablated from epithelium was generated. Enamel from wild-type (WT) and N-cadherin conditional knockout (cKO) mice was analyzed. μCT and scanning electron microscopy showed that thickness, surface structure, and prism pattern of the cKO enamel looked identical to WT. No significant difference in hardness was observed between WT and cKO enamel. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed the WT and N-cadherin cKO secretory stage ameloblasts expressed approximately equal amounts of total cadherins. Strikingly, E-cadherin was not normally down-regulated during the secretory stage in the cKO mice suggesting that E-cadherin can compensate for the loss of N-cadherin. Previously it was demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) induces E- and N-cadherin expression in human calvaria osteoblasts and we show that the N-cadherin cKO enamel organ expressed significantly more BMP2 and significantly less of the BMP antagonist Noggin than did WT enamel organ. Conclusions/Significance The E- to N-cadherin switch at the secretory stage is not essential for enamel development or for forming the decussating enamel rod pattern. E-cadherin can substitute for N-cadherin during these developmental processes. Bmp2 expression may compensate for the loss of N-cadherin by inducing or maintaining E-cadherin expression when E-cadherin is normally down

  17. E-cadherin can replace N-cadherin during secretory-stage enamel development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomu Guan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: N-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule and deletion of N-cadherin in mice is embryonic lethal. During the secretory stage of enamel development, E-cadherin is down-regulated and N-cadherin is specifically up-regulated in ameloblasts when groups of ameloblasts slide by one another to form the rodent decussating enamel rod pattern. Since N-cadherin promotes cell migration, we asked if N-cadherin is essential for ameloblast cell movement during enamel development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The enamel organ, including its ameloblasts, is an epithelial tissue and for this study a mouse strain with N-cadherin ablated from epithelium was generated. Enamel from wild-type (WT and N-cadherin conditional knockout (cKO mice was analyzed. μCT and scanning electron microscopy showed that thickness, surface structure, and prism pattern of the cKO enamel looked identical to WT. No significant difference in hardness was observed between WT and cKO enamel. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed the WT and N-cadherin cKO secretory stage ameloblasts expressed approximately equal amounts of total cadherins. Strikingly, E-cadherin was not normally down-regulated during the secretory stage in the cKO mice suggesting that E-cadherin can compensate for the loss of N-cadherin. Previously it was demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2 induces E- and N-cadherin expression in human calvaria osteoblasts and we show that the N-cadherin cKO enamel organ expressed significantly more BMP2 and significantly less of the BMP antagonist Noggin than did WT enamel organ. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The E- to N-cadherin switch at the secretory stage is not essential for enamel development or for forming the decussating enamel rod pattern. E-cadherin can substitute for N-cadherin during these developmental processes. Bmp2 expression may compensate for the loss of N-cadherin by inducing or maintaining E-cadherin expression when E-cadherin is

  18. Regulation of dental enamel shape and hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer, J P; Papagerakis, P; Smith, C E; Fisher, D C; Rountrey, A N; Zheng, L; Hu, J C C

    2010-10-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions guide tooth development through its early stages and establish the morphology of the dentin surface upon which enamel will be deposited. Starting with the onset of amelogenesis beneath the future cusp tips, the shape of the enamel layer covering the crown is determined by five growth parameters: the (1) appositional growth rate, (2) duration of appositional growth (at the cusp tip), (3) ameloblast extension rate, (4) duration of ameloblast extension, and (5) spreading rate of appositional termination. Appositional growth occurs at a mineralization front along the ameloblast distal membrane in which amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) ribbons form and lengthen. The ACP ribbons convert into hydroxyapatite crystallites as the ribbons elongate. Appositional growth involves a secretory cycle that is reflected in a series of incremental lines. A potentially important function of enamel proteins is to ensure alignment of successive mineral increments on the tips of enamel ribbons deposited in the previous cycle, causing the crystallites to lengthen with each cycle. Enamel hardens in a maturation process that involves mineral deposition onto the sides of existing crystallites until they interlock with adjacent crystallites. Neutralization of acidity generated by hydroxyapatite formation is a key part of the mechanism. Here we review the growth parameters that determine the shape of the enamel crown as well as the mechanisms of enamel appositional growth and maturation.

  19. Regulation of Dental Enamel Shape and Hardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer, J.P.; Papagerakis, P.; Smith, C.E.; Fisher, D.C.; Rountrey, A.N.; Zheng, L.; Hu, J.C.-C.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions guide tooth development through its early stages and establish the morphology of the dentin surface upon which enamel will be deposited. Starting with the onset of amelogenesis beneath the future cusp tips, the shape of the enamel layer covering the crown is determined by five growth parameters: the (1) appositional growth rate, (2) duration of appositional growth (at the cusp tip), (3) ameloblast extension rate, (4) duration of ameloblast extension, and (5) spreading rate of appositional termination. Appositional growth occurs at a mineralization front along the ameloblast distal membrane in which amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) ribbons form and lengthen. The ACP ribbons convert into hydroxyapatite crystallites as the ribbons elongate. Appositional growth involves a secretory cycle that is reflected in a series of incremental lines. A potentially important function of enamel proteins is to ensure alignment of successive mineral increments on the tips of enamel ribbons deposited in the previous cycle, causing the crystallites to lengthen with each cycle. Enamel hardens in a maturation process that involves mineral deposition onto the sides of existing crystallites until they interlock with adjacent crystallites. Neutralization of acidity generated by hydroxyapatite formation is a key part of the mechanism. Here we review the growth parameters that determine the shape of the enamel crown as well as the mechanisms of enamel appositional growth and maturation. PMID:20675598

  20. Enamel Resistance to Demineralization After Bracket Debonding Using Fluoride Varnish

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente, Ascensión; Ortiz Ruiz, Antonio José; García López, Miriam; Martínez Beneyto, Yolanda; Bravo-González, Luis-Alberto

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the elemental content and morphology of enamel subjected to demineralization cycles after bracket debonding, adhesive remnant removal, and application of a fluoride varnish. 125 bovine teeth were divided into five groups (n = 25): 1) Intact enamel; 2) Intact enamel + demineralization cycles (DC); 3) Enamel after adhesive removal; 4)Enamel after adhesive removal + DC; 5) Enamel after adhesive removal + Profluorid + DC. The weight percentages of calcium (Ca...

  1. Enamel and dentin as multi-scale bio-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Benny; Daniel Wagner, H

    2012-08-01

    Dentin and enamel are viewed here as multi-scale composites comprising a staggered micro-structure made of stiff platelets embedded in a more compliant matrix, and further assembled into macroscopic composite-like structures. Mechanical models are formulated for both tissues and their effective moduli are evaluated analytically. The resulting predictions are in very good agreement with Finite Elements (FE) simulations and experimental data from the literature. The models developed in this study demonstrate the possibility, in certain cases, to generate special mechanical effects linked to the structural complexity of these tissues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. FT-Raman spectroscopic characterization of enamel surfaces irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Sima Shahabi; Reza Fekrazad; Maryam Johari; Nasim Chiniforoush; Yashar Rezaei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite recent advances in dental caries prevention, caries is common and remains a serious health problem. Laser irradiation is one of the most common methods in preventive measures in recent years. Raman spectroscopy technique is utilized to study the microcrystalline structure of dental enamel. In this study, FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate chemical changes in enamel structure irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers. Methods. We used 15 freshly-extracted, non-cariou...

  3. Dental enamel, fluorosis and amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ciarrocchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Amoxicillin is one of the most used antibiotics among pediatric patients for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections and specially for acute otitis media (AOM, a common diseases of infants and childhood. It has been speculated that the use of amoxicillin during early childhood could be associated with dental enamel fluorosis, also described in literature with the term Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH, because they are generally situated in one or more 1st permanent molars and less frequently in the incisors. The effect of Amoxicillin seems to be independent of other risk factors such as fluoride intake, prematurity, hypoxia, hypocalcaemia, exposure to dioxins, chikenpox, otitis media, high fever and could have a significant impact on oral health for the wide use of this drug in that period of life. Objective: The aim of this work was to review the current literature about the association between amoxicillin and fluorosis. Methods and Results: A literature survey was done by applying the Medline database (Entrez PubMed; the Cochrane Library database of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL. The databases were searched using the following strategy and keywords: amoxicillin* AND (dental fluorosis* OR dental enamel* AND MIH*. After selecting the studies, only three relevant articles published between 1966 and 2011 were included in the review. Conclusion: The presence of several methodological issues does not allow to draw any evidence-based conclusions. No evidence of association was detected, therefore, there is a need of further well-designed studies to assess the scientific evidence of the relationship between amoxicillin and fluorosis and to restrict the prescription of this drug for recurrent upper respiratory tract infections especially acute otitis media (AOM during the first two years of life. When it is possible can be opportune to use an alternative antibiotic treatment.

  4. Hierarchical modelling of elastic behaviour of human enamel based on synchrotron diffraction characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2013-11-01

    Human enamel is a hierarchical mineralized tissue with a two-level composite structure. Few studies have focused on the structure-mechanical property relationship and its link to the multi-scale architecture of human enamel, whereby the response to mechanical loading is affected not only by the rod distribution at micro-scale, but also strongly influenced by the mineral crystallite shape, and spatial arrangement and orientation. In this study, two complementary synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques, wide and small angle X-ray scattering (WAXS/SAXS) were used to obtain multi-scale quantitative information about the structure and deformation response of human enamel to in situ uniaxial compressive loading. The apparent modulus was determined linking the external load and the internal strain in hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystallites. An improved multi-scale Eshelby model is proposed taking into account the two-level hierarchical structure of enamel. This framework has been used to analyse the experimental data for the elastic lattice strain evolution within the HAp crystals. The achieved agreement between the model prediction and experiment along the loading direction validates the model and suggests that the new multi-scale approach reasonably captures the structure-property relationship for the human enamel. The ability of the model to predict multi-directional strain components is also evaluated by comparison with the measurements. The results are useful for understanding the intricate relationship between the hierarchical structure and the mechanical properties of enamel, and for making predictions of the effect of structural alterations that may occur due to the disease or treatment on the performance of dental tissues and their artificial replacements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Considerations about enamel microabrasion after 18 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Croll, Theodore P; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Sversut; Sundfeld Neto, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    To review of the current status of enamel microabrasion method and its results 18 years after the development and application of this method. A technique performing enamel microabrasion with hydrochloric acid mixed with pumice and other techniques employing a commercially available compound of hydrochloric acid and fine-grit silicon carbide particles in a water-soluble paste have been described. Much has been learned about the application of this esthetic technique, long-term treatment results and microscopic changes to the enamel surface that has significant clinical implications. The latest treatment protocol is presented and photographic case histories document the treatment results. Clinical observations made over 18 years are discussed. According to our findings, the dental enamel microabrasion technique is a highly satisfactory, safe and effective procedure.

  6. Enzyme compartmentalization during biphasic enamel matrix processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, S J; Kirkham, J; Shore, R C; Bonass, W A; Robinson, C

    1998-01-01

    Processing of enamel matrix proteins is essentially biphasic. Secretory stage metalloprotease activity generates a discrete, presumably functional, spectrum of molecules which may also undergo dephosphorylation. Maturation stage serine proteases almost completely destroy the matrix. The present aim was to examine the tissue compartmentalization of these enzyme activities in relation to their possible function. A sequential extraction using synthetic enamel fluid, phosphate buffer and SDS was used to identify enzymes free in the enamel fluid, crystal bound or aggregated with the bulk matrix respectively. Results indicated that the metallo-proteases and alkaline phosphatase were free in the secretory stage enamel fluid while the serine proteases appeared to be largely bound to the maturation stage crystals. The mobility of the metallo-proteases and alkaline phosphatase would ensure efficient initial processing of secretory matrix, while the largely mineral bound serine proteases would ensure retention of protease activity despite massive destruction and protein removal.

  7. Enamel morphology after microabrasion with experimental compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Núbia I P; Costa, Rafaela; Bertoldo, Carlos E S; Aguiar, Flavio H B; Lovadino, José R; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-01

    Enamel microabrasion is an esthetic treatment for removing superficial stains or defects of enamel. This study evaluated the roughness after enamel microabrasion using experimental microabrasive systems. One hundred and ten samples (5 × 5 mm) were obtained from bovine incisors and divided into 11 groups (n = 10) in accordance with the treatment: Microabrasion using 6.6% hydrochloric acid (HCl) or 35% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) associated with aluminum oxide (AlO3) or pumice (Pum) with active application (using rubber cup coupled with a micro-motor of low rotation) or passive application (just placing the mixture on the enamel surface); just the use of acids in a passive application (negative control), and a group without treatment (positive control). Roughness analysis was performed before and after treatments. The statistical analysis used analysis of variance (PROC MIXED), Tukey-Kramer and Dunnet tests (P microabrasive systems.

  8. Combining resin composite bonding and enamel microabrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P

    1996-10-01

    Some teeth can best be treated by a combination of enamel microabrasion and resin composite bonding. This article outlines a protocol for treating patients with such teeth and documents one case, showing 5-year results.

  9. Aesthetic approach for anterior teeth with enamel hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué Martos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental defect of the enamel that is produced by a disturbance in the formation of the organic enamel matrix, clinically visible as enamel defects. Disorders that occur during the stages of enamel development and maturation reduce the amount or thickness of the enamel, resulting in white spots, tiny grooves, depressions and fissures in the enamel surface. The complexity and intensity of the dental deformity lesions will conduct the ideal treatment-associating conservative techniques. This article presents a case report of a restorative treatment of enamel hypoplasia using hybrid composite resin to mask color alteration and enamel defects. An aesthetic appearance that respects the tooth polychromatic and the self-esteem of the patient can be achieved with this approach.

  10. Morphological and functional investigation of the enamel organ and enamel in the rat incisor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy and other electron optical techniques, the ultrastructure of enamel hydroxyapatite crystallites and the morphology of the cells of the enamel organ related to these crystallites were examined. In the enamel secretion zone, putative cell communication via matched approaches of rough endoplasmic reticulum to the ameloblast cell membrane was not confirmed. Throughout the enamel organ, extracellular permeability was assessed using radiolabeled proteins as tracers. Regional differences were found, especially related to the two types of maturation ameloblasts. Several modified histochemical techniques were successfully applied to the enamel such that the functional contribution of each type of ameloblast was ascertained. In this way it was demonstrated that several functional cell subpopulations exist and that they can be correlated with different calcium and protein distributions with the enamel. In vivo injection of vinblastine, and in vitro treatments with other drugs, all severely modified the enamel maturation staining pattern and /sup 45/Ca uptake. In addition, it was found that ruffle-ended maturation zone ameloblasts possess higher levels of specific transferrin receptor sites relative to smooth-ended ameloblasts, a finding that may be directly related to the deposition of iron within the enamel.

  11. Enamel roughness and incidence of caries after interproximal enamel reduction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsi, V; Chatzigianni, A; Sidiropoulou, S

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of interproximal enamel reduction (IER) on tooth surfaces regarding the level of enamel roughness after applying different IER methods and the caries risk of treated teeth. Seven electronic databases were systematically searched. Two independent reviewers rated the articles at every step according to predetermined eligibility criteria. Data on enamel roughness were pooled if the same IER method was used and arithmetic values were available. Data on occurrence of caries were suitable for the analysis if the same units for caries development were used. From 2396 citations initially identified, 18 articles met the inclusion criteria and were further considered (14 studying enamel roughness and four studying the risk of caries after IER). A meta-analysis of quantitative data regarding enamel roughness was not possible due to statistical heterogeneity; instead, the enamel roughness findings are only described. The meta-analysis of studies focusing on the incidence of caries revealed no statistical difference between treated and untreated enamel surfaces (p = NS) from 1 to 7 years after IER. Drawing reliable conclusions on enamel roughness after IER is difficult owing to the diversity of the available studies. Statistically, the occurrence of caries on surfaces previously treated with IER was the same as that on intact surfaces, indicating that IER does not increase the risk of caries on treated teeth. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning...... characteristic of an erosive process that took place on human enamel. Depression areas, including the formation of craters, and exposure of enamel rods could also be detected. Conclusion: Bleaching effects on enamel morphology were randomly distributed throughout enamel surface and various degrees of enamel...

  13. A unique life history among tetrapods: an annual chameleon living mostly as an egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Kristopher B; Andriamandimbiarisoa, Laza N; Fox, Stanley F; Raxworthy, Christopher J

    2008-07-01

    The approximately 28,300 species of tetrapods (four-limbed vertebrates) almost exclusively have perennial life spans. Here, we report the discovery of a remarkable annual tetrapod from the arid southwest of Madagascar: the chameleon Furcifer labordi, with a posthatching life span of just 4-5 months. At the start of the active season (November), an age cohort of hatchlings emerges; larger juveniles or adults are not present. These hatchlings grow rapidly, reach sexual maturity in less than 2 months, and reproduce in January-February. After reproduction, senescence appears, and the active season concludes with population-wide adult death. Consequently, during the dry season, the entire population is represented by developing eggs that incubate for 8-9 months before synchronously hatching at the onset of the following rainy season. Remarkably, this chameleon spends more of its short annual life cycle inside the egg than outside of it. Our review of tetrapod longevity (>1,700 species) finds no others with such a short life span. These findings suggest that the notorious rapid death of chameleons in captivity may, for some species, actually represent the natural adult life span. Consequently, a new appraisal may be warranted concerning the viability of chameleon breeding programs, which could have special significance for species of conservation concern. Additionally, because F. labordi is closely related to other perennial species, this chameleon group may prove also to be especially well suited for comparative studies that focus on life history evolution and the ecological, genetic, and/or hormonal determinants of aging, longevity, and senescence.

  14. Periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone in the oldest herbivorous tetrapods, and their evolutionary significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Reisz, Robert R

    2013-01-01

    Tooth implantation provides important phylogenetic and functional information about the dentitions of amniotes. Traditionally, only mammals and crocodilians have been considered truly thecodont, because their tooth roots are coated in layers of cementum for anchorage of the periodontal ligament, which is in turn attached to the bone lining the alveolus, the alveolar bone. The histological properties and developmental origins of these three periodontal tissues have been studied extensively in mammals and crocodilians, but the identities of the periodontal tissues in other amniotes remain poorly studied. Early work on dental histology of basal amniotes concluded that most possess a simplified tooth attachment in which the tooth root is ankylosed to a pedestal composed of "bone of attachment", which is in turn fused to the jaw. More recent studies have concluded that stereotypically thecodont tissues are also present in non-mammalian, non-crocodilian amniotes, but these studies were limited to crown groups or secondarily aquatic reptiles. As the sister group to Amniota, and the first tetrapods to exhibit dental occlusion, diadectids are the ideal candidates for studies of dental evolution among terrestrial vertebrates because they can be used to test hypotheses of development and homology in deep time. Our study of Permo-Carboniferous diadectid tetrapod teeth and dental tissues reveal the presence of two types of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone, and therefore the earliest record of true thecodonty in a tetrapod. These discoveries in a stem amniote allow us to hypothesize that the ability to produce the tissues that characterize thecodonty in mammals and crocodilians is very ancient and plesiomorphic for Amniota. Consequently, all other forms of tooth implantation in crown amniotes are derived arrangements of one or more of these periodontal tissues and not simply ankylosis of teeth to the jaw by plesiomorphically retaining "bone of attachment", as

  15. The circadian clock modulates enamel development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Hacia, Joseph G; Bromage, Timothy G; Boyde, Alan; Lei, Yaping; Xu, Yucheng; Miller, Joseph D; Paine, Michael L; Snead, Malcolm L

    2012-06-01

    Fully mature enamel is about 98% mineral by weight. While mineral crystals appear very early during its formative phase, the newly secreted enamel is a soft gel-like matrix containing several enamel matrix proteins of which the most abundant is amelogenin (Amelx). Histological analysis of mineralized dental enamel reveals markings called cross-striations associated with daily increments of enamel formation, as evidenced by injections of labeling dyes at known time intervals. The daily incremental growth of enamel has led to the hypothesis that the circadian clock might be involved in the regulation of enamel development. To identify daily rhythms of clock genes and Amelx, we subjected murine ameloblast cells to serum synchronization to analyze the expression of the circadian transcription factors Per2 and Bmal1 by real-time PCR. Results indicate that these key genetic regulators of the circadian clock are expressed in synchronized murine ameloblast cell cultures and that their expression profile follows a circadian pattern with acrophase and bathyphase for both gene transcripts in antiphase. Immunohistological analysis confirms the protein expression of Bmal and Cry in enamel cells. Amelx expression in 2-day postnatal mouse molars dissected every 4 hours for a duration of 48 hours oscillated with an approximately 24-hour period, with a significant approximately 2-fold decrease in expression during the dark period compared to the light period. The expression of genes involved in bicarbonate production (Car2) and transport (Slc4a4), as well as in enamel matrix endocytosis (Lamp1), was greater during the dark period, indicating that ameloblasts express these proteins when Amelx expression is at the nadir. The human and mouse Amelx genes each contain a single nonconserved E-box element within 10 kb upstream of their respective transcription start sites. We also found that within 2 kb of the transcription start site of the human NFYA gene, which encodes a positive

  16. Neonatal lines in the enamel of primary teeth--a morphological and scanning electron microscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina; Johansson, Carina; Kühnisch, Jan; Robertson, Agneta; Steiniger, Frank; Norén, Jörgen G; Klingberg, Gunilla; Nietzsche, Sandor

    2008-10-01

    The neonatal line (NNL) is in principle found in all primary teeth and the line represents the time of birth. Earlier findings of the appearance of the NNL in light microscope and in microradiographs have shown not only changes in the prism direction of the enamel, but that the NNL has a hypomineralized character. The neonatal line was analyzed in un-decalcified sections of primary lower and central incisors, collected from individuals of different ages utilizing polarized light microscopy, microradiography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray analysis (XRMA). In polarized light the NNL appeared to have a more porous structure than the enamel in general. The appearance of the NNL as a dark line in microradiographs is interpreted as the NNL being less mineralized than neighbouring enamel. Analysis with ImageJ visualized the reduction of the amount of grey value, indicating that the NNL is less mineralized. Analysis of the NNL in SEM showed a reduction of the diameter of enamel prisms, the more narrow diameters continued through the postnatal enamel. A change of the growth direction of the prisms was also observed at the NNL. In a three-dimensional image the NNL appeared as a grove, however, in non-etched enamel no grove was seen. The elemental analyses with XRMA showed no marked changes in the content of C, Ca, P, N, O or S in the area around the NNL. The NNL is an optical phenomenon due to alterations in height, and degree of mineralization of the enamel prisms.

  17. Innovative Approaches to Regenerate Enamel and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanthippi Chatzistavrou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of tooth mineralization and the role of molecular control of cellular behavior during embryonic tooth development have attracted much attention the last few years. The knowledge gained from the research in these fields has improved the general understanding about the formation of dental tissues and the entire tooth and set the basis for teeth regeneration. Tissue engineering using scaffold and cell aggregate methods has been considered to produce bioengineered dental tissues, while dental stem/progenitor cells, which can differentiate into dental cell lineages, have been also introduced into the field of tooth mineralization and regeneration. Some of the main strategies for making enamel, dentin, and complex tooth-like structures are presented in this paper. However, there are still significant barriers that obstruct such strategies to move into the regular clinic practice, and these should be overcome in order to have the regenerative dentistry as the important mean that can treat the consequences of tooth-related diseases.

  18. Polymorphism, selection and tandem duplication of transferrin genes in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua - Conserved synteny between fish monolobal and tetrapod bilobal transferrin loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tooming-Klunderud Ave

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The two homologous iron-binding lobes of transferrins are thought to have evolved by gene duplication of an ancestral monolobal form, but any conserved synteny between bilobal and monolobal transferrin loci remains unexplored. The important role played by transferrin in the resistance to invading pathogens makes this polymorphic gene a highly valuable candidate for studying adaptive divergence among local populations. Results The Atlantic cod genome was shown to harbour two tandem duplicated serum transferrin genes (Tf1, Tf2, a melanotransferrin gene (MTf, and a monolobal transferrin gene (Omp. Whereas Tf1 and Tf2 were differentially expressed in liver and brain, the Omp transcript was restricted to the otoliths. Fish, chicken and mammals showed highly conserved syntenic regions in which monolobal and bilobal transferrins reside, but contrasting with tetrapods, the fish transferrin genes are positioned on three different linkage groups. Sequence alignment of cod Tf1 cDNAs from Northeast (NE and Northwest (NW Atlantic populations revealed 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP causing the replacement of 16 amino acids, including eight surface residues revealed by the modelled 3D-structures, that might influence the binding of pathogens for removal of iron. SNP analysis of a total of 375 individuals from 14 trans-Atlantic populations showed that the Tf1-NE variant was almost fixed in the Baltic cod and predominated in the other NE Atlantic populations, whereas the NW Atlantic populations were more heterozygous and showed high frequencies of the Tf-NW SNP alleles. Conclusions The highly conserved synteny between fish and tetrapod transferrin loci infers that the fusion of tandem duplicated Omp-like genes gave rise to the modern transferrins. The multiple nonsynonymous substitutions in cod Tf1 with putative structural effects, together with highly divergent allele frequencies among different cod populations, strongly suggest

  19. Polymorphism, selection and tandem duplication of transferrin genes in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)--conserved synteny between fish monolobal and tetrapod bilobal transferrin loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Øivind; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Pirolli, Davide; Tooming-Klunderud, Ave; Petersen, Petra E; André, Carl

    2011-05-25

    The two homologous iron-binding lobes of transferrins are thought to have evolved by gene duplication of an ancestral monolobal form, but any conserved synteny between bilobal and monolobal transferrin loci remains unexplored. The important role played by transferrin in the resistance to invading pathogens makes this polymorphic gene a highly valuable candidate for studying adaptive divergence among local populations. The Atlantic cod genome was shown to harbour two tandem duplicated serum transferrin genes (Tf1, Tf2), a melanotransferrin gene (MTf), and a monolobal transferrin gene (Omp). Whereas Tf1 and Tf2 were differentially expressed in liver and brain, the Omp transcript was restricted to the otoliths. Fish, chicken and mammals showed highly conserved syntenic regions in which monolobal and bilobal transferrins reside, but contrasting with tetrapods, the fish transferrin genes are positioned on three different linkage groups. Sequence alignment of cod Tf1 cDNAs from Northeast (NE) and Northwest (NW) Atlantic populations revealed 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) causing the replacement of 16 amino acids, including eight surface residues revealed by the modelled 3D-structures, that might influence the binding of pathogens for removal of iron. SNP analysis of a total of 375 individuals from 14 trans-Atlantic populations showed that the Tf1-NE variant was almost fixed in the Baltic cod and predominated in the other NE Atlantic populations, whereas the NW Atlantic populations were more heterozygous and showed high frequencies of the Tf-NW SNP alleles. The highly conserved synteny between fish and tetrapod transferrin loci infers that the fusion of tandem duplicated Omp-like genes gave rise to the modern transferrins. The multiple nonsynonymous substitutions in cod Tf1 with putative structural effects, together with highly divergent allele frequencies among different cod populations, strongly suggest evidence for positive selection and local adaptation in

  20. Polymorphism, selection and tandem duplication of transferrin genes in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) - Conserved synteny between fish monolobal and tetrapod bilobal transferrin loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The two homologous iron-binding lobes of transferrins are thought to have evolved by gene duplication of an ancestral monolobal form, but any conserved synteny between bilobal and monolobal transferrin loci remains unexplored. The important role played by transferrin in the resistance to invading pathogens makes this polymorphic gene a highly valuable candidate for studying adaptive divergence among local populations. Results The Atlantic cod genome was shown to harbour two tandem duplicated serum transferrin genes (Tf1, Tf2), a melanotransferrin gene (MTf), and a monolobal transferrin gene (Omp). Whereas Tf1 and Tf2 were differentially expressed in liver and brain, the Omp transcript was restricted to the otoliths. Fish, chicken and mammals showed highly conserved syntenic regions in which monolobal and bilobal transferrins reside, but contrasting with tetrapods, the fish transferrin genes are positioned on three different linkage groups. Sequence alignment of cod Tf1 cDNAs from Northeast (NE) and Northwest (NW) Atlantic populations revealed 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) causing the replacement of 16 amino acids, including eight surface residues revealed by the modelled 3D-structures, that might influence the binding of pathogens for removal of iron. SNP analysis of a total of 375 individuals from 14 trans-Atlantic populations showed that the Tf1-NE variant was almost fixed in the Baltic cod and predominated in the other NE Atlantic populations, whereas the NW Atlantic populations were more heterozygous and showed high frequencies of the Tf-NW SNP alleles. Conclusions The highly conserved synteny between fish and tetrapod transferrin loci infers that the fusion of tandem duplicated Omp-like genes gave rise to the modern transferrins. The multiple nonsynonymous substitutions in cod Tf1 with putative structural effects, together with highly divergent allele frequencies among different cod populations, strongly suggest evidence for positive

  1. Formation of the dentino-enamel interface in enamelysin (MMP-20)-deficient mouse incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniash, Elia; Skobe, Ziedonis; Bartlett, John D

    2006-05-01

    An anomalous dentino-enamel junction (DEJ), manifested by delamination of the enamel layer, was reported in enamelysin [matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20)] knockout (KO) mice. To better understand the possible role of MMP-20 in the formation of the DEJ, we performed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the DEJ at early stages of tooth morphogenesis in KO mice. Our TEM analysis revealed that in the incisors from KO mice the mantle dentin is hypomineralized at the onset of enamel mineralization. At this early stage, TEM revealed no apparent differences in nascent aprismatic enamel between the KO mice and the controls. Hypomineralized mantle dentin was also observed in the incisors from KO mice, as assessed by back-scattered SEM at the secretory and early maturation stages, but not in the late-maturation stage, suggesting that the mineralization of mantle dentin is not completely arrested, but rather postponed. Histological studies indicate that the organic content in the initial enamel layer remains very high throughout amelogenesis. These results imply that MMP-20 is involved in the regulation of mineralization in mantle dentin and demonstrate the complex nature of DEJ formation. They also suggest that the structural and functional properties of the DEJ are determined during the initial mineralization stages.

  2. The fracture behaviour of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtle, Sabine; Habelitz, Stefan; Klocke, Arndt; Fett, Theo; Schneider, Gerold A

    2010-01-01

    Enamel is the hardest tissue in the human body covering the crowns of teeth. Whereas the underlying dental material dentin is very well characterized in terms of mechanical and fracture properties, available data for enamel are quite limited and are apart from the most recent investigation mainly based on indentation studies. Within the current study, stable crack-growth experiments in bovine enamel have been performed, to measure fracture resistance curves for enamel. Single edge notched bending specimens (SENB) prepared out of bovine incisors were tested in 3-point bending and subsequently analysed using optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy. Cracks propagated primarily within the protein-rich rod sheaths and crack propagation occurred under an inclined angle to initial notch direction not only due to enamel rod and hydroxyapatite crystallite orientation but potentially also due to protein shearing. Determined mode I fracture resistance curves ranged from 0.8-1.5 MPa*m(1/2) at the beginning of crack propagation up to 4.4 MPa*m(1/2) at 500 microm crack extension; corresponding mode II values ranged from 0.3 to 1.5 MPa*m(1/2).

  3. [Enamel bundles and lamellae under the scanning electron microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bures, H; Svejda, J

    1976-01-01

    Lamellae, tufts and cracks were found in the enamel near the dentionenamel junction. When investigated by the scanning electron microscop, lamellae and tufts were very similar to each other as to their structure. Lamellae appeared in two kinds: 1. Organic material originating in the dentionenamel membrane filled the whole space. 2. The space was empty, yet an organic membrane was covering the walls of adjacent prisms. Tufts and lamellae differed merely in their lenght. The walls of the cracks lacked organic material, the prisms being damaged or their course interrupted.

  4. Dentin-enamel adhesives in pediatric dentistry: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Godoy, Franklin; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Adhesives and composite technology have made composite resins and polyacid-modified resin-based composites (compomers) very popular as materials to restore primary and permanent anterior and posterior teeth. More conservative preparations can be performed that maintain more tooth structure due to the adhesive properties of the adhesives used with composites and compomers. Meticulous care in the placement of adhesives and, subsequently, resin-based composites and compomers is necessary to produce long-term satisfactory results. The purpose of this paper is to update the current status in regards to dentin-enamel adhesives in primary teeth.

