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Sample records for tetraphenylborate catalyst studies

  1. Sodium Tetraphenylborate Catalyst Identification: Preliminary Studies Set 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    This document details the results of these tests and represents the second report of the task designed to identify soluble NaTPB decomposition catalysts. This task, performed as part of the DNFSB Recommendation 96-1 Implementation Plan, partially fulfills the request by High Level Waste Engineering and the ITP Flow Sheet Team in task Technical Request HLW-TTR-97008

  2. Effects of oxygen and catalyst on tetraphenylborate decomposition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that palladium catalyzes rapid decomposition of alkaline tetraphenylborate slurries. Oxygen inhibits the reaction at low temperature (25 C), presumably by preventing activation of the catalyst. The present study investigated oxygen's inhibiting effectiveness at higher temperature (45 C) and catalyst concentrations

  3. Excess Sodium Tetraphenylborate and Intermediates Decomposition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-12-07

    The stability of excess amounts of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility depends on a number of variables. Concentration of palladium, initial benzene, and sodium ion as well as temperature provide the best opportunities for controlling the decomposition rate. This study examined the influence of these four variable on the reactivity of palladium-catalyzed sodium tetraphenylborate decomposition. Also, single effects tests investigated the reactivity of simulants with continuous stirring and nitrogen ventilation, with very high benzene concentrations, under washed sodium concentrations, with very high palladium concentrations, and with minimal quantities of excess NaTPB.

  4. Excess Sodium Tetraphenylborate and Intermediates Decomposition Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.; Peterson, R.A.

    1998-04-01

    The stability of excess amounts of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility depends on a number of variables. Concentration of palladium, initial benzene, and sodium ion as well as temperature provide the best opportunities for controlling the decomposition rate. This study examined the influence of these four variables on the reactivity of palladium-catalyzed sodium tetraphenylborate decomposition. Also, single effects tests investigated the reactivity of simulants with continuous stirring and nitrogen ventilation, with very high benzene concentrations, under washed sodium concentrations, with very high palladium concentrations, and with minimal quantities of excess NaTPB. These tests showed the following.The testing demonstrates that current facility configuration does not provide assured safety of operations relative to the hazards of benzene (in particular to maintain the tank headspace below 60 percent of the lower flammability limit (lfl) for benzene generation rates of greater than 7 mg/(L.h)) from possible accelerated reaction of excess NaTPB. Current maximal operating temperatures of 40 degrees C and the lack of protection against palladium entering Tank 48H provide insufficient protection against the onset of the reaction. Similarly, control of the amount of excess NaTPB, purification of the organic, or limiting the benzene content of the slurry (via stirring) and ionic strength of the waste mixture prove inadequate to assure safe operation

  5. Excess Sodium Tetraphenylborate and Intermediates Decomposition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Peterson , R.A.

    1998-04-01

    The stability of excess amounts of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility depends on a number of variables. Concentration of palladium, initial benzene, and sodium ion as well as temperature provide the best opportunities for controlling the decomposition rate. This study examined the influence of these four variables on the reactivity of palladium-catalyzed sodium tetraphenylborate decomposition. Also, single effects tests investigated the reactivity of simulants with continuous stirring and nitrogen ventilation, with very high benzene concentrations, under washed sodium concentrations, with very high palladium concentrations, and with minimal quantities of excess NaTPB. These tests showed the following.The testing demonstrates that current facility configuration does not provide assured safety of operations relative to the hazards of benzene (in particular to maintain the tank headspace below 60 percent of the lower flammability limit (lfl) for benzene generation rates of greater than 7 mg/(L.h)) from possible accelerated reaction of excess NaTPB. Current maximal operating temperatures of 40 degrees C and the lack of protection against palladium entering Tank 48H provide insufficient protection against the onset of the reaction. Similarly, control of the amount of excess NaTPB, purification of the organic, or limiting the benzene content of the slurry (via stirring) and ionic strength of the waste mixture prove inadequate to assure safe operation.

  6. Aqueous protocol for allylic arylation of cinnamyl acetates with sodium tetraphenylborate using Bedford-type palladacycle catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Ghorpade, Seema Arun; Sawant, Dinesh N; Renn, Dominik; Zernickel, Anna; Du, Weiyuan; Sekar, Nethi; Eppinger, Jö rg

    2018-01-01

    Allylic arylation of cinnamyl acetates with sodium tetraphenylborate using 0.002 mol % of Bedford-type palladacycle catalyst is described. The developed methodology is applicable for wide range of cinnamyl acetates furnishing excellent yields up to 93%. Notably all reactions proceed smoothly under mild reaction conditions in water under air atmosphere.

  7. Aqueous protocol for allylic arylation of cinnamyl acetates with sodium tetraphenylborate using Bedford-type palladacycle catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Ghorpade, Seema Arun

    2018-03-19

    Allylic arylation of cinnamyl acetates with sodium tetraphenylborate using 0.002 mol % of Bedford-type palladacycle catalyst is described. The developed methodology is applicable for wide range of cinnamyl acetates furnishing excellent yields up to 93%. Notably all reactions proceed smoothly under mild reaction conditions in water under air atmosphere.

  8. Tetraphenylborate Catalyst Development for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory 20-L Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team identified Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation as one of the three alternatives to replace the In-Tank Precipitation Facility at the Savannah River Site. The proposed design incorporates two continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) a concentrate tank and a sintered metal crossflow filter. Previous use of tetraphenylborate in batch operation and testing demonstrated the ability of the feed material to catalyze the decomposition of tetraphenylborate. The Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation design seeks to overcome the processing limitation of the unwanted reaction by rapid throughput and temperature control. Nitrogen inerting of the vapor space helps mitigate any safety (i.e., flammable) concerns of the reaction

  9. Co-precipitation and solubility studies of cesium, potassium and sodium tetraphenylborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This report contains the results from a study requested by High Level Waste on the co-precipitation and solubility of cesium, potassium, and sodium tetraphenylborate. Co-precipitation of cesium (Cs), potassium (K), and sodium (Na) tetraphenylborate (TPB) helps determine the efficiency of reagent usage in the Small Tank Precipitation Process. This process uses NaTPB to remove cesium from waste by means of precipitation. Previous studies by McCabe suggested that if the sodium ion concentration [Na + ] increased the rate at which cesium tetraphenylborate (CsTPB) precipitates also increases. Serkiz also demonstrated that the precipitation of potassium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) in the presence of high [Na + ] (∼5M) appears to produce a mixed solid phase composed of NaTPB and KTPB together in the crystal lattice. In the crystallographic structure of these three tetraphenylborate salts (Cs,K,NaTPB), the tetraphenylborate ion dominates the size of the crystals. Also, note that the three crystals have nearly identical structures with the exception of two additional peaks in the cesium pattern. Given these similarities, TPB precipitation in the presence of Na + , Cs + and K + likely produces an impure isomorphic crystalline mixture of CsTPB, KTPB and NaTPB. The authors speculate that the primary crystalline structure resembles that of KTPB with NaTPB and CsTPB mixed throughout the crystal structure. The precipitation of NaTPB makes some of the anticipated excess tetraphenylborate relatively unavailable for precipitation of cesium. Thus, the amount of excess tetraphenylborate required to completely precipitate all of the potassium and cesium may increase significantly

  10. Co-precipitation and solubility studies of cesium, potassium and sodium tetraphenylborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains the results from a study requested by High Level Waste Division on the co-precipitation and solubility of cesium, potassium, and sodium tetraphenylborate. Co-precipitation of cesium (Cs), potassium (K), and sodium (Na) tetraphenylborate (TPB) helps determine the efficiency of reagent usage in the Small Tank Precipitation Process. This process uses NaTPB to remove cesium from waste by means of precipitation. Previous studies by McCabe suggested that if the sodium ion concentration [Na+] increased the rate at which cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) in the presence of high [Na+] (∼5M) appears to produce a mixed solid phase composed of NaTPB and KTPB together in the crystal lattice

  11. Decomposition of Sodium Tetraphenylborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical decomposition of aqueous alkaline solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the determination of additives and/or variables which influence NaTBP decomposition. This document describes work aimed at providing better understanding into the relationship of copper (II), solution temperature, and solution pH to NaTPB stability

  12. Rheology of tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, I.D.; Martin, H.D.; McLain, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The rheological properties of tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry were determined. This nonradioactive slurry simulates the radioactive tetraphenylborate precipitate generated at the Savannah River Plant by the In-Tank Precipitation Process. The data obtained in this study was applied in the design of slurry pumps, transfer pumps, transfer lines, and vessel agitation for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and other High Level Waste treatment projects. The precipitate slurry behaves as a Bingham plastic. The yield stress is directly proportional to the concentration of insoluble solids over the range of concentrations studied. The consistency is also a linear function of insoluble solids over the same concentration range. Neither the yield stress nor the consistency was observed to be affected by the presence of the soluble solids. Temperature effects on flow properties of the slurry were also examined: the yield stress is inversely proportional to temperature, but the consistency of the slurry is independent of temperature. No significant time-dependent effects were found. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Combustibility of tetraphenylborate solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid slurries expected under normal in-tank processing (ITP) operations are not ignitible because of their high water content. However, deposits of dry solids from the slurries are combustible and produce dense, black smoke when burned. The dry solids burn similarly to Styrofoam and more easily than sawdust. It is the opinion of fire hazard experts that a benzene vapor deflagration could ignite the dry solids. A tetraphenylborate solids fire will rapidly plug the waste tank HEPA ventilation filters due to the nature of the smoke produced. To prevent ignition and combustion of these solids, the waste tanks have been equipped with a nitrogen inerting system

  14. A study of the complex formation of bivalent lanthanides with tetraphenylborate-ion in organic solvents. Izuchenie kompleksoobrazovaniya dvukhvalentnykh lantanoidov s tetrafenilborat-ionom v organicheskikh rastvoritelyakh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veleshko, I E; Mikheev, N B; Kulyukhin, S A

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of bivalent lanthanides with tetraphenylborate-ion (BPh[sub 4][sup -]) in solutions of CH[sub 3]CN and C[sub 2]H[sub 5]OH was studied by the methods of cocrystallization, conductometry and spectrophotometry.It is shown that no complexing between Ln[sup 2+] and BPh[sub 4][sup -] takes place in ethanol, wheras in CH[sub 3]CN formation of second sphere complexes of the composition [Ln(CH[sub 3]CN)[sub n

  15. Literature Review of the Effects of Tetraphenylborate on Saltstone Grout: Benzene Evolution and TCLP Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAY, MICHAEL

    2004-01-01

    As part of the program to disposition the tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H and return the tank to service, Salt Processing Development requested a review of the literature to assess the state of knowledge pertaining to incorporation of tetraphenylborate slurries in saltstone grout with respect to benzene generation rates and leaching performance. Examination of past studies conducted at Savannah River Site (SRS) on the incorporation of TPB slurries in saltstone provides a basis for developing a more focused scope of experimental studies. Tank 48H currently contains potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate salts as a result of a demonstration of the In Tank Precipitation (ITP) process in 1983 and subsequent ITPradioactive start-up operations in 1995. The tank currently contains approximately 240,000 gallons of salt solution with approximately 19,000 kg of potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate salts. The presence of the TPB salts makes the waste incompatible with existing High Level Waste treatment facilities. The TPB salts in Tank 48H must be treated or removed to meet the scheduled return to service date of 2007. The two preferred options for disposition of the TBP slurries in Tank 48H include: (1) Aggregation of the material with the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) recycle stream and disposal in the Saltstone Processing Facility (SPF), and (2) In-Situ Thermal Decomposition using heat in combination with pH reduction and catalyst addition. The current literature review along with the current experimental studies provide a basis for determining the feasibility of the option to incorporate the TPB slurries into saltstone grout

  16. (Methoxymethylidenedimethylazanium tetraphenylborate acetonitrile monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the cation of the title salt, C4H10NO+·C24H20B−·C2H3N, the C—N bond lengths are 1.2864 (16, 1.4651 (17 and 1.4686 (16 Å, indicating double- and single-bond character, respectively. The C—O bond length of 1.2978 (15 Å shows double-bond character, pointing towards charge delocalization within the NCO plane of the iminium ion. C—H...π interactions are present between the methine H atom and two of the phenyl rings of the tetraphenylborate ion. The latter forms an aromatic pocket in which the cation is embedded. The iminium ion is further connected through a C—H...N hydrogen bond to the acetonitrile molecule. This leads to the formation of a two-dimensional supramolecular pattern along the bc plane.

  17. (Butoxymethylidenedimethylazanium tetraphenylborate acetonitrile monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title solvated salt, C7H16NO+·C24H20B−·C2H3N, the C—N bond lengths in the cation are 1.2831 (19, 1.467 (2 and 1.465 (2 Å, indicating double- and single-bond character, respectively. The C—O bond length of 1.2950 (18 Å shows a double-bond character, pointing towards charge delocalization within the NCO plane of the iminium ion. The two C atoms of the n-butyl group are disordered over the two sites, with refined occupancy ratios of 0.890 (5:0.110 (5 and 0.888 (4:0.112 (4. In the crystal, C—H...π interactions occur between the methine H atom, H atoms of the –N(CH32 and –CH2 groups of the cation, and two of the phenyl rings of the tetraphenylborate anion. The latter interaction forms an aromatic pocket in which the cation is embedded. Thus, a two-dimensional pattern is created in the ac plane.

  18. Sodium tetraphenylborate solubility and dissolution rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.; Peterson, R.A.; Swingle, R.F.; Reeves, C.T.

    1995-01-01

    The rate of solid sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) dissolution in In-Tank Precipitation salt solutions has been experimentally determined. The data indicates that the dissolution rate of solid NaTPB is a minor contributor the lag time experienced in the 1983 Salt Decontamination Demonstration Test and should not be considered as the rate determining step. Current analytical models for predicting the time to reach the composite lower flammability limit assume that the lag time is not more than 6 hours, and the data supports this assumption (i.e., dissolution by itself requires much less than 6 hours). The data suggests that another step--such as mass transport, the reaction of a benzene precursor or the mixing behavior--is the rate determining factor for benzene release to the vapor space in Tank 48H. In addition, preliminary results from this program show that the degree of agitation employed is not a significant parameter in determining the rate of NaTPB dissolution. As a result of this study, an improved equation for predicting equilibrium tetraphenylborate solubility with respect to temperature and sodium ion concentration has been determined

  19. Tetraphenylborate Solubility in High Ionic Strength Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, S.M.; Ginn, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1998-04-01

    Solubility of sodium and potassium salts of the tetraphenylborate ion (TPB) in simulated Savannah River Site High Level Waste was investigated. Data generated from this study allow more accurate predictions of TPB solubility at the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility. Because previous research showed large deviations in the observed solubility of TPB salts when compared with model predictions, additional data were generated to better understand the solubility of TPB in more complex systems of high ionic strength and those containing both potassium and sodium. These data allow evaluation of the ability of current models to accurately predict equilibrium TPB concentrations over the range of experimental conditions investigated in this study

  20. Identification of tetraphenylborate radiolysis products in a simulated feedstock for radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibling, R.E.; Bartlett, M.G.; Carlson, R.E.; Testino, S.A. Jr.; Kunkel, G.J.; Browner, R.F.; Busch, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    The first step towards immobilization of the soluble radioactive species in borosilicate glass is the addition of sodium tetraphenylborate (TPB) and sodium titanate to the radioactive aqueous solution. Initial studies of the TPB hydrolysis process have found that some component of the radiolysis mixture inactivates the Cu catalyst. The interaction of organic materials with the catalyst, and the subsequent interference with the hydrolysis process, would have presented problems with the use of the vitrification process. Prevention of the catalyst deactivation is obtained by washing the irradiated TPB precipitate in the Late Wash Facility prior to hydrolysis to remove the soluble radiolysis products. Identification of the organic radiolysis products, their distribution in the Late Wash Facility, and their interactions with the Cu catalyst has become an important analytical issue. To further investigate the reaction products of the TPB precipitation process, a simulated feedstock was created from compounds known to be present in the starting materials. This simulated feedstock was precipitated with sodium TPB and then exposed to Co-60 gamma radiation to simulate two years of additional storage time prior to the hydrolysis process. The irradiated product was divided into two parts, the filtered supernatant liquid and the precipitate slurry, which contains the TPB and the solid sodium titanate. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography, over 50 organic and inorganic species have been identified in the aqueous portion of a simulated feedstock for TPB hydrolysis. The major organic species present are benzene, phenol, benzamide and a variety of substituted phenylphenols. The major inorganic species present are sodium, nitrite, and oxalate ions

  1. 3-Methyl-4,5-dihydrooxazolium tetraphenylborate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the cation of the title salt, C4H8NO+·C24H20B−, the C—N bond lengths are 1.272 (2, 1.4557 (19 and 1.4638 (19 Å, indicating double- and single-bond character, respectively. The C—O bond length of 1.3098 (19 Å shows that double-bond character and charge delocalization occurs within the NCO plane of the cation. In the crystal, a C—H...π interaction is present between the methylene H atom of the cation and one phenyl ring of the tetraphenylborate ion. The latter forms an aromatic pocket in which the cation is embedded.

  2. In-Tank Peroxide Oxidation Process for the Decomposition of Tetraphenylborate in Tank 48H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DANIEL, LAMBERT

    2005-01-01

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. The TPB was added during an in-tank precipitation process to removed soluble cesium, but excessive benzene generation curtailed this treatment method. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to routine Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains approximately 240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with approximately 19,000 kg (42,000 lb) of potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). Out of Tank processing of the Tank 48H has some distinct advantages as aggressive processing conditions (e.g., high temperature, low pH) are required for fast destruction of the tetraphenylborate. Also, a new facility can be designed with the optimum materials of construction and other design features to allow the safe processing of the Tank 48H waste. However, it is very expensive to build a new facility. As a result, an in-tank process primarily using existing equipment and facilities is desirable. Development of an in-tank process would be economically attractive. Based on success with Fentons Chemistry (i.e., hydrogen peroxide with an iron or copper catalyst to produce hydroxyl radicals, strong oxidation agents), testing was initiated to develop a higher pH oxidation process that could be completed in-tank

  3. Studies on recycling and utilization of spent catalysts. Preparation of active hydrodemetallization catalyst compositions from spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafi, Meena; Stanislaus, Antony [Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, Safat (Kuwait)

    2007-02-15

    Spent catalysts form a major source of solid wastes in the petroleum refining industries. Due to environmental concerns, increasing emphasis has been placed on the development of recycling processes for the waste catalyst materials as much as possible. In the present study the potential reuse of spent catalysts in the preparation of active new catalysts for residual oil hydrotreating was examined. A series of catalysts were prepared by mixing and extruding spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts that contained C, V, Mo, Ni and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with boehmite in different proportions. All prepared catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis and by surface area, pore volume, pore size and crushing strength measurements. The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallization (HDM) activities of the catalysts were evaluated by testing in a high pressure fixed-bed microreactor unit using Kuwait atmospheric residue as feed. A commercial HDM catalyst was also tested under similar operating conditions and their HDS and HDM activities were compared with that of the prepared catalysts. The results revealed that catalyst prepared with addition of up to 40 wt% spent catalyst to boehmite had fairly high surface area and pore volume together with large pores. The catalyst prepared by mixing and extruding about 40 wt% spent catalyst with boehmite was relatively more active for promoting HDM and HDS reactions than a reference commercial HDM catalyst. The formation of some kind of new active sites from the metals (V, Mo and Ni) present in the spent catalyst is suggested to be responsible for the high HDM activity of the prepared catalyst. (author)

  4. Tank 50H Tetraphenylborate Destruction Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T.B.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted several scoping tests with both Tank 50H surrogate materials (KTPB and phenol) as well as with actual Tank 50H solids. These tests examined whether we could destroy the tetraphenylborate in the surrogates or actual Tank 50H material either by use of Fenton's Reagent or by hydrolysis (in Tank 50H conditions at a maximum temperature of 50 degrees C) under a range of conditions. The results of these tests showed that destruction of the solids occurred only under a minority of conditions. (1)Using Fenton's Reagent and KTPB as the Tank 50H surrogate, no reaction occurred at pH ranges greater than 9. (2)Using Fenton's Reagent and phenol as the Tank 50H surrogate, no reaction occurred at a pH of 14. (3)Using Fenton's Reagent and actual Tank 50H slurry, a reaction occurred at a pH of 9.5 in the presence of ECC additives. (4)Using Fenton's Reagent and actual Tank 50H slurry, after a thirty three day period, all attempts at hydrolysis (at pH 14) were too slow to be viable. This happened even in the case of higher temperature (50 degrees C) and added (100 ppm) copper. Tank 50H is scheduled to return to HLW Tank Farm service with capabilities of transferring and receiving salt supernate solutions to and from the Tank Farms and staging feed for the Saltstone Facility. Before returning Tank 50H to Tank Farm service as a non-organic tank, less than 5 kg of TPB must remain in Tank 50H. Recently, camera inspections in Tank 50H revealed two large mounds of solid material, one in the vicinity of the B5 Riser Transfer Pump and the other on the opposite side of the tank. Personnel sampled and analyzed this material to determine its composition. The sample analysis indicated presence of a significant quantity of organics in the solid material. This quantity of organic material exceeds the 5 kg limit for declaring only trace amounts of organic material remain in Tank 50H. Additionally, these large volumes of solids, calculated as approximately 61K gallons, present other

  5. Study of ammonia synthesis over uranium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Erofeev, B.V.; Mikhajlenko, I.E.; Gorelkin, I.I.; Ivanov, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of induced radiactivity and chemical composition of uranium catalysts on their catalytic activity in the ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied. The catalyst samples comprise pieces of metal uranium and chip irradiated in nuclear reactor by the 4.3x10 16 n/cm 2 integral flux of slow neutrons. Studies of catalytic activity was carried out at 1 atm and 340-510 deg C when stoichiometric nitrogen-hydrogen mixture passed through the following installation. At different temperatures uranium nitrides of different composition are shown to be formed. Uranium nitrides with the composition close to UN 2 are the samples with the highest catalYtic activity. The reduction of catalytic activity of uranium catalysts with the increased temperature of their formation above 400 deg C is explained by low catalytic activity of forming UNsub(1.7) in comparison with UN 2 . Catalytic properties of irradiated and nonirradiated samples do not differ from one another

  6. Study of ammonia synthesis using technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Mikhajlenko, I.E.; Pokrovskaya, O.V.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on catalytic properties of technetium in ammonia synthesis reaction. The preparation of technetium catalysts on ν-Al 2 O 3 , BaTiO 3 , BaO-ν-Al 2 O 3 substrates is described. The investigation of catalytic activity of catalysts was carried out at a pressure of 1 atm. in vertical reactor with volume rate of 15000 h - 1 in the temperature range of 350-425 deg. The amount of catalyst was 0.5-1 g, the volume- 0.5 ml, the size of granules- 2-3 mm. Rate constants of ammonia synthesis reaction were calculated. Seeming activation energies of the process have meanings wihtin the limits of 40-50 kcal/mol. It was shown that with increase in concentration of Tc on BaTiO 3 the catalytic activity rises in comparison with pure Tc. The reduction of catalytic activity with increase of metal content on Al 2 O 3 begins in the limits of 3.5-6.7% Tc/ν-Al 2 O 3 . The catalyst of 5.3% Tc/4.1% Ba/ν -Al 2 O 3 compound has the maximum activity. Technetium catalysts possess the stable catalytic activity and don't requre its reduction during several months

  7. Sexual selection studies: A NESCent catalyst meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roughgarden, J.; Adkins-Regan, E.; Akcay, E.; Hinde, C.A.; Hoquet, T.; O'Connor, C.; Prokop, Z.M.; Prum, R.O.; Shafir, S.; Snow, S.S.; Taylor, D.; Cleve, Van J.; Weisberg, M.

    2015-01-01

    A catalyst meeting on sexual selection studies was held in July 2013 at the facilities of the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) in Durham, NC. This article by a subcommittee of the participants foregrounds some of the topics discussed at the meeting. Topics mentioned here include the

  8. Theoretical studies of homogeneous catalysts mimicking nitrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Franco, Duvan; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2011-01-10

    The conversion of molecular nitrogen to ammonia is a key biological and chemical process and represents one of the most challenging topics in chemistry and biology. In Nature the Mo-containing nitrogenase enzymes perform nitrogen 'fixation' via an iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) under ambient conditions. In contrast, industrially, the Haber-Bosch process reduces molecular nitrogen and hydrogen to ammonia with a heterogeneous iron catalyst under drastic conditions of temperature and pressure. This process accounts for the production of millions of tons of nitrogen compounds used for agricultural and industrial purposes, but the high temperature and pressure required result in a large energy loss, leading to several economic and environmental issues. During the last 40 years many attempts have been made to synthesize simple homogeneous catalysts that can activate dinitrogen under the same mild conditions of the nitrogenase enzymes. Several compounds, almost all containing transition metals, have been shown to bind and activate N₂ to various degrees. However, to date Mo(N₂)(HIPTN)₃N with (HIPTN)₃N= hexaisopropyl-terphenyl-triamidoamine is the only compound performing this process catalytically. In this review we describe how Density Functional Theory calculations have been of help in elucidating the reaction mechanisms of the inorganic compounds that activate or fix N₂. These studies provided important insights that rationalize and complement the experimental findings about the reaction mechanisms of known catalysts, predicting the reactivity of new potential catalysts and helping in tailoring new efficient catalytic compounds.

  9. Theoretical Studies of Homogeneous Catalysts Mimicking Nitrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Magistrato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of molecular nitrogen to ammonia is a key biological and chemical process and represents one of the most challenging topics in chemistry and biology. In Nature the Mo-containing nitrogenase enzymes perform nitrogen ‘fixation’ via an iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co under ambient conditions. In contrast, industrially, the Haber-Bosch process reduces molecular nitrogen and hydrogen to ammonia with a heterogeneous iron catalyst under drastic conditions of temperature and pressure. This process accounts for the production of millions of tons of nitrogen compounds used for agricultural and industrial purposes, but the high temperature and pressure required result in a large energy loss, leading to several economic and environmental issues. During the last 40 years many attempts have been made to synthesize simple homogeneous catalysts that can activate dinitrogen under the same mild conditions of the nitrogenase enzymes. Several compounds, almost all containing transition metals, have been shown to bind and activate N2 to various degrees. However, to date Mo(N2(HIPTN3N with (HIPTN3N= hexaisopropyl-terphenyl-triamidoamine is the only compound performing this process catalytically. In this review we describe how Density Functional Theory calculations have been of help in elucidating the reaction mechanisms of the inorganic compounds that activate or fix N2. These studies provided important insights that rationalize and complement the experimental findings about the reaction mechanisms of known catalysts, predicting the reactivity of new potential catalysts and helping in tailoring new efficient catalytic compounds.

  10. Influence of particulates on crossflow filter performance with tetraphenylborate precipitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.A.; Nash, C.A.; McCabe, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The pretreatment of High Level Waste at the Savannah River Site, prior to vitrification, includes tetraphenylborate precipitation of cesium. Also, strontium and actinides are removed from solution by sorption on monosodium titanate. The resulting slurry is concentrated and washed using 0.4 micron stainless steel Mott filters in a crossflow assembly. The rate of filtrate production is governed by a number of parameters including the concentration of both soluble and insoluble solids present in the process stream. The major insoluble constituents in the process stream are tetraphenylborate solids. However, the presence of small quantities of monosodium titanate as well as sludge particulates, typically less than 10% of the total solids concentration, produces up to a 50% decline in the rate of filtrate production. The cake that develops during filtration is the primary resistance to flow of filtrate. In addition, experimental data indicate the filter cake is enriched in the insoluble solids relative to the bulk of the solution. The presence of these insoluble solids in the filter cake influences not only the overall filtrate flow rate, but also the mechanisms by which the filter cake is formed

  11. Electron microscopic studies of natural gas oxidation catalyst – Effects of thermally accelerated aging on catalyst microstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honkanen, Mari; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Jiang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Structural changes of PtPd nanoparticles in a natural gas oxidation catalyst were studied at elevated temperatures in air and low-oxygen conditions and in situ using environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). The fresh catalyst shows

  12. Studies of Deactivation of Methanol to Formaldehyde Selective Oxidation Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Kristian Viegaard; Schumann, Max; Høj, Martin

    This work presents a study of the deactivation behavior of Fe-Mo oxide catalyst during selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde in a period of 5 days. The structural changes in the catalyst have been investigated in situ for the initial 10 h by Raman spectroscopy, and the structure after 5...

  13. 57Fe Moessbauer Studies in Mo-Fe Supported Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelao-Dias, M.; Costa, B. F. O.; Quinta-Ferreira, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Industrially, the Mo-Fe catalysts used in the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde can rapidly deactivate. The use of support materials may reduce the high temperatures in the catalytic bed and/or increase thermal and mechanical resistance. However, during the preparation of these catalysts, or even during reaction conditions, the active species may react with the support material losing their catalytic activity. In this work silica, silicium carbide and titania were studied as supported catalysts by Moessbauer spectroscopy which proved to be a useful technique in the choice of supported materials

  14. Activation of heterogenised rhodium carbonylation catalyst infrared spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scurrell, M S

    1977-01-01

    In a study related to heterogeneous versions of homogeneous catalysts active in carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid, the catalyst consisted of 1Vertical Bar3< rhodium as rhodium trichloride supported on 13X zeolite and evacuated at 437/sup 0/K. Contacting the catalyst with carbon monoxide caused two bands, at 2025 and 2095 cm/sup -1/, to appear. Contact with a mixture of carbon monoxide and methyl iodide (the usual promoter) caused bands at 2085, 1710, 1440, and 1370 cm/sup -1/ to appear; the first two correspond to the bands at 2062 and 1711 cm/sup -1/ in homogeneous catalysts attributed to the formation of Rh(CH/sup 3/CO)(CO)X/sup 2/I/sup -/. Spectra.

  15. Study of the catalytic activity of supported technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Mikhailenko, I.E.; Pokorovskaya, O.V.

    1985-01-01

    The radioactive d metal 43 Tc 99 has catalytic properties in the synthesis of ammonia. For the purpose of reducing the quantity of the radioactive metal and of increasing the specific surface, the active component was applied to BaTiO 3 and gamma-Al 2 O 3 supports. This paper uses charcoal as a support and a table presents the catalytic activity of the samples during the synthesis of ammonia. X-ray diffractometric investigation of the catalysts was carried out with the use of Cu K /SUB alpha/ radiation. It is shown that the catalysts. The values of the specific rate constants of technetium in the catalysts. The values of the specific rate constants remain practically constant for all the catalyst samples studied, attesting to the absence of a specific metal-support interaction during the synthesis of ammonia

  16. Tetraphenylborate as a non - coordinating anion in hexamethyphosphoramine (HMPA) and tetramethylurea (TMU) lanthanide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuya, M.K.; Serra, O.A.

    1979-01-01

    The synthesis of the HMPA and TMU complexes of rare earth ions using tetraphenylborate, a non-coordinating anion, as a precipitating agent is reported. The compounds obtained conform to the general formula LnL 6 (B PHI 4 ) 3 (Ln=Ce-Lu,Y, whe L=HMPA and Ln=nd, Sm,Eu,Er,Y when L=TMU). The characterization by conductance, infrared and visible measurements is consistent with the lack of donor capacity of tetraphenylborate ion, and with a coordination number six in a nearly octahedral site symmetry for both type of compounds. The TMU complexes seem to be more stable than the corresponding HMPA ones, indicating that the steric factor can be more important than the donor capacity of the ligands in this type of lanthanide compounds. (author) [pt

  17. Study of the synthesis of ammonia over technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spetsyn, V.I.; Mikhailenko, I.E.; Pokrovskaya, O.V.

    1982-01-01

    The catalytic properties of technetium in the synthesis of ammonia have been studied in the present work. Technetium catalysts according to specific yield surpass all know catalysts for the synthesis of ammonia. The enhanced catalytic activity of technetium compared to manganese and rhenium is apparently explained by the presence of the radioactivity of 99 Tc. The processes of adsorption, orientation of the adsorbed molecules, and their binding energies can differ during radiation action. Irradiation of the carrier, occurring through #betta#-emission of 99 Tc, with doses of 4-8 x 10 3 rad/day, increased the number of defects in the crystal structure where stabilization of technetium atoms was possible. The existence of charged centers can cause an increase in the dissociative chemisorption of nitrogen, which is the limiting stage of the process. Technetium catalysts possess a stable catalytic activity and do not require its restoration for several months. Results suggest that the use of technetium as a catalyst for the synthesis of ammonia has real advantages and potential possibilities

  18. Characterization of catalysts by Moessbauer spectroscopy: An application to the study of Fischer-Tropsch, hydrotreating and super Claus catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraan, A.M. van der; Boellaard, E.; Craje, M.W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is an excellent in-situ technique for the identification of phases present in catalysts. Applied to metallic iron catalysts used in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction it reveals a detailed picture of the carburization process and provides insight into the relation between the properties of the catalytic material and its activity. The influence of a support and the effect of alloying iron with an (in)active metal on the catalytic performance is discussed for Fe, Cu-Fe and Ni-Fe systems. In addition, Moessbauer spectroscopy is used for the identification of 'Co-sulfide' species present in sulfided Co and CoMo catalysts applied in one of the largest chemical processes in the world, the hydrotreatment of crude oil. A structural model is proposed. Finally, the contribution of Moessbauer spectroscopic studies to the development of a new catalyst for cleaning of Claus tail gas via selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Study of the butyl acetate synthesis - 1. Catalyst selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Orjuela Londoño

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a laboratory scale selection study over eight catalytic agents was made, in the acetic acid and butyl alcohol esterification reaction (seven lon exchange resins and a zeolytic solid. Considering some physicochemical characteristics as the activation pre-treating requirements, acidity, thermal stability, reaction performance, etc., it was found that macroporous ion exchange resins are the most efficient catalysts, especially Lewatit K-2431 resin.

  20. HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation

    OpenAIRE

    Achmad Roesyadi; Danawati Hariprajitno; Nurjannah Nurjannah; Santi Dyah Savitri

    2013-01-01

    It is important to develop a renewable source of energy to overcome a limited source fossil energy. Palm oil is a potential alternative and environmental friendly energy resource in Indonesia due to high production capacity of this vegetable oil. The research studied effect of catalyst to selectivity of biofuel product from cracking of palm oil. The catalyst consisted of HZSM-5 catalyst with or without impregnation. The research was conducted in two steps, namely catalyst synthesized and cata...

  1. Dosage of cesium 137 in radioactive wastes by the application of sodium tetraphenylborate; Dosage du cesium 137 dans les effluents radioactifs par le tetraphenylborate de sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testemale, G; Girault, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    A simple technique of the dosage of {sup 137}Cs has been developed. The technique consists in the formation of cesium tetraphenyl borate, followed by a double extraction with isoamyl acetate, and washing of the organic phase. The counting of known parts of the cesium solution assaying of its purity by {gamma} spectrometry enable the determination of the {sup 137}Cs. The yield is about 98 per cent. (authors) [French] Une technique simple du dosage du {sup 137}Cs a ete mise au point. Elle consiste en une double extraction du tetraphenylborate de cesium forme par l'acetate d'isoamyle suivie d'un lavage de la phase organique. Des comptages sur des parties aliquotes de la solution de cesium et un controle de purete par spectrometrie {gamma} permettent la determination de cet element. Rendement: environ 98 pour cent. (auteurs)

  2. Structural studies of supported tin catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Noel; Viveros, Tomás

    1999-11-01

    Tin oxide was supported on aluminium oxide, titanium oxide, magnesium oxide and silicon oxide, and the resulting interactions between the components in the prepared samples and after reduction were characterized by Mössbauer spectroscopy. It was observed that in the oxide state, tin is present as SnO2 on alumina, magnesia and silica, but on titania tin occupies Ti sites in the structure. After hydrogen treatment at high temperatures, tin is reduced from Sn(4) to Sn(2) on alumina and titania; it is reduced from Sn(4) to Sn(0) on silica, and is practically not reduced on magnesia. These results reveal the degree of interaction between tin and the different supports studied.

  3. Structural studies of supported tin catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava, Noel; Viveros, Tomas

    1999-01-01

    Tin oxide was supported on aluminium oxide, titanium oxide, magnesium oxide and silicon oxide, and the resulting interactions between the components in the prepared samples and after reduction were characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy. It was observed that in the oxide state, tin is present as SnO 2 on alumina, magnesia and silica, but on titania tin occupies Ti sites in the structure. After hydrogen treatment at high temperatures, tin is reduced from Sn(4) to Sn(2) on alumina and titania; it is reduced from Sn(4) to Sn(0) on silica, and is practically not reduced on magnesia. These results reveal the degree of interaction between tin and the different supports studied

  4. Studies of Immobilized Homogeneous Metal Catalysts on Silica Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanger, Keith James [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The tethered, chiral, chelating diphosphine rhodium complex, which catalyzes the enantioselective hydrogenation of methyl-α-acetamidocinnamate (MAC), has the illustrated structure as established by 31P NMR and IR studies. Spectral and catalytic investigations also suggest that the mechanism of action of the tethered complex is the same as that of the untethered complex in solution. The rhodium complexes, [Rh(COD)H]4, [Rh(COD)2]+BF4-, [Rh(COD)Cl]2, and RhCl3• 3H2O, adsorbed on SiO2 are optimally activated for toluene hydrogenation by pretreatment with H2 at 200 C. The same complexes on Pd-SiO2 are equally active without pretreatments. The active species in all cases is rhodium metal. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, TEM, DRIFTS, and mercury poisoning experiments. Rhodium on silica catalyzes the hydrogenation of fluorobenzene to produce predominantly fluorocyclohexane in heptane and 1,2-dichloroethane solvents. In heptane/methanol and heptane/water solvents, hydrodefluorination to benzene and subsequent hydrogenation to cyclohexane occurs exclusively. Benzene inhibits the hydrodefluorination of fluorobenzene. In DCE or heptane solvents, fluorocyclohexane reacts with hydrogen fluoride to form cyclohexene. Reaction conditions can be chosen to selectively yield fluorocyclohexane, cyclohexene, benzene, or cyclohexane. The oxorhenium(V) dithiolate catalyst [-S(CH2)3s-]Re(O)(Me)(PPh3) was modified by linking it to a tether that could be attached to a silica support. Spectroscopic investigation and catalytic oxidation reactivity showed the heterogenized catalyst's structure and reactivity to be similar to its homogeneous analog. However, the immobilized catalyst offered additional advantages of recyclability, extended stability, and increased resistance to deactivation.

  5. Determination of radiocesium in environmental water samples using copper ferro(II)cyanide and sodium tetraphenylborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, L.; Kuleff, I.; Djingova, R.

    2006-01-01

    A procedure for the radiochemical separation and radiochemical purification of radiocesium ( 134 Cs and 137 Cs) in bulk environmental water samples is proposed. Radiocesium was removed from the water by cation-exchange with copper ferro(II)cyanide and was purified by precipitation with sodium tetraphenylborate. The influence of the concentration of potassium in the water sample on the chemical yield was investigated. The validation of the proposed method was carried out by analyzing reference materials. The application of the method was demonstrated with the determination of the concentration of radiocesium in water samples from rivers around NPP 'Kozloduy', Bulgaria, Danube and Ogosta. (author)

  6. Phenol Removal by a Novel Non-Photo-Dependent Semiconductor Catalyst in a Pilot-Scaled Study: Effects of Initial Phenol Concentration, Light, and Catalyst Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel non-photo-dependent semiconductor catalyst (CT was employed to degrade phenol in the present pilot-scaled study. Effect of operational parameters such as phenol initial concentration, light area, and catalyst loading on phenol degradation, was compared between CT catalyst and the conventional photocatalyst titanium dioxide. CT catalyst excelled titanium dioxide in treating and mineralizing low-level phenol, under both mild UV radiation and thunder conditions of nonphoton. The result suggested that CT catalyst could be applied in circumstances when light is not easily accessible in pollutant-carrying media (e.g., particles, cloudy water, and colored water.

  7. CO methanation over supported bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts: From computational studies towards catalyst optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustov, Arkadii; Frey, Anne Mette; Larsen, Kasper Emil

    2007-01-01

    with compositions 25Fe75Ni and 50Fe50Ni showed significantly better activity and in some cases also a higher selectivity to methane compared with the traditional monometallic Ni and Fe catalysts. A catalyst with composition 25Fe75Ni was found to be the most active in CO hydrogenation for the MgAl2O4 support at low...... metal loadings. At high metal concentrations, the maximum for the methanation activity was found for catalysts with composition 50Ni50Fe both on the MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 supports. This difference can be attributed to a higher reducibility of the constituting metals with increasing metal concentration......DFT calculations combined with a computational screening method have previously shown that bimetallic Ni-Fe alloys should be more active than the traditional Ni-based catalyst for CO methanation. That was confirmed experimentally for a number of bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts supported on MgAl2O4. Here...

  8. Catalyst study for the plasma exhaust purification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, J.; Sannier, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several catalysts available from commercial sources have been screened to find out specific catalysts which allow complete methane oxidation and ammonia decomposition at temperature as low as possible in order to minimize tritium loss by permeation through processing equipment walls. Afterwards, an extended kinetic investigation has been performed on the best catalysts to achieve the data necessary to unit calculations. For methane oxidation, a palladium on alumina catalyst shows a very satisfactory low-temperature efficiency while a non-precious metal catalyst made of nickel oxide and alumina was found to be the more efficient for ammonia decomposition

  9. Processing of tetraphenylborate precipitates in the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibling, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Savannah River Site has generated 77 million gallons of high level radioactive waste since the early 1950's. By 1987, evaporation had reduced the concentration of the waste inventory to 35 million gallons. Currently, the wastes reside in large underground tanks as a soluble fraction stored, crystallized salts, and an insoluble fraction, sludge, which consists of hydrated transition metal oxides. The bulk of the radionuclides, 67 percent, are in the sludge while the crystallized salts and supernate are composed of the nitrates, nitrites, sulfates and hydroxides of sodium, potassium, and cesium. The principal radionuclide in the soluble waste is 137 Cs with traces of 90 Sr. The transformation of the high level wastes into a borosilicate glass suitable for permanent disposal is the goal of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). To minimize the volume of glass produced, the soluble fraction of the waste is treated with sodium tetraphenylborate and sodium titanate in the waste tanks to precipitate the radioactive cesium ion and absorb the radioactive strontium ion. The precipitate is washed in the waste tanks and is then pumped to the DWPF. The precipitate, as received, is incompatible with the vitrification process because of the high aromatic carbon content and requires further chemical treatment. Within the DWPF, the precipitate is processed in the Salt Processing Cell to remove the aromatic carbon as benzene. The precipitate hydrolysis process hydrolyzes the tetraphenylborate anion to produce borate anion and benzene. The benzene is removed by distillation, decontaminated and transferred out of the DWPF for disposal

  10. Basic study of catalyst aging in the H-coal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cable, T.L.; Massoth, F.E.; Thomas, M.G.

    1985-04-01

    Samples of CoMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts used in an H-coal process demonstration run were studied to determine causes of catalyst deactivation. Physical and surface properties of the aged and regenerated catalysts were examined. Model compounds were used to assess four catalyst activity functions, viz., hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrogenation, cracking and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). Other tests were performed to study the effects of coke and metals separately on the four catalyst activity functions. Catalyst coke content and metal deposits first increased rapidly, then more gradually with exposure time in the process run. Surface area and pore volume markedly decreased with exposure time. Catalyst activities of aged catalysts showed a rapid decline with exposure time. One-day exposure to coal resulted in significant losses in HDS and hydrogenation activities and nearly complete loss in cracking and HDO activities. Although metal deposits caused some permanent catalyst deactivation, coke had a much greater effect. Regenerated catalysts showed less recovery of catalytic activity as processing time increased. These results agreed well with product inspections from the process run. Oxygen chemisorption on aged-regenerated catalysts decreased with catalyst exposure time, indicating a significant loss of active sites. However, ESCA results showed no evidence of extensive sintering of the active MoS/sub 2/ phase. Permanent deactivation of the longer-time exposed catalysts can be ascribed, at least partly, to lateral growth of the active molybdenum sulfide phase. In addition, some loss in cobalt promotion occurred early in the process, which may account for the rapid loss in HDS and HDO activity in regenerated catalysts. 24 references.

  11. Model studies of methanol synthesis on copper catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, J.; Nakamura, I.; Uchijima, T. [Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Research Inst. of Innovative Technology for Earth, Kyoto (Japan); Fujitani, T. [National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    The synthesis of methanol by the hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} over Zn-deposited and Zn-free copper surfaces has been studied using an XPS apparatus combined with a high-pressure flow reactor (18 atm). It was shown that the Zn deposited on Cu(111) and poly-Cu acted as a promoter for methanol synthesis, while the Zn on Cu(110) and Cu(100) had no such a promotional effect. The turnover frequency (TOF) for Zn/Cu(111) linearly increased with Zn coverage below {Theta}Zn--0.19, and then decreased above {Theta}Zn=0.20. The optimum TOF obtained at {Theta}Zn--0-19 was thirteen-fold larger than TOF for the Zn-free Cu(111) surface. On the other hand, no promotional effect of Zn was observed for the reverse water-gas shift reaction on all the surfaces. The results indicate the formation of special sites for methanol synthesis on Zn/Cu(111). The Zn-deposited Cu(111) can be regarded as a model of Cu/ZnO catalysts because the TOF and the activation energy for methanol formation over the Zn-deposited Cu(111) were in fairly good agreement with those for the Cu/ZnO powder catalysts. The post-reaction surface analysis by XPS showed the formation of formate species (HCOOa). The formate coverage was proportional to the activity for methanol formation below {Theta}Zn=0.20, suggesting that the hydrogenation of the formate species is the rate-determining step of methanol formation. The formate species was stabilized by Zn species on Cu(111) in the absence of ZnO species. STM results on the Zn-deposited Cu(111) suggested the formation of a Cu-Zn surface alloy. The presence of special sites for methanol synthesis was also indicated in the results of powder catalysts.

  12. A surface science study of model catalysts : II metal-support interactions in Cu/SiO2 model catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oetelaar, van den L.C.A.; Partridge, A.; Toussaint, S.L.G.; Flipse, C.F.J.; Brongersma, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal stability of wet-chemically prepared Cu/SiO2 model catalysts containing nanometer-sized Cu particles on silica model supports was studied upon heating in hydrogen and ultrahigh vacuum. The surface and interface phenomena that occur are determined by the metal-support interactions.

  13. Catalyst Schools' Implementation of the Learning School Approach. Catalyst Schools Research Study Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Patricia Cahape

    2016-01-01

    "Catalyst schools" were 28 elementary and secondary schools selected to participate in a pilot project begun in July 2014, which explored how best to support teacher professional learning through decentralization of decision making and implementation of the Learning School approach. The pilot project was the first phase in a statewide…

  14. Study of Catalyst Variation Effect in Glycerol Conversion Process to Hydrogen Gas by Steam Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widayat; Hartono, R.; Elizabeth, E.; Annisa, A. N.

    2018-04-01

    Along with the economic development, needs of energy being increase too. Hydrogen as alternative energy has many usages. Besides that, hydrogen is one source of energy that is a clean fuel, but process production of hydrogen from natural gas as a raw material has been used for a long time. Therefore, there is need new invention to produce hydrogen from the others raw material. Glycerol, a byproduct of biodiesel production, is a compound which can be used as a raw material for hydrogen production. By using glycerol as a raw material of hydrogen production, we can get added value of glycerol as well as an energy source solution. The process production of hydrogen by steam reforming is a thermochemical process with efficiency 70%. This process needs contribution of catalyst to improve its efficiency and selectivity of the process. In this study will be examined the effect variation of catalyst for glycerol conversion process to hydrogen by steam reforming. The method for catalyst preparation was variation of catalyst impregnation composition, catalyst calcined with difference concentration of hydrochloric acid and calcined with difference hydrochloric acid ratio. After that, all of catalyst which have been prepared, used for steam reforming process for hydrogen production from glycerol as a raw material. From the study, the highest yield of hydrogen gas showed in the process production by natural zeolite catalyst with 1:15 Hydrochloric acid ratio was 42.28%. Hydrogen yield for 2M calcined natural zeolite catalyst was 38.37%, for ZSM-5 catalyst was 15.83%, for 0.5M calcined natural zeolite was 13.09% and for ultrasonic natural zeolite was 11.43%. The lowest yield of hydrogen gas showed in catalyst 2Zn/ZSM-5 with 11.22%. This result showed that hydrogen yield product was affected by catalyst variation because of the catalyst has difference characteristic and difference catalytic activity after the catalyst preparation process.

  15. Non-conventional plasma assisted catalysts for diesel exhaust treatment. A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajanikanth, B.S.; Srinivas Kumar, P.K.; Ravi, V.

    2002-01-01

    The author reports the application of pulse discharges along with catalysts in treating the exhaust gas at higher temperatures. In the present work, a plasma reactor, filled with catalysts, called as plasma catalytic reactor, is studied for removal of oxides of nitrogen, total hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The experiments are conducted on an actual diesel engine exhaust at no-load and at different temperatures starting from room temperature to 300 degree C. The removal efficiencies of these pollutants are studied. The experiments are carried out with both conventional and non-conventional catalysts. The idea is to explore the pollutant removal efficiency characteristics by non-conventional catalysts. The efficiency results are compared with that of conventional catalysts. The experiments are carried out at a constant pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. Both pellet and honeycomb type catalysts are used in the study

  16. Study of Pd-Au/MWCNTs formic acid electrooxidation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikolajczuk, Anna; Borodzinski, Andrzej; Kedzierzawski, Piotr; Lesiak, Beata [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Stobinski, Leszek [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Koever, Laszlo; Toth, Jozsef [Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P. O. Box 51, 4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Lin, Hong-Ming [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, 40, Chungshan N. Rd., 3rd Sec, 104, Taipei (China)

    2010-12-15

    The Pd-Au multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) supported catalyst exhibits higher power density in direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) than similar Pd/MWCNTs catalyst. The Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalyst also exhibits higher activity and is more stable in electrooxidation reaction of formic acid during cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements. After preparation by polyol method, the catalyst was subjected to two type of treatments: (I) annealing at 250 C in 100% of Ar, (II) reducing in 5% of H{sub 2} in Ar atmosphere at 200 C. It was observed that the catalyst after treatment I was completely inactive, whereas after treatment II exhibited high activity. In order to explain this effect the catalysts were characterized by electron spectroscopy methods. The higher initial catalytic activity of Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalyst than Pd/MWCNTs catalyst in reaction of formic acid electrooxidation was attributed to electronic effect of gold in Pd-Au solution, and larger content of small Au nanoparticles of 1 nm size. The catalytic inactivity of Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalysts annealed in argon is attributed to carbon amorphous overlayer covering of Pd oxide shell on the metallic nanoparticles. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Catalytic Study on TiO2 Photo catalyst Synthesised Via Microemulsion Method on Atrazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruslimie, C.A.; Hasmizam Razali; Khairul, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium dioxide photo catalyst was synthesised by microemulsions method under controlled hydrolysis of titanium butoxide, Ti(O(CH 2 ) 3 )CH 3 . The synthesised TiO 2 photo catalyst was compared with Sigma-commercial TiO 2 by carrying out the investigation on its properties using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The photo catalytic activities for both photo catalysts were studied for atrazine photodegradation. (author)

  18. The asymmetric Schrock olefin metathesis catalysts. A computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goumans, T.P.M.; Ehlers, A.W.; Lammertsma, K.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of the transition metal catalyzed olefin metathesis reaction with the Schrock catalyst is investigated with pure (BP86) and hybrid (B3LYP) density functional theory. On the free-energy surface there is no adduct between ethylene and model catalyst (MeO)

  19. Study on Endurance and Performance of Impregnated Ruthenium Catalyst for Thruster System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jincheol; Kim, Taegyu

    2018-02-01

    Performance and endurance of the Ru catalyst were studied for nitrous oxide monopropellant thruster system. The thermal decomposition of N2O requires a considerably high temperature, which make it difficult to be utilized as a thruster propellant, while the propellant decomposition temperature can be reduced by using the catalyst through the decomposition reaction with the propellant. However, the catalyst used for the thruster was frequently exposed to high temperature and high-pressure environment. Therefore, the state change of the catalyst according to the thruster operation was analyzed. Characterization of catalyst used in the operation condition of the thruster was performed using FE-SEM and EDS. As a result, performance degradation was occurred due to the volatilization of Ru catalyst and reduction of the specific surface area according to the phase change of Al2O3.

  20. Studies on PEM fuel cell noble metal catalyst dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. M.; Grahl-Madsen, L.; Skou, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical, spectroscopic and gravimetric methods was carried out on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell electrodes with the focus on platinum and ruthenium catalysts dissolution, and the membrane degradation. In cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments, the noble metals were...... found to dissolve in 1 M sulfuric acid solution and the dissolution increased exponentially with the upper potential limit (UPL) between 0.6 and 1.6 vs. RHE. 2-20% of the Pt (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved during the experiments. Under the same conditions, 30-100% of the Ru...... (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved. The faster dissolution of ruthenium compared to platinum in the alloy type catalysts was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The dissolution of the carbon supported catalyst was found one order of magnitude higher than the unsupported...

  1. Study of PtNi/C catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, L.P.R. de; Silva, E.L. da; Amico, S.C.; Malfatti, C.F.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, PtNi binary catalyst and pure platin catalyst were synthesized by the impregnation-reduction method, using Vulcan XC72R as support, for direct ethanol fuel cells. The composition and structure of the catalysts were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, the electrochemical behavior was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and morphology of the catalysts was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the addition of Ni to Pt led to the contraction of the crystal lattice, increased the catalytic activity compared to pure Pt and initiated the electrooxidation of ethanol at lower potential. (author)

  2. Studies on mixed metal oxides solid solutions as heterogeneous catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. R. Arandiyan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a series of perovskite-type mixed oxide LaMo xV1-xO3+δ powder catalysts (x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and 1.0, with 0.5 < δ < 1.5, prepared by the sol-gel process and calcined at 750ºC, provide an attractive and effective alternative means of synthesizing materials with better control of morphology. Structures of resins obtained during the gel formation process by FT-IR spectroscopy and XRD analysis showed that all the LaMo xV1-xO3+δ samples are single phase perovskite-type solid solutions. The surface area (BET between 2.5 - 5.0 m²/g (x = 0.1 and 1.0 respectively increases with increasing Mo ratio in the samples. They show high purity, good chemical homogeneity, and lower calcinations temperatures as compared with the solid-state chemistry route. SEM coupled to EDS and thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analyses (TGA/DTA have been carried out in order to evaluate the homogeneity of the catalyst. Finally, the experimental studies show that the calcination temperature and Mo content exhibited a significant influence on catalytic activity. Among the LaMo xV1-xO3+δ samples, LaMo0.7V0.3O4.2 showed the best catalytic activity for the topic reaction and the best activity and stability for ethane reforming at 850ºC under 8 bar.

  3. Study of the effect of ionizing radiation for utilization of spent cracking catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Fernando Mantovani

    2014-01-01

    Catalyst is a substance that changes the rate of a reaction. In the petroleum industry the commonly catalysts are used for Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) and Hydrocatalytic Cracking (HCC), which one applied in a specific stage. These catalysts are used to facilitate the molecular chains cracking which will generate a mixture of hydrocarbons. However, the catalyst gradually loses its activity, either by changing its original molecular structure or by its contamination from other petroleum molecules. The application of ionizing radiation (electron beam and gamma rays) over these spent catalysts was studied to contribute with the extraction of metals or rare-earths of high added-value. Tests carried out with FCC catalysts were used the techniques of 60 Co irradiation and electron beam (EB) and had as a subject the extraction of lanthanum (La 2 O 3 ), regeneration and utilization of these catalysts. However, the use of ionizing radiation has not contributed in these processes. Meanwhile with HCC catalysts the irradiation used was electron beam and had as a subject the extraction of molybdenum (MoO 3 ). In temperature around 750°C, these irradiated catalysts of the lower region have an extraction yield twice higher compared to non-irradiated ones, in other words 57.65% and 26.24% respectively. (author)

  4. Analysis of coke precursor on catalyst and study on regeneration of catalyst in upgrading of bio-oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiaoya; Zheng, Yong; Zhang, Baohua; Chen, Jinyang

    2009-01-01

    Catalyst HZSM-5 was used in bio-oil catalytic cracking upgrading. The precursor of coke on the catalyst was analyzed by means of TGA, FTIR and C13 NMR. Precursors of coke deposited in the pore of the molecular sieve were mainly aromatic hydrocarbon with the boiling point range from 350 o C to 650 o C. Those on the outer surface of the pellet precursor were identified as saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons with the boiling point below 200 o C. The activity of HZSM-5 was studied after regeneration. In terms of yield of organic distillate and formation rate of coke, results showed that catalytic activity change moderately during the first three times of regeneration.

  5. Supporting Statewide Implementation of the Learning School Initiative. Catalyst Schools Research Study Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Patricia Cahape

    2016-01-01

    This is the first in a series of reports based on a research study, Developing Effective Professional Learning Communities in Catalyst Schools, conducted between February 2015 and June 2016. "Catalyst schools" were elementary- and secondary-level schools selected to participate in a pilot project intended to explore how best to support…

  6. In situ, Cr K-edge XAS study on the Phillips catalyst : activation and ethylene polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groppo, E.; Prestipino, C.; Cesano, F.; Bonino, F.; Bordiga, S.; Lamberti, C.; Thuene, P.C.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Zecchina, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this in situ EXAFS and XANES study on the Phillips ethylene-polymerization Cr/SiO2 catalyst, two polymerization routes are investigated and compared. The first mimics that adopted in industrial plants, where ethylene is dosed directly on the oxidized catalyst, while in the second the oxidized

  7. ETEM Studies of Electrodes and Electro-catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jooss, Christian; Mildner, Stephanie; Beleggia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Environmental TEM is an excellent tool for gaining insight into the atomic and electronic structure of electro-catalysts under operating conditions. Several electrochemical reactions such as oxidation/reduction processes of electrodes, heterogeneous gas phase catalysis of water splitting...

  8. Studies on PEM Fuel Cell Noble Metal Catalyst Dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Shuang; Skou, Eivind Morten

    Incredibly vast advance has been achieved in fuel cell technology regarding to catalyst efficiency, improvement of electrolyte conductivity and optimization of cell system. With breathtakingly accelerating progress, Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) is the most promising and most widely...

  9. Studies of Deactivation of Methanol to Formaldehyde Selective Oxidation Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Kristian Viegaard; Schumann, Max; Høj, Martin

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) may be synthesized industrially by selective oxidation of methanol over an iron-molybdate (Fe-Mo) oxide catalyst according to: CH3OH + ½O2 →CH2O + H2O. The reaction is normally carried out in a multitubular reactor with excess of air at 250-400 °C (yield = 90-95 %), known...... the activity of the catalyst [2]. Pure MoO3 in itself has low activity. Literature from the last decades agrees that the major reason for the deactivation is loss of molybdenum from the catalyst. Molybdenum forms volatile species with methanol, which can leave behind Mo poor zones. The catalyst is usually...

  10. Report of liquefaction catalyst study meeting (March 1996); Ekika shokubai kentokai hokoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Studied in the research are four iron-based catalysts, which are natural pyrite, synthetic iron sulfide, synthetic iron hydroxide, and catalyst-attached carbon. Tanito Harum coal is treated in a 0.01t/d-capable continuous operation furnace (once-through) under conditions of 450 degrees C and 170kgf/cm{sup 2} with catalyst addition of 1.0, 3.0wt% (catalyst-attached carbon 0.6, 1.0wt%), and a liquid yield of 41.5-48.6wt%-daf coal is achieved. A higher yield results when more catalyst is added. The same yield as achieved by the addition of 3wt% natural pyrite is obtained by the addition of 1.9wt% synthetic iron sulfide, 1.5wt% of synthetic iron hydroxide, or 0.7wt% catalyst-attached coal. The catalyst cost for treating a ton of coal is 4-9 hundred yen, which is far more expensive than the cost set forth as the target. Catalysts whose production process embodiment is now under study are natural pyrite and synthetic iron sulfide, and studies for others are just preliminary. Provided that the practical application of the liquefaction technology realizes in about 2000, then the petroleum price is predicted to be 23 dollars per barrel. Coal liquefaction products will have to be produced at a cost which will enable competition with the said petroleum price. (NEDO)

  11. Communicating catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2018-06-01

    The beauty and activity of enzymes inspire chemists to tailor new and better non-biological catalysts. Now, a study reveals that the active sites within heterogeneous catalysts actively cooperate in a fashion phenomenologically similar to, but mechanistically distinct, from enzymes.

  12. Study on the mechanism of a manganese-based catalyst for catalytic NOX flue gas denitration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wen, Xin; Lei, Zhang; Gao, Long; Sha, Xiangling; Ma, Zhenhua; He, Huibin; Wang, Yusu; Jia, Yang; Li, Yonghui

    2018-04-01

    Manganese-based bimetallic catalysts were prepared with self-made pyrolysis coke as carrier and its denitration performance of low-temperature SCR (selective catalyst reduction) was studied. The effects of different metal species, calcination temperature, calcination time and the metal load quantity on the denitration performance of the catalyst were studied by orthogonal test. The denitration mechanism of the catalyst was analyzed by XRD (X-ray diffraction), SEM (scanning electron microscope), BET test and transient test. The experiments show that: * The denitration efficiency of Mn-based bimetallic catalysts mainly relates to the metal type, the metal load quantity and the catalyst adjuvant type. * The optimal catalyst preparation conditions are as follows: the load quantity of monometallic MnO2 is 10%, calcined at 300°C for 4h, and then loaded with 8% CeO2, calcined at 350°Cfor 3h. * The denitration mechanism of manganese-based bimetallic oxide catalysts is stated as: NH3 is firstly adsorbed by B acid center Mn-OH which nears Mn4+==O to form NH4+, NH4+ was then attacked by the gas phase NO to form N2, H2O and Mn3+-OH. Finally, Mn3+-OH was oxidized by O2 to regenerate Mn4+.

  13. Study on the mechanism of a manganese-based catalyst for catalytic NOX flue gas denitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Manganese-based bimetallic catalysts were prepared with self-made pyrolysis coke as carrier and its denitration performance of low-temperature SCR (selective catalyst reduction was studied. The effects of different metal species, calcination temperature, calcination time and the metal load quantity on the denitration performance of the catalyst were studied by orthogonal test. The denitration mechanism of the catalyst was analyzed by XRD (X-ray diffraction, SEM (scanning electron microscope, BET test and transient test. The experiments show that: ① The denitration efficiency of Mn-based bimetallic catalysts mainly relates to the metal type, the metal load quantity and the catalyst adjuvant type. ② The optimal catalyst preparation conditions are as follows: the load quantity of monometallic MnO2 is 10%, calcined at 300°C for 4h, and then loaded with 8% CeO2, calcined at 350°Cfor 3h. ③ The denitration mechanism of manganese-based bimetallic oxide catalysts is stated as: NH3 is firstly adsorbed by B acid center Mn-OH which nears Mn4+==O to form NH4+, NH4+ was then attacked by the gas phase NO to form N2, H2O and Mn3+-OH. Finally, Mn3+-OH was oxidized by O2 to regenerate Mn4+.

  14. Direct dimethyl-ether (DME) synthesis by spatial patterned catalyst arrangement. A modeling and simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, K.; Turek, T.; Guettel, R. [Clausthal Univ. of Technology (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Process Engineering

    2011-07-01

    The effect of spatially patterned catalyst beds was investigated for direct DME synthesis from synthesis gas as an example. A layered arrangement of methanol synthesis and dehydration catalyst was chosen and studied by numerical simulation under typical operating conditions for single-step DME synthesis. It was revealed that catalyst layers significantly influence the DME productivity. With an increasing number of layers from 2 to 40, an increase in DME productivity was observed approaching the performance of a physical catalyst mixture for an infinite number of layers. The results prove that a physical mixture of methanol synthesis and dehydration catalyst achieves the highest DME productivity under operating conditions chosen in this study. This can be explained by the higher average methanol concentration for the layered catalyst arrangement and thus stronger equilibrium constraints for the methanol synthesis reaction. Essentially, the layered catalyst arrangement is comparable to a cascade model of the two-step process, which is less efficient in terms of DME yield than the single-step process. However, since a significant effect was found, the layered catalyst arrangement could be beneficial for other reaction systems. (orig.)

  15. On the nature of the outer-sphere coordination of bivalent f-elements with tetraphenylborate ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikheev, N.B.; Kulyukhin, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    On the basis of the data on complex formation of Eu 2+ , Yb 2+ and Es 2+ with tetraphenylborate ion (BPh 4 - ) in different media a conclusion is made that formation of outerspheric complexes between bivalent f-elements and BPh 4 :-ions occurs due to electron channeling from cation in unsaturated π-bonds of BPh 4 - ion with formation of exchangeable single-electron chemical bond. 9 refs.,1 tab

  16. MAGNETO-CHEMICAL CHARACTER STUDIES OF NOVEL Fe CATALYSTS FOR COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty A. Akundi; Jian H. Zhang; A.N. Murty; S.V. Naidu

    2002-04-01

    The objectives of the present study are: (1) To synthesize iron catalysts: Fe/MoO{sub 3}, and Fe/Co/MoO{sub 3} employing two distinct techniques: Pyrolysis with organic precursors and Co-precipitation of metal nitrates; (2) To investigate the magnetic character of the catalysts before and after exposure to CO and CO+H{sub 2} by (a) Mossbauer study of Iron (b) Zerofield Nuclear Magnetic Resonance study of Cobalt, and (c) Magnetic character of the catalyst composite; (3) To study the IR active surface species of the catalyst while stimulating (CO--Metal, (CO+H{sub 2})--Metal) interactions, by FTIR Spectroscopy; and (4) To analyze the catalytic character (conversion efficiency and product distribution) in both direct and indirect liquefaction Process and (5) To examine the correlations between the magnetic and chemical characteristics. This report presents the results of our investigation on (a) the effect of metal loading (b) the effect of intermetallic ratio and (c) the effect of catalyst preparation procedure on (i) the magnetic character of the catalyst composite (ii) the IR active surface species of the catalyst and (iii) the catalytic yields for three different metal loadings: 5%, 15%, and 25% (nominal) for three distinct intermetallic ratios (Fe/Co = 0.3, 1.5, 3.0).

  17. Study of iron-zinc catalysts by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriola, S.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Moessbauer parameters were determined on a series of catalyst mixtures of iron and zinc oxides with variable quantities of zinc. A change in the crystal structure of the iron oxide when introducing zinc into the samples was observed. The corundum structure of the α-Fe 2 O 3 phase was transformed into the spinel type of zinc ferrite when zinc oxide was present in any quantity. A strong electronic interaction between the zinc ferrite and the zinc oxide present in excess was evident. The catalysts were analyzed using x-ray fluorescence and x-ray diffraction methods. (author) 10 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  18. Hydrophobic catalyst applications in the nuclear field and in environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionita, Gheorghe; Popescu, Irina; Stefanescu, Ioan; Varlam, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents methods of preparation and applications of hydrophobic platinum catalysts in nuclear field and environmental protection. These catalysts allow the transport of gaseous reactants and reaction products to and from catalytic active centers since the pore blocking by water is avoided. Hence the activity and stability of the catalysts increase and isotopic exchange columns with simpler internal structure can be achieved. The aim of the paper is: 1. to give a data base regarding the preparation methods of the optimal catalyst type; 2. to indicate the utilization and operation procedures of hydrophobic catalysts with mixed and simple packings; 3. to evaluate the performances and applications of hydrophobic catalysts. Over one hundred of hydrophobic catalysts of the active metal/support type were prepared in our laboratory. Hydrophobic features were obtained by different methods like these: - coating a hydrophilic conventional catalyst with a hydrophobic agent such as silicone or teflon; - supporting the active metal directly into the pores of a hydrophobic support; - mixing the teflon powder with a hydrophilic conventional catalyst; coating the support with teflon followed by the impregnation with the precursor of the active metal. The most important application of these catalysts is detritiation of the heavy water used as moderator and coolant in CANDU type reactors. Build-up of tritium in heavy water following the neutron capture by deuterium leads to a reduction in the moderating properties and at the same time leads to a contamination hazard for both operation personnel and environment. Tritium recovery leads this way to both improving the moderating qualities of the heavy water and obtaining valuable pure tritium of high importance in fusion research and other laboratory studies. One gram of tritium costs about USD 10,000. The physical chemical process is water-hydrogen catalyzed isotopic exchange. Also discussed in the paper is the separation of

  19. A nanostructural study of Raney-type nickel catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devred, F.

    2004-01-01

    Raney-type nickel catalysts have been applied in commercial hydrogenation reactions for decades. They are relatively cheap and have proven to be very efficient in hydrogenation. The preparation process is relatively simple, but it appears that many parameters have an influence on the performance of

  20. Moessbauer study on the formation process of Fe-K composition in iron-based catalyst for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Keyu; Zhao Zhenjie; Yang Xielong

    2001-01-01

    Fe-K spinel structure is the predecessor of active phase of potassium promoted iron-based catalyst for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene. Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to study the formation process of Fe-K spinel structure which depends on the catalyst composition and preparing condition. The results may prove useful for production of industrial catalyst

  1. 2-Dimethylamino-1-(2-ethoxy-2-oxoethyl-3-methyl-4,5-dihydroimidazolium tetraphenylborate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title salt, C10H20N3O2+·C24H20B−, the C—N bond lengths in the cation are 1.327 (3, 1.339 (3 and 1.342 (3 Å, indicating partial double-bond character. The central C atom is bonded to the three N atoms, indicating only a slight deviation from a trigonal–planar geometry. The positive charge is delocalized in the CN3 plane. The ethoxy group is disordered over two orientations, with an occupancy ratio of 0.60 (1:0.40 (1. C—H...π interactions are present between the guanidinium H atoms and the phenyl C atoms of the tetraphenylborate ions. The phenyl rings form aromatic pockets, in which the cations are embedded. This leads to the formation of a two-dimensional supramolecular pattern along the ac plane.

  2. An optimization study of PtSn/C catalysts applied to direct ethanol fuel cell: Effect of the preparation method on the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, T. S.; Palma, L. M.; Leonello, P. H.; Morais, C.; Kokoh, K. B.; De Andrade, A. R.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work was to perform a systematic study of the parameters that can influence the composition, morphology, and catalytic activity of PtSn/C nanoparticles and compare two different methods of nanocatalyst preparation, namely microwave-assisted heating (MW) and thermal decomposition of polymeric precursors (DPP). An investigation of the effects of the reducing and stabilizing agents on the catalytic activity and morphology of Pt75Sn25/C catalysts prepared by microwave-assisted heating was undertaken for optimization purposes. The effect of short-chain alcohols such as ethanol, ethylene glycol, and propylene glycol as reducing agents was evaluated, and the use of sodium acetate and citric acid as stabilizing agents for the MW procedure was examined. Catalysts obtained from propylene glycol displayed higher catalytic activity compared with catalysts prepared in ethylene glycol. Introduction of sodium acetate enhanced the catalytic activity, but this beneficial effect was observed until a critical acetate concentration was reached. Optimization of the MW synthesis allowed for the preparation of highly dispersed catalysts with average sizes lying between 2.0 and 5.0 nm. Comparison of the best catalyst prepared by MW with a catalyst of similar composition prepared by the polymeric precursors method showed that the catalytic activity of the material can be improved when a proper condition for catalyst preparation is achieved.

  3. A study on the polymer catalyst manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Heung Seok; Lee, Han Soo; Kang, Hee Seok; Paek, Seung Uh; Kim, Kwang Rak; Koo, Jee Hyu; Chung, Yong Won; Sung, Ki Ung; Na, Jeong Won; Hwang, Seong Tae; Kim, Yong Ik; Choi, Yoon Dong

    1994-01-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in Pressurized Heavy Water Power Plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply, Korea is scheduled to construct new four pressurized heavy water power plants till the year 2006. Total heavy water demand for these plants would be 1988 Mg during the period 1992-2006. Reformed hydrogen processes is considered best suited to Korea. Hydrophobic catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchance was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m 3 HD/m 3 Bed.sec. and heavy water separation processes using the catalysts were optimized. (Author)

  4. Study of propane partial oxidation on vanadium-containing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komashko, G.A.; Khalamejda, S.V.; Zazhigalov, V.A. [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. Fizicheskoj Khimii

    1998-12-31

    The present results indicate that maximum selectivity to acrylic acid can be reached over V-P-Zr-O catalysts. When the hydrocarbon concentration is 5.1 vol.% the selectivity is about 30% at quite high paraffin conversion. Conclusively, some explanations to the observed facts can be given. The V-P-O catalyst promotion with lanthanum by means of mechanochemical treatment is distinguished by the additive uniform spreading all over the matrix surface. Such twophase system is highly active in propane conversion (lanthanum oxide) and further oxidation of the desired products. The similar properties are attributed to V-P-Bi-La-O catalyst. Bismuth, tellurium and zirconium additives having clearly defined acidic properties provoke the surface acidity strengthening and make easier desorption of the acidic product (acrylic acid) from the surface lowering its further oxidation. Additionally, since bismuth and zirconium are able to form phosphates and, according to, to create space limitations for the paraffin molecule movement out of the active group boundaries, this can be one more support in favour of the selectivity increase. With this point of view very interesting results were obtained. It has been shown that the more limited the size of the vanadium unit, the higher the selectivity is. Monoclinic phase AV{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 10} which consists in clusters of four vanadium atoms is sensibly more reactive than the orthorhombic phase consists in V{sub {infinity}} infinite chains. (orig.)

  5. Chemisorption studies of Pt/SnO2 catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth G.; Ohorodnik, Susan K.; Vannorman, John D.; Schryer, Jacqueline; Upchurch, Billy T.; Schryer, David R.

    1990-01-01

    The low temperature CO oxidation catalysts that are being developed and tested at NASA-Langley are fairly unique in their ability to efficiently oxidize CO at low temperatures (approx. 303 K). The bulk of the reaction data that has been collected in the laboratory has been determined using plug flow reactors with a low mass of Pt/SnO2/SiO2 catalyst (approx. 0.1 g) and a modest flow rate (5 to 10 sc sm). The researchers have previously characterized the surface solely in terms of N2 BET surface areas. These surface areas have not been that indicative of reaction rate. Indeed, some of the formulations with high BET surface area have yielded lower reaction rates than those with lower BET surface areas. As a result researchers began a program of determining the chemisorption of the various species involved in the reaction; CO, O2 and CO2. Such a determination of will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism and overall kinetics of the reaction. The pulsed-reactor technique, initially described by Freel, is used to determine the amount of a particular molecule that is adsorbed on the catalyst. Since there is some reaction of CO with the surface to produce CO2, the pulsed reactor had to be coupled with a gas chromatograph in order to distinguish between the loss of CO that is due to adsorption by the surface and the loss that is due to reaction with the surface.

  6. Further studies on hydration of alkynes by the PtCl4-CO catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israelsohn, Osnat; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.; Blum, Jochanan

    2002-01-18

    Under CO atmosphere, between 80 and 120 C, a glyme solution of PtCl{sub 4} forms a carbonyl compound that promotes hydration of internal as well as terminal alkynes to give aldehyde-free ketones. The catalytic process depends strongly on the electronic and steric nature of the substrates. Part of the carbonyl functions of the catalyst can be replaced by phosphine ligands. Chiral DIOP reacts with the PtCl{sub 4}-CO compound to give a catalyst that promotes partial kinetic resolution of a racemic alkyne. Replacement of part of the CO by polystyrene-bound diphenylphosphine enables to attach the catalyst to the polymeric support. Upon entrapment of the platinum compound in a silica sol-gel matrix, it reacts as a partially recyclable catalyst. A reformulated mechanism for the PdCl{sub 4}-CO catalyzed hydration is suggested on the basis of the present study.

  7. HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Roesyadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is important to develop a renewable source of energy to overcome a limited source fossil energy. Palm oil is a potential alternative and environmental friendly energy resource in Indonesia due to high production capacity of this vegetable oil. The research studied effect of catalyst to selectivity of biofuel product from cracking of palm oil. The catalyst consisted of HZSM-5 catalyst with or without impregnation. The research was conducted in two steps, namely catalyst synthesized and catalytic cracking process. HZSM-5 was synthesized using Plank methods. The characterization of the synthesized catalysts used AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and BET (Brunaueur Emmet Teller. The cracking was carried out in a fixed bed microreactor with diameter of 1 cm and length of 16 cm which was filled with 0.6 gram catalyst. The Zn/HZSM-5 catalyst was recommended for cracking palm oil for the high selectivity to gasoline. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Selected Paper from International Conference on Chemical and Material Engineering (ICCME 2012Received: 28th September 2012; Revised: 19th November 2012; Accepted: 20th December 2012[How to Cite: A. Roesyadi, D. Hariprajitno, N. Nurjannah, S.D. Savitri, (2013. HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (3: 185-190.(doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4045.185-190][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4045.185-190 ] View in  |

  8. TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR OUT-OF-TANK DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE VIA WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: PHASE I - BENCH SCALE TESTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adu-Wusu, K

    2006-01-01

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) management has the goal of returning Tank 48H to routine service by January 2010 or as soon as practical. Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains ∼240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with about 2 wt % potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). The main radioactive component in Tank 48H is 137 Cs. The waste also contains ∼0.15 wt % Monosodium Titanate (MST) which has adsorbed 90 Sr, U, and Pu isotopes. A System Engineering Evaluation of technologies/ideas for the treatment of TPB identified Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a leading alternative technology to the baseline aggregation approach. Over 75 technologies/ideas were evaluated overall. Forty-one technologies/ideas passed the initial screening evaluation. The 41 technologies/ideas were then combined to 16 complete solutions for the disposition of TPB and evaluated in detail. Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is an aqueous phase process in which soluble or suspended waste components are oxidized using molecular oxygen contained in air. The process operates at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 to 320 C and 7 to 210 atmospheres, respectively. The products of the reaction are CO 2 , H 2 O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). The basic flow scheme for a typical WAO system is as follows. The waste solution or slurry is pumped through a high-pressure feed pump. An air stream containing sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen requirements of the waste stream is injected into the pressurized

  9. Ruthenium-platinum bimetallic catalysts supported on silica: characterization and study of benzene hydrogenation and CO methanation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, D.K.; Rao, K.M.; Sundararaman, N.; Chandavar, K.

    1986-12-15

    Ru-Pt/SiO/sub 2/ bimetallic catalysts with varying Ru:Pt ratio have been prepared and studied with the aim to establish if they contain coclusters or isolated ruthenium and platinum particles. X-ray diffraction studies show that individual crystallites of ruthenium and platinum are present and no coclusters are formed. Metal dispersion has been determined by hydrogen chemisorption and surface composition of the catalysts has been obtained from XPS. It was found that preoxidation of the catalysts prior to reduction is essential for good platinum dispersion. The experimental turnover number (TN) for benzene hydrogenation on the bimetallic catalysts agrees very well with that of the weighted average on the individual metal catalysts and this may be taken as a kinetic evidence for the absence of coclusters. Carbon monoxide methanation activity of the bimetallic catalysts is quite similar to that of the supported platinum catalyst. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Pt based PEMFC catalysts prepared from colloidal particle suspensions--a toolbox for model studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speder, Jozsef; Altmann, Lena; Roefzaad, Melanie; Bäumer, Marcus; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Mortensen, Kell; Arenz, Matthias

    2013-03-14

    A colloidal synthesis approach is presented that allows systematic studies of the properties of supported proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalysts. The applied synthesis route is based on the preparation of monodisperse nanoparticles in the absence of strong binding organic stabilizing agents. No temperature post-treatment of the catalyst is required rendering the synthesis route ideally suitable for comparative studies. We report work concerning a series of catalysts based on the same colloidal Pt nanoparticle (NP) suspension, but with different high surface area (HSA) carbon supports. It is shown that for the prepared catalysts the carbon support has no catalytic co-function, but carbon pre-treatment leads to enhanced sticking of the Pt NPs on the support. An unwanted side effect, however, is NP agglomeration during synthesis. By contrast, enhanced NP sticking without agglomeration can be accomplished by the addition of an ionomer to the NP suspension. The catalytic activity of the prepared catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction is comparable to industrial catalysts and no influence of the particle size is found in the range of 2-5 nm.

  11. Study and application of hydrophobic catalyst in treating tritium waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Gui-ping; Zhang, Dong; Qiu, Yong-mei; Yuan, Guo-Qi

    2008-01-01

    Tritium decontamination from tritium waste is important for the management of tritium waste. Tritium removal from waste tritium oxide can not only get tritium, but also reduce the amount of waste tritium. At the meantime, by cleaning the tritium pollution gas can also reduce the tritium exhausting from tritium facility. At present, the process of hydrogen isotopic exchange in tritium removal from waste tritium oxide and coordination oxidisation-adsorption in tritium cleaning from waste tritium gas are the mainly methods. In these methods, hydrophobic catalysts which can be used in these process are the key technology. There are many references about their preparing and applying, but few on the estimation about their performance changing during their applying. However, their performance stability on isotopic catalytic exchange and catalytic oxidisation will affect their using in reaction. Hydrophobic catalyst Pt-SDB which can be used in tritium isotopic exchange between tritium oxide and hydrogen and the cleaning of tritium pollution gas have been prepared in our laboratory in early days. In order to estimating their performance stability during their using, this work will investigate their stability on their catalytic activity and their radiation-resistance tritium. (author)

  12. Model studies of secondary hydrogenation in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis studied by cobalt catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaserud, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Mass transfer effects are very important in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. In order to study the FT synthesis without the influence of any transport limitations, cobalt foils have been used as model catalysts. The effect of pretreatment (number of calcinations and different reduction times) for cobalt foil catalysts at 220 {sup o}C, 1 bar and H{sub 2}/CO = 3 has been studied in a microreactor. The foils were examined by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the catalytic activity of the cobalt foil increases with the number of pretreatments possibly due to an increase in the surface area of the cobalt foil. The SEM results support the assumption that the surface area of the cobalt foil increases with the number of pretreatments. The reduction time was also found to influence the catalytic activity of the cobalt foil. Highest activity was obtained using a reduction time of only five min (compared to one and thirty min). The decrease in activity after reduction for thirty min compared to five min was suggested to be due to restructuring of the surface of the cobalt foil and a reduction time of only 1 min was not enough to reduce the cobalt foil sufficiently. Time of reduction did also influence the product distribution. Increased reduction time resulted in a lower selectivity to light products and increased selectivity to heavier components. The paraffin/olefin ratio increased with increasing CO-conversion also for cobalt foils. The paraffin/olefin ratio also increased when the reduction period of the cobalt foil was increased at a given CO-conversion. Hydrogenation of propene to propane has been studied as a model reaction for secondary hydrogenation of olefins in the FT synthesis. The study has involved promoted and unpromoted cobalt FT catalysts supported on different types of supports and also unsupported cobalt. Hydrogenation of propene was carried out at 120 {sup o}C, 1.8 bar and H{sub 2}/C{sub 3}H{sub 6} 6 in a fixed bed microreactor. The rate

  13. A study on production of biodiesel using a novel solid oxide catalyst derived from waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Samrat; Ray, Srimanta

    2016-05-01

    The issues of energy security, dwindling supply and inflating price of fossil fuel have shifted the global focus towards fuel of renewable origin. Biodiesel, having renewable origin, has exhibited great potential as substitute for fossil fuels. The most common route of biodiesel production is through transesterification of vegetable oil in presence of homogeneous acid or base or solid oxide catalyst. But, the economics of biodiesel is not competitive with respect to fossil fuel due to high cost of production. The vegetable oil waste is a potential alternative for biodiesel production, particularly when disposal of used vegetable oil has been restricted in several countries. The present study evaluates the efficacy of a low-cost solid oxide catalyst derived from eggshell (a food waste) in transesterification of vegetable oil and simulated waste vegetable oil (SWVO). The impact of thermal treatment of vegetable oil (to simulate frying operation) on transesterification using eggshell-derived solid oxide catalyst (ESSO catalyst) was also evaluated along with the effect of varying reaction parameters. The study reported that around 90 % biodiesel yield was obtained with vegetable oil at methanol/oil molar ratio of 18:1 in 3 h reaction time using 10 % ESSO catalyst. The biodiesel produced with ESSO catalyst from SWVO, thermally treated at 150 °C for 24 h, was found to conform with the biodiesel standard, but the yield was 5 % lower compared to that of the untreated oil. The utilization of waste vegetable oil along with waste eggshell as catalyst is significant for improving the overall economics of the biodiesel in the current market. The utilization of waste for societal benefit with the essence of sustainable development is the novelty of this work.

  14. Fundamental Studies of the Reforming of Oxygenated Compounds over Supported Metal Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumesic, James A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-01-04

    microcopy (STEM) to measure size and structure, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to measure atomic composition, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to measure oxidation state and metal coordination, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to study adsorbed species, laser Raman spectroscopy to probe metal oxide promoters, and temperature programmed reaction/desorption to study the energetics of adsorption and desorption processes. We have studied our bimetallic catalysts for the selective cleavage of carbon-oxygen bonds, and we have studied the effects of adding metal oxide promoters to supported platinum and gold catalysts for water-gas shift (i.e., the production of hydrogen by reaction of carbon monoxide with water). We anticipate that the knowledge obtained from our studies will allow us to identify promising directions for new catalysts that show high activity, selectivity, and stability for important reactions, such as the conversion of biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons to fuels and chemicals.

  15. A study on the polymer catalyst process technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Kang, H. S.; Paek, S. W.; Lee, S. H.; Sung, K. W.

    1997-06-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in Pressurized Heavy Water Power Plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply Korea is scheduled to construct and operate total four pressurized heavy water power plant till the year 1999. Total heavy water make-up for these plants would be 18 Mg/a from the year 1999. Reformed hydrogen processes is considered best suited to Korea. Polymer catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchange was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m{sup 3}.HD/m{sup 3} Bed.sec. and heavy water separation process using the catalysis were optimized. (author). 102 refs., 134 tabs., 65 figs.

  16. A study on the polymer catalyst process technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Kang, H. S.; Paek, S. W.; Lee, S. H.; Sung, K. W.

    1997-06-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in Pressurized Heavy Water Power Plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply Korea is scheduled to construct and operate total four pressurized heavy water power plant till the year 1999. Total heavy water make-up for these plants would be 18 Mg/a from the year 1999. Reformed hydrogen processes is considered best suited to Korea. Polymer catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchange was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m 3 .HD/m 3 Bed.sec. and heavy water separation process using the catalysis were optimized. (author). 102 refs., 134 tabs., 65 figs

  17. Crystal structure of 2-dimethylamino-1-ethoxycarbonyl-3-methyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-1-ium tetraphenylborate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C10H20N3O2+·C24H20B−, contains two cations and two tetraphenylborate ions. The C—N bond lengths in the central CN3 unit of the guanidinium ions range between 1.323 (2 and 1.381 (2 Å, indicating partial double-bond character. The central C atoms are bonded to the three N atoms in a nearly ideal trigonal–planar geometry and the positive charge is delocalized in the CN3 plane. The cationic six-membered rings are nonplanar, the dihedral angles between the N/C/N and C/C/C planes ranging from 45.8 (1 to 53.6 (1°. In the crystal, C—H...π interactions are present between the guanidinium H atoms and the phenyl rings of the tetraphenylborate ions. The phenyl rings form aromatic pockets, in which the guanidinium ions are embedded.

  18. N,N,N′,N′-Tetramethyl-N′′-[2-(trimethylazaniumylethyl]guanidinium bis(tetraphenylborate acetone disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title solvated salt, C10H26N42+·2C24H20B−·2C3H6O, comprises one cation, two tetraphenylborate ions and two acetone solvent molecules. The N and methyl C atoms of the terminal trimethylammonium group are disordered over two sets of sites, with a refined occupancy ratio of 0.846 (3:0.154 (3. The C—N bond lengths in the central C3N unit of the guanidinium ion range between 1.3308 (16 and 1.3508 (16 Å, indicating a degree of double-bond character. The central C atom is bonded to the three N atoms in a nearly ideal trigonal–planar geometry and the positive charge is delocalized in the CN3 plane. The C—N bond lengths in the terminal trimethylammonium group have values close to that of a typical single bond, and the second positive charge is localized there. In the crystal, the guanidinium ion is connected by N—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds with the acetone molecules. C—H...π interactions are present between the guanidinium H atoms and the phenyl rings of the tetraphenylborate ions, leading to the formation of a two-dimensional supramolecular pattern along the bc plane.

  19. Methodology study for the catalyst obtention to low temperature fuel cells (DEFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Emilia Lucena de; Korb, Matias De Angelis; Correa, Patricia dos Santos; Radtke, Claudio; Malfatti, Celia de Fraga; Rieder, Ester

    2010-01-01

    Different methods to elaboration of catalysts in direct ethanol fuel cells (low temperature fuel cells) have been proposed in the literature. The present work aims to study a simplified methodology to obtain Pt-Sn-Ni alloys, used as catalysts in low temperature fuel cells. Impregnation/reduction method was employed to obtain Pt- Sn-Ni alloys supported on carbon, using ethylenoglycol as reductor agent and carbon Vulcan XC72R as support. Different amounts of Pt, Sn e Ni were studied, with the intent to obtain the maximum catalytic effect. The catalysts were obtained in an alkaline range, at 130 deg C, using the proportion ethylenoglycol:water 75/25 v/v. The analytical techniques used in this study was RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy), X Ray Diffraction and Cyclic Voltammetry. (author)

  20. XPS/STM study of model bimetallic Pd–Au/HOPG catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukhtiyarov, Andrey V., E-mail: avb@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva Ave. 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Prosvirin, Igor P., E-mail: prosvirin@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva Ave. 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I., E-mail: vib@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva Ave. 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The model Pd–Au/HOPG catalysts preparation has been studied by XPS and STM. • Model “core–shell” type Pd–Au/HOPG catalysts with different Pd/Au ratios were prepared. • Heating of the “core–shell” Pd–Au/HOPG samples up to 400 °C leads to alloy formation. • Contribution of parameters controlling the properties of Pd–Au alloyed particles has been discussed. - Abstract: The preparation of model bimetallic Pd–Au/HOPG catalysts has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Initially, model “core–shell” type Pd–Au/HOPG catalysts with similar particle size distribution (5–8 nm), but with different densities of particle locations on the HOPG surface and Pd/Au atomic ratios are prepared. Further, their thermal stability is studied within a temperature range of 50–500 °C at UHV conditions. It has been shown that annealing the model catalysts at a temperature range of 300–400 °C leads to formation of Pd–Au alloyed particles. Enhancement of heating temperature up to 500 °C results in sintering of bimetallic nanoparticles. Contribution of different parameters controlling the properties of Pd–Au alloyed particles has been discussed.

  1. A combined in situ XAS-XRPD-Raman study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a carbon supported Co catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakoumis, Nikolaos E.; Dehghan, Roya; Johnsen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    A cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalyst, supported on a carbon nanofibers/carbon felt composite (Co/CNF/CF) was studied in situ at realistic conditions. The catalyst was monitored by Xray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (HR-XRPD) and Raman...... spectroscopy, while changes in the gas phase were observed by mass spectrometry (MS). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also applied to characterise the catalyst. The catalyst has a bimodal particle size distribution and exhibits a high deactivation rate. During the in situ study the catalyst appears...... to reduce further at the induction period of FTS, while crystallite growth is been detected in the same period. At steady state FTS the amount of metallic Co is constant. A change in the volumetric flow towards higher conversions did not affect the degree of reduction or the crystallite size of the catalyst...

  2. Kinetics study of ethanol steam reforming on Pt/CeO{sub 2} based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, A. [Queen' s-RMC Fuel Cell Research Centre, Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Thurgood, C.; Amphlett, J. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Peppley, B. [Queens Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Interest in fuel cell systems operating on fuels derived from renewable energy sources is increasing because they have the potential to produce electricity with high efficiency and minimal emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants. Bioethanol is currently produced by the fermentation of non-edible biomass, through conventional means and also through advances in enzyme technology. The authors previously reported on the steam reforming of bioethanol with a stable ceria supported precious metal catalyst, developed in-house. The catalyst had good thermal stability and resisted carbon formation. This paper reported on a more recent kinetic study in which the influence of operating conditions were quantified. The operating conditions included temperature, steam/carbon ratios, and gas hourly velocities. The results of standard catalyst characterization techniques such as BET, TGA, SEM and TPR were also provided. The data was used to drive an empirical rate expression. The study also investigated a potential rate mechanism.

  3. Experimental study of simultaneous Athabasca bitumen recovery and upgrading using ultradispersed catalysts injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, R.; Pereira, P. [University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    As the demand for oil is continuously increasing, the need for unconventional resources is rising. Oil extraction from bitumen and heavy oil reservoirs requires advanced techniques in order to decrease the viscosity of the oil. To increase the recovered original oil in place (OOIP) of a reservoir and decrease refining costs, new techniques to upgrade oil in situ are being developed. The current study investigates the use of ultra-dispersed (UD) submicronic catalysts to decrease oil viscosity. The experiment involved the injection of the catalyst and hydrogen gas in a sand pack saturated with Athabasca bitumen. Analysis was carried out by building recovery curves, and by comparing the oil recovery from the catalyzed process with that of catalyst-free processes. The study demonstrated that the oil recovered from the new technique had higher API gravity and lower viscosity, indicating the success of the in situ upgrading process.

  4. Kinetic study of the hydration of propylene oxide in the presence of heterogeneous catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akyalcin Sema

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the hydration of propylene oxide was studied using a pressurized batch reactor for both uncatalyzed and heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Lewatit MonoPlus M500/HCO3 - was used as heterogeneous catalyst, which showed better performance than Dowex Marathon A/HCO3 -. The effects of the parameters, namely internal and external diffusion resistances, temperature, catalyst loading and mole ratios of reactants, on the reaction rate were studied. The uncatalyzed and heterogeneously catalyzed reactions were proven to follow a series-parallel irreversible homogeneous mechanism. The temperature dependencies of the rate constants appearing in the rate expressions were determined.

  5. Recent density functional studies of hydrodesulfurization catalysts: insight into structure and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinnemann, Berit; Moses, Poul Georg; Noerskov, Jens K

    2008-01-01

    The present article will highlight some recent density functional theory (DFT) studies of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts. It will be summarized how DFT in combination with experimental studies can give a detailed picture of the structure of the active phase. Furthermore, we have used DFT to investigate the reaction pathway for thiophene HDS, and we find that the reaction entails a complex interplay of different active sites, depending on reaction conditions. An investigation of pyridine inhibition confirmed some of these results. These fundamental insights constitute a basis for rational improvement of HDS catalysts, as they have provided important structure-activity relationships

  6. Study of the oxides nature effect of rare and rare earth elements on the aluminium-chromium catalyst properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadashev, B.A.; Abbasov, S.G.; Sarydzhanov, A.A.; AN Azerbajdzhanskoj SSR, Baku. Inst. Neftekhimicheskikh Protsessov)

    1975-01-01

    Adsorption studies have shown that oxides of rare and rare earth elements REE appreciably influence the structure of aluminium-chrome catalyst. Alkaline promotors, unlike REE, contribute to the formation of developed contact surface. Electrophysical investigations show that oxides of rare elements introduced into the catalyst increase its conductivity and activation energy. As for REE oxides, they decrease the conductivity and increase the activation energy. Catalysts with developed surface and high conductivity are also more active in the reaction of isopentane dehydration

  7. Studies of Heterogenous Palladium and Related Catalysts for Aerobic Oxidation of Primary Alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Maaz S.

    alcohol solvent and the surface of the catalyst: (listed in order of strength) lone pair-surface (heterocyclic primary alcohols) > pi-surface (aryl primary alcohols) > van der Waals-surface (alkyl primary alcohols). These interactions were previously underappreciated in condensed phase heterogeneously catalyzed aerobic oxidations. Bi and Te serve as synergistic promoters that enhance both the rate and yield of the reactions relative to reactions employing Pd alone or Pd in combination with Bi or with Te as the sole promoter. We report X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the heterogenous catalyst. These methods show that the promoters undergo oxidation in preference to Pd, maintaining the Pd surface in the active metallic state and preventing inhibition by surface Pd-oxide formation. The data also suggest formation of a Pd-Te alloy phase that modifies the electronic properties of the Pd catalyst. Collectively, these results provide valuable insights into the synergistic benefits of multiple promoters in heterogeneous catalytic oxidation reactions.

  8. Deactivation of SCR catalysts by potassium: A study of potential alkali barrier materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Kjærgaard; Kügler, Frauke; Castellino, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    The use of coatings in order to protect vanadia based SCR catalysts against potassium poisoning has been studied by lab- and pilot-scale experiments. Three-layer pellets, consisting of a layer ofa potential coating material situated between layers of fresh and potassium poisoned SCR catalyst, were...... the coating process. Potassium had to some extent penetrated the MgO coat, and SEM analysis revealed it to be rather thick and fragile. Despite these observations, the coating did protect the SCR catalyst against potassium poisoning to some degree, leaving promise of further optimization....... used to test the ability of the barrier layer to block the diffusion of potassium across the pellet. Of MgO, sepiolite and Hollandite manganese oxide, MgO was the most effective potassium barrier, and no potassium was detected in the MgO layer upon exposure to SCR conditions for 7 days. Two monoliths...

  9. Kinetic study on the photocatalytic degradation of salicylic acid using ZnO catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nageswara Rao, A.; Sivasankar, B.; Sadasivam, V.

    2009-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of salicylic acid was studied by a batch process using ZnO as the catalyst on irradiation with UV light. The effect of process parameters such as pH, catalyst loading and initial concentration of salicylic acid on the extent of degradation was investigated. The degradation of salicylic acid was found to be effective in the neutral pH range. The optimum catalyst loading was observed at 2.0 g/L. The process followed first order kinetics and the apparent rate constant decreased with increase in the initial concentration of salicylic acid. The mechanism for the degradation of salicylic acid could be explained on the basis of Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The complete mineralization of salicylic acid was observed in the presence of ZnO photocatalyst. The ZnO was found to be quite stable and undergoes photocorrosion only to a negligible extent.

  10. An XPS study on ruthenium compounds and catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, C.L.; Ragaini, V.; Cattania, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The binding energy (BE) of the relevant peaks of several ruthenium compounds have been measured with a monochromatic small spot XPS. The BE of the 3d 5/2 level of ruthenium is in the range 279.91-282.88 eV. The variation of BE is due either to the variation of the oxidation state or to the different counter-ion. A series of catalysts with varying amounts of ruthenium supported on alumina and prepared using different precursors was also analyzed. The presence of more ruthenium species other than the metal was observed. On the basis of the values previously obtained on unsupported compounds, the species with higher BE were assigned to oxides. On all the samples prepared from RuCl 3 , an additional peak at a very high BE (283.79 eV) has been observed. This peak is related to the presence of chlorine on the surface: it is suggested that it is related to a charge transfer interaction. The influence of this species on the CO reactivity in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of supported catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyner, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Since the rebirth of interest in extended X-ray absorption fine structure there have been several studies of systems of catalytic interest. This note is a preliminary account of an investigation of supported platinum catalysts and NiO/Al 2 O 3 catalysts. Experiments were performed on pressed disc samples at the DESY synchrotron, Hamburg, using the EXAFS spectrometer. The synchrotron operated at 7 GeV energy with a circulating current of approximately 4 mA; spectrum accumulation time was typically 45 minutes. (author)

  12. From fundamental studies of reactivity on single crystals to the design of catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Larsen, Jane; Chorkendorff, Ib

    One of the prominent arguments for performing surface science studies have for many years been to improve and design new and better catalysts. Although surface science has provided the fundamental framework and tools for understanding heterogeneous catalysis until now there have been extremely few examples of actually designing new catalysts based solely on surface science studies. In this review, we shall demonstrate how a close collaboration between different fundamental disciplines like structural-, theoretical-and reactivity-studies of surfaces as well as a strong interaction with industry can have strong synergetic effects and how this was used to develop a new catalyst. As so often before the studies reviewed here were not initiated with the objective to solve a specific problem, but realizing that a new class of very stable two-dimensional alloys could be synthesized from otherwise immiscible metals made it possible to present a new solution to a specific problem in the industrial catalysis relating to methane activation in the steam reforming process. Methane is the main constituent of natural gas and it is an extremely important raw material for many large scale chemical processes such as production of hydrogen, ammonia, and methanol. In the steam reforming process methane and water are converted into a mixture of mainly hydrogen and carbon monoxide, the so-called synthesis gas. Industrially the steam reforming process usually takes place over a catalyst containing small nickel crystallites highly dispersed on a porous support material like aluminum/magnesium oxides in order to achieve a high active metal area. There is a general consensus that the rate limiting step of this process is the dissociative sticking of methane on the nickel surface. Driven by the desire to understand this step and hopefully be able to manipulate the reactivity, a large number of investigations of the methane/nickel interaction have been performed using nickel single crystals as

  13. Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akito Takashima

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the one-order-of-magnitude increase in the density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition process was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques. In the developed process, a Ti film is used as the underlayer for an Fe catalyst film. A characteristic point of this process is that C2H2 feeding for the catalyst starts at a low temperature of 450°C, whereas conventional feeding temperatures are ∼800°C. Photoemission spectroscopy using soft and hard X-rays revealed that the Ti underlayer reduced the initially oxidized Fe layer at 450°C. A photoemission intensity analysis also suggested that the oxidized Ti layer at 450°C behaved as a support for nanoparticle formation of the reduced Fe, which is required for dense CNT growth. In fact, a CNT growth experiment, where the catalyst chemical state was monitored in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, showed that the reduced Fe yielded a CNT forest at 450°C. Contrarily, an Fe layer without the Ti underlayer did not yield such a CNT forest at 450°C. Photoemission electron microscopy showed that catalyst annealing at the conventional feeding temperature of 800°C caused excess catalyst agglomeration, which should lead to sparse CNTs. In conclusion, in the developed growth process, the low-temperature catalyst activation by the Ti underlayer before the excess Fe agglomeration realised the CNT densification.

  14. Spectroscopic studies of surface-gas interactions and catalyst restructuring at ambient pressure: mind the gap!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupprechter, Guenther; Weilach, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress in the application of surface vibrational spectroscopy at ambient pressure allows us to monitor surface-gas interactions and heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions approaching those of technical catalysis. The surface specificity of photon-based methods such as polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) and sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is utilized to monitor catalytically active surfaces while they function at high pressure and high temperature. Together with complementary information from high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HP-XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), reaction mechanisms can be deduced on a molecular level. Well defined model catalysts, prepared under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), are typically employed in such studies, including smooth and stepped single crystals, thin oxide films, and oxide-supported nanoparticles. A number of studies on unsupported and supported noble metal (Pd, Rh) catalysts are presented, focusing on the transformation of the catalysts from the 'as-prepared' to the 'active state'. This often involves pronounced alterations in catalyst structure and composition, for example the creation of surface carbon phases, surface oxides or surface alloys, as well as nanoparticle restructuring. The reactivity studies include CH 3 OH, CH 4 and CO oxidation with gas phase analysis by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Differing results between studies under ultrahigh vacuum and ambient pressure, and between studies on single crystals and supported nanoparticles, demonstrate the importance of 'minding the gap' between idealized and realistic conditions

  15. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  16. Stability and kinetic studies of supported ionic liquid phase catalysts for hydroformylation of propene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Haumann, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts have been studied with regard to their long-term stability in the continuous gas-phase hydroformylation of propene. Kinetic data have been acquired by variation of temperature, pressure, syngas composition, substrate concentration, and residence time...

  17. A mechanistic study on the oxidative coupling of methane over lithium doped magnesium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, J.W.M.H.; Kasteren, van J.M.N.; Wiele, van der K.; Imarisio, G.; Frias, M.; Berntgen, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the importance of various reaction steps in the oxidative convers ion of methane, experiments were carried out with three reaction products: ethane, ethylene and carbon monoxide. These products were studied seperately, in oxidation experiments with and without a catalyst. Moreover , the

  18. Hydrodeoxygenation of waste fat for diesel production: Study on model feed with Pt/alumina catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Theilgaard; Ahmed, El Hadi; Christensen, Claus H.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation of waste fats and oils is a viable method for producing renewable diesel oil. In this study a model feed consisting of oleic acid and tripalmitin in molar ratio 1:3 was hydrotreated at 325°C with 20bars H2 in a stirred batch autoclave with a 5wt% Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst, and samples...

  19. A MECHANISTIC STUDY OF RHODIUM TRI(ORTHO-TERT-BUTYLPHENYL)PHOSPHITE COMPLEXES AS HYDROFORMYLATION CATALYSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JONGSMA, T; CHALLA, G; VANLEEUWEN, PWNM

    1991-01-01

    A mechanistic study of the hydroformylation cycle with a rhodium tri(o-t-butylphenyl)phosphite complex as catalyst is presented. Spectroscopic experiments prove that under hydroformylation conditions this complex is coordinated by only one phosphite. The complex has a high activity in the

  20. Impregnation of mesoporous silica for catalyst preparation studied with differential scanning calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggenhuisen, T.M.; van Steenbergen, M.J.; Talsma, H.; de Jongh, P.E.; de Jong, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous impregnation of mesoporous silica as a first step in catalyst preparation was studied to investigate the distribution of the metal-precursor solution over the support. The degree of pore-filling after impregnation was determined using the freezing point depression of confined liquids. A

  1. A Comparative Study of Solvothermal and Sol-Gel-Derived Nanocrystalline Alumina Catalysts for Ethanol Dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingkwan Wannaborworn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol dehydration to ethylene over alumina catalysts prepared by solvothermal and sol-gel methods was investigated. Also, a commercial alumina was used for comparison purposes. The results showed that the catalytic activity depends on the properties of catalyst derived from different preparation methods and reaction temperature. The alumina synthesized by solvothermal method exhibited the highest activity. This can be attributed to the higher surface area and larger amount of acid site, especially the ratio of weak/strong acid strength as determined by N2 physisorption and NH3-TPD studies. The solvothermal-derived catalyst exhibited an excellent performance with complete ethanol conversion and 100% selectivity to ethylene at 350°C in comparison with other ones. In addition, we further studied the catalytic dehydration of alumina catalyst modified with Fe. The presence of 10 wt.% Fe decreased both conversion and ethylene selectivity. However, the acetaldehyde selectivity apparently increased. It was related to the dehydrogenation pathway that takes place on Fe species.