  5. Enamel microabrasion for aesthetic management of dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Pallavi; Ansari, Afroz Alam; Moda, Preeti; Yadav, Madhulika

    2013-10-11

    Fluorosis has increased in recent times due to fluoridation of drinking water and addition of fluoride to various edible items, which leads to unaesthetic appearance of teeth visible at close quarters. The enamel microabrasion technique is a conservative method that improves the appearance of the teeth by restoring bright and superficial smoothness, without causing significant structural loss. The aim of this article is to describe an easy technique for managing mild to moderate dental fluorosis using Opalustre (Ultradent Products) microabrasion slurry. This conservative approach may be considered an interesting alternative to more invasive prosthetic techniques like composite resin restorations, ceramic veneers or crown fabrications.

  6. Enamel microabrasion for aesthetic management of dental fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Pallavi; Ansari, Afroz Alam; Moda, Preeti; Yadav, Madhulika

    2013-01-01

    Fluorosis has increased in recent times due to fluoridation of drinking water and addition of fluoride to various edible items, which leads to unaesthetic appearance of teeth visible at close quarters. The enamel microabrasion technique is a conservative method that improves the appearance of the teeth by restoring bright and superficial smoothness, without causing significant structural loss. The aim of this article is to describe an easy technique for managing mild to moderate dental fluorosis using Opalustre (Ultradent Products) microabrasion slurry. This conservative approach may be considered an interesting alternative to more invasive prosthetic techniques like composite resin restorations, ceramic veneers or crown fabrications. PMID:24121810

  7. Regularities of intermittent luminescence from spherical and tetrapod-shaped quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Vitukhnovsky, A G; Lidsky, V V; Khokhlov, E M

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent photoluminescence of colloidal core/shell semiconductor nanocrystals of spherical and branched shape was studied under CW-laser excitation. Luminescent multichannel registration system was applied for the fluorescence detection of single quantum dots (QDs) in the polystyrene matrix. Comparative statistical data were obtained and analyzed for nano-sphere CdSe/CdS and nano-tetrapod CdTe/CdSe crystals. It was found that "on-" and "off-" blinking times are distributed according to the power law both for spherical CdSe/CdS and tetrapod shape CdTe/CdSe samples in spite of significant QD formfactor differences. We have also found that regardless of the QD-shape both successive "on"-times and successive "off "-times are correlated and pointing out to the memory effect in the mechanism of QD re-emission comprising the prehistory of exciton birth and recombination. Pearson-s co-efficients were calculated for the correlations of QD-luminescence behavior. Results of experimental measurements were compared wi...

  8. Evolution and development of the tetrapod auditory system: an organ of Corti-centric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Pan, Ning; Jahan, Israt; Duncan, Jeremy S; Kopecky, Benjamin J; Elliott, Karen L; Kersigo, Jennifer; Yang, Tian

    2013-01-01

    The tetrapod auditory system transmits sound through the outer and middle ear to the organ of Corti or other sound pressure receivers of the inner ear where specialized hair cells translate vibrations of the basilar membrane into electrical potential changes that are conducted by the spiral ganglion neurons to the auditory nuclei. In other systems, notably the vertebrate limb, a detailed connection between the evolutionary variations in adaptive morphology and the underlying alterations in the genetic basis of development has been partially elucidated. In this review, we attempt to correlate evolutionary and partially characterized molecular data into a cohesive perspective of the evolution of the mammalian organ of Corti out of the tetrapod basilar papilla. We propose a stepwise, molecularly partially characterized transformation of the ancestral, vestibular developmental program of the vertebrate ear. This review provides a framework to decipher both discrete steps in development and the evolution of unique functional adaptations of the auditory system. The combined analysis of evolution and development establishes a powerful cross-correlation where conclusions derived from either approach become more meaningful in a larger context which is not possible through exclusively evolution or development centered perspectives. Selection may explain the survival of the fittest auditory system, but only developmental genetics can explain the arrival of the fittest auditory system. [Modified after (Wagner 2011)]. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A revision of tetrapod footprints from the late Carboniferous of the West Midlands, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Luke E; Jones, Andrew S; Butler, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    A series of sandstone slabs from Hamstead, Birmingham (West Midlands, UK), preserve an assemblage of tetrapod trackways and individual tracks from the Enville Member of the Salop Formation (late Carboniferous: late Moscovian-Kasimovian). This material has received limited previous study, despite being one of the few British sites to preserve Carboniferous tetrapod footprints. Here, we restudy and revise the taxonomy of this material, and document it using 3D models produced using photogrammetry. The assemblage is dominated by large tracks assigned to Limnopus isp., which were made by early amphibians (temnospondyls). A number of similar but smaller tracks are assigned to Batrachichnus salamandroides (also made by temnospondyls). Dimetropus leisnerianus (made by early synapsids) and Dromopus lacertoides (made by lizard-like sauropsids such as araeoscelids) are also present. This ichnofauna contrasts with a slightly stratigraphically older, more extensive and better-studied assemblage from Alveley (Shropshire), which is dominated by small amphibians with relatively rare reptiliomorphs, but which lacks Dromopus tracks. The presence of Dromopus lacertoides at Hamstead is consistent with the trend towards increasing aridity through the late Carboniferous. It is possible that the assemblage is the stratigraphically oldest occurrence of this important amniote ichnotaxon.

  10. A revision of tetrapod footprints from the late Carboniferous of the West Midlands, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke E. Meade

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of sandstone slabs from Hamstead, Birmingham (West Midlands, UK, preserve an assemblage of tetrapod trackways and individual tracks from the Enville Member of the Salop Formation (late Carboniferous: late Moscovian–Kasimovian. This material has received limited previous study, despite being one of the few British sites to preserve Carboniferous tetrapod footprints. Here, we restudy and revise the taxonomy of this material, and document it using 3D models produced using photogrammetry. The assemblage is dominated by large tracks assigned to Limnopus isp., which were made by early amphibians (temnospondyls. A number of similar but smaller tracks are assigned to Batrachichnus salamandroides (also made by temnospondyls. Dimetropus leisnerianus (made by early synapsids and Dromopus lacertoides (made by lizard-like sauropsids such as araeoscelids are also present. This ichnofauna contrasts with a slightly stratigraphically older, more extensive and better-studied assemblage from Alveley (Shropshire, which is dominated by small amphibians with relatively rare reptiliomorphs, but which lacks Dromopus tracks. The presence of Dromopus lacertoides at Hamstead is consistent with the trend towards increasing aridity through the late Carboniferous. It is possible that the assemblage is the stratigraphically oldest occurrence of this important amniote ichnotaxon.

  11. Enamel microabrasion: An overview of clinical and scientific considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Aguiar, Flavio Henrique Baggio; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-01

    Superficial stains and irregularities of the enamel are generally what prompt patients to seek dental intervention to improve their smile. These stains or defects may be due to hypoplasia, amelogenesis imperfecta, mineralized white spots, or fluorosis, for which enamel microabrasion is primarily indicated. Enamel microabrasion involves the use of acidic and abrasive agents, such as with 37% phosphoric acid and pumice or 6% hydrochloric acid and silica, applied to the altered enamel surface wi...

  12. Changes in dental enamel oven heated or irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Analysis by FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, J. S.; Ana, P. A.; Benetti, C.; Valério, M. E. G.; Zezell, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the change that occurs in dental enamel under action of oven heating or Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation aiming to obtain a structure more resistant to demineralization. Enamel powder was obtained from bovine teeth. Samples were subjected to oven heating at temperatures of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000°C or during laser irradiation with energy densities of 7.53, 10.95, and 13.74 J/cm2. The infrared thermography was used to measure the surface temperature generated in the solid samples of enamel during lasers irradiation. The samples were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), which shows changes on enamel oven heated or laser irradiated, due to treatments, related to carbonates, adsorbed water and hydroxyl content. These compositional effects were more evident in lased samples. These changes may alter the material properties such as its solubility, and decrese of demineralization that is important for caries prevention.

  13. In vitro inhibition of bovine enamel demineralization by enamel matrix derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Jin Mei; Ieong, Cheng Cheng; Xiang, Chen Yang; Lv, Xue Ping; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Xue Dong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Ling Lin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) affects the demineralization of bovine enamel in vitro and to assess the agent's anti-caries potential. Bovine enamel blocks were prepared and randomly divided into three groups (n = 15 per group), which were treated with distilled water (negative control), NaF (positive control), or Emdogain. All three groups were pH-cycled 12 times over 6 days. The percentage of surface enamel microhardness reduction (%SMHR), calcium demineralization rate (CDR), surface roughness, lesion depth and mineral loss after demineralization were examined. Surface morphology of specimens was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The Emdogain and positive control groups showed similar surface roughness, lesion depths and mineral loss, which were significantly lower than those in the negative control group. In addition, the enamel surfaces of both the Emdogain and NaF groups showed much narrower intercrystalline spaces than the surfaces of the negative control group, which exhibited extensive microfractures along the crystal edges. %SMHR differed significantly among all three groups, with the smallest value in the Emdogain group and the greatest in the negative control group. These results indicate that enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) can significantly inhibit demineralization of bovine enamel in vitro, suggesting that it has potential as an anti-caries agent. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Uniaxial compressive behavior of micro-pillars of dental enamel characterized in multiple directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ezgi D; Jelitto, Hans; Schneider, Gerold A

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the compressive elastic modulus and failure strength values of bovine enamel at the first hierarchical level formed by hydroxyapatite (HA) nanofibers and organic matter are identified in longitudinal, transverse and oblique direction with the uniaxial micro-compression method. The elastic modulus values (∼70 GPa) measured here are within the range of results reported in the literature but these values were found surprisingly uniform in all orientations as opposed to the previous nanoindentation findings revealing anisotropic elastic properties in enamel. Failure strengths were recorded up to ∼1.7 GPa and different failure modes (such as shear, microbuckling, fiber fracture) governed by the orientation of the HA nanofibers were visualized. Structural irregularities leading to mineral contacts between the nanofibers are postulated as the main reason for the high compressive strength and direction-independent elastic behavior on enamels first hierarchical level. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Added, N. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: nemitala@dfn.if.usp.br; Rizzutto, M.A. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curado, J.F. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Francci, C. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Markarian, R. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mori, M. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-08-15

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a {sup 35}Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  16. PRISMLESS ENAMEL IN HUMAN NON-ERUPTED DECIDUOUS MOLAR TEETH: A SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAVA Marcelo

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency, structure and thickness of the prismless enamel layer in the buccal and lingual surfaces of non-erupted deciduous molar teeth were described. The teeth were extracted, kept in a 70% ethanol solution, dried, coated with gold and examined in a scanning electron microscope JEOL, JSM-6.100. The aprismatic layer was observed in the occlusal, middle and cervical thirds of all buccal and lingual surfaces. The hydroxyapatite crystals were arranged parallel to each other and perpendicular to the enamel surface. No statistically significant differences were observed between the occlusal, middle and cervical thirds, which had 7.257 m m of average thickness.

  17. Synthesis of dental enamel-like hydroxyapatite through solution mediated solid-state conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junling; Jiang, Dongliang; Zhang, Jingxian; Lin, Qingling; Huang, Zhengren

    2010-03-02

    An ordered dental enamel-like structure of hydroxyapatite (HAp) was achieved through a solution mediated solid-state conversion process with organic phosphate surfactant and gelatin as the mediating agent. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests demonstrated uniform sizes in the obtained apatite nanorods which arranged in parallel to each other along the c-axis and formed organized microarchitectural units over 10 microm in size. The sizes of the synthetic hydroxyapatite nanorods were similar to that observed in enamel from human teeth. The formation and regulation of the orientation and size of HAp nanorods might lead to a better understanding of the biomineralization process for the preparation of high performance biomaterials.

  18. Morphology of the cemento-enamel junction in premolar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arambawatta, Kapila; Peiris, Roshan; Nanayakkara, Deepthi

    2009-12-01

    The present study attempted to describe the distribution of the mineralized tissues that compose the cemento-enamel junction, with respect to both the different types of permanent premolars of males and females and the various surfaces of individual teeth. The cervical region of ground sections of 67 premolars that had been extracted for orthodontic reasons were analyzed using transmitted light microscopy to identify which of the following tissue interrelationships was present at the cemento-enamel junction: cementum overlapping enamel; enamel overlapping cementum; edge-to-edge relationship between cementum and enamel; or the presence of gaps between the enamel and cementum with exposed dentin. An edge-to-edge interrelation between root cementum and enamel was predominant (55.1%). In approximately one-third of the sample, gaps between cementum and enamel with exposed dentin were observed. Cementum overlapping enamel was less prevalent than previously reported, and enamel overlapping cementum was seen in a very small proportion of the sample. In any one tooth, the distribution of mineralized tissues at the cemento-enamel junction was irregular and unpredictable. The frequency of gaps between enamel and cementum with exposure of dentin was higher than previously reported, which suggests that this region is fragile and strongly predisposed to pathological changes. Hence, this region should be protected and carefully managed during routine clinical procedures such as dental bleaching, orthodontic treatment, and placement of restorative materials.

  19. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Guy

    Full Text Available The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution. Recent decades have been significant in unveiling developmental processes controlling tooth morphogenesis, dental variation and the origination of dental novelties. The enamel-dentine junction constitutes a precursor for the morphology of the outer enamel surface through growth of the enamel cap which may go along with the addition of original features. The relative contribution of these two tooth components to morphological variation and their respective response to natural selection is a major issue in paleoanthropology. This study will determine how much enamel morphology relies on the form of the enamel-dentine junction. The outer occlusal enamel surface and the enamel-dentine junction surface of 76 primate second upper molars are represented by polygonal meshes and investigated using tridimensional topometrical analysis. Quantitative criteria (elevation, inclination, orientation, curvature and occlusal patch count are introduced to show that the enamel-dentine junction significantly constrains the topographical properties of the outer enamel surface. Our results show a significant correlation for elevation, orientation, inclination, curvature and occlusal complexity between the outer enamel surface and the enamel dentine junction for all studied primate taxa with the exception of four modern humans for curvature (p<0.05. Moreover, we show that, for all selected topometrical parameters apart from occlusal patch count, the recorded correlations significantly decrease along with enamel thickening in our sample. While preserving tooth integrity by providing resistance to wear and fractures, the variation of enamel thickness may modify the curvature present at the occlusal enamel surface in relation to enamel-dentine junction

  20. Effect of fluoride toothpastes on enamel demineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintner Zeno

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was the aim of this study to investigate the effect of four different toothpastes with differing fluoride compounds on enamel remineralization. Methods A 3 × 3 mm window on the enamel surface of 90 human premolars was demineralized in a hydroxyethylcellulose solution at pH 4.8. The teeth were divided into 6 groups and the lower half of the window was covered with varnish serving as control. The teeth were immersed in a toothpaste slurry containing: placebo tooth paste (group 1; remineralization solution (group 2; Elmex Anticaries (group 3; Elmex Sensitive (group 4; Blend-a-med Complete (group 5 and Colgate GRF (group 6. Ten teeth of each group were used for the determination of the F- content in the superficial enamel layer and acid solubility of enamel expressed in soluble phosphorus. Of 6 teeth of each group serial sections were cut and investigated with polarization light microscopy (PLM and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. Results The PLM results showed an increased remineralization of the lesion body in the Elmex Anticaries, Elmex Sensitive and Colgate GRF group but not in the Blend-a-med group. A statistically significant higher Ca content was found in the Elmex Anticaries group. The fluoride content in the superficial enamel layer was significantly increased in both Elmex groups and the Blend-a-med group. Phosphorus solubility was significantly decreased in both Elmex groups and the Blend-a-med group. Conclusion It can be concluded that amine fluoride compounds in toothpastes result in a clearly marked remineralization of caries like enamel lesions followed by sodium fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate formulations.

  1. Fluoride reduces the expression of enamel proteins and cytokines in an ameloblast-derived cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riksen, Elisabeth Aurstad; Kalvik, Anne; Brookes, Steven; Hynne, Astrid; Snead, Malcolm L; Lyngstadaas, S Petter; Reseland, Janne E

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the effects of two different fluoride concentrations on the expression of enamel proteins, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), cytokines and interleukins by an ameloblast-derived cell line. Murine ameloblast-derived cells (LS-8), mouse odontogenic epithelia, were exposed to 1 or 5ppm sodium fluoride (NaF) (0.46 and 2.25ppm F, respectively) for 1, 3 and 7 days. The effect of NaF on the mRNA expression of enamel proteins was quantified; the secretion of cytokines, and interleukins, and the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, into the cell culture medium was measured and compared to untreated controls. The effect on cell growth after 1- and 3-days in culture was measured using BrdU incorporation. Fluoride at 2.25ppm reduced mRNA expression of the structural enamel matrix proteins amelogenin (amel), ameloblastin (ambn), enamelin (enam), and the enamel protease matrix metallopeptidase-20 (MMP-20). Similarly several vascularisation factors (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCP-1) and interferon inducible protein 10 (IP-10), was also reduced by 2.25ppm fluoride. ALP activity and proliferation were stimulated by 0.46ppm fluoride but inhibited by 2.25ppm fluoride. These results indicate that fluoride may impact on the expression of structural enamel proteins and the protease responsible for processing these proteins during the secretory stage of amelogenesis and go some way to explaining the mineralization defect that characterises fluorotic enamel. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of vertical wall and tetrapod weights on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters under irregular wave conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Kil Park

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rubble mound breakwaters protect the coastal line against severe erosion caused by wave action. This study examined the performance of different sizes and properties (i.e. height of vertical wall and tetrapod size of rubble mound breakwaters on reducing the overtopping discharge. The physical model used in this study was derived based on an actual rubble mound in Busan Yacht Harbor. This research attempts to fill the gap in practical knowledge on the combined effect of the armor roughness and vertical wall on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters. The main governing parameters used in this study were the vertical wall height, variation of the tetrapod weights, initial water level elevation, and the volume of overtopping under constant wave properties. The experimental results showed that the roughness factor differed according to the tetrapod size. Furthermore, the overtopping discharge with no vertical wall was similar to that with relatively short vertical walls (γν = 1. Therefore, the experimental results highlight the importance of the height of the vertical wall in reducing overtopping discharge. Moreover, a large tetrapod size may allow coastal engineers to choose a shorter vertical wall to save cost, while obtaining better performance.

  3. Effects of vertical wall and tetrapod weights on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters under irregular wave conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Sang Kil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rubble mound breakwaters protect the coastal line against severe erosion caused by wave action. This study examined the performance of different sizes and properties (i.e. height of vertical wall and tetrapod size of rubble mound breakwaters on reducing the overtopping discharge. The physical model used in this study was derived based on an actual rubble mound in Busan Yacht Harbor. This research attempts to fill the gap in practical knowledge on the combined effect of the armor roughness and vertical wall on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters. The main governing parameters used in this study were the vertical wall height, variation of the tetrapod weights, initial water level elevation, and the volume of overtopping under constant wave properties. The experimental results showed that the roughness factor differed according to the tetrapod size. Furthermore, the overtopping discharge with no vertical wall was similar to that with relatively short vertical walls ( 1 γv = 1. Therefore, the experimental results highlight the importance of the height of the vertical wall in reducing overtopping discharge. Moreover, a large tetrapod size may allow coastal engineers to choose a shorter vertical wall to save cost, while obtaining better performance.

  4. Diverse tetrapod trackways in the Lower Pennsylvanian Tynemouth Creek Formation, near St. Martins, southern New Brunswick, Canada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falcon-Lang, Howard J.; Gibling, Martin R.; Benton, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Newly discovered tetrapod trackways are reported from eight sites in the Lower Pennsylvanian Tynemouth Creek Formation of southern New Brunswick, Canada. By far the most abundant and well-preserved tracks comprise pentadactyl footprints of medium size (32–53 mm long) with slender digits and a nar...

  5. The application of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) in regenerative periodontal therapy: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Schwarz, F.; Becker, J.; Brecx, M.

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative periodontal therapy aims at reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures such as new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Findings from basic research indicate that enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) has a key role in periodontal wound healing.

  6. Surface variations affecting human dental enamel studied using nanomechanical and chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Michelle Emma

    The enamel surface is the interface between the tooth and its ever changing oral environment. Cavity (caries) formation and extrinsic tooth staining are due, respectively, to degradation of the enamel structure under low pH conditions and interactions between salivary pellicle and dietary elements. Both of these occur at the enamel surface and are caused by the local environment changing the chemistry of the surface. The results can be detrimental to the enamel's mechanical integrity and aesthetics. Incipient carious lesions are the precursor to caries and form due to demineralisation of enamel. These carious lesions are a reversible structure where ions (e.g. Ca2+, F -) can diffuse in (remineralisation) to preserve the tooth's structural integrity. This investigation used controlled in vitro demineralisation and remineralisation to study artificial carious lesion formation and repair. The carious lesions were cross-sectioned and characterised using nanoindentation, electron probe micro-analysis and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Mechanical and chemical maps showed the carious lesion had a significantly reduced hardness and elastic modulus, and the calcium and phosphate content was lower than in sound enamel. Fluoride based remineralisation treatments gave a new phase (possibly fluorohydroxyapatite) within the lesion with mechanical properties higher than sound enamel. The acquired salivary pellicle is a protein-rich film formed by the physisorption of organic molecules in saliva onto the enamel surface. Its functions include lubrication during mastication and chemical protection. However, pellicle proteins react with dietary elements such as polyphenols (tannins in tea) causing a brown stain. This study has used in vitro dynamic nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy to examine normal and stained pellicles formed in vivo. The effects of polyphenols on the pellicle's mechanical properties and morphology have been studied. It was found that the

  7. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Franck; Lazzari, Vincent; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Thiery, Ghislain

    2015-01-01

    The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution. Recent decades have been significant in unveiling developmental processes controlling tooth morphogenesis, dental variation and the origination of dental novelties. The enamel-dentine junction constitutes a precursor for the morphology of the outer enamel surface through growth of the enamel cap which may go along with the addition of original features. The relative contribution of these two tooth components to morphological variation and their respective response to natural selection is a major issue in paleoanthropology. This study will determine how much enamel morphology relies on the form of the enamel-dentine junction. The outer occlusal enamel surface and the enamel-dentine junction surface of 76 primate second upper molars are represented by polygonal meshes and investigated using tridimensional topometrical analysis. Quantitative criteria (elevation, inclination, orientation, curvature and occlusal patch count) are introduced to show that the enamel-dentine junction significantly constrains the topographical properties of the outer enamel surface. Our results show a significant correlation for elevation, orientation, inclination, curvature and occlusal complexity between the outer enamel surface and the enamel dentine junction for all studied primate taxa with the exception of four modern humans for curvature (penamel thickening in our sample. While preserving tooth integrity by providing resistance to wear and fractures, the variation of enamel thickness may modify the curvature present at the occlusal enamel surface in relation to enamel-dentine junction, potentially modifying dental functionalities such as blunt versus sharp dental tools. In terms of natural selection, there is a balance between increasing tooth resistance and maintaining

  8. Passive and iontophoretic transport of fluorides across enamel in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Baig, Arif; Li, S Kevin

    2014-06-01

    Passive and iontophoretic transport of fluoride from three fluoride sources, NaF, sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP), and SnF2 solutions, across bovine enamel was investigated to (1) determine the characteristics of the intrinsic barrier of enamel for ion transport, (2) examine the feasibility of iontophoretically enhanced transport of fluoride across enamel, and (3) identify the transport mechanisms involved in enamel iontophoresis. Conductivity experiments were performed with bovine enamel specimens in side-by-side diffusion cells to evaluate the electrical and barrier properties of the enamel with electrolytes of different ion sizes and under different ion concentrations and pH conditions in vitro. Transport experiments of the enamel were performed in the diffusion cells with the NaF, MFP, and SnF2 solutions. The conductivity results showed that the enamel specimens behaved as a neutral membrane or that of low pore charge density. Cathodal iontophoresis significantly enhanced the delivery of fluoride ions across the enamel from the solutions over passive transport, consistent with Nernst-Planck theory and the direct field effect (i.e., electrophoresis) as the dominant flux-enhancing mechanism. The enamel demonstrated significant transport hindrance for the ions, and the effective pore radii of the transport pathways in the enamel were found to be approximately 0.7-0.9 nm. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Growth and mechanisms of enamel-like hierarchical nanostructures on single crystalline hydroxyapatite micro-ribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guobin; Liu, Xiang Yang; Wang, Mu

    2011-06-01

    In vitro growth of enamel-like microstructured hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals is highly expected for developing novel biomaterials/scaffolds. It is also essential for a clearer understanding of in vivo biomineralization process. In this paper, hierarchical HAP structures are controllably fabricated by growth of nanocrystals on single crystalline micro-ribbon substrates in vitro at biophysical conditions. HAP crystals grown on the substrate change from disordered aggregations of nano-flakes to well-oriented nano-needles, branched bundles of nano-needles, and finally highly porous aggregates, with increase of F- concentrations. The flexibility of the size, morphology, and microstructure control highlights a method to produce hierarchical HAP structures for potential applications in dental restoration or bone implant. We demonstrate that the mutual effects of F- on the crystallinity of HAP and on the supersaturation of the solutions control the morphology and assembly properties of the products. Moreover, the products excellently mimic real tooth enamel structures formed with different F- intakes. The work represents an appropriate simplified model system for an in-depth understanding of the microscopic mechanisms of the effects of F- on enamel growth, and the relationship of enamel microstructures and dental diseases.

  10. Micro-CT and FE-SEM enamel analyses of calcium-based agent application after bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Mauricio Neves; Rodrigues, Flávia Pires; Silikas, Nick; Francci, Carlos Eduardo

    2017-07-08

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effects of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on bleached enamel. A bleaching agent (35% hydrogen peroxide) was applied, 4 × 8 min on premolar teeth (n = 8). A CPP-ACP paste was applied for 7 days. Prior and post-treatment, microtomography images were obtained and 3D regions of interest (ROIs) were selected, from outer enamel, extending to 110.2-μm depth. CT parameters of structure: thickness (St.Th), separation (St.Sp), and fragmentation index (Fr.I.) were calculated for each (ROI). Data was submitted to paired t tests at a 95% confidence level. The samples were evaluated at 3000 to 100,000 magnification. Quantitative analysis of enamel mineral content was also determined by SEM EDX. There was a significant increase in structure thickness and calcium content. The phosphorus content increased after bleaching. There was also a decreased separation and fragmentation index on the outer enamel to a depth of 56.2 μm (p < 0.05). There were no changes at 110.2-μm depth for the bleaching CPP-ACP association. A covering layer and decreased spaces between the hydroxyapatite crystals appeared around the enamel prisms, 7 days after the CPP-ACP application. The application of a CPP-ACP provides a compact structure on the enamel's outer surface, for 7 days, due to calcium deposition. CT parameters seem to be a useful tool for mineralizing and remineralizing future studies. CPP-ACP neutralizes any adverse effects on enamel surface when applied during a week after bleaching and minimizes any side effects of the bleaching treatment due to a more compact structure.

  11. Diagenesis-inspired reaction of magnesium ions with surface enamel mineral modifies properties of human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Eimar, Hazem; Bassett, David C; Schnabel, Martin; Ciobanu, Ovidiu; Nelea, Valentin; McKee, Marc D; Cerruti, Marta; Tamimi, Faleh

    2016-06-01

    Mineralized tissues such as teeth and bones consist primarily of highly organized apatitic calcium-phosphate crystallites within a complex organic matrix. The dimensions and organization of these apatite crystallites at the nanoscale level determine in part the physical properties of mineralized tissues. After death, geological processes such as diagenesis and dolomitization can alter the crystallographic properties of mineralized tissues through cycles of dissolution and re-precipitation occurring in highly saline environments. Inspired by these natural exchange phenomena, we investigated the effect of hypersalinity on tooth enamel. We discovered that magnesium ions reacted with human tooth enamel through a process of dissolution and re-precipitation, reducing enamel crystal size at the surface of the tooth. This change in crystallographic structure made the teeth harder and whiter. Salt-water rinses have been used for centuries to ameliorate oral infections; however, our discovery suggests that this ancient practice could have additional unexpected benefits. Here we describe an approach inspired by natural geological processes to modify the properties of a biomineral - human tooth enamel. In this study we showed that treatment of human tooth enamel with solutions saturated with magnesium induced changes in the nanocrystals at the outer surface of the protective enamel layer. As a consequence, the physical properties of the tooth were modified; tooth microhardness increased and the color shade became whiter, thus suggesting that this method could be used as a clinical treatment to improve dental mechanical properties and esthetics. Such an approach is simple and straightforward, and could also be used to develop new strategies to synthesize and modify biominerals for biomedical and industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Viable approach to manage superficial enamel discoloration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Naveen; Singbal, Kiran P.

    2010-01-01

    Esthetics is a primary concern amongst young patients and represents a challenge to the dentist. Discolored teeth are frequently seen in the general population. Several techniques have been devised to minimize or completely eliminate tooth discoloration. This case report highlights the successful management of enamel discoloration via modified microabrasion technique followed by in office bleaching. PMID:22114441

  13. Mechanics of longitudinal cracks in tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barani, A; Keown, A J; Bush, M B; Lee, J J-W; Chai, H; Lawn, B R

    2011-05-01

    A study is made of longitudinal "channel" cracking in tooth enamel from axial compressive loading. The cracks simulate those generated in the molar and premolar teeth of humans and animals by natural tooth function. Contact loading tests are made on extracted human molars with hard and soft indenting plates to determine the evolution of such cracks with increasing load. Fracture is largely stable, with initial slow growth followed by acceleration as the cracks approach completion around an enamel side wall. A simple power law relation expresses the critical load for full fracture in terms of characteristic tooth dimensions-base radius and enamel thickness-as well as enamel toughness. Extended three-dimensional finite element modeling with provision for growth of embedded cracks is used to validate this relation. The cracks leave "fingerprints" that offer valuable clues to dietary habits, and provide a basis for a priori prediction of bite forces for different animals from measured tooth dimensions. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. RATE AND MECHANISM OF ENAMEL DEMINERALIZATION INSITU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARENDS, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, MR; OGAARD, B; DIJKMAN, AG; JONGEBLOED, WL

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, data are presented on the in situ demineralization of human enamel as a function of the demineralization period. To quantify the mineral loss parameters versus time, it is important to obtain information on the kinetics, and thus on the mechanism of dental caries. The results show

  15. [Incipient cariogenic demineralization of human enamel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, M M; Uribe Echevarría, J; Gendelman, H

    1991-09-01

    32 teeth (12 premolars and 20 molars) were studied under light microscopy, polarized microscopy, transparence light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. These teeth presented changes in colour in their free and proximal surface as well as close to pits and fissures. As an extra diagnostic test the PAS reaction was used to assess descalcifying processes in both light and transparence microscopy. Polarized light was used to assess normal enamel. Scanning electron microscopy corroborated the lesions produced in the enamel surface in the form of micropores. PAS reaction diagnosed decalcifying processes in yellow, brown and brownish stains. White staims not always were PAS-positive and when they reacted in the same manner as other positive stains, with the immersion technique. This penetrated 40-60 umtrs. and in some areas in relation to lamellae they reached dentin. Light, polarized and scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of micropores in the external surface of enamel in PAS-positive cases. The possibility of a modified PAS technique to use in clinical practice is discussed. It is concluded that PAS relation is useful as "ex situ" test to detect the first signs of mineral salt loss at the enamel surface. More research is needed to transfer these results to clinical practice.

  16. Caries risk after interproximal enamel reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarjoura, Karim; Gagnon, Genevieve; Nieberg, Lewis

    2006-07-01

    Air-rotor stripping (ARS) is a commonly used method to alleviate crowding in the permanent dentition. Its widespread acceptance, however, has been limited by the potential increase in caries risk of the abraded enamel surface. The aim of this study was to compare the susceptibility of ARS-treated enamel surfaces with intact surfaces in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy. Forty patients treated with ARS were examined clinically and radiographically for caries 1 to 6 years after interproximal enamel reduction. All patients were seen by their dentists for prophylaxis at 6-month intervals during active orthodontic treatment and were exposed to fluoridated water and toothpaste. Topical fluoride agents or sealants were not applied on the abraded surface after any ARS session. Caries incidence was compared between ARS-treated and unaltered surfaces within subjects. The decayed, missing, filled tooth (DMFT) and surface (DMFS) scores were used to evaluate the subjects' overall caries risk. Totals of 376 test and 376 control surfaces were examined. The number of interproximal lesions detected was found to be low with no statistically significant difference detected between the groups (test = 3; control = 6; P = .33]. The DMFT and DMFS scores increased significantly during the study period, indicating that these patients were clearly at risk of tooth decay (P caries is not affected by ARS. Furthermore, our data show that the application of topical fluoride on the enamel surfaces immediately after ARS in patients exposed to fluoridated water and fluoride-containing toothpaste may not provide any additional benefit.

  17. Viable approach to manage superficial enamel discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Chhabra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthetics is a primary concern amongst young patients and represents a challenge to the dentist. Discolored teeth are frequently seen in the general population. Several techniques have been devised to minimize or completely eliminate tooth discoloration. This case report highlights the successful management of enamel discoloration via modified microabrasion technique followed by in office bleaching.

  18. Traceless liquid-phase synthesis of biphenyls and terphenyls using pentaerythritol as a tetrapodal soluble support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul-Bae; Cho, Chul-Hee; Kim, Chang Keun; Park, Kwangyong

    2007-01-01

    Application of a novel sulfonate-based traceless multifunctional linker system using pentaerythritol as a tetrapodal soluble support was demonstrated using liquid-phase parallel and combinatorial preparation of biphenyl and terphenyl compounds. Nickel-catalyzed reactions of pentaerythritol tetrakis(arenesulfonate)s with arylmagnesium bromides generated the desired products in sufficient yields through reductive cleavage/cross-coupling of the C-S bond. Homogeneous pentaerythritol-supported reactions could be accomplished using less nucleophile with shorter reaction periods than could the corresponding heterogeneous polymer-supported reactions. This liquid-phase approach using a small polyfunctionalized support combines advantages of solution-phase and solid-phase syntheses by allowing high reactivity, high atom economy, simple isolation, and real-time monitoring of the reaction progress.

  19. Sequestered defensive toxins in tetrapod vertebrates: principles, patterns, and prospects for future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitzky, Alan H; Mori, Akira; Hutchinson, Deborah A; Saporito, Ralph A; Burghardt, Gordon M; Lillywhite, Harvey B; Meinwald, Jerrold

    2012-09-01

    Chemical defenses are widespread among animals, and the compounds involved may be either synthesized from nontoxic precursors or sequestered from an environmental source. Defensive sequestration has been studied extensively among invertebrates, but relatively few examples have been documented among vertebrates. Nonetheless, the number of described cases of defensive sequestration in tetrapod vertebrates has increased recently and includes diverse lineages of amphibians and reptiles (including birds). The best-known examples involve poison frogs, but other examples include natricine snakes that sequester toxins from amphibians and two genera of insectivorous birds. Commonalities among these diverse taxa include the combination of consuming toxic prey and exhibiting some form of passive defense, such as aposematism, mimicry, or presumptive death-feigning. Some species exhibit passive sequestration, in which dietary toxins simply require an extended period of time to clear from the tissues, whereas other taxa exhibit morphological or physiological specializations that enhance the uptake, storage, and/or delivery of exogenous toxins. It remains uncertain whether any sequestered toxins of tetrapods bioaccumulate across multiple trophic levels, but multitrophic accumulation seems especially likely in cases involving consumption of phytophagous or mycophagous invertebrates and perhaps consumption of poison frogs by snakes. We predict that additional examples of defensive toxin sequestration in amphibians and reptiles will be revealed by collaborations between field biologists and natural product chemists. Candidates for future investigation include specialized predators on mites, social insects, slugs, and toxic amphibians. Comprehensive studies of the ecological, evolutionary, behavioral, and regulatory aspects of sequestration will require teams of ecologists, systematists, ethologists, physiologists, molecular biologists, and chemists. The widespread occurrence of

  20. Atmospheric oxygen levels affect mudskipper terrestrial performance: implications for early tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jew, Corey J; Wegner, Nicholas C; Yanagitsuru, Yuzo; Tresguerres, Martin; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2013-08-01

    The Japanese mudskipper (Periophthalmus modestus), an amphibious fish that possesses many respiratory and locomotive specializations for sojourns onto land, was used as a model to study how changing atmospheric oxygen concentrations during the middle and late Paleozoic Era (400-250 million years ago) may have influenced the emergence and subsequent radiation of the first tetrapods. The effects of different atmospheric oxygen concentrations (hyperoxia = 35%, normoxia = 21%, and hypoxia = 7% O2) on terrestrial performance were tested during exercise on a terrestrial treadmill and during recovery from exhaustive exercise. Endurance and elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC; the immediate O2 debt repaid post-exercise) correlated with atmospheric oxygen concentration indicating that when additional oxygen is available P. modestus can increase oxygen utilization both during and following exercise. The time required post-exercise for mudskippers to return to a resting metabolic rate did not differ between treatments. However, in normoxia, oxygen consumption increased above hyperoxic values 13-20 h post-exercise suggesting a delayed repayment of the incurred oxygen debt. Finally, following exercise, ventilatory movements associated with buccopharyngeal aerial respiration returned to their rest-like pattern more quickly at higher concentrations of oxygen. Taken together, the results of this study show that P. modestus can exercise longer and recover quicker under higher oxygen concentrations. Similarities between P. modestus and early tetrapods suggest that increasing atmospheric oxygen levels during the middle and late Paleozoic allowed for elevated aerobic capacity and improved terrestrial performance, and likely led to an accelerated diversification and expansion of vertebrate life into the terrestrial biosphere.

  1. Endocrinology of osmoregulation and thermoregulation of Australian desert tetrapods: A historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christine Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    Many Australian tetrapods inhabit desert environments characterised by low productivity, unpredictable rainfall, high temperatures and high incident solar radiation. Maintaining a homeostatic milieu intérieur by osmoregulation and thermoregulation are two physiological challenges faced by tetrapods in deserts, and the endocrine system plays an important role in regulating these processes. There is a considerable body of work examining the osmoregulatory role of antidiuretic hormones for Australian amphibians, reptiles and mammals, with particular contributions concerning their role and function for wild, free-living animals in arid environments. The osmoregulatory role of the natriuretic peptide system has received some attention, while the role of adrenal corticosteroids has been more thoroughly investigated for reptiles and marsupials. The endocrinology of thermoregulation has not received similar attention. Reptiles are best-studied, with research examining the influence of arginine vasotocin and melatonin on body temperature, the role of prostaglandins in heart rate hysteresis and the effect of melanocyte-stimulating hormone on skin reflectivity. Australian mammals have been under-utilised in studies examining the regulation, development and evolution of endothermy, and there is little information concerning the endocrinology of thermoregulation for desert species. There is a paucity of data concerning the endocrinology of osmoregulation and thermoregulation for Australian desert birds. Studies of Australian desert fauna have made substantial contributions to endocrinology, but there is considerable scope for further research. A co-ordinated approach to examine arid-habitat adaptations of the endocrine system in an environmental and evolutionary context would be of particular value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enamel morphology after microabrasion with experimental compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núbia I. P. Pini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enamel microabrasion is an esthetic treatment for removing superficial stains or defects of enamel. Aim: This study evaluated the roughness after enamel microabrasion using experimental microabrasive systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred and ten samples (5 × 5 mm were obtained from bovine incisors and divided into 11 groups (n = 10 in accordance with the treatment: Microabrasion using 6.6% hydrochloric acid (HCl or 35% phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 associated with aluminum oxide (AlO 3 or pumice (Pum with active application (using rubber cup coupled with a micro-motor of low rotation or passive application (just placing the mixture on the enamel surface; just the use of acids in a passive application (negative control, and a group without treatment (positive control. Roughness analysis was performed before and after treatments. The statistical analysis used analysis of variance (PROC MIXED, Tukey-Kramer and Dunnet tests (P < 0.05. Representative specimens were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results: There was no significant difference between the acids used (P = 0.0510 and the applications (P = 0.8989. All of the treated groups were statistically different from the positive control. When using passive application, the use of HCl + AlO 3 resulted in higher roughness when compared with HCl + Pum. Additionally, this treatment was statistically different from the passive application of H 3 PO 4 (negative control (P < 0.05. However, SEM analysis showed that the treatment with AlO 3 resulted in an enamel surface with a more polished aspect when compared with Pum. Conclusion: AlO 3 may be a suitable particle for use in microabrasive systems.

  3. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg(2+) ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth.

  4. Characterization of enamel caries lesions in rat molars using synchrotron X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Free, R.D.; DeRocher, K.; Stock, S.R.; Keane, D.; Scott-Anne, K.; Bowen, W.H.; Joester, D. (Rochester); (NWU)

    2017-08-18

    Dental caries is a ubiquitous infectious disease with a nearly 100% lifetime prevalence. Rodent caries models are widely used to investigate the etiology, progression and potential prevention or treatment of the disease. To explore the suitability of these models for deeper investigations of intact surface zones during enamel caries, the structures of early-stage carious lesions in rats were characterized and compared with previous reports on white spot enamel lesions in humans. Synchrotron X-ray microcomputed tomography non-destructively mapped demineralization in carious rat molar specimens across a range of caries severity, identifying 52 lesions across the 30 teeth imaged. Of these lesions, 13 were shown to have intact surface zones. Depth profiles of fractional mineral density were qualitatively similar to lesions in human teeth. However, the thickness of the surface zone in the rat model ranges from 10 to 58 µm, and is therefore significantly thinner than in human enamel. These results indicate that a fraction of lesions in rat caries possess an intact surface zone and are qualitatively similar to human lesions at the micrometer scale. This suggests that rat caries models may be a suitable analog through which to investigate the structure of surface zone enamel and its role during dental caries.

  5. Peran kalsium sebagai prevensi terjadinya hipoplasia enamel (The role of calcium on enamel hypoplasia prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soegeng Wahluyo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoride is a trace element found in many natural and commonly consumed by humans in the form of fluoride salts such as Sodium Fluoride (NaF. The impacts that are most often caused by the intake of fluoride is a damage of enamel tooth/enamel hypoplasi or fluorosis. The manifestations of these effects are defects in teeth with whitish colour, brown to black colour effected on the aesthetic. So that the prevention of fluorosis is required. Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of calcium as prevention against tooth enamel fluorosis in Wistar rats caused by exposure to fluoride through indicators of Amelogenin, Calbindin- 28kDa protein expression, the matrix of tooth enamel density and distance between ameloblast cell. Methods: This was an experimental studies, post-test only control group design. This study used three groups of rats. Group 1 (Control was induced by sterile destilled water, group 2 (treatment 1 was induced by fluoride and group 3 (treatment 2 was induced by combination of fluoride and calcium. Each induction was done through sonde for 28 days. results: The results showed that the induction of fluoride causes the increased expression of Amelogenin protein; decreased expression of Calbindin-28kDa protein; a decrease in the density of the enamel matrix and widen the distance between cells ameloblast, while the result of the combination induced by fluoride and calcium showed increased protein expression of Calbindin-28kDa and increased density of the enamel matrix. Conclusion: Calcium can be used as an alternative preventive against the occurrence of enamel hypoplasia due to exposure of fluoride in Wistar rats.latar belakang: Fluorida adalah salah satu trace element yang ada dialam dan sering dikonsumsi manusia dalam bentuk garam fluorida yaitu sodium fluoride (NaF. Paparan fluorida biasanya berkaitan dengan asupan fluorida yang dapat membahayakan enamel gigi yaitu terjadinya hipoplasia enamel atau

  6. [Enamel fluoride uptake following fluoride application and fluoride precipitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, Wolfgang; Lennon, Aine M; Trage, Katrin; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This study is on fluoride uptake into enamel following fluoride precipitation with calcium hydroxide. Five specimens each from 12 bovine incisors were polished, covered with a salivary pellicle, and distributed into five groups (n=12). A fluoride solution (43,500 ppm F from magnesiumfluorosilicate, copper-(II)-fluorosilicate and sodium-fluoride, pH 2; Tiefenfluorid Touchierlösung, Humanchemie) and Ca(OH)2-solution (Tiefenfluorid Nachtouchierlösung) were applied subsequently in group TN. "Touchierlosung" only was used in group T, sodium-fluoride (43,500 ppm F, pH 2) in group NaF, and aminefluoride (Elmex fluid, 10,000 ppm F, pH 4) in group EF. No fluoride was used in group NK (negative control). Following rinsing and 24 h storage in artificial saliva surface KOH-soluble fluoride content (KOHF), and structurally bound fluoride content (SBF) from three layers (0-33, 33-66 and 66-99 pm) was determined by fluoride electrode procedures. KOHF (median in microg/cm2) of NK was below the lower limit of quantification of the fluoride electrode. The other group values were significantly higher (Mann-Whitney test, p precipitation reaction with Ca(OH)2 following fluoridation did not increase enamel fluoride uptake.

  7. Integrative Temporo-Spatial, Mineralogic, Spectroscopic, and Proteomic Analysis of Postnatal Enamel Development in Teeth with Limited Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirali Pandya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tooth amelogenesis is a complex process beginning with enamel organ cell differentiation and enamel matrix secretion, transitioning through changes in ameloblast polarity, cytoskeletal, and matrix organization, that affects crucial biomineralization events such as mineral nucleation, enamel crystal growth, and enamel prism organization. Here we have harvested the enamel organ including the pliable enamel matrix of postnatal first mandibular mouse molars during the first 8 days of tooth enamel development to conduct a step-wise cross-sectional analysis of the changes in the mineral and protein phase. Mineral phase diffraction pattern analysis using single-crystal, powder sample X-ray diffraction analysis indicated conversion of calcium phosphate precursors to partially fluoride substituted hydroxyapatite from postnatal day 4 (4 dpn onwards. Attenuated total reflectance spectra (ATR revealed a substantial elevation in phosphate and carbonate incorporation as well as structural reconfiguration between postnatal days 6 and 8. Nanoscale liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS demonstrated highest protein counts for ECM/cell surface proteins, stress/heat shock proteins, and alkaline phosphatase on postnatal day 2, high counts for ameloblast cytoskeletal proteins such as tubulin β5, tropomyosin, β-actin, and vimentin on postnatal day 4, and elevated levels of cofilin-1, calmodulin, and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase on day 6. Western blot analysis of hydrophobic enamel proteins illustrated continuously increasing amelogenin levels from 1 dpn until 8 dpn, while enamelin peaked on days 1 and 2 dpn, and ameloblastin on days 1–5 dpn. In summary, these data document the substantial changes in the enamel matrix protein and mineral phase that take place during postnatal mouse molar amelogenesis from a systems biological perspective, including (i relatively high levels of matrix protein expression during the early

  8. Redescription and phylogenetic analysis of the mandible of an enigmatic Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) tetrapod from Nova Scotia, and the lability of Meckelian jaw ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookias, Roland B; Böhmer, Christine; Clack, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    The lower jaw of an unidentified Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) tetrapod from Nova Scotia--the "Parrsboro jaw"--is redescribed in the light of recent tetrapod discoveries and work on evolution of tetrapod mandibular morphology and placed for the first time in a numerical cladistics analysis. All phylogenetic analyses place the jaw in a crownward polytomy of baphetids, temnospondyls, and embolomeres. Several features resemble baphetids and temnospondyls including dermal ornamentation, absence of coronoid teeth, and presence of coronoid shagreen. Dentary dentition is most similar to Baphetes. An adsymphysial toothplate may not preclude temnospondyl affinity. An apparent large exomeckelian fenestra, with the dorsal foraminal margins formed by an unossified element, echoes the morphology of the stem tetrapod Sigournea and is unusually primitive given the other features of the jaw. The jaw may thus provide an example of an intermediate stage in Meckelian element evolution.

  9. An in vitro shear bond strength study of enamel/dentin bonding systems on enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifeis, P E; Cochran, M A; Moore, B K

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the enamel shear bond strengths achieved with four acid conditioners employed by current enamel/dentin bonding systems (maleic acid, citric acid, nitric acid, oxalic acid) with a 37% phosphoric acid etching technique. The study also compared enamel shear bond strengths between the manufacturers' enamel/dentin conditioner used with an unfilled enamel bonding resin. The facial surfaces of 135 bovine incisors were ground flat and divided into nine test groups of n=15. Conditioning and bonding procedures were carried out following manufacturers' instructions. The phosphoric acid groups were etched for 15 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and dried for 20 seconds with compressed air. All bonding was accomplished at a constant temperature of 21 degrees C and a relative humidity of 60%. A single composite restorative resin (Z-100) was used with all specimens to eliminate variables between composite materials. All specimens were thermocycled 2500 times (5 to 45 degrees C) and had a total storage time of 21 days prior to shear testing on an Instron at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Shear strengths were calculated by dividing load at failure by specimen area. A light microscope was used to determine failure mode. The data were subjected to Bartlett's test for homogeneity of variance and were found not to be homogeneous. The Welch Test was applied and indicated that the treatments used had influence on bond strength at Pbond strength values between traditional phosphoric acid/enamel bonding resin and Mirage Bond Dentin and Enamel Adhesive, Clearfil Liner Bond System, and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Dental Adhesive System.

  10. Near-UV laser treatment of extrinsic dental enamel stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenly, J E; Seka, W; Featherstone, J D B; Rechmann, P

    2012-04-01

    The selective ablation of extrinsic dental enamel stains using a 400-nm laser is evaluated at several fluences for completely removing stains with minimal damage to the underlying enamel. A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser (400-nm wavelength, 60-nanosecond pulse duration, 10-Hz repetition rate) was used to treat 10 extracted human teeth with extrinsic enamel staining. Each tooth was irradiated perpendicular to the surface in a back-and-forth motion over a 1-mm length using an ∼300-µm-diam 10th-order super-Gaussian beam with fluences ranging from 0.8 to 6.4 J/cm(2) . Laser triangulation determined stain depth and volume removed by measuring 3D surface images before and after irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy evaluated the surface roughness of enamel following stain removal. Fluorescence spectroscopy measured spectra of unbleached and photobleached stains in the spectral range of 600-800 nm. Extrinsic enamel stains are removed with laser fluences between 0.8 and 6.4 J/cm(2) . Stains removed on sound enamel leave behind a smooth enamel surface. Stain removal in areas with signs of earlier cariogenic acid attacks resulted in isolated and randomly located laser-induced, 50-µm-diam enamel pits. These pits contain 0.5-µm diam, smooth craters indicative of heat transfer from the stain to the enamel and subsequent melting and water droplet ejection. Ablation stalling of enamel stains is typically observed at low fluences (Laser ablation of extrinsic enamel stains at 400 nm is observed to be most efficient above 3 J/cm(2) with minimal damage to the underlying enamel. Unsound underlying enamel is also observed to be selectively removed after irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. © International & American Associations for

  12. [Study on enhancement effect and mechanism of the acid resistance of enamel by Fe2+ and F].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Huang, Rui-zhe

    2016-02-01

    The phase of new substances and the effect on enamel lattice was analysed after ferrous sulfate ,sodium fluoride treatment through X-ray diffraction, in order to explore the mechanism of Fe2+ and F- reinforced enamel acid resistance. Fragments of enamel obtained from fifty molars were ground into powder and randomly divided into four groups: C (control,deionized water); Fe2+ (15 mmol/L FeSO4); F- (1.23% NaF) and Fe2++F- (15 mmol/L FeSO4 and 1.23% NaF). Before exposure to acid, the samples were incubated in one of the experimental solutions for 48 hours. After that, the samples were submitted to six alternating remineralization and demineralization cycles. A complete cycle consisted of the following steps:① demineralization in 5 mL of the beverage (Coca-Cola, pH=2.58) for 5 minutes under gentle agitation;② remineralization in 5 mL of artificial saliva for 1 hour at 37℃. X-ray diffraction was employed to identify precipitates and estimate their lattice constants before enamel power dried at 40℃. The XRD pattern of the group of ferrous sulfate was not sharper than control while the full width half maximum of peak increased and became more gentle. The enamel crystal grain size and crystallinity decreased. Secondary phase retrieval showed there was new phase formed which was iron phosphate. Diffraction spectrum of ferrous sulfate with fluoride group was similar to fluoride alone, the full width half maximum of peak became sharper and more narrow.The enamel crystal grain crystallinity improved and there was new phase of calcium fluoride formed. Fe2+ and F- both had certain influence on the crystal structure of enamel. However, the impact of Fe2+ was concealed when reacted with high concentration F-. Fe2+ may participate in the nucleation of apatite through substitution of calcium in apatite. Acid-resistant enamel surfaces are established due to precipitation of ferric phosphates on the enamel surface, and combination of Fe2+ with PO4(3-) dissolved on enamel

  13. Surface integrity governs the proteome of hypomineralized enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, J E; Crombie, F A; Kilpatrick, N; Manton, D J; Hubbard, M J

    2010-10-01

    Growing interest in the treatment and prevention of Molar/Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) warrants investigation into the protein composition of hypomineralized enamel. Hypothesizing abnormality akin to amelogenesis imperfecta, we profiled proteins in hypomineralized enamel from human permanent first molars using a biochemical approach. Hypomineralized enamel was found to have from 3- to 15-fold higher protein content than normal, but a near-normal level of residual amelogenins. This distinguished MIH from hypomaturation defects with high residual amelogenins (amelogenesis imperfecta, fluorosis) and so typified it as a hypocalcification defect. Second, hypomineralized enamel was found to have accumulated various proteins from oral fluid and blood, with differential incorporation depending on integrity of the enamel surface. Pathogenically, these results point to a pre-eruptive disturbance of mineralization involving albumin and, in cases with post-eruptive breakdown, subsequent protein adsorption on the exposed hydroxyapatite matrix. These insights into the pathogenesis and properties of hypomineralized enamel hold significance for prevention and treatment of MIH.

  14. Immunogold labeling of amelogenin in developing porcine enamel revealed by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chang; Fan, Daming; Sun, Zhi; Fan, Yuwei; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2009-01-01

    The present study describes a method using immunohistochemical labeling in combination with high-resolution imaging (field emission scanning electron microscopy) to investigate the spatial localization of amelogenins on apatite crystallites in developing porcine enamel. Cross-sections of developing enamel tissue from freeze-fractured pig third molar were treated with antiserum against recombinant mouse amelogenin and immunoreactivity confirmed by Western blot analysis. The samples were then treated with the goat anti-rabbit IgG conjugated with 10-nm gold particles. The control samples were treated with the secondary antibody only. The in-lens secondary electrons detector and quadrant back-scattering detector were employed to reveal the high-resolution morphology of enamel structures and gold particle distribution. The immunolabeling showed a preference of the gold particle localization along the side faces of the ribbon-like apatite crystals. The preferential localization of amelogenin in vivo on enamel crystals strongly supports its direct function in controlling crystal morphology. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Chemical Changes Associated with Increased Acid Resistance of Er:YAG Laser Irradiated Enamel

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    Jennifer Manuela Díaz-Monroy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. An increase in the acid resistance of dental enamel, as well as morphological and structural changes produced by Er:YAG laser irradiation, has been reported. Purpose. To evaluate the chemical changes associated with acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser. Methods. Forty-eight enamel samples were divided into 4 groups (n=12. Group I (control; Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with Er:YAG at 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2, 200 mJ (25.5 J/cm2, and 300 mJ (38.2 J/cm2, respectively. Results. There were significant differences in composition of irradiated groups (with the exception of chlorine and in the amount of calcium released. Conclusions. Chemical changes associated with an increase in acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser showed a clear postirradiation pattern characterized by a decrease in C at.% and an increase in O, P, and Ca at.% and no changes in Cl at.%. An increased Ca/P ratio after Er:YAG laser irradiation was associated with the use of higher laser energy densities. Chemical changes produced by acid dissolution showed a similar trend among experimental groups. Stable or increased Ca/P ratio after acid dissolution was observed in the irradiated groups, with reduction of Ca released into the acid solution.

  16. Synthesis and ultrastructure of plate-like apatite single crystals as a model for tooth enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Zhi, E-mail: zhuang@meiji.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Yoshimura, Hideyuki, E-mail: hyoshi@isc.meiji.ac.jp [Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Aizawa, Mamoru, E-mail: mamorua@isc.meiji.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is an inorganic constituent compound of human bones and teeth, with superior biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics. Its crystal structure is hexagonal, characterized by a(b)- and c-planes. In vertebrate long bones, HAp crystals have a c-axis orientation, while in tooth enamel, they have an a(b)-axis orientation. Many methods can be used to synthesize c-axis oriented HAp single crystals; however, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports on a synthesis method for a(b)-axis oriented HAp single crystals. In this study, we successfully synthesized plate-like HAp crystals at the air–liquid interface of a starting solution via an enzyme reaction of urea with urease. Crystal phase analysis and ultrastructure observations were carried out, and the results indicated that the particles were single crystals, with almost the same a(b)-axis orientation as tooth enamel. It is hoped that by utilizing their unique surface charge and atomic arrangement, the resulting particles can be used as a high-performance biomaterial, capable of adsorbing bio-related substances and a model for tooth enamel. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals at air–liquid interface ► Ultrastructural analysis of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals ► Plate-like hydroxyapatite single crystals with a high a(b)-axis orientation ► Plate-like hydroxyapatite single crystals as a model for tooth enamel.

  17. Influence of enamel preservation on failure rates of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel, Galip; Sesma, Newton; Calamita, Marcelo A; Coachman, Christian; Morimoto, Susana

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the failure rates of porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) and the influence of clinical parameters on these rates in a retrospective survey of up to 12 years. Five hundred eighty laminate veneers were bonded in 66 patients. The following parameters were analyzed: type of preparation (depth and margin), crown lengthening, presence of restoration, diastema, crowding, discoloration, abrasion, and attrition. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression modeling was used to determine which factors would predict PLV failure. Forty-two veneers (7.2%) failed in 23 patients, and an overall cumulative survival rate of 86% was observed. A statistically significant association was noted between failure and the limits of the prepared tooth surface (margin and depth). The most frequent failure type was fracture (n = 20). The results revealed no significant influence of crown lengthening apically, presence of restoration, diastema, discoloration, abrasion, or attrition on failure rates. Multivariable analysis (Cox regression model) also showed that PLVs bonded to dentin and teeth with preparation margins in dentin were approximately 10 times more likely to fail than PLVs bonded to enamel. Moreover, coronal crown lengthening increased the risk of PLV failure by 2.3 times. A survival rate of 99% was observed for veneers with preparations confined to enamel and 94% for veneers with enamel only at the margins. Laminate veneers have high survival rates when bonded to enamel and provide a safe and predictable treatment option that preserves tooth structure.

  18. Chemical Changes Associated with Increased Acid Resistance of Er:YAG Laser Irradiated Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Mejía, Oscar Fernando; García-Fabila, María Magdalena; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura Emma; Sánchez-Flores, Ignacio; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background. An increase in the acid resistance of dental enamel, as well as morphological and structural changes produced by Er:YAG laser irradiation, has been reported. Purpose. To evaluate the chemical changes associated with acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser. Methods. Forty-eight enamel samples were divided into 4 groups (n = 12). Group I (control); Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with Er:YAG at 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2), 200 mJ (25.5 J/cm2), and 300 mJ (38.2 J/cm2), respectively. Results. There were significant differences in composition of irradiated groups (with the exception of chlorine) and in the amount of calcium released. Conclusions. Chemical changes associated with an increase in acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser showed a clear postirradiation pattern characterized by a decrease in C at.% and an increase in O, P, and Ca at.% and no changes in Cl at.%. An increased Ca/P ratio after Er:YAG laser irradiation was associated with the use of higher laser energy densities. Chemical changes produced by acid dissolution showed a similar trend among experimental groups. Stable or increased Ca/P ratio after acid dissolution was observed in the irradiated groups, with reduction of Ca released into the acid solution. PMID:24600327

  19. Imaging tooth enamel using zero echo time (ZTE) magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychert, Kevin M.; Zhu, Gang; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Nemani, Venkata K.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Flood, Ann B.; Swartz, Harold M.; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-03-01

    In an event where many thousands of people may have been exposed to levels of radiation that are sufficient to cause the acute radiation syndrome, we need technology that can estimate the absorbed dose on an individual basis for triage and meaningful medical decision making. Such dose estimates may be achieved using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth biodosimetry, which measures the number of persistent free radicals that are generated in tooth enamel following irradiation. However, the accuracy of dose estimates may be impacted by individual variations in teeth, especially the amount and distribution of enamel in the inhomogeneous sensitive volume of the resonator used to detect the radicals. In order to study the relationship between interpersonal variations in enamel and EPR-based dose estimates, it is desirable to estimate these parameters nondestructively and without adding radiation to the teeth. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is capable of acquiring structural and biochemical information without imparting additional radiation, which may be beneficial for many EPR dosimetry studies. However, the extremely short T2 relaxation time in tooth structures precludes tooth imaging using conventional MRI methods. Therefore, we used zero echo time (ZTE) MRI to image teeth ex vivo to assess enamel volumes and spatial distributions. Using these data in combination with the data on the distribution of the transverse radio frequency magnetic field from electromagnetic simulations, we then can identify possible sources of variations in radiation-induced signals detectable by EPR. Unlike conventional MRI, ZTE applies spatial encoding gradients during the RF excitation pulse, thereby facilitating signal acquisition almost immediately after excitation, minimizing signal loss from short T2 relaxation times. ZTE successfully provided volumetric measures of tooth enamel that may be related to variations that impact EPR dosimetry and facilitate the development

  20. [Application of atomic force microscopy in evaluation of three-dimensional morphology of eroded human enamel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan-yong; Jiang, Li; Lan, Jing; Zhang, Jian; Li, Wei

    2012-06-01

    To compare the three dimensional morphology and surface roughness changes of enamel eroded for different etching time. Fifteen freshly extracted sound human pre-molars for orthodontic purpose were collected. The buccal surface of teeth were prepared into smooth enamel slices, and then were randomly divided into 5 groups based on their etching time 0 s (control group), 5 s, 10 s, 20 s, 30 s, respectively by 37% phosphoric acid. The three dimensional morphology was observed under atomic force microscope (AFM). The profile was analyzed, and the value of Ra, Rq, Rz and the surface area and volume were measured. The AFM photograph showed that with the etching time from 0 s to 20 s the enamel surface demineralised gradually, the top structure of enamel rod and the fish scaled structure became obvious. But the morphology only changed a bit after 20 s. The surrounding inter-rod enamel eroded first, the depth increased to 2.8 µm at 20 s but decreased to 1.8 µm at 30 s. The value of Ra increased from (19.69 ± 3.42) nm to (359.51 ± 75.79) nm, and Rq from (22.02 ± 5.57) nm to (431.02 ± 83.09) nm, Rz from (0.24 ± 0.08) µm to (2.38 ± 0.26) µm. Except for groups 20 s and 30 s, the difference among other groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The surface area expanded from (406.77 ± 3.88) µm(2) to (546.69 ± 84.02) µm(2), and surface volume from (65.73 ± 14.46) µm(3) to (474.63 ± 52.50) µm(3). The depth, surface roughness, surface area and volume caused by erosion increased with etching time. The three dimensional morphology greatly changed by acid-etching process.

  1. Enamel Pearls Implications on Periodontal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Elton Gonçalves Zenóbio; Thaís Ribeiral Vieira; Roberta Paula Colen Bustamante; Hayder Egg Gomes; Jamil Awad Shibli; Rodrigo Villamarin Soares

    2015-01-01

    Dental anatomy is quite complex and diverse factors must be taken into account in its analysis. Teeth with anatomical variations present an increase in the rate of severity periodontal tissue destruction and therefore a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. In this context, this paper reviews the literature regarding enamel pearls and their implications in the development of severe localized periodontal disease as well as in the prognosis of periodontal therapy. Radiographic examinat...

  2. Microabrasion as treatment of enamel fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Caroline Brito; Renato da Costa Ribeiro; Raimundo Rosendo Prado Júnior; Teresinha Soares Pereira Lopes

    2008-01-01

    There is currently a trend in favor of using fluoride as a coadjuvant in reducing caries indexes, as much in underdeveloped as in developedcountries. However, simultaneously the indexes of dental fluorosis seem to grow in an inverse proportion. This is brought about by chronic ingestion of fluoride for a prolonged length of time or in high concentration. Enamel microabrasion is an effective method to remove superficial stains caused by this condition, which affects esthetics of that tissue. T...