  2. Structure and acidity of individual Fluid Catalytic Cracking catalyst particles studied by synchrotron-based infrared micro-spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurmans, I.L.C.; Soulimani, F.; Ruiz Martinez, J.; van der Bij, H.E.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    A synchrotron-based infrared micro-spectroscopy study has been conducted to investigate the structure as well as the Brønsted and Lewis acidity of Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst particles at the individual particle level. Both fresh and laboratory-deactivated catalyst particles have been

  3. Photoinduced Charge Shifts and Electron Transfer in Viologen-Tetraphenylborate Complexes: Push-Pull Character of the Exciplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Willy G; Budkina, Darya S; Deflon, Victor M; Tarnovsky, Alexander N; Cardoso, Daniel R; Forbes, Malcolm D E

    2017-06-14

    Viologen-tetraarylborate ion-pair complexes were prepared and investigated by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques such as fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption. The results highlight a charge transfer transition that leads to changes in the viologen structure in the excited singlet state. Femtosecond transient absorption reveals the formation of excited-state absorption and stimulated emission bands assigned to the planar (k obs < 10 12 s -1 ) and twisted (k obs ∼ 10 10 s -1 ) structures between two pyridinium groups in the viologen ion. An efficient photoinduced electron transfer from the tetraphenylborate anionic moiety to the viologen dication was observed less than 1 μs after excitation. This is a consequence of the push-pull character of the electron donor twisted viologen structure, which helps formation of the borate triplet state. The borate triplet state is deactivated further via a second electron transfer process, generating viologen cation radical (V •+ ).

  4. N,N,N′,N′,N′′-Pentamethyl-N′′-[2-(trimethylazaniumylethyl]guanidinium bis(tetraphenylborate acetone monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title solvated salt, C11H28N42+·2C24H20B−·C3H6O, comprises two cations, four tetraphenylborate anions and two acetone molecules. One cation shows an orientational disorder at the CN3 moiety and two sets of N-atom positions were found related by a 60° rotation, with a refined occupancy ratio of 0.935 (1:0.065 (1. The respective nitrogen-bonded –CH2 and –CH3 groups are included in the disorder model. The C—N bond lengths in the central CN3 units of both guanidinium ions range between 1.3329 (17 and 1.364 (16 Å, indicating a degree of double-bond character. The central C atom is bonded to the three N atoms in a nearly ideal trigonal–planar geometry and one positive charge is delocalized in the CN3 plane. The C—N bond lengths in the terminal trimethylammonium groups have values close to a typical single bond, and the second positive charge is localized there. In the crystal, the guanidinium ions are connected by C—H...O hydrogen bonds with the acetone molecules. C—H...π interactions are present between the guanidinium and acetone hydrogen atoms and the phenyl rings of the tetraphenylborate ions, leading to the formation of a two-dimensional supramolecular pattern along the bc plane.

  5. Kinetics study of levulinic acid production from corncobs by tin tetrachloride as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Qing; Guo, Qi; Wang, Pengbo; Qian, Hongjia; Gao, Xiaohang; Zhang, Yue

    2018-07-01

    Levulinic acid (LA) is an ideal platform chemical that can be produced through acid-catalyzed dehydration and hydrolysis of hexose sugars obtained from lignocellulosic materials. In this study, SnCl 4 was identified as an efficient catalyst for LA production and the reaction kinetics was investigated in a single water phase under different reaction conditions. The Box-Behnken design response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to determine the optimized reaction conditions and three individual variables including reaction temperature, duration, and catalyst concentration were evaluated. An appealing LA yield of 76.0% was achieved at 193 °C and 17 min with 82 mM SnCl 4 catalyst. A kinetics model was developed to predict the yields of glucose, HMF, and LA, which are tally with the experimental results. The analysis of the related kinetic parameters and the results of the RSM experiment helped to provide insights into the interplay between various reaction steps with SnCl 4 as catalysts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multi-level computational chemistry study on hydrogen recombination catalyst of off-gas treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Ise, Mariko; Inaba, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    In order to reveal the deactivation mechanism of the hydrogen recombination catalyst of off-gas treatment system, we investigate by using multi-level computational chemistry simulation methods. The recombiner apparatus is modeled by the numerical mesh system in the axial coordinates, and unsteady, advection and reaction rate equations are solved by using a finite difference method. The chemical reactions are formulated to represent adsorption-desorption of hydrogen and oxygen on Pt catalyst, and time developments of the coverage factors of Pt are solved numerically. The computational simulations successfully reproduce the very similar behaviors observed by experiments, such as increasing of the inversion rates of H 2 to H 2 O, the temperatures distributions along the flow direction, dependencies of experimental condition, and so on. Thus Pt poisoning is considered to cause the deactivation of the hydrogen recombination catalyst. To clarify the poisoning mechanism, the molecular level simulation is applied to the system of Pt on boehmite attacked by a cyclic siloxane which has been detected by experiments and considered as one of poisoning spices. The simulation shows ring-opening reaction of the cyclic siloxane on Pt, then attachment of two ends of the chain-like siloxane to Pt and boehmite, respectively, and that finally the recombination reaction is prevented. This may be the first study to find out the detailed dynamical mechanism of hydrogen recombination catalyst poisoning with cyclic siloxane. (author)

  7. The study of catalysts for synthesis of higher alcohols from CO + H/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Yugin; Chen Zhenghua; Liu Xiulan; Li Yu; Bo Luhong

    1988-03-01

    Catalysts for synthesis of higher alcohols from CO+H/sub 2/ were developed, and the effects of preparing methods, Zn/Cr atomic ratio and K/sub 2/0 content on catalyst activity were investigated. The effects of the technological parameters were studied. An 1000 h long term test was carried out in order to investigate the catalyst life. Experimental results show that the catalyst has high activity and selectivity, as well as good stability. In the long term test under reaction conditions of 400-405 degrees C, 14-15 MPa, 5000h/sup -1/ (with respect to exit gas), the alcohol product composition is methanol 73-75%; ethanol 1.5-2.2%; propanol 2.2-2.5%; isobutanol 15-17; isopentanol 1-1.5%, while the activity and selectivity are 0.3-0.32 ml/ml cat.h and more than 90% respectively. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Disposition of nonflammable low-level radioactive wastes using supercritical water with ruthenium(IV) oxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Wataru

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the distribution behavior of iron, cobalt, cesium, iodine and strontium attached to nonflammable organic materials, in solid, liquid and gas phases during the decomposition of these materials using supercritical water with ruthenium(IV) oxide (RuO 2 ) catalyst. The distributions of these elements under various conditions (initial amounts, with/without precipitation reagent) were determined by using their radioisotopes as simulated low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) in order to ease the detection of trace amounts of elements even in solid and gas phases. Iron and cobalt were found only in the solid phase when iron hydroxide was added as a precipitation reagent before the supercritical water reaction. Cesium, iodine and strontium were found in the liquid phase after the reaction. Therefore, by adding precipitation reagents such as sodium tetraphenylborate, and sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) (or sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaHCO 3 )) and silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ) aqueous solutions to each resultant liquid phase containing cesium, strontium and iodine, respectively, these elements can be successfully recovered only in the solid phase. The gases produced during the decomposition of the organic material contain no radioactivity under all conditions in this study. These results indicate that all of the elements investigated in this study (iron, cobalt, cesium, iodine and strontium) can be recovered successfully by this supercritical water process using RuO 2 Consequently, this process is suggested as a predominant candidate for the treatment of nonflammable organic materials in LLW. (author)

  9. Flow dynamics study of catalyst powder in catalytic cracking unit for troubleshooting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelgaonkar Vivek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gamma scanning and radiotracer applications are very effective and inexpensive tools to understand and optimize the process as well as troubleshoot the various types of problems in many chemical, petrochemical industries and refineries. These techniques are non-invasive; hence, the problems can be pinpointed online, which leads to reduce the downtime, schedule the shutdown and maintenance of the plant equipment, rendering huge economic benefits. In a leading refinery of India, the catalytic cracking unit (CCU was malfunctioning. It was suspected by the refinery engineers that the catalyst powder was being carried over to the fractionator, which could have led to erosion of the fractionator column internals resulting in their rupture, and consequentially, to the fire hazard. To understand the flow behaviour of the catalyst powder and to ensure the mechanical integrity, catalyst accumulation and choking, both radiotracer study and gamma scanning of the CCU reactor was carried out. The reactor consists of a riser, three primary cyclones and three secondary cyclones. Gamma scanning of the reactor was carried out with the help of an automatic gamma scanner using 1.8 GBq of Co-60 sealed source. Results showed that the catalyst powder was accumulated in one of the secondary cyclones and uneven density distribution was observed in another secondary cyclone. The radiotracer study was carried out using the irradiated catalyst powder as a radiotracer, which contains 0.9 GBq of Na-24. The radiotracer was injected in the reactor through the specially fabricated injection system. Radiation measurement was done using the thermally insulated and collimated NaI(Tl scintillation detectors located at various strategic locations coupled to a multi-detector data acquisition system. The data were mathematically analysed. It was confirmed that the catalyst powder was accumulated in one of the secondary cyclones with no flow downwards. This resulted in excess powder

  10. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al2O3) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum

  11. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremerey, Peter; Jess, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2015-10-23

    In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H₂S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  12. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fremerey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H2S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  13. Does Pelletizing Catalysts Influence the Efficiency Number of Activity Measurements? Spectrochemical Engineering Considerations for an Accurate Operando Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Perez-Ferreras, Susana; Banares, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    of, for example, support oxides might take place, which in turn affects the pore size distribution and the porosity of the catalyst, leading to the observation of lower activity values due to decreased catalyst efficiency. This phenomenon can also apply to conventional activity measurements......, in the cases that pelletizing and recrushing of samples are performed to obtain adequate particle size fractions for the catalytic bed. A case study of an operand investigation of a V2O3-WO3/TiO2-sepiolite catalyst is used as an example, and simple calculations of the influence of catalyst activity...... and internal pore diffusion properties are considered in this paper for the evaluation of catalyst performance in, for example, operando reactors. Thus, it is demonstrated that with a pelletizing pressure of...

  14. Moessbauer spectroscopy and nuclear inelastic scattering studies on polynuclear oxo-bridged iron catalyst-first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Buerck, U. van; Wagner, F. E.; Laschat, S.

    2008-01-01

    Polynuclear iron catalysts are interesting materials because of their novel properties. In the future they may help to replace high cost and hazardous heavy metal catalysts by efficient, non toxic and economic iron compounds. In this work, we present some preliminary results on a novel polynuclear oxo-bridged iron catalyst. The chemical environment of the metal species (Fe) was studied under Gif-type conditions (Fe catalyst/Zn/O 2 in pyridine/acetic acid) with cyclohexene as substrate. Such Gif-type catalysts are able to catalyse the selective oxidation of alkanes and alkenes. The characterization was done by Moessbauer spectroscopy and nuclear inelastic scattering. In order to identify the intermediate species during the reaction (selective oxidation using molecular O 2 ), a freeze-quench technique was used. This also helps to understand the kinetics of the chemical reaction.

  15. Catalytic Activity Studies of Vanadia/Silica–Titania Catalysts in SVOC Partial Oxidation to Formaldehyde: Focus on the Catalyst Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina Koivikko

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, silica–titania supported catalysts were prepared by a sol–gel method with various compositions. Vanadia was impregnated on SiO2-TiO2 with different loadings, and materials were investigated in the partial oxidation of methanol and methyl mercaptan to formaldehyde. The materials were characterized by using N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM, NH3-TPD, and Raman techniques. The activity results show the high importance of an optimized SiO2-TiO2 ratio to reach a high reactant conversion and formaldehyde yield. The characteristics of mixed oxides ensure a better dispersion of the active phase on the support and in this way increase the activity of the catalysts. The addition of vanadium pentoxide on the support lowered the optimal temperature of the reaction significantly. Increasing the vanadia loading from 1.5% to 2.5% did not result in higher formaldehyde concentration. Over the 1.5%V2O5/SiO2 + 30%TiO2 catalyst, the optimal selectivity was reached at 415 °C when the maximum formaldehyde concentration was ~1000 ppm.

  16. FY 1990 Study Meeting of Catalyst (Iron system). Data; 1990 nendo shokubai kento kai (Tetsu kei) shiryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-03-01

    The FY 1990 Study Meeting of Iron-system Catalyst was held at NEDO on March 12, 1991, and the data were arranged. In the study meeting, papers titled as follows were made public: About the behavior of H{sub 2}S on iron-system catalyst by Muroran Institute of Technology; Results of the test on iron-system catalyst in the BCL project by Research Institute, Mitsubishi Kasei Corp.; Results of the test on iron-system catalyst by 2.4 t/d PDU by NKK; Results of the test on iron-system catalyst by 0.1 t/d BSU by Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co.; Results of the test on iron-system catalyst by 1 t/d PSU by Nippon Steel Corp.; Results of the research at Government Industrial Development Laboratory, Hokkaido, and the study; Results of the research at National Chemical Laboratory for Industry and the study; Results of the research at the University of Tokyo and the study; Details of the development of synthetic iron sulfide and the attainment up to now by Asahi Chemical Industry Co. Moreover, the plenary session was held on research items for the development of iron-system catalyst in future. (NEDO)

  17. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical studies of Pt- W/C catalyst for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Shahid, S.; Ansari, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Pt-W/C catalyst was synthesized by slow reduction of platinum and tungsten solutions in the desired ratio with subsequent deposition on the Vulcan carbon already added to the solution. Crystallite size of catalyst was about 9 nm and its density, cell volume, d-spacing and lattice parameter were also calculated. EDX analysis of the catalyst was also done. Electrochemical surface area of the catalyst was determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV). CV of the catalyst was done both in acidic and basic media to find out the peak potential, peak current, specific activity and mass activity of the catalyst. Peak potential versus scan rate plots showed that the electro oxidation of methanol is an irreversible process. Tafel equation was used to plot polarization curves to find out the exchange current density. Higher values of exchange current indicate better catalysts. Specific activities of the catalyst were determined in acidic and basic media and it was found that the specific activity in basic media increased substantially as compared to acidic media. The specific activity in acidic media was 83 mA/mg pt whereas in basic media it was 137mA/mg pt which is a substantial increase. Heterogeneous rate constant in acidic media was 6.15 * 10-6 cm/ s and in basic media it was 4.92 * 10-5 cm/s which is much higher in basic media. In this binary catalyst addition of tungsten has increased the catalytic activity but it is non-noble metal thus will decrease the cost. Stability studies of the catalyst were done upto fifty cycles both in acidic and basic media and was found quite stable in both the media. (author)

  18. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical studies of Pt-W/C catalyst for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Riaz; Shahid, Saliha; Ansari, Muhammad Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Pt-W/C catalyst was synthesized by slow reduction of platinum and tungsten solutions in the desired ratio with subsequent deposition on the Vulcan carbon already added to the solution. Crystallite size of catalyst was about 9 nm and its density, cell volume, d-spacing and lattice parameter were also calculated. EDX analysis of the catalyst was also done. Electrochemical surface area of the catalyst was determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV). CV of the catalyst was done both in acidic and basic media to find out the peak potential, peak current, specific activity and mass activity of the catalyst. Peak potential versus scan rate plots showed that the electro oxidation of methanol is an irreversible process. Tafel equation was used to plot polarization curves to find out the exchange current density. Higher values of exchange current indicate better catalysts. Specific activities of the catalyst were determined in acidic and basic media and it was found that the specific activity in basic media increased substantially as compared to acidic media. The specific activity in acidic media was 83 mA/mg pt whereas in basic media it was 137mA/mg pt which is a substantial increase. Heterogeneous rate constant in acidic media was 6.15 x 10 −6 cm/ s and in basic media it was 4.92 x 10 −5 cm/s which is much higher in basic media. In this binary catalyst addition of tungsten has increased the catalytic activity but it is non-noble metal thus will decrease the cost. Stability studies of the catalyst were done upto fifty cycles both in acidic and basic media and was found quite stable in both the media

  19. Catalyst study for the decontamination of glove-box atmospheres containing tritium at MPC levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobot, J.; Montel, J.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    The BEATRICE loop was designed for studying the conversion of tritium at very low activity levels using catalytic oxidation followed by water trapping. The purpose is to study kinetic parameters required for the design of the NET tritium cleanup system with the two main objectives to operate without isotopic swamping and to determine the ability of efficient conversion at room temperature. From experiments carried out between 20 and 250 0 C it is concluded that two palladium/alumina and platinum/alumina catalysts are very efficient in removing tritium from contaminated gas mixtures down to a few MPC levels without isotopic swamping and even at room temperature. However at room temperature, in relation to tritium species trapped on the catalyst surface a progressive deactivation with time occurs. This phenomenon may be a concern for process efficiency and tritium inventory and regeneration conditions have to be determined in order to demonstrate industrial feasibility of operating at room temperature

  20. Studies on Nano-Engineered TiO2 Photo Catalyst for Effective Degradation of Dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowmya, S. R.; Madhu, G. M.; Hashir, Mohammed

    2018-02-01

    All Heterogeneous photo catalysis employing efficient photo-catalyst is the advanced dye degradation technology for the purification of textile effluent. The present work focuses on Congo red dye degradation employing synthesized Ag doped TiO2 nanoparticles as photocatalyst which is characterized using SEM, XRD and FTIR. Studies are conducted to study the effect of various parameters such as initial dye concentration, catalyst loading and pH of solution. Ag Doped TiO2 photocatalyst improve the efficacy of TiO2 by reducing high band gap and electron hole recombination of TiO2. The reaction kinetics is analyzed and the process is found to follow pseudo first order kinetics.

  1. Catalyst study for the decontamination of glove-boxe atmospheres containing tritium at MPC levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, J.; Montel, J.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    The BEATRICE loop was designed for studying the conversion of tritium at very low activity levels using catalytic oxidation followed by water trapping. The purpose is to study kinetic parameters required for the design of the NET tritium clean-up system with the two main objectives to operate without isotopic swamping and to determine the ability of efficient conversion at room temperature. From experiments carried out between 20 and 250 0 C it is concluded that two palladium/alumina and platinum/alumina catalysts are very efficient in removing tritium from contaminated gas mixtures down to a few MPC levels without isotopic swamping and even at room temperature. However at room temperature, in relation to tritium species trapped on the catalyst surface a progressive deactivation with time occurs. This phenomenon may be a concern for process efficiency and tritium inventory and best regeneration conditions have to be determined in order to demonstrate industrial feasibility of operating at room temperature

  2. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of Supported Chromium Oxide Catalysts: Reactivity Studies with Methanol and Butane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    The interactions of methanol and butane with supported chromium oxide catalysts under oxidizing and reducing conditions were studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of the specific oxide support (Al2O3, ZrO2, TiO2, SiO2, Nb2O5, 3% SiO2/TiO2, 3% TiO2/SiO2, and a physical mixture of SiO2

  3. Preparation and characterization of the perovskite catalysts : activity studies for diesel surrogate (dodecane) reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondakindi, R.; Kundu, A.; Karan, K.; Peppley, B. [Queen' s-RMC Fuel Cell Research Centre, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Canada's northern communities rely on diesel fuel for generating electricity. The process of converting diesel to electricity in internal combustion engines is not efficient and generates significant amounts of unwanted products. This paper presented an alternative process whereby diesel is reformed into hydrogen-rich reformate which can then be fed to a solid oxide fuel cell. This alternative process converts energy more efficiently and eliminates the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot. This study focused on the development of LaFeO{sub 3} based perovskite catalysts for diesel reforming. The activity of the perovskite catalysts was assessed for steam reforming of dodecane, a surrogate for diesel. In order to study the effect on catalytic activity, various perovskite materials were prepared by doping the perovskite at A-site to minimize the coke deposition and at B-site to improve the activity. Preliminary results for dodecane reforming for selected perovskites were promising. Additional testing is underway regarding catalyst activity and stability studies as well carbon and sulphur poisoning.

  4. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapours over Sodium-Based Catalyst; A Study on teh State of Sodium on the Catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.S.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Gupta, K.B. Sai Sankar; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2015-01-01

    In situ upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapours over Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3 catalysts was studied in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor at 500 °C. Catalytic oil exhibits a significant improvement over its non-catalytic counterpart, such as lower oxygen content (12.3 wt % compared to 42.1 wt %), higher

  5. Evaluating the NOx Storage Catalysts (NSC Aging: A Preliminary Analytical Study with Electronic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonarda Bellebuono

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an expeditious and reliable method for determining the thermal effects in a static condition of commercial NOx storage catalysts (NSCs using scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray analytical system (SEM/EDS. It is worth remarking that possible changes in the morphology and in the elemental composition of the catalyst may be considered as the most important causes of the lower conversion of NOx. The information attained in this work indicates that Pt nanoparticle sintering is strongly increased by the oxygen exposure, and this can be considered a very useful preliminary investigation for the studies already present in the literature on the efficiency of NSCs.

  6. Quantitative positron annihilation studies in citrates, halides and oxyhalides chemisorbed on γ-alumina catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, X.H.; Jean, Y.C.; Cheng, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative study of the γ-alumina catalyst chemisorbed by nitrates, halides, and oxyhalides has been conducted with the positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Catalysts containing Fe, Co, or Ni have been extensively used in chemical industry and petroleum refining. The positron or Ps annihilation can provide a profile information about the bulk, near surface, and void. It is an in-situ surface technique. The PAS technique has shown its capability to determine the nitrate or chloride in γ-alumina as low as 0.02% in solids. It is interesting to note that the PAS may offer the oxidation state information in solids. This is not surprising because the positron annihilation is sensitive to the electron density variation in environments. Positron annihilation models for halides and oxyhalides are proposed

  7. Catalyst-Controlled and Tunable, Chemoselective Silver-Catalyzed Intermolecular Nitrene Transfer: Experimental and Computational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Nicholas S; Scamp, Ryan J; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Berry, John F; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2016-11-09

    The development of new catalysts for selective nitrene transfer is a continuing area of interest. In particular, the ability to control the chemoselectivity of intermolecular reactions in the presence of multiple reactive sites has been a long-standing challenge in the field. In this paper, we demonstrate examples of silver-catalyzed, nondirected, intermolecular nitrene transfer reactions that are both chemoselective and flexible for aziridination or C-H insertion, depending on the choice of ligand. Experimental probes present a puzzling picture of the mechanistic details of the pathways mediated by [( t Bu 3 tpy)AgOTf] 2 and (tpa)AgOTf. Computational studies elucidate these subtleties and provide guidance for the future development of new catalysts exhibiting improved tunability in group transfer reactions.

  8. Moessbauer study of CO-precipitated Fischer-Tropsch iron catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Mahajan, V.; Huffman, G.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rao, V.U.S.

    1994-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of precipitated Fischer-Tropsch (FT) iron catalysts, viz. 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/x SiO 2 , where x = 0, 8, 16, 24, 25, 40, or 100, have shown that reduction of the oxide precursor in CO gives rise to χ-carbide Fe 5 C 2 whose amount decreases with an increase of SiO 2 content. The χ-carbide is converted into magnetite Fe 3 O 4 while catalyzing the FT synthesis reaction. A correlation between FT activity and the content of χ-carbide in the catalysts was found, which indicated that χ-carbide is active for FT synthesis reaction. (orig.)

  9. Kinetic Study on the Esterification of Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) Using Heterogeneous Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofiqah, U.; Djalal, R. A.; Sutrisno, B.; Hidayat, A.

    2018-05-01

    Esterification with heterogeneous catalysts is believed to have advantages compared to homogeneous catalysts. Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) was esterified by ZrO2 -SO4 2-/natural zeolite at temperature variation of 55°C, 60°C, and 65°C to produce biodiesel. Determination of reaction kinetics was done by experiment and modeling. Kinetic study was approached using pseudo-homogeneous model of first order. For experiment, reaction kinetics were 0.0031 s-1, 0.0054 s-1, and 0.00937 s-1 for a temperature of 55 °C, 60 °C and 65 °C, respectively. For modelling, reaction kinetics were 0.0030 s-1, 0.0055 s-1, and 0.0090 s-1 for a temperature of 55°C, 60°C and 65°C, respectively. Rate and conversion of reaction are getting increased by increasing temperature.

  10. Catalyst study for the decontamination of atmospheres containing few traces of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, J.; Montel, J.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    The conversion of tritium at very low activity level using catalytic oxidation followed by water trapping is studied in the loop BEATRICE in order to measure kinetic parameters required for the design of the NET tritium clean-up system. Two precious-metal catalysts (Pd/alumina and Pt/alumina) are very efficient in removing tritium from contaminated gas mixtures down to a few MPC level at low temperatures, without need of isotopic swamping. However at room temperature, the trapping of tritium species on the catalyst surface gives rise to a progressive deactivation with time. Best regeneration conditions have to be determined in order to demonstrate industrial feasibility of operating at low temperatures

  11. Thermal conductivity of catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells: Part 1 - Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Mohammad; Tam, Mickey; Saha, Madhu S.; Stumper, Jürgen; Bahrami, Majid

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a new methodology is proposed for measuring the through-plane thermal conductivity of catalyst layers (CLs) in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The proposed methodology is based on deconvolution of bulk thermal conductivity of a CL from measurements of two thicknesses of the CL, where the CLs are sandwiched in a stack made of two catalyst-coated substrates. Effects of hot-pressing, compression, measurement method, and substrate on the through-plane thermal conductivity of the CL are studied. For this purpose, different thicknesses of catalyst are coated on ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) and aluminum (Al) substrates by a conventional Mayer bar coater and measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The through-plane thermal conductivity of the CLs is measured by the well-known guarded heat flow (GHF) method as well as a recently developed transient plane source (TPS) method for thin films which modifies the original TPS thin film method. Measurements show that none of the studied factors has any effect on the through-plane thermal conductivity of the CL. GHF measurements of a non-hot-pressed CL on Al yield thermal conductivity of 0.214 ± 0.005 Wṡm-1ṡK-1, and TPS measurements of a hot-pressed CL on ETFE yield thermal conductivity of 0.218 ± 0.005 Wṡm-1ṡK-1.

  12. Support Screening Studies on the Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid to γ-Valerolactone in Water Using Ru Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Piskun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available γ-Valerolactone (GVL has been identified as a sustainable platform chemical for the production of carbon-based chemicals. Here we report a screening study on the hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA to GVL in water using a wide range of ruthenium supported catalysts in a batch set-up (1 wt. % Ru, 90 °C, 45 bar of H2, 2 wt. % catalyst on LA. Eight monometallic catalysts were tested on carbon based(C, carbon nanotubes (CNT and inorganic supports (Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Nb2O5 and Beta-12.5. The best result was found for Ru/Beta-12.5 with almost quantitative LA conversion (94% and 66% of GVL yield after 2 h reaction. The remaining product was 4-hydroxypentanoic acid (4-HPA. Catalytic activity for a bimetallic RuPd/TiO2 catalyst was by far lower than for the monometallic Ru catalyst (9% conversion after 2 h. The effects of relevant catalyst properties (average Ru nanoparticle size, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET surface area, micropore area and total acidity on catalyst activity were assessed.

  13. Characterization and parametric study of mesoporous calcium titanate catalyst for transesterification of waste cooking oil into biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahya, Noor Yahida; Ngadi, Norzita; Jusoh, Mazura; Halim, Noor Amirah Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: •Simple synthesis of mesoporous calcium titanate by sol-gel-hydrothermal method. •Improvement of characteristics and catalytic activity from commercial CaO. • Production of biodiesel at relatively mild reaction conditions. - Abstract: Mesoporous calcium titanate (MCT) catalyst was synthesized via a sol-gel-hydrothermal method and investigated as a catalyst for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil (WCO). Calcium was supported on titanate in order to increase their surface area, stability and consequently, improve its performance in the transesterification of WCO to biodiesel. Synthesized catalyst was characterized with powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), N_2 physisorption, Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and carbon dioxide temperature-programmed desorption (CO_2-TPD). The catalyst possessed high surface area, basicity and stability than calcium oxide (CaO) catalyst. The highest biodiesel yield achieved was 80.0% in 3:1 of methanol to WCO molar ratio, 0.2 wt.% of MCT catalyst for 1 h at 65 °C. Reusability study suggested that this catalyst can be recycled for five successive runs.

  14. Acid properties of catalysts as studied by CO adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knozinger, H.

    1992-01-01

    CO is a soft base and can therefore, be used as a highly specific probe for acid sites on oxide surfaces. Relative acidity sequences of Bronsted sites can be established based on the IR-hydroxyl frequency shifts when CO is adsorbed by H-bonding at 77 K. Coordination of CO onto coordinately unsaturated cation sites (Lewis acid sites) leads to cation-sensitive carbonyl stretching frequency shifts. The CO stretching band postions can be correlated with the electric field strength exerted by the cation. A universal correlation seems to exist. Applications of these principles for the study of binary oxides; zeolites, supported oxides and sulfides will be discussed in this paper

  15. Structural Modification of Cobalt Catalysts: Effect of Wetting Studied by X-Ray and Infrared Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodakov A.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wetting on the structure and localisation of cobalt species on various supports (Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, HZSM-5 zeolite was studied using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with CO as a molecular probe, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. Aqueous impregnation to incipient wetness of reduced and passivated cobalt catalysts results, even in the absence of any promoter, in a considerable decrease in the concentration of Co crystalline phases and modifies the surface sites. The decrease in the concentration of Co3O4 crystallites was especially pronounced on silica supported catalysts prepared via impregnation of cobalt and on a mixture of Co3O4 and HZSM-5 zeolite. Saturation with water of the passivated Co/SiO2 sample results in an amorphous solid with a local structure close to that of Co2SiO4. For Co/Al2O3 and Co/TiO2 catalysts, the effect of wetting on the concentration of Co3O4 crystalline phase was considerably smaller.

  16. Comparison study of catalyst nanoparticle formation and carbon nanotube growth: Support effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yunyu; Luo Zhiquan; Li Bin; Ho, Paul S.; Yao Zhen; Shi Li; Bryan, Eugene N.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    A comparison study has been conducted on the formation of catalyst nanoparticles on a high surface tension metal and low surface tension oxide for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). Silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) and tantalum have been deposited as supporting layers before deposition of a thin layer of iron catalyst. Iron nanoparticles were formed after thermal annealing. It was found that densities, size distributions, and morphologies of iron nanoparticles were distinctly different on the two supporting layers. In particular, iron nanoparticles revealed a Volmer-Weber growth mode on SiO 2 and a Stranski-Krastanov mode on tantalum. CCVD growth of CNTs was conducted on iron/tantalum and iron/SiO 2 . CNT growth on SiO 2 exhibited a tip growth mode with a slow growth rate of less than 100 nm/min. In contrast, the growth on tantalum followed a base growth mode with a fast growth rate exceeding 1 μm/min. For comparison, plasma enhanced CVD was also employed for CNT growth on SiO 2 and showed a base growth mode with a growth rate greater than 2 μm/min. The enhanced CNT growth rate on tantalum was attributed to the morphologies of iron nanoparticles in combination with the presence of an iron wetting layer. The CNT growth mode was affected by the adhesion between the catalyst and support as well as CVD process

  17. Study of Alginate-Supported Ionic Liquid and Pd Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Guibal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available New catalytic materials, based on palladium immobilized in ionic liquid supported on alginate, were elaborated. Alginate was associated with gelatin for the immobilization of ionic liquids (ILs and the binding of palladium. These catalytic materials were designed in the form of highly porous monoliths (HPMs, in order to be used in a column reactor. The catalytic materials were tested for the hydrogenation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA in the presence of formic acid as hydrogen donor. The different parameters for the elaboration of the catalytic materials were studied and their impact analyzed in terms of microstructures, palladium sorption properties and catalytic performances. The characteristics of the biopolymer (proportion of β-D-mannuronic acid (M and α-L-guluronic acid (G in the biopolymer defined by the M/G ratio, the concentration of the porogen agent, and the type of coagulating agent significantly influenced catalytic performances. The freezing temperature had a significant impact on structural properties, but hardly affected the catalytic rate. Cellulose fibers were incorporated as mechanical strengthener into the catalytic materials, and allowed to enhance mechanical properties and catalytic efficiency but required increasing the amount of hydrogen donor for catalysis.

  18. Studying nature of oxide catalyst activity in olefine hydrogenetion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minachev, Kh.M.; Khodakov, Yu.S.; Makarov, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    La 2 O 3 activity nature in ethylene hydrogenation is discussed. The adsorbed forms of H 2 , ethylene, as well as CO, CO 2 , H 2 O, isolated at thermovacuum treatment, are studied. The conclusions on the mechanism of La 2 O 3 poizoning are made on the basis of investigation into interaction of C 2 H 4 and H 2 adsorbed forms with one another and with CO, CO 2 , H 2 O. It has been found that La 2 O 3 poisoning by water, CO and CO 2 at low-temperature ethylene hydrogenation is connected with the adsorptive hydrogen displacement. At adsorption temperatures of 20,-68,-78 deg, CO and CO 2 have been adsorbed in α-, β-, γ-forms; ethylene in α-and β-forms, and hydrogen only in the α-form. The adsorbed hydrogen at -68, -78 deg is irreversibly desorbed by CO and CO 2 . The adsorptive C 2 H 4 displacement by the above materials is observed only at 20 deg. According to the specific toxic effect of ethylene hydrogenation on La 2 O 3 poisons are placed in the following way: CO > CO 2 > H 2 O

  19. Nanoporosity studies of novel catalysts through positronium annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, M. V.; Rodríguez-Rojas, R. A.; Castañeda-Contreras, J.; Nava, R.; Consolati, G.; Castaño, V. M.

    2006-10-01

    Eight novel hybrid silica gel-succinic acid-zinc acetate samples were analyzed through Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy in order to study average free volume quantities and free volume distributions. The aim of this work was to understand the type of porosity within these species and its relationship with surface textural properties (tested by the BET method) and catalytic activity. We found a noticeable dependence of o-Ps lifetimes on the nature of each modifier agent (succinic acid, Zn acetate, succinic acid-Zn acetate) fixed on the surface of SiO 2 and SiO 2-Al 2O 3 particles. We observed the trend of the Zinc acetate to create mesopores among silica particles, while succinic acid acts as a positronium quencher and a nanoporosity performer. Long o-Ps lifetimes were decomposed into two components accounting for the existence of interparticle and intraparticle holes, however discrepancies beyond elementary facts between the BET method measurements and our positronium calculations were found. A discussion of the kind of open spaces analysis necessary to fully understand the porosity in these hybrid materials is also presented.

  20. A Study of CO2 Methanation over Ni-Based Catalysts Supported by CNTs with Various Textural Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Yanyan Feng; Wen Yang; Wei Chu

    2015-01-01

    This work studied the influence of textural characteristics of CNTs on catalytic performance of Ni/CNTs for CO2 methanation. The CNTs supports were prepared by chemical vapor deposition method using Ni/MgO catalysts, and acetonitrile and ethanol were used as carbon sources, respectively. The Ni/CNTs catalysts were prepared via impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption, and temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) techniques. The results indica...

  1. SISGR-Fundamental Experimental and Theoretical Studies on a Novel Family of Oxide Catalyst Supports for Water Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumta, Prashant [University of Pittsburgh

    2014-10-03

    Identification and development of non-noble metal based electro-catalysts or electro-catalysts with significant reduction of expensive noble metal contents (E.g. IrO2, Pt) with comparable electrochemical performance as the standard noble metal/metal oxide for proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolysis would constitute a major breakthrough in the generation of hydrogen by water electrolysis. Accomplishing such a system would not only result reduction of the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers, but also help attain the targeted hydrogen production cost [< $ 3.0 / gallon gasoline equivalent (gge)] comparable to conventional liquid fuels. In line with these goals, it was demonstrated that fluorine doped IrO2 thin films and nanostructured high surface area powders display remarkably higher electrochemical activity, and comparable durability as pure IrO2 electro-catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis. Furthermore, corrosion resistant SnO2 and NbO2 support has been doped with F and coupled with IrO2 or RuO2 for use as an OER electro-catalyst. A solid solution of SnO2:F or NbO2:F with only 20 - 30 mol.% IrO2 or RuO2 yielding a rutile structure in the form of thin films and bulk nanoparticles displays similar electrochemical activity and stability as pure IrO2/RuO2. This would lead to more than 70 mol.% reduction in the noble metal oxide content. Novel nanostructured ternary (Ir,Sn,Nb)O2 thin films of different compositions FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRO-CATALYSTS WITH REDUCED NOBLE METAL CONTENT FOR PEM BASED WATER ELECTROLYSIS 4 have also been studied. It has been shown that (Ir0.40Sn0.30Nb0.30)O2 shows similar electrochemical activity and enhanced chemical robustness as compared to pure IrO2. F doping of the ternary (Ir,Sn,Nb)O2 catalyst helps in further decreasing the noble metal oxide content of the catalyst. As a result, these reduced noble metal oxide catalyst systems would

  2. Soybean oil transesterification: Study of using Nb2O5.xH2O as catalyst in biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. dos Santos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Economic and environmental reasons show a trend towards replacing fossil fuels with biofuels such as those from triglycerides. Biodiesel can be obtained from vegetable oils and animal fat through several processes such as transesterification, esterification, usually with methanol, ethanol or through pyrolysis, all of them in the presence of an acid or basis catalyst. The use of solid catalysts in biodiesel production has the following advantages: easy recovery and reuse, thus decreasing process costs and amount of waste generated.1 Some of the problems in the use of solid catalysts are: low concentration of active sites, microporosity, and leaching of active sites.2 Studies aiming at developing methodologies involving hydrated niobium oxide as catalyst in biodiesel production have been carried out by our research group.3,4 Parameters such as the use of assistant solvent to increase the boiling point of the mixture (toluene, ethylene glycol, and DMSO, pre-thermal treatment (calcinations and catalyst molar concentration were initially assessed in esterification, oleic acid, and methanol reactions.  From these studies we could observe that high temperatures and excessive alcohol favor esterification reactions.  The best reaction conditions were then used as models and employed in transesterification reactions of soybean oil.  DMSO (Dimethyl sulfoxide was the solvent used to increase the reaction medium temperature without evaporating all the methanol. Transesterification reactions were carried out with soybean oil (0.5 g, methanol (0.85 g, DMSO (2.50 ml, and hydrated niobium oxide as catalyst in ratios of 20% and 100% (in relation to oil mass.  Catalyst was employed without pretreatment and after pretreatment at 115 °C, 300 °C, and 500 °C. The reactions occurred at 170 °C, under reflux for 48 hours.  A reaction without a catalyst was also carried out. All the reactions have shown conversion using CCD and they have been determined by 1H NMR

  3. In situ FTIRS study of ethanol electro-oxidation on anode catalysts in direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q.; Sun, G.; Jiang, L.; Zhu, M.; Yan, S.; Wang, G.; Xin, Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian (China). Dalian Inst. of Chemical Physics; Chen, Q.; Li, J.; Jiang, Y.; Sun, S. [Xiamen Univ., Xiamen (China). State Key Lab. for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces

    2006-07-01

    The low activation of ethanol oxidation at lower temperatures is an obstacle to the development of cost-effective direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs). This study used a modified polyol method to prepare carbon-supported platinum (Pt) based catalysts. Carbon supported Pt-based catalysts were fabricated by a modified polyol method and characterized through transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results of the study showed that the particles in the Pt/C and PtRu/C and PtSn/C catalysts were distributed on the carbon support uniformly. Diffraction peaks of the Pt shifted positively in the PtRu/C catalysts and negatively in the PtSn/C catalysts. In situ Fourier Transform Infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to investigate the adsorption and oxidation process of ethanol on the catalysts. Results showed that the electrocatalytic activity of ethanol oxidation on the materials was enhanced. Linear bonded carbon monoxide (CO) was the most strongly absorbed species, and the main products produced by the catalysts were carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), acetaldehyde, and acetic acid. Results showed that the PtRu/C catalyst broke the C-C bond more easily than the Pt/C and PtSn/C compounds. However, the results of a linear sweep voltammogram analysis showed that ethanol oxidation of the PtSn/C was enhanced. Bands observed on the compound indicated the formation of acetic acid and acetaldehyde. It was concluded that the enhancement of PtSn/C for ethanol oxidation was due to the formation of acetic acid and acetaldehyde at lower potentials. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Crystal structure of N′′-benzyl-N′′-[3-(benzyldimethylazaniumylpropyl]-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylguanidinium bis(tetraphenylborate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title salt, C24H38N42+·2C24H20B−, the C—N bond lengths in the central CN3 unit of the guanidinium ion are 1.3364 (13, 1.3407 (13 and 1.3539 (13 Å, indicating partial double-bond character. The central C atom is bonded to the three N atoms in a nearly ideal trigonal–planar geometry and the positive charge is delocalized in the CN3 plane. The bonds between the N atoms and the terminal methyl groups of the guanidinium moiety and the four C—N bonds to the central N atom of the (benzyldimethylazaniumylpropyl group have single-bond character. In the crystal, C—H...π interactions between the guanidinium H atoms and the phenyl C atoms of the tetraphenylborate ions are present, leading to the formation of a two-dimensional supramolecular pattern parallel to the ac plane.

  5. Crystal Structure of [Bis(DIMETHYLFORMAMIDE Bis (2,2’-PYRIDYLQUINOLINE Iron (II] Bis-(TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohari M. Yamin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to obtain single crystal and structural information of iron(II complex with 2,(2'-pyridylquinoline(pq ligands. The reaction of iron(II salt with 2,(2'-pyridylquinoline ligand and sodiumtetraphenylborate in the molar ratio of 1:3:2 in methanol-N,N-dimethylformamide(dmf solution results in an iron(IIcomplex. The formula of the [Fe(pq2(dmf2](BPh42 complex has been obtained from the iron(II and C, H, N contents.Single crystal of [Fe(pq2(dmf2](BPh42 suitable for X-ray investigation was obtained by evaporation of the complexsolution in N,N-dimethylformamide at room temperature after 24 hours. This compound crystallizes in monoclinicsystem with C2/c space group, a = 27.950(4, b = 14.169(7, c = 17.717(9 Å and b = 105.669(11°. The structureconsist of iron(II is chelated by two pq ligands through the N atoms and two dmf molecules in a six-coordinationenvironment. The charge of the [Fe(pq2(dmf2]2+ cation is balanced by two tetraphenylborate (BPh4- anions.

  6. In operando Detection of Three-Way Catalyst Aging by a Microwave-Based Method: Initial Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Beulertz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Initial studies on aging detection of three way catalysts with a microwave cavity perturbation method were conducted. Two physico-chemical effects correlate with the aging state. At high temperatures, the resonance frequencies for oxidized catalysts (λ = 1.02 are not influenced by aging, but are significantly affected by aging in the reduced case (λ = 0.98. The catalyst aging state can therefore potentially be inferred from the resonance frequency differences between reduced and oxidized states or from the resonance frequency amplitudes during lambda oscillations. Secondly, adsorbed water at low temperatures strongly affects the resonance frequencies. Light-off experiment studies showed that the resonance frequency depends on the aging state at temperatures below the oxygen storage light-off. These differences were attributed to different water sorption capabilities of differently aged samples due to a surface area decrease with proceeding aging. In addition to the aging state, the water content in the feed gas and the temperature affect the amount of adsorbed water, leading to different integral electrical material properties of the catalyst and changing the resonance properties of the catalyst-filled canning. The classical aging-related properties of the catalyst (oxygen storage capacity, oxygen storage light-off, surface area, agreed very well with data obtained by the microwave-based method.

  7. Deuterium absorption in Mg70Al30 thin films with bilayer catalysts: A comparative neutron reflectometry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, Eric; Harrower, Chris T.; Kalisvaart, Peter; Bird, Adam; Teichert, Anke; Wallacher, Dirk; Grimm, Nico; Steitz, Roland; Mitlin, David; Fritzsche, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mg 70 Al 30 thin films studied for hydrogen absorption using in situ neutron reflectometry. → Films with Ta/Pd, Ti/Pd and Ni/Pd bilayer catalysts systematically compared. → Measurements reveals deuterium spillover from the catalysts to the MgAl phase. → The use of Ti-Pd bilayer offers best results in terms of amount absorbed and kinetics. → Key results cross-checked with X-ray reflectometry. - Abstract: We present a neutron reflectometry study of deuterium absorption in thin films of Al-containing Mg alloys capped with a Ta/Pd, Ni/Pd and Ti/Pd-catalyst bilayer. The measurements were performed at room temperature over the 0-1 bar pressure range under quasi-equilibrium conditions. The modeling of the measurements provided a nanoscale representation of the deuterium profile in the layers at different stages of the absorption process. The absorption mechanism observed was found to involve spillover of atomic deuterium from the catalyst layer to the Mg alloy phase, followed by the deuteration of the Mg alloy. Complete deuteration of the Mg alloy occurs in a pressure range between 100 and 500 mbar, dependent on the type of bilayer catalyst. The use of a Ti/Pd bilayer catalyst yielded the best results in terms of both storage density and kinetic properties.

  8. A study on the properties of blended regenerated spent catalyst and cement sandcrete blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amissah, Emmanuel Kofi

    2016-07-01

    Sandcrete is widely used as building material. Its properties greatly depend on the properties and proportions of its constituents. The main binder material to produce sandcrete is the Portland cement. The uncertainty about future availability of commonly used Portland materials concomitantly with the environmental problems such as greenhouse gases emissions and high cost of clinker consumption are highlighting the need of identifying other materials for the construction industry, which will aid in minimizing the clinker consumption and reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and cost in the production of cement. The purpose of this study is to examine the properties of sandcrete blocks produced with blended Regenerated Spent Catalyst and cement. In this work, two different series of sandcrete mixtures in which cement was partially replaced with Regenerated Spent Catalyst(RSC) within the range of 5% to 20% (by mass) with an increment of 5%. 100% cement sandcrete was also prepared as reference sandcrete. The physical properties studied were compressive strength, water absorption and setting time. Chemical property studied was chloride content. Comparison of data between the control and that of cement with additives were made. The results obtained in this study clearly indicated that substituting Portland cement up to 20wt. % RSC gave sandcrete strengths higher than the 32.5N/mm 2 , which corresponds to that of Portland cement. The replacement of Portland cement with 10 wt. % of RSC gave the highest strength of 34.0 N/mm 2 . Thus, Regenerated Spent Catalyst may be utilized as effective mineral additive for designing durable sandcrete structures. The optimum amount of RSC recommended to be added as an additive to the Portland cement is 10%. (au)

  9. Steam reforming of methanol over oxide decorated nanoporous gold catalysts: a combined in situ FTIR and flow reactor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J; Mahr, C; Murshed, M M; Gesing, T M; Rosenauer, A; Bäumer, M; Wittstock, A

    2017-03-29

    Methanol as a green and renewable resource can be used to generate hydrogen by reforming, i.e., its catalytic oxidation with water. In combination with a fuel cell this hydrogen can be converted into electrical energy, a favorable concept, in particular for mobile applications. Its realization requires the development of novel types of structured catalysts, applicable in small scale reactor designs. Here, three different types of such catalysts were investigated for the steam reforming of methanol (SRM). Oxides such as TiO 2 and CeO 2 and mixtures thereof (Ce 1 Ti 2 O x ) were deposited inside a bulk nanoporous gold (npAu) material using wet chemical impregnation procedures. Transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy reveal oxide nanoparticles (1-2 nm in size) abundantly covering the strongly curved surface of the nanoporous gold host (ligaments and pores on the order of 40 nm in size). These catalysts were investigated in a laboratory scaled flow reactor. First conversion of methanol was detected at 200 °C. The measured turn over frequency at 300 °C of the CeO x /npAu catalyst was 0.06 s -1 . Parallel investigation by in situ infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) reveals that the activation of water and the formation of OH ads are the key to the activity/selectivity of the catalysts. While all catalysts generate sufficient OH ads to prevent complete dehydrogenation of methanol to CO, only the most active catalysts (e.g., CeO x /npAu) show direct reaction with formic acid and its decomposition to CO 2 and H 2 . The combination of flow reactor studies and in operando DRIFTS, thus, opens the door to further development of this type of catalyst.

  10. Studies on the behaviour of different spent fluidized-bed catalytic cracking catalysts on Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soriano, L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The fluidized-bed catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC it is a residue from the industry of the petroleum that shows a high pozzolanic reactivity and, in cementing matrix, it significantly improves their mechanical behaviour as well as durability. In this research a comparative study on residues of catalyst from different sources has been carried out, in order to know if these residues can be used jointly in an indiscriminate way or, on the contrary, it is necessary to classify them according to their characteristics. Thus, a study on five different FCC residues, supplied from different companies, has been carried out, and their physical-chemical characteristics, pozzolanic reactivity by means of thermogravimetric analysis and the evolution of the mechanical strength of mortars were studied. After analyzing all the aspects, it can be concluded that no significant differences among the different tested catalysts were found.El catalizador de craqueo catalítico (FCC es un residuo de la industria del petróleo que posee una elevada reactividad puzolánica y en matrices cementicias mejora de manera importante los aspectos mecánicos así como de durabilidad. En este trabajo se realiza un estudio comparativo sobre residuos de catalizador de distintos orígenes, para poder conocer si se pueden utilizar conjuntamente de forma indiscriminada o por el contrario hay que catalogarlos según su origen. Para ello, se realizó un estudio sobre cinco residuos de catalizador de craqueo catalítico distintos, suministrados por diferentes empresas y se estudiaron sus características fisicoquímicas, reactividad puzolánica a través de estudios termogravimétricos y la evolución de las resistencias mecánicas en morteros. Tras analizar todos los aspectos se concluye que no existen diferencias significativas entre los distintos catalizadores empleados.

  11. Study of Supported Nickel Catalysts Prepared by Aqueous Hydrazine Method. Hydrogenating Properties and Hydrogen Storage: Support Effect. Silver Additive Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcieszak, R.

    2006-06-01

    We have studied Ni or NiAg nano-particles obtained by the reduction of nickel salts (acetate or nitrate) by hydrazine and deposited by simple or EDTA-double impregnation on various supports (γ-Al 2 O 3 , amorphous or crystallized SiO 2 , Nb 2 O 5 , CeO 2 and carbon). Prepared catalysts were characterized by different methods (XRD, XPS, low temperature adsorption and desorption of N 2 , FTIR and FTIR-Pyridine, TEM, STEM, EDS, H 2 -TPR, H 2 -adsorption, H 2 -TPD, isopropanol decomposition) and tested in the gas phase hydrogenation of benzene or as carbon materials in the hydrogen storage at room temperature and high pressure. The catalysts prepared exhibited better dispersion and activity than classical catalysts. TOF's of NiAg/SiO 2 or Ni/carbon catalysts were similar to Pt catalysts in benzene hydrogenation. Differences in support acidity or preparation method and presence of Ag as metal additive play a crucial role in the chemical reduction of Ni by hydrazine and in the final properties of the materials. Ni/carbon catalysts could store significant amounts of hydrogen at room temperature and high pressure (0.53%/30 bars), probably through the hydrogen spillover effect. (author)

  12. Mechanistic Studies of Metal-Oxo Cubane Catalysts for Lightweight Solar Fuels Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    13692. 4 “ Single - crystal growth, crystal and electronic structure of NaCoO2.” Takahashi, Y.; Gotoh, Y.; Akimoto, J. J. Sol. State Chem. 2003, 172, 22...bond formation by the Co–OEC catalysts. 2. A penetrating study of Co3 +|Co4+ self-exchange kinetics of Co4O4 cubanes and a detailed understanding of...construct the artificial leaf described in (7). 4. The examination of Co2+| Co3 + self-exchange in a faithful structural molecular analog of the 7

  13. System Identification for Experimental Study for Polymerization Catalyst Reaction in Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmmed Saadi Ibrehem

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, system identification method is used to capture the reactor characteristics of production rate of polyethylene (PE based on published experimental data. The identification method is used to measure the percentage effect on the production rate of PE by measuring the effect of input factors of temperature of reaction, hydrogen concentration, and [Al]/[Ti] molar catalyst ratio. Temperature of reaction has big effects equal 52.4 % on the output of the system and 47.6 % on interaction of the system's parameters compare to other two factors. Also, hydrogen concentration has big effect equal 45.66 % on the output of the system and 14.7 % on interaction of the system's parameters. [Al]/[Ti] molar catalyst ratio has big effect on interaction of the system equal 28.6 and 1.94 % on the output of the system but less than the reaction temperature and hydrogen concentration. All these results depend on experiment results and these results are very important in industrial plants. ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 13rd May 2011; Revised: 27th July 2011; Accepted: 22th September 2011[How to Cite: Ahmmed S. Ibrehem. (2011. System Identification for Experimental Study for Polymerization Catalyst Reaction in Fluidized Bed. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 137-146. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.874.137-146][How to Link / DOI: http://dx,doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.874.137-146 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/874 ] | View in 

  14. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  15. Atomic level study of water-gas shift catalysts via transmission electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatay, Mehmed Cem

    Water-gas shift (WGS), CO + H2O ⇆ CO2 + H2 (DeltaH° = -41 kJ mol -1), is an industrially important reaction for the production of high purity hydrogen. Commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts are employed to accelerate this reaction, yet these catalysts suffer from certain drawbacks, including costly regeneration processes and sulfur poisoning. Extensive research is focused on developing new catalysts to replace the current technology. Supported noble metals stand out as promising candidates, yet comprise intricate nanostructures complicating the understanding of their working mechanism. In this study, the structure of the supported Pt catalysts is explored by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of the supporting phase and the use of secondary metals on the reaction kinetics is investigated. Structural heterogeneities are quantified and correlated with the kinetic descriptors of the catalysts to develop a fundamental understanding of the catalytic mechanism. The effect of the reaction environment on catalyst structure is examined by in-situ techniques. This study benefitted greatly from the use of model catalysts that provide a convenient medium for the atomic level characterization of nanostructures. Based on these studies, Pt supported on iron oxide nano islands deposited on inert spherical alumina exhibited 48 times higher WGS turnover rate (normalized by the total Pt surface area) than Pt supported on bulk iron oxide. The rate of aqueous phase glycerol reforming reaction of Pt supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) is promoted by co-impregnating with cobalt. The synthesis resulted in a variety of nanostructures among which Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles are found to be responsible for the observed promotion. The unprecedented WGS rate of Pt supported on Mo2C is explored by forming Mo 2C patches on top of MWCNTs and the rate promotion is found to be caused by the Pt-Mo bimetallic entities.