  3. Single and Networked ZnO-CNT Hybrid Tetrapods for Selective Room-Temperature High-Performance Ammonia Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Fabian; Postica, Vasile; Adelung, Rainer; Lupan, Oleg

    2017-07-12

    Highly porous hybrid materials with unique high-performance properties have attracted great interest from the scientific community, especially in the field of gas-sensing applications. In this work, tetrapodal-ZnO (ZnO-T) networks were functionalized with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to form a highly efficient hybrid sensing material (ZnO-T-CNT) for ultrasensitive, selective, and rapid detection of ammonia (NH3) vapor at room temperature. By functionalizing the ZnO-T networks with 2.0 wt % of CNTs by a simple dripping procedure, an increase of 1 order of magnitude in response (from about 37 to 330) was obtained. Additionally, the response and recovery times were improved (by decreasing them from 58 and 61 s to 18 and 35 s, respectively). The calculated lowest detection limit of 200 ppb shows the excellent potential of the ZnO-T-CNT networks as NH3 vapor sensors. Room temperature operation of such networked ZnO-CNT hybrid tetrapods shows an excellent long-time stability of the fabricated sensors. Additionally, the gas-sensing mechanism was identified and elaborated based on the high porosity of the used three-dimensional networks and the excellent conductivity of the CNTs. On top of that, several single hybrid microtetrapod-based devices were fabricated (from samples with 2.0 wt % CNTs) with the help of the local metal deposition function of a focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy instrument. The single microdevices are based on tetrapods with arms having a diameter of around 0.35 μm and show excellent NH3 sensing performance with a gas response (Igas/Iair) of 6.4. Thus, the fabricated functional networked ZnO-CNT hybrid tetrapods will allow to detect ammonia and to quantify its concentration in automotive, environmental monitoring, chemical industry, and medical diagnostics.

  4. Skeletal Morphogenesis of Microbrachis and Hyloplesion (Tetrapoda: Lepospondyli), and Implications for the Developmental Patterns of Extinct, Early Tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olori, Jennifer C

    2015-01-01

    The ontogeny of extant amphibians often is used as a model for that of extinct early tetrapods, despite evidence for a spectrum of developmental modes in temnospondyls and a paucity of ontogenetic data for lepospondyls. I describe the skeletal morphogenesis of the extinct lepospondyls Microbrachis pelikani and Hyloplesion longicostatum using the largest samples examined for either taxon. Nearly all known specimens were re-examined, allowing for substantial anatomical revisions that affect the scoring of characters commonly used in phylogenetic analyses of early tetrapods. The palate of H. longicostatum is re-interpreted and suggested to be more similar to that of M. pelikani, especially in the nature of the contact between the pterygoids. Both taxa possess lateral lines, and M. pelikani additionally exhibits branchial plates. However, early and rapid ossification of the postcranial skeleton, including a well-developed pubis and ossified epipodials, suggests that neither taxon metamorphosed nor were they neotenic in the sense of branchiosaurids and salamanders. Morphogenetic patterns in the foot suggest that digit 5 was developmentally delayed and the final digit to ossify in M. pelikani and H. longicostatum. Overall patterns of postcranial ossification may indicate postaxial dominance in limb and digit formation, but also more developmental variation in early tetrapods than has been appreciated. The phylogenetic position and developmental patterns of M. pelikani and H. longicostatum are congruent with the hypothesis that early tetrapods lacked metamorphosis ancestrally and that stem-amniotes exhibited derived features of development, such as rapid and complete ossification of the skeleton, potentially prior to the evolution of the amniotic egg.

  5. Skeletal Morphogenesis of Microbrachis and Hyloplesion (Tetrapoda: Lepospondyli, and Implications for the Developmental Patterns of Extinct, Early Tetrapods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Olori

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of extant amphibians often is used as a model for that of extinct early tetrapods, despite evidence for a spectrum of developmental modes in temnospondyls and a paucity of ontogenetic data for lepospondyls. I describe the skeletal morphogenesis of the extinct lepospondyls Microbrachis pelikani and Hyloplesion longicostatum using the largest samples examined for either taxon. Nearly all known specimens were re-examined, allowing for substantial anatomical revisions that affect the scoring of characters commonly used in phylogenetic analyses of early tetrapods. The palate of H. longicostatum is re-interpreted and suggested to be more similar to that of M. pelikani, especially in the nature of the contact between the pterygoids. Both taxa possess lateral lines, and M. pelikani additionally exhibits branchial plates. However, early and rapid ossification of the postcranial skeleton, including a well-developed pubis and ossified epipodials, suggests that neither taxon metamorphosed nor were they neotenic in the sense of branchiosaurids and salamanders. Morphogenetic patterns in the foot suggest that digit 5 was developmentally delayed and the final digit to ossify in M. pelikani and H. longicostatum. Overall patterns of postcranial ossification may indicate postaxial dominance in limb and digit formation, but also more developmental variation in early tetrapods than has been appreciated. The phylogenetic position and developmental patterns of M. pelikani and H. longicostatum are congruent with the hypothesis that early tetrapods lacked metamorphosis ancestrally and that stem-amniotes exhibited derived features of development, such as rapid and complete ossification of the skeleton, potentially prior to the evolution of the amniotic egg.

  6. Levels of enamel erosion for the application of bleaching agents

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Soriano, Ana; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Biosocial.; Pérez Vargas, Luis; Departamento Academico de Estomatología Biosocial.; Mattos Vela, Manuel; Departamento Academico de Estomatología Biosocial.; Asurza Ruiz, José; Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas - INEN.; Bernuy Torres, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Dental bleaching systems and its use of toothpaste with bleaching agents lead to search the effect of these systems on the enamel surface. Scientific evidence shows that these systems can provoke an answer in chemical shucture of the dental enamel with loss of calcium . The concentration of calcium was measured in ppm in 27 crowns of human bicuspids. The enamel erosion was measured through the liberation of calcium salts into teeth in two kinds of bleaching toothpastes : Crest whitening and C...

  7. Theobromine Effects on Enamel Surface Microhardness: In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Syafira; Rina Permatasari; Nina Wardani

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is still a dental health problem in Indonesia. Fluoride, one of the dental caries prevention material, but its safety and the danger of fluorosis is still debated. Theobromine is an alkaloid compound contained in cocoa beans. Theobromine is believed to increase enamel microhardness with mineral changes in the enamel superficial layer. Objectives: To determine the influence of theobromine on the enamel surface microhardness. Methods: This study used 40 premolar tooth crown pieces...

  8. Regional Odontodysplasia with Generalised Enamel Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Al-Mullahi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional odontodysplasia (ROD is uncommon developmental anomaly, which tends to be localised and involves the ectodermal and mesodermal tooth components. A five-year-old female was referred to Department of Child Dental Health at the Leeds Dental Institute regarding malformed primary teeth. On examination 64, 74, and 72 had localised hypomineralized enamel defect. The crown of 55 was broken down with only the root remaining below the gingival level. 54 has a yellowish brown discolouration with rough irregular surface. The upper anterior teeth show mild enamel opacity. Radiographically, 55 and 54 had thin radioopaque contour, showing poor distinction between the enamel and dentine and the classic feature of a wide pulp chamber. 15, 16, and 17 were developmentally delayed and were displaying the characteristic “ghost appearance.” Comprehensive dental care was done under local anaesthesia and it included extraction of the primary molars affected by ROD, stainless steel crown on 64, and caries prevention program. Fifteen months following the initial assessment the patient’s oral condition remains stable and she is under regular follow-up at the department. Paediatric dentists should be aware of this anomaly as it involves both dentitions and usually requires multidisciplinary care.

  9. Limb ossification in the Paleozoic branchiosaurid Apateon (Temnospondyli) and the early evolution of preaxial dominance in tetrapod limb development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröbisch, Nadia B; Carroll, Robert L; Schoch, Rainer R

    2007-01-01

    Despite the wide range of shapes and sizes that accompany a vast variety of functions, the development of tetrapod limbs follows a conservative pattern of de novo condensation, branching, and segmentation. Development of the zeugopodium and digital arch typically occurs in a posterior to anterior sequence, referred to as postaxial dominance, with a digital sequence of 4-3-5-2-1. The only exception to this pattern in all of living Tetrapoda can be found in salamanders, which display a preaxial dominance in limb development, a de novo condensation of a basale commune (distal carpal/tarsal 1+2) and a precoccial development of digits I and II. These divergent patterns have puzzled researchers for over a century leading to various explanatory hypotheses. Despite many advances in research on tetrapod limb development, the divergent evolution of these two pathways and its causes are still not understood. Based on an extensive ontogenetic series we investigated the pattern of limb development of the 300 Ma old branchiosaurid amphibian Apateon. This revealed a preaxial dominance in limb development that was previously believed to be unique and derived for modern salamanders. The Branchiosauridae are favored as close relatives of extant salamanders in most phylogenetic hypotheses of the highly controversial origins and relationships of extant amphibians. The findings provide new insights into the evolution of developmental pathways in tetrapod limb development, the relationships of modern amphibians with possible Paleozoic antecedents, and their initial timing of divergence.

  10. Influence of trace elements on dental enamel properties: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Zeeshan; Haji Abdul Rahim, Zubaidah Binti; Chew, Hooi Pin; Fatima, Tayyaba

    2017-01-01

    Dental enamel, an avascular, irreparable, outermost and protective layer of the human clinical crown has a potential to withstand the physico-chemical effects and forces. These properties are being regulated by a unique association among elements occurring in the crystallites setup of human dental enamel. Calcium and phosphate are the major components (hydroxyapatite) in addition to some trace elements which have a profound effect on enamel. The current review was planned to determine the aptitude of various trace elements to substitute and their influence on human dental enamel in terms of physical and chemical properties.

  11. Targeted p120-catenin ablation disrupts dental enamel development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, John D; Dobeck, Justine M; Tye, Coralee E

    2010-01-01

    Dental enamel development occurs in stages. The ameloblast cell layer is adjacent to, and is responsible for, enamel formation. When rodent pre-ameloblasts become tall columnar secretory-stage ameloblasts, they secrete enamel matrix proteins, and the ameloblasts start moving in rows that slide by...... to altered p120-mediated cell signaling. These data reveal a critical role for p120 in tooth and dental enamel development and are consistent with p120 directing the attachment and detachment of the secretory stage ameloblasts as they move in rows.......Dental enamel development occurs in stages. The ameloblast cell layer is adjacent to, and is responsible for, enamel formation. When rodent pre-ameloblasts become tall columnar secretory-stage ameloblasts, they secrete enamel matrix proteins, and the ameloblasts start moving in rows that slide...... by one another. This movement is necessary to form the characteristic decussating enamel prism pattern. Thus, a dynamic system of intercellular interactions is required for proper enamel development. Cadherins are components of the adherens junction (AJ), and they span the cell membrane to mediate...

  12. Modulated regeneration of acid-etched human tooth enamel by a functionalized dendrimer that is an analog of amelogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Yang, Jiaojiao; Li, Jiyao; Liang, Kunneng; He, Libang; Lin, Zaifu; Chen, Xingyu; Ren, Xiaokang; Li, Jianshu

    2014-10-01

    In the bioinspired repair process of tooth enamel, it is important to simultaneously mimic the organic-matrix-induced biomineralization and increase the binding strength at the remineralization interface. In this work, a fourth-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) is modified by dimethyl phosphate to obtain phosphate-terminated dendrimer (PAMAM-PO3H2) since it has a similar dimensional scale and peripheral functionalities to that of amelogenin, which plays important role in the natural development process of enamel. Its phosphate group has stronger affinity for calcium ion than carboxyl group and can simultaneously provide strong hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding capability. The MTT assay demonstrates the low cytotoxicity of PAMAM-PO3H2. Adsorption tests indicate that PAMAM-PO3H2 can be tightly adsorbed on the human tooth enamel. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to analyze the remineralization process. After being incubated in artificial saliva for 3weeks, there is a newly generated HA layer of 11.23μm thickness on the acid-etched tooth enamel treated by PAMAM-PO3H2, while the thickness for the carboxyl-terminated one (PAMAM-COOH) is only 6.02μm. PAMAM-PO3H2 can regulate the remineralization process to form ordered new crystals oriented along the Z-axis and produce an enamel prism-like structure that is similar to that of natural tooth enamel. The animal experiment also demonstrates that PAMAM-PO3H2 can induce significant HA regeneration in the oral cavity of rats. Thus PAMAM-PO3H2 shows great potential as a biomimetic restorative material for human tooth enamel. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. RNA-controlled assembly of tobacco mosaic virus-derived complex structures: from nanoboomerangs to tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eber, Fabian J.; Eiben, Sabine; Jeske, Holger; Wege, Christina

    2014-11-01

    The in vitro assembly of artificial nanotubular nucleoprotein shapes based on tobacco mosaic virus-(TMV-)-derived building blocks yielded different spatial organizations of viral coat protein subunits on genetically engineered RNA molecules, containing two or multiple TMV origins of assembly (OAs). The growth of kinked nanoboomerangs as well as of branched multipods was determined by the encapsidated RNAs. A largely simultaneous initiation at two origins and subsequent bidirectional tube elongation could be visualized by transmission electron microscopy of intermediates and final products. Collision of the nascent tubes' ends produced angular particles with well-defined arm lengths. RNAs with three to five OAs generated branched multipods with a maximum of four arms. The potential of such an RNA-directed self-assembly of uncommon nanotubular architectures for the fabrication of complex multivalent nanotemplates used in functional hybrid materials is discussed.

  14. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    OpenAIRE

    Guy, Franck; Lazzari, Vincent; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Thiery, Ghislain

    2015-01-01

    The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution. Recent decades have been significant in unveiling developmental processes controlling tooth morphogenesis, dental variation and the origination of dental novelties. The enamel-dentine junction constitutes a precursor for the morphology of the outer enamel surface through growth of t...

  15. Enamel pearl on an unusual location associated with localized periodontal disease: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivani; Malhotra, Sumit; Baliga, Vidya; Hans, Manoj

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial plaque has been implicated as the primary etiologic factor in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. Anatomic factors (such as enamel pearls) are often associated with advanced localized periodontal destruction. The phenomenon of ectopic development of enamel on the root surface, variedly referred to as enameloma, enamel pearl, enamel drop or enamel nodule, is not well-understood. Such an anomaly may facilitate the progression of periodontal breakdown. A rare case of enamel pearl on the lingual aspect of mandibular central incisor associated with localized periodontal disease is presented. Removal and treatment of enamel pearl along with possible mechanisms to account for the pathogenesis of ectopic enamel formation are also discussed.

  16. Photoinduced electron transfer fluorometric Hg(II) chemosensor based on a BODIPY armed with a tetrapod receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culzoni, M J; Muñoz de la Peña, A; Machuca, A; Goicoechea, H C; Brasca, R; Babiano, R

    2013-12-15

    From the great variety of BODIPY based-chemosensors able to determine Hg(2+), only a small portion has been applied to its determination in environmental and/or biological samples. The lack of studies on the analytical performance of the latter sensors makes interesting the development of investigations oriented to their possible analytical applications. The synthesis of a BODIPY derivative armed with a tetrapod receptor is described. The procedure is based on a previous publication, and the modifications performed to improve the synthesis include alternative procedures with different objectives, as the consecution of a multigram synthesis, improving the low yields of some of the previously proposed procedure steps, simplifying the experimental steps, achieving the desired purity requirements for use with analytical purposes, and enriching the characterization of the implied structures. The characteristics of its selectivity towards Hg(2+) have been investigated, and the OFF-ON fluorometric response, based on a photo-electron transfer (PET) mechanism, served as the base for the development of a method able to determine Hg(2+) in environmental waters at ng mL(-1) levels. The intrinsic fluorescence of the BODIPY core is inhibited and the probe exhibits a weak fluorescence (i.e. "OFF" state due to the deactivating PET effect). Upon complexation, Hg(2+) interacts with the lone-pair electrons on the nitrogen atoms of the receptor moiety so that the electronic transfer from the receptor to the photo-excited fluorophore is slowed down or switched off (i.e. "ON" state due to the suppression of the deactivating PET effect by coordination of the analyte to the probe). Regarding the complex photostability in aqueous solution, it is mandatory to conduct the experiments at darkness due to its photodegradation. The stoichiometry studies indicated a 1:2 relationship for the BODIPY-Hg(2+) complex. The high selectivity towards mercuric ions is considerably influenced by pH, being

  17. Inhibition of enamel demineralization by buffering effect of S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaga, Masayuki; Kakuda, Shinichi; Ida, Yusuke; Toshima, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Masanori; Endo, Kazuhiko; Sano, Hidehiko

    2014-02-01

    The buffering capacity and inhibitory effects on enamel demineralization of two commercially available dental sealants were evaluated in this study. The effects of filler particles were also examined. Disks of enamel and cured sealant materials of BeautiSealant (silica or S-PRG filler) or Teethmate F-1 were incubated in lactic acid solutions (pH 4.0) for 1-6 d. The pH changes and amounts of ions released in the solutions were assessed, and enamel surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscope. The pH of the solution with BeautiSealant (S-PRG filler) was neutralized from pH 4.0 to pH 6.1 (after incubation for 1 d) and from pH 4.0 to pH 6.7 (after incubation for 6 d). In addition, no release of calcium ions was detected and the enamel surface was morphologically intact in scanning electron microscopy images. However, the pH of the solution with Teethmate F-1 remained below pH 4.0 during incubation from days 1 to 6. Calcium release was increased in solutions up to and after 6 d of incubation. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the structures of hydroxyapatite rods were exposed at the specimen surfaces as a result of demineralization. Ions released from S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant rapidly buffered the lactic acid solution and inhibited enamel demineralization. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  18. Olson's Extinction and the latitudinal biodiversity gradient of tetrapods in the Permian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Neil; Day, Michael O; Rubidge, Bruce S; Fröbisch, Jörg

    2017-04-12

    The terrestrial vertebrate fauna underwent a substantial change in composition between the lower and middle Permian. The lower Permian fauna was characterized by diverse and abundant amphibians and pelycosaurian-grade synapsids. During the middle Permian, a therapsid-dominated fauna, containing a diverse array of parareptiles and a considerably reduced richness of amphibians, replaced this. However, it is debated whether the transition is a genuine event, accompanied by a mass extinction, or whether it is merely an artefact of the shift in sampling from the palaeoequatorial latitudes to the palaeotemperate latitudes. Here we use an up-to-date biostratigraphy and incorporate recent discoveries to thoroughly review the Permian tetrapod fossil record. We suggest that the faunal transition represents a genuine event; the lower Permian temperate faunas are more similar to lower Permian equatorial faunas than middle Permian temperate faunas. The transition was not consistent across latitudes; the turnover occurred more rapidly in Russia, but was delayed in North America. The argument that the mass extinction is an artefact of a latitudinal biodiversity gradient and a shift in sampling localities is rejected: sampling correction demonstrates an inverse latitudinal biodiversity gradient was prevalent during the Permian, with peak diversity in the temperate latitudes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Origin of tetrapods inferred from their mitochondrial DNA affiliation to lungfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A; Wilson, A C

    1990-11-01

    This paper shows that questions of an unexpected phylogenetic depth can be addressed by the study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. For decades, it has been unclear whether coelacanth fishes or lungfishes are the closest living relatives of land vertebrates (Tetrapoda). Segments of mtDNA from a lungfish, the coelacanth, and a ray-finned fish were sequenced and compared to the published sequence of a frog mtDNA. A tree based on inferred amino acid replacements, silent transversions, and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) substitutions showed with statistical confidence that the lungfish mtDNA is more closely related to that of the frog than is the mtDNA of the coelacanth. This result appears to rule out the possibility that the coelacanth lineage gave rise to land vertebrates; hence, morphological characters that link the latter two groups are possibly due to convergent evolution or reversals and not to common descent. Besides supporting the theory that land vertebrates arose from an offshoot of the lineage leading to lungfishes, the molecular tree facilitates an evolutionary interpretation of the morphological differences among the living forms. It would appear that the common ancestor of lungfishes and tetrapods already possessed multiple morphological traits preadapting their locomotion, circulation, and respiration for life on land.

  20. Pattern of the divergence of olfactory receptor genes during tetrapod evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takushi Kishida

    Full Text Available The olfactory receptor (OR multigene family is responsible for the sense of smell in vertebrate species. OR genes are scattered widely in our chromosomes and constitute one of the largest gene families in eutherian genomes. Some previous studies revealed that eutherian OR genes diverged mainly during early mammalian evolution. However, the exact period when, and the ecological reason why eutherian ORs strongly diverged has remained unclear. In this study, I performed a strict data mining effort for marsupial opossum OR sequences and bootstrap analyses to estimate the periods of chromosomal migrations and gene duplications of OR genes during tetrapod evolution. The results indicate that chromosomal migrations occurred mainly during early vertebrate evolution before the monotreme-placental split, and that gene duplications occurred mainly during early mammalian evolution between the bird-mammal split and marsupial-placental split, coinciding with the reduction of opsin genes in primitive mammals. It could be thought that the previous chromosomal dispersal allowed the OR genes to subsequently expand easily, and the nocturnal adaptation of early mammals might have triggered the OR gene expansion.

  1. An ancient genomic regulatory block conserved across bilaterians and its dismantling in tetrapods by retrogene replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeso, Ignacio; Irimia, Manuel; Tena, Juan J; González-Pérez, Esther; Tran, David; Ravi, Vydianathan; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Campuzano, Sonsoles; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2012-04-01

    Developmental genes are regulated by complex, distantly located cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), often forming genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs) that are conserved among vertebrates and among insects. We have investigated GRBs associated with Iroquois homeobox genes in 39 metazoans. Despite 600 million years of independent evolution, Iroquois genes are linked to ankyrin-repeat-containing Sowah genes in nearly all studied bilaterians. We show that Iroquois-specific CRMs populate the Sowah locus, suggesting that regulatory constraints underlie the maintenance of the Iroquois-Sowah syntenic block. Surprisingly, tetrapod Sowah orthologs are intronless and not associated with Iroquois; however, teleost and elephant shark data demonstrate that this is a derived feature, and that many Iroquois-CRMs were ancestrally located within Sowah introns. Retroposition, gene, and genome duplication have allowed selective elimination of Sowah exons from the Iroquois regulatory landscape while keeping associated CRMs, resulting in large associated gene deserts. These results highlight the importance of CRMs in imposing constraints to genome architecture, even across large phylogenetic distances, and of gene duplication-mediated genetic redundancy to disentangle these constraints, increasing genomic plasticity.

  2. Intravaginal Zinc Oxide Tetrapod Nanoparticles as Novel Immunoprotective Agents against Genital Herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Thessicar E; Hadigal, Satvik R; Yakoub, Abraam M; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Bhattacharya, Palash; Haddad, Christine; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Adelung, Rainer; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Shukla, Deepak

    2016-06-01

    Virtually all efforts to generate an effective protection against the life-long, recurrent genital infections caused by HSV-2 have failed. Apart from sexual transmission, the virus can also be transmitted from mothers to neonates, and it is a key facilitator of HIV coacquisition. In this article, we uncover a nanoimmunotherapy using specially designed zinc oxide tetrapod nanoparticles (ZOTEN) with engineered oxygen vacancies. We demonstrate that ZOTEN, when used intravaginally as a microbicide, is an effective suppressor of HSV-2 genital infection in female BALB/c mice. The strong HSV-2 trapping ability of ZOTEN significantly reduced the clinical signs of vaginal infection and effectively decreased animal mortality. In parallel, ZOTEN promoted the presentation of bound HSV-2 virions to mucosal APCs, enhancing T cell-mediated and Ab-mediated responses to the infection, and thereby suppressing a reinfection. We also found that ZOTEN exhibits strong adjuvant-like properties, which is highly comparable with alum, a commonly used adjuvant. Overall, to our knowledge, our study provides the very first evidence for the protective efficacy of an intravaginal microbicide/vaccine or microbivac platform against primary and secondary female genital herpes infections. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. A biologically based neural system coordinates the joints and legs of a tetrapod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Alexander; Schmidt, Manuela; Fischer, Martin; Quinn, Roger

    2015-09-09

    A biologically inspired neural control system has been developed that coordinates a tetrapod trotting gait in the sagittal plane. The developed neuromechanical system is used to explore properties of connections in inter-leg and intra-leg coordination. The neural controller is built with biologically based neurons and synapses, and connections are based on data from literature where available. It is applied to a planar biomechanical model of a rat with 14 joints, each actuated by a pair of antagonistic Hill muscle models. The controller generates tension in the muscles through activation of simulated motoneurons. The hind leg and inter-leg control networks are based on pathways discovered in cat research tuned to the kinematic motions of a rat. The foreleg network was developed by extrapolating analogous pathways from the hind legs. The formulated intra-leg and inter-leg networks properly coordinate the joints and produce motions similar to those of a walking rat. Changing the strength of a single inter-leg connection is sufficient to account for differences in phase timing in different trotting rats.

  4. Intra-vaginal Zinc Oxide Tetrapod Nanoparticles as Novel Immunoprotective Agents against Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Thessicar E.; Hadigal, Satvik R.; Yakoub, Abraam; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Bhattacharya, Palash; Haddad, Christine; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Adelung, Rainer; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Shukla, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all efforts to generate an effective protection against the life-long, recurrent genital infections caused by Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) have failed. Apart from sexual transmission, the virus can also be transmitted from mothers to neonates, and is a key facilitator of HIV co-acquisition. Here, we uncover a nanoimmunotherapy using specially designed Zinc Oxide Tetrapod Nanoparticles (ZOTEN) with engineered oxygen vacancies. We demonstrate that ZOTEN, when used intravaginally as a microbicide, is an effective suppressor of HSV-2 genital infection in female BALB/c mice. The strong HSV-2 trapping ability of ZOTEN significantly reduced the clinical signs of vaginal infection and effectively decreased animal mortality. In parallel, ZOTEN promoted the presentation of bound HSV-2 virions to mucosal antigen presenting cells, enhancing T cell- mediated and antibody-mediated responses to the infection, and thereby, suppressing a re-infection. We also found that ZOTEN exhibits strong adjuvant-like properties, which is highly comparable to alum, a commonly used adjuvant. Overall, our study provides very first evidence for the protective efficacy of an intravaginal microbicide/vaccine or microbivac platform against primary and secondary female genital herpes infections. PMID:27183601

  5. Targeted p120-Catenin Ablation Disrupts Dental Enamel Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, John D.; Dobeck, Justine M.; Tye, Coralee E.; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Stokes, Nicole; Reynolds, Albert B.; Fuchs, Elaine; Skobe, Ziedonis

    2010-01-01

    Dental enamel development occurs in stages. The ameloblast cell layer is adjacent to, and is responsible for, enamel formation. When rodent pre-ameloblasts become tall columnar secretory-stage ameloblasts, they secrete enamel matrix proteins, and the ameloblasts start moving in rows that slide by one another. This movement is necessary to form the characteristic decussating enamel prism pattern. Thus, a dynamic system of intercellular interactions is required for proper enamel development. Cadherins are components of the adherens junction (AJ), and they span the cell membrane to mediate attachment to adjacent cells. p120 stabilizes cadherins by preventing their internalization and degradation. So, we asked if p120-mediated cadherin stability is important for dental enamel formation. Targeted p120 ablation in the mouse enamel organ had a striking effect. Secretory stage ameloblasts detached from surrounding tissues, lost polarity, flattened, and ameloblast E- and N-cadherin expression became undetectable by immunostaining. The enamel itself was poorly mineralized and appeared to be composed of a thin layer of merged spheres that abraded from the tooth. Significantly, p120 mosaic mouse teeth were capable of forming normal enamel demonstrating that the enamel defects were not a secondary effect of p120 ablation. Surprisingly, blood-filled sinusoids developed in random locations around the developing teeth. This has not been observed in other p120-ablated tissues and may be due to altered p120-mediated cell signaling. These data reveal a critical role for p120 in tooth and dental enamel development and are consistent with p120 directing the attachment and detachment of the secretory stage ameloblasts as they move in rows. PMID:20862276

  6. Targeted p120-catenin ablation disrupts dental enamel development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Bartlett

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dental enamel development occurs in stages. The ameloblast cell layer is adjacent to, and is responsible for, enamel formation. When rodent pre-ameloblasts become tall columnar secretory-stage ameloblasts, they secrete enamel matrix proteins, and the ameloblasts start moving in rows that slide by one another. This movement is necessary to form the characteristic decussating enamel prism pattern. Thus, a dynamic system of intercellular interactions is required for proper enamel development. Cadherins are components of the adherens junction (AJ, and they span the cell membrane to mediate attachment to adjacent cells. p120 stabilizes cadherins by preventing their internalization and degradation. So, we asked if p120-mediated cadherin stability is important for dental enamel formation. Targeted p120 ablation in the mouse enamel organ had a striking effect. Secretory stage ameloblasts detached from surrounding tissues, lost polarity, flattened, and ameloblast E- and N-cadherin expression became undetectable by immunostaining. The enamel itself was poorly mineralized and appeared to be composed of a thin layer of merged spheres that abraded from the tooth. Significantly, p120 mosaic mouse teeth were capable of forming normal enamel demonstrating that the enamel defects were not a secondary effect of p120 ablation. Surprisingly, blood-filled sinusoids developed in random locations around the developing teeth. This has not been observed in other p120-ablated tissues and may be due to altered p120-mediated cell signaling. These data reveal a critical role for p120 in tooth and dental enamel development and are consistent with p120 directing the attachment and detachment of the secretory stage ameloblasts as they move in rows.

  7. Initial microbial colonization of enamel in children with different levels of caries activity: An in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Susann; Wolf, Alexandra; Basche, Sabine; Viergutz, Gabriele; Rupf, Stefan; Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2017-06-01

    To investigate patterns of overnight in situ microbial colonization of enamel in children. Overall, 29 children (aged 5-9 years) participated in the study. Nine were caries-free with no decayed, missing, or filled teeth (DMFT), 11 were caries-rehabilitated (DMFT ≥ 2, no active carious lesions), and nine were caries-active (DMFT ≥ 2, at least two carious lesions). Bovine enamel samples were fixed on individual upper jaw splints stored overnight in situ. 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) combined with Concanavalin A staining was applied for fluorescence microscopic visualization of total adherent bacteria and glucans. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for distinction of eubacteria, streptococci, and Candida albicans. Salivary samples were investigated for Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) by using CRT bacteria test and yeasts with Calcofluor white (CFW) staining. With all fluorescence methods, bacteria but not Candida albicans were detected on enamel samples. No statistically significant differences were observed in distribution patterns of the adherent bacteria between the groups. CFW staining indicated fungal structures in saliva samples of all participants. Based on CRT test results, the lowest amount of S. mutans were observed in caries-free children. Thus, initial microbial colonization patterns of enamel in children are not influenced by caries activity. Caries activity in children may influence the process of initial bioadhesion and thus distribution patterns of bacterial attachment to the enamel surface. Investigation of in situ biofilm formation might provide valuable insights regarding the varying caries susceptibility in children.

  8. Ultra-wide bandwidth with enhanced microwave absorption of electroless Ni-P coated tetrapod-shaped ZnO nano- and microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najim, Mohd; Modi, Gaurav; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Adelung, Rainer; Singh, Dharmendra; Agarwala, Vijaya

    2015-09-21

    A viable lightweight absorber is the current need for stealth technology as well as microwave absorption. Several microwave absorbers have been developed, but it is still a challenge to fabricate an absorber that facilitates microwave absorption in broad bandwidth or covers the maximum portion of the frequency range 2-18 GHz, the commonly used range for radar and other applications. Therefore, it is highly required to develop a wide bandwidth absorber that can provide microwave absorption in the most part of the frequency range 2-18 GHz while simultaneously being lightweight and can be fabricated in desired bulk quantities by the cost-effective synthesis methods. In this paper, an attempt has been made to design an ultra-wide bandwidth absorber with enhanced microwave absorption response by using nickel-phosphorus coated tetrapod-shaped ZnO (Ni-P coated T-ZnO). In the Ni-P coated T-ZnO absorber, ZnO acts as a good dielectric contributor, while Ni as a magnetic constituent to obtain a microwave absorbing composite material, which has favorable absorption properties. Ni-P coated ZnO nano-microstructures are synthesized by a simple and scalable two-step process. First, tetrapod-shaped ZnO (T-ZnO) structures have been grown by the flame transport synthesis (FTS) approach in a single step process and then they have been coated with Ni-P by an electroless coating technique. Their morphology, degree of crystallinity and existing phases were studied in detail by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The complex permittivity and permeability of the "as-fabricated" T-ZnO and Ni-P coated T-ZnO have been measured in the frequency range of 4-14 GHz and their microwave absorption properties are computed using the coaxial transmission-reflection method. The strongest reflection loss (RL) peak value of -36.41 dB has been obtained at a frequency of ∼8.99 GHz with coating thickness of 3.4 mm for the Ni

  9. Characterization of dentin, enamel, and carious lesions by a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yueli; Otis, Linda; Piao, Daqing; Zhu, Quing

    2005-04-01

    Enamel and dentin are the primary components of human teeth. Both of them have a strong polarization effect. We designed a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) system to study the spatially resolved scattering and polarization phenomena of teeth. The system is constructed in free space to avoid the complexity of polarization control in fiber-based PSOCT. The structural features of enamel were evaluated in five human teeth that had no visible evidence of caries. The teeth were subsequently sectioned in mesial distal orientation and coronal orientation. Then the structural aspects of dentin were evaluated. OCT images were made of the mantel dentin near the dentin-enamel junction. Five teeth with interproximal and occlusal caries were also studied. With two channel and phase-retardation images, PSOCT provided better functional contrast and more detailed structural information than conventional OCT. For a better description of the measured PSOCT data, we classify these features by two types, i.e., the local textural features and the global structural features. This study indicates that PSOCT has the potential to be a powerful tool for research of dental formation and caries diagnosis.

  10. OH⁻ deficiency in dental enamel, crown and root dentine as studied by ¹H CRAMPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Mai, Ronald; Scheler, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR based on combined rotation and multipulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) has been applied to study chemical structures of dental tissues. The samples of human enamel, crown dentine and root dentin studied in this work were used without chemical pre-treatment. The quantitative ¹H NMR spectra permit an assignment to different structures and a quantification of the content of hydroxyl groups. While there is 40% hydroxyl content in the enamel, there is significantly less in the dentin, 14% in the crown and 9% in the root. Thus this study provides the direct evidence of OH⁻ ion deficiency in all dental tissues supporting earlier findings that bone and dental mineral apatite is poorly hydroxylated.

  11. Efficacy of fluoride varnishes for preventing enamel demineralization after interproximal enamel reduction. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Vicente

    Full Text Available To evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the changes produced to enamel after interproximal reduction and subjected to demineralization cycles, after applying a fluoride varnish (Profluorid and a fluoride varnish containing tricalcium phosphate modified by fumaric acid (Clinpro White.138 interproximal dental surfaces were divided into six groups: 1 Intact enamel; 2 Intact enamel + demineralization cycles (DC; 3 Interproximal Reduction (IR; 4 IR + DC; 5 IR + Profluorid + DC; 6 IR + Clinpro White + DC. IR was performed with a 0.5 mm cylindrical diamond bur. The weight percentage of calcium (Ca, phosphorous (P and fluoride (F were quantified by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX. Samples were examined under scanning electron microscopy (SEM.The weight percentage of Ca was significantly higher (p0.05. The weight percentage of P was similar among all six groups (p>0.05. F was detected on 65% of Group 6 surfaces. SEM images of Groups 4 and 6 showed signs of demineralization, while Group 5 did not.Profluorid application acts as a barrier against the demineralization of interproximally reduced enamel.

  12. Dental enamel defects in children with coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierink, C.D.; van Diermen, D.E.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Heijmans, H.S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Dutch children with proven coeliac disease show specific dental enamel defects, and to asses whether children with the same gastrointestinal complaints, but proved no-coeliac disease, lack these specific dental enamel defects. Materials and

  13. Dental enamel defects in children with coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werink, Claar D.; van Diermen, Denise E.; Aartman, Irene H. A.; Heymans, Hugo S. A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether Dutch children with proven coeliac disease show specific dental enamel defects, and to asses whether children with the same gastrointestinal complaints, but proved no-coeliac disease, lack these specific dental enamel defects. MATERIALS AND

  14. Chromatographic separation of alkaline phosphatase from dental enamel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moe, D; Kirkeby, S; Salling, E

    1989-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) was prepared from partly mineralized bovine enamel by extraction in phosphate buffer, centrifugation and various chromatographic techniques. Chromatofocusing showed that the enamel enzyme possessed five isoelectric points at the acid pH level ranging from pH 5.7 to pH 4...

  15. Oral biofilm and caries-infiltrant interactions on enamel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tawakoli, Pune N; Attin, Thomas; Mohn, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    ...-infiltrated enamel [4–6] , only very little is known about the interaction of oral microflora with resin-infiltrated enamel. It is known that biofilms develop on all orally exposed surfaces and consist of different cross-linked bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances [7] . Bacteria in biofilms show a higher pathogenicity compared to thei...

  16. Class II composite restorations: importance of cervical enamel in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laegreid, Torgils; Gjerdet, Nils Roar; Vult von Steyern, Per; Johansson, Ann-Katrin

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the importance of enamel at the cervical margin for support and retention of a class II composite restoration in relation to fracture strength, fracture mode, and leakage. Sixty-five newly extracted teeth were randomly divided into five groups. Within each group, standardized class II preparations were made at the mesial surface of the tooth with four different preparation designs. Group D (n=15) had the cervical margin placed below the cemento-enamel junction (the dentin group), and in the other three groups (the enamel groups: E1, E2, and E3), the cervical margin was within the enamel (n=15 each). Group E3 had restorations with cuspal coverage, while groups E1 and E2 differed in vertical dimension. Intact teeth without preparation or restoration were tested as controls (n=5). The area of the horizontal part of enamel at the cervical margin of the preparation (available cervical enamel) was calculated. The teeth were restored with a nanofilled composite material and an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. The teeth were subjected to artificial aging consisting of thermocycling and mechanical cyclical loading. The restorations were subsequently loaded until fracture. The teeth were examined microscopically to assess fracture mode and leakage at the interface between the restoration and the tooth substance. The fracture strength in group D (without cervical enamel) and E3 (with cuspal coverage and cervical enamel) was lower (pclass II composite restorations.

  17. Electron probe microanalysis of permanent human enamel and dentine. A methodological and quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Quevedo, M.C.; Nieto-Albano, O.H.; García, J. M.; Gómez de Ferraris, M.E.; Campos, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Sample preparation of dental tissues for quantitative electron microprobe analysis has not been critically examined because of the highly mineralized nature of these structures. The present study was designed to establish the most suitable method for the electron probe quantitative determination of calcium in human permanent enamel and dentine while preserving the morphological features. Comparisons of quantitative data obtained with air-drying and freeze-dryin...

  18. Comparative Morphology of Incisor Enamel and Dentin in Humans and Fat Dormice (Glis glis)

    OpenAIRE

    Konjević, Dean; Keros, Tomislav; Brkić, Hrvoje; Slavica, Alen; Janicki, Zdravko; Margaletić, Josip

    2003-01-01

    The structure of teeth in all living beings is genetically predetermined, although it can change under external physiological and pathological factors. The author’s hypothesis was to indicate evolutional shifts resulting from genetic, functional and other differences. A comparative study about certain characteristics of incisors in humans and myomorpha, the fat dormouse (Glis glis) being their representative as well, comprised measurements of enamel and dentin thickness in indi...

  19. ONLINE TECHNOLOGICAL MONITORING OF INSULATION DEFECTS IN ENAMELED WIRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Zolotaryov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors used non-destructive technological monitoring of defects insulation enameled wire with poliimid polymer. The paper is devoted to the statistical method for processing, comparison and analysis of results of measurements of parameters of insulation of enameled wire because of mathematical model of trend for application in active technological monitoring is developed; the recommendations for parameters of such monitoring are used. It is theoretically justified and the possibility of determination of dependence of the error on the velocity of movement of a wire for want of quantifying of defects in enameled insulation by non-destructive tests by high voltage. The dependence of average value of amount of defects for enameled wire with two-sheeted poliimid insulation in a range of nominal diameter 0.56 mm is experimentally determined. The technological monitoring purpose is to reduce the quantifying defects of enameled insulation.

  20. Gold Enamel Choumps – A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargam D. Kotecha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tooth jewellery has been practiced since time immemorial and has become an increasingly popular trend. This case report provides a brief insight into a kind of tooth adornment/a tooth tattoo on the enamel prevalent in parts of western Uttar Pradesh, India locally known as a ‘Choump’. A tooth tattooed with ‘Choumps’ has extremely low incidence and could be used as an identification trait. Tooth adornment with ‘Choumps’ has been reported in adults however, this is the first reported case of ‘Choumps’ in children.

  1. Porcelain enamel passive thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, H.; King, H. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and evaluation of a highly adherent, low solar absorptance, porcelain enamel thermal control coating applied to 6061 and 1100 aluminum for space vehicle use. The coating consists of a low index of refraction, transparent host frit and a high volume fraction of titania as rutile, crystallized in-situ, as the scattering medium. Solar absorptance is 0.21 at a coating thickness of 0.013 cm. Hemispherical emittance is 0.88. The change in solar absorptance is 0.03, as measured in-situ, after an exposure of 1000 equivalent sun hours in vacuum.

  2. Enamel surface morphology after bracket debonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, R; Toledano, M; García-Godoy, F

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of brackets and the enamel morphology after using six methods for removal of adhesive after bracket debonding. A total of thirty-five recently extracted noncarious human premolars were used. The twin bracket Mini-Taurus was used with the Mono-Lok2 TM bonding system. Shear bond strength (MPa) was calculated. Immediately after the brackets were removed, the teeth were rinsed and dried, using an air-water syringe. The adhesive remnant index was calculated and the debonded teeth with residual adhesive material attached to the enamel surface were equally sorted in seven groups of five, as follows: Group 1. The residual adhesive was removed with a 12-blade tungsten carbide finishing bur in a high-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. Group 2. The residual adhesive was removed with a 12-blade tungsten carbide finishing bur in a low-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. Group 3. The residual adhesive was removed with an Arkansas stone: Dura-white stones for finishing composite in a high-speed handpiece using water as the coolant. Group 4. The residual adhesive was removed with an Arkansas stone: Dura-white stones for finishing composite in a low-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. Group 5. The residual adhesive was removed with Sof-Lex aluminum oxide discs according to manufacturer's instructions in a low-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. Group 6. The residual adhesive was removed with Enhance Composite Finishing Discs in a low-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. In this group, the paste was not applied after the polishing discs. Group 7. The residual adhesive was removed with Enhance Composite Finishing Discs and Polishing Cups in a low-speed handpiece, using water as the coolant. Prisma-gloss polishing paste and ultrafine polishing paste were applied according to manufacturer's instructions. After removal of the adhesive, all teeth were evaluated with the scanning

  3. The Presence of MMP-20 Reinforces Biomimetic Enamel Regrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, S; Ruan, Q; Mukherjee, K; Nutt, S; Moradian-Oldak, J

    2018-01-01

    Biomimetic synthesis of artificial enamel is a promising strategy for the prevention and restoration of defective enamel. We have recently reported that a hydrogel system composed of chitosan-amelogenin (CS-AMEL) and calcium phosphate is effective in forming an enamel-like layer that has a seamless interface with natural tooth surfaces. Here, to improve the mechanical system function and to facilitate the biomimetic enamel regrowth, matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) was introduced into the CS-AMEL hydrogel. Inspired by our recent finding that MMP-20 prevents protein occlusion inside enamel crystals, we hypothesized that addition of MMP-20 to CS-AMEL hydrogel could reinforce the newly grown layer. Recombinant human MMP-20 was added to the CS-AMEL hydrogel to cleave full-length amelogenin during the growth of enamel-like crystals on an etched enamel surface. The MMP-20 proteolysis of amelogenin was studied, and the morphology, composition, and mechanical properties of the newly grown layer were characterized. We found that amelogenin was gradually degraded by MMP-20 in the presence of chitosan. The newly grown crystals in the sample treated with MMP-20-CS-AMEL hydrogel showed more uniform orientation and greater crystallinity than the samples treated with CS-AMEL hydrogel without MMP-20. Stepwise processing of amelogenin by MMP-20 in the CS-AMEL hydrogel prevented undesirable protein occlusion within the newly formed crystals. As a result, both the modulus and hardness of the repaired enamel were significantly increased (1.8- and 2.4-fold, respectively) by the MMP-20-CS-AMEL hydrogel. Although future work is needed to further incorporate other enamel matrix proteins into the system, this study brings us one step closer to biomimetic enamel regrowth.

  4. In vivo spectrophotometric evaluation of pure enamel and enamel-dentine complex in relationship with different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, Juan R; Arocha, Mariana A; Domínguez, Soledad; Roig, Miguel; Ardu, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this in vivo study was to investigate the influence of age on optical properties of pure enamel and enamel-dentine complex. A spectrophotometric study was performed on two different age groups: young (10-35 years old) and adult (36-60 years old). In both groups, the tooth's total area of the upper right central incisor was recorded. Areas of 2mm thick pure enamel and 3mm enamel-dentine complex were detected and their L a b and CR evaluated. For 2mm pure enamel medians in the young group were L 74.8, a 3.1, b 15.1, against white background; and L 65.5, a 0.9, b 10.3 against black background. The correspondent opacity was 75%. In the adult group medians were L 70.0, a 4.1, b 15.4 against white background; and L 61.2, a 1.6, b 9.6, against black background. The correspondent opacity was 75%. For 3mm enamel-dentine complex medians in the young group were L 77.8, a 3.0, b 19.8 against white background; and L 74.2, a 1.1, b 15.9, against black background. The correspondent opacity was 89%. In the adult group medians were L 73.4, a 4.0, b 18.5 against white background; and L 71.0, a 2.0, and b 15.3 against black background. The correspondent opacity was 90%. The application of this method on a larger group of subjects of different ages may serve as a database for a more exact characterization of optical properties of natural enamel and dentine. L values in enamel, as well as a* value of 3mm thick enamel-dentine complex and 2mm pure enamel were significantly higher in the young age group. L and a values of enamel over white and black backgrounds were statistically different within the 2 age groups considered. L values over white background and a values over black background of the enamel dentine complex seem to change with age. The opacity (CR) for enamel nor for enamel dentine complex does not change within the two age groups considered in this study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of shear bond strength between unfilled resin to dry enamel and dentin bonding to moist and dry enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasini E.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The use of dentine bondings on enamel and dentin in total etch protocols has recently become popular. Unfilled resin is hydrophobic and dentin bonding is hydrophilic in nature. This chemical difference could be effective in enamel bonding process. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of unfilled resin to dry enamel and dentin bonding to dry and moist enamel. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, a total of 30 incisor teeth were used. The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups of 10. 37% phosphoric acid etchant was applied to the enamel surfaces in each group for 15 seconds, rinsed with water for 20 seconds and dried for 20 seconds with compressed air in groups one and two. After conditioning, group 1 received unfilled resin (Margin Bond, Colten and group 2 received dentin bonding (Single Bond, 3M and in group 3 after conditioning and rinsing with water, a layer of dentin bonding (Single Bond was applied on wet enamel. The enamel and dentin bonding were light cured for 20 seconds. A ring mold 3.5 mm in diameter and 2 mm height was placed over the specimens to receive the composite filling material (Z100, 3M. The composite was cured for 40 seconds. The specimens were thermocycled and shear bond strengths were determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The findings were analyzed by ANOVA One-Way and Tukey HSD tests. Results: Shear bond strength of dentin bonding to dry enamel was significantly less than unfilled resin to dry enamel (P<0.05. There was no significant difference between the bond strength of dentin bonding to moist and dry enamel. In addition bond strength of dentin bonding to wet enamel was not significantly different from unfilled resin to dry enamel. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, it is suggested that enamel surface should remain slightly moist after etching before bonding with single bond but when using unfilled resin, the

  6. The lineage-specific evolution of aquaporin gene clusters facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Roderick Nigel; Chauvigné, François; Hlidberg, Jón Baldur; Cutler, Christopher P; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-01

    A major physiological barrier for aquatic organisms adapting to terrestrial life is dessication in the aerial environment. This barrier was nevertheless overcome by the Devonian ancestors of extant Tetrapoda, but the origin of specific molecular mechanisms that solved this water problem remains largely unknown. Here we show that an ancient aquaporin gene cluster evolved specifically in the sarcopterygian lineage, and subsequently diverged into paralogous forms of AQP2, -5, or -6 to mediate water conservation in extant Tetrapoda. To determine the origin of these apomorphic genomic traits, we combined aquaporin sequencing from jawless and jawed vertebrates with broad taxon assembly of >2,000 transcripts amongst 131 deuterostome genomes and developed a model based upon Bayesian inference that traces their convergent roots to stem subfamilies in basal Metazoa and Prokaryota. This approach uncovered an unexpected diversity of aquaporins in every lineage investigated, and revealed that the vertebrate superfamily consists of 17 classes of aquaporins (Aqp0 - Aqp16). The oldest orthologs associated with water conservation in modern Tetrapoda are traced to a cluster of three aqp2-like genes in Actinistia that likely arose >500 Ma through duplication of an aqp0-like gene present in a jawless ancestor. In sea lamprey, we show that aqp0 first arose in a protocluster comprised of a novel aqp14 paralog and a fused aqp01 gene. To corroborate these findings, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of five syntenic nuclear receptor subfamilies, which, together with observations of extensive genome rearrangements, support the coincident loss of ancestral aqp2-like orthologs in Actinopterygii. We thus conclude that the divergence of sarcopterygian-specific aquaporin gene clusters was permissive for the evolution of water conservation mechanisms that facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation.

  7. The lineage-specific evolution of aquaporin gene clusters facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick Nigel Finn

    Full Text Available A major physiological barrier for aquatic organisms adapting to terrestrial life is dessication in the aerial environment. This barrier was nevertheless overcome by the Devonian ancestors of extant Tetrapoda, but the origin of specific molecular mechanisms that solved this water problem remains largely unknown. Here we show that an ancient aquaporin gene cluster evolved specifically in the sarcopterygian lineage, and subsequently diverged into paralogous forms of AQP2, -5, or -6 to mediate water conservation in extant Tetrapoda. To determine the origin of these apomorphic genomic traits, we combined aquaporin sequencing from jawless and jawed vertebrates with broad taxon assembly of >2,000 transcripts amongst 131 deuterostome genomes and developed a model based upon Bayesian inference that traces their convergent roots to stem subfamilies in basal Metazoa and Prokaryota. This approach uncovered an unexpected diversity of aquaporins in every lineage investigated, and revealed that the vertebrate superfamily consists of 17 classes of aquaporins (Aqp0 - Aqp16. The oldest orthologs associated with water conservation in modern Tetrapoda are traced to a cluster of three aqp2-like genes in Actinistia that likely arose >500 Ma through duplication of an aqp0-like gene present in a jawless ancestor. In sea lamprey, we show that aqp0 first arose in a protocluster comprised of a novel aqp14 paralog and a fused aqp01 gene. To corroborate these findings, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of five syntenic nuclear receptor subfamilies, which, together with observations of extensive genome rearrangements, support the coincident loss of ancestral aqp2-like orthologs in Actinopterygii. We thus conclude that the divergence of sarcopterygian-specific aquaporin gene clusters was permissive for the evolution of water conservation mechanisms that facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation.

  8. Toothpaste prevents debonded brackets on erosive enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Érico Luiz Damasceno; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Ellwood, Roger Phillip; Pretty, Ian; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of high fluoride dentifrice on the bond strength of brackets after erosive challenge. Eighty-four enamel specimens were divided into seven groups (n = 12): WN (distilled water/no acid challenge), W3C (distilled water/3 cycles of acid challenge), and W6C (distilled water/6 cycles of acid challenge) were not submitted to dentifrice treatment. Groups RF3C (regular fluoride dentifrice/3 cycles of acid challenge) and RF6C (regular fluoride dentifrice/6 cycles of acid challenge) were treated with dentifrices containing 1450 μg F(-)/g and HF3C (high fluoride dentifrice/3 cycles of acid challenge) and HF6C (high fluoride dentifrice/6 cycles of acid challenge) were with 5000 μg F(-)/g. Acid challenges were performed for seven days. After bond strength test, there was no significant difference among groups submitted to 3 cycles of acid challenge (P > 0.05). Statistically significant difference was found between the regular and high fluoride dentifrices after 6 cycles of acid challenge (<0.05). Similar areas of adhesive remaining were found among control groups and among groups W6C, RF3C, RF6C, HF3C, and HF6C. The high fluoride dentifrice was able to prevent the reduction of bond strength values of brackets submitted to acid challenge. the high fluoride toothpaste prevents debonded brackets on erosive enamel.

  9. Toothpaste Prevents Debonded Brackets on Erosive Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érico Luiz Damasceno Barros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of high fluoride dentifrice on the bond strength of brackets after erosive challenge. Eighty-four enamel specimens were divided into seven groups (n=12: WN (distilled water/no acid challenge, W3C (distilled water/3 cycles of acid challenge, and W6C (distilled water/6 cycles of acid challenge were not submitted to dentifrice treatment. Groups RF3C (regular fluoride dentifrice/3 cycles of acid challenge and RF6C (regular fluoride dentifrice/6 cycles of acid challenge were treated with dentifrices containing 1450 μg F−/g and HF3C (high fluoride dentifrice/3 cycles of acid challenge and HF6C (high fluoride dentifrice/6 cycles of acid challenge were with 5000 μg F−/g. Acid challenges were performed for seven days. After bond strength test, there was no significant difference among groups submitted to 3 cycles of acid challenge (P>0.05. Statistically significant difference was found between the regular and high fluoride dentifrices after 6 cycles of acid challenge (<0.05. Similar areas of adhesive remaining were found among control groups and among groups W6C, RF3C, RF6C, HF3C, and HF6C. The high fluoride dentifrice was able to prevent the reduction of bond strength values of brackets submitted to acid challenge. Clinical relevance: the high fluoride toothpaste prevents debonded brackets on erosive enamel.

  10. Phylogenomic analysis of vertebrate thrombospondins reveals fish-specific paralogues, ancestral gene relationships and a tetrapod innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Josephine C

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thrombospondins (TSPs are evolutionarily-conserved, extracellular, calcium-binding glycoproteins with important roles in cell-extracellular matrix interactions, angiogenesis, synaptogenesis and connective tissue organisation. Five TSPs, designated TSP-1 through TSP-5, are encoded in the human genome. All but one have known roles in acquired or inherited human diseases. To further understand the roles of TSPs in human physiology and pathology, it would be advantageous to extend the repertoire of relevant vertebrate models. In general the zebrafish is proving an excellent model organism for vertebrate biology, therefore we set out to evaluate the status of TSPs in zebrafish and two species of pufferfish. Results We identified by bioinformatics that three fish species encode larger numbers of TSPs than vertebrates, yet all these sequences group as homologues of TSP-1 to -4. By phylogenomic analysis of neighboring genes, we uncovered that, in fish, a TSP-4-like sequence is encoded from the gene corresponding to the tetrapod TSP-5 gene. Thus, all TSP genes show conservation of synteny between fish and tetrapods. In the human genome, the TSP-1, TSP-3, TSP-4 and TSP-5 genes lie within paralogous regions that provide insight into the ancestral genomic context of vertebrate TSPs. Conclusion A new model for TSP evolution in vertebrates is presented. The TSP-5 protein sequence has evolved rapidly from a TSP-4-like sequence as an innovation in the tetrapod lineage. TSP biology in fish is complicated by the presence of additional lineage- and species-specific TSP paralogues. These novel results give deeper insight into the evolution of TSPs in vertebrates and open new directions for understanding the physiological and pathological roles of TSP-4 and TSP-5 in humans.

  11. 'In vitro' assessment to instrumented indentation hardness tests in enamel of bovine teeth, before and after dental bleaching by laser; Avaliacao in vitro' de ensaios instrumentados de dureza em esmalte de dente bovino, antes e apos clareamento dental a laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto Junior, Francisco Meira

    2004-07-01

    The laser enamel bleaching is a common used procedure due to its satisfactory esthetic results. The possible changes on the dental structures caused by the bleaching technique are of great importance. The enamel superficial microhardness changes through instrumented indentation hardness on bovine teeth were analyzed in this present study. The samples were divided in two halves, one being the control and the other irradiated with a diode laser (808 nm) or with a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) to activate the Whiteness HP bleaching gel (hydrogen peroxide at 35%). It was possible to conclude that there was a statistical significant increase on the enamel superficial microhardness (Group I, sample 1 and Group II, sample 1) despite this increase did not seem to indicate a concern regarding the enamel surface resistance change. There was not a significant statistical change on the enamel microhardness on the other samples. The final conclusion is that there was no superficial enamel morphological change after these treatments. (author)

  12. Enamel-like apatite crown covering amorphous mineral in a crayfish mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentov, Shmuel; Zaslansky, Paul; Al-Sawalmih, Ali; Masic, Admir; Fratzl, Peter; Sagi, Amir; Berman, Amir; Aichmayer, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Carbonated hydroxyapatite is the mineral found in vertebrate bones and teeth, whereas invertebrates utilize calcium carbonate in their mineralized organs. In particular, stable amorphous calcium carbonate is found in many crustaceans. Here we report on an unusual, crystalline enamel-like apatite layer found in the mandibles of the arthropod Cherax quadricarinatus (freshwater crayfish). Despite their very different thermodynamic stabilities, amorphous calcium carbonate, amorphous calcium phosphate, calcite and fluorapatite coexist in well-defined functional layers in close proximity within the mandible. The softer amorphous minerals are found primarily in the bulk of the mandible whereas apatite, the harder and less soluble mineral, forms a wear-resistant, enamel-like coating of the molar tooth. Our findings suggest a unique case of convergent evolution, where similar functional challenges of mastication led to independent developments of structurally and mechanically similar, apatite-based layers in the teeth of genetically remote phyla: vertebrates and crustaceans. PMID:22588301

  13. Optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribioli, J. T.; Jacomassi, D.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Pratavieira, S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of composite resins for restorative procedure in anterior and posterior cavities is highly common in Dentistry due to its mechanical and aesthetic properties that are compatible with the remaining dental structure. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler. The same organic matrix of the commercially available resins was used for this experimental resin. The reinforcing filler was obtained after the gridding of bovine enamel fragments and a superficial treatment was performed to allow the adhesion of the filler particles with the organic matrix. Different optical images as fluorescence and reflectance were performed to compare the experimental composite with the human teeth. The present experimental resin shows similar optical properties compared with human teeth.

  14. Re-establishing esthetics of fluorosis-stained teeth using enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Correa, Ketlen Michele; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia

    2012-01-01

    Dental fluorosis manifests itself as white stains on the enamel of teeth exposed to excessive doses of fluoride during their formation. Fluorosis usually occurs as a result of the ingestion of dentifrices, gels and fluoridated solutions. It may be diagnosed as mild, moderate or severe, and in some cases, it may cause the loss of the surface structure of dental enamel. The aim of this study was to report the clinical case of a female patient of 18 years with moderate fluorosis, whose smile was reestablished by the use of an enamel microabrasion technique, followed by in-office bleaching. A microabrasion technique with 6% hydrochloric acid associated with silica carbide showed to be a safe and efficient method for removing white fluorosis stains, while dental bleaching was useful for obtaining a uniform tooth shade. The association of these techniques presented excellent results and the patient was satisfied. Both techniques are painless, fast and easy to perform, in addition to preserving the dental structure. Treatment showed immediate and permanent results; this technique must be divulged among professionals and their patients.

  15. Confocal Raman mapping of collagen cross-link and crystallinity of human dentin-enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Amel; Nouioua, Fares; Desoutter, Alban; Levallois, Bernard; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.; Tassery, Hervé; Terrer, Elodie; Salehi, Hamideh

    2017-08-01

    The separation zone between enamel and dentin [dentin-enamel junction (DEJ)] with different properties in biomechanical composition has an important role in preventing crack propagation from enamel to dentin. The understanding of the chemical structure (inorganic and organic components), physical properties, and chemical composition of the human DEJ could benefit biomimetic materials in dentistry. Spatial distribution of calcium phosphate crystallinity and the collagen crosslinks near DEJ were studied using confocal Raman microscopy and calculated by different methods. To obtain collagen crosslinking, the ratio of two peaks 1660 cm-1 over 1690 cm-1 (amide I bands) is calculated. For crystallinity, the inverse full-width at half maximum of phosphate peak at 960 cm-1, and the ratio of two Raman peaks of phosphate at 960/950 cm-1 is provided. In conclusion, the study of chemical and physical properties of DEJ provides many benefits in the biomaterial field to improve the synthesis of dental materials in respect to the natural properties of human teeth. Confocal Raman microscopy as a powerful tool provides the molecular structure to identify the changes along DEJ and can be expanded for other mineralized tissues.

  16. Er:YAG and CTH:YAG laser radiation: contact versus non-contact enamel ablation and sonic-activated bulk composite placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckova, M.; Kasparova, M.; Dostalova, T.; Jelinkova, H.; Sulc, J.; Nemec, M.; Fibrich, M.; Bradna, P.; Miyagi, M.

    2013-05-01

    Laser radiation can be used for effective caries removal and cavity preparation without significant thermal effects, collateral damage of tooth structure, or patient discomfort. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of tissue after contact or non-contact Er:YAG and CTH:YAG laser radiation ablation. The second goal was to increase the sealing ability of hard dental tissues using sonic-activated bulk filling material with change in viscosity during processing. The artificial caries was prepared in intact teeth to simulate a demineralized surface and then the Er:YAG or CTH:YAG laser radiation was applied. The enamel artificial caries was gently removed by the laser radiation and sonic-activated composite fillings were inserted. A stereomicroscope and then a scanning electron microscope were used to evaluate the enamel surface. Er:YAG contact mode ablation in enamel was quick and precise; the cavity was smooth with a keyhole shaped prism and rod relief arrangement without a smear layer. The sonic-activated filling material was consistently regularly distributed; no cracks or microleakage in the enamel were observed. CTH:YAG irradiation was able to clean but not ablate the enamel surface; in contact and also in non-contact mode there was evidence of melting and fusing of the enamel.

  17. In vivo imaging of enamel by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM): non-invasive analysis of dental surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaldo, Maria; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2014-07-01

    The aim is to establish the feasibility to image in vivo microscopic dental surface by non-invasive, real-time, en face Reflectance Confocal Microscopy (RCM). Fifteen healthy volunteers referred at the Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Odontostomatological Specialties, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy, were enrolled. A commercially available hand-held RCM (Vivascope(®)3000, Lucid, Rochester, NY, USA) was used to image in vivo the dental surface of the upper right and left central incisors of each volunteer. Totally, thirty vestibular surfaces of upper central incisors were imaged in vivo by RCM to preliminary image the dental surface and assess the feasibility of a more extended study on teeth. In vivo RCM was able to image the dental surface within the enamel, at a maximum depth imaging of 300 μm, with images good in quality and the capability to detect enamel structures such as enamel lamellae and enamel damages, such as unevenness and cracks. In conclusion, enamel "optical biopsy", gained by RCM imaging, revealed to be a non-invasive real-time tool valid to obtain architectural details of the dental surface with no need for extraction or processing the samples. RCM appears to be an optimum auxiliary device for investigating the architectural pattern of superficial enamel, therefore inviting further experiments aimed to define our knowledge about damages after etching treatments or bracket removal and the responsiveness to fluoride seals and the morphology of the tooth/restoration interface. Moreover, this device could also be used to detect relevant diseases like caries, or to assess surface properties to evaluate lesion activity.

  18. Primary tooth enamel loss after manual and mechanical microabrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuanon, Angela Cristina Cilense; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; Azevedo, Elcilaine Rizzato; Lima, Luciana Monti

    2008-01-01

    This study's purpose was to assess the amount of dental enamel loss on primary incisors after manual or mechanical microabrasion with a phosphoric acid/pumice paste. Ten exfoliated primary maxillary incisors were bisected faciolingually and the resulting 20 halves were randomly assigned to 2 groups: group 1 (N = 10)-manual technique (plastic spatula); and group 2 (N = 10)-mechanical technique (rubber cup attached to a low-speed handpiece). Microabrasion was performed on the buccal surface using an abrasive paste prepared with 37% phosphoric acid and pumice. Ten 20-second applications alternated with 20-second risings were performed in each group. Enamel thickness measurements made under stereomicroscopy before and after microabrasion were analyzed statistically by analysis of variance and pairwise t test. There was a statistically significant difference (P = .003) between the manual and mechanical techniques. The mechanical technique produced a mean enamel loss of 274.16 microm (66% of total enamel thickness), while the mean enamel loss with the manual technique was 152.59 microm (39% of total enamel thickness). Manual microabrasion using a plastic spatula removed less enamel, but was sufficient to eliminate most superficial stains and defects, and may be a viable option for the microabrasive technique on primary teeth.