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of catalyst based zinc oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, S.S.; Rajpure, K.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The two step approach for quantitative XPS analysis of ZnO films has been reported. → Surface composition and chemical states of F and In/ZnO catalysts have been studied. → The chemical shifts and Auger parameter have been investigated. - Abstract: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a powerful tool for surface and interface analysis, providing an elemental composition of surfaces and the local chemical environment of adsorbed species. The surface composition and chemical states of the F/ZnO and In/ZnO catalysts deposited using spray technique have been studied by high resolution and high sensitivity X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A hybrid multiline method is proposed for quantitative XPS analysis that combines the first principles approach with the experimental determination of overall response function. The chemical shifts of XPS core lines for Zn (2P 3/2 , F 1s and In 3d) and Auger parameter for zinc (β Zn = 2012.6, 2011.48 eV for F/ZnO and In/ZnO, respectively) have been calculated. The results have been used to determine the bond iconicity (0.55).

  17. Study of the performance of vanadium based catalysts prepared by grafting in the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santacesaria, E.; Carotenuto, G.; Tesser, R.; Di Serio, M. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane has been investigated by using many different vanadia based catalysts, prepared by grafting technique and containing variable amounts of active phase supported on SiO{sub 2} previously coated, by grafting in three different steps, with multilayer of TiO{sub 2}. A depth catalytic screening, conducted in a temperature range of 400-600 C, at atmospheric pressure and in a range of residence time W/F=0.08-0.33 ghmol{sub -1}, has shown that the vanadium oxide catalysts on TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} support, prepared by grafting have good performances in the ODH of propane. In particular, a preliminary study has demonstrated that higher selectivities can be obtained employing catalysts having a well dispersed active phase that can be achieved with a V{sub 2}O{sub 5} content lower than 10%{sub w}t. It is well known that, in the case of redox catalysts, an increase of the selectivity can be achieved not only by using an adequate catalytic system but also via engineering routes like decoupling catalytic steps of reduction and re-oxidation. In fact it has been observed that by operating in dehydrogenating mode, on the same catalysts, a higher selectivity is obtained although the catalyst is poisoned by the formation of coke on the surface. As consequence of the results obtained in dehydrogenation, in this work has been explored the possibility to feed low amounts of oxygen, below the stoichiometric level with the aim to keep clean the surface from coke but maintaining high the selectivity, because, dehydrogenation reaction prevails. In this work, the behavior of catalysts containing different amounts of V2O5 has been studied in the propane-propene reaction by using different ratios C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/O{sub 2} included in the range 0-2. (orig.)

  18. Studies of catalyst material for the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol, formaldehyde and formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajwa, S.Z.; Ahmed, R.

    2007-01-01

    Fuel cell is an electrochemical device that converts the chemical energy of reaction directly into the electrical energy. It is highly efficient and environment friendly device. Normally used fuel in fuel cells is hydrogen, but due to the convenience in handling some other liquid fuels are also used and now direct methanol fuel cells are available in the market. Rapid electro-oxidation of the fuel at the fuel cell electrode is necessary for its optimum use. In addition to the methanol, other liquid fuels can also be used in the fuel cell. In this work, cyclic voltammetric studies have been done for the electro-oxidation of the methanol, ethanol, formic acid and formaldehyde on fuel cell catalyst. Platinum electrode is characterized by the measurement of active surface area and roughness factor. Classical electrochemical equations have been employed to find out rate constants for electro-oxidation of methanol fuel and calculations have been carried out to find out thermodynamic parameters. Exchange current density has been evaluated with reference to catalyst by drawing polarization curves. (author)

  19. Density functional theory study for the enhanced sulfur tolerance of Ni catalysts by surface alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Bohyun; Kwon, Hyunguk; Ko, Jeonghyun; Kim, Byung-Kook; Han, Jeong Woo

    2018-01-01

    Sulfur compounds in fuels deactivate the surface of anode materials in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which adversely affect the long-term durability. To solve this issue, it is important to design new SOFC anode materials with high sulfur tolerance. Unfortunately, it is difficult to completely replace the traditional Ni anode owing to its outstanding reactivity with low cost. As an alternative, alloying Ni with transition metals is a practical strategy to enhance the sulfur resistance while taking advantage of Ni metal. Therefore, in this study, we examined the effects of transition metal (Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au) doping into a Ni catalyst on not only the adsorption of H2S, HS, S, and H but also H2S decomposition using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The dopant metals were selected rationally by considering the stability of the Ni-based binary alloys. The interactions between sulfur atoms produced by H2S dissociation and the surface are weakened by the dopant metals at the topmost layer. In addition, the findings show that H2S dissociation can be suppressed by doping transition metals. It turns out that these effects are maximized in the Au-doped Ni catalyst. Our DFT results will provide useful insights into the design of sulfur-tolerant SOFC anode materials.

  20. Open circuit voltage durability study and model of catalyst coated membranes at different humidification levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Sumit; Fowler, Michael W.; Simon, Leonardo C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Abouatallah, Rami; Beydokhti, Natasha [Hydrogenics Corporation, 5985 McLaughlin Road, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-11-01

    Fuel cell material durability is an area of extensive research today. Chemical degradation of the ionomer membrane is one important degradation mechanism leading to overall failure of fuel cells. This study examined the effects of relative humidity on the chemical degradation of the membrane during open circuit voltage testing. Five Gore trademark PRIMEA {sup registered} series 5510 catalyst coated membranes were degraded at 100%, 75%, 50%, and 20% RH. Open circuit potential and cumulative fluoride release were monitored over time. Additionally scanning electron microscopy images were taken at end of the test. The results showed that with decreasing RH fluoride release rate increased as did performance degradation. This was attributed to an increase in gas crossover with a decrease in RH. Further, it is also shown that interruptions in testing may heavily influence cumulative fluoride release measurements where frequent stoppages in testing will cause fluoride release to be underestimated. SEM analysis shows that degradation occurred in the ionomer layer close to the cathode catalyst. A chemical degradation model of the ionomer membrane was used to model the results. The model was able to predict fluoride release trends, including the effects of interruptions, showing that changes in gas crossover with RH could explain the experimental results. (author)

  1. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etherton, B.P.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts which were examined by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The metal particle size and number of particles per area of catalyst increased with increasing metal loading. The particles were approx. 10 A. in diameter, cubo-octahedral shaped, and approx. 80-90% disperse. The STEM electron beam caused negligible damage to the samples. Hydrogen adsorption measurements showed that the hydrogen-iridium atom ratio was 1.2:1-1.3:1 and increased with decreasing metal loading. Temperature-programed desorption showed four types of adsorbed hydrogen desorbing at -90/sup 0/C (I), 15/sup 0/C (IV), 115/sup 0/C (II), and 245/sup 0/C (III). Types II and IV desorb from single atom sites and Types I and III from multiple atom sites. Type I is in rapid equilibrium with the gas phase. All desorption processes appear to be first order. Carbon monoxide adsorbed nondissociatively at 25/sup 0/C with approx. 0.7:1 CO/Ir atom ratio. It adsorbed primarily in linear forms at low coverage, but a bridged form appeared at high coverage.

  2. Hydroprocessing catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorman, P.M.; Kydd, R.A.; Sorensen, T.S.; Chong, K.; Lewis, J.

    1992-08-01

    Co-Mo and Ni-Mo hydroprocessing catalysts were examined for their activity in removal of sulfur from thiophene in model compounds, and in the cracking and hydrocracking of cumene. Three types of support materials were examined: carbon, modified carbon, and carbon covered alumina. The objective of the study was to examine the correlation between catalyst activity in the hydrodenitrogenation of model compounds, and the resistance of the catalyst to nitrogen poisoning during use in the hydroprocessing of gas oils. The use of model compound testing provided information on the individual catalytic reactions promoted by those materials. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study surface species on the catalysts and to explain many of the trends in activity observed, revealing the role of fluoride and phosphorus as a secondary promoter. Testing of the catalysts in hydrotreating of gas oils allowed comparison of model compound results with those from a real feedstock. The gas oil was also spiked with a model nitrogen compound and the results from catalytic hydrotreating of this material were compared with those from unspiked material. A key finding was that the carbon supported catalysts were the most effective in treating high-nitrogen feeds. The very favorable deactivation properties of carbon and carbon-covered alumina supported catalysts make these promising from an industrial point of view where catalyst deactivation is a limiting factor. 171 refs., 25 figs., 43 tabs.

  3. In-situ Spectroscopic Studies and Modelling of Crystallization Processes of Sulphuric Acid Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlers, C.; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Masters, Stephen Grenville

    1996-01-01

    Deactivation of commercial and prototype sulphuric acid catalysts has been investigated in-situ by ESR spectroscopy. The influence of support pore structure,and the chemical composition of the catalyst and the gas phase was dicussed.A statistical lattice model was applied to describe the crystall......Deactivation of commercial and prototype sulphuric acid catalysts has been investigated in-situ by ESR spectroscopy. The influence of support pore structure,and the chemical composition of the catalyst and the gas phase was dicussed.A statistical lattice model was applied to describe...

  4. HZSM-5 CATALYST FOR CRACKING PALM OIL TO BIODIESEL: A COMPARATIVE STUDY WITH AND WITHOUT PT AND PD IMPREGNATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Budianto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Needs of healthy environment and green energy poses a great demand for alternative energy. Biofuel is one of the alternative energy products that are environmentally friendly. Biofuel can be made from plant oils, especially palm oil. Cracking of palm oil into biofuel is constrained by the availability of catalysts. Moreover the available catalyst still gives a low yield. This research aims to study the effect of Pt and Pd impregnation into HZSM-5 catalyst on the catalytic properties. Another aim is to obtain the operating conditions of the catalytic cracking process of palm oil into biofuel which gives the highest yield and selectivity, especially for biodiesel and biogasoline fractions. Catalytic cracking process was carried out in a micro fixed bed reactor with diameter of 1 cm and length of 16 cm. The reactor was filled with a catalyst. The results of the study successfully prove that Pt and Pd impregnated into HZSM-5 catalyst can increase the yield and selectivity of biodiesel. Pd and Pt are highly recommended to increase the yield and selectivity of biodiesel.

  5. Dry (CO_2) reforming of methane over Pt catalysts studied by DFT and kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Juntian; Du, Xuesen; Ran, Jingyu; Wang, Ruirui

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CH appears to be the most abundant species on Pt(1 1 1) surface in CH_4 dissociation. • CO_2* + H* → COOH* + * → CO* + OH* is the dominant reaction pathway in CO_2 activation. • Major reaction pathway in CH oxidation: CH* + OH* → CHOH* + * → CHO* + H* → CO* + 2H*. • C* + OH* → COH* + * → CO* + H* is the dominant reaction pathway in C oxidation. - Abstract: Dry reforming of methane (DRM) is a well-studied reaction that is of both scientific and industrial importance. In order to design catalysts that minimize the deactivation and improve the selectivity and activity for a high H_2/CO yield, it is necessary to understand the elementary reaction steps involved in activation and conversion of CO_2 and CH_4. In our present work, a microkinetic model based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations is applied to explore the reaction mechanism for methane dry reforming on Pt catalysts. The adsorption energies of the reactants, intermediates and products, and the activation barriers for the elementary reactions involved in the DRM process are calculated over the Pt(1 1 1) surface. In the process of CH_4 direct dissociation, the kinetic results show that CH dissociative adsorption on Pt(1 1 1) surface is the rate-determining step. CH appears to be the most abundant species on the Pt(1 1 1) surface, suggesting that carbon deposition is not easy to form in CH_4 dehydrogenation on Pt(1 1 1) surface. In the process of CO_2 activation, three possible reaction pathways are considered to contribute to the CO_2 decomposition: (I) CO_2* + * → CO* + O*; (II) CO_2* + H* → COOH* + * → CO* + OH*; (III) CO_2* + H* → mono-HCOO* + * → bi-HCOO* + * [CO_2* + H* → bi-HCOO* + *] → CHO* + O*. Path I requires process to overcome the activation barrier of 1.809 eV and the forward reaction is calculated to be strongly endothermic by 1.430 eV. In addition, the kinetic results also indicate this process is not easy to

  6. Deactivation Studies of Rh/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 Catalysts in Low Temperature Ethanol Steam Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platon, Alex; Roh, Hyun-Seog; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

    2007-10-30

    Rapid deactivation of Rh/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalysts in low temperature ethanol steam reforming was studied. A significant build-up of carbonaceous intermediate, instead of carbon deposit, was observed at a lower reaction temperature which was attributed to the rapid catalyst deactivation. Co-feed experiments indicated that acetone and ethylene caused more severe catalyst deactivation than other oxygenates such as acidic acid and acetaldehyde.

  7. Carbon-Supported Fe Catalysts for CO2 Electroreduction to High-Added Value Products: A DEMS Study: Effect of the Functionalization of the Support

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Rodríguez, S.; García, G.; Calvillo, L.; Celorrio, V.; Pastor, E.; Lázaro, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Vulcan XC-72R-supported Fe catalysts have been synthesised for the electroreduction of CO2 to high-added value products. Catalysts were obtained by the polyol method, using ethylene glycol as solvent and reducing agent. Prior to the metal deposition, Vulcan was subjected to different oxidation treatments in order to modify its surface chemistry and study its influence on the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the catalysts, as well as on the product distribution. The oxidation ...

  8. Kinetics and mechanistic study of n-alkane hydroisomerization reaction on Pt-doped γ-alumina catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Dhar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalysts γ-alumina (GA, the reference catalyst and Pt doped γ-alumina (PGA-s were synthesized using a simple sol-gel technique, in which at first preparation of porous base (GA, then impregnation of platinum salt over the base and finally reduction of platinum in the surface of the support were done. These catalysts prepared in different mole ratios of Pt:Al as 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2 are named as PGA-1, PGA-2 and PGA-3 respectively. The isomerization of n-alkanes (n-hexane, n-heptane and n-octane were investigated over the synthesized catalysts. The 2-methyl pentane (2-MP, 2,2-dimethyl pentane (2,2-DMP and 2,3-dimethyl hexane (2,3-DMH are the major products of respective isomerization of n-hexane, n-heptane and n-octane, besides a small amount of other branched isomers are also produced. The product distribution is comparable to that reported for Pt based other catalysts. The optimal mole ratios of Pt:Al is 1:1 (PGA-2 gives quite good catalytic activity for isomerization of n-alkane. Even through in reusability study, PGA-2 gives better performance than others. We have mainly focused on kinetic study, reaction mechanism behind isomerization and calculated the order of reactions and activation energies of the isomerization reactions in the present work. Keywords: Isomerization, n-alkanes, Catalyst, Reaction mechanism, Kinetics study, Activation energy

  9. Analysis and study on the performance variation of SCR DeNOx catalyst of Coal-Fired Boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianxing, Ren; Fangqin, Li; Jiang, Wu; Qingrong, Liu; Yongwen, Yang; Zhongzhu, Qiu

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO x ) are one kind of harmful substances from the burning process of fossil fuel and air at high temperature. NO x emissions cause serious pollution on atmospheric environment. In this paper, coal-fired utility boilers were chosen as the object, NO x formation mechanism and control were studied, and SCR deNO x technology was used to control NO x emissions from coal-fired boilers. Analyzed the relationship between deNO x efficiency and characteristics of SCR DeNO x catalyst. Through analysis, affecting SCR DeNO x catalyst failure factors, change law of catalytic properties and technical measures to extend the service life of the catalyst were gotten. (author)

  10. Tacticities study of high poly-α-olefins, from poly-1-hexene to poly-1-octadecene, obtained with metallocenes catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Luciano F. da; Galland, Griselda B.

    2003-01-01

    High poly-α-olefins such as poly-1-hexene, poly-1-octene, poly-1-decene, poly-1-dodecene, poly-1-tetradecene, poly-1-hexadecene and poly-1-octadecene were obtained with the homogeneous iso specific catalyst rac-Et[Ind]ZrCl 2 /MAO and with the homogeneous syndiospecific catalyst Me 2 C[Cp(9-Flu)]ZrCl 2 /MAO at the polymerization temperatures of 0 deg C, 30 deg C and 60 deg C. The polymers were analyzed by 13 C NMR to study the influence of the α - olefins sizes, the catalysts type and the polymerization temperatures in their tacticities. The stereospecific control of both catalytic systems decreased with the increase of the reaction temperature and with the α-olefin size. (author)

  11. N,N,N′,N′,N′′,N′′,N′′′,N′′′-Octamethyl(but-2-ynebisamidinium bis(tetraphenylborate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C12H24N42+.2C24H20B−, comprises half a cation and one tetraphenylborate ion. An inversion centre is situated at the mid-point of the triple C[triple-bond]C bond in the cation. The bisamidinium C—N bonds [1.3249 (11 and 1.3267 (11 Å] have double-bond character and both positive charges are delocalized between the dimethylamino groups. The bonds between the N atoms and the terminal C-methyl groups all have values characteristic for a typical single bond [1.4656 (12–1.4687 (12 Å]. The acetylenic bond length [1.1889 (18 Å] is consistent with a triple C[triple-bond]C bond and the butyne carbon chain is almost linear. C—H...π interactions between the bisamidinium methyl H atoms and the phenyl C atoms of the tetraphenylborate ions are present. The phenyl rings form aromatic pockets, in which the cations are embedded. This leads to the formation of a two-dimensional supramolecular pattern in the ab plane.

  12. Study on the Hydrolysis Kinetics of Xylan on Different Acid Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Byeong-Il; Lee, Jae-Won [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we investigated kinetic model for the acid-catalyzed xylan hydrolysis at temperature 120-150 .deg. C. Also, we analyzed the kinetic parameters for xylose production and furfural decomposition. The hydrolysis of xylan and the degradation of xylose were promoted by high reaction temperature and acid concentration. The optimal hydrolysis condition for the highest reaction rate constants (k{sub 1}) was different depending on the acid catalysts. Among sulfuric, oxalic and maleic acid, the xylan reaction rate constants (k{sub 1}) to xylose had the highest value of 0.0241 min{sup -1} when 100 mM sulfuric acid was used at 120 .deg. C. However, sulfuric acid induced more xylose degradation compared to oxalic and maleic acid hydrolysis. The activation energy for xylan degradation was the highest when sulfuric acid was used.

  13. X-ray emission spectroscopy study of iron silicate catalyst FeZSM-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csencsits, R.; Lyman, C.E.; Gronsky, R.

    1988-03-01

    Iron silicate analogs of the zeolite ZMS-5 may be directly synthesized from iron silicate gels in a manner which differs slightly from the alumino-silicate ZSM-5. The resultant white, crystalline iron silicate is referred to as FeZSM-5 in the as-synthesized form. Thermal treatment removes the organic crystal-directing agent and moves some of the framework iron into non-framework sites producing the calcined form of the molecular sieve FeZSM-5. Homogeneity in the distribution of catalytic iron throughout the particles is desired in an optimal catalyst. Distribution of the iron throughout the framework in the as-synthesized forms would affect the final distribution of catalytic iron in the calcined and steamed forms; thus, the iron distribution throughout the as-synthesized and calcined forms of FeZSM-5 were studied using the high spatial resolution on the analytical electron microscope. 7 refs., 3 figs

  14. Kinetic Studies of Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reaction on Model Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Abdulaziz M.

    2016-04-26

    With the increasing production of natural gas as a result of the advancement in the technology, methane conversion to more valuable products has become a must. One of the most attractive processes which allow the utilization of the world’s most abundant hydrocarbon is the oxidative coupling. The main advantage of this process is the ability of converting methane into higher paraffins and olefins (primarily C2) in a direct way using a single reactor. Nevertheless, low C2+ yields have prevented the process to be commercialized despite the fact that great number of attempts to prepare catalysts were conducted so that it can be economically viable. Due to these limitations, understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction can be utilized in improving the catalysts’ performance. The reaction involves the formation of methyl radicals that undergo gas-phase radical reactions. CH4 activation is believed to be done the surface oxygen species. However, recent studies showed that, in addition to the surface oxygen mediated pathway, an OH radical mediated pathway have a large contribution on the CH4 activation. The experiments of Li/MgO, Sr/La2O3 and NaWO4/SiO2 catalysts revealed variation of behavior in activity and selectivity. In addition, water effect analysis showed that Li/MgO deactivate at the presence of water due to sintering phenomena and the loss of active sites. On the other hand, negative effect on the C2 yield and CH4 conversion rate was observed with Sr/La2O3 with increasing the water partial pressure. Na2WO4/SiO2 showed a positive behavior with water in terms of CH4 conversion and C2 yield. In addition, the increment in CH4 conversion rate was found to be proportional with PO2 ¼ PH2O ½ which is consistent with the formation of OH radicals and the OH-mediated pathway. Experiments of using ring-dye laser, which is used to detect OH in combustion experiments, were tried in order to detect OH radicals in the gas-phase of the catalyst. Nevertheless

  15. Study of PtNi/C catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cell; Estudo do catalisador PtNi/C para celula a combustivel de etanol direto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, L.P.R. de; Silva, E.L. da; Amico, S.C.; Malfatti, C.F., E-mail: eticiaprm@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In this work, PtNi binary catalyst and pure platin catalyst were synthesized by the impregnation-reduction method, using Vulcan XC72R as support, for direct ethanol fuel cells. The composition and structure of the catalysts were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, the electrochemical behavior was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and morphology of the catalysts was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the addition of Ni to Pt led to the contraction of the crystal lattice, increased the catalytic activity compared to pure Pt and initiated the electrooxidation of ethanol at lower potential. (author)

  16. Kinetic studies of isooctane partial oxidation over a nickel-based catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Hussameldin; Idem, Raphael; Aboudheir, Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    The production of hydrogen (H 2 ) for fuel cell applications in mobile vehicles by reforming technologies such as partial oxidation of various fossil fuels has gained much attention recently. In this study, the production of H 2 by the catalytic partial oxidation of isooctane ((C 8 H 18 ) used here as a surrogate for gasoline) was investigated over alumina (AI 2 O 3 )supported nickel (Ni) catalyst. The work investigated the kinetics of the partial oxidation of isooctane over a stable Ni/□-AI 2 O 3 catalyst in the range of 863 to 913 K, at atmospheric pressure, W/F i c8 in the range of 1.97 to 8.58 g h mol - 1, and molar feed ratio in the range of 2.0 to 8.0 experiments to obtain kinetic data were performed in a 12.7 mm diameter Inconel micro-reactor housed in an electrically controlled furnace. The chemical reaction was then modeled using rate models developed from the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-hougen-Watson (LHHW) and Eley-Rideal (ER) formulations. The model parameters were estimated using an adaptive Gauss-Newton and Marquardi-Levenberg minimization algorithm. Rival models were screened for their thermodynamic consistency and physicochemical significance of estimated parameters. Langmuir-Hinshelwood-hougen-Watson mechanism requiring the dissociative adsorption of isooctane and oxygen on two different sites appeared to be the most likely pathway for the partial oxidation reaction of isooctane. Reaction order with respect to isooctane indicates the strong coverage of nickel by isooctane. The activation energy of 73±3.1 kJ mol - 1 estimated from the LHHW model is consistent with the trend observed with lower hydrocarbons.(Author)

  17. STUDY OF EPOXIDE DECYCLISATION OF CARYOPHYLENE OXIDE WITH SYNTHETIC ZEOLITE AS CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winarto Haryadi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of epoxide ring opening of caryophillene oxide has been done using zeolite H-Y, H-sodalit, and H-ZSM-5 as catalysts. The reactions were done in two types, there were in dioxane solvent at temperature of 110 oC and without solvent at temperature of 175 oC. The catalyst weight was 10 % from caryophillene oxide weight, and the time of reaction was four hours. The product of reaction was analyzed using GC, FTIR, and GC-MS. The reactions of caryophillene oxide in dioxane solvent with the three kinds of zeolites did not give any targeted product. Whereas, the reactions without solvent gave three main products, there was one compound with one group of secondary hidroxyl (secondary alcohol, and two compounds of ketone from caryophillene. The reaction product of caryophillene oxide obtained without using solvent with the three type of catalysts were then compared. Conversion of three main products produced by H-ZSM-5 catalyst, H-sodalit catalyst and H-Y catalyst were 82.11 %, 54.92 % and 38.53 % respectively. For that reason, the transformation of caryophillene oxide using H-ZSM-5 catalyst was considered to be the best selective product. The alcohol product was resulted from reaction between caryophillene oxide and Bronsted acid, and  the ketone products was resulted from the reaction with Lewis acid in zeolite.   Keywords: Epoxide ring opening, HY, H-sodalit and HZSM-5

  18. Iron-57 and iridium-193 Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of supported iron-iridium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.; Jobson, S.

    1988-01-01

    57 Fe and 193 Ir Moessbauer spectroscopy shows that silica- and alumina-supported iron-iridium catalysts formed by calcination in air contain mixtures of small particle iron(III) oxide and iridium(IV) oxide. The iridium dioxide in both supported catalysts is reduced in hydrogen to metallic iridium. The α-Fe 2 O 3 in the silica supported materials is predominantly reduced in hydrogen to an iron-iridium alloy whilst in the alumina-supported catalyst the iron is stabilised by treatment in hydrogen as iron(II). Treatment of a hydrogen-reduced silica-supported iron catalyst in hydrogen and carbon monoxide is accompanied by the formation of iron carbides. Carbide formation is not observed when the iron-iridium catalysts are treated in similar atmospheres. The results from the bimetallic catalysts are discussed in terms of the hydrogenation of associatively adsorbed carbon monoxide and the selectivity of supported iron-iridium catalysts to methanol formation. (orig.)

  19. Electrochemical stability and postmortem studies of Pt/SiC catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatin, Serban Nicolae; Spéder, József; Dhiman, Rajnish

    2015-01-01

    In the presented work, the electrochemical stability of platinized silicon carbide is studied. Postmortem transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to document the change in the morphology and structure upon potential cycling of Pt/SiC catalysts. Two differen......, silicon carbide undergoes at least mild oxidation if not even silicon leaching....

  20. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ADDITION ON MERCURY OXIDATION BY SCR CATALYST UNDER SIMULATED SUBBITUMINOUS COAL FLUE GAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An entrained flow reactor is used to study the effect of addition of chlorine-containing species on the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hgo)by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst in simulated subbituminous coal combustion flue gas. The combustion flue gas was doped wit...

  1. Support screening studies on the hydrogenation of levulinic acid to γ‐valerolactone in water using RU catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piskun, Anna; Winkelman, Jozef G M; Tang, Zhenchen; Heeres, Hero Jan

    2016-01-01

    γ-Valerolactone (GVL) has been identified as a sustainable platform chemical for the production of carbon-based chemicals. Here we report a screening study on the hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) to GVL in water using a wide range of ruthenium supported catalysts in a batch set-up (1 wt. % Ru,

  2. Structure of Rhodium in an Ultradispersed Rhodium/Alumina Catalyst as Studied by EXAFS and Other Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Blik, H.F.J. van 't; Zon, J.B.A.D. van; Huizinga, T.; Vis, J.C.; Prins, R.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of rhodium in an ultradispersed 0.57 wt % Rh/y-Al,O, catalyst before and after CO adsorption was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron spin resonance (ESR), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), CO infrared

  3. Iron sulphide containing hydrodesulfurization catalysts : Mössbauer study of the sulfidibility of alpha-iron(III) oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1988-01-01

    As a first step in the study of the sulphidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst systems the sulphiding of a well-characterized, unsupported model compound, viz. a-Fe2O3(mean particle diameter ca. 50 nm) was investigated using in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy and the temperature-programmed

  4. Bimetallic Catalysts and Platinum Surfaces Studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenning, Magnus

    2000-07-01

    Bimetallic catalyst systems used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (Co-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and in the naphtha reforming process (Pt-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been studied in situ using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). Additionally, the adsorption of ethene on platinum single crystal surfaces has been investigated using scanning tunnelling microscopy. In situ EXAFS at the cobalt K absorption edge have been carried out at 450{sup o}C on the hydrogen reduction of a rhenium-promoted Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Reductions carried out using 100% hydrogen and 5% hydrogen in helium gave different results. Whereas the reduction using dilute hydrogen leads to bulk-like metallic cobalt particles (hcp or fcc), reaction with pure hydrogen yields a more dispersed system with smaller cobalt metal particles (< 40 A). The results are rationalised in terms of different degrees of reoxidation of cobalt by the higher and lower concentrations of water generated during the reduction of cobalt oxide by 100% and 5% hydrogen, respectively. Additionally, in both reduction protocols a small fraction (3 -4 wt%) of the cobalt content is randomly dispersed over the tetrahedral vacancies of the alumina support. This dispersion occurs during reduction and not calcination. The cobalt in these sites cannot be reduced at 450 {sup o}C. The local environments about the rhenium atoms in Co-Re/{gamma}-A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst after different reduction periods have been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A bimetallic catalyst containing 4.6 wt% cobalt and 2 wt% rhenium has been compared with a corresponding monometallic sample with 2 wt% rhenium on the same support. The rhenium L{sub III} EXAFS analysis shows that bimetallic particles are formed after reduction at 450{sup o}C with the average particle size being 10-15 A. Rhenium is shown to be reduced at a later stage than cobalt. The fraction of cobalt atoms entering the support obstructs the access to the support for the

  5. Feasibility study of various sulphonation methods for transforming carbon nanotubes into catalysts for the esterification of palm fatty acid distillate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuit, Siew Hoong; Tan, Soon Huat

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • First report on the production of biodiesel from low-value industrial by-product using sulphonated MWCNTs as catalyst. • Various sulphonation methods were used to transform MWCNTs into catalysts. • SO 3 H were successfully grafted on the surface of MWCNTs, which resulted in a high biodiesel yield and reuse capacity. • The maximum FAME yield by sulphonated MWCNTs was higher than for other popular solid acid catalysts. - Abstract: Sulphonated multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesised and utilised as catalysts to transform palm fatty acid distillate, the low-value by-product of palm oil refineries, into the more valuable product of biodiesel. The most common method to prepare carbon-based solid acid catalysts is thermal treatment with concentrated sulphuric acid, which is a time-consuming and energy-intensive process. Therefore, the feasibility of other sulphonation methods, such as the in situ polymerisation of acetic anhydride and sulphuric acid, the thermal decomposition of ammonium sulphate and the in situ polymerisation of poly(sodium4-styrenesulphonate), were examined in this study. The esterification reaction was performed at 170 °C for 3 h at a methanol to palm fatty acid distillate ratio of 20 and catalyst loading of 2 wt% in a pressurised reactor. The fatty acid methyl esters yields achieved by the sulphonated multi-walled carbon nanotubes prepared via thermal treatment with concentrated sulphuric acid, the in situ polymerisation of acetic anhydride and sulphuric acid, the thermal decomposition of ammonium sulphate and the in situ polymerisation of poly(sodium4-styrenesulphonate) were 78.1%, 85.8%, 88.0% and 93.4%, respectively. All catalysts could maintain a high catalytic activity even during the fifth cycle. Among the sulphonation methods, the in situ polymerisation of poly(sodium4-styrenesulphonate) produced the catalyst with the highest acid group density. In addition, the resonance structures of the benzenesulphonic acid

  6. Study on positron annihilation spectroscopy of methanol synthesis catalyst CuO/ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qisheng; Dai Guohuan; Sun Jiying; Ding Yingru; Yao Jianhua

    1989-01-01

    A new method was developed for determining the solid solubility of a metal oxide series prepared by precipitation using the positron lifetime parameters. The positron lifetime spectra of a series of CuO/ZnO catalysts prepared by precipitation were measured, in which the CuO at % contents were different before and after reducing. The relations between the solid solubility of the catalysts and the positron lifetime parameters were obtained, from which a result of solid solubility of 12 CuO at% after reducing had been found. The viewpoint that the Cu + ion acted as the active centre in the CuO/ZnO catalyst was supported

  7. A Study of Iron-Nitrogen-Carbon Fuel Cell Catalysts: Chemistry - Nanostructure - Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Michael J., Jr.

    Fuel cells have the potential to be a pollution-free, low-cost, and energy efficient alternative to the internal combustion engine for transportation and small-scale stationary power applications. The current state of fuel cell technology has already achieved two of these three lofty goals. The remaining barrier to wide-scale deployment is the high cost, which is primarily caused by dependence on large amounts of platinum to catalyze the energy conversion reactions. To overcome this barrier and facilitate the integration of fuel cells into mainstream applications, research into a new class of catalyst materials that do not require platinum is needed. There has been a significant amount of research effort directed toward the development of platinum-group metal free (PGM-free) catalysts, yet there is a lack of consensus on both the engineering parameters necessary to improve the technology and the fundamental science that would facilitate rational design. I have engaged in research on PGM-free catalysts based on inexpensive and abundant reagents, specifically: nicarbazin and iron. Catalysts made from these precursors have previously proven to be among the best PGM-free catalysts, but their continued advancement suffered from the same lack of understanding that besets all catalysts in this class. The work I have performed address both engineering concerns and fundamental underlying principles. I present results demonstrating correlations between physical structure, chemical speciation, and synthesis parameters, as well as addressing active site chemistry and likely locations. My research presented herein introduces new morphology analysis techniques and elucidates several key structure-to-property characteristics of catalysts derived from iron and nicarbazin. I discuss the development and application of a new length-scale specific surface analysis technique that allows for analysis of well-defined size ranges from a few nm to several microns. The existing technique of

  8. Recent Advances in the Mechanistic Studies of Alkylaromatic Conversions over Zeolite Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Hyung-Ki; Hong, Suk Bong

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of alkylaromatic hydrocarbons using zeolite catalysts play big part in the current petrochemical industry. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of the reaction mechanisms of various alkylaromatic conversions with respect to the structural and physicochemical properties of zeolite catalysts employed. Indeed, the shape-selective nature of zeolite catalysts determines the type of reaction intermediates and hence the prevailing reaction mechanism together with the product distribution. The prospect of zeolite catalysis in the development of more efficient petrochemical processes is also described

  9. Magnesium oxide prepared via metal-chitosan complexation method: Application as catalyst for transesterification of soybean oil and catalyst deactivation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almerindo, Gizelle I.; Probst, Luiz F. D.; Campos, Carlos E. M.; de Almeida, Rusiene M.; Meneghetti, Simoni M. P.; Meneghetti, Mario R.; Clacens, Jean-Marc; Fajardo, Humberto V.

    2011-10-01

    A simple method to prepare magnesium oxide catalysts for biodiesel production by transesterification reaction of soybean oil with ethanol is proposed. The method was developed using a metal-chitosan complex. Compared to the commercial oxide, the proposed catalysts displayed higher surface area and basicity values, leading to higher yield in terms of fatty acid ethyl esters (biodiesel). The deactivation of the catalyst due to contact with CO2 and H2O present in the ambient air was verified. It was confirmed that the active catalytic site is a hydrogenocarbonate adsorption site.

  10. Mechanistic Studies on Chabazite-Type Methanol-to-Olefin Catalysts: Insights from Time-Resolved UV/Vis Microspectroscopy Combined with Theoretical Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Speybroeck, V.; Hemelsoet, K.L.J.; De Wispelaere, K.; Qian, Q.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34138609X; Van der Mynsbrugge, J.; De Sterck, B.; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Waroquier, M.

    2013-01-01

    The formation and nature of active sites for methanol conversion over solid acid catalyst materials are studied by using a unique combined spectroscopic and theoretical approach. A working catalyst for the methanol-to-olefin conversion has a hybrid organic–inorganic nature in which a cocatalytic

  11. Combined XRD and XANES studies of a Re-promoted Co/γ-Al2O3 catalyst at Fischer–Tropsch synthesis conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønning, Magnus; Tsakoumis, Nikolaos E.; Voronov, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    A cobalt based Fischer–Tropsch catalyst was studied during the initial stages of the reaction at industrially relevant conditions. The catalyst consists of 20wt% cobalt supported on γ-Al2O3 and promoted by 1wt% of rhenium. X-ray diffraction (XRD) in combination with X-ray absorption near edge...

  12. Study of selective Fischer-Tropsch catalysts synthesized by the destruction of bimetallic carbonyl complexes on activated γ-Al2O3 support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimov, Yu.V.; Matveev, V.V.; Suzdalev, I.P.; Khomenko, T.I.; Kadushin, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    The bimetallic catalysts obtained by the deposition of a Fe-Co binuclear cluster on the dehydroxylated γ-Al 2 O 3 are studied and compared to some other relative systems. These bimetallic catalysts are found to be active and selective in olefin synthesis. This is connected with the formation of Fe-Co contact which is detectable by Moessbauer spectroscopy. (orig.)

  13. Kinetic Studies of Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reaction on Model Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Abdulaziz M.

    2016-01-01

    the process to be commercialized despite the fact that great number of attempts to prepare catalysts were conducted so that it can be economically viable. Due to these limitations, understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction can be utilized

  14. Dynamical properties of nano-structured catalysts for methane conversion: an in situ scattering study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehres, Jan

    /NiO particles in a fresh catalyst sample showed a Ni/NiO core shell structure. The Ni lattice parameter decreased during the reduction due to the release of stress between the Ni core and the NiO shell. Ni particles sintered during heating in hydrogen after the reduction of the NiO shell. Dry reforming......The reactivity of catalyst particles can be radically enhanced by decreasing their size down to the nanometer range. The nanostructure of a catalyst can have an enormous and positive influence on the reaction rate, for example strong structure sensitivity was observed for methane reforming...... range from 298 - 1023 K. Correlated crystallite and particle growth due to sintering were observed after the decomposition of the surfactant. Furthermore transformations from rod to spherical particle shape were observed. In situ reduction experiments of a Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst were performed. The Ni...

  15. Elucidation of reaction mechanism for m -cresol hydrodeoxygenation over Fe based catalysts: A kinetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yongchun; Wang, Yong

    2017-09-01

    Fe based catalysts are promising for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of lignin derived phenolics due to their high selectivity for aromatics. In this work, the reaction mechanism of m-cresol HDO on Fe catalysts and the kinetic consequence with Pd addition were elucidated by examining the effect of H2, H2O and m-cresol pressures on toluene formation rate on Fe and PdFe catalysts. A direct CO bond cleavage mechanism is proposed for HDO catalysis on both Fe and PdFe catalysts, while Pd provides a facilitated reaction pathway at the PdFe interface and therefore promotes the catalysis on Fe without changing the high selectivity towards aromatics.

  16. Electrochemical and Spectroscopic Study of Mononuclear Ruthenium Water Oxidation Catalysts: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Investigation

    KAUST Repository

    de Ruiter, J. M.; Purchase, R. L.; Monti, A.; van der Ham, C. J. M.; Gullo, M. P.; Joya, K. S.; D'Angelantonio, M.; Barbieri, A.; Hetterscheid, D. G. H.; de Groot, H. J. M.; Buda, F.

    2016-01-01

    derivatives). The proposed catalytic cycle and intermediates are examined using density functional theory (DFT), radiation chemistry, spectroscopic techniques, and electrochemistry to establish the water oxidation mechanism. The stability of the catalyst

  17. Study on the poisoning effect-of non-vanadium catalysts by potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huanmu; Liu, Ying; Yu, Xiaowei; Lin, Yasi

    2018-02-01

    The poisoning effect of catalyst by alkali metals is one of the problems in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3. Serious deactivation by alkali poisoning have been proved to take place in the commercial vanadium catalyst. Recently, non-vanadium catalysts such as copper oxides, manganese oxides, chromium oxides and cerium oxides have attracted special attentions in SCR application. However, their tolerance in the presence of alkali metals is still doubtful. In this paper, copper oxides, manganese oxides, chromium oxides and cerium oxides supported on TiO2 nanoparticle was prepared by impregnating method. Potassium nitrate was chosen as the precursor of poisoner. Catalytic activities of these catalysts were evaluated before and after the addition of potassium. Some characterization methods including X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed desorption was utilized to reveal the main reason of alkali deactivation.

  18. Study and development of membrane electrode assemblies for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) with palladium based catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifacio, Rafael Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    PEMFC systems are capable of generating electricity with high efficiency and low or no emissions, but durability and cost issues prevent its large commercialization. In this work MEA with palladium based catalysts were developed, Pd/C, Pt/C and alloys PdPt/C catalysts with different ratios between metals and carbon were synthesized and characterized. A study of the ratio between catalyst and Nafion Ionomer for formation of high performance triple-phase reaction was carried out, a mathematical model to implement this adjustment to catalysts with different relations between metal and support taking into account the volumetric aspects of the catalyst layer was developed and then a study of the catalyst layer thickness was performed. X-ray diffraction, Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Energy Dispersive, Gas Pycnometry, Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry, Gas adsorption according to the BET and BJH equations, and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis techniques were used for characterization and particle size, specific surface areas and lattice parameters determinations were also carried out. All catalysts were used on MEAs preparation and evaluated in 5 cm 2 single cell from 25 to 100 °C at 1 atm and the best composition was also evaluated at 3 atm. In the study of metals for reactions, to reduce the platinum applied to the electrodes without performance losses, Pd/C and PdPt/C 1:1 were selected for anodes and cathodes, respectively. The developed MEA structure used 0,25 mgPt.cm -2 , showing power densities up to 550 mW.cm -2 and power of 2.2 kW net per gram of platinum. The estimated costs showed that there was a reduction of up to 64.5 %, compared to the MEA structures previously known. Depending on the temperature and operating pressure, values from US$ 1,475.30 to prepare MEAs for each installed kilowatt were obtained. Taking into account recent studies, it was concluded that the cost of the developed MEA is compatible with PEMFC stationary application

  19. Catalyst activity maintenance study for the liquid phase dimethyl ether process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, X.D.; Toseland, B.A.; Underwood, R.P. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The co-production of dimethyl ether (DME) and methanol from syngas is a process of considerable commercial attractiveness. DME coproduction can double the productivity of a LPMEOH process when using coal-derived syngas. This in itself may offer chemical producers and power companies increased flexibility and more profitable operation. DME is also known as a clean burning liquid fuel; Amoco and Haldor-Topsoe have recently announced the use of DME as an alternative diesel fuel. Moreover, DME can be an interesting intermediate in the production of chemicals such as olefins and vinyl acetate. The current APCl liquid phase dimethyl ether (LPDME) process utilizes a physical mixture of a commercial methanol synthesis catalyst and a dehydration catalyst (e.g., {gamma}-alumina). While this arrangement provides a synergy that results in much higher syngas conversion per pass compared to the methanol-only process, the stability of the catalyst system suffers. The present project is aimed at reducing catalyst deactivation both by understanding the cause(s) of catalyst deactivation and by developing modified catalyst systems. This paper describes the current understanding of the deactivation mechanism.

  20. A comparative parametric study of a catalytic plate methane reformer coated with segmented and continuous layers of combustion catalyst for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhwa, Mayur; Parmar, Rajesh D.; Thurgood, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    A parametric comparison study is carried out between segmented and conventional continuous layer configurations of the coated combustion-catalyst to investigate their influence on the performance of methane steam reforming (MSR) for hydrogen production in a catalytic plate reactor (CPR). MSR is simulated on one side of a thin plate over a continuous layer of nickel-alumina catalyst by implementing an experimentally validated surface microkinetic model. Required thermal energy for the MSR reaction is supplied by simulating catalytic methane combustion (CMC) on the opposite side of the plate over segmented and continuous layer of a platinum-alumina catalyst by implementing power law rate model. The simulation results of both coating configurations of the combustion-catalyst are compared using the following parameters: (1) co-flow and counter-flow modes between CMC and MSR, (2) gas hourly space velocity and (3) reforming-catalyst thickness. The study explains why CPR designed with the segmented combustion-catalyst and co-flow mode shows superior performance not only in terms of high hydrogen production but also in terms of minimizing the maximum reactor plate temperature and thermal hot-spots. The study shows that the segmented coating requires 7% to 8% less combustion-side feed flow and 70% less combustion-catalyst to produce the required flow of hydrogen (29.80 mol/h) on the reforming-side to feed a 1 kW fuel-cell compared to the conventional continuous coating of the combustion-catalyst.

  1. A Study of CO2 Methanation over Ni-Based Catalysts Supported by CNTs with Various Textural Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the influence of textural characteristics of CNTs on catalytic performance of Ni/CNTs for CO2 methanation. The CNTs supports were prepared by chemical vapor deposition method using Ni/MgO catalysts, and acetonitrile and ethanol were used as carbon sources, respectively. The Ni/CNTs catalysts were prepared via impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, N2 adsorption/desorption, and temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR techniques. The results indicated that the textural characteristics of CNTs supports significantly impacted on the catalytic performance of Ni/CNTs. The catalyst Ni/CNTs-E (CNTs using ethanol as carbon source had good reducibility, high specific surface area, and moderate defects, resulting in higher CO2 conversion and CH4 yield, followed by Ni/CNTs-C (commercial CNTs and Ni/CNTs-A (CNTs using acetonitrile as carbon source. Based on Arrhenius formula, activation energies of the catalysts were calculated and were found decreased for Ni/CNTs-A and Ni/CNTs-E.

  2. STUDY ON THE CONCENTRATION EFFECT OF Nb2O5-ZAA CATALYST TOWARDS TOTAL CONVERSION OF BIODIESEL IN TRANSESTERIFICATION OF WASTED COOKING OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astuti Tri Padmaningsih

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Study on the concentration effect of Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst towards total conversion of biodiesel has been conducted. The natural zeolite (ZA was activated by dipping in NH4Cl solution and was calcined using N2 atmosphere at 500 °C for 5h to produce the ZAA sample. The Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst was made by mixing the activated natural zeolite (ZAA, Nb2O5 3 % (w/w and oxalic acid 10 % (w/w solution, until the paste was formed, followed by drying and calcining the catalyst for 3 h at 500 °C under N2 atmosphere. Catalyst characterizations were conducted by measuring acidity with NH3 gas using gravimetric method and porosimetric analysis using N2 gas adsorption based on the BET equation by surface area analyzer instrument. The Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst was then used as an acid catalyst in free fatty acid esterification reaction of wasted cooking oil in methanol medium with variation of catalyst concentration: 1.25%; 2.5%; 3.75% and 5% towards the weight of oil+methanol. The reaction was continued by transesterification of triglyceride in the used cooking oil using NaOH catalyst in methanol medium. For comparison, the esterification reaction using H2SO4 catalyst 1.25% towards the weight of oil+methanol has been conducted as well. Methyl ester (biodiesel product was analyzed using Gas Chromatography (GC and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. The characters of biodiesel were analyzed using American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM method. The results showed that modification of ZAA by impregning Nb2O5 3% (w/w increased the total catalyst acidity from 5.00 mmol/g to 5.65 mmol/g. The Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst has specific surface area of 60.61 m2/g, total pore volume of 37.62x10-3 cc/g and average pore radius of 12.41 Å. The Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst with concentration of 1.25%-5% produced higher total conversion of biodiesel than that of H2SO4 catalyst 1.25%. The Nb2O5-ZAA catalyst with concentration of 3.75% produced the highest total conversion of biodiesel, i

  3. Lunar CATALYST

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar CATALYST) is a NASA initiative to encourage the development of U.S. private-sector robotic lunar...

  4. In-situ X-ray diffraction activation study on an Fe/TiO2 pre-catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Matthew K; Billing, David G; Coville, Neil J

    2014-06-01

    This study focuses on the use of in situ powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and quantitative phase analysis using the Rietveld method to monitor the structural properties of a titania-supported iron (10% Fe/TiO2) pre-catalyst during calcination (oxidation) and activation (reduction) in the temperature range 25-900°C. The TiO2 oxidation study revealed an increase in anatase particle size before the anatase to rutile phase transformation, lending credibility to the bridging mechanism proposed by Kim et al. [(2007), Mater. Sci. Forum, 534-536, 65-68]. Pre-catalyst oxidation experiments allowed for the determination of a suitable calcination temperature (450°C) of the pre-catalyst in terms of maximum hematite concentration and appropriate particle size. These experiments also confirmed that the anatase to rutile phase transformation occurred at higher temperatures after Fe addition and that anatase was the sole donor of Ti(4+) ions, which are known to migrate into hematite (Gennari et al., 1998), during the formation of pseudobrookite (Fe2TiO5) at temperatures above 690°C. Using the results from the oxidation experiments, two pre-catalyst samples were calcined at different temperatures; one to represent the preferred case and one to represent a case where the pre-catalyst had been excessively heated. Samples of the excessively heated catalysts were exposed to different reducing gas atmospheres (5, 10 and 100% H2/N2) and heated in the in situ PXRD reactor, so that diffraction data could be collected during the activation process. The results show that reduction with gases containing low concentrations of H2 (5 and 10%) led to the formation of ilmenite (FeTiO3) and we were able to show that both anatase and rutile are consumed in the reaction. Higher concentrations of H2 led to the formation of magnetite (Fe3O4) and metallic iron (Fe(0)). We also noted a decrease in the anatase to rutile transformation temperature under reducing atmospheres when compared with the pre-catalyst

  5. Study of Catalyst, Aging Time and Surfactant Effects on Silica Inorganic Polymer Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pakizeh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the sol-gel method is used for synthesis of amorphous nanostructure silica polymer using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS as silicon source. This polymer can be used in manufacturing of nanoporous asymmetricmembranes. The effect of catalyst on silica particle size has been studied under acidic and basic conditions.زAcid-catalyzed reaction leads to the formation of fine particles while the base-catalyzed reaction produceslarger particles. The presence of cationic template surfactant namely cetyl pyridinium bromide (CPBزdirects the structural formation of the polymer by preventing the highly branched polymeric clusters. This will increase the effective area of the produced silica membrane. Nitrogen physisorption tests by Brunaver- Emmett-Teller (BET and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH methods revealed that the surface area of the membrane increases significantly around 5-folds when acid-catalyzed reaction is used. 29Si-NMR test is also used to study the aging time effect on the level of silica polymer branching. The results show that in acidic condition, aging time up to three weeks can still affect branching. The calcinations process in which the organic materials and CPB (surfactant are burned and released from the silica particles, is studied on template free silica materials as well as templated silica materials using TGA and DTA techniques.

  6. Macrodynamic study and catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia under mild conditions over Pt-La-Ce-O/Al2O3 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yanhui; Zhu, Jingli; Ma, Runyu

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic reduction of NO using ammonia upon series prepared catalysts under 423-573 K in a fixed bed reactor was investigated. Results showed that the performance of supported platinum catalyst could be improved by addition of La and Ce to it. Experimental studies indicated that the suitable molar ratio of Pt:La:Ce would be 1.0:3.78:3.56, Pt-La-Ce (c). Results also found Pt-La-Ce (c) catalyst had good stability and tolerance to certain amounts of sulfur compounds under the used experimental conditions. Characterization for the fresh and used catalysts showed the Pt-La-Ce (c) catalyst had a stable structure. In addition, based on experimental data and using a nonlinear regression algorithm method, an empirical macrodynamic equation was obtained in this study

  7. Reaction mechanism of ethylene glycol decomposition on Pt model catalysts: A density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Cun-Qin; Yang, Bo; Pang, Xian-Yong; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • DFT calculations were performed to study the ethylene glycol decomposition on Pt. • The final products are CO and H_2 on Pt(111), (100) and (211). • Ethylene glycol decomposition on Pt(111) undergoes via initial O−H bond scission and followed by C−H bond cleavage. • Ethylene glycol decomposition proceeds via initial O−H bond scission and followed by O−H bond cleavage on Pt(100)/(211). - Abstract: Understanding and controlling bond beak sequence is important in catalytic processes. The DFT-GGA method combined with slab model was performed to study the ethylene glycol decomposition on various Pt model catalysts such as close-packed Pt(111), stepped Pt(211) and a more open one, Pt(100). Calculation results show that the adsorption energies of ethylene glycol and other decomposition species depend on the coordination number of surface atom, that is, low coordination number correspond to high adsorption energy. Moreover, it was found that final products of ethylene glycol decomposition are CO and H_2 on all model catalysts, but the reaction mechanism varies: On Pt(111), the first step is O−H bond scission, followed by C−H bond cleavage, namely C_2H_6O_2 → HOCH_2CH_2O + H → HOCH_2CHO + 2H→ HOCH_2CO +3H → OCH_2CO + 4H → OCHCO + 5H → CO + HCO + 5H → 2CO + 6H→ 2CO + 3H_2; On Pt(211) and Pt(100), however, it is a second O−H bond cleavage that follows the initial O−H bond scission, that is, C_2H_6O_2 → HOCH_2CH_2O + H → OCH_2CH_2O + 2H → OCHCH_2O + 3H → OCHCHO + 4H → 2HCO + 4H → 2CO + 6H → 2CO + 3H_2  on Pt(211), and C_2H_6O_2 →HOCH_2CH_2O+ H → OCH_2CH_2O + 2H→OCHCH_2O+3H→OCCH_2O+4H→CO+H_2CO+4H→CO+HCO+5H→2CO+6H→2CO+3H_2 on Pt(100) For the catalytic order of ethylene glycol to form H_2, it may be determined based on the rate-controlling step, and it is Pt(111) > Pt(211) > Pt(100).

  8. Hanford ferrocyanide waste chemistry and reactivity preliminary catalyst and initiator screening studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, R.D.; Bryan, S.A.; Johnston, J.W.; Tingey, J.M.; Burger, L.L.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-05-01

    During the 1950s, ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from aqueous nitrate-containing Hanford wastes. During the production of defense materials and while these wastes were stored in high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, some of these wastes were likely mixed with other waste constituents and materials. Recently, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was commissioned by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to investigate the chemical reactivity of these ferrocyanide-bearing wastes. Because of known or potential thermal reactivity hazards associated with ferrocyanide- and nitrate-bearing wastes, and because of the potential for different materials to act as catalysts or initiators of the reactions about which there is concern, we at PNL have begun investigating the effects of the other potential waste constituents. This report presents the results of a preliminary screening study to identify classes of materials that might be in the Hanford high-level waste tanks and that could accelerate or reduce the starting temperature of the reaction(s) of concern. We plan to use the resulted of this study to determine which materials or class of materials merit additional research

  9. Comparative study of the methanolysis and ethanolysis of maize oils using alkaline catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, U.; Ibrahim, M.; Ali, S.; Adil, M.; Hina, S.; Bukhari, I. H.; Yunus, R.

    2012-11-01

    With an increasing population and economic development, fuel from renewable resources needs to be widely explored in order to fulfill the future energy demand. In the present study, bio diesel from maize oil using transesterification reactions with methanol and ethanol was evaluated in the presence of NaOCH{sub 3}, KOCH{sub 3}, NaOCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, KOCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, NaOH and KOH as catalysts. The influence of reaction variables such as the alcohol to oil molar ratio (3:1-15:1), catalyst concentration (0.25-1.50%) and reaction time (20-120 min) to achieve the maximum yield was determined at fixed reaction temperatures. The optimized variables in the case of methanolysis were 6:1 methanol to oil molar ratio (mol/ mol), 0.75% sodium methoxide concentration (wt%) and 90 min reaction time at 65 degree centigrade, which produced a yield of 97.1% methyl esters. A 9:1 ethanol to oil molar ratio (mol/mol), 1.00% sodium ethoxide concentration (wt%) and 120 min reaction time at 75 degree centigrade were found to produce the maximum ethyl ester yield of up to 85%. The methanolysis of maize oil was depicted more rapidly as compared to the ethanolysis of maize oil. Gas chromatography of the produced bio diesel from maize oil showed high levels of linoleic acid (up to 50.89%) followed by oleic acid (up to 36.00%), palmitic acid (up to 9.98%), oleic acid (up to 1.80%) and linolenic acid (up to 0.98%). The obtained fatty acid esters were further analyzed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to ensure the completion of transesterification. The fuel properties of the produced bio diesels i.e. kinematic viscosity, cetane number, oxidative stability, pour point, cloud point, cold filter plugging point, ash content, flash point, acid value, sulfur content, higher heating value, density, methanol content, free glycerol and bound glycerol were determined. The analyses were performed using the FTIR method and the results were compared to the bio diesel standards ASTM and

  10. A study on the deactivation and stability of hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Soon Hwan

    2006-02-01

    The hydrophobic catalyst has been prepared by deposition of platinum on porous styrene divinylbenzene copolymers(Pt/SDBC) and at the same time a separated type catalytic reactor has been developed for the Wolsong tritium removal facility(WTRF). Several tests carried out to obtain the experimental performance data of the Pt/SDBC with a recycle reactor system. The long-term stability was also measured with the Pt/SDBC catalyst immersed in water for a long time. The long-term deactivations of the Pt/SDBC catalyst were evaluated quantitatively by mathematical models. The simple mathematical models were presented to evaluate the uniform poisoning and shell progressive poisoning to be occurred simultaneously during the hydrogen isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and liquid water in the Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange(LPCE) column. The uniform poisoning was well characterized by a time on stream theory and then the deactivation parameters were determined from the experimental performance data. The impurity poisoning was derived by a shell progressive model with two-layer mass transfer. The water vapor condensation was a main cause of the reversible uniform poisoning for the Pt/SDBC catalyst. The values of the decay rate constant (K d ) and order of the decay reaction(m) were of 2 and 4, respectively, based on the experimental data. It indicated that the decay might be attributable to pore mouth poisoning. From the long-term stability of the catalyst immersed in water, there was no intrinsic decay of catalyst activity due to water logging to the catalyst. The activity decreased by only 7% over 18 months, which was equivalent to a catalyst half-life longer than 15 years. On the basis of the above deactivation parameters, the values for k c /k co with Thiele modulus=20 after 3 years and 10 years of operation were expected about 19% and 15% of the initial activity, respectively, while the values for k c /k co with Thiele modulus=100 were of about 22% and 18%, respectively

  11. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael T. Klein

    2000-01-01

    There are several aspects of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process which are not fully understood and which if better understood might lead to improved yields and conversions. Among these questions are the roles of the catalyst and the solvent. While the solvent is known to act by transfer of hydrogen atoms to the free radicals formed by thermal breakdown of the coal in an uncatalyzed system, in the presence of a solid catalyst as is now currently practiced, the yields and conversions are higher than in an uncatalyzed system. The role of the catalyst in this case is not completely understood. DOE has funded many projects to produce ultrafine and more active catalysts in the expectation that better contact between catalyst and coal might result. This approach has met with limited success probably because mass transfer between two solids in a fluid medium i.e. the catalyst and the coal, is very poor. It is to develop an understanding of the role of the catalyst and solvent in Direct Liquefaction that this project was initiated. Specifically it was of interest to know whether direct contact between the coal and the catalyst was important. By separating the solid catalyst in a stainless steel basket permeable to the solvent but not the coal in the liquefaction reactor, it was shown that the catalyst still maintains a catalytic effect on the liquefaction process. There is apparently transfer of hydrogen atoms from the catalyst through the basket wall to the coal via the solvent. Strong hydrogen donor solvents appear to be more effective in this respect than weak hydrogen donors. It therefore appears that intimate contact between catalyst and coal is not a requirement, and that the role of the catalyst may be to restore the hydrogen donor strength to the solvent as the reaction proceeds. A range of solvents of varying hydrogen donor strength was investigated. Because of the extensive use of thermogravimetric analysis in this laboratory in was noted that the peak

  12. Enantioselective polymerization of epoxides using biaryl-linked bimetallic cobalt catalysts: A mechanistic study

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Syud M.; Poater, Albert; Childers, M. Ian; Widger, Peter C B; Lapointe, Anne M.; Lobkovsky, Emil B.; Coates, Geoffrey W.; Cavallo, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The enantioselective polymerization of propylene oxide (PO) using biaryl-linked bimetallic salen Co catalysts was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Five key aspects of this catalytic system were examined: (1) the structural features of the catalyst, (2) the regio- and stereoselectivity of the chain-growth step, (3) the probable oxidation and electronic state of Co during the polymerization, (4) the role of the cocatalyst, and (5) the mechanism of monomer enchainment. Several important insights were revealed. First, density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided detailed structural information regarding the regio- and stereoselective chain-growth step. Specifically, the absolute stereochemistry of the binaphthol linker determines the enantiomer preference in the polymerization, and the interaction between the salen ligand and the growing polymer chain is a fundamental aspect of enantioselectivity. Second, a new bimetallic catalyst with a conformationally flexible biphenol linker was synthesized and found to enantioselectively polymerize PO, though with lower enantioselectivity than the binaphthol linked catalysts. Third, DFT calculations revealed that the active form of the catalyst has two active exo anionic ligands (chloride or carboxylate) and an endo polymer alkoxide which can ring-open an adjacent cobalt-coordinated epoxide. Fourth, calculations showed that initiation is favored by an endo chloride ligand, while propagation is favored by the presence of two exo carboxylate ligands. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. An EXAFS study of the structure of Co-Mo hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, B.S.; Topsoe, H.; Candia, R.; Villadsen, J.; Lengeler, B.

    1981-05-01

    By analysing the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of the Mo absorption edge, structural information about both calcined and sulfided Mo/Al 2 O 3 and Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalysts has been obtained. The calcined catalysts show only one strong backscatterer peak in the radial distribution function, which indicates that molybdenum is present in a highly disordered structure. For the Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst the presence of cobalt seems to have some effect on the immediate surroundings of molybdenum. Upon sulfiding the catalysts, an ordering of the molybdenum-containing phase takes place as evidenced by the observation of a contribution from the second coordination shell. From a comparison with EXAFS data obtained on well-crystallized MoS 2 it is concluded that the molybdenum atoms in the catalysts are present in MoS 2 -like structures. Furthermore, from a comparison of the amplitude of the Mo-backscatterer peak it is found that these MoS 2 -like structures are ordered in very small domains. (orig.)

  14. Enantioselective polymerization of epoxides using biaryl-linked bimetallic cobalt catalysts: A mechanistic study

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Syud M.

    2013-12-18

    The enantioselective polymerization of propylene oxide (PO) using biaryl-linked bimetallic salen Co catalysts was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Five key aspects of this catalytic system were examined: (1) the structural features of the catalyst, (2) the regio- and stereoselectivity of the chain-growth step, (3) the probable oxidation and electronic state of Co during the polymerization, (4) the role of the cocatalyst, and (5) the mechanism of monomer enchainment. Several important insights were revealed. First, density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided detailed structural information regarding the regio- and stereoselective chain-growth step. Specifically, the absolute stereochemistry of the binaphthol linker determines the enantiomer preference in the polymerization, and the interaction between the salen ligand and the growing polymer chain is a fundamental aspect of enantioselectivity. Second, a new bimetallic catalyst with a conformationally flexible biphenol linker was synthesized and found to enantioselectively polymerize PO, though with lower enantioselectivity than the binaphthol linked catalysts. Third, DFT calculations revealed that the active form of the catalyst has two active exo anionic ligands (chloride or carboxylate) and an endo polymer alkoxide which can ring-open an adjacent cobalt-coordinated epoxide. Fourth, calculations showed that initiation is favored by an endo chloride ligand, while propagation is favored by the presence of two exo carboxylate ligands. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Crystal structure of N′′-(2-ethoxy-2-oxoethyl-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-N′′-[3-(1,3,3-trimethylureidopropyl]guanidinium tetraphenylborate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title salt, C16H34N5O3+·C24H20B−, the C—N bond lengths in the cation are 1.3368 (16, 1.3375 (18 and 1.3594 (17 Å, indicating partial double-bond character. The central C atom is bonded to the three N atoms in a nearly ideal trigonal–planar geometry and the positive charge is delocalized in the CN3 plane. In the crystal, weak C—H...O contacts are observed between neighbouring guanidinium ions and between guanidinium ions and tetraphenylborate anions. In addition, C—H...π interactions involving guanidinium H atoms and aromatic rings of the anion are present. The phenyl rings form aromatic pockets, in which the cations are embedded. This leads to the formation of a two-dimensional supramolecular pattern along the ab plane.

  16. cis-Bis(2,2′-bipyridine-κ2N,N′bis(dimethyl sulfoxide-κOzinc bis(tetraphenylborate dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Tomyn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the mononuclear title complex, [Zn(C10H8N22(C2H6OS2](C24H20B2·C2H6OS, the ZnII ion is coordinated by four N atoms of two bidentate 2,2′-bipyridine molecules and by the O atoms of two cis-disposed dimethyl sulfoxide molecules in a distorted octahedral geometry. The S atom and the methyl groups of one of the coordinated dimethyl sulfoxide molecules are disordered in a 0.509 (2:0.491 (2 ratio. The crystal packing is stabilized by C—H...O hydrogen bonds between the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecules and tetraphenylborate anions.

  17. Electronic state of cerium-based catalysts studied by spectroscopic methods (XPS, XAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Normand, F.; Bernhardt, P.; Hilaire, L.; Kili, K.; Maire, G.; Krill, G.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) of the 3d core level of cerium and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the L III absorption edge of cerium have been used to study Pd/CeO 2 , Pd-Ce/γAl 2 O 3 and Ce/γAl 2 O 3 catalysts. The oxidation state of cerium was found to decrease with decreasing amounts of cerium on the surface. It was quite close to III for very low contents of cerium (2-3%). For higher cerium contents the oxidation state was nearer to IV but differences between the two methods were found, owing to the fact that XAS is a volume sensitive probe. The oxidation state of cerium was also lower for Pd-Ce/γAl 2 O 3 than for Ce/γAl 2 O 3 , suggesting the formation of Ce III OCl, chlorine coming from the precursor salt of palladium. 15 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 table

  18. Crystal structure of di-μ-aqua-μ-(pyrazine N,N′-dioxide-κ2O:O-bis(diaquasodium tetraphenylborate dihydrate pyrazine N,N′-dioxide monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine P. Boron

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The search for novel lanthanide coordination networks using pyrazine N,N′-dioxide (pzdo, C4H4N2O2 as a structure-directing unit, led to the synthesis and the structure determination of the title compound, [Na2(C4H4N2O2(H2O6][B(C6H54]2·C4H4N2O2·2H2O. The crystal structure is comprised of discrete [{Na(H2O2}2(μ-H2O2(μ-pzdo]2+ cations and tetraphenylborate anions, as well as pzdo and H2O solvent molecules. The dinuclear cation is located about a twofold rotation axis, and the symmetry-related NaI atoms display a distorted square-pyramidal coordination sphere defined by two O atoms of terminal water ligands, two O atoms of bridging water ligands and one O atom of a bridging pzdo ligand. In the crystal, O—H...O hydrogen bonds link the dinuclear cation and solvent pzdo molecules (point-group symmetry -1 into rectangular grid-like layers parallel to the bc plane. Additional C—H...O, O—H...O, C—H...π and O—H...π interactions link the anion and solvent water molecules to the layers. The layers are further linked into a three-dimensional network through a combination of C—H...π and O—H...π hydrogen bonds involving the tetraphenylborate anion.

  19. An iron-57 Moessbauer spectroscopic study of titania-supported iron- and iron-iridium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.; Jobson, S.

    1992-01-01

    57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy shows that titania-supported iron is reduced by treatment in hydrogen at significantly lower temperatures than corresponding silica- and alumina-supported catalysts. The metallic iron formed under hydrogen at 600deg C is partially converted to carbide by treatment in carbon monoxide and hydrogen. In contrast to its alumina- and silica-supported counterparts, the remainder of the titania-supported iron is unchanged by this gaseous mixture. The 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra of EXAFS show that iron and iridium in the titania-supported iron-iridium catalysts are reduced in hydrogen at even lower temperatures and, after treatment at 600deg C, are predominantly present as the iron-iridium alloy. The treatment of these reduced catalysts in carbon monoxide and hydrogen is shown by Moessbauer spectroscopy and EXAFS to induce the segregation of iron from the iron-iridium alloy and its conversion to iron oxide. (orig.)

  20. A comprehensive study of olefin metathesis catalyzed by Ru-based catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2015-09-29

    During a Ru-catalyzed reaction of an olefin with an alkylidene moiety that leads to a metallacycle intermediate, the cis insertion of the olefin can occur from two different directions, namely side and bottom with respect to the phosphine or N-heterocyclic ligand (NHC), depending on the first or second generation Grubbs catalyst. Here, DFT calculations unravel to which extent the bottom coordination of olefins with respect is favored over the side coordination through screening a wide range of catalysts, including first and second generation Grubbs catalysts as well as the subsequent Hoveyda derivatives. The equilibrium between bottom and side coordination is influenced by sterics, electronics, and polarity of the solvent. The side attack is favored for sterically less demanding NHC and/or alkylidene ligands. Moreover the generation of a 14-electron species is also discussed, with either pyridine or phosphine ligands to dissociate.

  1. A comprehensive study of olefin metathesis catalyzed by Ru-based catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    During a Ru-catalyzed reaction of an olefin with an alkylidene moiety that leads to a metallacycle intermediate, the cis insertion of the olefin can occur from two different directions, namely side and bottom with respect to the phosphine or N-heterocyclic ligand (NHC), depending on the first or second generation Grubbs catalyst. Here, DFT calculations unravel to which extent the bottom coordination of olefins with respect is favored over the side coordination through screening a wide range of catalysts, including first and second generation Grubbs catalysts as well as the subsequent Hoveyda derivatives. The equilibrium between bottom and side coordination is influenced by sterics, electronics, and polarity of the solvent. The side attack is favored for sterically less demanding NHC and/or alkylidene ligands. Moreover the generation of a 14-electron species is also discussed, with either pyridine or phosphine ligands to dissociate.

  2. DFT study on the impact of the methylaluminoxane cocatalyst in ethylene oligomerization using a titanium-based catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Pasha, Farhan Ahmad

    2015-01-26

    A computational study within the framework of density functional theory is presented on the oligomerization of ethylene to yield 1-hexene using [(η5-C5H4CMe2C6H5)]TiCl3/MAO] catalyst. This study explicitly takes into account a methylaluminoxane (MAO) cocatalyst model, where the MAO cluster has become an anionic species after having abstracted one chloride anion, yielding a cationic activated catalyst. Hence, the reaction profile was calculated using the zwitterionic system, and the potential energy surface has been compared to the cationic catalytic system. Modest differences were found between the two free energy profiles. However, we show for the first time that the use of a realistic zwitterionic model is required to obtain a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship between the energy barriers and reaction energies.

  3. DFT study on the impact of the methylaluminoxane cocatalyst in ethylene oligomerization using a titanium-based catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Basset, Jean-Marie; Toulhoat, Hervé ; De Bruin, Theodorus J M

    2015-01-01

    A computational study within the framework of density functional theory is presented on the oligomerization of ethylene to yield 1-hexene using [(η5-C5H4CMe2C6H5)]TiCl3/MAO] catalyst. This study explicitly takes into account a methylaluminoxane (MAO) cocatalyst model, where the MAO cluster has become an anionic species after having abstracted one chloride anion, yielding a cationic activated catalyst. Hence, the reaction profile was calculated using the zwitterionic system, and the potential energy surface has been compared to the cationic catalytic system. Modest differences were found between the two free energy profiles. However, we show for the first time that the use of a realistic zwitterionic model is required to obtain a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship between the energy barriers and reaction energies.

  4. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-02-20

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  5. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-03-03

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  6. A hard X-ray study of a manganese-terpyridine catalyst in a chromium-based Metal Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Alexandra V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Hydrogen produced from water splitting is a promising source of clean energy. However, a robust catalyst is necessary to carry out the water oxidation step of water splitting. In this study, the catalyst studied was [(terpy)Mn(μ-O)2Mn(terpy)]3+ (MnTD) synthesized in the Metal Organic Framework (MOF) MIL-101(Cr), and the method used for analysis was hard X-ray powder diffraction. The diffraction data was used to detect the presence of MOF in different catalytic stages, and lattice parameters were assigned to the samples containing MOF. Fourier maps were constructed with GSAS II to determine the contents of the MOF as preliminary studies suggested that MnTD may not be present. Results showed that MOF is present before catalysis occurs but disappears by the time 45 minutes of catalysis has ensued. Changes in the MOF’s lattice parameters and location of electron density in the Fourier maps suggest attractions between the MOF and catalyst that may lead to MOF degradation. Fourier maps also revealed limited, if any, amounts of MnTD, even before catalysis occurred. Molecular manganese oxide may be the source of the high rate of water oxidation catalysis in the studied system.

  7. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  8. Cluster-derived Ir-Sn/SiO2 catalysts for the catalytic dehydrogenation of propane: A spectroscopic study

    KAUST Repository

    Gallo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Ir-Sn bimetallic silica-based materials have been prepared via deposition of the molecular organometallic clusters (NEt4)2[Ir 4(CO)10(SnCl3)2] and NEt 4[Ir6(CO)15(SnCl3)] or via deposition of Sn organometallic precursor Sn(n-C4H9) 4 onto pre-formed Ir metal particles. These solids possess promising properties, in terms of selectivity, as catalysts for propane dehydrogenation to propene. Detailed CO-adsorption DRIFTS, XANES and EXAFS characterization studies have been performed on these systems in order to compare the structural and electronic evolution of systems in relation to the nature of the Ir-Sn bonds present in the precursor compounds and to propose a structural model of the Ir-Sn species present at the silica surface of the final catalyst. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. A study of binuclear zirconium hydride catalysts of the hydrogenolysis of alkanes by the density functional theory method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustynyuk, L. Yu.; Fast, A. S.; Ustynyuk, Yu. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2012-06-01

    Binuclear hydride centers containing two Zr(IV) atoms are suggested as promising catalysts for the hydrogenolysis of alkanes under mild conditions ( T model compounds L2(H)Zr(X)2Zr(H)L2 (X = H, L = OSi≡ ( 4a), X = L = OMe ( 4d)), L(H)Zr(O)2Zr(H)L (L = OSi≡ ( 4b), Cp( 4c)) and (≡SiO)2(H)Zr-O-Zr(H)(OSi≡)2 ( 4e and 4f) with the propane molecule were studied using the density functional theory method. The results show that centers of the 4a, 4e, and 4f types and especially 4b are promising catalysts of the hydrogenolysis of alkanes due to a high degree of unsaturation of two Zr atoms and their sequential participation in the splitting of the C-C bond and hydrogenation of ethylene formed as a result of splitting.

  10. Study of the reaction between polyethylene glycol and epoxy resins using N,N-dimethylbenzylamine as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharuk, Mario; Coelho, Luiz A.F.; Pezzin, Sergio H.; Becker, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    In this work the use of N,N-dimethylbenzylamine as a catalyst of the reaction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and epoxy resin (DGEBA) was studied. The reaction products were evaluated by infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and viscosity measurements. Samples cured with a polyamine-based hardener were also submitted to tensile tests and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results of the viscosity analyses, FTIR and RMN ( 1 H) had confirmed the occurrence of the reaction between DGEBA epoxy groups and PEG hydroxyl groups in the presence of N, N-dimethylbenzylamine as catalyst, at 100 deg C. DSC analyses and tensile tests of cured systems showed that the reaction of DGEBA with PEG leads to a reduction of the Tg, generating a more flexible material. (author)

  11. Green catalysis by nanoparticulate catalysts developed for flow processing? case study of glucose hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gericke, D.; Ott-Reinhardt, D.; Matveeva, V.; Sulman, E.M.; Aho, A.; Murzin, D.Y.; Roggan, S.; Danilova, L.; Hessel, V.; Löb, P.; Kralisch, D.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis, flow chemistry, continuous processing, green solvents, catalyst immobilization and recycling are some of the most relevant, emerging key technologies to achieve green synthesis. However, a quantification of potential effects on a case to case level is required to provide a

  12. Studies in transition metal chemistry ; V. Soluble Ziegler-type catalysts based on vanadium, part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefde Meijer, H.J. de; Hurk, J.W.G. van den; Kerk, G.J.M. van der

    1966-01-01

    Experiments are described aiming at a simplification of the catalyst system originally consisting of a mixture of tetraphenyltin, aluminium bromide and vanadium tetrachloride (or vanadium oxytrichloride). It is shown that tetraphenyltin merely acts as a phenylating agent for the aluminium bromide

  13. Porous-microelectrode study on Pt/C catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Minoru; Kokubo, Mitsuhiro; Mohamedi, Mohamed; Uchida, Isamu

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a porous-microelectrode (PME) to investigate the electroactivity of catalyst particles for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The cavity at the tip of the PME was filled with Pt/C catalysts prepared by impregnation method. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) recorded in 1 N H 2 SO 4 aqueous solution revealed that the active area of the stacked catalysts exist not only at the surface but also inside of the stack. For methanol electrooxidation, 30 wt.% Pt/C exhibited the highest electroactivity, whereas the 50 wt.% Pt/C showed extremely small current. The small current is considered as a result of a small active-surface area. Methanol oxidation peak potential shifted toward cathodic direction as Pt-loading decreased, which agrees well with the Pt-oxide formation potential. The activation energy for methanol oxidation was assessed to be 44±3 kJ mol -1 for all Pt/C catalysts and Pt-disc electrode

  14. Studies on the promotion of nickel—alumina coprecipitated catalysts: III. Cerium oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink Rotgerink, H.G.J.; Slaa, J.C.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Three series of cerium-promoted nickel—alumina catalysts with different nickel-to-aluminium ratios each containing different amounts of cerium have been prepared and characterized. The calcination and reduction behaviour were found not to be altered by the presence of cerium. Part of the promoter

  15. Studies on the promotion of nickel—alumina coprecipitated catalysts: I. Titanium oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink Rotgerink, H.G.J.; Mercera, P.D.L.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1988-01-01

    A series of TiO2-promoted nickel—alumina catalysts has been prepared and characterized. The promoter was added in various proportions to a calcined coprecipitated nickel—alumina material by adsorption of the acetylacetonate complex of titanium, followed by further calcination and reduction. The

  16. Studies on the promotion of nickel—alumina coprecipitated catalysts: II. Lanthanum oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink Rotgerink, H.G.J.; Paalman, R.P.A.M.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Two series of lanthanum promoted nickel—alumina catalysts have been prepared by coprecipitation of the metal nitrates, using potassium carbonate. The molar ratio between nickel and the sum of aluminium and lanthanum was kept constant at 2.5 or 9.0 within each series. The calcination and reduction of

  17. Surface science approach to Pt/carbon model catalysts: XPS, STM and microreactor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motin, Abdul Md.; Haunold, Thomas; Bukhtiyarov, Andrey V.; Bera, Abhijit; Rameshan, Christoph; Rupprechter, Günther

    2018-05-01

    Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon are an important technological catalyst. A corresponding model catalyst was prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD) of Pt on sputtered HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite). The carbon substrate before and after sputtering as well as the Pt/HOPG system before and after Pt deposition and annealing were examined by XPS and STM. This yielded information on the surface density of defects, which serve as nucleation centres for Pt, and on the size distribution (mean size/height) of the Pt nanoparticles. Two different model catalysts were prepared with mean sizes of 2.0 and 3.6 nm, both turned out to be stable upon UHV-annealing to 300 °C. After transfer into a UHV-compatible flow microreactor and subsequent cleaning in UHV and under mbar pressure, the catalytic activity of the Pt/HOPG model system for ethylene hydrogenation was examined under atmospheric pressure flow conditions. This enabled to determine temperature-dependent conversion rates, turnover frequencies (TOFs) and activation energies. The catalytic results obtained are in line with the characteristics of technological Pt/C, demonstrating the validity of the current surface science based model catalyst approach.

  18. Model study on transesterification of soybean oil to biodiesel with methanol using solid base catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejun; Piao, Xianglan; Wang, Yujun; Zhu, Shenlin

    2010-03-25

    Modeling of the transesterification of vegetable oils to biodiesel using a solid base as a catalyst is very important because the mutual solubilities of oil and methanol will increase with the increasing biodiesel yield. The heterogeneous liquid-liquid-solid reaction system would become a liquid-solid system when the biodiesel reaches a certain content. In this work, we adopted a two-film theory and a steady state approximation assumption, then established a heterogeneous liquid-liquid-solid model in the first stage. After the diffusion coefficients on the liquid-liquid interface and the liquid-solid interface were calculated on the basis of the properties of the system, the theoretical value of biodiesel productivity changing with time was obtained. The predicted values were very near the experimental data, which indicated that the proposed models were suitable for the transesterification of soybean oil to biodiesel when solid bases were used as catalysts. Meanwhile, the model indicated that the transesterification reaction was controlled by both mass transfer and reaction. The total resistance will decrease with the increase in biodiesel yield in the liquid-liquid-solid stage. The solid base catalyst exhibited an activation energy range of 9-20 kcal/mol, which was consistent with the reported activation energy range of homogeneous catalysts.

  19. Kinetics study of Jatropha oil esterification with ethanol in the presence of tin (II) chloride catalyst for biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningtyas, Ratna Dewi; Ratrianti, Naomi; Purnamasari, Indah; Budiman, Arief

    2017-01-01

    Jatropha oil is one of the promising feedstocks for biodiesel production. Jatropha oil is non-edible oil hence utilization of this oil would not compete with the needs of food. However, crude jatropha oil usually has high free fatty acid (FFA) content. Due to this fact, direct alkaline-catalyzed transesterification of crude jatropha oil for biodiesel production cannot be performed. FFA in crude jatropha oil will react with a base catalyst, resulting in soap as by product and hindering methyl ester (biodiesel) production. Therefore, prior to a transesterification reaction, it is crucial to run a pretreatment step of jatropha oil which can lower the FFA content in the oil. In this work, the pretreatment process was conducted through the esterification reaction of FFA contained in crude jatropha oil with ethanol over tin (II) chloride catalyst to reduce the acid value of the feedstock. The feedstock was Indonesia crude jatropha oil containing 12.03% of FFA. The esterification reaction was carried out in a batch reactor with a molar ratio of FFA to ethanol was 1:60 and total reaction time was 180 minutes. Tin (II) chloride catalyst was varied at 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10% wt, whereas the effect of the reaction temperature was studied at 35, 34, 55, and 65 °C. The best reaction conversion was 71.55%, achieved at the following condition: a reaction temperature of 65 °C, catalyst concentration of 10% wt, the reaction time of 180 min, and the molar ratio of FFA to ethanol was 1:60. Kinetics study was also conducted in this work. It was found that esterification reaction of jatropha oil FFA with ethanol catalyzed by tin(II) chloride fitted the first-order pseudo-homogeneous kinetics model. It was also revealed that the frequency factor (A) and the activation energy (Ea) were 4.3864 × 106 min-1 and 56.2513 kJ/mole, respectively.

  20. Removal of residual palm oil-based biodiesel catalyst using membrane ultra-filtration technique: An optimization study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Atadashi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, residual potassium hydroxide catalyst was removed from palm oil-based alkyl esters (biodiesel using membrane separative technique, with the aim of achieving high-quality biodiesel that meets international standard specifications. Further, Central Composite Design (CCD coupled with Response Surface Methodology (RSM was employed to study the effects of the system variables such as flow rate, temperature and transmembrane pressure (TMP on the retention of potassium. At the optimum conditions, the coefficient of retention (%R of the catalyst was 93.642, and the content of the potassium was reduced from 8.328 mg/L to 0.312 mg/L; a value well below the one specified by both EN 14214 and ASTM D6751 standards. In addition, the comparison between predicted and experimental values for the catalyst retention offers a reasonable percentage error of 0.081%. Therefore, this study has proven that membrane technique can be used to post treat crude biodiesel; in order to achieve high-quality biodiesel fuel that can be efficiently used on diesel engines.

  1. Ethanolysis conversion of spent frying oils over aluminium, calcium-phosphate based bi-functional formulated catalysts. Catalytic activity assessment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Zaini, Essam O.; Chesterfield, Dean; Adesina, Adesoji A. [The Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia). Reactor Engineering and Technology Group; Olsen, John [The Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia). School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

    2013-06-01

    The current study compares the catalytic performance of two bi-functional solid catalysts for the transesterification of waste cooking vegetable oil in presence of bio-ethanol acyl-acceptor. The two catalysts were aluminum oxide and seashell-derived calcium oxide supported K{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. The catalytic activity of the produced catalyst samples were assessed and evaluated in terms of their textural and surface chemical properties. Evaluative runs showed that increased amounts of K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} have differently controlled the textural and surface chemical property of the finally synthesised catalyst samples. The behaviour revealed a strong correlation between the percentage yield of ethyl esters EEY% and acid-base site density and strength between the two types of catalysts. Possible leaching test of the catalysts was also used as a measure of performance and as a result, the optimum catalyst, on the basis of both ester yield and resistance to leaching was identified as the sample containing between 10 and 15wt% of K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} on AlO{sub 3} and CaO respectively. (orig.)

  2. Report on the research achievements in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1992. Studies on a direct gasification catalyst; 1992 nendo chokusetsu ekika shokubai ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes the research achievements in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1992 in studies on a direct gasification catalyst. The paper summarizes the points where the catalyst research has reached to date. The catalyst surface effective for hydrogenation is the metal surface that can dissociate hydrogen. However, metals having large adsorption heat against hydrogen do not show the activity greatly because these metals are difficult of desorbing hydrogen having high dissociating activity. The coal liquefaction system has the surface oxidized by water content, wherein hydrogen dissociation cannot be expected, and sulfides are suitable. When a sulfide catalyst contacts hydrogen, the catalyst itself is desulfurized, producing H{sub 2}S and becomes a low-order sulfide. When atmospheric H{sub 2}S contacts this sulfide, it dissociates into HS and H, and this H behaves as active hydrogen. However, the liquefaction activity can be recognized even in a sulfuric acid type catalyst containing no sulfide whatsoever, wherein the H{sub 2}S partial pressure in the reaction system becomes extremely low. This fact means that the active hydrogen is not necessarily generated by the dissociation of H{sub 2}S. There is no other way but to think that hydrogen is dissociated directly without going through H{sub 2}S. If this is true, it provides a new guideline in developing and designing the future catalysts. (NEDO)

  3. The role of catalysts in the decomposition of phenoxy compounds in coal: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Ming-Fei; Gao, Zhi-Hua; Zuo, Zhi-Jun; Huang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The pyrolysis mechanisms of anisole (C6H5OCH3), as a coal-based model compound, on CaO, ZnO and γ-Al2O3 catalysts were studied using density functional theory (DFT). In contrast to the products of pyrolysis (C6H6, H2 and CO), the products of catalytic pyrolysis on CaO, ZnO, and γ-Al2O3 are C6H5OH and C2H4; CO, C5H6 and C2H4; and C6H5OH and C2H4, respectively. Our results indicate that CaO, ZnO and γ-Al2O3 catalysts not only decrease the energy barrier of C6H5OCH3 decomposition but also alter the pyrolysis process and the products. It is also found that the pyrolysis gas H2 alters the products on CaO (C6H5OH and CH4), but it does not affect the products on ZnO and γ-Al2O3. In sum, these catalysts are beneficial for phenoxy compound decomposition.

  4. A possible highly active supported Ni dimer catalyst for O{sub 2} dissociation: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shan [College of Physics and Materials Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Zhang, Yanxing, E-mail: 2016025@htu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Materials Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Zhang, Xilin; Mao, Jianjun [College of Physics and Materials Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Yang, Zongxian, E-mail: yzx@henannu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Materials Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Nano Functional Materials and Applications, Henan Province (China)

    2017-04-30

    Graphical abstract: The minimum energy paths (MEPs) for the dissociation process of O{sub 2} on the surfaces of bare YSZ (111) and Ni{sub n}/YSZ (111) (n = 1, 2 and 3). - Highlights: • The catalytic activity of supported metal catalysts is closely related to the size of metal particles. • The dissociation of O{sub 2} on the YSZ (111) surface is largely enhanced by the supported Ni cluster. • The supported Ni dimer is predicted to be the smallest Ni cluster needed for efficient O{sub 2} dissociation. • The results would provide an important reference to improve the activity and efficiency of the Ni/YSZ(111) nanocomposite catalysts in cost-effective materials. - Abstract: The adsorption and dissociation of O{sub 2} on the supported small nickel clusters with one-, two-, three-Ni atoms on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) (111) surfaces, as well as those on the bare YSZ(111) and Ni(111) surfaces are comparatively studied using ab initio density functional theory calculations. It is found that the dissociation of O{sub 2} on the YSZ(111) surface is largely enhanced by the supported Ni dimer, which is predicted to be the smallest Ni cluster needed for efficient O{sub 2} dissociation. The results would provide an important reference to improve the activity and efficiency of the Ni/YSZ(111) nanocomposite catalysts in cost-effective materials.

  5. A Comparative Study of Basic, Amphoteric, and Acidic Catalysts in the Oxidative Coupling of Methanol and Ethanol for Acrolein Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilić, Aleksandra; Wei, Tiantian; Bennici, Simona; Devaux, Jean-François; Dubois, Jean-Luc; Auroux, Aline

    2017-09-11

    The impact of acid/base properties (determined by adsorption microcalorimetry) of various catalysts on the cross-aldolization of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde leading to acrolein was methodically studied in oxidizing conditions starting from a mixture of methanol and ethanol. The aldol condensation and further dehydration to acrolein were carried out on catalysts presenting various acid/base properties (MgO, Mg-Al oxides, Mg/SiO 2 , NbP, and heteropolyanions on silica, HPA/SiO 2 ). Thermodynamic calculations revealed that cross-aldolization is always favored compared with self-aldolization of acetaldehyde, which leads to crotonaldehyde formation. The presence of strong basic sites is shown to be necessary, but a too high amount drastically increases CO x production. On strong acid sites, production of acrolein and carbon oxides (CO x ) does not increase with temperature. The optimal catalyst for this process should be amphoteric with a balanced acid/base cooperation of medium strength sites and a small amount (150 kJ mol -1 ). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Reuse of Hydrotreating Spent Catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, A.M.; Menoufy, M.F.; Amhed, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    All hydro treating catalysts used in petroleum refining processes gradually lose activity through coking, poisoning by metal, sulfur or halides or lose surface area from sintering at high process temperatures. Waste hydrotreating catalyst, which have been used in re-refining of waste lube oil at Alexandria Petroleum Company (after 5 years lifetime) compared with the same fresh catalyst were used in the present work. Studies are conducted on partial extraction of the active metals of spent catalyst (Mo and Ni) using three leaching solvents,4% oxidized oxalic acid, 10% aqueous sodium hydroxide and 10% citric acid. The leaching experiments are conducting on the de coked extrude [un crushed] spent catalyst samples. These steps are carried out in order to rejuvenate the spent catalyst to be reused in other reactions. The results indicated that 4% oxidized oxalic acid leaching solution gave total metal removal 45.6 for de coked catalyst samples while NaOH gave 35% and citric acid gave 31.9 % The oxidized leaching agent was the most efficient leaching solvent to facilitate the metal removal, and the rejuvenated catalyst was characterized by the unchanged crystalline phase The rejuvenated catalyst was applied for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of vacuum gas oil as a feedstock, under different hydrogen pressure 20-80 bar in order to compare its HDS activity

  7. Novel metalloporphyrin catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, M.C.; Nenoff, T.M.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Work was done for developing biomimetic oxidation catalysts. Two classes of metalloporphyrin catalysts were studied. The first class of catalysts studied were a novel series of highly substituted metalloporphyrins, the fluorinated iron dodecaphenylporphyrins. These homogeneous metalloporphyrin catalysts were screened for activity as catalysts in the oxidation of hydrocarbons by dioxygen. Results are discussed with respect to catalyst structural features. The second type of catalysts studied were heterogeneous catalysts consisting of metalloporphyrins applied to inorganic supports. Preliminary catalytic testing results with these materials are presented.

  8. Study to improve the quality of a Mexican straight run gasoil over NiMo/γ-Al2O3 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A.; Diaz-Garcia, L.; Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Cortez de la Paz, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Four NiMo catalyst supported on Al 2 O 3 with different textural properties have been studied in the hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA) of a Mexican straight run gasoil (SRGO). All reactions were carried out at three different temperatures 613, 633, and 653 K. Alumina supports were analysed by pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption in order to determine their surface acidity and textural properties, respectively. TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were analysed to correlate their hydrogenating properties. Metallic particles were characterized (after sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Catalytic activities are discussed in relation to the physicochemical properties of NiMo catalysts. The importance of textural properties on coke deposition has been emphasized. The results of catalytic activity of these materials varied depending on dispersed MoS particles and pore distribution in final catalysts. The optimum pore diameter was found around 80 A for HDS and HDN

  9. Study to improve the quality of a Mexican straight run gasoil over NiMo/γ-Al 2O 3 catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Crespo, M. A.; Díaz-García, L.; Arce-Estrada, E. M.; Torres-Huerta, A. M.; Cortéz-De la Paz, M. T.

    2006-11-01

    Four NiMo catalyst supported on Al 2O 3 with different textural properties have been studied in the hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatization (HDA) of a Mexican straight run gasoil (SRGO). All reactions were carried out at three different temperatures 613, 633, and 653 K. Alumina supports were analysed by pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption in order to determine their surface acidity and textural properties, respectively. TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were analysed to correlate their hydrogenating properties. Metallic particles were characterized (after sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Catalytic activities are discussed in relation to the physicochemical properties of NiMo catalysts. The importance of textural properties on coke deposition has been emphasized. The results of catalytic activity of these materials varied depending on dispersed MoS particles and pore distribution in final catalysts. The optimum pore diameter was found around 80 Å for HDS and HDN.

  10. Development of the advanced nuclear materials -A study on the polymer catalyst process technology-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kook, Il Hyun; Jung, Heung Suk; Lee, Han Soo; An, Doh Heui; Kang, Heui Suk; Baek, Seung Woo; Lee, Sung Hoh; Sung, Kee Woong; Kim, Kwang Lak; Kim, Jong Hoh; Koo, Je Hyoo; Park, Tae Keun; Kim, Sang Hwan; Yoo, Ryong; Song, Myung Jae; Son, Soon Hwan; Choi, Jung Kil; Lee, Jae Choon; Jung, Moon Kyoo

    1995-07-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in pressurized heavy water power plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply, Korea is scheduled to construct new four pressurized heavy water power plants till the year 2006. Total heavy water make-up for these plants would be 22 Mg/a from the year 2006. Reformed hydrogen processes is considered best suited to Korea. Hydrophobic catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchange was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m3 HD/m3 Bed.sec. and heavy water separation processes using the catalysts were optimized. 66 figs, 62 tabs, 19 refs. (Author)

  11. Development of the advanced nuclear materials -A study on the polymer catalyst process technology-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kook, Il Hyun; Jung, Heung Suk; Lee, Han Soo; An, Doh Heui; Kang, Heui Suk; Baek, Seung Woo; Lee, Sung Hoh; Sung, Kee Woong; Kim, Kwang Lak; Kim, Jong Hoh; Koo, Je Hyoo; Park, Tae Keun; Kim, Sang Hwan; Yoo, Ryong; Song, Myung Jae; Son, Soon Hwan; Choi, Jung Kil; Lee, Jae Choon; Jung, Moon Kyoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in pressurized heavy water power plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply, Korea is scheduled to construct new four pressurized heavy water power plants till the year 2006. Total heavy water make-up for these plants would be 22 Mg/a from the year 2006. Reformed hydrogen processes is considered best suited to Korea. Hydrophobic catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchange was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m3 HD/m3 Bed.sec. and heavy water separation processes using the catalysts were optimized. 66 figs, 62 tabs, 19 refs. (Author).

  12. Electron microscopy study of the deactivation of nickel based catalysts for bio oil hydrodeoxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Carvalho, Hudson W. P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is proposed as an efficient way to remove oxygen in bio-oil, improving its quality as a more sustainable alternative to conventional fuels in terms of CO2 neutrality and relative short production cycle [1]. Ni and Ni-MoS2 nanoparticles supported on ZrO2 show potential...... as high-pressure (100 bar) catalysts for purification of bio-oil by HDO. However, the catalysts deactivate in presence of sulfur, chlorine and potassium species, which are all naturally occurring in real bio-oil. The deactivation mechanisms of the Ni/ZrO2 have been investigated through scanning...... transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Catalytic testing has been performed using guaiacol in 1-octanol acting as a model compound for bio-oil. Addition of sulphur (0.3 vol% octanethiol) in the feed...

  13. Pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance study of transport properties of fluid catalytic cracking catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kortunov, P.; Vasenkov, S.; Kärger, J.; Fé Elía, M.; Perez, M.; Stöcker, M.; Papadopoulos, G. K.; Theodorou, D.; Drescher, B.; McElhiney, G.; Bernauer, B.; Krystl, V.; Kočiřík, Milan; Zikánová, Arlette; Jirglová, Hana; Berger, C.; Gläser, R.; Weitkamp, J.; Hansen, E. W.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2005), s. 233-237 ISSN 0730-725X Grant - others:TROCAT project - European Community(DE) G5RD-CT-2001-00520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : pulsed-field gradient * nuclear magnetic resonance * fluid catalytic cracking catalyst Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.361, year: 2005

  14. FeRu/TiO2 and Fe/TiO2 catalysts after reduction and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraan, A.M. van der; Nonnekens, R.C.H.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    A series of TiO 2 -supported bimetallic FeRu catalysts with different Fe:Ru ratios (infinity; 10:1; 3:1; 1:1; 1:3) has been studied by means of in situ Moessbauer spectroscopy. The influence of reduction and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on the state of iron in the FeRu/TiO 2 catalysts is derived. (Auth.)

  15. Design of Pd-Based Bimetallic Catalysts for ORR: A DFT Calculation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Ou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing Pd-lean catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR is the key for large-scale application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. In the present paper, we have proposed a multiple-descriptor strategy for designing efficient and durable ORR Pd-based alloy catalysts. We demonstrated that an ideal Pd-based bimetallic alloy catalyst for ORR should possess simultaneously negative alloy formation energy, negative surface segregation energy of Pd, and a lower oxygen binding ability than pure Pt. By performing detailed DFT calculations on the thermodynamics, surface chemistry and electronic properties of Pd-M alloys, Pd-V, Pd-Fe, Pd-Zn, Pd-Nb, and Pd-Ta, are identified theoretically to have stable Pd segregated surface and improved ORR activity. Factors affecting these properties are analyzed. The alloy formation energy of Pd with transition metals M can be mainly determined by their electron interaction. This may be the origin of the negative alloy formation energy for Pd-M alloys. The surface segregation energy of Pd is primarily determined by the surface energy and the atomic radius of M. The metals M which have smaller atomic radius and higher surface energy would tend to favor the surface segregation of Pd in corresponding Pd-M alloys.

  16. Electrochemical and Spectroscopic Study of Mononuclear Ruthenium Water Oxidation Catalysts: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Investigation

    KAUST Repository

    de Ruiter, J. M.

    2016-09-20

    One of the key challenges in designing light-driven artificial photosynthesis devices is the optimization of the catalytic water oxidation process. For this optimization it is crucial to establish the catalytic mechanism and the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, yet a full description is often difficult to obtain using only experimental data. Here we consider a series of mononuclear ruthenium water oxidation catalysts of the form [Ru(cy)(L)(H2O)](2+) (cy = p-cymene, L = 2,2\\'-bipyridine and its derivatives). The proposed catalytic cycle and intermediates are examined using density functional theory (DFT), radiation chemistry, spectroscopic techniques, and electrochemistry to establish the water oxidation mechanism. The stability of the catalyst is investigated using online electrochemical mass spectrometry (OLEMS). The comparison between the calculated absorption spectra of the proposed intermediates with experimental spectra, as well as free energy calculations with electrochemical data, provides strong evidence for the proposed pathway: a water oxidation catalytic cycle involving four proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) steps. The thermodynamic bottleneck is identified as the third PCET step, which involves O-O bond formation. The good agreement between the optical and thermodynamic data and DFT predictions further confirms the general applicability of this methodology as a powerful tool in the characterization of water oxidation catalysts and for the interpretation of experimental observables.

  17. Structure, Mobility, and Composition of Transition Metal Catalyst Surfaces. High-Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zhongwei [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-12-06

    Surface structure, mobility, and composition of transition metal catalysts were studied by high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) at high gas pressures. HP-STM makes it possible to determine the atomic or molecular rearrangement at catalyst surfaces, particularly at the low-coordinated active surface sites. AP-XPS monitors changes in elemental composition and chemical states of catalysts in response to variations in gas environments. Stepped Pt and Cu single crystals, the hexagonally reconstructed Pt(100) single crystal, and Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size, shape and composition, were employed as the model catalysts for experiments in this thesis.

  18. A comparative study on the influence of the platinum catalyst in poly(dimethylsiloxane) based networks synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Poulsen, Julie Øblom; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the project is to find the best of three Pt catalysts and their appropriate quantity in order to obtain soft networks in one hour at room temperature. How the choice of catalyst influences the final elastomeric properties is also evaluated. The differences between the catalysts...

  19. Sputtered catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyerman, W.J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for preparing a supported catalyst by a sputtering process. A material that is catalytic, or which is a component of a catalytic system, is sputtered on to the surface of refractory oxide particles that are compatible with the sputtered material and the sputtered particles are consolidated into aggregate form. The oxide particles before sputtering should have a diameter in the range 1000A to 50μ and a porosity less than 0.4 ml/g, and may comprise MgO, Al 2 O 3 or SiO 2 or mixtures of these oxides, including hydraulic cement. The particles may possess catalytic activity by themselves or in combination with the catalytic material deposited on them. Sputtering may be effected epitaxially and consolidation may be effected by compaction pelleting, extrusion or spray drying of a slurry. Examples of the use of such catalysts are given. (U.K.)

  20. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare

  1. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin, E-mail: franklin.tao.2011@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  2. In Situ UV-Visible Assessment of Iron-Based High-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Catalysts Promoted with Lanthana: An Extent of Reduction Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basseem B. Hallac

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The extent of reduction of unsupported iron-based high-temperature water-gas shift catalysts with small (<5 wt % lanthana contents was studied using UV-visible spectroscopy. Temperature- programmed reduction measurements showed that lanthana content higher than 0.5 wt % increased the extent of reduction to metallic Fe, while 0.5 wt % of lanthana facilitated the reduction to Fe3O4. In situ measurements on the iron oxide catalysts using mass and UV-visible spectroscopies permitted the quantification of the extent of reduction under temperature-programmed reduction and high-temperature water-gas shift conditions. The oxidation states were successfully calibrated against normalized absorbance spectra of visible light using the Kubelka-Munk theory. The normalized absorbance relative to the fully oxidized Fe2O3 increased as the extent of reduction increased. XANES suggested that the average bulk iron oxidation state during the water-gas shift reaction was Fe+2.57 for the catalyst with no lanthana and Fe+2.54 for the catalysts with 1 wt % lanthana. However, the UV-vis spectra suggest that the surface oxidation state of iron would be Fe+2.31 for the catalyst with 1 wt % lanthana if the oxidation state of iron in the catalyst with 0 wt % lanthana were Fe+2.57. The findings of this paper emphasize the importance of surface sensitive UV-visible spectroscopy for determining the extent of catalyst reduction during operation. The paper highlights the potential to use bench-scale UV-visible spectroscopy to study the surface chemistry of catalysts instead of less-available synchrotron X-ray radiation facilities.

  3. Modeling to study the role of catalyst in the formation of graphitic shells during carbon nanofiber growth subjected to reactive plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Gupta, Neha; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2018-04-01

    An analytical model to study the role of a metal catalyst nanofilm in the nucleation, growth, and resulting structure of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) in low-temperature hydrogen diluted acetylene plasma has been developed. The model incorporates the nanostructuring of thin catalyst films, growth of CNF, restructuring of catalyst nanoparticles during growth, and its repercussion on the resulting structure (alignment of rolled graphene sheets around catalyst nanoparticles) by taking into account the plasma sheath formalization, kinetics of neutrals and positively charged species in the reactive plasma, flux of plasma species onto the catalyst front surface, and numerous surface reactions for carbon generation. In order to examine the influence of the catalyst film on the growth of CNFs, the numerical solutions of the model equations have been obtained for experimentally determined initial conditions and glow discharge plasma parameters. From the solutions obtained, we found that nanostructuring of thin films leads to the formation of small nanoparticles with high surface number density. The CNF nucleates over these small-sized nanoparticles grow faster and attain early saturation because of the quick poisoning of small-sized catalyst particles, and contain only a few graphitic shells. However, thick nanofilms result in shorter CNFs with large diameters composed of many graphitic shells. Moreover, we found that the inclination of graphitic shells also depends on the extent up to which the catalyst can reconstruct itself during the growth. The small nanoparticles show much greater elongation along the growth axis and also show a very small difference between their tip and base diameter during the growth due to which graphitic shells align at very small angles as compared to the larger nanoparticles. The present study is useful to synthesize the thin and more extended CNFs/CNTs having a smaller opening angle (inclination angle of graphene layers) as the opening angle has a

  4. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  5. Deactivation of La-Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sup 3}. Field study results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Gongshin; Yang, Ralph T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Chang, Ramsay; Cardoso, Sylvio [Air Pollution Control, Power Generation, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1395 (United States); Smith, Randall A. [Fossil Energy Research Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA 92653 (United States)

    2004-11-08

    Results are summarized for a study on the effects of poisons on the La-Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst activity for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia. The deactivation of La-Fe-ZSM-5 honeycombs was studied in field tests. A honeycomb catalyst containing 25%La-Fe-ZSM-5 had an overall activity similar to that of a commercial vanadia honeycomb catalyst. Long-term activity test results show that the 25%La-Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst activity decreased to 50% after 300h and 25% after 1769h of on-stream flue gas exposure. The deactivation is correlated to the amounts of poisons deposited on the catalyst. Poisons include alkali and alkaline earth metals, As and Hg. Hg was found to be ion-exchanged from HgCl{sup 2} to form Hg-ZSM-5, and Hg was found to be among the strongest poisons. The poisoning effects of these elements appeared to be additive. Thus, from the chemical analysis of the deactivated catalyst, the deactivation of Fe-ZSM-5 can be predicted.