  19. Enamel microabrasion: An overview of clinical and scientific considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Aguiar, Flavio Henrique Baggio; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-16

    Superficial stains and irregularities of the enamel are generally what prompt patients to seek dental intervention to improve their smile. These stains or defects may be due to hypoplasia, amelogenesis imperfecta, mineralized white spots, or fluorosis, for which enamel microabrasion is primarily indicated. Enamel microabrasion involves the use of acidic and abrasive agents, such as with 37% phosphoric acid and pumice or 6% hydrochloric acid and silica, applied to the altered enamel surface with mechanical pressure from a rubber cup coupled to a rotatory mandrel of a low-rotation micromotor. If necessary, this treatment can be safely combined with bleaching for better esthetic results. Recent studies show that microabrasion is a conservative treatment when the enamel wear is minimal and clinically imperceptible. The most important factor contributing to the success of enamel microabrasion is the depth of the defect, as deeper, opaque stains, such as those resulting from hypoplasia, cannot be resolved with microabrasion, and require a restorative approach. Surface enamel alterations that result from microabrasion, such as roughness and microhardness, are easily restored by saliva. Clinical studies support the efficacy and longevity of this safe and minimally invasive treatment. The present article presents the clinical and scientific aspects concerning the microabrasion technique, and discusses the indications for and effects of the treatment, including recent works describing microscopic and clinical evaluations.

  20. DESIGN AND APPLICATION OF TRANSPARENT AND TRANSLUCENT ENAMELS ON ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. AHMADI MOGHADDAM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Transparent and opaque glass enamels for aluminum plates were designed with a minimum or with no heavy atom oxides such as lead and bismuth oxides. The thermal properties of the enamels were studied by DTA and their stability as measured by the difference of glass transition and crystallization onset temperatures was determined. Bending and rapid deformation (impact tests indicated the interfacial adhesion. The enamel/aluminum interfacial qualities were viewed and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. A large amount of NaF and P2O5 in their formulation created opaque enamels. The three methods of melt dipping, pouring, and sintering were used to apply layers of enamels on aluminum plates. The novelty of the pouring and spreading method and its advantages over other methods, were in the use of lower stability and higher melting point enamels, without thermally/mechanically damaging the aluminum. Observations suggested that the interfacial contact and adhesion properties were good, particularly with the transparent or glassy state enamels.

  1. EFFECT OF SURFACE TREATMENT ON ENAMEL SURFACE ROUGHNESS

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    Şeyda Erşahan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the effects of different methods of surface treatment on enamel roughness. Materials and Methods: Ninety human maxillary first premolars were randomly divided into three groups (n=30 according to type of enamel surface treatment: I, acid etching; II, Er:YAG laser; III, Nd:YAG laser. The surface roughness of enamel was measured with a noncontact optical profilometer. For each enamel sample, two readings were taken across the sample—before enamel surface treatment (T1 and after enamel surface treatment (T2. The roughness parameter analyzed was the average roughness (Ra. Statistical analysis was performed using a Paired sample t test and the post-hoc Mann- Whitney U test, with the significance level set at 0.05. Results: The highest Ra (average roughness values were observed for Group II, with a significant difference with Groups I and III (P<0.001. Ra values for the acid etching group (Group I were significantly lower than other groups (P<0.001. Conclusion: Surface treatment of enamel with Er:YAG laser and Nd:YAG laser results in significantly higher Ra than acid-etching. Both Er:YAG laser or Nd:YAG laser can be recommended as viable treatment alternatives to acid etching.

  2. The methylcobalt(III) complex of a tetrapodal pentadentate amine ligand, 2,6-bis(1′,3′-diamino-2′-methyl-prop-2′-yl)pyridine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohmann, Andreas; Heinemann, Frank W; Kofod, Pauli

    1999-01-01

    . The structure of the complex has been determined using the dithionate salt [Co(pyN4)(CH3)]S2O6. The coordination geometry at cobalt is close to octahedral, the tetrapodal pentadentate amine ligand providing a C2-symmetrical coordination cap for the metal centre. One axial position is occupied by the pyridine...... nitrogen atom, while the four equivalent primary amino groups take the equatorial positions. The other axial position, trans to the pyridine ring, is occupied by the methyl group. The Co–Npy bond length of 2.018(2) Å is significantly elongated compared with other cobalt(III) complexes of the pyN4 ligand......, demonstrating the strong trans influence of the CH3 ligand. The Co–C bond length (1.975(4) Å) is virtually identical to the value found in the related complex [Co(NH3)5(CH3)](S2O6)....

  3. Primary enamel permeability: a SEM evaluation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchese, A; Bertacci, A; Chersoni, S; Portelli, M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the occurrence of outward fluid flow on primary tooth sound enamel surface. Sixty primary upper canines from preadolescent patients (mean age 8.0±1.9) and 24 retained primary upper canines from adult subjects (mean age 35.0±1.8) were analysed. The enamel surface was gently polished and air dried for 10 s. An impression was immediately obtained by vinyl polyxiloxane. Replicas were then obtained by polyether impression material, gold coated and inspected under SEM. The hydrophobic vinyl polyxiloxane material enabled to obtain in situ a morphological image of the presence of droplets, most likely resulting from outward fluids flow through outer enamel. For each sample three different representative areas of 5μ² in the cervical, medium and incisal third were examined and droplets presence values was recorded. All data were analysed by by Fisher's exact test. Primary enamel showed a substantial permeability expressed as droplets discharge on its surface. Droplets distribution covered, without any specific localisation, the entire enamel surface in all the samples. No signs of post-eruptive maturation with changes in droplets distribution were observed in samples from adult subjects. No statistically significant differences (P = 0.955) were noted in the percentage distribution of enamel area covered with droplets among the two group studied. SEM evaluation of droplets distribution on enamel surface indicated a substantial enamel permeability in primary teeth, accordingly with histological features, without changes during aging. A relationship between enamel permeability, caries susceptibility and bonding procedures effectiveness could be hypothesised.

  4. Disruption of enamel crystal formation quantified by synchrotron microdiffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jawad, Maisoon; Addison, Owen; Khan, Malik Arshman; James, Alison; Hendriksz, Christian J

    2012-12-01

    To understand the pathology of the ultrastructure of enamel affected by systemic disorders which disrupt enamel tissue formation in order to give insight into the precise mechanisms of matrix-mediated biomineralization in dental enamel in health and disease. Two-dimensional synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been utilized as a sophisticated and useful technique to spatially quantify preferred orientation in mineralized healthy deciduous dental enamel, and the disrupted crystallite organization in enamel affected by a systemic disease affecting bone and dental mineralization (mucopolysaccharidosis Type IVA and Type II are used as examples). The lattice spacing of the hydroxyapatite phase, the crystallite size and aspect ratio, and the quantified preferred orientation of crystallites across whole intact tooth sections, have been determined using synchrotron microdiffraction. Significant differences in mineral crystallite orientation distribution of affected enamel have been observed compared to healthy mineralized tissue. The gradation of enamel crystal orientation seen in healthy tissue is absent in the affected enamel, indicating a continual disruption in the crystallite alignment during mineral formation. This state of the art technique has the potential to provide a unique insight into the mechanisms leading to deranged enamel formation in a wide range of disease states. Characterising crystal orientation patterns and geometry in health and following disruption can be a powerful tool in advancing our overall understanding of mechanisms leading to the tissue phenotypes seen clinically. Findings can be used to inform the appropriate dental management of these tissues and/or to investigate the influence of therapeutic interventions or external stressors which may impact on amelogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ON THE BRITTLENESS OF ENAMEL AND SELECTED DENTAL MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S.; Quinn, J. B; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2008-01-01

    Although brittle material behavior is often considered undesirable, a quantitative measure of “brittleness” is currently not used in assessing the clinical merits of dental materials. Objective To quantify and compare the brittleness of human enamel and common dental restorative materials used for crown replacement. Methods Specimens of human enamel were prepared from the 3rd molars of “young” (18≤age≤25) and “old” (50≤age) patients. The hardness, elastic modulus and apparent fracture toughness were characterized as a function of distance from the DEJ using indentation approaches. These properties were then used in estimating the brittleness according to a model that accounts for the competing dissipative processes of deformation and fracture. The brittleness of selected porcelain, ceramic and Micaceous Glass Ceramic (MGC) dental materials was estimated and compared with that of the enamel. Results The average brittleness of the young and old enamel increased with distance from the DEJ. For the old enamel the average brittleness increased from approximately 300 µm−1 at the DEJ to nearly 900 µm−1 at the occlusal surface. While there was no significant difference between the two age groups at the DEJ, the brittleness of the old enamel was significantly greater (and up to 4 times higher) than that of the young enamel near the occlusal surface. The brittleness numbers for the restorative materials were up to 90% lower than that of young occlusal enamel. Significance The brittleness index could serve as a useful scale in the design of materials used for crown replacement, as well as a quantitative tool for characterizing degradation in the mechanical behavior of enamel. PMID:18436299

  6. Interproximal enamel reduction as a part of orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenaite, Egle; Lopatiene, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Interproximal enamel reduction is a part of orthodontic treatment for gaining a modest amount of space in the treatment of crowding. Today interproximal enamel reduction has become a viable alternative to the extraction of permanent teeth, and helps to adjust the Bolton Index discrepancy. The aim of the study is to evaluate various interproximal enamel reduction techniques, its indications, contraindications and complications presented in recent scientific studies. Papers published in English language between 2003 and 2012 were searched in PubMed, ScienceDirect and The Cochrane Library databases, as well as the Web search Google Scholar. Initial searches were made to find peer-reviewed systematic reviews, meta-analyses, literature reviews, clinical trials, which analysed at least one interproximal enamel reduction method. 31 published data fulfilled the inclusion criteria. According to the study, abrasive metal strips, diamond-coated stripping disks, and air-rotor stripping are the main interproximal enamel reduction techniques. Indications for use are mild or moderate crowding in dental arches, Bolton Index discrepancy, changes in tooth shape and dental esthetics within the enamel, enhancement of retention and stability after orthodontic treatment, normalization of gingival contour, elimination of black gingival triangles, and correction of the Curve of Spee. Complications of interproximal enamel reduction are hypersensitivity, irreversible damage of dental pulp, increased formation of plaque, the risk of caries in the stripped enamel areas and periodontal diseases. Interproximal enamel reduction is an important part of orthodontic treatment for gaining space in the dental arch, and for the correction of the Bolton index discrepancy.

  7. Microabrasion in tooth enamel discoloration defects: three cases with long-term follow-ups

    OpenAIRE

    SUNDFELD,Renato Herman; SUNDFELD-NETO,Daniel; MACHADO,Lucas Silveira; FRANCO,Laura Molinar; FAGUNDES,Ticiane Cestari; BRISO,André Luiz Fraga

    2014-01-01

    Superficial irregularities and certain intrinsic stains on the dental enamel surfaces can be resolved by enamel microabrasion, however, treatment for such defects need to be confined to the outermost regions of the enamel surface. Dental bleaching and resin-based composite repair are also often useful for certain situations for tooth color corrections. This article presented and discussed the indications and limitations of enamel microabrasion treatment. Three case reports treated by enamel m...

  8. Synthetic tooth enamel: SEM characterization of a fluoride hydroxyapatite coating for dentistry applications

    OpenAIRE

    Marise de Oliveira; Herman Sander Mansur

    2007-01-01

    An alternative to etching enamel for retention of an adhesive is to grow crystals on the enamel surface. The potential advantages of crystal growth include easy procedure and less damage to the enamel. These crystals retain the adhesive or are the actual dental restoration. In this work, a paste of synthetic enamel was used to grow crystals of fluoride hydroxyapatite (F-HA) onto the human tooth surface. This technique can be used for several dentistry applications like enamel whitening, stren...

  9. Enamel pearl on an unusual location associated with localized periodontal disease: A clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Shivani; Malhotra, Sumit; Baliga, Vidya; Hans, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial plaque has been implicated as the primary etiologic factor in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. Anatomic factors (such as enamel pearls) are often associated with advanced localized periodontal destruction. The phenomenon of ectopic development of enamel on the root surface, variedly referred to as enameloma, enamel pearl, enamel drop or enamel nodule, is not well-understood. Such an anomaly may facilitate the progression of periodontal breakdown. A rare case of...

  10. Jurassic tetrapods and flora of Cañadón Asfalto Formation in Cerro Cóndor area, Chubut Province

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio H. Escapa; Juliana Sterli; Diego Pol; Laura Nicoli

    2008-01-01

    The plant and tetrapod fossil record of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Middle to Late Jurassic) found in Cerro Cóndor area (Chubut Province) is summarized here. The flora is dominated by conifers (Araucariaceae, Cupressaceae sensu lato) but also includes ferns and equisetaleans. The tetrapod fauna is composed of dinosaur taxa described in the 70's as well as other remains recently described and other vertebrate groups such as amphibians, turtles, and mammals. The amphibian remains have been i...

  11. Microstructure and hardness of bovine enamel in roselle extract solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dame, M. T.; Noerdin, A.; Indrani, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of roselle extract solution on the microstructure and hardness of bovine enamel. Ten bovine teeth and a 5% concentration of roselle extract solution were prepared. Immersions of each bovine tooth in roselle extract solution were conducted up to 60 minutes. The bovine enamel surface was characterized in hardness and microscopy. It was apparent that the initial hardness was 328 KHN, and after immersion in 15 and 60 min, the values decrease to 57.4 KHN and 11 KHN, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed changes in enamel rods after immersion in the roselle extract solution.

  12. Atomic force microscopy analysis of enamel nanotopography after interproximal reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Lydia; Farella, Mauro; Lowrey, Sam; Cannon, Richard D; Mei, Li

    2017-04-01

    Interproximal reduction (IPR) removes enamel and leaves grooves and furrows on the tooth surface, which may increase the risk of caries. The aims of this study were to assess the nanotopography of enamel surfaces produced by the most commonly used IPR instruments and to evaluate the effect of polishing after IPR. Enamel slabs were cut from the interproximal surfaces of healthy premolars and then treated with diamond burs, strips, or discs, or Sof-Lex polishing discs (3M ESPE, St Paul, Minn). All samples were cleaned by sonication in distilled water. The control group had no IPR performed and was subjected only to cleaning by sonication. The enamel surfaces were assessed using atomic force microscopy. The IPR instruments all produced surfaces rougher than the control sample; however, the samples that received polishing with Sof-Lex discs after enamel reduction were smoother than untreated enamel (P <0.05 for all comparisons). The larger grit medium diamond burs and medium strips generated rougher enamel surfaces than their smaller grit counterparts: fine diamond burs and fine strips (P <0.001). The difference in roughness generated by mesh and curved disks was not statistically significant (P = 0.122), nor was the difference caused by fine strips and mesh discs (P = 0.811) or by fine strips and curved discs (P = 0.076) (surface roughness values for medium bur, 702 ± 134 nm; medium strip, 501 ± 115 nm; mesh disc, 307 ± 107 nm; fine bur, 407 ± 95 nm; fine strip, 318 ± 50 nm; curved disc, 224 ± 65 nm). The smoothest surfaces were created by use of the entire series of Sof-Lex polishing discs after the enamel reduction (surface roughness, 37 ± 14 nm), and these surfaces were significantly smoother than the control surfaces (surface roughness, 149 ± 39 nm; P = 0.017). Different IPR instruments produced enamel surfaces with varied nanotopography and different degrees of roughness. Enamel surfaces treated with diamond-coated burs

  13. Carabelli's trait revisited: an examination of mesiolingual features at the enamel-dentine junction and enamel surface of Pan and Homo sapiens upper molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Alejandra; Skinner, Matthew M; Bailey, Shara E; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Carabelli's trait is a morphological feature that frequently occurs on the mesiolingual aspect of Homo sapiens upper molars. Similar structures also referred to as Carabelli's trait have been reported in apes and fossil hominins. However, the morphological development and homology of these mesiolingual structures among hominoids are poorly understood. In this study, we employ micro-computed tomography to image the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) and outer enamel surface (OES) of Pan (n = 48) and H. sapiens (n = 52) upper molars. We investigate the developmental origin of mesiolingual features in these taxa and establish the relative contribution of the EDJ and enamel cap to feature expression. Results demonstrate that mesiolingual features of H. sapiens molars develop at the EDJ and are similarly expressed at the OES. Morphological variation at both surfaces in this taxon can satisfactorily be assessed using standards for Carabelli's trait developed by the Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System (ASUDAS). Relative to H. sapiens, Pan has an even greater degree of correspondence in feature expression between the EDJ and OES. Morphological manifestations in Pan molars are not necessarily limited to the protocone and are best characterized by a lingual cingulum that cannot be captured by the ASUDAS. Cusp-like structures, similar to those seen in marked Carabelli's trait expressions in H. sapiens, were not found in Pan. This study provides a foundation for further analyses on the evolutionary history of mesiolingual dental traits within the hominoid lineage. It also highlights the wealth of morphological data that can be obtained at the EDJ for understanding tooth development and for characterizing tooth crown variation in worn fossil teeth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enamel Maturation: A Brief Background with Implications for Some Enamel Dysplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin eRobinson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The maturation stage of enamel development begins once the final tissue thickness has been laid down. Maturation includes an initial transitional pre-stage during which morphology and function of the enamel organ cells change. When this is complete, maturation proper begins. Fully functional maturation stage cells are concerned with final proteolytic degradation and removal of secretory matrix components which are replaced by tissue fluid. Crystals, initiated during the secretory stage, then grow replacing the tissue fluid. Crystals grow in both width and thickness until crystals abut each other occupying most of the tissue volume i.e. full maturation. If this is not complete at eruption, a further post eruptive maturation can occur via mineral ions from the saliva. During maturation calcium and phosphate enter the tissue to facilitate crystal growth. Whether transport is entirely active or not is unclear. Ion transport is also not unidirectional and phosphate, for example, can diffuse out again especially during transition and early maturation. Fluoride and magnesium, selectively taken up at this stage can also diffuse both in an out of the tissue. Crystal growth can be compromised by excessive fluoride and by ingress of other exogenous molecules such as albumin and tetracycline. This may be exacerbated by the relatively long duration of this stage, 10 days or so in a rat incisor and up to several years in human teeth rendering this stage particularly vulnerable to ingress of foreign materials, incompletely mature enamel being the result.

  15. Brief communication: Contributions of enamel-dentine junction shape and enamel deposition to primate molar crown complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Matthew M; Evans, Alistair; Smith, Tanya; Jernvall, Jukka; Tafforeau, Paul; Kupczik, Kornelius; Olejniczak, Anthony J; Rosas, Antonio; Radovcić, Jakov; Thackeray, J Francis; Toussaint, Michel; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2010-05-01

    Molar crown morphology varies among primates from relatively simple in some taxa to more complex in others, with such variability having both functional and taxonomic significance. In addition to the primary cusps, crown surface complexity derives from the presence of crests, cuspules, and crenulations. Developmentally, this complexity results from the deposition of an enamel cap over a basement membrane (the morphology of which is preserved as the enamel-dentine junction, or EDJ, in fully formed teeth). However, the relative contribution of the enamel cap and the EDJ to molar crown complexity is poorly characterized. In this study we examine the complexity of the EDJ and enamel surface of a broad sample of primate (including fossil hominin) lower molars through the application of micro-computed tomography and dental topographic analysis. Surface complexity of the EDJ and outer enamel surface (OES) is quantified by first mapping, and then summing, the total number of discrete surface orientation patches. We investigate the relative contribution of the EDJ and enamel cap to crown complexity by assessing the correlation in patch counts between the EDJ and OES within taxa and within individual teeth. We identify three patterns of EDJ/OES complexity which demonstrate that both crown patterning early in development and the subsequent deposition of the enamel cap contribute to overall crown complexity in primates.

  16. Impact of Crest Night Effects bleaching gel on dental enamel, dentin and key restorative materials. In vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donald J; Kozak, Kathleen M; Zoladz, James R; Duschner, Heinz J; Goetz, Hermann

    2003-11-01

    To examine the effects of a paint-on 19% sodium percarbonate 'overnight' bleaching gel on the structure and integrity of enamel, dentin and some common restorative materials, with a laboratory cycling model. Enamel, root dentin and restorative materials (glass-ionomer, composite and amalgam) were prepared in methacrylate molds with surface polishing. A treatment regimen was carried out including diurnal incubation in pooled human saliva and including twice daily toothbrushing with standard fluoridated dentifrice. Test samples were treated daily with Crest Night Effects bleaching gel, which included drying of surfaces, painting of percarbonate bleaching gel, and then incubation throughout the day (8 hours) to simulate overnight wear. Treatments were carried out over 14 days, to simulate clinical exposure periods. Control and test specimens were evaluated for surface and subsurface structure and morphological integrity utilizing surface microhardness, surface profilometry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Percarbonate bleaching film treatments had no effects on enamel or root dentin surface microhardness, or on subsurface ultrastructural integrity of enamel and coronal dentin. Surface profilometry confirmed retention of small amounts of residual silicone polymers, which contributed to CLSM air objective appearance and surface roughness measures. Restoratives were generally passive to bleaching gel treatments, though composite showed a tendency to attract retained residual silicone film.

  17. Microabrasion as treatment of enamel fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Caroline Brito

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently a trend in favor of using fluoride as a coadjuvant in reducing caries indexes, as much in underdeveloped as in developedcountries. However, simultaneously the indexes of dental fluorosis seem to grow in an inverse proportion. This is brought about by chronic ingestion of fluoride for a prolonged length of time or in high concentration. Enamel microabrasion is an effective method to remove superficial stains caused by this condition, which affects esthetics of that tissue. The use of 18% hydrochloric acid in association with pumice, despite being a simple and low cost method, has been gradually replaced due to its potential of causing damage to periodontal tissues. Thus, this article reports the treatment of a fluorosis clinical case solved with microabrasion using phosphoric acid 37%, because its costbenefit is supposedly better than with chloridric acid. The deliberate ingestion of toothpaste was the probable cause of the tooth stains. Due to the location of the teeth and to the patient’s smile, only the six upper anterior teeth were selected to receive the proposed treatment. Four clinical sessions, with a seven days interval between each other, were carried out using 37% phosphoric acid and pumice. Under rubber dam isolation, the two first sessions consisted of rubbing the acid-pumice mix on enamel surface using a rubber cup on slow speed, and abrasive paper strips on the interproximal tooth surfaces. On the two final sessions, only finishing touches were performed using a wooden spatula to manually rub the acid-pumice paste.

  18. Factors associated with active white enamel lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, M A F; Mendes, N S

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the factors associated with the presence of active white enamel lesions among public school students in the city of Natal, Brazil. A convenience sample of 300 boys and girls aged between 7 and 12 years was selected among the pupils attending public schools in the city of Natal. Only those children presenting with opaque and rough-surface white lesions in a region of biofilm accumulation on the vestibular surface of permanent upper incisors were included. The investigation took the form of a cross-sectional study. A chart containing individual data was used, and a clinical examination was performed to determine the oral health status of the children, including caries (DMF-s(1), DMF-s(2), DMFdmf, dmf and total number of teeth with caries) and oral hygiene status (Gingival Bleeding Index and Visible Plaque Index). Data underwent descriptive analysis and analysis of variance, and chi-square tests were used for the comparison of continuous and dichotomous variables between groups with one, two, or three or more white lesions. On average, each child presented with 2.3 teeth affected by white lesions, relatively high indices of dental caries and poor oral hygiene, with an 85% rate of localized plaque on the surfaces of teeth with lesions. The presence of visible plaque was statistically significant between the three groups, based on the number of lesions (P = 0.006), indicating a positive association between the number of lesions and the presence of biofilm. There is a strong association between the presence of dental biofilm, high indices of caries and active white enamel lesions. Full professional effort is needed in order to motivate children to carry out oral hygiene sufficient for the adequate control of dental biofilm.

  19. Analysis of micro computed tomography images; a look inside historic enamelled metal objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Veerle; van de Casteele, Elke; Thomas, Mienke Simon; de Vos, Annemie; Janssen, Elsje; Janssens, Koen

    2010-02-01

    In this study the usefulness of micro-Computed Tomography (µ-CT) for the in-depth analysis of enamelled metal objects was tested. Usually investigations of enamelled metal artefacts are restricted to non-destructive surface analysis or analysis of cross sections after destructive sampling. Radiography, a commonly used technique in the field of cultural heritage studies, is limited to providing two-dimensional information about a three-dimensional object (Lang and Middleton, Radiography of Cultural Material, pp. 60-61, Elsevier-Butterworth-Heinemann, Amsterdam-Stoneham-London, 2005). Obtaining virtual slices and information about the internal structure of these objects was made possible by CT analysis. With this technique the underlying metal work was studied without removing the decorative enamel layer. Moreover visible defects such as cracks were measured in both width and depth and as of yet invisible defects and weaker areas are visualised. All these features are of great interest to restorers and conservators as they allow a view inside these objects without so much as touching them.

  20. The role of organic proteins on the crack growth resistance of human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-06-01

    With only 1% protein by weight, tooth enamel is the most highly mineralized tissue in mammals. The focus of this study was to evaluate contributions of the proteins on the fracture resistance of this unique structural material. Sections of enamel were obtained from the cusps of human molars and the crack growth resistance was quantified using a conventional fracture mechanics approach with complementary finite element analysis. In selected specimens the proteins were extracted using a potassium hydroxide treatment. Removal of the proteins resulted in approximately 40% decrease in the fracture toughness with respect to the fully proteinized control. The loss of organic content was most detrimental to the extrinsic toughening mechanisms, causing over 80% reduction in their contribution to the total energy to fracture. This degradation occurred by embrittlement of the unbroken bridging ligaments and consequent reduction in the crack closure stress. Although the organic content of tooth enamel is very small, it is essential to crack growth toughening by facilitating the formation of unbroken ligaments and in fortifying their potency. Replicating functions of the organic content will be critical to the successful development of bio-inspired materials that are designed for fracture resistance. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of the Early Stages and Evolution of Dental Enamel Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derceli, Juliana Dos Reis; Faraoni, Juliana Jendiroba; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo Assumpção; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate by atomic force microscopy (AFM) the early phases and evolution of dental enamel erosion caused by hydrochloric acid exposure, simulating gastroesophageal reflux episodes. Polished bovine enamel slabs (4x4x2 mm) were selected and exposed to 0.1 mL of 0.01 M hydrochloric acid (pH=2) at 37 ?#61472;?#61616;C using five different exposure intervals (n=1): no acid exposure (control), 10 s, 20 s, 30 s and 40 s. The exposed area was analyzed by AFM in 3 regions to measure the roughness, surface area and morphological surface. The data were analyzed qualitatively. Roughness started as low as that of the control sample, Rrms=3.5 nm, and gradually increased at a rate of 0.3 nm/s, until reaching Rrms=12.5 nm at 30 s. After 40 s, the roughness presented increment of 0.40 nm only. Surface area (SA) increased until 20 s, and for longer exposures, the surface area was constant (at 30 s, SA=4.40 μm2 and at 40 s, SA=4.43 μm2). As regards surface morphology, the control sample presented smaller hydroxyapatite crystals (22 nm) and after 40 s the crystal size was approximately 60 nm. Short periods of exposure were sufficient to produce enamel demineralization in different patterns and the morphological structure was less affected by exposure to hydrochloric acid over 30 s.

  2. Claudin-16 Deficiency Impairs Tight Junction Function in Ameloblasts, Leading to Abnormal Enamel Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Claire; Courson, Frédéric; Wu, Yong; Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Ribes, Sandy; Thumfart, Julia; Yamaguti, Paulo M; Rochefort, Gael Y; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Garcia-Castaño, Alejandro; Vallée, Benoit; Le Denmat, Dominique; Baroukh, Brigitte; Guilbert, Thomas; Schmitt, Alain; Massé, Jean-Marc; Bazin, Dominique; Lorenz, Georg; Morawietz, Maria; Hou, Jianghui; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Manzanares, Maria Cristina; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Talmud, Deborah; Demontis, Renato; Neves, Francisco; Zenaty, Delphine; Berdal, Ariane; Kiesow, Andreas; Petzold, Matthias; Menashi, Suzanne; Linglart, Agnes; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Müller, Dominik; Houillier, Pascal; Chaussain, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Claudin-16 protein (CLDN16) is a component of tight junctions (TJ) with a restrictive distribution so far demonstrated mainly in the kidney. Here, we demonstrate the expression of CLDN16 also in the tooth germ and show that claudin-16 gene (CLDN16) mutations result in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the 5 studied patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). To investigate the role of CLDN16 in tooth formation, we studied a murine model of FHHNC and showed that CLDN16 deficiency led to altered secretory ameloblast TJ structure, lowering of extracellular pH in the forming enamel matrix, and abnormal enamel matrix protein processing, resulting in an enamel phenotype closely resembling human AI. This study unravels an association of FHHNC owing to CLDN16 mutations with AI, which is directly related to the loss of function of CLDN16 during amelogenesis. Overall, this study indicates for the first time the importance of a TJ protein in tooth formation and underlines the need to establish a specific dental follow-up for these patients. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  3. The remineralization potential of cocoa (Theobroma cacao bean extract to increase the enamel micro hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistianingsih Sulistianingsih

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Remineralization is the process of returning mineral ions into a hydroxyapatite structure characterized by mineral deposition on the enamel surface. The presence of mineral deposition would affect the micro hardness of tooth enamel. The use of fluorine as remineralization agent with side effects such as fluorosis. Cocoa bean extract contains theobromin that can be used as an alternative remineralization ingredients. The objectives was to determine micro hardness email after remineralization using cocoa bean extract as natural material and to compare with fluorine use as synthetic material. Methods: Thirty-six maxillary first premolar tooth crown was cut and planted in the epoxy resin. Teeth were then immersed in demineralization solution at pH 4 for 6 hours. The sample were divided into 2 groups, 18 for the fluorine group and the remaining group of cocoa extract. Vickers microhardness test was used before treatment, after demineralized and after remineralization. Results: Enamel microhardness value before treatment in the fluorine group average value was 376.17 VHN and the cocoa extract group was 357.33 VHN. After demineralization in fluorine group was 268,13 VHN and cocoa extract group was 235,93 VHN. After remineralization in fluorine group was 321,08 VHN and cocoa extract group was 293,86 VHN. The results of the analysis showed that the level of micro hardness email after remineralization was not significantly different in two groups (p > 0.05. Conclusions: Cocoa extract is able to increase the microhardness of enamel so it can act as a substitution for fluorine remineralization.

  4. Surface roughness and wettability of enamel and dentine surfaces prepared with different dental burs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omari, W M; Mitchell, C A; Cunningham, J L

    2001-07-01

    The aim of dental adhesive restorations is to produce a long lasting union between the restoration and the tooth structure. This bond depends on many variables including the geometry of the preparation and the type of bonding agent or luting cement. It is therefore suggested that the topography of the tooth surface may influence the wettability and the bonding quality of adhesive systems. This study measured the surface roughness and wettability of enamel and dentine after preparation with different dental burs. The mesial and distal surfaces of 15 extracted sound human premolar teeth were prepared with a tungsten carbide crown bur, a diamond bur and a tungsten carbide finishing bur and finished in enamel or dentin, respectively. The prepared surfaces were analysed with a surface profilometer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The contact angle of distilled water on each of the prepared surfaces was used as the measure of wettability. The differences in average surface roughness (Ra) were significant between the rotary instrument groups, as revealed by a two-way ANOVA test. No differences were detected between enamel and dentine surfaces prepared with the same type of dental bur. The smoothest surfaces were those completed with tungsten carbide finishing burs. The diamond bur preparations were intermediate in the roughness assessment and the tungsten carbide crown burs gave the roughest surfaces. There were no significant differences in the contact angle measurements for the various groups. It was concluded that the surface roughness of enamel and dentine prepared by different rotary instruments had no significant influence on the wettability of distilled water on these surfaces.