  6. Deuterium absorption in Mg{sub 70}Al{sub 30} thin films with bilayer catalysts: A comparative neutron reflectometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, Eric [National Research Council Canada/Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Bldg. 459, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Harrower, Chris T.; Kalisvaart, Peter [Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta and National Research Council Canada/National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2M9 (Canada); Bird, Adam [National Research Council Canada/Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Bldg. 459, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Teichert, Anke [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica and INPAC, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Laboratorium voor Vaste-Stoffysica en Magnetisme and INPAC, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Wallacher, Dirk; Grimm, Nico; Steitz, Roland [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Mitlin, David [Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta and National Research Council Canada/National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2M9 (Canada); Fritzsche, Helmut, E-mail: Helmut.Fritzsche@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada/Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Bldg. 459, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2011-05-05

    Highlights: > Mg{sub 70}Al{sub 30} thin films studied for hydrogen absorption using in situ neutron reflectometry. > Films with Ta/Pd, Ti/Pd and Ni/Pd bilayer catalysts systematically compared. > Measurements reveals deuterium spillover from the catalysts to the MgAl phase. > The use of Ti-Pd bilayer offers best results in terms of amount absorbed and kinetics. > Key results cross-checked with X-ray reflectometry. - Abstract: We present a neutron reflectometry study of deuterium absorption in thin films of Al-containing Mg alloys capped with a Ta/Pd, Ni/Pd and Ti/Pd-catalyst bilayer. The measurements were performed at room temperature over the 0-1 bar pressure range under quasi-equilibrium conditions. The modeling of the measurements provided a nanoscale representation of the deuterium profile in the layers at different stages of the absorption process. The absorption mechanism observed was found to involve spillover of atomic deuterium from the catalyst layer to the Mg alloy phase, followed by the deuteration of the Mg alloy. Complete deuteration of the Mg alloy occurs in a pressure range between 100 and 500 mbar, dependent on the type of bilayer catalyst. The use of a Ti/Pd bilayer catalyst yielded the best results in terms of both storage density and kinetic properties.

  7. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...... under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...

  8. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  9. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  10. Study on the structure of Co/ZrO2-SiO2 catalysts by XAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Haiyan; Xiang Hongwei; Li Yongwang; Sun Yuhan; Liu Tao; Xie Yaning; Hu Tiandou

    2002-01-01

    The Co-based catalysts have been extensively used in converting CO to longer chain hydrocarbons which can then be hydrocracked to diesel oil with high grade. SiO 2 is one of the most commonly used carriers for Co-based catalysts. It is showed that commercial silica carrier after modification can lead to much high reaction activity and selectivity to heavy hydrocarbons. But the structure of Co-based catalysts supported on the modified carrier has not been clearly understood. XAFS is used to investigate the change of structure of cobalt species in Co-based catalysts supported on modified carriers. The result from XAFS indicate that the structure of Co-based catalysts supported on modified carrier has certain change in comparison with Co-based catalyst supported on commercial silica. The interaction between carrier and metal is woken in the modified catalysts. Especially, the structure of catalysts after reduction have distinct difference. The extent of reduction in modified catalysts is much more than the catalyst supported on commercial silica. Cobalt species of the catalyst supported commercial silica after reduction dose exist mainly in the form of cobalt metal forms and may exist in the form of Co 2 SiO 4 surface compound

  11. Moessbauer study of the evolution of a laterite iron mineral based catalyst: effect of the activation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubeiro, M.L.; Goldwasser, M.R.; Perez Zurita, M.J.; Franco, C.; Gonzalez-Jimenez, F.; Jaimes, E.

    1994-01-01

    The syngas reaction has been studied using a laterite iron mineral, promoted with K and Mn. In situ activation under syngas, as well as pre-treatment with H 2 followed by CO under mild and more severe conditions were tested. These activation procedures led to different iron phase compositions and to different catalytic selectivities. The C 2 -C 4 /CH 4 ratio was significantly lower for those catalysts which after reaction showed the presence of hexagonal carbide and magnetite compared to the solid, which showed the highest proportion of Haegg carbide. (orig.)

  12. Structural and textural study of Ni and/or Co in a common molybdate lattice as catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boukhlouf H.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the search for new molybdate catalyst formulations, which are known to be active in light alkane oxidative dehydrogenation, a process which could be replace in the near future the common steam cracking and pure dehydrogenation processes currently used for the production of alkenes. Co, Ni and mixed Ni-Co molybdates of various compositions are prepared by a modified coprecipitation procedure from metal nitrates and ammonium heptamolybdate. Their structural and textural properties were studied by XRD, Raman, B.E.T and XPS. Textural and structural properties of the materials are correlated to the composition.

  13. Use of deuterium n. m. r. spectroscopy in mechanistic studies of exchange reactions of ethers on supported metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.A.; Kemball, Charles; McDougall, G.S.

    1987-10-01

    Exchange reactions of diethyl ether (DEE) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) with deuterium have been studied over supported nickel, palladium, platinum, and rhodium catalysts. Products from most of the systems were analysed by deuterium n.m.r. spectroscopy (55.28 MHz) which gave quantitative results about the distribution of deuterium in the exchanged ethers. The results confirm earlier conclusions about the mechanism of the exchange of DEE and provide new evidence about the reactions of THF. Some hydrogenolysis occurred simultaneously with exchange of THF over both nickel and platinum.

  14. [Towards computer-aided catalyst design: Three effective core potential studies of C-H activation]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Research in the initial grant period focused on computational studies relevant to the selective activation of methane, the prime component of natural gas. Reaction coordinates for methane activation by experimental models were delineated, as well as the bonding and structure of complexes that effect this important reaction. This research, highlighted in the following sections, also provided the impetus for further development, and application of methods for modeling metal-containing catalysts. Sections of the report describe the following: methane activation by multiple-bonded transition metal complexes; computational lanthanide chemistry; and methane activation by non-imido, multiple-bonded ligands.

  15. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins; Jasna Tomic

    2000-01-01

    To provide a better understanding of the roles of a solid catalyst and the solvent in Direct Coal Liquefaction, a small reactor was equipped with a porous-walled basket which was permeable to the solvent but was not permeable to the coal or solid catalyst. With this equipment and a high volatile bituminous coal it was found that direct contact between the catalyst in the basket and the coal outside the basket is not required for catalyzed coal liquefaction. The character of the solvent in this system makes a significant difference in the conversion of the coal, the better solvents being strong donor solvents. Because of the extensive use of thermogravimetric analysis in this laboratory, it was noted that the peak temperature for volatiles evolution from coal was a reliable measure of coal rank. Because of this observation, a variety of coals of a range of ranks was investigated. It was shown in this work that measuring the peak temperature for volatiles evolution was a quite precise indicator of rank and correlated closely with the rank value obtained by measuring vitrinite reflectance, a more difficult measurement to make. This prompted the desire to know the composition of the volatile material evolved as a function of coal rank. This was then measured by coupling a TGA to a mass spectrometer using laser activation and photoionization detection TG-PI-MS. The predominant species in volatiles of low rank coal turned out to be phenols with some alkenes. As the rank increases, the relative amounts of alkene and aromatic hydrocarbons increases and the oxygenated species decrease. It was shown that these volatiles were actually pyrolytic products and not volatilization products of the coal. Solvent extraction experiments coupled with Thermogravimetric-photoionization-mass spectrometry (TG-PI-MS) indicated that the low boiling and more extractable material are essentially similar in chemical types to the non-extractable portions but apparently higher molecular weight

  16. Comparative study of the methanolysis and ethanolysis of Maize oil using alkaline catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid, U.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing population and economic development, fuel from renewable resources needs to be widely explored in order to fulfill the future energy demand. In the present study, biodiesel from maize oil using transesterification reactions with methanol and ethanol was evaluated in the presence of NaOCH3, KOCH3, NaOCH2CH3, KOCH2CH3, NaOH and KOH as catalysts. The influence of reaction variables such as the alcohol to oil molar ratio (3:1-15:1, catalyst concentration (0.25-1.50% and reaction time (20-120 min to achieve the maximum yield was determined at fixed reaction temperatures. The optimized variables in the case of methanolysis were 6:1 methanol to oil molar ratio (mol/ mol, 0.75% sodium methoxide concentration (wt% and 90 min reaction time at 65°C, which produced a yield of 97.1% methyl esters. A 9:1 ethanol to oil molar ratio (mol/mol, 1.00% sodium ethoxide concentration (wt% and 120 min reaction time at 75°C were found to produce the maximum ethyl ester yield of up to 85%. The methanolysis of maize oil was depicted more rapidly as compared to the ethanolysis of maize oil. Gas chromatography of the produced biodiesel from maize oil showed high levels of linoleic acid (up to 50.89% followed by oleic acid (up to 36.00%, palmitic acid (up to 9.98%, oleic acid (up to 1.80% and linolenic acid (up to 0.98%. The obtained fatty acid esters were further analyzed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR to ensure the completion of transesterification. The fuel properties of the produced biodiesels i.e. kinematic viscosity, cetane number, oxidative stability, pour point, cloud point, cold filter plugging point, ash content, flash point, acid value, sulfur content, higher heating value, density, methanol content, free glycerol and bound glycerol were determined. The analyses were performed using the FTIR method and the results were compared to the biodiesel

  17. Nanolithographic Fabrication and Heterogeneous Reaction Studies ofTwo-Dimensional Platinum Model Catalyst Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Anthony Marshall [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-05-20

    In order to better understand the fundamental components that govern catalytic activity, two-dimensional model platinum nanocatalyst arrays have been designed and fabricated. These catalysts arrays are meant to model the interplay of the metal and support important to industrial heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Photolithography and sub-lithographic techniques such as electron beam lithography, size reduction lithography and nanoimprint lithography have been employed to create these platinum nanoarrays. Both in-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques and catalytic reaction measurements were used to correlate the structural parameters of the system to catalytic activity.

  18. Metal-phthalocyanine functionalized carbon nanotubes as catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Walter

    2012-07-01

    The covalent functionalization of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with transition metal phthalocyanines (MPc, with M = Mn, Fe and Co) are addressed by density functional calculations. The CNT-MPc catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is investigated through the O2 stretching frequency adsorbed on the phthalocyanine metal center. We find better reduction abilities when the CNT functionalization occurs through sp2-like bonds. Multiple stable-spin states for the M-O2 adduct are also found for M = Mn and Fe, suggesting higher ORR rates. The CNT-MPc complexes show metallic characteristics, suggesting favorable conditions to work as ORR cathode catalysts in fuel cells.

  19. The study on preparation of high dispersion and pure cerium dioxide for producing automotive exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Minh Tuan; Nguyen Trong Hung; Nguyen Thanh Chung

    2003-01-01

    The multi-stage counter-current solvent extraction process using TBP as the solvent has been carried out for purifying cerium and the ammonium carbonate precipitation method has been used to produce the cerium oxide of high dispersion and pure. The flow sheet of extraction system includes 3 extraction stages with O/A = 0.7,2 stripping stages and 4 scrubbing stages with O/A = 5. The condition for ammonium carbonate precipitation, drying and calcination have been investigated and a procedure that seem to be practically suitable to prepare cerium dioxide powder with great specific surface area for producing automotive exhaust catalyst has been proposed. (LMT)

  20. EPR study of the coordination sphere of Mo5+ ions in UV-irradiated silica-supported molybdenum catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canose, B.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.; Che, M.

    1991-01-01

    The determination of the number of coordination vacancies existing at transition metal cations at the surface of bulk or supported oxides is of greater interest in relation to the adsorption and catalytic properties of such systems. In the case of paramagnetic cations, the authors have developed a method consisting of the recording of their first and third derivative EPR spectra after adsorption of 13 CO, ( 13 C, I = 1/2). In this way, the 13 C superhyperfine structure which is normally observed permits the determination of the number of CO molecules bonded to the metal center. In a recent EPR work published in this journal, Seyedmonir and Howe have reported the formation of a CO adduct of the tetrahedral Mo 5+ -OH - species formed by UV-irradiation at 20 K of a MoO 3 /SiO 2 catalyst in the presence of H 2 . In that work, although the structure of such an adduct could not be derived unambiguously on the basis of the g tensor values, the coordination of the Mo 5+ ion by two CO molecules was suggested. This would be in agreement with the previous results with thermally reduced V 2 O 5 /SiO 2 and MoO 3 /SiO 2 catalysts, where the coordination of, respectively, V 4+ and Mo 5+ tetrahedral centers by two CO molecules was proven by means of the combined use of 13 CO and third derivative EPR spectra. In the present work, using this approach, they have studied the structure of these Mo 5+ ions photochemically generated on MoO 3 /SiO 2 catalysts and concluded that only one CO molecule is bonded to the paramagnetic ion

  1. Determination of methylmercury in fish tissue by gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry after derivatization with sodium tetraphenylborate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmieri, H.E.L.; Leonel, L.V. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2000-03-01

    The detection of methylmercury species (MeHg) in fish tissue was investigated. Samples were digested with KOH-methanol and acidified prior to extraction with methylene chloride. MeHg was back-extracted from the organic phase into water. An aliquot of this aqueous solution (buffered to pH 5) was subjected to derivatization with sodium tetraphenylborate (NaBPh{sub 4}) and then extracted with toluene. The organic phase containing MePhHg was injected into a gas chromatograph (GC) which is on-line with a microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometer (MIP-AED). The quantification limit was about 0.6 {mu}g/g and 0.1 {mu}g/g of MeHg (as Hg) for 0.08 g of freeze-dried fish powder and 0.5 g of fresh samples, respectively. Two certified reference materials, CRM 464 (tuna fish) from Community Bureau of Reference-BCR and DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) from National Research Council Canada-NRC were selected for checking the accuracy of the method. This methodology was applied to the determination of MeHg in some kinds of fish from the Carmo river with alluvial gold recovery activities (''garimpos'') in Mariana, Minas Gerais, Brazil. (orig.)

  2. Determination of methylmercury in fish tissue by gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry after derivatization with sodium tetraphenylborate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, H E; Leonel, L V

    2000-03-01

    The detection of methylmercury species (MeHg) in fish tissue was investigated. Samples were digested with KOH-methanol and acidified prior to extraction with methylene chloride. MeHg was back-extracted from the organic phase into water. An aliquot of this aqueous solution (buffered to pH 5) was subjected to derivatization with sodium tetraphenylborate (NaBPh4) and then extracted with toluene. The organic phase containing MePhHg was injected into a gas chromatograph (GC) which is on-line with a microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometer (MIP-AED). The quantification limit was about 0.6 microg/g and 0.1 microg/g of MeHg (as Hg) for 0.08 g of freeze-dried fish powder and 0.5 g of fresh samples, respectively. Two certified reference materials, CRM 464 (tuna fish) from Community Bureau of Reference-BCR and DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) from National Research Council Canada-NRC were selected for checking the accuracy of the method. This methodology was applied to the determination of MeHg in some kinds of fish from the Carmo river with alluvial gold recovery activities ("garimpos") in Mariana, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

  3. Studies on the catalysts for coal liquefaction. ; Specific behaviours of coals of different ranks in their hydrogenolysis reactions catalyzed by various kinds of catalysts. Sekitan ekikayo shokubai ni kansuru kenkyu. ; Suisoka bunkai seiseibutsu sosei ni oyobosu kakushu shokubai no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takechi, Y; Ikenaga, N; Oda, H; Yokokawa, C [Kansai University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1991-11-07

    Three kinds of coals with different rank of 76, 85 and 87C% were hydrocracked to study the specific reaction behavior of four kinds of 1coal liquefaction catalysts such as CuCrO4, Fe2O3+S, MoO3-TiO2 and MoS3-Al2O3. The reaction was conducted without any solvent to find out the specific phenomenon of each combination of coal and catalyst, and terminated at the point where nearly 30% of an initial amount of coal is converted to benzene-soluble. The products were separated by GPC into four fractions, and their average molecular weights and intrinsic viscosities were measured to study characteristics of each combination. As a result, the molecular weight distribution was obviously dependent on the combination of coal and catalyst, and no specific relation was observed between the molecular weight and intrinsic viscosity. The molecular of each fraction had a bar shape with an elliptic section indicating no apparent correlation with the molecular weight. 3 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction studies on supported Ni catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldea, N.; Marginean, P.; Yaning, Xie; Tiandou, Hu; Tao, Liu; Wu, Zhongua; ZhenYa, Dai

    1999-01-01

    In the first part of this paper, we present a study based on EXAFS spectroscopy. This method can yield structural information about the local environment around a specific atomic constituent in the amorphous materials, the location and chemical state of any catalytic atom on any support or point defect structures, in alloys and composites. EXAFS is a specific technique of the scattering of X-ray on materials. The present study is aimed toward elucidation of the local structure of Ni atoms and their interaction with oxide support. The second goal of the paper consists in X-ray diffraction on the same samples. X-ray diffraction method that is capable to determine average particle size, microstrains, probability of faults as well as particle size distribution function of supported Ni catalysts is presented. The method is based on the Fourier analysis of a single X-Ray diffraction profile. The results obtained on supported nickel catalysts, which are used in H/D isotopic exchange reactions are reported. The global structure is obtained with a new fitting method based on the Generalised Fermi Function facilities for approximation and Fourier transform of the experimental X-Ray line profiles. Both types of measurements were performed on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facilities (BSRF). (authors)

  5. Comparative Study of Various Preparation Methods of CuO–CeO2 Catalysts for Oxidation of n–Hexane and iso–Octane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Mishra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The complete oxidation of n-Hexane and iso-Octane was studied individually in a fixed bed tubular flow reactor over CuO-CeO2 catalysts synthesized via four different methods namely urea-nitrate combustion method, urea gelation/co-precipitation method, citric acid sol-gel method and co-impregnation method. Laser diffraction was employed in catalysts characterization. The results obtained from the complete conversion of n-Hexane and iso-Octane revealed that the CuO-CeO2 catalysts prepared by urea-nitrate combustion method (UNC showed the best performance than the catalysts prepared by other methods used in the present investigation. CuO-CeO2 catalysts prepared by UNC method achieve total n-Hexane and iso-Octane conversion to CO2 at lower temperatures of 280 0C and 340 0C respectively due to the larger surface area of the catalysts which increases the specific rate of reaction. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 30th October 2012; Revised: 30th November 2012; Accepted: 3rd December 2012[How to Cite: A. Mishra, B.D. Tripathi, A.K. Rai, R. Prasad (2013. Comparative Study of Various Preparation Methods of CuO–CeO2 Catalysts for Oxidation of n–Hexane and iso–Octane. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7(3: 172-178. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4076.172-178][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4076.172-178 ] View in  |

  6. An introduction to catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hak Je

    1988-11-01

    This book explains basic conception of catalyst such as definition, velocity of chemical reaction and velocity of catalyst reaction, absorption with absorption energy and chemical absorption, pore structure with the role of pore and measurement of pore structure, catalyst activity on solid structure, electrical property on catalyst activity, choice and design of catalyst, catalytic reaction with reaction velocity and chemical equilibrium and reaction velocity model, measurement of reaction velocity and material analysis, catalyst for mixed compound, catalyst for solid acid and catalyst for supported metal.

  7. Study on the effects of titanium oxide based nanomaterials as catalysts on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Anderson de Farias; Jardim, Paula Mendes; Santos, Dilson Silva dos, E-mail: anderso.n@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Conceicao, Monique Osorio Talarico da [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UniFOA), RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Magnesium hydride is highly attractive for hydrogen storage in solid state in reason of its high gravimetric capacity (7,6 wt% of H{sub 2}) and low density (1,7 g/cm³), making it a promissory candidate for mobile applications [1]. However, its low sorption kinetics and desorption temperature are the main obstacles for its application. In the present study the catalytic role of TiO{sub 2} based nanomaterials with different morphologies on the sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2} was evaluated. The additions consisted on titanate nanotubes (TTNT-Low), TiO{sub 2} nanorods (TTNT-550) and nanoparticles (KA-100, TTNT-ACID). Transmission and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (S/TEM) associated with X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) mapping was used to characterize the catalysts' morphology and crystalline structure and their dispersion within magnesium hydride, altogether with other characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET technique for structure and surface area analysis. The sorption kinetics were evaluated by means of a volumetric gas absorption/desorption (Sievert-type) apparatus. The results indicated that all additives improved the sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}, but the samples with TTNT-550 (TiO{sub 2} nanorods) and TTNT-ACID (TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles) presented the best and the second best performances, respectively, suggesting that the 1D morphology may promote a slightly superior kinetics than particulate catalysts. (author)

  8. Studies on synthesis and hydrogenation behaviour of graphitic nanofibres prepared through palladium catalyst assisted thermal cracking of acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Tiwari, R.S.; Srivastava, O.N.

    2004-01-01

    The nano-variants of carbon including graphitic nanofibres (GNF) have recently been considered to be exotic (light weight, high storage capacity) hydrogen storage materials. In the present paper, we report growth of aligned bundles of GNF. The length and width of cross-section of the bundles is ∼50 and ∼25 μm, respectively. The length of individual GNF is ∼50 μm and diameter ∼0.25 μm. The GNFs have been synthesized through thermal decomposition of acetylene using palladium (Pd) sheets as catalyst. This represents a new form of catalyst. The GNFs bundles grown by the present method are easier to hydrogenate. They adsorb hydrogen at a lower pressure of ∼80 atm as against ∼120 atm for the GNF grown in the earlier studies. The storage capacity obtained in the present investigation is ∼17 wt.%. Electron microscopic investigations reveal that as against the as grown GNF, the hydrogenated version embodies microstructures exhibiting fragmentation of graphitic layer bundles. The reasons for the growth of GNF in the form of aligned bundles, the ease of hydrogenation and relevance of GNF fragmentation after hydrogenation have been outlined

  9. Iron alloy Fischer-tropsch catalysts--1. Oxidation-reduction studies of the Fe-Ni system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unmuth, E.E.; Schwartz, L.H.; Butt, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    Catalysts containing 5% iron, nickel, or 4:1 iron-nickel on silica were hydrogen-reduced at 425/sup 0/C for 12 or 24 hr, reoxidized in air for 2 or 4 hr, reduced again in hydrogen for 12 hr, and studied at each treatment step by Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and temperature-programed desorption. The nickel was reduced directly to the metal, redispersed during the oxidation, and gave 20% smaller particles in the second reduction than in the first reduction. The ..cap alpha..-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ reduced via an Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ intermediate and yielded approx. 70% metallic iron and the second reduction produced about the same particle size as the first reduction. The alloy catalyst reduced into a mixture of two phases, a face-centered cubic phase containing approx. 37.5% Ni, i.e., the bulk equilibrium value, and a body-centered cubic phase, and the particle sizes obtained in the first and second reductions were similar. The activation energies for the reduction were determined.

  10. Studies on synthesis and hydrogenation behaviour of graphitic nanofibres prepared through palladium catalyst assisted thermal cracking of acetylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Tiwari, R.S.; Srivastava, O.N

    2004-11-03

    The nano-variants of carbon including graphitic nanofibres (GNF) have recently been considered to be exotic (light weight, high storage capacity) hydrogen storage materials. In the present paper, we report growth of aligned bundles of GNF. The length and width of cross-section of the bundles is {approx}50 and {approx}25 {mu}m, respectively. The length of individual GNF is {approx}50 {mu}m and diameter {approx}0.25 {mu}m. The GNFs have been synthesized through thermal decomposition of acetylene using palladium (Pd) sheets as catalyst. This represents a new form of catalyst. The GNFs bundles grown by the present method are easier to hydrogenate. They adsorb hydrogen at a lower pressure of {approx}80 atm as against {approx}120 atm for the GNF grown in the earlier studies. The storage capacity obtained in the present investigation is {approx}17 wt.%. Electron microscopic investigations reveal that as against the as grown GNF, the hydrogenated version embodies microstructures exhibiting fragmentation of graphitic layer bundles. The reasons for the growth of GNF in the form of aligned bundles, the ease of hydrogenation and relevance of GNF fragmentation after hydrogenation have been outlined.

  11. Theoretical Studies in Heterogenous Catalysis: Towards a Rational Design of Novel Catalysts for Hydrodesulfurization and Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez,J.A.; Liu, P.

    2008-10-01

    Traditionally, knowledge in heterogeneous catalysis has come through empirical research. Nowadays, there is a clear interest to change this since millions of dollars in products are generated every year in the chemical and petrochemical industries through catalytic processes. To obtain a fundamental knowledge of the factors that determine the activity of heterogeneous catalysts is a challenge for modern science since many of these systems are very complex in nature. In principle, when a molecule adsorbs on the surface of a heterogeneous catalyst, it can interact with a large number of bonding sites. It is known that the chemical properties of these bonding sites depend strongly on the chemical environment around them. Thus, there can be big variations in chemical reactivity when going from one region to another in the surface of a heterogeneous catalyst. A main objective is to understand how the structural and electronic properties of a surface affect the energetics for adsorption processes and the paths for dissociation and chemical reactions. In recent years, advances in instrumentation and experimental procedures have allowed a large series of detailed works on the surface chemistry of heterogeneous catalysts. In many cases, these experimental studies have shown interesting and unique phenomena. Theory is needed to unravel the basic interactions behind these phenomena and to provide a general framework for the interpretation of experimental results. Ideally, theoretical calculations based on density-functional theory have evolved to the point that one should be able to predict patterns in the activity of catalytic surfaces. As in the case of experimental techniques, no single theoretical approach is able to address the large diversity of phenomena occurring on a catalyst. Catalytic surfaces are usually modeled using either a finite cluster or a two-dimensionally periodic slab. Many articles have been published comparing the results of these two approaches. An

  12. Structural parameters of polyethylenes obtained using a palladium catalyst: dilute solution and solid state studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, Simoni Plentz; Lutz, Pierre J.; Duval, M.; Kress, Jacky; Lapp, A.

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylenes were obtained using palladium catalyst [(Ar N=C(Me)-C(Me)=N Ar) Pd(CH 2 ) 3 (COOMe)] + BAr' 4 - (VERSIPOL TM ); Ar2,6-i-Pr 2 -C 6 H 3 and Ar'3,5-(CF 3 ) 2 -C 6 H 3 . The combination of dilute solution and solid state characterization of these polyethylenes revealed strong differences between structural parameters of samples prepared under almost identical conditions except ethylene pressure (6, 3 and 1 bar). These differences can be explained by the fact that samples prepared at 6 bar are almost linear, with only a few short branches, whereas those synthesized at 1 bar are highly branched or even hyper branched. (author)

  13. Enantioselective Decarboxylative Alkylation Reactions: Catalyst Development, Substrate Scope, and Mechanistic Studies

    KAUST Repository

    Behenna, Douglas C.; Mohr, Justin T.; Sherden, Nathaniel H.; Marinescu, Smaranda C.; Harned, Andrew M.; Tani, Kousuke; Seto, Masaki; Ma, Sandy; Nová k, Zoltá n; Krout, Michael R.; McFadden, Ryan M.; Roizen, Jennifer L.; Enquist, John A.; White, David E.; Levine, Samantha R.; Petrova, Krastina V.; Iwashita, Akihiko; Virgil, Scott C.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    α-Quaternary ketones are accessed through novel enantioselective alkylations of allyl and propargyl electrophiles by unstabilized prochiral enolate nucleophiles in the presence of palladium complexes with various phosphinooxazoline (PHOX) ligands. Excellent yields and high enantiomeric excesses are obtained from three classes of enolate precursor: enol carbonates, enol silanes, and racemic β-ketoesters. Each of these substrate classes functions with nearly identical efficiency in terms of yield and enantioselectivity. Catalyst discovery and development, the optimization of reaction conditions, the exploration of reaction scope, and applications in target-directed synthesis are reported. Experimental observations suggest that these alkylation reactions occur through an unusual inner-sphere mechanism involving binding of the prochiral enolate nucleophile directly to the palladium center.

  14. Scanning mass spectrometer setup for spatially resolved reactivity studies on model catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, Matthias; Schirling, Christian; Kielbassa, Stefan; Bansmann, Joachim; Behm, Juergen [Institut fuer Oberflaechenchemie und Katalyse, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    A scanning mass spectrometer with micrometer-scale resolution was developed for investigations on the catalytic activity of microstructured planar model catalysts. Products of local surface reactions can be detected via a fine capillary orifice in a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer. The position of the sample with respect to the capillary is controlled by three piezo-driven translators. The surface reactivity of a resistive heated sample can be depicted in a spatially resolved topogram, taking into account the influence of the distance between sample and capillary on the magnitude of the QMS signal and the lateral resolution. Photolithographic structured reactive patterns on top of an inactive substrate enable investigations of mesoscopic transport effects such as coupling between catalytically active areas and of (reverse) spillover phenomena on one sample by varying the size and the distances of the active areas.

  15. Enantioselective Decarboxylative Alkylation Reactions: Catalyst Development, Substrate Scope, and Mechanistic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behenna, Douglas C.; Mohr, Justin T.; Sherden, Nathaniel H.; Marinescu, Smaranda C.; Harned, Andrew M.; Tani, Kousuke; Seto, Masaki; Ma, Sandy; Novák, Zoltán; Krout, Michael R.; McFadden, Ryan M.; Roizen, Jennifer L.; Enquist, John A.; White, David E.; Levine, Samantha R.; Petrova, Krastina V.; Iwashita, Akihiko; Virgil, Scott C.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    α-Quaternary ketones are accessed through novel enantioselective alkylations of allyl and propargyl electrophiles by unstabilized prochiral enolate nucleophiles in the presence of palladium complexes with various phosphinooxazoline (PHOX) ligands. Excellent yields and high enantiomeric excesses are obtained from three classes of enolate precursors: enol carbonates, enol silanes, and racemic β-ketoesters. Each of these substrate classes functions with nearly identical efficiency in terms of yield and enantioselectivity. Catalyst discovery and development, the optimization of reaction conditions, the exploration of reaction scope, and applications in target-directed synthesis are reported. Experimental observations suggest that these alkylation reactions occur through an unusual inner-sphere mechanism involving binding of the prochiral enolate nucleophile directly to the palladium center. PMID:22083969

  16. Enantioselective Decarboxylative Alkylation Reactions: Catalyst Development, Substrate Scope, and Mechanistic Studies

    KAUST Repository

    Behenna, Douglas C.

    2011-11-14

    α-Quaternary ketones are accessed through novel enantioselective alkylations of allyl and propargyl electrophiles by unstabilized prochiral enolate nucleophiles in the presence of palladium complexes with various phosphinooxazoline (PHOX) ligands. Excellent yields and high enantiomeric excesses are obtained from three classes of enolate precursor: enol carbonates, enol silanes, and racemic β-ketoesters. Each of these substrate classes functions with nearly identical efficiency in terms of yield and enantioselectivity. Catalyst discovery and development, the optimization of reaction conditions, the exploration of reaction scope, and applications in target-directed synthesis are reported. Experimental observations suggest that these alkylation reactions occur through an unusual inner-sphere mechanism involving binding of the prochiral enolate nucleophile directly to the palladium center.

  17. A Comparative Study of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized from Co/Zn/Al and Fe/Ni/Al Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Dixon Dikio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalyst systems Fe/Ni/Al and Co/Zn/Al were synthesized and used in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes produced were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM, Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS, Raman spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM. A comparison of the morphological profile of the carbon nanotubes produced from these catalysts indicates the catalyst system Fe/Ni/Al to have produced higher quality carbon nanotubes than the catalyst system Co/Zn/Al.

  18. Esterification of Glycerol with Acetic Acid over Highly Active and Stable Alumina-based Catalysts: A Reaction Kinetics Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rane, S. A.; Pudi, S. M.; Biswas, P.

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Cu- or Ni monometallic and Cu-Ni bimetallic (Cu/Ni ratio = 3, 1, 0.33) catalysts supported on γ-Al2O3 and SO42–/γ-Al2O3 catalysts were evaluated for esterification of glycerol. The reactions were performed in a batch reactor under reflux at standard reaction conditions: temperature 110 °C, atmospheric pressure, glycerol to acetic acid molar ratio 1:9, and catalyst loading 0.25 g. The best catalytic activity was observed over 2 M SO42–/γ-Al2O3 catalyst, which showed t...

  19. Report on the achievements in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1986. Coal energy (Studies on coal liquefying catalysts and a liquefied oil analyzing method); 1986 nendo sekitan ekikayo shokubai oyobi ekikayu bunsekiho no kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-03-01

    The present studies are intended to study catalysts that make manufacture of liquid fuel possible through coal liquefying reactions, and establish a liquefied oil analyzing method. The following items are discussed based on the achievements obtained by fiscal 1985: in the studies on coal liquefying catalysts, (1) a study on selectively liquefying catalysts, in which elucidation is made on effects of catalyst carriers on reaction selectivity and life of coal liquefying catalysts, and fundamental data are accumulated toward designing the catalysts with respect to catalyst carriers capable of selective hydrogenating reactions, and to carrying conditions; and (2) a study on solvent properties and reaction conditions. in which Mo-based catalysts are used to perform kinetic discussions on the relationship between the liquefying reaction conditions and compositions of solvents and produced oil to accumulate data for elucidating the action mechanisms of the Mo-based catalysts. In the study of the liquefied oil analyzing method, discussions are carried out on a measuring technology to expand the conventional method for liquefied oil analysis to hard-to-volatilize components. For the light and medium oils, an analyzing method will be established that utilizes effectively the NMR method and the MS method that have been established to date. (NEDO)

  20. Dry (CO{sub 2}) reforming of methane over Pt catalysts studied by DFT and kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Juntian [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Ministry of Education of PRC, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); College of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); Du, Xuesen, E-mail: xuesendu@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Ministry of Education of PRC, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); College of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); Ran, Jingyu, E-mail: jyran@189.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Ministry of Education of PRC, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); College of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); Wang, Ruirui [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Ministry of Education of PRC, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); College of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CH appears to be the most abundant species on Pt(1 1 1) surface in CH{sub 4} dissociation. • CO{sub 2}* + H* → COOH* + * → CO* + OH* is the dominant reaction pathway in CO{sub 2} activation. • Major reaction pathway in CH oxidation: CH* + OH* → CHOH* + * → CHO* + H* → CO* + 2H*. • C* + OH* → COH* + * → CO* + H* is the dominant reaction pathway in C oxidation. - Abstract: Dry reforming of methane (DRM) is a well-studied reaction that is of both scientific and industrial importance. In order to design catalysts that minimize the deactivation and improve the selectivity and activity for a high H{sub 2}/CO yield, it is necessary to understand the elementary reaction steps involved in activation and conversion of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. In our present work, a microkinetic model based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations is applied to explore the reaction mechanism for methane dry reforming on Pt catalysts. The adsorption energies of the reactants, intermediates and products, and the activation barriers for the elementary reactions involved in the DRM process are calculated over the Pt(1 1 1) surface. In the process of CH{sub 4} direct dissociation, the kinetic results show that CH dissociative adsorption on Pt(1 1 1) surface is the rate-determining step. CH appears to be the most abundant species on the Pt(1 1 1) surface, suggesting that carbon deposition is not easy to form in CH{sub 4} dehydrogenation on Pt(1 1 1) surface. In the process of CO{sub 2} activation, three possible reaction pathways are considered to contribute to the CO{sub 2} decomposition: (I) CO{sub 2}* + * → CO* + O*; (II) CO{sub 2}* + H* → COOH* + * → CO* + OH*; (III) CO{sub 2}* + H* → mono-HCOO* + * → bi-HCOO* + * [CO{sub 2}* + H* → bi-HCOO* + *] → CHO* + O*. Path I requires process to overcome the activation barrier of 1.809 eV and the forward reaction is calculated to be strongly endothermic by 1.430 eV. In

  1. Comparative study of activated carbon, natural zeolite, and green sand supports for CuOX and ZnO sites as ozone decomposition catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhariyah, A. S.; Pradyasti, A.; Dianty, A. G.; Bismo, S.

    2018-03-01

    This research was based on ozone decomposition in industrial environment. Ozone is harmful to human. Therefore, catalysts were made as a mask filter to decompose ozone. Comparison studies of catalyst supports were done using Granular Activated Carbon (GAC), Natural Zeolite (NZ), and Green Sand (GS). GAC showed the highest catalytic activity compared to other supports with conversion of 98%. Meanwhile, the conversion using NZ was only 77% and GS had been just 27%. GAC had the highest catalytic activity because it had the largest pore volume, which is 0.478 cm3/g. So GAC was used as catalyst supports. To have a higher conversion in ozone decomposition, GAC was impregnated with metal oxide as the active site of the catalyst. Active site comparison was made using CuOX and ZnO as the active site. Morphology, composition, and crystal phase were analyzed using SEM-EDX, XRF, and XRD methods. Mask filter, which contained catalysts for ozone decomposition, was tested using a fixed bed reactor at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The result of conversion was analyzed using iodometric method. CuOX/GAC and ZnO/GAC 2%-w showed the highest catalytic activity and conversion reached 100%. From the durability test, CuOX/GAC 2%-w was better than ZnO/GAC 2%-w because the conversion of ozone to oxygen reached 100% with the lowest conversion was 70% for over eight hours.

  2. Study of the effect of different mixed supports on the catalytic activity and the structure of Bi2MoxW1-xO6 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, R.; Cervantes L, J. L.; Espino, J.; Nunez G, R.; Bartolo P, P.; Gomez C, A.; Diaz, G.

    2014-01-01

    A series of Bi 2 Mo x W 1-x O 6 catalysts supported on Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 , SiO 2 -TiO 2 and activated carbon were synthesized. The aim was to compare the different supports and calcination temperature of catalysts, studying their efficiency and activation temperature in the CO oxidation reaction. The catalysts active phase, Bi 2 Mo x W 1-x O 6 was made by means of chemical precipitation procedure starting from high purity (NH 4 ) 6 Mo 7 O 24 ·4H 2 O, (NH 4 ) 6 W 12 O 6 ·H 2 O, Bi(NO 3 ) 2 ·5H 2 O compounds, which afterwards, were supported on Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 , SiO 2 -TiO 2 and activated carbon through impregnation. The catalysts characterization was carried out by means of X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy and surface area determination (Bet method). Regarding the catalytic activity the Bi 2 Mo x W 1-x O 6 /carbon activated compound synthesized at 500 grades C was the best catalyst being activated at 125 grades C reaching 90% conversion. It is concludes that was observed an effect of calcination temperature and the support on the different values reached for the catalytic activity. (Author)

  3. Study of Hopcalite (CuMnOx) Catalysts Prepared Through A Novel Route for the Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide at Low Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Subhashish Dey; Ganesh Chandra Dhal; Devendra Mohan; Ram Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a poisonous gas, recognized as a silent killer. The gas is produced by incomplete combustion of carbonaceous fuel. Recent studies have shown that hopcalite group is one of the promising catalysts for CO oxidation at low temperature. In this study, hopcalite (CuMnOx) catalysts were prepared by KMnO4 co-precipitation method followed by washing, drying the precipitate at different temperatures (22, 50, 90, 110, and 120 oC) for 12 h in an oven and subsequent calcination at...

  4. The Learning School Approach and Student Proficiency in ELA and Math: Preliminary Findings. Catalyst Schools Research Study Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Patricia Cahape

    2016-01-01

    The Learning School initiative completed its pilot testing in June 2016, with 28 schools, called catalyst schools, taking part. Catalyst schools were located in all eight regional education service agencies (RESAs) and were supported by RESA staff in implementing the Learning School approach. Five schools had been part of the program for 2 years…

  5. Experimental Studies on the Hydrotreatment of Kraft Lignin to Aromatics and Alkylphenolics Using Economically Viable Fe-Based Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Limonite, a low-cost iron ore, was investigated as a potential hydrotreatment catalyst for kraft lignin without the use of an external solvent (batch reactor, initial H2 pressure of 100 bar, 4 h). The best results were obtained at 450 °C resulting in 34 wt % of liquefied kraft lignin (lignin oil) on lignin intake. The composition of the lignin oil was determined in detail (elemental composition, GC-MS, GC×GC-FID, and GPC). The total GC-detectable monomeric species amounts up to 31 wt % on lignin intake, indicating that 92 wt % of the products in the lignin oil are volatile and thus of low molecular weight. The lignin oil was rich in low-molecular-weight alkylphenolics (17 wt % on lignin) and aromatics (8 wt % on lignin). Performance of the limonite catalyst was compared to other Fe-based catalysts (goethite and iron disulfide) and limonite was shown to give the highest yields of alkylphenolics and aromatics. The limonite catalyst before and after reaction was characterized using XRD, TEM, and nitrogen physisorption to determine changes in structure during reaction. Catalyst recycling tests were performed and show that the catalyst is active after reuse, despite the fact that the morphology changed and that the surface area of the catalyst particles was decreased. Our results clearly reveal that cheap limonite catalysts have the potential to be used for the depolymerization/hydrodeoxygenation of kraft lignin for the production of valuable biobased phenolics and aromatics. PMID:28413733

  6. A detailed kinetic study of the direct ring opening of cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane over monofunctional Ir/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Hui; Gutierrez, O.Y.; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Catalysis Research Center

    2011-07-01

    The present study analyses a series of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported iridium catalysts with different pretreatments and addresses the kinetic features and structural requirements of direct ring opening of cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane catalyzed by Ir in absence of acid-catalyzed ring contraction. Mild reaction conditions and high H{sub 2}/hydrocarbon ratios (200-1000) were used to improve accuracy of kinetic measurements and to negate deactivation. Isomerization and dehydrogenation pathways were suppressed to low extents (1-5%) over the weakly acidic catalysts under the reaction conditions applied. Three main observations are shown: 1) initial selectivity to ring opening products (ROPs) increases with iridium dispersion; 2) optimal H{sub 2} pressures differ not only between primary and secondary products, but also among ROPs and fragments; 3) the air-calcination step before catalyst reduction imposes a significant impact on both activity and product distribution. (orig.)

  7. A DRIFTS study of the partial oxidation of ethanol on Rh catalysts; Estudo da oxidacao parcial do etanol em catalisadores de Rh por DRIFTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Raquel Lima; Passos, Fabio Barboza, E-mail: fbpassos@vm.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica e de Petroleo

    2013-09-01

    The partial oxidation of ethanol on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} and Ce{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} supported rhodium catalysts was investigated by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The catalysts were characterized by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and cyclohexane dehydrogenation. DRIFTS studies on the partial oxidation of ethanol showed that ethanol is adsorbed dissociatively, through O-H bond breaking, with the formation of ethoxy species, followed by successive dehydrogenation to acetaldehyde and acetyl species. Further oxidation to acetate and carbonate species lead to the formation of CO, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} by decomposition. The presence of CeO{sub 2} in the catalysts favored the oxidation steps due to its oxygen storage capacity. (author)

  8. A Moessbauer spectroscopic study on the action of Ce in the catalyst for dehydrogenation of etylbenzene to styrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Keyu, E-mail: keyujiang@126.com [East China Normal University, Department of Physics (China); Fan Qin; Chen Tong; Miao Changxi [Shanghai Research Institute of Petrochemical Technology, SINOPEC (China); Zhao Zhenji; Yang Xielong [East China Normal University, Department of Physics (China)

    2012-03-15

    Two series of Fe-K catalysts for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene were prepared with different amounts and different compounds of the additional element Ce. Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to determine the Fe compound in the catalyst and to investigate the effect of Ce. The catalytic properties of the catalysts have also been measured. The results show that the element Ce in the catalyst is favorable to form the predecessor of the catalytic active phase, the compound KFe{sub 11}O{sub 17} and that the optimal percentage of CeO{sub 2} is 8%{approx}15% in the catalyst which is favorable to the formation of KFe{sub 11}O{sub 17} and to get better catalytic properties.

  9. Contribution to the study of the oxidation reaction of the carbon oxide in contact with catalysts issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaane, Mikhail

    1966-01-01

    Addressing the study of the oxidation reaction of carbon oxide which produces carbon dioxide, this research thesis reports the study of this reaction in presence of catalysts (2NiO + Al 2 O 3 , NiAl 2 O 4 and NiO + NiAl 2 O 4 ) issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at different temperatures. The first part describes experimental techniques and the nature of materials used in this study. The second part reports the study of the catalytic activity of the 2NiO+Al 2 O 3 catalyst during the oxidation of CO. Preliminary studies are also reported: structure and texture of nickel hydro-aluminate which is the raw material used to produce catalysts, activation of this compound to develop the catalytic activity in CO oxidation, chemisorption of CO, O 2 and CO 2 on the 2NiO+Al 2 O 3 solid, interaction of adsorbed gases at the solid surface, and kinetic study of the oxidation reaction. The third part reports the study of the catalytic activity in the oxidation reaction of CO of spinel catalysts (NiAl 2 O 4 and NiO+NiAl 2 O 4 ) obtained by calcination of nickel hydro-aluminates at high temperature. The formation of the spinel phase, the chemisorption of CO, O 2 and CO 2 on NiAl 2 O 4 , and the kinetic of the oxidation reaction are herein studied

  10. Water dissociation and CO oxidation over Au/anatase catalyst. A DFT-D2 study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqlain, Muhammad Adnan; Hussain, Akhtar; Siddiq, Muhammad; Leitão, Alexandre A.

    2018-03-01

    With the help of DFT-D2 methodology, we have investigated the adsorption of water on clean anatase(001) and Au/anatase(001). In the former case, adsorption energies of H2O differ to small extent computed employing GGA = PW91 and DFT-D2 methods. While the GGA = PW91 predicts that water would desorb close to 650 K on the TiO2 surface, the DFT-D2 predicts that desorption is most likely to occur above 700 K. A comparison of water adsorption on TiO2 and Au/TiO2 surfaces shows that the TiO2 prefers dimer adsorption whereas the Au/TiO2 prefers monomer adsorption. We found that the diffusion of surface hydroxyls on to the Au cluster from the Au/TiO2 periphery is unlikely and it seems that the CO oxidation would occur at the Au/TiO2 boundary. The results show that water dissociation and CO oxidation steps occur easily on Au/TiO2 indicating that this could be good alternative catalyst for water gas shift reaction industry.

  11. Experimental and DFT study of thiol-stabilized Pt/CNTs catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Chen, S G; Wei, Z D; Qi, X Q; Xia, M R; Wang, Y Q

    2012-12-28

    Using a combination of experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we explored the mechanisms of the stabilization effect of the thiolized (-SH) group on the Pt/SH-CNTs catalyst. Pt particles supported on the hydroxyl functionalized CNTs (Pt/OH-CNTs) are synthesized as a baseline for comparison. Experimentally, the platinum on OH-CNTs has a stronger tendency for aggregation than that on SH-CNTs. The differences in the oxidation resistance, migration activation energy, and corrosion resistance between the Pt/SH-CNTs and Pt/OH-CNTs are calculated using DFT. The DFT calculations indicate that the -SH group enhances the oxidation resistance of the Pt cluster and CNTs and restricts Pt migration on the CNTs. DFT calculations also suggest that the enhanced stability of Pt/SH-CNTs originates from the increased interaction between Pt and SH-CNTs and the depressed d-band center of the Pt NPs. Thus, the functional groups on the CNTs used for stabilization of supported Pt NPs should provide a deposit and anchor site for Pt NPs and maintain the perfect structure of CNTs rather than destroying it.

  12. Study of Horseradish Peroxidase Fixed on Mesoporous Materials as a Chemical Reaction Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mengdan; Dai, Rongji

    2017-12-01

    Nanostructured mesoporous materials is a new type of porous materials, which has been widely used. It has excellent capability in enzymes immobilization, but modification on the chemical bonds of the enzyme reduce the enzymatic activity and rarely used in chemical reactions. The horseradish peroxidase was immobilized on the mesoporous materials with appropriate aperture and its activity and stability was evaluated when catalyzing the nitration reaction of amines and oxidation reaction of thiourea. The optimum mesoporous material to fix the horseradish peroxidase can be obtained by mixing polyoxyethylene - polyoxypropylene-pol, yoxyethylene(P123), 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene(TMB), and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) at a ratio of 10:1:1, whose surface area and pore volume and pore diameter calculated by BET and BJH model were 402.903m2/g, 1.084cm2/g, 1.084cm2/g respectively. The horseradish peroxidase, immobilized on the mesoporous materials, was applied for catalyzing the nitration reaction of anilines and oxidation reaction of thiourea, produced a high product yield and can be recycled. Thus, it is a strong candidate as a catalysts for oxidation reactions, to be produced at industral scale, due to its high efficiency and low cost.

  13. Trust Pathways, Trust Catalysts, Theory of Change and Citizen Science: A COASST Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, H. K.; Parrish, J.; Dolliver, J.; Metes, J.; Ballard, H. L.

    2017-12-01

    Environmental challenges, from local water quality to the effects of global climate change, are overwhelming the mainstream science community. We need help. Citizen science offers one solution pathway - in the ideal, thousands of participants engaged in authentic science that delivers high quality information not otherwise obtainable. But in the real world, are citizen science data used? And more broadly: what are the interactions between citizen science and natural resource management in service of conserving or protecting system structure and function? The Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST) is a rigoros citizen science program focused on documenting patterns of beached bird and marine debris abundance on beaches along the coast of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. Housed at the University of Washington, COASST partners directly with a wide range of local, tribal, state and federal agencies to effect positive change and a wide range of scientific, community and educational outcomes. Following from years of trial, error and adaptive management, we propose a "trust pathway" between citizen science and agencies that moves from an initial contact and multiple interaction types to eventual partnership and capacity sharing. Along the way are trust catalysts, including but not limited to: stakeholder engagement, data QA/QC, interactive data analysis, housing at an academic institution, and timely, repeated communication. In this presentation, we will discuss strategies and outcomes employed by COASST for fostering trust and successful partnerships, drawing on 20 years of program experience as well as reflections from a variety of partners and stakholdres.

  14. 197Au Moessbauer study of nano-sized gold catalysts supported on Mg(OH)2 and TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Nasu, S.; Tsubota, S.; Haruta, M.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied nano-sized Au catalysts supported on Mg(OH) 2 and TiO 2 using 197 Au Moessbauer spectroscopy. 197 Au Moessbauer spectra observed for Au/Mg(OH) 2 catalysts can be decomposed into one singlet with zero isomer shift and several doublets. One of the doublets shows an isomer shift that is typical for Au I , and other doublets are due to Au III . The relative area of the Au I component shows the maximum value for a specimen calcined at 523 K, which also shows the highest catalytic activity

  15. KINETIC STUDY OF SELECTIVE GAS-PHASE OXIDATION OF ISOPROPANOL TO ACETONE USING MONOCLINIC ZRO2 AS A CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadiq

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia was prepared by a precipitation method and calcined at 723 K, 1023 K, and 1253 K in order to obtain monoclinic zirconia. The prepared zirconia was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, surface area and pore size analyzer, and particle size analyzer. Monoclinic ZrO2 as a catalyst was used for the gas-phase oxidation of isopropanol to acetone in a Pyrex-glass-flow-type reactor with a temperature range of 443 K - 473 K. It was found that monoclinic ZrO2 shows remarkable catalytic activity (68% and selectivity (100% for the oxidation of isopropanol to acetone. This kinetic study reveals that the oxidation of isopropanol to acetone follows the L-H mechanism.

  16. Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production from water over Pt-Eosin Y catalyst: A systemic study of reaction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Yong; Sun, Ruimin; Han, Bing

    2016-07-01

    A high efficient homogeneous system for hydrogen production from water consisting of Eosin Y as a photosensitizer, methyl viologen (MV2+) as an electron transfer mediator, triethanolamine (TEOA) as a sacrificial electron donor and colloid Pt as a catalyst, has been systemicly studied. The initial system pH and the concentration of Eosin Y have remarkable effects on the rate of hydrogen evolution. The optimal pH and concentration of Eosin Y are 9 and 7.2×10-5 M. Triethanolamine (TEOA) as an electron donor, can reductively quench the oxidized Eosin Y and the quenching is well modeled by the Stern-Volmer equation. The optimal concentration of TEOA and the concentration of MV2+ are 0.3 M and 3.1×10-4 M, respectively. In addition, the role of colloid Pt has been investigated.

  17. Disproportionation phenema of wistite phase in the model iron catalysts for ammonia synthesis studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattek-Janczyk, A.; Miczko, B.

    1990-01-01

    A model iron catalysts for ammonia synthesis containing a large amount of wustite (35 wt%) has been studied during the annealing in an inert atmosphere in the temperature range of 573-773 K. Changes in magnetite and wustite phases were followed by Muessbauer spectroscopy (MS). Before starting the thermal treatment, two kinds of wustite of different structures have been found by MS and X-ray diffraction. The behaviour of both kinds of wustite during the annealing was different. One of them, closer to the stoichiometric compound, disproportionated at once into magnetite and iron; its content decreased systematically without changes in the Muessbauer parameters. In the second wustite, only qualitatieve changes were observed at first (its nonstoichiometry decreases without changes in content and, next, this phase started to disproportionate too. (auhtor). 31 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  18. An XPS [x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy] study of the sulfidation-regeneration cycle of a hydroprocessing catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, D.Y.; Adnot, A.; Kaliaguine, S. (Laval Univ., Ste-Foy, PQ (Canada)); Chmielowiec, J. (Petro Canada Products Co., Mississauga, ON (Canada))

    1993-10-01

    The formation of sulfates in an industrial Ni-W hydroprocessing (HP) catalyst was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A small fluidized bed test unit with on-line sampling device was constructed to simulate industrial sulfidation and oxyregeneration processes of HP catalysts. The results obtained show that the sulfates observed on the surface of sulfided catalysts are not formed during the sulfidation process. Two oxidation processes seem to be responsible for the formation of sulfates: one happens when the catalyst is exposed to air before it is properly cooled and the other is a slow conversion at ambient temperature. The two different processes might be associated to different sulfidic species formed during the sulfidation processes, with the sulfides in the bulk of catalyst particles being more easily oxidized than the ones on the external surface of the catalyst particles. The sulfate formed during the air oxidation of sulfided catalysts, as well as that after oxyregeneration, is not aluminum sulfate but nickel sulfate in both cases. XPS results also indicate that oxygenates in the feedstock are not directly involved in the sulfate formation. 18 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Radio-Frequency-Based NH3-Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Control: Studies on Temperature Dependency and Humidity Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Dietrich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The upcoming more stringent automotive emission legislations and current developments have promoted new technologies for more precise and reliable catalyst control. For this purpose, radio-frequency-based (RF catalyst state determination offers the only approach for directly measuring the NH3 loading on selective catalytic reduction (SCR catalysts and the state of other catalysts and filter systems. Recently, the ability of this technique to directly control the urea dosing on a current NH3 storing zeolite catalyst has been demonstrated on an engine dynamometer for the first time and this paper continues that work. Therefore, a well-known serial-type and zeolite-based SCR catalyst (Cu-SSZ-13 was investigated under deliberately chosen high space velocities. At first, the full functionality of the RF system with Cu-SSZ-13 as sample was tested successfully. By direct RF-based NH3 storage control, the influence of the storage degree on the catalyst performance, i.e., on NOx conversion and NH3 slip, was investigated in a temperature range between 250 and 400 °C. For each operation point, an ideal and a critical NH3 storage degree was found and analyzed in the whole temperature range. Based on the data of all experimental runs, temperature dependent calibration functions were developed as a basis for upcoming tests under transient conditions. Additionally, the influence of exhaust humidity was observed with special focus on cold start water and its effects to the RF signals.

  20. Radio-Frequency-Based NH₃-Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Control: Studies on Temperature Dependency and Humidity Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Reitmeier, Willibald; Burger, Katharina; Hien, Markus; Grass, Philippe; Kubinski, David; Visser, Jaco; Moos, Ralf

    2017-07-12

    The upcoming more stringent automotive emission legislations and current developments have promoted new technologies for more precise and reliable catalyst control. For this purpose, radio-frequency-based (RF) catalyst state determination offers the only approach for directly measuring the NH₃ loading on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts and the state of other catalysts and filter systems. Recently, the ability of this technique to directly control the urea dosing on a current NH₃ storing zeolite catalyst has been demonstrated on an engine dynamometer for the first time and this paper continues that work. Therefore, a well-known serial-type and zeolite-based SCR catalyst (Cu-SSZ-13) was investigated under deliberately chosen high space velocities. At first, the full functionality of the RF system with Cu-SSZ-13 as sample was tested successfully. By direct RF-based NH₃ storage control, the influence of the storage degree on the catalyst performance, i.e., on NO x conversion and NH₃ slip, was investigated in a temperature range between 250 and 400 °C. For each operation point, an ideal and a critical NH₃ storage degree was found and analyzed in the whole temperature range. Based on the data of all experimental runs, temperature dependent calibration functions were developed as a basis for upcoming tests under transient conditions. Additionally, the influence of exhaust humidity was observed with special focus on cold start water and its effects to the RF signals.

  1. UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption studies of model and bulk heterogeneous catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewell, Craig Richmond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) have been used to investigate the surface structure of model heterogeneous catalysts in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). UV-Raman spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure of bulk model catalysts in ambient and reaction conditions. The structural information obtained through UV-Raman spectroscopy has been correlated with both the UHV surface analysis and reaction results. The present day propylene and ethylene polymerization catalysts (Ziegler-Natta catalysts) are prepared by deposition of TiCl4 and a Al(Et)3 co-catalyst on a microporous Mg-ethoxide support that is prepared from MgCl2 and ethanol. A model thin film catalyst is prepared by depositing metallic Mg on a Au foil in a UHV chamber in a background of TiCl4 in the gas phase. XPS results indicate that the Mg is completely oxidized to MgCl2 by TiCl4 resulting in a thin film of MgCl2/TiClx, where x = 2, 3, and 4. To prepare an active catalyst, the thin film of MgCl2/TiClx on Au foil is enclosed in a high pressure cell contained within the UHV chamber and exposed to ~1 Torr of Al(Et)3.

  2. Radio-Frequency-Based NH3-Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Control: Studies on Temperature Dependency and Humidity Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Reitmeier, Willibald; Burger, Katharina; Hien, Markus; Grass, Philippe; Kubinski, David; Visser, Jaco; Moos, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The upcoming more stringent automotive emission legislations and current developments have promoted new technologies for more precise and reliable catalyst control. For this purpose, radio-frequency-based (RF) catalyst state determination offers the only approach for directly measuring the NH3 loading on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts and the state of other catalysts and filter systems. Recently, the ability of this technique to directly control the urea dosing on a current NH3 storing zeolite catalyst has been demonstrated on an engine dynamometer for the first time and this paper continues that work. Therefore, a well-known serial-type and zeolite-based SCR catalyst (Cu-SSZ-13) was investigated under deliberately chosen high space velocities. At first, the full functionality of the RF system with Cu-SSZ-13 as sample was tested successfully. By direct RF-based NH3 storage control, the influence of the storage degree on the catalyst performance, i.e., on NOx conversion and NH3 slip, was investigated in a temperature range between 250 and 400 °C. For each operation point, an ideal and a critical NH3 storage degree was found and analyzed in the whole temperature range. Based on the data of all experimental runs, temperature dependent calibration functions were developed as a basis for upcoming tests under transient conditions. Additionally, the influence of exhaust humidity was observed with special focus on cold start water and its effects to the RF signals. PMID:28704929

  3. A Catalyst for Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønsmann, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    This case study of a team in an international workplace investigates processes of language socialization in a transient multilingual setting. Using interview and observational data, the analysis shows how social and linguistic norms are negotiated, with the newcomer positioned as a catalyst...... for changing language practices toward more English, with the ultimate aim of creating a 'global mindset' in the organization. Language socialization in a transient multilingual setting is shown to focus on and assign positive value to new linguistic norms that experienced members are socialized...... into in a process that hinges on new members functioning as tools for management to bring about the desired change. The article shows that while the newcomer is used as a catalyst for increased use of English and for the creation of a 'global mindset,' she is at the same time socialized into the existing Danish...

  4. Recent progress in the use of in situ X-ray methods for the study of heterogeneous catalysts in packed-bed capillary reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacques, S.D.M.; Leynaud, O.; Strusevich, D.; Stukas, P.; Barnes, P.; Sankar, G.; Sheehy, M.; O’Brien, M.G.; Iglesias-Juez, A.; Beale, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray techniques, such as Diffraction and Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), can be readily employed to study catalysts in action, thereby offering great potential for revealing the mechanism and behaviour of catalytic solids both during preparation and reaction. The continued

  5. From 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to Polymer Precursors : Catalyst Screening Studies on the Conversion of 1,2,6-hexanetriol to 1,6-hexanediol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buntara, Teddy; Noel, Sébastien; Phua, Pim Huat; Melián-Cabrera, Ignacio; Vries, Johannes G. de; Heeres, Hero J.

    1,6-hexanediol (1) is an important polymer precursor for the polyester industry. In this paper, exploratory catalyst screening studies on the synthesis of 1 from 1,2,6-hexanetriol (2) are described via two different routes. The latter is available by a two-step procedure from 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

  6. Role of Re in Pt-Re/TiO2 catalyst for water gas shift reaction: A mechanistic and kinetic study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azzam, K.G.H.; Babych, Igor V.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2008-01-01

    Transient kinetic studies and in situ FTIR spectroscopy were used to follow the reaction sequences that occur during water gas shift (WGS) reaction over Pt–Re/TiO2 catalyst. Results pointed to contributions of an associative formate route with redox regeneration and two classical redox routes

  7. Preparation of a rhodium catalyst from rhodium trichloride on a flat, conducting alumina support studied with static secondary ion mass spectrometry and monochromatic x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, H.J.; Oetelaar, van den L.C.A.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    A Rh catalyst was prepd. by electrostatic adsorption of RhCl3-derived species in aq. soln. on a model support, consisting of a 4-5 mm thick layer of Al oxide on an Al foil. The conversion of the Rh precursor species into metallic Rh was studied by monochromatic XPS and static SIMS. Freshly prepd.

  8. Study of Hopcalite (CuMnOx Catalysts Prepared Through A Novel Route for the Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashish Dey

    2017-10-01

    How to Cite: Dey, S., Dhal, G.C., Mohan, D., Prasad, R. (2017. Study of Hopcalite (CuMnOx Catalysts Prepared through A Novel Route for the Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide at Low Temperature. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (3: 393-407 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.882.393-407

  9. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    was inspired by a computational screening, suggesting that alloys such as Ni-Fe, Co-Ni, and Co-Fe should show superior activity to the industrially used nickel catalyst. Especially the Ni-Fe system was considered to be interesting, since such alloy catalysts should be both more active and cheaper than the Ni...... catalyst. The results from the screening were experimentally verified for CO hydrogenation, CO2 hydrogenation, and simultaneous CO and CO2 hydrogenation by bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts. These catalysts were found to be highly active and selective. The Co-Ni and Co-Fe systems were investigated for CO...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...

  10. Characterization and parametrical study of Rh-TPPTS supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts for ethylene hydroformylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanh, Nguyen Thi Ha; Duc, Duc Truong; Thang, Vu Dao

    2012-01-01

    The supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysis technology was applied to continuous, gas-phase hydroformylation of ethylene. Rh-TPPTS SILP catalysts with relatively low ionic liquid loading were shown to be stable and highly activity for ethylene hydroformylation. However, the catalytic activity......, BET surface area and pore morphology of the catalysts depended on the content of ionic liquid. Hence, catalysts with high ionic liquid loading content showed deactivation at high reaction temperatures, possibly caused by redistribution of ionic liquid out of the pores under these conditions. (C) 2012...

  11. Thiophene hydrodesulfurization over CoMo/Al2O3-CuY catalysts: Temperature effect study

    OpenAIRE

    Boukoberine, Yamina; Hamada, Boudjema

    2016-01-01

    CoMo/γ-Al2O3-CuY catalysts are prepared by physically mixing CoMo/γ-Al2O3 catalyst with Cu-exchanged Y zeolite. The CuY zeolite is prepared by the solid state ion exchange technique. The thiophene hydrodesulfurization is performed in a fixed bed reactor at high temperature and atmospheric pressure. The results show that the presence of CuY zeolite particles in CoMo/Al2O3 catalyst can have a noticeable effect on both the conversion and product selectivities. An increasing zeolite loading in ca...

  12. Structural, electronic and adsorption properties of Rh(111)/Mo(110) bimetallic catalyst: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palotás, K., E-mail: palotas@phy.bme.hu [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Theoretical Physics, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, Department of Complex Physical Systems, Center for Computational Materials Science, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Bakó, I. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Center for Natural Sciences, Institute of Organic Chemistry, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Bugyi, L. [MTA-SZTE, Reaction Kinetics and Surface Chemistry Research Group, Rerrich B. Sqr. 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • 1 ML of Rh on Mo(110) forms a wavy structure propagating along the [001] direction. • Strain & ligand effects in the Rh film cause a downward shift of the d-band center. • CO adsorption energies are decreased by about 35% compared to pure Rh(111). • Depending on adsorption site, 0.28–0.46 e is transferred to adsorbed CO from Rh film. • CO adsorption generates 0.15–0.22 e transfer from Rh film to Mo in the unit cell. - Abstract: Geometric and electronic characterizations of one monolayer rhodium with Nishiyama-Wassermann (NW) structure on Mo(110) substrate have been performed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In the NW structure the Rh atoms form a wavy structure propagating along the [001] direction, characterized by an amplitude of 0.26 Å in the [110] direction and by 0.10 Å in the [110] direction of the Mo(110) substrate. Strain and ligand effects operating in the rhodium film are distinguished and found to be manifested in the downward shift of the d-band center of the electron density of states (DOS) by 0.11 eV and 0.18 eV, respectively. The shift in the d-band center of Rh DOS predicts a decrease in the surface reactivity toward CO adsorption, which has been verified by detailed calculations of bond energies of CO located at on-top, bridge and hollow adsorption sites. The CO adsorption energies are decreased by about 35% compared to those reported for pure Rh(111), offering novel catalytic pathways for the molecule. An in-depth analysis of the charge transfer and the partial DOS characters upon CO adsorption on the NW-structured Rh(111)/Mo(110) bimetallic catalyst and on the pure Rh(111) surface sheds light on the bonding mechanism of CO and on the governing factors determining its lowered bond energy on the bimetallic surface.

  13. Thiophene hydrodesulfurization over CoMo/Al2O3-CuY catalysts: Temperature effect study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamina Boukoberine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available CoMo/γ-Al2O3-CuY catalysts are prepared by physically mixing CoMo/γ-Al2O3 catalyst with Cu-exchanged Y zeolite. The CuY zeolite is prepared by the solid state ion exchange technique. The thiophene hydrodesulfurization is performed in a fixed bed reactor at high temperature and atmospheric pressure. The results show that the presence of CuY zeolite particles in CoMo/Al2O3 catalyst can have a noticeable effect on both the conversion and product selectivities. An increasing zeolite loading in catalyst results in a decrease of the thiophene HDS activity. This decrease is probably caused by the formation of heavy compounds and the deactivation of the zeolite at high temperatures.

  14. Spectroscopy, microscopy and theoretical study of NO adsorption on MoS2 and Co-Mo-S hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Nan-Yu; Tuxen, Anders Kyrme; Hinnemann, Berit

    2011-01-01

    nfrared (IR) spectroscopy using NO as a probe molecule has been one of the important methods for characterizing hydrotreating catalysts, since this technique provides information on the nature and quantity of active edge sites of these catalysts. However, due to the strong adsorption of NO, which......) calculations, we present new atomic-scale insight into the nature of NO adsorption on MoS2 and Co-Mo-S nanoclusters. The DFT calculations and STM experiments show that NO does not adsorb at fully sulfided MoS2 edges not containing hydrogen. However, typical sulfided catalysts will have hydrogen present...... NO as a probe molecule to obtain detailed atomic-scale information on hydrotreating catalysts and the origins of activity differences. (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier Inc....

  15. Evaluation of the Small-Tank Tetraphenylborate Process Using a Bench-Scale, 20-L Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Results of Test 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the Savannah River Salt Waste Processing Program (SPP) is to evaluate the presently available technologies and select the most effective approach for treatment of high-level waste salt solutions currently stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. One of the three technologies currently being developed for this application is the Small-Tank Tetraphenylborate Process (STTP). This process uses sodium tetraphenylborate (TPB) to precipitate and remove radioactive cesium from the waste and monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb and remove radioactive strontium and actinides. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is demonstrating this process at the 1:4000 scale using a 20-L-capacity continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system. Since March 1999, five operating campaigns of the 20-L CSTR have been conducted. The ultimate goal is to verify that this process, under certain extremes of operating conditions, can meet the minimum treatment criteria necessary for processing and disposing of the salt waste at the Savannah River Saltstone Facility. The waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total alpha nuclides are 137 Cs and 90 Sr are to obtain decontamination factors (DFs) of 40,000 (99.998% removal) and 26 (96.15% removal), respectively. (DF is mathematically defined as the concentration of contaminant in the waste feed divided by the concentration of contaminant in the effluent stream.)

  16. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type...... by impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution....

  17. In-Situ TEM Study of a Nanoporous Ni–Co Catalyst Used for the Dry Reforming of Methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Fujita

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We performed in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM on a dealloyed nanoporous NiCo catalyst used for the dry reforming of methane (DRM to investigate the origin of the catalytic activity and structural durability. The in-situ observations and local chemical analysis indicated that the DRM induced chemical demixing of Ni and Co accompanied by grain refinement, implying possible “synergic effects” in a general bimetallic NiCo catalyst when used for the DRM.

  18. Mechanistic understanding and kinetic studies of highly selective oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane over novel supported molten chloride catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertner, C.; Veen, A.C. van; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Ethene is one of the most important feedstocks for chemical industry, nowadays mainly produced via steam cracking. However, oxidative dehydrogenation becomes a more important process route, allowing to produce ethene selectively and at lower temperatures. Supported alkali chloride catalysts are promising materials. However, the ODH mechanism of this class of catalysts is not well investigated so far. The investigation of the reaction mechanism is thus the aim of this contribution. (orig.)

  19. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  20. Study of ternary-component bismuth molybdate catalysts by 18O2 tracer in the oxidation of propylene to acrolein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, W.; Moro-oka, Y.; Ikawa, T.

    1981-01-01

    Participation of lattice oxide ions of ternary-component bismuth molybdate catalysts M-Bi-Mo-O (M = Ni, Co, Mg, Mn, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Pb) was investigated using the 18 O 2 tracer in the selective oxidation of propylene to acrolein. The participation of the lattice oxide ions in the oxidation is prominent on every catalyst but the extent of the participation varies significantly depending on the structure of the catalyst. Only lattice oxide ions in the bismuth molybdate phase are incorporated into the oxidized products on the catalysts (M = Ni, Co, Mg, and Mn) where M have smaller ionic radius than Bi 3+ ; catalyst particles are composed of a shell of bismuth molybdates and a core of MMoO 4 . On the other hand, whole oxide ions in the active particles are involved in the oxidation on catalysts having a scheelite-type structure (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, and Pb) where M has a comparable ionic radius to Bi 3+

  1. Molecular catalysts structure and functional design

    CERN Document Server

    Gade, Lutz H

    2014-01-01

    Highlighting the key aspects and latest advances in the rapidly developing field of molecular catalysis, this book covers new strategies to investigate reaction mechanisms, the enhancement of the catalysts' selectivity and efficiency, as well as the rational design of well-defined molecular catalysts. The interdisciplinary author team with an excellent reputation within the community discusses experimental and theoretical studies, along with examples of improved catalysts, and their application in organic synthesis, biocatalysis, and supported organometallic catalysis. As a result, readers wil

  2. Excited-state dynamics of a ruthenium(II) catalyst studied by transient photofragmentation in gas phase and transient absorption in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanbaew, D.; Nosenko, Y. [Fachbereich Chemie, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 52–54, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 46, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Kerner, C. [Fachbereich Chemie, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 52–54, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Chevalier, K.; Rupp, F. [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 46, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Riehn, C., E-mail: riehn@chemie.uni-kl.de [Fachbereich Chemie, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 52–54, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 46, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Thiel, W.R. [Fachbereich Chemie, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 52–54, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Diller, R. [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 46, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2014-10-17

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ultrafast dynamics of new Ru(II) catalysts investigated in gas phase and solution. • Catalyst activation (HCl loss) achieved in ion trap by UV photoexcitation. • Electronic relaxation proceeds by IVR and IC followed by ground state dissociation. • No triplet formation in contrast to other Ru-polypyridine complexes. • Solvent prohibits catalyst activation in solution by fast vibrational cooling. - Abstract: We report studies on the excited state dynamics of new ruthenium(II) complexes [(η{sup 6}-cymene)RuCl(apypm)]PF{sub 6} (apypm=2-NR{sub 2}-4-(pyridine-2-yl)-pyrimidine, R=CH{sub 3} (1)/H (2)) which, in their active form [1{sup +}-HCl] and [2{sup +}-HCl], catalyze the transfer hydrogenation of arylalkyl ketones in the absence of a base. The investigations encompass femtosecond pump–probe transient mass spectrometry under isolated conditions and transient absorption spectroscopy in acetonitrile solution, both on the cations [(η{sup 6}-cymene)RuCl(apypm)]{sup +} (1{sup +}, 2{sup +}). Gas phase studies on mass selected ions were performed in an ESI ion trap mass spectrometer by transient photofragmentation, unambiguously proving the formation of the activated catalyst species [1{sup +}-HCl] or [2{sup +}-HCl] after photoexcitation being the only fragmentation channel. The primary excited state dynamics in the gas phase could be fitted to a biexponential decay, yielding time constants of <100 fs and 1–3 ps. Transient absorption spectroscopy performed in acetonitrile solution using femtosecond UV/Vis and IR probe laser pulses revealed additional deactivation processes on longer time scales (∼7–12 ps). However, the formation of the active catalyst species after photoexcitation could not be observed in solution. The results from both studies are compared to former CID investigations and DFT calculations concerning the activation mechanism.

  3. Spectroelectrochemical Study of Carbon Monoxide and Ethanol Oxidation on Pt/C, PtSn(3:1/C and PtSn(1:1/C Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Rizo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available PtSn-based catalysts are one of the most active materials toward that contribute ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR. In order to gain a better understanding of the Sn influence on the carbon monoxide (principal catalyst poison and ethanol oxidation reactions in acidic media, a systematic spectroelectrochemical study was carried out. With this end, carbon-supported PtSnx (x = 0, 1/3 and 1 materials were synthesized and employed as anodic catalysts for both reactions. In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS indicate that Sn diminishes the amount of bridge bonded CO (COB and greatly improves the CO tolerance of Pt-based catalysts. Regarding the effect of Sn loading on the EOR, it enhances the catalytic activity and decreases the onset potential. FTIRS and DEMS analysis indicate that the C-C bond scission occurs at low overpotentials and at the same potential values regardless of the Sn loading, although the amount of C-C bond breaking decreases with the rise of Sn in the catalytic material. Therefore, the elevated catalytic activity toward the EOR at PtSn-based electrodes is mainly associated with the improved CO tolerance and the incomplete oxidation of ethanol to form acetic acid and acetaldehyde species, causing the formation of a higher amount of both C2 products with the rise of Sn loading.

  4. Study of the productivity of MWCNT over Fe and Fe–Co catalysts supported on SiO2, Al2O3 and MgO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Shokry

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT were prepared in good quality and quantity, MWCNT were produced using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD technique and the carbon source was acetylene. Different catalysts were synthesized based on iron and a mixture of iron and cobalt metal supported on SiO2, Al2O3 or MgO. The effect of parameters such as iron concentration, support type, bimetallic catalyst and the method of catalyst preparation has been investigated in the production of MWCNT. The quality of as-made nanotubes was investigated by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The best yield of MWCNT was 30 times of the amount of the used catalyst. The high yield of MWCNT was gained by 40 wt.% Fe on alumina support which was prepared by the sol–gel method. TEM analysis was done for the carbon deposit, which revealed that the walls of the MWCNT were graphitized, with regular inner channel and uniform diameter. It reflected a reasonable degree of purity. The TGA showed that MWCNT was decomposed at 635 °C by a small rate indicating a high thermal stability and well crystalline formation of the produced MWCNT.

  5. Catalytic optimization and physicochemical studies over Zn/Ca/Al2O3 catalyst for transesterification of low grade cooking oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Kamal, Norhasyimah; Wan Abu Bakar, Wan Azelee; Ali, Rusmidah

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Zn/Ca/Al 2 O 3 has high potential in producing biodiesel. • High basicity favoured high conversion of biodiesel. • Calcination temperature showed the highest influence on the catalytic activity. • RSM was used to determine the optimum operating conditions for biodiesel production. - Abstract: Recently, there has been an increasing interest in green and renewable fuels due to the worldwide concern of an environmental crisis. So, this study focused on the synthesis, optimization and characterization of series of heterostructure Zn/Ca/Al 2 O 3 catalysts with different parameters to test their effectiveness towards biodiesel production. The physicochemical properties of the potential catalyst were determined by BET, FESEM and CO 2 -TPD. The activity of the catalyst in transesterification reaction was evaluated at reaction temperature of 65 °C, 3 h reaction time, 6% (w/w) catalyst concentration and 1:24 M ratio of oil to methanol. The investigation of the synthesized Zn/Ca/Al 2 O 3 catalyst showed that the calcination temperature, number of alumina coatings and dopant to base ratio have significant effects on the catalytic performance. These three critical parameters were investigated using response surface methodology (RSM) with Box Behnken design (BBD) to determine the optimum operating conditions for biodiesel production. From RSM study, the optimum conditions were 800 °C calcination temperature, 3 times alumina beads coating and 10:90 dopant to base ratio which gave 97.80% biodiesel conversion. From the F-value and low p-value (<0.05) obtained showed that the model was significant for predicting the optimum biodiesel conversion. An experiment was conducted under the optimum conditions to confirm the agreement of the model prediction and the experimental results. The experimental value (97.64%) closely agreed with the predicted results from RSM and hence validated the findings of response surface optimization.

  6. MECHANISTIC STUDIES AND DESIGN OF HIGHLY ACTIVE CUPRATE CATALYSTS FOR THE DIRECT DECOMPOSITION AND SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE AND HYDROCARBONS TO NITROGEN FOR ABATEMENT OF STACK EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-04-30

    A flow trough type catalytic reactor system was adequately modified for NO related catalytic and adsorption measurements, including the on-line connection of a digital chemiluminescent NO-NO{sub x} analyzer to the reactor outlet system. Moreover, we have largely completed the installation of an FTIR coupled catalytic system containing a HTEC cell for high temperature DRIFT studies. Three different barium cuprate samples, Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 3}, BaCuO{sub 2}, and Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 5} were synthesized and characterized by powder XRD for catalytic tests. Prior to catalytic studies over these cuprates, a new, liquid indium based supported molten metal catalyst (In-SMMC) was tested in the reduction of NO by various reductants. In the presence of excess O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, the In-SMMC proved to be more active for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO to N{sub 2} by ethanol than most other catalysts. Using C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} alcohols as reductants, self sustained periodic oscillations observed in the NO{sub x} concentrations of reactor effluents indicated the first time that radical intermediates can be involved in the SCR of NO by alcohols. Further, In-SMMC is the only effective and water tolerant SCR catalyst reported thus far which contains SiO{sub 2} support. Thus, this novel catalyst opens up a promising new alternative for developing an effective and durable catalyst for NO{sub x} abatement in stack emission.

  7. Catalytic Transformation of Ethylbenzene over Y-Zeolite-based Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2008-11-19

    Catalytic transformation of ethylbenzene (EB) has been investigated over ultrastable Y (USY)-zeolite-based catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. The effect of reaction conditions on EB conversion is reported. The USY catalyst (FCC-Y) was modified by steaming to form a significantly lower acidity catalyst (FCC-SY). The current study shows that the FCC-SY catalyst favors EB disproportionation more than cracking. A comparison has been made between the results of EB conversion over the lowly acidic catalyst (FCC-SY) and the highly acidic catalyst (FCC-Y) under identical conditions. It was observed that increase in catalyst acidity favored cracking of EB at the expense of disproportionation. Kinetic parameters for EB disappearance during disproportionation reaction over the FCC-SY catalyst were calculated using the catalyst activity decay function based on time on stream (TOS). © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  8. Calcium manganese oxides as oxygen evolution catalysts: O2 formation pathways indicated by 18O-labelling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevela, Dmitriy; Koroidov, Sergey; Najafpour, M Mahdi; Messinger, Johannes; Kurz, Philipp

    2011-05-02

    Oxygen evolution catalysed by calcium manganese and manganese-only oxides was studied in (18)O-enriched water. Using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry, we monitored the formation of the different O(2) isotopologues (16)O(2), (16)O(18)O and (18)O(2) in such reactions simultaneously with good time resolution. From the analysis of the data, we conclude that entirely different pathways of dioxygen formation catalysis exist for reactions involving hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hydrogen persulfate (HSO(5)(-)) or single-electron oxidants such as Ce(IV) and [Ru(III) (bipy)(3)](3+) . Like the studied oxide catalysts, the active sites of manganese catalase and the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) consist of μ-oxido manganese or μ-oxido calcium manganese sites. The studied processes show very similar (18)O-labelling behaviour to the natural enzymes and are therefore interesting model systems for in vivo oxygen formation by manganese metalloenzymes such as PSII. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Studies on reaction parameters influence on ethanolic production of coconut oil biodiesel using immobilized lipase as a catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Livia M.O.; Santos, Bruno C. da S.; Almeida, Renata M.R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel production by enzymatic catalysis has been the subject of much research for developing processes that can potentially compete with other types of catalysis. The objective of this paper was to study the variables that affect the transesterification of coconut oil in biodiesel production using immobilized enzymes as catalysts and ethanol. The transesterification reactions were carried out in closed glass reactors kept under agitation at 200 rpm and catalyzed by the commercial immobilized lipase Novozym 435. An experimental design with the variables: temperature (40–60 °C), enzyme concentration (3–7%) and oil:ethanol ratio (1:6–1:10) was carried out. The best result – 80.5% conversion – was achieved with the highest temperature, molar ratio and enzyme concentration. -- Highlights: ► Coconut oil was used to produce biodiesel by enzymatic catalysis. ► Variables that interfere in the ethanolic transesterification were studied. ► An experimental design studied: temperature; lipase concentration; oil:ethanol ratio. ► The best result was 80.5% of biodiesel under 60 °C, 7% enzyme and 1:10 of oil:ethanol.

  10. Comparative study on cubic and tetragonal CexZr1-xO2 supported MoO3-catalysts for sulfur-resistant methanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaopeng; Xu, Yan; Cheng, Jiaming; Wang, Weihan; Wang, Baowei; Li, Zhenhua; Ma, Xinbin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, two kinds of CexZr1-xO2 solid solution carriers with different Ce/Zr ratio were prepared by one-step co-precipitation method: the cubic Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 and the tetragonal Ce0.2Zr0.8O2 support. The MoO3/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 and MoO3/Ce0.2Zr0.8O2 catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method for comparative study on sulfur-resistant methanation reaction. The N2 adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), X-ray photoelectron (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen (H2-TPR) were undertaken to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the samples. The results indicated that the prepared MoO3/CexZr1-xO2 catalysts have a mesoporous structure with high surface area and uniform pore size distribution, achieving good MoO3 dispersion on CexZr1-xO2 supports. As for the catalytic performance of sulfur-resistant methanation, the cubic MoO3/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 exhibited better than the tetragonal MoO3/Ce0.2Zr0.8O2 catalyst at reaction temperature 400 °C and 450 °C. CO conversion on the cubic MoO3/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalyst was 50.1% at 400 °C and 75.5% at 450 °C, which is respectively 7% and 20% higher than that on the tetragonal MoO3/Ce0.2Zr0.8O2 catalyst. These were mainly attributed to higher content of active MoS2 on the surface of catalyst, the enhanced oxygen mobility, increased Mo-species dispersion as well as the excellent reducibility resulted from the increased amount of the reducible Ce3+ on the cubic MoO3/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalyst.

  11. A study of a ceria-zirconia-supported manganese oxide catalyst for combustion of Diesel soot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Escribano, V.; Fernandez Lopez, E.; del Hoyo Martinez, C. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Pa. de la Merced s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Gallardo-Amores, J.M. [Lab. Complutense de Altas Presiones, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica I, Universidad Complutense, Ciudad Universitaria, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Pistarino, C.; Panizza, M.; Resini, C.; Busca, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica e di Processo, Universita di Genova, P.le J.F. Kennedy, Pad. D, I-16129 Genoa (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    A study has been conducted on the structural and morphological characterization of a Ce-Zr mixed oxide-supported Mn oxide as well as on its catalytic activity in the oxidation of particulate matter arising from Diesel engines. X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD) and FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy evidence that the support is a fluorite-like ceria-zirconia solid solution, whereas the supported phase corresponds to the manganese oxide denoted as bixbyite ({alpha}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Thermal analyses and FT-IR spectra in air at varying temperatures of soot mechanically mixed with the catalyst evidence that the combustion takes place to a total extent in the range 420-720 K, carboxylic species being detected as intermediate compounds. Moreover, the soot oxidation was studied in a flow reactor and was found to be selective to CO{sub 2}, with CO as by-product in the range 420-620 K. The amount of the generated CO decreases significantly with increasing O{sub 2} concentration in the feed. (author)

  12. A density functional theory study of a silica-supported zirconium monohydride catalyst for depolymerization of polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, J.J.; Parrinello, M.

    2000-04-06

    A silica-supported zirconium hydride catalyst for depolymerization of polyethylene is studied using density functional theory (DFT) together with a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange and correlation energy. The (100) and (111) surfaces of {beta}-cristobalite are used as two possible models of a silica surface. Based on the experimental surface structure determined by J. Corker et al., they propose a detailed atomic model of the zirconium monohydride that is believed to be the active site for depolymerization of polyolefins. The model of the zirconium monohydride on the (100) surface is found to be very stable and the structure is in good agreement with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements. Depolymerization of a small polyolefin chain (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) was carried out to give CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} by addition of H{sub 2}. The rate-limiting step is a {beta}-methyl transfer to the zirconium atom, and the activation energy is 29 kcal/mol on the (100) surface.

  13. A kinetic study of plutonium dioxide dissolution in hydrochloric acid using iron (II) as an electron transfer catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    Effective dissolution of plutonium dioxide has traditionally been accomplished by contact with strong nitric acid containing a small amount of fluoride at temperatures of ∼ 100 C. In spite of these aggressive conditions, PuO 2 dissolution is sometimes incomplete requiring additional contact with the solvent. This work focused on an alternative to conventional dissolution in nitric acid where an electron transfer catalyst, Fe(II), was used in hydrochloric acid. Cyclic voltammetry was employed as an in-situ analytical technique for monitoring the dissolution reaction rate. The plutonium oxide selected for this study was decomposed plutonium oxalate with > 95% of the material having a particle diameter (< 70 microm) as determined by a scanning laser microscopy technique. Attempts to dry sieve the oxide into narrow size fractions prior to dissolution in the HCl-Fe(II) solvent system failed, apparently due to significant interparticle attractive forces. Although sieve splits were obtained, subsequent scanning laser microscopy analysis of the sieve fractions indicated that particle segregation was not accomplished and the individual sieve fractions retained a particle size distribution very similar to the original powder assemblage. This phenomena was confirmed through subsequent dissolution experiments on the various screen fractions which illustrated no difference in kinetic behavior between the original oxide assemblage and the sieve fractions

  14. In Situ Structure-Function Studies of Oxide Supported Rhodium Catalysts by Combined Energy Dispersive XAFS and DRIFTS Spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, John; Dent, Andrew J.; Diaz-Moreno, Sofia; Fiddy, Steven G.; Jyoti, Bhrat; Tromp, Moniek; Newton, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    The techniques of energy dispersive EXAFS (EDE), diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and mass spectrometry (MS) have been combined to study the structure and function of an oxide supported metal catalyst, namely 5 wt% Rh/Al2O3. Using a FreLoN camera as the EDE detector and a rapid-scanning IR spectrometer, experiments could be performed with a repetition rate of 50 ms. The results show that the nature of the rhodium centers is a function of the partial pressures of the reacting gases (CO and NO) and also temperature. This combination of gases oxidizes metallic rhodium particles to Rh(CO)2 at room temperature. The proportion of the rhodium adopting this site increases as the temperature is raised (up to 450 K). Above that temperature the dicarbonyl decomposes and the metal reclusters. Once this condition is met, catalysis ensues. Gas switching techniques show that at 573 K with NO in excess, the clusters can be oxidized rapidly to afford a linear nitrosyl complex; re-exposure to CO also promotes reclustering and the CO adopts terminal (atop) and bridging (2-fold) sites

  15. Part I: A Comparative Thermal Aging Study on the Regenerability of Rh/Al2O3 and Rh/CexOy-ZrO2 as Model Catalysts for Automotive Three Way Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghe Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The rhodium (Rh component in automotive three way catalysts (TWC experiences severe thermal deactivation during fuel shutoff, an engine mode (e.g., at downhill coasting used for enhancing fuel economy. In a subsequent switch to a slightly fuel rich condition, in situ catalyst regeneration is accomplished by reduction with H2 generated through steam reforming catalyzed by Rh0 sites. The present work reports the effects of the two processes on the activity and properties of 0.5% Rh/Al2O3 and 0.5% Rh/CexOy-ZrO2 (CZO as model catalysts for Rh-TWC. A very brief introduction of three way catalysts and system considerations is also given. During simulated fuel shutoff, catalyst deactivation is accelerated with increasing aging temperature from 800 °C to 1050 °C. Rh on a CZO support experiences less deactivation and faster regeneration than Rh on Al2O3. Catalyst characterization techniques including BET surface area, CO chemisorption, TPR, and XPS measurements were applied to examine the roles of metal-support interactions in each catalyst system. For Rh/Al2O3, strong metal-support interactions with the formation of stable rhodium aluminate (Rh(AlO2y complex dominates in fuel shutoff, leading to more difficult catalyst regeneration. For Rh/CZO, Rh sites were partially oxidized to Rh2O3 and were relatively easy to be reduced to active Rh0 during regeneration.

  16. Dehydrogenation Kinetics and Modeling Studies of MgH2 Enhanced by Transition Metal Oxide Catalysts Using Constant Pressure Thermodynamic Driving Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidi Temitope Sabitu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of transition metal oxide catalysts (ZrO2, CeO2, Fe3O4 and Nb2O5 on the hydrogen desorption kinetics of MgH2 was investigated using constant pressure thermodynamic driving forces in which the ratio of the equilibrium plateau pressure (pm to the opposing plateau (pop was the same in all the reactions studied. The results showed Nb2O5 to be vastly superior to other catalysts for improving the thermodynamics and kinetics of MgH2. The modeling studies showed reaction at the phase boundary to be likely process controlling the reaction rates of all the systems studied.

  17. Study of KOH/Al2O3 as heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production via in situ transesterification from microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guixia; Hu, Wenrong; Pei, Haiyan; Jiang, Liqun; Ji, Yan; Mu, Ruimin

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous KOH/Al2O3 catalysts, synthesized by the wet impregnation method with different KOH loadings (20-40 wt%) and calcination temperatures from 400°C to 800°C, were used to produce biodiesel from Chlorella vulgaris biomass by in situ transesterification. The highest yield of biodiesel of 89.53±1.58% was achieved at calcination temperature of 700°C for 2 h and 35 wt% loading of KOH, and at the optimal reaction condition of 10 wt% of catalyst content, 8 mL/g of methanol to biomass ratio and at 60°C for 5 h. The characteristics of the catalysts were analysed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller.

  18. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of catalyst sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of electron microscopy, such as aberration correctors, have now been integrated into Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), making it possible to study the behavior of supported metal catalysts under operating conditions at atomic resolution. Here......, we focus on in situ electron microscopy studies of catalysts that shed light on the mechanistic aspects of catalyst sintering. Catalyst sintering is an important mechanism for activity loss, especially for catalysts that operate at elevated temperatures. Literature from the past decade is reviewed...... along with our recent in situ TEM studies on the sintering of Ni/MgAl2O4 catalysts. These results suggest that the rapid loss of catalyst activity in the earliest stages of catalyst sintering could result from Ostwald ripening rather than through particle migration and coalescence. The smallest...

  19. Experimental and theoretical study about sulfur deactivation of Ni/ CeO{sub 2} and Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocsachoque, Marco A., E-mail: ocmarco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas “Dr Jorge J. Ronco”, (CONICET, CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Cs Exactas (UNLP), Calle 48 N° 257, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Eugenio Russman, Juan I.; Irigoyen, Beatriz [Instituto de Tecnologías del Hidrógeno y Energías Sostenibles (ITHES), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ingeniería (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gazzoli, Delia [Dipartimento di Chimia, Universitá di Roma “La Sapienza”, Roma (Italy); González, María G. [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas “Dr Jorge J. Ronco”, (CONICET, CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Cs Exactas (UNLP), Calle 48 N° 257, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur deactivation of Ni/CeO{sub 2} and Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts were examined through an experimental and theoretical study. These catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption, X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed reaction, thermogravimetric analysis, Uv–visible spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, and tested under the methane dry reforming reaction in the presence of H{sub 2}S. On the other hand, different possible interactions of sulfur with Rh, Ni or surface sites of the CeO{sub 2} support were evaluated by performing energy calculations with the density functional theory (DFT). Overall, the results indicate that tolerance to sulfur of Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalyst is higher than that of Ni/CeO{sub 2} one. In this sense, TPR measurements show that reduction of CeO{sub 2} is promoted by the presence of Rh. This effect, probably caused by hydrogen spillover to CeO{sub 2} support during the reduction of RhO{sub x} species, could be linked to a high oxygen donation capacity of Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. Accordingly, the O{sup 2−} species existing on Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts, revealed by Raman spectra of these samples, could favor sulfur oxidation and prevent Rh–S interactions. Likewise, the theoretical calculations show that desorption of S–O species from Rh/CeO{sub 2} system is more favorable than that from Ni/CeO{sub 2} one. Therefore, our experimental and theoretical study about sulfur deactivation of Ni and Rh supported on CeO{sub 2} allow us to postulate that Rh can help to desorb SO{sub x} species formed on the support, retarding sulfur poisoning of the Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. - Highlights: • CeO{sub 2} support can act as a sacrifice trap decreasing sulfur poisoning. • Theoretical calculations indicate an important nickel affinity with sulfur. • Rh would favor desorption of S–O species formed on the support. • The O{sup 2−} species present on the Rh–CeO{sub 2} sample favor sulfur removal.

  20. Effect of potential waste constituents on the reactivity of Hanford ferrocyanide wastes: Diluent, catalyst, and initiator studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, R.D.; Johnston, J.W.; Tingey, J.M.; Burger, L.L.; Sell, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    During the 1980s, scientists at the Hanford Site began considering disposal options for wastes in underground storage tanks. As a result of safety concerns, it was determined that special consideration should be given to ferrocyanide-bearing wastes to ensure their continued safe storage. In addition, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) chartered Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the conditions necessary for vigorous reactions to occur in the Hanford Site ferrocyanide wastes. As part of those studies, PNL has evaluated the effects of selected potential waste constituents to determine how they might affect the reactivity of the wastes. The authors' investigations of the diluent, catalytic, or initiating effects of potential waste constituents included studies (1) to determine the effect of the oxidant-to-ferrocyanide ratio, (2) to establish the effect of sodium aluminate concentration, (3) to identify materials that could affect the explosivity of a mixture of sodium nickel ferricyanide (a potential aging product of ferrocyanide) and sodium nitrate and nitrite, (4) and to determine the effect of nickel sulfide concentration. They also conducted a thermal sensitivity study and analyzed the results to determine the relative behaviors of sodium nickel ferrocyanide and ferricyanide. A statistical evaluation of the time-to-explosion (TTX) test results from the catalyst and initiator screening study found that the ferricyanide reacted at a faster rate than did the ferrocyanide analog. The thermal analyses indicated that the ferricyanide form is more thermally sensitive, exhibiting exothermic behavior at a lower temperature than the ferrocyanide form. The increased thermal sensitivity of the ferricyanide, which is a potential oxidation product of ferrocyanide, relative to the ferrocyanide analog, does not support the hypothesis that aging independent of the reaction pathway will necessarily reduce the reaction hazard of ferrocyanide wastes

  1. Transmission electron microscopy on live catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, G.M.

    2017-01-01

    The dissertation describes TEM experiments on heterogeneous catalysts. Starting with characterization of (Ni/Co)MoS2 on Alumina and the effect of oxidation, and sequential resulfidation. After that, Co-based catalysts are used for high-resolution (S)TEM/EDX caracterization studies, and in situ

  2. Mössbauer emission study on 57Co doped carbon-supported Ni and Ni-Mo sulfide hydrotreating catalysts : the influence of phosphorus on the structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crajé, M.W.J.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study it is demonstrated that Mössbauer emission spectroscopy (MES) can generate information on the various Ni phases present in sulfided Ni containing catalysts when a small amount of 57Co is used as a probe for Ni.Application of MES to 57Co:Ni(4.5)Mo(8.0)/C and 57Co:Ni(5.6)/C

  3. Hydrodenitrogenation and hydrodesulphurization of heavy gas oil using NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst containing phosphorous : experimental and kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdous, D.; Dalai, A.K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Adjaye, J. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Edmonton Research Centre

    2005-10-01

    Oil sand bitumens and their derived products contain high levels of nitrogen and sulfur compounds which cause the formation of SOx and NOx in the atmosphere. These compounds also deactivate the catalysts used in fluid catalytic cracking and hydrocracking. This study focused on finding a better catalyst to efficiently remove sulphur and nitrogen from oil sand-derived heavy gas oils. The NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst with phosphorous (P) was used in a trickle-bed reactor under a range of temperature and pressure conditions to study the reactivity of vacuum, atmospheric and hydrocracked heavy gas oils produced from Athabasca bitumen. The concentration of phosphorous was maintained at 2.7 wt per cent, while the hydrogen flow rate and catalyst weight were maintained constant at 50 mL/min and 4 g respectively. An ANOVA analysis of experimental data was performed to optimize the process conditions for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodesulphurization (HDS) reactions. Kinetic studies for HDN and HDS reactions were studied within the temperature range of 340 to 400 degrees C using the power law model and the Langmuir-Hinshelhood model. It was shown that HDN and HDS of heavy gas oil follows first order kinetics. The activation energies for HDN and HDS reactions from the power law and Langmuir-Hinshelhood models were 94 and 96 kJ/mol and 113 and 137 kJ/mol, respectively. It was concluded that nitrogen and hydrogen sulfide adsorption have a significant influence on HDN and HDS reactions. 32 refs., 8 tabs., 7 figs.

  4. Strengthening leadership as a catalyst for enhanced patient safety culture: a repeated cross-sectional experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Solvejg; Christensen, Karl Bang; Jaquet, Annette; Møller Beck, Carsten; Sabroe, Svend; Bartels, Paul; Mainz, Jan

    2016-05-13

    Current literature emphasises that clinical leaders are in a position to enable a culture of safety, and that the safety culture is a performance mediator with the potential to influence patient outcomes. This paper aims to investigate staff's perceptions of patient safety culture in a Danish psychiatric department before and after a leadership intervention. A repeated cross-sectional experimental study by design was applied. In 2 surveys, healthcare staff were asked about their perceptions of the patient safety culture using the 7 patient safety culture dimensions in the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. To broaden knowledge and strengthen leadership skills, a multicomponent programme consisting of academic input, exercises, reflections and discussions, networking, and action learning was implemented among the clinical area level leaders. In total, 358 and 325 staff members participated before and after the intervention, respectively. 19 of the staff members were clinical area level leaders. In both surveys, the response rate was >75%. The proportion of frontline staff with positive attitudes improved by ≥5% for 5 of the 7 patient safety culture dimensions over time. 6 patient safety culture dimensions became more positive (increase in mean) (pculture are remarkable, and imply that strengthening the leadership can act as a significant catalyst for patient safety culture improvement. Further studies using a longitudinal study design are recommended to investigate the mechanism behind leadership's influence on patient safety culture, sustainability of improvements over time, and the association of change in the patient safety culture measures with change in psychiatric patient safety outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Study on the effective utilization of palm oil (Part 1). Survey of catalysts for oxidative cleavage of palm stearin into mono and dibasic acids with middle carbon chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Yasuhiko; Shiina, Hisako; Mamuro, Hideo; Nakasato, Satoshi; Ooi, T L; S H, Ong A

    1987-05-01

    Production of palm oil in Malaysia increases annually and it is estimated that the production will reach 6 million tons in 1990. Palm stearin which constitutes 20% or more of palm oil is not suitable for the food production, but if it is successfully converted into mono and dibasic acids with middle carbon chains, a big potential demand as excellent lubricating oil is expected. Chemical Engineering Institute, Agency of Industrial Science and Technology studied this matter jointly with Malaysian Institute of Palm Oil. Various metal (II) ion-exchanged zeolites which were considered to be effective catalysts for the above conversion were screened and from the analytical results utilizing signal strength of carboxyl proton, it was found that several catalysts were effective for the formation of carboxylic acids. Furthermore, it was revealed that Mn (II) ion-exchanged zeolite 5A and Co(II)-Cu(II) ion-exchanged zeolite Y were the catalysts suitable for the objective of this study, but a study for finding out the conditions to obtain high conversion ratio is required. (4 tabs, 28 refs)

  6. Coking of residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, M.R.; Zhao, Y.X. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; McKnight, C.A. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Komar, D.A.; Carruthers, J.D. [Cytec Industries Inc., Stamford, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    One of the major causes of deactivation of Ni/Mo and Co/Mo sulfide catalysts for hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum and bitumen fractions is coke deposition. The composition and amount of coke deposited on residue hydroprocessing catalysts depends on the composition of the liquid phase of the reactor. In the Athabasca bitumen, the high molecular weight components encourage coke deposition at temperatures of 430 to 440 degrees C and at pressures of 10 to 20 MPa hydrogen pressure. A study was conducted to determine which components in the heavy residual oil fraction were responsible for coking of catalysts. Seven samples of Athabasca vacuum residue were prepared by supercritical fluid extraction with pentane before being placed in the reactor. Carbon content and hydrodesulfurization activity was measured. It was concluded that the deposition of coke depended on the presence of asphaltenes and not on other compositional variables such as content of nitrogen, aromatic carbon or vanadium.

  7. Active carbon catalyst for heavy oil upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Hidetsugu; Terai, Satoshi [Technology Research Center, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 1818 Azafujimi, Togo, Mobara-shi, Chiba 297-00017 (Japan); Uchida, Masayuki [Business Planning and Exploring Department, Overseas Business Development and Marketing Division, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 2-8-1 Akanehama, Narashino-shi, Chiba 275-0024 (Japan); Cano, Jose L.; Ancheyta, Jorge [Maya Crude Treatment Project, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-11-24

    The active carbon (AC) catalyst was studied by hydrocracking of Middle Eastern vacuum residue (VR) for heavy oil upgrading. It was observed that the active carbon has the affinity to heavy hydrocarbon compounds and adsorption selectivity to asphaltenes, and exhibits better ability to restrict the coke formation during the hydrocracking reaction of VR. The mesopore of active carbon was thought to play an important role for effective conversion of heavy hydrocarbon compounds into lighter fractions restricting carbon formation. The performance of the AC catalyst was examined by continuous hydrocracking by CSTR for the removal of such impurities as sulfur and heavy metals (nickel and vanadium), which are mostly concentrated in the asphaltenes. The AC catalyst was confirmed to be very effective for the removal of heavy metals from Middle Eastern VR, Maya/Istmo VR and Maya VR. The extruded AC catalysts were produced by industrial manufacturing method. The application test of the extruded AC catalyst for ebullating-bed reactor as one of the commercially applicable reactors was carried out at the ebullating-bed pilot plant for 500h. The ebullition of the extruded AC catalyst was successfully traced and confirmed by existing {gamma}-ray density meter. The extruded AC catalyst showed stable performance with less sediment formation at an equivalent conversion by conventional alumina catalyst at commercial ebullating-bed unit. The degradation of the AC catalyst at the aging test was observed to be less than that of the conventional alumina catalyst. Thus, the AC catalyst was confirmed to be effective and suitable for upgrading of heavy oil, especially such heavy oils as Maya, which contains much heavy metals.

  8. Study to determine the content of vanadium, aluminum, nickel, sodium, iron and copper in a catalytic cracking catalyst, by using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, J.; Alonso, A.; Tumbarell, O.; Bustanmete, E.

    2003-01-01

    Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS), has the advantage of its simplicity, speed and low cost. All this, together with its high sensibility and selectivity, makes the AAS one the most widely used analytic techniques. The present work shows, the study to determine the content of vanadium, aluminum, nickel, sodium, iron and copper in a catalytic cracking catalyst of a refinery, by using this technique. The results are compared to those of two laboratories which use the ICP-AES and AAS techniques and shows the processing of the statistics with the use of the t of Student and the F of Snedecor. The results using different methods are also shown as well as the recommended application of this results in the chemical characterization of this type of catalysts

  9. Transient-response study of CO insertion into CHx surface intermediates on a vanadium-promoted rhodium catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerts, T.; Santen, van R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The rate of CO insertion into surface CHx species was investigated on silica-supported rhodium and rhodium-vanadium catalysts. Isotopically labelled 13CO was used in a transient kinetic experiment under steady-state conditions. A main conclusion is that vanadium promotion does not affect the rate of

  10. Experimental Studies on the Hydrotreatment of Kraft Lignin to Aromatics and Alkylphenolics Using Economically Viable Fe-Based Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agarwal, Shilpa; Chowdari, Ramesh Kumar; Hita, Idoia; Heeres, Hero Jan

    Limonite, a low-cost iron ore, was investigated as a potential hydrotreatment catalyst for kraft lignin without the use of an external solvent (batch reactor, initial H-2 pressure of 100 bar, 4 h). The best results were obtained at 450 degrees C resulting in 34 wt % of liquefied kraft lignin (lignin

  11. Genesis of Co/SiO2 catalysts : XAS study at the cobalt L-III,L- II absorption edges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazin, D.; Kovacs, I.; Guczi, L.; Parent, P.; Laffon, C.; De Groot, F.; Ducreux, O.; Lynch, J.

    2000-01-01

    Silica-supported cobalt catalysts have been investigated by soft X-ray absorption techniques. Soft X-ray absorption spectra were collected at the Co LII,III edge during in situ reduction of calcined samples in a stream of hydrogen in the temperature range between 300 and 650°C. Using reference

  12. Studies about the transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase in a catalyst and ordered packing successive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornea, Anisia; Cristescu, Ion; Zamfirache, Marius; Varlam, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    The processes for hydrogen isotope separation are very important for nuclear technology. One of the most important processes for tritium separation, is the catalyst isotope exchange water-hydrogen. In a column of isotope exchange tritium is transferred from liquid phase (tritiated heavy water) in gaseous phase (hydrogen). In the experimental setup, which was used, the column of catalytic isotope exchange is filled with successive layers of catalyst and ordered packing. The catalyst consists of 95.5 wt.% of PTFE, 4.1 wt. % of carbon and 0.40 wt. % of platinum and was made of Raschig rings 10 x 10 x 2 mm. The ordered packing was of B7 type and consists of a phosphor bronze wire mesh of 0.18 x 0.48 mm dimension. We analysed the transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase, in this system. The mathematical model presented in the paper allowed computing experimental data for testing the catalyst performances. In this way the speed constants which characterized the isotopic exchange on the catalysis bed ks, and the distillation on the ordered packing kd, were expressed as function of experimental concentrations and hydrodynamic conditions. (authors)

  13. Experimental research of technology activating catalysts for SCR DeNOx in boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xi; Yang, Zhengde; Li, Yan; Chen, Donglin

    2018-01-01

    In order to improve activity of the catalysts used in SCR DeNOx system of flue gas, a series of catalysts activated by different activating liquids under varied conditions in boiler directly were conducted. Then these catalysts were characterized by SEM, FT-IR and BET technology. And NO conversions of the activated catalysts were studied and compared with that of inactivated catalyst. The above experiment shows that NO conversion of the activated catalyst can be up to 99%, which 30% higher than that of inactivated catalyst, so activity of catalysts were improved greatly. Furthermore, optimal activating liquid labeled L2 and effective technology parameters were gained in the experiment.