  5. Dental health assessed after interproximal enamel reduction: caries risk in posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisson, Björn U; Minster, Line; Ogaard, Bjørn; Birkhed, Dowen

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether careful interdental enamel reduction (using extrafine diamond disks with air cooling, followed by contouring with triangular diamond burs and polishing) leads to increased caries risk in premolars and first molars. Our subjects were 43 consecutive patients from 19 to 71 years of age who had received mesiodistal enamel reduction of anterior and posterior teeth 4 to 6 years previously. Dental caries were assessed on standardized bite-wing radiographs according to a 5-grade scale and with a fine-tip explorer catch. The incidence of interproximal caries was compared between reproximated and unground contralateral surfaces in the same patient. Patients were asked about their toothbrushing habits, use of dental floss and toothpicks, and regular fluoride supplementation after the orthodontic appliances were removed. The overall clinical impression generally showed healthy dentitions with excellent occlusion. Only 7 (2.5%) new caries lesions (all grade 1) were found among 278 reproximated mesial or distal surfaces, in 3 patients. Among 84 contralateral unground reference tooth surfaces, 2 lesions (2.4%) were seen. On nonpaired premolars and molars that had not been ground, 23 surfaces had to be referred for caries treatment (grade 3 or occlusal caries). Eleven of these occurred in 1 patient. None of the 43 patients reported increased sensitivity to temperature variations. Interdental enamel reduction with this protocol did not result in increased caries risk in posterior teeth. We found no evidence that proper mesiodistal enamel reduction within recognized limits and in appropriate situations will cause harm to the teeth and supporting structures. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Topographic assessment of human enamel surface treated with different topical sodium fluoride agents: Scanning electron microscope consideration

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    Gurlal Singh Brar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuous balanced demineralization and remineralization are natural dynamic processes in enamel. If the balance is interrupted and demineralization process dominates, it may eventually lead to the development of carious lesions in enamel and dentine. Fluoride helps control decay by enhancing remineralization and altering the structure of the tooth, making the surface less soluble. Methodology: One hundred and twenty sound human permanent incisors randomly and equally distributed into six groups as follows: Group I - Control, II - Sodium fluoride solution, III - Sodium fluoride gel, IV - Sodium fluoride varnish, V - Clinpro Tooth Crème (3M ESPE, and VI-GC Tooth Mousse Plus or MI Paste Plus. The samples were kept in artificial saliva for 12 months, and the topical fluoride agents were applied to the respective sample groups as per the manufacturer instructions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM evaluation of all the samples after 6 and 12 months was made. Results: Morphological changes on the enamel surface after application of fluoride in SEM revealed the presence of globular precipitate in all treated samples. Amorphous, globular, and crystalline structures were seen on the enamel surface of the treated samples. Clear differences were observed between the treated and untreated samples. Conclusion: Globular structures consisting of amorphous CaF2precipitates, which acted as a fluoride reservoir, were observed on the enamel surface after action of different sodium fluoride agents. CPP-ACPF (Tooth Mousse and Tricalcium phosphate with fluoride (Clinpro tooth crème are excellent delivery vehicles available in a slow release amorphous form to localize fluoride at the tooth surface.

  7. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on microhardness of bleached enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Shirban, Farinaz; Kaveh, Sara; Doustfateme, Samaneh

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of incorporating three different nanobiomaterials into bleaching material on microhardness of bleached enamel. The crowns of 24 extracted sound human molars were sectioned. Sixty enamel specimens (2 × 3 × 4 mm) were selected and divided into five groups (n = 12): Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 underwent bleaching with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by incorporation of bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and hydroxyapatite (HA), respectively. The enamel microhardness was evaluated. The differences in Knoop microhardness data of each group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Tukey tests. Significant differences were observed between the study groups. The enamel microhardness changes in Groups 1, 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than that of Group 2 (p microhardness changes subsequent to in-office bleaching.

  8. Amorphous intergranular phases control the properties of rodent tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lyle M.; Cohen, Michael J.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Pasteris, Jill D.; Seda, Takele; Joester, Derk

    2015-02-01

    Dental enamel, a hierarchical material composed primarily of hydroxylapatite nanowires, is susceptible to degradation by plaque biofilm-derived acids. The solubility of enamel strongly depends on the presence of Mg2+, F-, and CO32-. However, determining the distribution of these minor ions is challenging. We show—using atom probe tomography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlative techniques—that in unpigmented rodent enamel, Mg2+ is predominantly present at grain boundaries as an intergranular phase of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP). In the pigmented enamel, a mixture of ferrihydrite and amorphous iron-calcium phosphate replaces the more soluble Mg-ACP, rendering it both harder and more resistant to acid attack. These results demonstrate the presence of enduring amorphous phases with a dramatic influence on the physical and chemical properties of the mature mineralized tissue.

  9. Targeted Overexpression of Amelotin Disrupts the Microstructure of Dental Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Yohei Nakayama; James Holcroft; Van, Nguyen.; Eszter Somogyi-Ganss; Snead, Malcolm L.; WHITE, Shane N.; Paine, Michael L.; Bernhard Ganss

    2012-01-01

    We have previously identified amelotin (AMTN) as a novel protein expressed predominantly during the late stages of dental enamel formation, but its role during amelogenesis remains to be determined. In this study we generated transgenic mice that produce AMTN under the amelogenin (Amel) gene promoter to study the effect of AMTN overexpression on enamel formation in vivo. The specific overexpression of AMTN in secretory stage ameloblasts was confirmed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. ...

  10. The enamel protein amelotin is a promoter of hydroxyapatite mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbarin, Nastaran; San Miguel, Symone; Holcroft, James; Iwasaki, Kengo; Ganss, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) is a recently discovered protein that is specifically expressed during the maturation stage of dental enamel formation. It is localized at the interface between the enamel surface and the apical surface of ameloblasts. AMTN knock-out mice have hypomineralized enamel, whereas transgenic mice overexpressing AMTN have a compact but disorganized enamel hydroxyapatite (HA) microstructure, indicating a possible involvement of AMTN in regulating HA mineralization directly. In this study, we demonstrated that recombinant human (rh) AMTN dissolved in a metastable buffer system, based on light scattering measurements, promotes HA precipitation. The mineral precipitates were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. Colloidal gold immunolabeling of AMTN in the mineral deposits showed that protein molecules were associated with HA crystals. The binding affinity of rh-AMTN to HA was found to be comparable to that of amelogenin, the major protein of the forming enamel matrix. Overexpression of AMTN in mouse calvaria cells also increased the formation of calcium deposits in the culture medium. Overexpression of AMTN during the secretory stage of enamel formation in vivo resulted in rapid and uncontrolled enamel mineralization. Site-specific mutagenesis of the potential serine phosphorylation motif SSEEL reduced the in vitro mineral precipitation to less than 25%, revealing that this motif is important for the HA mineralizing function of the protein. A synthetic short peptide containing the SSEEL motif was only able to facilitate mineralization in its phosphorylated form ((P)S(P) SEEL), indicating that this motif is necessary but not sufficient for the mineralizing properties of AMTN. These findings demonstrate that AMTN has a direct influence on biomineralization by promoting HA mineralization and suggest a critical role for AMTN in the formation of the compact aprismatic enamel surface layer during the maturation

  11. Enamel thickness in Asian human canines and premolars

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Robin N. M.; Zermeno, John P.; Reid, Donald J.; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Dental enamel thickness continues to feature prominently in anthropological studies of ape and human evolution, as well as studies of preventative oral care and treatment. Traditional studies of enamel thickness require physical sectioning of teeth for linear and scaled measurements. Recent applications of microtomographic imaging allow scientists to employ larger and more diverse samples, including global samples of recent humans as well as fossil hominin teeth. Unfortunately, little is know...

  12. DENTAL ENAMEL FORMATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ORAL HEALTH AND DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Habelitz, Stefan; Wright, J Timothy; Paine, Michael L

    2017-07-01

    Dental enamel is the hardest and most mineralized tissue in extinct and extant vertebrate species and provides maximum durability that allows teeth to function as weapons and/or tools as well as for food processing. Enamel development and mineralization is an intricate process tightly regulated by cells of the enamel organ called ameloblasts. These heavily polarized cells form a monolayer around the developing enamel tissue and move as a single forming front in specified directions as they lay down a proteinaceous matrix that serves as a template for crystal growth. Ameloblasts maintain intercellular connections creating a semi-permeable barrier that at one end (basal/proximal) receives nutrients and ions from blood vessels, and at the opposite end (secretory/apical/distal) forms extracellular crystals within specified pH conditions. In this unique environment, ameloblasts orchestrate crystal growth via multiple cellular activities including modulating the transport of minerals and ions, pH regulation, proteolysis, and endocytosis. In many vertebrates, the bulk of the enamel tissue volume is first formed and subsequently mineralized by these same cells as they retransform their morphology and function. Cell death by apoptosis and regression are the fates of many ameloblasts following enamel maturation, and what cells remain of the enamel organ are shed during tooth eruption, or are incorporated into the tooth's epithelial attachment to the oral gingiva. In this review, we examine key aspects of dental enamel formation, from its developmental genesis to the ever-increasing wealth of data on the mechanisms mediating ionic transport, as well as the clinical outcomes resulting from abnormal ameloblast function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Materials chemistry: A synthetic enamel for rapid tooth repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Kazue; Onuma, Kazuo; Suzuki, Takashi; Okada, Fumio; Tagami, Junji; Otsuki, Masayuki; Senawangse, Pisol

    2005-02-01

    The conventional treatment of dental caries involves mechanical removal of the affected part and filling of the hole with a resin or metal alloy. But this method is not ideal for tiny early lesions because a disproportionate amount of healthy tooth must be removed to make the alloy or resin stick. Here we describe a dental paste of synthetic enamel that rapidly and seamlessly repairs early caries lesions by nanocrystalline growth, with minimal wastage of the natural enamel.

  14. Effects of sports drinks and other beverages on dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fraunhofer, J Anthony; Rogers, Matthew M

    2005-01-01

    A high percentage of people consume soft drinks that contain sugar or artificial sweeteners, flavorings, and various additives. The popularity of sports (energy) drinks is growing and this pilot study compares enamel dissolution in these and a variety of other beverages. Enamel blocks (approximately 7.0 x 5.0 x 2.5 mm) were sectioned from sound extracted human premolars and molars and measured, weighed, and immersed in the selected beverages for a total of 14 days. The pH of all beverages was measured. The enamel sections were weighed at regular intervals throughout the immersion period with the solutions being changed daily; all studies were performed in duplicate. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA with post hoc Scheffe testing. Enamel dissolution occurred in all of the tested beverages, with far greater attack occurring in flavored and energy (sports) drinks than previously noted for water and cola drinks. No correlation was found between enamel dissolution and beverage pH. Non-cola drinks, commercial lemonades, and energy/sports drinks showed the most aggressive dissolution effect on dental enamel. Reduced residence times of beverages in the mouth by salivary clearance or rinsing would appear to be beneficial.

  15. Shear bond strength of two adhesive materials to eroded enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Tathiane; Hesse, Daniela; Guglielmi, Camila; Anacleto, Ketlin; Raggio, Daniela Procida

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of one etch-and-rinse adhesive system and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement to sound and eroded enamel. Forty-eight bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal enamel surfaces. Half of the specimens were submitted to erosion challenge with pH-cycling model (3x/cola drink for 7 days) to induce eroded enamel. After that, all specimens were randomly assigned according to adhesive material: etch-andrinse adhesive system (Adper Single Bond 2 - 3M ESPE, USA) or resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitro Fil LC - DFL, Brazil). The shear bond testing was performed after 24 hours water storage (0.5 mm/min). Shear bond strength means were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests (p Bond 2 showed the highest bond strength value to eroded enamel (p 0.05). Bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive system increases in eroded enamel, while no difference is verified to resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Adhesive materials may be used in eroded enamel without jeopardizing the bonding quality; however it is preferable to use etch-and-rinse adhesive system.

  16. The measurement of enamel wear by four toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, A; Pickles, M J; Lynch, S; Cox, T F

    2008-02-01

    To determine the enamel abrasivity of three whitening toothpastes and a silica toothpaste and to measure the brushing forces used. Polished human enamel blocks were indented with a Knoop diamond and attached to dentures of adult volunteers. The blocks were brushed ex vivo, twice per day with either a whitening toothpaste containing Perlite (White System), a commercial whitening toothpaste (A and B) or a silica toothpaste. After four and twelve-weeks, one block per subject was removed and the Knoop indent remeasured. From the changes in the indent length, the amount of enamel wear was calculated. The mean enamel wear (sd) for White System, silica toothpaste, whitening toothpaste A and B after four-weeks was 0.14 (0.15), 0.09 (0.16), 0.14 (0.12) and 0.89 (0.93) and after twelve-weeks was 0.24 (0.21), 0.37 (0.73), 0.36 (0.52) and 1.04 (0.98) microm respectively. After four-weeks, the differences in enamel wear between whitening toothpaste B and all other toothpastes were of statistical significance (p whitening toothpastes did not give significantly more enamel wear than a silica toothpaste after twelve-weeks in situ with ex vivo brushing.

  17. MMP20 modulates cadherin expression in ameloblasts as enamel develops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, X; Bartlett, J D

    2013-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (enamelysin, MMP20) is essential for dental enamel development. Seven different MMP20 mutations in humans cause non-syndromic enamel malformations, termed amelogenesis imperfecta, and ablation of Mmp20 in mice results in thin brittle enamel with a dysplastic rod pattern. Healthy enamel formation requires the sliding movement of ameloblasts in rows during the secretory stage of development. This is essential for formation of the characteristic decussating enamel rod pattern observed in rodents, and this is also when MMP20 is secreted into the enamel matrix. Therefore, we propose that MMP20 facilitates ameloblast movement by cleaving ameloblast cell-cell contacts. Here we show that MMP20 cleaves the extracellular domains of the E- and N-cadherin adherens junction proteins, that both E- and N-cadherin transcripts are expressed at significantly higher levels in Mmp20 null vs. wild-type (WT) mice, and that in Mmp20 ablated mice, high-level ameloblast N-cadherin expression persists during the maturation stage of development. Furthermore, we show that E-cadherin gene expression is down-regulated from the pre-secretory to the secretory stage, while N-cadherin levels are up-regulated. This E- to N-cadherin switch supports epithelial migration in other tissues and may be an important event necessary for the ameloblasts to start moving in rows that slide by one another.

  18. Theobromine Effects on Enamel Surface Microhardness: In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Syafira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is still a dental health problem in Indonesia. Fluoride, one of the dental caries prevention material, but its safety and the danger of fluorosis is still debated. Theobromine is an alkaloid compound contained in cocoa beans. Theobromine is believed to increase enamel microhardness with mineral changes in the enamel superficial layer. Objectives: To determine the influence of theobromine on the enamel surface microhardness. Methods: This study used 40 premolar tooth crown pieces that were embedded in epoxy resin. Furthermore specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups, which were control (distilled water, theobromine 100 mg/L (T100, theobromine 500 mg/L (T500 and theobromine 1000 mg/L (T1000. Specimens were immersed for 15 minutes and microhardness test was performed using Knoop microhardness tester. Results: Increasing enamel microhardness was observed after treatment with four different theobromine concentrations. The highest icreased of enamel microhardness was shown in T1000 group and difference compared to other groups were statistically significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: theobromine is a potential dental caries prevention material due to its effect in improving the microhardness of tooth enamel.

  19. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guy, Franck; Lazzari, Vincent; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Thiery, Ghislain

    2015-01-01

    The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution...

  20. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guy, Franck; Lazzari, Vincent; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Thiery, Ghislain

    2014-01-01

    The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution...

  1. Indirect veneer treatment of anterior maxillary teeth with enamel hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Eka Juniarti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, aesthetic rehabilitation becomes a necessity. It is affected by patient’s background, especially career, social and economic status. The aesthetic abnormality of anterior teeth i.e discoloration, malposition and malformation can affect patient’s appearance, especially during smile. These dental abnormalities, as a result, can decrease patient’s performance. Dental malformation, for instance, can be caused by developmental tooth defect, such as enamel hypoplasia. Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental defect caused by the lack of matrix amount which leads to thin and porous enamel. Enamel hypoplasia can also be caused by matrix calcification disturbance starting from the formation and development of enamel matrix causing defect and permanent changes which can occur on one or more tooth. Purpose: The aim of the study is to improve dental discoloration and tooth surface texture on anterior maxillary teeth with enamel hypoplasia by using indirect veneer with porcelain material. Case: A 20 years-old woman with enamel hypoplasia came to the Dental Hospital, Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University. The patient wanted to improve her anterior maxillary teeth. It is clinically known that there were some opaque white spots (chalky spotted and porous on anterior teeth’s surface. Case management: Indirect veneer with porcelain material had been chosen as a restoration treatment which has excellent aesthetics and strength, and did not cause gingival irritation. As a result, the treatment could improve the confidence of the patient, and could also make their function normal. Conclusion: Indirect veneer is an effective treatment, which can improve patient’s appearance and self confidence.Latar belakang: Saat ini perbaikan estetik menjadi suatu kebutuhan. Kebutuhan akan estetik dipengaruhi latar belakang penderita, terutama karir, status sosial dan ekonomi. Hal ini disebabkan, kelainan estetik seperti diskolorasi, malposisi

  2. Morphological appearance and chemical composition of enamel in primary teeth from patients with 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingberg, Gunilla; Dietz, Wolfram; Oskarsdóttir, Sólveig; Odelius, Hans; Gelander, Lars; Norén, Jörgen G

    2005-08-01

    Patients with 22q11 deletion syndrome have many and complex medical problems, including hypocalcemia and/or hypoparathyroidism. Odontological findings include enamel aberrations in both dentitions. In order to describe enamel morphology, chemical composition in primary teeth, and to investigate the relationship between medical history and morphological appearance, dental enamel was investigated in 38 exfoliated primary teeth from 15 children and adolescents. Morphology was studied by the use of a polarized light microscope, microradiography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The morphological findings were compared with medical history. The teeth showed, in principle, a normal morphological appearance with regard to prism structure. A high frequency of aberrations, such as hypomineralization, hypoplasia and extra incremental lines, were found. The majority of the aberrations were found around the neonatal line. There was a relationship between high numbers of medical problems in the patients and enamel deviations. The result supports the hypothesis of under-reporting of both hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism in patients with 22q11 deletion syndrome.

  3. Noncontact, nondestructive elasticity evaluation of sound and demineralized human dental enamel using a laser ultrasonic surface wave dispersion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Chuan; Fleming, Simon; Lee, Yung-Chun; Law, Susan; Swain, Michael; Xue, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Laser ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods have been proposed to replace conventional in vivo dental clinical diagnosis tools that are either destructive or incapable of quantifying the elasticity of human dental enamel. In this work, a laser NDE system that can perform remote measurements on samples of small dimensions is presented. A focused laser line source is used to generate broadband surface acoustic wave impulses that are detected with a simplified optical fiber interferometer. The measured surface wave velocity dispersion spectrum is in turn used to characterize the elasticity of the specimen. The NDE system and the analysis technique are validated with measurements of different metal structures and then applied to evaluate human dental enamel. Artificial lesions are prepared on the samples to simulate different states of enamel elasticity. Measurement results for both sound and lesioned regions, as well as lesions of different severity, are clearly distinguishable from each other and fit well with physical expectations and theoretical value. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that a laser-based surface wave velocity dispersion technique is successfully applied on human dental enamel, demonstrating the potential for noncontact, nondestructive in vivo detection of the development of carious lesions.

  4. Evaluation of the colour change in enamel and dentine promoted by the interaction between 2% chlorhexidine and auxiliary chemical solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Matheus; Cecchin, Doglas; Barbizam, Joao V B; Almeida, José F A; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Gomes, Brenda P F A; Ferraz, Caio C R

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the colour change in enamel and dentine, promoted by interaction of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Fragments containing enamel and dentine were obtained from the crowns of extracted bovine incisors. Before and after immersion of the samples in the substances, they were evaluated with reference to the colour of the enamel and dentine. The values obtained in numerical scores were subjected to statistical analysis using Wilcoxon test. A colour change in the enamel and dentine in groups treated with CHX gel + NaOCl and CHX gel + NaOCl + EDTA, and a change in colour only in the dentine in groups treated with CHX solution + NaOCl and CHX solution + NaOCl + EDTA. When used prior to NaOCl, CHX has the ability to induce a colour change in dental structures. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2011 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  5. Further morphological evidence on South African earliest Homo lower postcanine dentition: Enamel thickness and enamel dentine junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Dumoncel, Jean; de Beer, Frikkie; Hoffman, Jakobus; Thackeray, John Francis; Duployer, Benjamin; Tenailleau, Christophe; Braga, José

    2016-07-01

    The appearance of the earliest members of the genus Homo in South Africa represents a key event in human evolution. Although enamel thickness and enamel dentine junction (EDJ) morphology preserve important information about hominin systematics and dietary adaptation, these features have not been sufficiently studied with regard to early Homo. We used micro-CT to compare enamel thickness and EDJ morphology among the mandibular postcanine dentitions of South African early hominins (N = 30) and extant Homo sapiens (N = 26), with special reference to early members of the genus Homo. We found that South African early Homo shows a similar enamel thickness distribution pattern to modern humans, although three-dimensional average and relative enamel thicknesses do not distinguish australopiths, early Homo, and modern humans particularly well. Based on enamel thickness distributions, our study suggests that a dietary shift occurred between australopiths and the origin of the Homo lineage. We also observed that South African early Homo postcanine EDJ combined primitive traits seen in australopith molars with derived features observed in modern human premolars. Our results confirm that some dental morphological patterns in later Homo actually occurred early in the Homo lineage, and highlight the taxonomic value of premolar EDJ morphology in hominin species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dentist and practice characteristics associated with restorative treatment of enamel caries in permanent teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellows, Jeffrey L; Gordan, Valeria V; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2014-01-01

    and proximal caries compared to dentin lesions, accounting for dentist and patient clustering. RESULTS: Network dentists from five regions placed 6,891 restorations involving occlusal and/or proximal caries lesions. Enamel restorations accounted for 16% of enrolled occlusal caries lesions and 6% of enrolled...... proximal caries lesions. Enamel occlusal restorations varied significantly (P caries risk assessment, network region, and practice type. Enamel proximal restorations varied significantly (P ...PURPOSE: Current evidence in dentistry recommends non-surgical treatment to manage enamel caries lesions. However, surveyed practitioners report they would restore enamel lesions that are confined to the enamel. Actual clinical data were used to evaluate patient, dentist, and practice...

  7. Surface roughness of the restored enamel after orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Törün; Başaran, Güvenç; Kama, Jalen Devecioğlu

    2010-03-01

    After fixed appliance treatment, one concern is to restore the enamel surface as closely to its original state as possible. A variety of cleanup processes are available, but all are time-consuming and carry some risk of enamel damage. The purpose of this study was to examine tooth surfaces restored with different cleanup protocols. Ninety-nine premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were used. The 2 materials tested were Sof-Lex disks (3 M ESPE AG, Seefeld, Germany) and fiberglass burs (Stain Buster, Carbotech, Ganges, France). These were used alone and in combination with high- and low-speed handpieces, with which they were also compared. Eight groups were ultimately tested. All groups were compared with intact enamel, which served as the control group. From each group, 10 samples were examined with profilometry and 1 with scanning electron microscopy. Adhesive remnant index scores were recorded to ensure equal distributions for the groups. The time required for the cleanup processes and profilometry test results were also recorded. The fastest procedure was performed with high-speed handpieces, followed by low-speed handpieces. Sof-Lex disks and fiberglass burs required more time than carbide burs but did not result in significantly longer times for the cleanup procedure when combined with tungsten carbide-driven low- or high-speed handpieces or when used alone with low-speed handpieces. Although Sof-Lex disks were the most successful for restoring the enamel, it was not necessary to restore the enamel to its original surface condition. Generally, all enamel surface-roughness parameters were increased when compared with the values of intact enamel. The average roughness and maximum roughness depth measurements with Sof-Lex disks were statistically similar to measurements of intact enamel. No cleanup procedure used in this study restored the enamel to its original roughness. The most successful was Sof-Lex disks, which restored the enamel closer to its

  8. Enamel matrix proteins; old molecules for new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngstadaas, S P; Wohlfahrt, J C; Brookes, S J; Paine, M L; Snead, M L; Reseland, J E

    2009-08-01

    Emdogain (enamel matrix derivative, EMD) is well recognized in periodontology, where it is used as a local adjunct to periodontal surgery to stimulate regeneration of periodontal tissues lost to periodontal disease. The biological effect of EMD is through stimulation of local growth factor secretion and cytokine expression in the treated tissues, inducing a regenerative process that mimics odontogenesis. The major (>95%) component of EMD is Amelogenins (Amel). No other active components have so far been isolated from EMD, and several studies have shown that purified amelogenins can induce the same effect as the complete EMD. Amelogenins comprise a family of highly conserved extracellular matrix proteins derived from one gene. Amelogenin structure and function is evolutionary well conserved, suggesting a profound role in biomineralization and hard tissue formation. A special feature of amelogenins is that under physiological conditions the proteins self-assembles into nanospheres that constitute an extracellular matrix. In the body, this matrix is slowly digested by specific extracellular proteolytic enzymes (matrix metalloproteinase) in a controlled process, releasing bioactive peptides to the surrounding tissues for weeks after application. Based on clinical and experimental observations in periodontology indicating that amelogenins can have a significant positive influence on wound healing, bone formation and root resorption, several new applications for amelogenins have been suggested. New experiments now confirm that amelogenins have potential for being used also in the fields of endodontics, bone regeneration, implantology, traumatology, and wound care.

  9. High-resolution electron microscope and computed images of human tooth enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brés, E F; Barry, J C; Hutchison, J L

    1985-03-01

    The structure of human enamel crystallites has been studied at a near atomic level by high-resolution electron microscopy. Electron micrographs have been obtained from crystallites present in human enamel with a structure resolution of 0.2 nm in the [0001], [1210], [1213], [1100] and [4510] zone axes directions. In most cases it was possible to match the experimental images with images calculated using the atomic positions of mineral hydroxyapatite. However, in some cases a discrepancy between calculated and experimental image detail was observed in the c direction of the [1210] and the [1100] images. This shows: (i) a structural heterogeneity of the crystals, and (ii) a loss of hexagonal symmetry of the structure. The resolution required to distinguish individual atomic sites in the different zones has been determined, and this will provide a useful basis for future work. As the determination of the "real structure" of biological crystals is of prime importance for the study of calcification mechanisms (crystal growth), biological properties and destructive phenomena of calcified tissues (i.e., dental caries and bone resorption).

  10. The measurement of enamel wear of two toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Andrew; Weader, Elizabeth; Cox, Trevor F

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the enamel abrasivity of a whitening toothpaste with a standard silica toothpaste. Polished human enamel blocks (4 x 4 mm) were indented with a Knoop diamond. The enamel blocks were attached to the posterior buccal surfaces of full dentures and worn by adult volunteers for 24 hours per day. The blocks were brushed ex vivo for 30 seconds, twice per day with the randomly assigned toothpaste (n = 10 per treatment). The products used were either a whitening toothpaste containing Perlite or a standard silica toothpaste. After four, eight and twelve weeks, one block per subject was removed and the geometry of each Knoop indent was re-measured. From the baseline and post-treatment values of indent length, the amount of enamel wear was calculated from the change in the indent depth. The mean enamel wear (sd) for the whitening toothpaste and the standard silica toothpaste after four weeks was 0.20 (0.11) and 0.14 (0.10); after 8 weeks was 0.44 (0.33) and 0.18 (0.17), and after 12 weeks was 0.60 (0.72) and 0.67 (0.77) microns respectively. After four, eight and twelve weeks, the difference in enamel wear between the two toothpastes was not of statistical significance (p > 0.05, 2 sample t-test) at any time point. The whitening toothpaste did not give a statistically significantly greater level of enamel wear as compared to a standard silica toothpaste over a 4-, 8- and 12-weeks period.

  11. A quantitative light microscopic study of the odontoblast and subodontoblastic reactions to active and arrested enamel caries without cavitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørndal, L.; Darvann, T.A.; Thylstrup, Anders

    1998-01-01

    Carious lesions, Computerized histomorphology, Dental pulp, Dentine, Enamel, Microradiography, Odontoblast......Carious lesions, Computerized histomorphology, Dental pulp, Dentine, Enamel, Microradiography, Odontoblast...

  12. Placoderm Assemblage from the Tetrapod-Bearing Locality of Strud (Belgium, Upper Famennian) Provides Evidence for a Fish Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Gaël; Daeschler, Edward B.; Dupret, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The placoderm fauna of the upper Famennian tetrapod-bearing locality of Strud, Belgium, includes the antiarch Grossilepis rikiki, the arthrodire groenlandaspidid Turrisaspis strudensis and the phyllolepidid Phyllolepis undulata. Based on morphological and morphometric evidence, the placoderm specimens from Strud are predominantly recognised as immature specimens and this locality as representing a placoderm nursery. The Strud depositional environment corresponds to a channel in an alluvial plain, and the presence of a nursery in such environment could have provided nutrients and protection to the placoderm offspring. This represents one of the earliest pieces of evidence for this sort of habitat partitioning in vertebrate history, with adults living more distantly from the nursery and using the nursery only to spawn or give live birth. PMID:27552196

  13. A new captorhinid reptile from the Lower Permian of Oklahoma showing remarkable dental and mandibular convergence with microsaurian tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, R. R.; LeBlanc, Aaron R. H.; Sidor, Christian A.; Scott, Diane; May, William

    2015-10-01

    The Lower Permian fossiliferous infills of the Dolese Brothers Limestone Quarry, near Richards Spur, Oklahoma, have preserved the most diverse assemblage of Paleozoic terrestrial vertebrates, including small-bodied reptiles and lepospondyl anamniotes. Many of these taxa were previously known only from fragmentary remains, predominantly dentigerous jaw elements and numerous isolated skeletal elements. The recent discovery of articulated skulls and skeletons of small reptiles permits the recognition that dentigerous elements, previously assigned at this locality to the anamniote lepospondyl Euryodus primus, belong to a new captorhinid eureptile, Opisthodontosaurus carrolli gen. et sp. nov. This mistaken identity points to a dramatic level of convergence in mandibular and dental anatomy in two distantly related and disparate clades of terrestrial tetrapods and sheds light on the earliest instance of durophagy in eureptiles.

  14. Effects of 45S5 bioglass on surface properties of dental enamel subjected to 35% hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng; Wen, Hai-Lin; Dong, Xiao-Li; Li, Feng; Xu, Xin; Li, Hong; Li, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Tooth bleaching agents may weaken the tooth structure. Therefore, it is important to minimize any risks of tooth hard tissue damage caused by bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of applying 45S5 bioglass (BG) before, after, and during 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching on whitening efficacy, physicochemical properties and microstructures of bovine enamel. Seventy-two bovine enamel blocks were prepared and randomly divided into six groups: distilled deionized water (DDW), BG, HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. Colorimetric and microhardness tests were performed before and after the treatment procedure. Representative specimens from each group were selected for morphology investigation after the final tests. A significant color change was observed in group HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. The microhardness loss was in the following order: group HP>BG before HP, BG after HP>BG during HP>DDW, BG. The most obvious morphological alteration of was observed on enamel surfaces in group HP, and a slight morphological alteration was also detected in group BG before HP and BG after HP. Our findings suggest that the combination use of BG and HP could not impede the tooth whitening efficacy. Using BG during HP brought better protective effect than pre/post-bleaching use of BG, as it could more effectively reduce the mineral loss as well as retain the surface integrity of enamel. BG may serve as a promising biomimetic adjunct for bleaching therapy to prevent/restore the enamel damage induced by bleaching agents. PMID:23743618

  15. Developmental Defects of Enamel : an increasing reality in the everyday practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Guerra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Developmental defects of enamel (DDE are daily encountered in clinical practice. DDE are alteration in quality and quantity of the enamel, caused by disruption and/or damage to the enamel organ during the amelogenesis process. Several clinical indices have been developed to categorize enamel defects based on their nature, appearance, microscopic features or their cause. The aetiology of DDE is not completely clear. Enamel fluorosis is a hypo-mineralization of enamel characterised by subsurface porosity as a result of excess fluoride intake during the period of enamel formation. Several types of treatment have been reported, related to the degree of enamel defect. Correct diagnosis according to lesion depth and prognosis of the technique are fundamental factors in the treatment decision-making process.

  16. Enamel subsurface lesion remineralisation with casein phosphopeptide stabilised solutions of calcium, phosphate and fluoride

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cochrane, N J; Saranathan, S; Cai, F; Cross, K J; Reynolds, E C

    2008-01-01

    ...) solutions have been shown to remineralise enamel subsurface lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ion composition of CPP-ACP and CPP-ACFP solutions on enamel subsurface lesion remineralisation in vitro...

  17. Chemical regeneration of human tooth enamel under near-physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yujing; Yun, Song; Fang, Jieshi; Chen, Haifeng

    2009-10-21

    Regenerating the microstructure of human tooth enamel under near-physiological conditions (pH 6.0, 37 degrees C, 1 atm) using a simple chemical approach demonstrates a potential application to repair enamel damage in dental clinics.

  18. Microabrasion in tooth enamel discoloration defects: three cases with long-term follow-ups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Franco, Laura Molinar; Fagundes, Ticiane Cestari; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2014-01-01

    Superficial irregularities and certain intrinsic stains on the dental enamel surfaces can be resolved by enamel microabrasion, however, treatment for such defects need to be confined to the outermost...

  19. Effect of moist bonding on composite/enamel bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Karlheinz; Gärtner, Thomas; Haller, Bernd

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of moist bonding on shear bond strength of resin-based composite to enamel using different adhesive systems. Six restorative systems were selected for this study: OptiBond FL/Prodigy, Solid Bond/Charisma F, Syntac Single Component/Tetric, Prime&Bond 2.1/Spectrum TPH, Single Bond/Z100, Etch&Prime 3.0/Degufill Mineral. Flat enamel surfaces were ground on the buccal and lingual aspects of 80 extracted human molars. OptiBond FL and Solid Bond were tested with and without primer application. Prior to application of the adhesives, the enamel was either carefully dried with compressed air (dry bonding) or blot dried with a cotton pellet (moist bonding). Shear bond strength was determined with a universal testing machine after 24-hour storage in 0.9% NaCl at 37 degrees C. Moist bonding did not significantly affect shear bond strength to enamel of the adhesives tested except for Solid Bond without primer application. Primer contamination of the etched enamel did not significantly influence bond strength, neither in the dry bonding nor in the moist bonding group. Of all adhesives tested in both groups, the highest mean bond strength was observed with Prime&Bond 2.1 and the lowest with Etch&Prime 3.0.

  20. Enamel colour changes after debonding using various bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaher, Abbas R; Abdalla, Essam M; Abdel Motie, Maha A; Rehman, Noman Atiq; Kassem, Hassan; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2012-06-01

    To test the possible association between enamel colour alteration and resin tag depth. In vitro laboratory study. Department of Orthodontics, Alexandria University, Egypt. Fifty freshly extracted human premolar teeth were equally divided randomly into a control and four experimental groups. Teeth in group I received only enamel prophylaxis. Teeth in groups II and III were etched with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 and 60 seconds, respectively. Teeth in group IV were conditioned with Prompt L-pop self-etching primer and in group V with Xeno III self-etching primer, according to the manufacturer's instructions. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the teeth in all experimental groups using Transbond XT composite. Following bracket debonding, finishing and polishing were performed. Enamel colour was evaluated spectrophotometrically at baseline and then after debonding, with the corresponding colour differences ΔE calculated. Resin tags lengths were measured on sectioned teeth in each experimental group under scanning electron microscope. All experimental groups showed clinically perceivable colour change after debonding and finishing as all values were exceeded the clinical colour detection threshold of ΔE = 3.7 units. Significant differences (Pcolour change and resin tags length when all teeth were combined and tested, irrespective of group. Moderate evidence exists that shorter resin tag penetration produces less change in enamel colour following clean-up and polishing. Self-etch primers produce less resin penetration and these systems may produce less iatrogenic colour change in enamel following orthodontic treatment.

  1. Year of Birth Determination Using Radiocarbon Dating of Dental Enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2009-03-10

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, {sup 14}C levels in the enamel represent {sup 14}C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists.

  2. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on microhardness of bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of incorporating three different nanobiomaterials into bleaching material on microhardness of bleached enamel. Materials and Methods The crowns of 24 extracted sound human molars were sectioned. Sixty enamel specimens (2 × 3 × 4 mm were selected and divided into five groups (n = 12: Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control; Group 2 underwent bleaching with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by incorporation of bioactive glass (BAG, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP and hydroxyapatite (HA, respectively. The enamel microhardness was evaluated. The differences in Knoop microhardness data of each group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Tukey tests. Results Significant differences were observed between the study groups. The enamel microhardness changes in Groups 1, 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than that of Group 2 (p < 0.001. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that incorporation of each one of the three tested biomaterials as remineralizing agents might be effective in decreasing enamel microhardness changes subsequent to in-office bleaching.

  3. Microstructural variation in conodont enamel is a functional adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, P C

    2001-08-22

    Recognition that conodonts were the earliest vertebrate group to experiment with skeletal biomineralization provides a window in which to study the origin and early evolution of this developmental system. It has been contended that the conodont skeleton comprised a classic suite of vertebrate hard tissues, while others suggest that conodont hard tissues represent divergent specializations within the early diversification of vertebrate hard tissues, supporting a view that the hard tissues of conodonts, particularly enamel, exhibit a range of microstructural variation beyond that seen in vertebrates. New evidence reveals that, although variable, conodont enamel microstructure is consistent between homologous portions of homologous dentitions. Although there is a correlation between morphology and microstructure, this belies a stronger correlation between the commonality of microstructure and dental function. The enamel of conodonts evolved in response to changes in dental function and differentiation of the microstructural layer into a number of enamel types and can be linked to dental occlusion, heterodonty, a permanent dentition, enamel thickness and, probably above all, the small size of the dental elements.

  4. A Quantitative Study of Hunter-Schreger Brands in the Tooth Enamel of Camelus Dromedarius

    OpenAIRE

    Radhi, Ameera

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Hunter-Schreger Bands (HSBs) are an optical phenomenon seen in mammalian tooth enamel related to orientation changes in the enamel prisms. HSBs are considered a factor in the development and progress of certain clinical conditions, including tooth wear, the resistance of enamel to fracture, cracked tooth syndrome, enamel bonding, abfraction, and vital tooth bleaching. They can also be used for personal identification in automated systems. No previous investigations have descr...

  5. Microabrasion Technique for Enamel with Fluorosis: A Case Report Utilizing Two Distinct Pastes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Carla Müller; Faculdade de Odontologia de Bauru - Universidade de São Paulo; Bim Júnior, Odair; Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo; Borges, Ana Flávia Sanches; Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo; Wang, Linda; Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo

    2013-01-01

    The technique of enamel microabrasion is considered an aesthetic alternative conservative and effective for stain removal or surface irregularities of the enamel and different materials or pastes can be used for this purpose Objetives: The objective of this study was to compare the efficiency of the technique of enamel microabrasion using two different pastes at removing hypoplastic stains by fluorosis. Methods: The female patient, 18 years, was submitted to enamel microabrasion, and in the r...

  6. Accomplishing Esthetics Using Enamel Microabrasion and Bleaching-A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Franco, L.M.; Goncalves, R. S. [UNESP; ALEXANDRE, R. S.; Machado,L.S.; Neto, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the sequential steps that were used to treat unesthetic, white, hard-texture enamel stains of unknown etiology. A tapered fine diamond bur was used to remove superficial enamel followed by the use of an enamel microabrasion compound Opalustre (Ultradent Products Inc). This technique removed the stains and was followed by polishing with a fluoride paste to restore the enamel to a smooth finish. The teeth were subsequently bleached with carbamide peroxide (Opalescence...

  7. [Enamel microabrasion and in-office bleaching for fluorosis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Nicole; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Enamel microabrasion is a proven method of removing superficial intrinsic enamel discoloration defects from teeth. In many cases, with insignificant and unrecognizable loss of enamel, those defects can be permanently eliminated, improving the appearance of treated teeth. This article describes the treatment of one patient whose fluorotic brown stains were corrected with a combination of enamel microabrasion and in-office-bleaching technique with a hydrogen peroxide gel solution.

  8. Angular distribution of cross-sectioned cell boundaries at the distal terminal web in differentiating preameloblasts, inner enamel secretory ameloblasts and outer enamel secretory ameloblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaohong; Nishikawa, Sumio

    2014-02-01

    The cross-sectioned profiles of differentiating preameloblasts, inner enamel secretory ameloblasts and outer enamel secretory ameloblasts at the distal terminal web were quantitatively compared. First, the angles of each line constituting the sectioned cell polygons were measured, and the patterns of angular distribution histograms were compared. Second, all groups of line angles from one differentiating preameloblast population, two inner enamel secretory ameloblast and one outer enamel secretory ameloblast populations at the distal terminal web were compared statistically by the χ(2)-test using the multiple comparison method. The results showed that cell shapes between differentiating preameloblasts and inner enamel secretory ameloblasts were similar, but that those between differentiating preameloblasts and outer enamel secretory ameloblasts and between inner enamel secretory ameloblasts and outer enamel secretory ameloblasts were significantly different. Third, F-actin fluorescence microscopy in the distal terminal web was performed and was consistent with the angular distribution. These results suggest that cell shapes of inner enamel secretory ameloblasts and differentiating preameloblasts at the distal terminal web are specialized for sideways cell movement during decussating tooth enamel formation.

  9. The impact of fluoride on ameloblasts and the mechanisms of enamel fluorosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Lyaruu, D.M.; Denbesten, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Intake of excess amounts of fluoride during tooth development cause enamel fluorosis, a developmental disturbance that makes enamel more porous. In mild fluorosis, there are white opaque striations across the enamel surface, whereas in more severe cases, the porous regions increase in size, with

  10. XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices in sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Gasga, José, E-mail: jreyes@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Martínez-Piñeiro, Esmeralda L., E-mail: esmemapi@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Rodríguez-Álvarez, Galois, E-mail: galoisborre@yahoo.com [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E., E-mail: gab0409@yahoo.com.mx [Unidad Académica de Odontología, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Edificio E7, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo”, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); García-García, Ramiro, E-mail: ramiro@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2013-12-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is a measure of the percentage of crystalline material in a given sample and it is also correlated to the degree of order within the crystals. In the literature two ways are reported to measure the CI: X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Although the CI determined by these techniques has been adopted in the field of archeology as a structural order measure in the bone with the idea that it can help e.g. in the sequencing of the bones in chronological and/or stratigraphic order, some debate remains about the reliability of the CI values. To investigate similarities and differences between the two techniques, the CI of sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) was measured in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), at room temperature and after heat treatment. Although the (CI){sub XRD} index is related to the crystal structure of the samples and the (CI){sub FTIR} index is related to the vibration modes of the molecular bonds, both indices showed similar qualitative behavior for heat-treated samples. At room temperature, the (CI){sub XRD} value indicated that enamel is more crystalline than synthetic HAP, while (CI){sub FTIR} indicated the opposite. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) images were also used to corroborate the measured CI values. - Highlights: • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices for tooth enamel and synthetic HAP were obtained. • SEM and TEM images were more correlated with (CI){sub XRD} than with (CI){sub FTIR}. • Regardless of the temperature, (CI){sub XRD} and (CI){sub FTIR} showed similar behavior. • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices resulted in a fast and qualitative measurement.

  11. Surface changes of enamel after brushing with charcoal toothpaste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertiwi, U. I.; Eriwati, Y. K.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the surface roughness changes of tooth enamel after brushing with charcoal toothpaste. Thirty specimens were brushed using distilled water (the first group), Strong® Formula toothpaste (the second group), and Charcoal® Formula toothpaste for four minutes and 40 seconds (equivalent to one month) and for 14 minutes (equivalent to three months) using a soft fleece toothbrush with a mass of 150 gr. The roughness was measured using a surface roughness tester, and the results were tested with repeated ANOVA test and one-way ANOVA. The value of the surface roughness of tooth enamel was significantly different (p<0.05) after brushing for an equivalent of one month and an equivalent of three months. Using toothpaste containing charcoal can increase the surface roughness of tooth enamel.

  12. The effects of microabrasion on demineralization inhibition of enamel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, A; Donly, K J; Wefel, J S

    1997-07-01

    Microabraded enamel acquires a highly polished surface of mineralized tissue. The purpose of this study was to determine if microabraded enamel surfaces are more resistant to demineralization. Twenty extracted permanent incisors were used in the experiment. Four treatment modalities were investigated: (1) microabrasion in conjunction with a topical fluoride treatment, (2) topical fluoride treatment, (3) microabrasion, and (4) no treatment. All surfaces, following their respective treatment regimen, were stored in artificial saliva for 2 months and then exposed to an artificial caries system for 5 days. Teeth treated with microabrasion followed by a 4-minute application of 1% neutral topical sodium fluoride exhibited significantly less enamel demineralization when subjected to an artificial caries challenge than did teeth that underwent microabrasion alone, topical fluoride treatment alone, or no treatment at all.

  13. Removal of enamel caries with an air abrasion powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Klaus W; Ciucchi, Philip; Donnet, Marcel; Lussi, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the efficiency of air abrasion on enamel caries with selective enamel powder (SEP) or with alumina powder and a negative and positive control group. Ninety-three extracted molars with non-cavitated incipient enamel lesions were selected. After embedding the roots in resin, each lesion was sectioned perpendicular to the surface and photographed. Each lesion was classified microscopically as having or not having dentin involvement. The lesions were distributed into four groups with an equal number of enamel caries with or without dentin involvement. Each group was treated differently: Group 1 had SEP abrasion, Group 2 had alumina abrasion, Group 3 had sodium bicarbonate abrasion (negative control) and Group 4 had bur treatment (positive control). The surface was rephotographed after treatment. Superimposition of the photographs identified areas of "correct-excavation," "under-excavation" and "over-excavation." There were no statistical differences between lesions treated with or without dentin involvement for Groups 2 through 4. However, in the SEP group, all measured areas were significantly influenced by dentin involvement. In pairwise comparisons, no statistical differences were found between the alumina and bur groups. The SEP group, however, showed statistically significant differences for each area compared to the alumina group in enamel caries without dentin involvement. SEP performed as well as alumina and bur in lesions with dentin involvement. SEP is different in its ablative properties toward caries with dentin involvement or no dentin involvement. In terms of dental treatment, SEP seems to have a diagnostic potential for enamel lesions before operative intervention in patients with high caries risk.

  14. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Enamel thickness after preparation of tooth for porcelain laminate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Pahlevan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation the thickness of enamel in the gingival, middle, and incisal thirds of the labial surface of the anterior teeth were measured regarding preparation of the teeth for porcelain laminate veneers.Part one, 20 extracted intact human maxillary central and lateral incisors ten of each were selected. The teeth were imbedded in autopolimerize acrylic resin. Cross section was preformed through the midline of the incisal, middle and cervical one-third of the labial surface of the teeth. The samples were observed under reflected stereomicroscope and the thickness of enamel was recorded. Part II, the effect of different types of preparation on dentin exposure was evaluated. Thirty maxillary central incisor teeth were randomly divided into two groups: A: Knife-edge preparation. B: Chamfer preparation. All samples were embedded in autopolimerize acrylic resin using a silicon mold. The samples were cut through the midline of the teeth. The surface of the samples were polished and enamel and dentin were observed under the stereomicroscope.Data were analyzed by ANOVA-one way test. The results of this study showed that the least enamel thickness in the central incisor was 345 and in lateral incisor is 235 μ this thickness is related to the one-third labial cervical area. Maximum thickness in maxillary central and lateral incisors in the one-third labial incisal surface was 1260 μ and 1220μ, respectively. In the second part of the study, the tendency of dentinal exposure was shown with the chamfer preparation, but no dentinal exposure was found in the knife-edge preparation. The differences between groups were significant (p<0.05.The knowledge of enamel thickness in different part of labial surface is very important. The thickness of enamel in the gingival area does not permit a chamfer preparation. The knife edge preparation is preferable in gingival area.

  16. Non-invasive in vivo visualization of enamel defects by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaldo, Maria; Di Stasio, Dario; Santoro, Rossella; Laino, Luigi; Perillo, Letizia; Petruzzi, Massimo; Lauritano, Dorina; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2015-05-01

    The enamel defects (EDs) may present with a variety of clinical manifestations with increasing severity from the sole appearance of pale discoloration to remarkable structural alterations. EDs are responsible for higher caries receptivity. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows to image in vivo at microscopic resolution of the dental surface, thus avoiding the tooth extraction and the sample preparation because of its ability to optically scan living tissues along their depth. Aim of this study is the in vivo assessment at microscopic resolution of dental surfaces affected by EDs without resorting to invasive methods such as teeth extractions, to define histological findings occurring in chromatic and/or structural EDs. For the purpose, 15 children, referring at the Dental Clinic of the Second University of Naples, affected by several degrees of EDs, were enrolled and underwent in vivo RCM imaging to microscopically define the ED confocal features using a commercially available hand-held reflectance confocal microscope with neither injuries nor discomfort. Totally, 29 teeth were imaged. Results demonstrated images good in quality and the capability to detect EDs such as unevenness, grooves, and lack of mineralization according to their clinical degree of disarray. The present in vivo microscopic study on EDs allowed to highlight structural changes in dental enamel at microscopic resolution in real-time and in a non-invasive way, with no need for extraction or processing the samples. Further experiments could define the responsiveness to remineralizing procedures as therapeutic treatments.

  17. FT-Raman spectroscopic characterization of enamel surfaces irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite recent advances in dental caries prevention, caries is common and remains a serious health problem. Laser irradiation is one of the most common methods in preventive measures in recent years. Raman spectroscopy technique is utilized to study the microcrystalline structure of dental enamel. In this study, FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate chemical changes in enamel structure irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers. Methods. We used 15 freshly-extracted, non-carious, human molars that were treated as follows: No treatment was carried out in group A (control group; Group B was irradiated with Er:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray; and Group C was irradiated with Nd:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray. After treatment, the samples were analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy. Results. The carbonate content evaluation with regard to the integrated area under the curve (1065/960 cm–1 exhibited a significant reduction in its ratio in groups B and C. The organic content (2935/960 cm-1 area exhibited a significant decrease after laser irradiation in group B and C. Conclusion. The results showed that the mineral and organic matrices of enamel structure were affected by laser irradiation; therefore, it might be a suitable method for caries prevention.

  18. Critical roles for WDR72 in calcium transport and matrix protein removal during enamel maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Hu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jie; Smith, Charles E; Nunez, Stephanie M; Richardson, Amelia S; Pal, Soumya; Samann, Andrew C; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2015-01-01

    Defects in WDR72 (WD repeat-containing protein 72) cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We generated and characterized Wdr72-knockout/lacZ-knockin mice to investigate the role of WDR72 in enamel formation. In all analyses, enamel formed by Wdr72 heterozygous mice was indistinguishable from wild-type enamel. Without WDR72, enamel mineral density increased early during the maturation stage but soon arrested. The null enamel layer was only a tenth as hard as wild-type enamel and underwent rapid attrition following eruption. Despite the failure to further mineralize enamel deposited during the secretory stage, ectopic mineral formed on the enamel surface and penetrated into the overlying soft tissue. While the proteins in the enamel matrix were successfully degraded, the digestion products remained inside the enamel. Interactome analysis of WDR72 protein revealed potential interactions with clathrin-associated proteins and involvement in ameloblastic endocytosis. The maturation stage mandibular incisor enamel did not stain with methyl red, indicating that the enamel did not acidify beneath ruffle-ended ameloblasts. Attachment of maturation ameloblasts to the enamel layer was weakened, and SLC24A4, a critical ameloblast calcium transporter, did not localize appropriately along the ameloblast distal membrane. Fewer blood vessels were observed in the papillary layer supporting ameloblasts. Specific WDR72 expression by maturation stage ameloblasts explained the observation that enamel thickness and rod decussation (established during the secretory stage) are normal in the Wdr72 null mice. We conclude that WDR72 serves critical functions specifically during the maturation stage of amelogenesis and is required for both protein removal and enamel mineralization. PMID:26247047

  19. Distinguishing between enamel fluorosis and other enamel defects in permanent teeth of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aira Sabokseir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. The inconsistent prevalence of fluorosis for a given level of fluoride in drinking water suggests developmental defects of enamel (DDEs other than fluorosis were being misdiagnosed as fluorosis. The imprecise definition and subjective perception of fluorosis indices could result in misdiagnosis of dental fluorosis. This study was conducted to distinguish genuine fluorosis from fluorosis-resembling defects that could have adverse health-related events as a cause using Early Childhood Events Life-grid method (ECEL. Methods. A study was conducted on 400 9-year-old children from areas with high, optimal and low levels of fluoride in the drinking water of Fars province, Iran. Fluorosis cases were diagnosed on the standardized one view photographs of the anterior teeth using Dean’s and TF (Thylstrup and Fejerskov Indices by calibrated dentists. Agreements between examiners were tested. Early childhood health-related data collected retrospectively by ECEL method were matched with the position of enamel defects. Results. Using both Dean and TF indices three out of four dentists diagnosed that 31.3% (115 children had fluorosis, 58.0%, 29.1%, and 10.0% in high (2.12–2.85 ppm, optimal (0.62–1.22 ppm, and low (0.24–0.29 ppm fluoride areas respectively (p < 0.001. After matching health-related events in the 115 (31.3% of children diagnosed with fluorosis, 31 (8.4% of children had fluorosis which could be matched with their adverse health-related events. This suggests that what was diagnosed as fluorosis were non-fluoride related DDEs that resemble fluorosis. Discussion. The frequently used measures of fluorosis appear to overscore fluorosis. Use of ECEL method to consider health related events relevant to DDEs could help to differentiate between genuine fluorosis and fluorosis-resembling defects.

  20. Microabrasion in tooth enamel discoloration defects: three cases with long-term follow-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Franco, Laura Molinar; Fagundes, Ticiane Cestari; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2014-01-01

    Superficial irregularities and certain intrinsic stains on the dental enamel surfaces can be resolved by enamel microabrasion, however, treatment for such defects need to be confined to the outermost regions of the enamel surface. Dental bleaching and resin-based composite repair are also often useful for certain situations for tooth color corrections. This article presented and discussed the indications and limitations of enamel microabrasion treatment. Three case reports treated by enamel microabrasion were also presented after 11, 20 and 23 years of follow-ups.

  1. Microabrasion in tooth enamel discoloration defects: three cases with long-term follow-ups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Herman SUNDFELD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Superficial irregularities and certain intrinsic stains on the dental enamel surfaces can be resolved by enamel microabrasion, however, treatment for such defects need to be confined to the outermost regions of the enamel surface. Dental bleaching and resin-based composite repair are also often useful for certain situations for tooth color corrections. This article presented and discussed the indications and limitations of enamel microabrasion treatment. Three case reports treated by enamel microabrasion were also presented after 11, 20 and 23 years of follow-ups.

  2. Effect of ethanol-wet-bonding technique on resin–enamel bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Kerim Ayar

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The ethanol-wet-bonding technique may increase the bond strength of commercial adhesives to enamel. The chemical composition of the adhesives can affect the bond strength of adhesives when bonding to acid-etched enamel, using the ethanol-wet-bonding technique. Some adhesive systems used in the present study may simultaneously be applied to enamel and dentin using ethanol-wet-bonding. Furthermore, deploying ethanol-wet-bonding for the tested commercial adhesives to enamel can increase the adhesion abilities of these adhesives to enamel.

  3. Ultrastructural effects caused by the irradiation of Er:YAG laser on smooth surfaces of deciduous tooth enamel

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    Borges, Denise G.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Watanabe-Sei, Ii

    1999-05-01

    Enamel surface morphologic alterations were investigated when an Er:YAG focused moistened laser radiation (λ =2.94μm) was applied on canine deciduous teeth enamel. The results were compared to the data already reported concerning permanent dental enamel. The results indicated that the ultrastructural effects obtained were very alike to permanent enamel literature reports.

  4. Analysis of the interface zone between the glass ionomer and enamel and dentin of primary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Bojan B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoring carious teeth is one of the major dental treatment needs of young children. Conventional glassionomer materials are frequently used as filling materials in contemporary pediatric dentistry. The objective of this study was to evaluate the restorative and prophylactic efficacy of the newly marketed glass ionomer, Fuji Triage (GC, Tokyo, Japan, through morphological analysis of the interface zone between the material and the enamel and the dentin of primary molars and to determine the extent of the ion exchange at the interface zone. The sample consisted of 5 extracted intact first primary molars in which glassionomer had been used as filling material after standard class I cavity preparation. The material was placed according to the manufacturer's instructions and teeth were placed into dionised water prior to experiment. Six sections of each tooth had been examined using scanning electron microscopic and electron dispersive spectroscopic techniques (SEM/EDS. The parameters for evaluation included: morphological characteristics of the interface zone and the extent of the ion exchange between the material and the tooth structures Results were statistically analyzed using descriptive statistical methods. SEM/EDS analysis revealed the presence of the chemical bonding between the glass ionomer and the enamel and dentin, 5 and 15 μm in width, respectively. Ion exchange has not been detected in the enamel at the EDS sensitivity level. Strontium and fluor penetration has been detected in dentin. The ion exchange and chemical bonding formation justify the usage of the conventional glass ionomer materials for restorative procedures in primary molars.

  5. Histological, morphological, profilometric and optical changes of human tooth enamel after microabrasion.

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    Schmidlin, Patrick Roger; Göhring, Till Nicolaus; Schug, Jens; Lutz, Felix

    2003-09-01

    To determine the loss of enamel after a single 20-secondsapplication of a microabrasion slurry and to evaluate structural changes by means of laser fluorescence, and microscopic and optical measurements. Defined buccal areas with a diameter of 2 mm from 16 extracted human molars were demineralized for 12 weeks using a demineralization gel (pH 4.8). The created artificial white-spot lesions were divided corono-apically in control and test sites, using a rubber cement that prospectively covered the untreated control site. Teeth were divided into two groups of eight teeth each. One group was treated with an abrasive cleaning paste (Pell-ex) and the other group with a commercially available microabrasion slurry (Opalustre) for 20 seconds, applying a load of 200 g. Before and after treatment, standardized photographs were taken for the determination of luminescence and profilometric tracings of the surface, and these were recorded for the determination of enamel loss. The grade of demineralization was quantified using a laser fluorescence method (Diagnodent). Statistical differences were checked using a Mann Whitney and student t-test. Replicas of the treated areas were made for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, and teeth were histologically investigated by polarized light microscopy. Loss of tooth substance was significantly higher (P microabrasion group (134.8 +/- 35.5 microm) compared with the abrasive cleaning paste group (4.5 +/- 1.2 microm). After treatment, statistically significant differences in fluorescence and luminescence measurements could only be detected for microabraded teeth. No significant changes were noted for teeth treated with an abrasive cleaning paste. Histological findings confirmed removal of the demineralized surface zone when microabrading the enamel, whereas no changes were observed in the test group treated with an abrasive cleaning paste. Polarized light microscopy did not indicate any changes in the mineralization pattern, for

  6. Determination of atomic number and composition of human enamel; Determinacao da composicao e numero atomico efetivo do esmalte humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, M.S. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN), Recife, PE (Brazil); Rodas Duran, J.E. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2001-07-01

    The teeth are organs of complicated structure that consist, partly, of hard tissue containing in its interior the dental pulp, rich in vases and nerves. The main mass of the tooth is constituted by the dentine, which is covered with hard tissues and of epithelial origin called enamel. The dentine of the human teeth used in this work were completely removed and the teeth were cut with a device with a diamond disc. In this work the chemical composition of the human enamel was determined, which showed a high percentage of Ca and P, in agreement with the results found in the literature. The effective atomic number of the material and the half-value layer in the energy range of diagnostic X-ray beams were determined. Teeth could be used to evaluated the public's individual doses as well as for retrospective dosimetry what confirms the importance of their effective atomic number and composition determination. (author)

  7. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Xianglong [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu Xiaolin [Department of Orthodontics, Stomatology Hospital, Dalian University, Dalian 116021 (China); Bai Ding [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: baiding88@hotmail.com; Meng Yao; Huang Lan [Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  8. XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices in sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Gasga, José; Martínez-Piñeiro, Esmeralda L; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Galois; Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E; García-García, Ramiro; Brès, Etienne F

    2013-12-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is a measure of the percentage of crystalline material in a given sample and it is also correlated to the degree of order within the crystals. In the literature two ways are reported to measure the CI: X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Although the CI determined by these techniques has been adopted in the field of archeology as a structural order measure in the bone with the idea that it can help e.g. in the sequencing of the bones in chronological and/or stratigraphic order, some debate remains about the reliability of the CI values. To investigate similarities and differences between the two techniques, the CI of sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) was measured in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), at room temperature and after heat treatment. Although the (CI)XRD index is related to the crystal structure of the samples and the (CI)FTIR index is related to the vibration modes of the molecular bonds, both indices showed similar qualitative behavior for heat-treated samples. At room temperature, the (CI)XRD value indicated that enamel is more crystalline than synthetic HAP, while (CI)FTIR indicated the opposite. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) images were also used to corroborate the measured CI values. © 2013.

  9. Comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the pectoral and forelimb musculature of tetrapods with special attention to extant limbed amphibians and reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Virginia; Diogo, Rui

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of the present work is to synthesize the information obtained from our dissections of the pectoral and forelimb muscles of representative members of the major extant taxa of limbed amphibians and reptiles and from our review of the literature, in order to provide an account of the comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of these muscles in the Tetrapoda. The pectoral and forelimb musculature of all these major taxa conform to a general pattern that seems to have been acquired very early in the evolutionary history of tetrapods. Although some muscles are missing in certain taxa, and a clear departure from this general pattern is obviously present in derived groups such as birds, the same overall configuration is easily distinguishable in these taxa. Among the most notable anatomical differences between the groups, one that seems to have relevant evolutionary and functional implications, concerns the distal insertion points of the forearm musculature. In tetrapods, the muscles of the radial and ulnar complexes of the forearm are pleisomorphically mainly inserted onto the radius/ulna or onto the more proximal carpal bones, but in mammals some of these muscles insert more distally onto bones such as the metacarpals. Interestingly, a similar trend towards a more distal insertion of these muscles is also found in some non-mammalian tetrapod taxa, such as some anurans (e.g. Phyllomedusa). This may be correlated with the acquisition of more subtle digital movement abilities in these latter taxa. PMID:20807270

  10. Three-dimensional molar enamel distribution and thickness in Australopithecus and Paranthropus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejniczak, A J; Smith, T M; Skinner, M M; Grine, F E; Feeney, R N M; Thackeray, J F; Hublin, J-J

    2008-08-23

    Thick molar enamel is among the few diagnostic characters of hominins which are measurable in fossil specimens. Despite a long history of study and characterization of Paranthropus molars as relatively 'hyper-thick', only a few tooth fragments and controlled planes of section (designed to be proxies of whole-crown thickness) have been measured. Here, we measure molar enamel thickness in Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus using accurate microtomographic methods, recording the whole-crown distribution of enamel. Both taxa have relatively thick enamel, but are thinner than previously characterized based on two-dimensional measurements. Three-dimensional measurements show that P. robustus enamel is not hyper-thick, and A. africanus enamel is relatively thinner than that of recent humans. Interspecific differences in the whole-crown distribution of enamel thickness influence cross-sectional measurements such that enamel thickness is exaggerated in two-dimensional sections of A. africanus and P. robustus molars. As such, two-dimensional enamel thickness measurements in australopiths are not reliable proxies for the three-dimensional data they are meant to represent. The three-dimensional distribution of enamel thickness shows different patterns among species, and is more useful for the interpretation of functional adaptations than single summary measures of enamel thickness.

  11. Sea otter dental enamel is highly resistant to chipping due to its microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziscovici, Charles; Lucas, Peter W; Constantino, Paul J; Bromage, Timothy G; van Casteren, Adam

    2014-10-01

    Dental enamel is prone to damage by chipping with large hard objects at forces that depend on chip size and enamel toughness. Experiments on modern human teeth have suggested that some ante-mortem chips on fossil hominin enamel were produced by bite forces near physiological maxima. Here, we show that equivalent chips in sea otter enamel require even higher forces than human enamel. Increased fracture resistance correlates with more intense enamel prism decussation, often seen also in some fossil hominins. It is possible therefore that enamel chips in such hominins may have formed at even greater forces than currently envisaged. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of in-office and at-home bleaching on human enamel and dentin: an in vitro application of Fourier transform infrared study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severcan, Feride; Gokduman, Kurtulus; Dogan, Ayca; Bolay, Sukran; Gokalp, Saadet

    2008-11-01

    In-office and at-home bleaching techniques are widely used methods for the whitening of teeth. However, the safety of these techniques has not been clarified yet. The aim of the current study is to investigate the in-office- and at-home-bleaching-induced structural and quantitative changes in human enamel and dentin at the molecular level, under in vitro conditions. The Fourier transform mid-infrared (mid-FT-IR) spectroscopic technique was used to monitor bleaching-induced structural changes. Band frequency and intensity values of major absorptions such as amide A, amide I, phosphate (PO(4)), and carbonate (CO(3)(-2)) bands, for treatment groups and control, were measured and compared. The results revealed that both procedures have negligible effects on dentin constituents. In office-bleached