  14. Research training for teaching staff as a catalyst for professional and institutional development : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crispin, Darla; Stolte, Tine; Bisschop Boele, Evert

    2015-01-01

    When an institution wishes to develop a Masters programme that combines relevance to the profession with preparation for possible 3rd cycle study, there are many things to consider: curriculum design and content, facilities, stakeholder opinion, assessment, likely student intake, etc. But at least

  15. The kinetics of the methanol synthesis on a copper catalyst: An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.N.R.; Borman, P.C.; Kuczynski, M.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1989-01-01

    The kinetics of the low pressure of methanol from feed gases containing solely CO and H2 were studied in an internally recycled gradientless reactor. As experimental accuracy impeded the application of high CO contents, the experimental range of mole fraction of CO was limited to 0.04 to 0.22. The

  16. Accessibility, Structure and Reactivity of Individual Catalyst Particles Studied by Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, F.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412642697

    2017-01-01

    This PhD thesis is aimed at using fluorescence microscopy to study accessibility, structure and reactivity of two types of systems. The first part of this thesis is focused on model zeolite crystals. Fundamental insights into the accessibility and internal structure of zeolite powders and crystals

  17. A combined experimental and theoretical study on ethanol conversion to propylene over Y/ZrO2 catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Xia, Wei; Mu, Xichuan; Chen, Kun; Si, Huimin; Li, Zhihao

    2018-05-01

    ZrO2-based catalysts doped with Y were prepared by co-precipitation method. The effect of yttrium modification on the selective conversion of bio-ethanol to propylene over ZrO2 catalysts was investigated. The physical and chemical properties of the catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption method, temperature programmed desorption and X-ray diffraction. The maximum yield of propylene reached 44.0% over 0.03Y/ZrO2 catalyst. A coordination of acid-base properties accounts for the remarkable improvement of reaction activities over Y-doped ZrO2 catalysts in this investigation. On the basis of calculation results, it can be concluded that significant charge transfer occurs as a result of introduction of Y or O-vacancy. The adsorption of ethanol and propylene on perfect t-ZrO2 (1 0 1), defect t-ZrO2 (1 0 1) and Y/ZrO2 (1 0 1) surfaces were investigated with density functional theory (DFT). The adsorption for ethanol on Y/ZrO2 (1 0 1) and defect t-ZrO2 (1 0 1) surfaces are more stable than that on perfect t-ZrO2 (1 0 1). On the defect t-ZrO2 (1 0 1) surface, ethanol dominantly absorbs at the O-vacancy site, indicating that O-vacancy becomes the favorable adsorption site. On the Y/ZrO2 (1 0 1) and defect t-ZrO2 (1 0 1) surfaces, the adsorption energy of propylene decreases, which makes propylene desorb quickly after formation.

  18. Pd-Catalyzed N-Arylation of Secondary Acyclic Amides: Catalyst Development, Scope, and Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jacqueline D.; Hyde, Alan M.; Cuezva, Alberto Martinez; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2009-01-01

    We report the efficient N-arylation of acyclic secondary amides and related nucleophiles with aryl nonaflates, triflates, and chlorides. This method allows for easy variation of the aromatic component in tertiary aryl amides. A new biaryl phosphine with P-bound 3,5-(bis)trifluoromethylphenyl groups was found to be uniquely effective for this amidation. The critical aspects of the ligand were explored through synthetic, mechanistic, and computational studies. Systematic variation of the ligand revealed the importance of (1) a methoxy group on the aromatic carbon of the “top ring” ortho to the phosphorus and (2) two highly electron-withdrawing P-bound 3,5-(bis)trifluoromethylphenyl groups. Computational studies suggest the electron-deficient nature of the ligand is important in facilitating amide binding to the LPd(II)(Ph)(X) intermediate. PMID:19886610

  19. Studies on the decomposition of oxalic acid by nitric acid in presence of catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noronha, D.M.; Pius, I.C.; Chaudhury, S.

    2015-01-01

    Impure Plutonium oxalate generated from the recovery of plutonium from waste solutions may require further purification via anion exchange. Conventionally, plutonium oxalate is converted to oxide in a furnace and the oxide is dissolved in Conc. HNO 3 containing HF and purified by anion exchange route. Studies initiated on the decomposition of oxalic acid with Conc. HNO 3 to facilitate direct dissolution of plutonium oxalate and quantitative destruction of oxalate are discussed in this paper. (author)

  20. Dearomatization of jet fuel on irradiated platinum-supported catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucka, V.; Ostrihonova, A.; Kopernicky, I.; Mikula, O.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation ( 60 Co #betta#-rays) on Pt-supported catalyst used for the dearomatization of jet fuel with distillation in the range 395 to 534 K has been studied. Pre-irradiation of the catalyst with doses in the range 10 2 to 5 x 10 4 Gy leads to the partial catalyst activation. Irradiation of the catalyst enhances its resistance to catalyst poisons, particularly to sulphur-compounds, and this is probably the reason for its catalytic activity being approx. 60 to 100% greater than that of un-irradiated catalyst. Optimum conditions for dearomatization on the irradiated catalyst were found and, by means of a rotary three-factorial experiment, it was shown that these lie at lower temperatures and lower pressures than those for un-irradiated catalyst. (author)

  1. Study of heterogeneous catalytic processes over cobalt, molybdenum and cobalt-molybdenum catalysts supported on alumina by temperature-programmed desorption and temperature-programmed reaction. 1. Adsorption of hydrozen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanov, V.V.; Tsao Yamin; Krylov, O.V.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on reduced, sulphidized and reoxidized specimens of molybdenum-and cobalt-molybdenum-containing catalysts applied on aluminium oxide has been studied by the method of thermal desorption (TD). Comparison of TD spectra of hydrogen and data of X-ray phase analysis of the specimens and mass-spectrometric analysis of the products desorbed from the surface of catalysts after their successive reduction sulphidizing, carbonizing and reoxidation permitted a correlation between various forms of hydrogen adsorption and certain centres on the surface of the catalysts. 12 refs., 2 figs

  2. Methods of making textured catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  3. DFT study of gases adsorption on sharp tip nano-catalysts surface for green fertilizer synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Noorhana; Irfan, Muhammad; Shafie, Afza; Soleimani, Hassan; Alqasem, Bilal; Rehman, Zia Ur; Qureshi, Saima

    2016-11-01

    The energy minimization and spin modifications of sorbates with sorbents in magnetic induction method (MIM) play a vital role in yield of fertilizer. Hence, in this article the focus of study is the interaction of sorbates/reactants (H2, N2 and CO2) in term of average total adsorption energies, average isosteric heats of adsorption energies, magnetic moments, band gaps energies and spin modifications over identical cone tips nanocatalyst (sorbents) of Fe2O3, Fe3O4 (magnetic), CuO and Al2O3 (non-magnetic) for green nano-fertilizer synthesis. Study of adsorption energy, band structures and density of states of reactants with sorbents are purely classical and quantum mechanical based concepts that are vividly illustrated and supported by ADSORPTION LOCATOR and Cambridge Seriel Total Energy Package (CASTEP) modules following classical and first principle DFT simulation study respectively. Maximum values of total average energies, total average adsorption energies and average adsorption energies of H2, N2 and CO2 molecules are reported as -14.688 kcal/mol, -13.444 kcal/mol, -3.130 kcal/mol, - kcal/mol and -6.348 kcal/mol over Al2O3 cone tips respectively and minimum over magnetic cone tips. Whereas, the maximum and average minimum values of average isosteric heats of adsorption energies of H2, N2 and CO2 molecules are figured out to be 3.081 kcal/mol, 4.842 kcal/mol and 6.848 kcal/mol, 0.988 kcal/mol, 1.554 kcal/mol and 2.236 kcal/mol over aluminum oxide and Fe3O4 cone tips respectively. In addition to the adsorption of reactants over identical cone sorbents the maximum and minimum values of net spin, electrons and number of bands for magnetite and aluminum oxide cone structures are attributed to 82 and zero, 260 and 196, 206 and 118 for Fe3O4 and Al2O3 cones respectively. Maximum and least observed values of band gap energies are figured out to be 0.188 eV and 0.018 eV with Al2O3 and Fe3O4 cone structures respectively. Ultimately, with the adsorption of reactants an

  4. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopic study of nickel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldatov, Alexander V.; Smolentsev, Grigory; Kravtsova, Antonina; Yalovega, Galina; Feiters, Martin C.; Metselaar, Gerald A.; Joly, Yves

    2006-01-01

    Ni-isocyanide and Ni-acac complexes have been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Theoretical analysis has been done using self-consistent full multiple scattering (MS) approach within both muffin-tin (MT) model of the potential and non-MT finite deference method. For the isocyanide complex, it was shown that MS theoretical spectra reproduce all structural details of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), but also that it is important to consider the non-MT effects in the potential for a correct simulation of the shape of the pre-edge structures. The contribution of a non-constant potential in the interstitial regions is extremely important for the interpretation of the XANES of Ni(acac) 2

  5. Rapid Syphilis Tests as Catalysts for Health Systems Strengthening: A Case Study from Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Patricia J.; Cárcamo, César P.; Chiappe, Marina; Valderrama, Maria; La Rosa, Sayda; Holmes, King K.; Mabey, David C. W.; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Untreated maternal syphilis leads to adverse pregnancy outcomes. The use of point of care tests (POCT) offers an opportunity to improve screening coverage for syphilis and other aspects of health systems. Our objective is to present the experience of the introduction of POCT for syphilis in Peru and describe how new technology can catalyze health system strengthening. Methods The study was implemented from September 2009–November 2010 to assess the feasibility of the use of a POCT for syphilis for screening pregnant women in Lima, Peru. Outcomes measured included access to syphilis screening, treatment coverage, partner treatment, effect on patient flow and service efficiency, acceptability among providers and patients, and sustainability. Results Before the introduction of POCT, a pregnant woman needed 6 visits to the health center in 27 days before she received her syphilis result. We trained 604 health providers and implemented the POCT for syphilis as the “two for one strategy”, offering with one finger stick both syphilis and HIV testing. Implementation of the POCT resulted in testing and treatment on the first visit. Screening and treatment coverages for syphilis improved significantly compared with the previous year. Implementation of POCT has been scaled up nationally since the study ended, and coverages for screening, treatment and partner treatment have remained over 92%. Conclusions Implementation of POCT for syphilis proved feasible and acceptable, and led to improvement in several aspects of health services. For the process to be effective we highlight the importance of: (1) engaging the authorities; (2) dissipating tensions between providers and identifying champions; (3) training according to the needs; (4) providing monitoring, supervision, support and recognition; (5) sharing results and discussing actions together; (6) consulting and obtaining feedback from users; and (7) integrating with other services such as with rapid HIV

  6. Rapid Syphilis Tests as Catalysts for Health Systems Strengthening: A Case Study from Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J García

    Full Text Available Untreated maternal syphilis leads to adverse pregnancy outcomes. The use of point of care tests (POCT offers an opportunity to improve screening coverage for syphilis and other aspects of health systems. Our objective is to present the experience of the introduction of POCT for syphilis in Peru and describe how new technology can catalyze health system strengthening.The study was implemented from September 2009-November 2010 to assess the feasibility of the use of a POCT for syphilis for screening pregnant women in Lima, Peru. Outcomes measured included access to syphilis screening, treatment coverage, partner treatment, effect on patient flow and service efficiency, acceptability among providers and patients, and sustainability.Before the introduction of POCT, a pregnant woman needed 6 visits to the health center in 27 days before she received her syphilis result. We trained 604 health providers and implemented the POCT for syphilis as the "two for one strategy", offering with one finger stick both syphilis and HIV testing. Implementation of the POCT resulted in testing and treatment on the first visit. Screening and treatment coverages for syphilis improved significantly compared with the previous year. Implementation of POCT has been scaled up nationally since the study ended, and coverages for screening, treatment and partner treatment have remained over 92%.Implementation of POCT for syphilis proved feasible and acceptable, and led to improvement in several aspects of health services. For the process to be effective we highlight the importance of: (1 engaging the authorities; (2 dissipating tensions between providers and identifying champions; (3 training according to the needs; (4 providing monitoring, supervision, support and recognition; (5 sharing results and discussing actions together; (6 consulting and obtaining feedback from users; and (7 integrating with other services such as with rapid HIV testing.

  7. Catalyst design for carbon nanotube growth using atomistic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pint, Cary L; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Hauge, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The formation and stability of bimetallic catalyst particles, in the framework of carbon nanotube growth, is studied using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloys. Monte Carlo-Metropolis simulations with the BFS method are utilized in order to predict and study equilibrium configurations for nanoscale catalyst particles which are directly relevant to the catalyst state prior to growth of carbon nanotubes. At the forefront of possible catalyst combinations is the popular Fe-Mo bimetallic catalyst, which we have recently studied experimentally. We explain our experimental results, which indicate that the growth observed is dependent on the order of co-catalyst deposition, in the straightforward interpretation of BFS strain and chemical energy contributions toward the formation of Fe-Mo catalyst prior to growth. We find that the competition between the formation of metastable inner Mo cores and clusters of surface-segregated Mo atoms in Fe-Mo catalyst particles influences catalyst formation, and we investigate the role of Mo concentration and catalyst particle size in this process. Finally, we apply the same modeling approach to other prominent bimetallic catalysts and suggest that this technique can be a powerful tool to understand and manipulate catalyst design for highly efficient carbon nanotube growth

  8. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  9. Metal catalysts fight back

    OpenAIRE

    George Marsh

    1998-01-01

    In recent years organometallic catalysts, especially metallocenes, have been a major focus of attention in terms of polymerisation chemistry. But the news earlier this year of a family of iron-based catalysts able to rival the effectiveness of both conventional and metallocene catalysts in the polymerisation of ethylene has excited the plastics industry. Because of the impact of this discovery and its potential as a route to lower-priced commodity plastics in the future, it may be useful at t...

  10. A study of the homogeneous stages in the catalytic oxidation of naphthalene, o-xylene, and benzene over a vibratory-fluidized catalyst bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneichuk, G P; Stasevich, V P; Shaprinskaya, T M; Girushtin, G G; Gritsenko, V I; Zelenchukova, T G

    1978-01-01

    To identify the conditions for minimizing homogeneous states, the reaction kinetics were studied in a vibrating gradientless quartz reactor both in the presence and absence of the catalyst. A tenfold decrease of the reactional space in the absence of catalyst inhibited the oxidation (e.g., from a 68% conversion to 10% at 500/sup 0/C for o-xylene, and from 100% to 2% at 580/sup 0/C for benzene), whereas increasing the surface-volume ratio of the reactor increased the oxidation rate for benzene, which indicated that noncatalytic oxidation follows a radical-chain mechanism and involves both homogeneous (mainly) and heterogeneous stages. Catalytic oxidation carried out in a small volume (to avoid the homogeneous states) followed a heterogeneous mechanism up to 580/sup 0/C for naphthalene and o-xylene, and up to 550/sup 0/C for benzene. At higher temperatures, however, volume oxidation of benzene to carbon oxides was detected, which was favored by intense reactor vibration (i.e., increasing free space between catalyst grains), constituted 27% at 564/sup 0/C and 40% at 584/sup 0/C, and probably followed a heterogeneous-homogeneous mechanism. The partial oxidation products (i.e., phthalic and (for benzene) maleic anhydride) formed entirely by a heterogeneous mechanism. Tables and graphs.

  11. Study on the effects of temperature, time and policy of pre polymerization on particle morphology in propylene slurry polymerization with heterogeneous ziegler-Natta catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pircheraghi, G.; Pourmahdian, S.; Vatankhah, M.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of temperature, time and the strategy of pre polymerization were studied on the morphology of polypropylene particles. Propylene polymerization was carried out in slurry phase using fourth generation of Ziegler-Natta Catalyst, cyclohexylmethyl dimethoxysilane as external electron donor, and triethyl aluminum as co-catalyst. Pre polymerizations were carried out based on two strategies: isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. Particle imaging using SEM, bulk density, and particle size distribution was used to analyse the particle morphology. It was found that the variation of initial condition together with the change in the mechanism of particle fracture has a dominant effect on particle morphology. Each combination between the temperature and reaction time causes to have a special effect on the product particle morphology. It has become clear that in isothermal pre polymerization, spherical particles with identical properties were produced. In low temperature experiments particles with porous surface were observed. At increasing temperature, however, the pores disappeared. Non-isothermal pre polymerization produced different morphological types. In all experiments core shell structures were observed that seemed to be related to the structure of catalysts

  12. Interaction of water, alkyl hydroperoxide, and allylic alcohol with a single-site homogeneous Ti-Si epoxidation catalyst: A spectroscopic and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakawa, Atsushi; Bürgi, Thomas; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Baiker, Alfons

    2005-02-17

    Tetrakis(trimethylsiloxy)titanium (TTMST, Ti(OSiMe3)4) possesses an isolated Ti center and is a highly active homogeneous catalyst in epoxidation of various olefins. The structure of TTMST resembles that of the active sites in some heterogeneous Ti-Si epoxidation catalysts, especially silylated titania-silica mixed oxides. Water cleaves the Ti-O-Si bond and deactivates the catalyst. An alkyl hydroperoxide, TBHP (tert-butyl hydroperoxide), does not cleave the Ti-O-Si bond, but interacts via weak hydrogen-bonding as supported by NMR, DOSY, IR, and computational studies. ATR-IR spectroscopy combined with computational investigations shows that more than one, that is, up to four, TBHP can undergo hydrogen-bonding with TTMST, leading to the activation of the O-O bond of TBHP. The greater the number of TBHP molecules that form hydrogen bonds to TTMST, the more electrophilic the O-O bond becomes, and the more active the complex is for epoxidation. An allylic alcohol, 2-cyclohexen-1-ol, does not interact strongly with TTMST, but the interaction is prominent when it interacts with the TTMST-TBHP complex. On the basis of the experimental and theoretical findings, a hydrogen-bond-assisted epoxidation mechanism of TTMST is suggested.

  13. Direct atomic imaging and density functional theory study of the Au24Pd1 cluster catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruma, A; Negreiros, F R; Xie, S; Tsukuda, T; Johnston, R L; Fortunelli, A; Li, Z Y

    2013-10-21

    In this study we report a direct, atomic-resolution imaging of calcined Au24Pd1 clusters supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes by employing aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Using gold atoms as mass standards, we confirm the cluster size to be 25 ± 2, in agreement with the Au24Pd1(SR)18 precursor used in the synthesis. Concurrently, a Density-Functional/Basin-Hopping computational algorithm is employed to locate the low-energy configurations of free Au24Pd1 cluster. Cage structures surrounding a single core atom are found to be favored, with a slight preference for Pd to occupy the core site. The cluster shows a tendency toward elongated arrangements, consistent with experimental data. The degree of electron transfer from the Pd dopant to Au is quantified through a Löwdin charge analysis, suggesting that Pd may act as an electron promoter to the surrounding Au atoms when they are involved in catalytic reactions.

  14. Study of (La, Ce)(Pd, Mn, Fe, Co) O3-Perovskite catalysts characterization with nanoparticles produced by compressor and vacuum until 20/000 km and comparison with imported catalyst of Iran Khodro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanfekr, A.; Arzani, K.; Nemati, A.; Hossaini, M.

    2009-01-01

    (La,Ce)(Pd,Mn,Fe,Co)O 3 - Perovskite catalyst was prepared by the citrate route and deposited on ceramic monoliths via dip coating procedure by compressor and vacuum method. The catalyst was applied on Rd car with XU7 motors model and the amount of emission was monitored with vehicle emission test systems in Sapco Company after 10000 and 20/000 Km. The results indicate low emission in catalyst with vacuum method and were compared with the imported catalyst with noble metals such as Palladium, Platinum and Rhodium by Iran Khodro Company b ased on the Euro III standards . The catalysts were characterized by specific surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, line scan and map. In the results indicated in the home made sample, the amount of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons were lower than imported catalyst with Iran Khodro company with nobel metals. The illustration shows Nano Particles size on coat. The microstructure evaluation showed that the improved properties can he related to the existence of nano particles on coating.

  15. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    with the wealthy district of Ipanema. The project, which consists of several public programs, addresses the need to open up districts in Rio and create access and connections in the socially divided city across the formal and informal areas, of which the latter counts for more than half of the population in Rio...... that it is not the intention to bring a debate on economic or more general political topics, how interesting it might seem to be. Among others, the issue of gentrification is very relevant in connection with urban renewal of urban interventions. We are very well aware of that. We mention the problem especially in the cases...... the specific challenges facing Rio de Janeiro - a divided city with the formal city and its wealthy neighborhoods on one side and on the other, the many favelas, which are not included in the regulations and public practices of the formal city. Then the case studies of the projects Cantagalo Elevator, designed...

  16. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  17. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J.; Kruger, Jacob S.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-10-17

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  18. Fundamental Studies of Butane Oxidation over Model-Supported Vanadium Oxide Catalysts: Molecular Structure-Reactivity Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachs, I.E.; Jehng, J.M.; Deo, G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Guliants, V.V.; Benziger, J.B.; Sundaresan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride was investigated over a series of model-supported vanadia catalysts where the vanadia phase was present as a two-dimensional metal oxide overlayer on the different oxide supports (TiO2, ZrO2, CeO2, Nb2O5, Al2O3, and SiO2). No correlation was found

  19. [In situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy study of CO adsorption on Ni2P/mesoporous molecule sieve catalysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian-qian; Ji, Sheng-fu; Wu, Ping-yi; Hu, Lin-hua; Huang, Xiao-fan; Zhu, Ji-qin; Li, Cheng-yue

    2009-05-01

    Abstract The supported nickel phosphate precursors were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using nickel nitrate as nickel source, diammonium hydrogen phosphate as phosphorus source, and MCM-41, MCM-48, SBA-15 and SBA-16 as supports, respectively. Then, the supported Ni2 P catalysts were prepared by temperature-programmed reduction in flowing Hz from their nickel phosphate precursors. The in situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis with the probe molecule CO was carried out to characterize the surface properties. The results indicated that there were significant differences in the spectral features of the samples. The upsilon(CO) absorbances observed for adsorbed CO on mesoporous molecule sieve was attributed to weak physical adsorption. There are four different kinds of upsilon(CO) absorbances observed for adsorbed CO on Ni2 P/MCM-41 catalyst with the following assignments: (1) the formation of Ni(CO)4 at 2055 cm(-1). (2) CO terminally bonded to cus Ni(delta+) (0catalysts. The absorbance observed at 2051-2055 cm(-1) for CO adsorption on Ni2P/MCM-48, Ni2P/SBA-15 and Ni2P/SBA-16 catalysts is due to the formation of Ni(CO)4 species. The other upsilon absorbances observed at 2093-2096 cm(-1) was attributed to CO terminally bonded to cus Ni(delta+) (0

  20. A Comparative Study of Mn/Co Binary Metal Catalysts Supported on Two Commercial Diatomaceous Earths for Oxidation of Benzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tomatis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Two commercial diatomaceous earths were used as supports for the preparation of Mn/Co binary metal catalysts at different metal loads (5 to 10 wt % Mn and 5 to 15 wt % Co by incipient wetness deposition. The activity of the prepared catalysts towards the complete oxidation of benzene to CO2 and water was investigated between 100 and 400 °C. Raw supports and synthesized catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2 physisorption, SEM-EDS, H2-TPR, and TPD. The purification treatment of food-grade diatomite significantly affected the crystallinity of this support while reducing its specific surface area (SSA. A loss of SSA, associated with the increase in the metal load, was observed on samples prepared on natural diatomite, while the opposite trend occurred with food-grade diatomite-supported catalysts. Metal nanoparticles of around 50 nm diameter were observed on the catalysts’ surface by SEM analysis. EDS analysis confirmed the uniform deposition of the active phases on the support’s surface. A larger H2 consumption was found by TPR analysis of natural diatomite-based samples in comparison to those prepared at the same metal load on food-grade diatomite. During the catalytic oxidation experiment, over 90% conversion of benzene were achieved at a reaction temperature of 225 °C by all of the prepared samples. In addition, the formation of coke during the oxidation tests was demonstrated by TGA analysis and the soluble fraction of the produced coke was characterized by GC-MS.

  1. Enhanced gasification of wood in the presence of mixed catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S. L.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, Jr., L. J.; Robertus, R. J.; Mitchell, D. E.

    Experimental results obtained in laboratory investigations of steam gasification of wood in the presence of mixed catalysts are presented. These studies are designed to test the technical feasibility of producing specific gaseous products from wood by enhancing its reactivity and product specificity through the use of combined catalysts. The desired products include substitute natural gas, hydrocarbon synthesis gas and ammonia synthesis gas. The gasification reactions are controlled through the use of specific catalyst combinations and operating parameters. A primary alkali carbonate gasification catalyst impregnated into the wood combined with specific commercially available secondary catalysts produced the desired products. A yield of 50 vol % methane was obtained with a randomly mixed combination of a commercial nickel methanation catalyst and silica-alumina cracking catalyst at a weight ratio of 3:1 respectively. Steam gasification of wood in the presence of a commercial Si-Al cracking catalyst produced the desired hydrocarbon synthesis gas. Hydrogen-to-carbon monoxide ratios needed for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons were obtained with this catalyst system. A hydrogen-to-nitrogen ratio of 3:1 for ammonia synthesis gas was achieved with steam-air gasification of wood in the presence of catalysts. The most effective secondary catalyst system employed to produce the ammonia synthesis gas included two commercially prepared catalysts formulated to promote the water-gas shift reaction.

  2. Catalyst Stability Benchmarking for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction: The Importance of Backing Electrode Material and Dissolution in Accelerated Aging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Simon; Kasian, Olga; Mingers, Andrea M; Nicley, Shannon S; Haenen, Ken; Mayrhofer, Karl J J; Cherevko, Serhiy

    2017-09-18

    In searching for alternative oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts for acidic water splitting, fast screening of the material intrinsic activity and stability in half-cell tests is of vital importance. The screening process significantly accelerates the discovery of new promising materials without the need of time-consuming real-cell analysis. In commonly employed tests, a conclusion on the catalyst stability is drawn solely on the basis of electrochemical data, for example, by evaluating potential-versus-time profiles. Herein important limitations of such approaches, which are related to the degradation of the backing electrode material, are demonstrated. State-of-the-art Ir-black powder is investigated for OER activity and for dissolution as a function of the backing electrode material. Even at very short time intervals materials like glassy carbon passivate, increasing the contact resistance and concealing the degradation phenomena of the electrocatalyst itself. Alternative backing electrodes like gold and boron-doped diamond show better stability and are thus recommended for short accelerated aging investigations. Moreover, parallel quantification of dissolution products in the electrolyte is shown to be of great importance for comparing OER catalyst feasibility. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Study on the correlation between the surface active species of Pd/cordierite monolithic catalyst and its catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Hengcheng; Zuo, Peiyuan; Liu, Miaomiao

    2016-01-01

    Two Pd-loading routes and three Pd-precursor matters were adopted to prepare Pd/(Ce,Y)O_2/γ-Al_2O_3/cordierite monolithic catalyst. The surface active species on the catalyst were characterized by XPS, and its catalytic activity for methane combustion was tested, and the dynamics of the catalytic combustion reaction was also discussed. Pd-loading route and Pd-precursor mass have a significant influence on the catalytic activity and surface active species. The sol dipping method is more advanced than the aqueous solution impregnating method. PN-sol catalyst, by sol dipping combined with Pd(NO_3)_2-precursor, has the best catalytic activity. The physical reason is the unique active Pd phase coexisting with active PdO phase on the surface, and thus the Pd3d_5_/_2 binding energy of surface species and apparent activation energy of combustion reaction are considerably decreased. The catalytic activity index, Pd3d_5_/_2 binding energy and apparent activation energy are highly tied each other with exponential relations.

  4. Catalyst for hydrocarbon conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhaut, P.; Miquel, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given for a catalyst and process for hydrocarbon conversions, e.g., reforming. The catalyst contains an alumina carrier, platinum, iridium, at least one metal selected from uranium, vanadium, and gallium, and optionally halogen in the form of metal halide of one of the aforesaid components. (U.S.)

  5. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  6. Magnetic catalyst bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Wendy; Bol, A.A.; Geus, John W.

    1999-01-01

    After a discussion about the importance of the size of the catalyst bodies with reactions in the liquid-phase with a suspended catalyst, the possibilities of magnetic separation are dealt with. Deficiencies of the usual ferromagnetic particles are the reactivity and the clustering of the

  7. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  8. A Combined Synthetic and DFT Study on the Catalyst-Free and Solvent-Assisted Synthesis of 1,3,4-Oxadiazole-2-thiol Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Soleiman-Beigi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel practical and efficient catalyst-free method for the synthesis of 5-substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiols has been developed, which is assisted by reaction solvent (DMF. The solvent effects on product selectivity were studied based on Onsager’s reaction field theory of electrostatic solvation. The ab initio theoretical studies on the effect of solvents on the process also supported the suitability of DMF as the reaction medium for the preparation of 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiol derivatives.

  9. A new catalyst for heavy water production and its prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshio; Ohkoshi, Sumio; Takahashi, Tomiki

    1978-01-01

    The heavy water production process utilizing isotope exchange reaction between liquid water and hydrogen is the most promising method. Study was made for developing highly active and long life catalyst practically applied for this process. As platinum is used as this catalyst, catalytic activities using varieties of Polapacs and Shodexes instead of active carbon as the carriers of platinum catalyst were investigated. It became clear that the catalytic activity using Pt/Shodex 104 (3 wt %) was 1000 times as high as the activity using Pt/active carbon (1 wt %). This method is considered to be reasonable enough economically. There are many problems which must be solved hereafter for its practical use, and the further studies are required regarding the following points; forming of catalyst, life of catalyst, mass production of catalyst, most appropriate counter flow reacting device of hydrophobic catalyst, pressure and temperature effects on reaction. (Kobatake, H.)

  10. Methanol conversion to hydrocarbons using modified clinoptilolite catalysts. Investigation of catalyst lifetime and reactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, G J; Themistocleous, T; Copperthwaite, R G

    1988-10-17

    A study of the deactivation and reactivation of modified clinoptilolite catalysts for methanol conversion to hydrocarbons is reported. Clinoptilolite catalysts, modified by either ammonium ion exchange or hydrochloric acid treatment, exhibit a short useful catalyst lifetime for this reaction (ca. 2-3 h) due to a high rate of coke deposition (3-5.10/sup -3/ g carbon/g catalyst/h). A comparative study of reactivation using oxygen, nitrous oxide and ozone/oxygen as oxidants indicated that nitrous oxide reactivation gives improved catalytic performance when compared to the activity and lifetime of the fresh catalyst. Both oxygen and ozone/oxygen were found to be ineffective for the reactivation of clinoptilolite. Initial studies of in situ on-line reactivation are also described. 3 figs., 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Report on the achievements in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1988. Coal energy (Studies on coal liquefying catalysts and a method for analyzing liquefied oil); 1988 nendo sekitan ekikayo shokubai oyobi ekikayu binsekiho no kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-03-01

    The present study, as part of the studies on coal liquefying technologies, was originally intended to develop optimal catalysts that make it possible to manufacture a liquid fuel from hydrogenation treatment of coal, and establish optimal reaction operation for the liquefaction process. To achieve the intentions, studies were moved forward on the following four sub-themes: (1) fundamentals and developmental research on catalysts for the direct liquefaction, (2) chemical structures of organic constituents in the coal liquefaction process, (3) research on the optimal reaction operation in the direct coal liquefaction process, and (4) studies on nature and behavior of ash constituent in the coal liquefaction process. The current fiscal year has performed the discussions on the following items based on the achievements attained by fiscal 1987: 1. as a study on liquefaction catalysts, (1) a study on properties of liquefaction catalysts, and (2) a study on characteristics of the liquefying reaction; 2. as a study on the analytic method, (1) a study on the liquefying reaction analyzing method, and (2) a study on the liquefied oil property analyzing method. In Item 1-(1), a prototype zeolite-based catalyst having high hydrogenating decomposition activity was used to execute a reaction to lighten the liquefied oil. As a result, it was revealed that the liquefied oil can be lightened efficiently by having the oil go through a two-stage reforming reaction. (NEDO)

  12. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia; El Eter, Mohamad; Caps, Valerie; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  13. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  14. Finding furfural hydrogenation catalysts via predictive modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.; Mooijman, M.; Ruijter, E.; Alberts, A.H.; Maldonado, A.G.; Orru, R.V.A.; Rothenberg, G.

    2010-01-01

    We combine multicomponent reactions, catalytic performance studies and predictive modelling to find transfer hydrogenation catalysts. An initial set of 18 ruthenium-carbene complexes were synthesized and screened in the transfer hydrogenation of furfural to furfurol with isopropyl alcohol complexes

  15. Multiphase catalysts for selective reduction of NOx with hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisuls, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    Among the existing proposed solutions to reduce emission of NOx there is a promising alternative, the so-called (HC-SCR) selective catalytic reduction of NOx using hydrocarbons as reductant. This thesis is part of a worldwide effort devoted to gain knowledge on the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with hydrocarbons with the final goal to contribute to the development of suitable catalysts for the above mentioned process. Chapter 2 describes the details of the experimental set-up and of the analytical methods employed. Among the catalyst for HC-SCR, Co-based catalyst are known to be active and selective, thus, a study on a series of Co-based catalysts, supported on zeolites, was undertaken and the results are presented in Chapter 3. Correlation between catalytic characteristics and kinetic results are employed to understand the working catalyst and this is used as a basis for catalyst optimization. With the intention to prepare a multi-functional catalyst that will preserve the desired characteristics of the individual components, minimizing their negative aspects, catalysts based on Co-Pt, supported on ZSM-5, were investigated. In Chapter 4 the results of this study are discussed. A bimetallic Co-Pt/ZSM-5 catalysts with low Pt contents (0.1 wt %) showed a synergistic effect by combining high stability and activity of Pt catalysts with the high N2 selectivity of Co catalysts. Furthermore, it was found to be sulfur- and water-tolerant. Its positive qualities brought us to study the mechanism that takes place over this catalyst during HC-SCR. The results of an in-situ i.r mechanistic study over this catalyst is reported in Chapter 5. From the results presented in Chapter 5 a mechanism operating over the Co-Pt/ZSM-5 catalyst is proposed. The modification of Co catalyst with Pt improved the catalysts. However, further improvement was found to be hindered by high selectivity to N2O. Since Rh catalysts are generally less selective to N2O, the modification of Co

  16. Study on purification of carbon nano tubes grown on Fe/Ni bimetallic catalyst supported on Mg O by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirershadi, S.; Mortazavi, Z.; Reyhani, A.; Norouzian, Sh.; Moniri, N.; Novinrooz, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nano tubes grown on Fe/Ni bimetallic catalysts supported on Mg O by thermal chemical vapor deposition. Then purification of carbon nano tubes by oxidation under air at atmospheric pressure and acid treatment with HCl, have been studied. The Scanning electron microscopy observation showed impurities with carbon nano tubes. Scanning electron microscopy, XRD, Raman spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric analysis/Differential Scanning Calorimetry techniques have been used to investigate the effect of purification of carbon nano tubes on morphology and structural quality of them. The weight ratio of carbon nano tubes in purified sample re saved to 85/8 %.

  17. A comparative study on synthesis of LLDPE/TiO2 nanocomposites using different TiO2 by in situ polymerization with zirconocene/dMMAO catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owpradit, Wathanyoo; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd

    2008-01-01

    The present study revealed the effect of different TiO 2 nanoparticles employed on catalytic and characteristic properties of LLDPE/TiO 2 nanocomposites synthesized by the in situ polymerization with zirconocene/dMMAO catalyst. It was found that the presence of rutile phase in titania apparently resulted in decreased activities due to low intrinsic activity of active sites being present. Based on 13 C NMR results, all LLDPE/TiO 2 samples exhibited the random copolymer having different degree of 1-hexene insertion. The highly dispersion of titania can enhance the degree of 1-hexene insertion resulting in decreased crystallinity

  18. The use of deuterium n.m.r. spectroscopy in mechanistic studies of exchange reactions of ethers on supported metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Kemball, Charles; McDougall, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    Exchange reactions of diethyl ether (DEE) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) with deuterium have been studied over supported nickel, palladium, platinum, and rhodium catalysts. Products from most of the systems were analysed by deuterium n.m.r. spectroscopy (55.28 MHz) which gave quantitative results about the distribution of deuterium in the exchanged ethers. The results confirm earlier conclusions about the mechanism of the exchange of DEE and provide new evidence about the reactions of THF. Some hydrogenolysis occurred simultaneously with exchange of THF over both nickel and platinum. (author)

  19. A theoretical and experimental XAS study of monolayer dispersive supported CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongliang; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    The local structures of supported CuO/γ-Al 2 O 3 monolayer dispersive catalysts with different CuO loadings have been investigated by EXAFS and multiple scattering XANES simulations. The EXAFS results show that the first nearest neighbors around the Cu atoms in the CuO/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalysts are similar to that of the polycrystalline CuO powder, which is independent of the CuO loadings. Moreover, the Cu K-XANES FEFF8 calculations for CuO reveal that the monolayer-dispersed CuO species are of small distorted (CuO 4 ) m n+ clusters, which is mainly composed of a distorted CuO 6 octahedron incorporated in the surface octahedral vacant sites of the γ-Al 2 O 3 support. We consider that the CuO species for the CuO/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalysts with loadings of 0.4 and 0.8 mmol/100 m 2 are distorted (CuO 4 ) m n+ clusters composed mainly of a distorted CuO 6 octahedron incorporated in the surface octahedral vacant sites of the γ-Al 2 O 3 support after calcinations at high temperature in air for a few hours. On the contrary, for the CuO/γ-Al 2 O 3 with loading of 1.2 mmol/100 m 2 , the local structure of Cu atoms in CuO/γ-Al 2 O 3 is similar to that of polycrystalline CuO powder

  20. Effect study of the support in nickel and cobalt catalysts for obtaining hydrogen from ethanol steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Sirlane Gomes da

    2013-01-01

    A range of oxide-supported metal catalysts have been investigated for the steam reforming of ethanol for the production of hydrogen and subsequent application in fuel cells. The catalysts were synthesized by the co-precipitation and internal gelification methods using cobalt and nickel as active metals supported on aluminum, zirconium, lanthanum and cerium oxides. After prepared and calcined at 550 Cº the solids were fully characterized by different techniques such as X-rays diffraction(DRX), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption (B.E.T), temperature-programmed reduction in H2 (TPR-H2) and thermogravimetric analysis. The catalytic tests were performed in a monolithic quartz reactor and submitted to different thermodynamic conditions of steam reforming of ethanol at temperatures varying from 500º C to 800 ºC. The product gas streams from the reactor were analyzed by an on-line gas chromatograph. The cobalt/nickel catalyst supported on a ceria-lanthania mixture (Co 10% / Ni 5% - CeO 2 La 2 O 3 ) showed good catalytic performance in hydrogen selectivity reaching a concentration greater than 65%, when compared to other catalytic systems such as: Co 10% / Ni5% - CeO 2 ; Co 10% / Ni 5% - CeO 2 ZrO 2 ; Co 10% / Ni 5% - ZrO 2 ; Co 10% / Ni 5% - La 2 O 3 ; Co 10% / Ni 5% - CeO 2 La 2 O 3 /K 2% ; Co 10 % / Ni 5% - CeO 2 La 2 O 3 / Na 2% ; Ni 10% / Co 5% - CeO 2 La 2 O 3 ; Co-Al 2 O 3 e Co-Al 2 O 3 CeO 2 . (author)

  1. A study of Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 methanol catalysts prepared by flame combustion synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Joakim Reimer; Johannessen, Tue; Wedel, Stig

    2003-01-01

    The flame combustion synthesis of Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts for the synthesis of methanol from CO, CO2 and H2 is investigated. The oxides are generated in a premixed flame from the acetyl-acetonate vapours of Cu, Zn and Al mixed with the fuel and air prior to combustion. The flame-generated powder...... temperature and quench-cooling of the flame tend to increase the dispersion of the phases and the specific surface area of the particles. Properties of both the ternary composition, the three binary compositions and the pure oxides are discussed. The calculation of simultaneous phase and chemical equilibrium...

  2. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  3. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention concerns the selective removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from gasses. In particular, the invention concerns a process, a catalyst and the use of a catalyst for the selective removal of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia from gases containing a significant amount...... of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  4. The study of CaO and MgO heterogenic nano-catalyst coupling on transesterification reaction efficacy in the production of biodiesel from recycled cooking oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahvildari, Kambiz; Anaraki, Yasaman Naghavi; Fazaeli, Reza; Mirpanji, Sogol; Delrish, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Fossil fuels' pollution and their non-renewability have motivated the search for alternative fuels. Some common example of seed oils are sunflower oil, date seed oil, soy bean oil. For instance, soy methyl and soy-based biodiesel are the main biodiesel. Biodiesel is a clean diesel fuel that can be produced through transesterification reaction. Recycled cooking oil, on the other hand, is one of the inexpensive, easily available sources for producing biodiesel. This article is aimed at production of biodiesel via trans-esterification method, Nano CaO synthesis using sol-gel method, and Nano MgO synthesis using sol-gel self-combustion. Two catalysts' combination affecting the reaction's efficacy was also discussed. Optimum conditions for the reaction in the presence of Nano CaO are 1.5 % weight fracture, 1:7 alcohol to oil proportion and 6 h in which biodiesel and glycerin (the byproduct) are produced. Moreover, the optimum conditions for this reaction in the presence of Nano CaO and Nano MgO mixture are 3 % weight fracture (0.7 g of Nano CaO and 0.5 g of Nano MgO), 1:7 alcohols to oil proportion and 6 h. Nano MgO is not capable of catalyzing the transesterification by itself, because it has a much weaker basic affinity but when used with Nano CaO due to its surface structure, the basic properties increase and it becomes a proper base for the catalyst so that CaO contact surface increases and transesterification reaction yield significantly increases as well. This study investigates the repeatability of transesterification reaction in the presence of these Nano catalysts as well.

  5. Theoretical Study on Free Fatty Acid Elimination Mechanism for Waste Cooking Oils to Biodiesel over Acid Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Xiaochao; Zhang, Jilong; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Fan, Caimei; Han, Peide

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical investigation on the esterification mechanism of free fatty acid (FFA) in waste cooking oils (WCOs) has been carried out using DMol(3) module based on the density functional theory (DFT). Three potential pathways of FFA esterification reaction are designed to achieve the formation of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), and calculated results show that the energy barrier can be efficiently reduced from 88.597kcal/mol to 15.318kcal/mol by acid catalyst. The molar enthalpy changes (ΔrHm°) of designed pathways are negative, indicating that FFA esterification reaction is an exothermic process. The obtained favorable energy pathway is: H(+) firstly activates FFA, then the intermediate combines with methanol to form a tetrahedral structure, and finally, producing FAME after removing a water molecule. The rate-determining step is the combination of the activated FFA with methanol, and the activation energy is about 11.513kcal/mol at 298.15K. Our results should provide basic and reliable theoretical data for further understanding the elimination mechanism of FFA over acid catalyst in the conversion of WCOs to biodiesel products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Studies on transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase in a successive catalyst and ordered packing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornea, Anisia; Cristescu, Ion; Zamfirache, Marius; Varlam, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    The processes for hydrogen isotope separation are very important for nuclear technology. One of the most important processes in tritium separation, is the water-hydrogen catalytic isotope exchange. In a column of isotope exchange, tritium is transferred from the liquid phase (tritiated heavy water) to the gaseous phase (hydrogen). In the experimental set-up, which was used, the column of catalytic isotope exchange is filled with successive layers of catalyst Pt/C/PtFe and B7 type ordered packing of phosphor bronze. The tritium transfer from liquid phase to water vapours, is achieved on ordered packing by distillation process: (DTO)L+(D 2 O)V → (D 2 O)L+(DTO)V. On the catalytic tritium transfer from water vapours to hydrogen gas is achieved by the catalytic isotopic exchange process: (DTO)V+(D 2 )G → (D 2 O)V+(DT)G. We analyzed the transfer phenomena of tritium in this system by using the experimental data obtained. The mathematical model presented in the paper allowed computing experimental data for testing the catalyst performances. The transfer equations are solved using the Runge - Kutta method. In this way the speed constants which characterized the isotopic exchange on the catalysis bed ks, and the distillation on the ordered packing kd, were expressed as function of experimental concentrations and hydrodynamic conditions. (authors)

  7. Study on supported binary sulfide catalysts for secondary hydrogenation of coal-derived liquids; Sekitan ekikayu niji suisoka shokubai no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, H.; Matsubayashi, N.; Sato, T.; Imamura, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nishijima, A. [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1995-07-28

    To utilize the high performance of supported catalysts in coal liquefaction processes, one of the promising ways is to apply hydroprocessing sulfide catalysts to the secondary hydrogenation of coal-derived liquids which have undergone the solid separation unit. However, when the product yield from the first-stage liquefaction is maximized, the feed stocks in the secondary hydrogenation contain large amounts of residual fractions with preasphaltenes and metallic components. In this case, the development of a long-life catalyst is essential to establish the two-stage process as a practical one. From this viewpoint, the authors have investigated the deactivation causes of supported Ni-Mo sulfide catalysts through the analysis of the used catalysts in the secondary hydrogenation of coal-derived liquids for long periods. The major cause of the catalyst deactivation has been found to be metallic and carbonaceous deposition on the catalyst, which results thin layer which covers the catalyst particles. The catalysts located at the reactor inlet are more rapidly deactivated than those at the rector exit because of larger amounts of metallic foul ants and the above described shell-like layer. Hydrocracking active sites are much heavily deactivated compared with hydrogenation active sites. It is inferred that the basic or polar compounds contained in coal liquids are permanency adsorbed on the hydrocracking active sites. Spectroscopic analysis of the used catalysts clarified the destruction of the active phase of the binary sulfides, through the segregation and crystal growth. The structural changes of the catalysts are very likely caused by heteroatom compounds in the preasphaltenes. Thus, the primary cause of the catalyst deactivation is the preasphaltenes in the coal liquids. Hydroaromatic compounds in the coal liquids suppress the change of the deposited carbonaceous materials into inert coke which permanently deactivate the catalyst.

  8. Characterization of Coke on a Pt-Re/γ-Al _2 O _3 Re-Forming Catalyst: Experimental and Theoretical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bare, Simon R.; Vila, F. D.; Prabhakar, Sesh; Bradley, William J.

    2017-01-01

    oxygen of a phenoxide-like species bound to the alumina surface. Finally, these data confirm earlier Soxhlet extraction studies and show that extraction process did not substantially change the character of the coke from what it was while still in contact with the catalyst surface.

  9. Computational Study of the Effect of Confinement within Microporous Structures on the Activity and Selectivity of Metallocene Catalysts for Ethylene Oligomerization

    KAUST Repository

    Toulhoat, Hervé

    2011-03-02

    The effect of confinement within some zeolitic structures on the activity and selectivity of metallocene catalysts for the ethylene oligomerization has been investigated using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations (GCMC). The following zeolite (host) frameworks displaying different pore sizes, have been studied as solid hosts: mazzite (MAZ), AIPO-8 (AET), UTD-1F (DON), faujasite (FAU), and VPI-5 (VFI). Intermediates and transition states involved in the ethylene trimerization reaction catalyzed by a Ti-based catalyst [(η5-C5H4CMe2C6H 5)TiCl3/MAO] have been used as sorbates (guests). We have demonstrated linear correlations with slope aH,j between the adsorption enthalpy and the molecular volume Vm of the sorbates, each holding for a given microporous host below a host-specific threshold V mmax,j. Beyond this maximal molecular volume, the adsorption vanishes due to steric exclusion. aH,j increases, and Vmmax,j decreases with decreasing host pore size, in line with the confinement concept. We moreover showed that, in the limit of vanishing loading (Henry regime), the enthalpies and entropies of adsorption in a given host are linearly correlated. We have defined a host-specific confinement compensation temperature a j, which refers to a temperature where the stabilizing adsorption enthalpic interactions are canceled out against the loss in entropy. However, calculated aj are much larger than the operating temperatures. With a setup microkinetic model, we predict that the activity and selectivity of the confined Ti-catalyst in ethylene oligomerization can be significantly altered with respect to homogeneous phase conditions, since the adsorption free energies of transition states and intermediates also become functions of aH,j and Vm. We have applied this theory to predict the optimum host pore size to get maximum α-octene production, instead of α-hexene, which is primarily produced in the homogeneous phase. We also predict a significantly increased activity for

  10. High pressure flow reactor for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of catalysts in gas-liquid mixtures—A case study on gas and liquid phase activation of a Co-Mo/Al2O3 hydrodesulfurization catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haandel, L.; Hensen, E.J.M.; Weber, Th.

    2017-01-01

    An in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts under industrial operating conditions may involve high pressure and reactants in both the gas and the liquid phase. In this paper, we describe an in situ XAS flow reactor, which is suitable to operate under such conditions (pmax 20 bar, Tmax 350

  11. Effects of preparation method and active metal content on of Ni/kieselguhr catalyst activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galuh Widiyarti; Wuryaningsih Sri Rahayu

    2010-01-01

    The preparation and the active metal content influence the activity of catalyst. Study has been conducted to see the activity of Ni/kieselguhr based on preparation method and Nickel (Ni) contents in the catalyst in the laboratory scale. The Ni/kieselguhr catalyst were prepared by impregnation and precipitation methods, with Ni active contents of 10, 20, and 30 % by weight. The catalysts characterization was analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Catalysts activities were analyzed based on decreasing of iodine number from hydrogenation of crude palm oil for 2 hours. The activity tests results show that precipitation catalysts are more active than impregnation catalysts. The decreasing in iodine number of fatty acid after 2 hours of hydrogenation process using precipitation catalysts and impregnation catalysts are 51.53 and 21.85 %, respectively. In addition, the catalysts are more active with increasing Ni contents. (author)

  12. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA; Satcher, Joseph H [Patterson, CA; Gash, Alex E [Brentwood, CA

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  13. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  14. Pathway and Surface Mechanism Studies of 1,3-butadiene Selective Oxidation Over Vanadium-Molybdenum-Oxygen Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, William David [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The partial oxidation of 1,3-butadiene has been investigated over VMoO catalysts synthesized by sol-gel techniques. Surface areas were 9-14 m2/g, and compositions were within the solid solution regime, i.e. below 15.0 mol % MoO3/(MoO3 + V2O5). Laser Raman Spectroscopy and XRD data indicated that solid solutions were formed, and pre- and post-reaction XPS data indicated that catalyst surfaces contained some V+4 and were further reduced in 1,3-butadiene oxidation. A reaction pathway for 1,3-butadiene partial oxidation to maleic anhydride was shown to involve intermediates such as 3,4-epoxy-1-butene, crotonaldehyde, furan, and 2-butene-1,4-dial. The addition of water to the reaction stream substantially increased catalyst activity and improved selectivity to crotonaldehyde and furan at specific reaction temperatures. At higher water addition concentrations, furan selectivity increased from 12% to over 25%. The catalytic effects of water addition were related to competitive adsorption with various V2O5-based surface sites, including the vanadyl V=O, corner sharing V-O-V and edge sharing V-O oxygen. Higher levels of water addition were proposed to impose acidic character by dissociative adsorption. In addition, a novel combinatorial synthesis technique for VMoO was used to investigate the phase transitions of V2O5, solid solutions of Mo in V2O5, V9Mo6O40, and other reduced VMoO compounds, characterized by laser Raman spectroscopy. The natural composition gradient imposed by the sputter deposition apparatus was used to create VMoO arrays containing 225 samples ranging from 7.0-42 mol% MoO3/(V2O5 + MoO3), determined by EDS analysis.

  15. Carbon-doped boron nitride nanosheet as a promising catalyst for N2O reduction by CO or SO2 molecule: A comparative DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Saeidi, Nasibeh

    2018-06-01

    We report for the first time, the catalytic activity of the experimentally available carbon-doped boron nitride nanosheet (C-BNNS) towards the reduction of N2O in the presence of CO or SO2 molecule. According to our density functional theory calculations, C-doping can introduce high spin density into BN monolayer which is mainly localized over the C and its neighboring N atoms. The Hirshfeld charge density analysis reveals that the electron-rich C-BNNS acts as an electron donating support to activate N2O molecule which is an important step in the reduction of N2O. The N2O reduction reaction starts with the dissociative adsorption of N2O over the C-BNNS surface, yielding the N2 molecule and an activated oxygen moiety (Oads) adsorbed over the C atom. The reaction then proceeds via the elimination of Oads by a CO or SO2 molecule. The obtained low activation energies clearly indicate that the metal-free C-BNNS surface can be regarded as a highly active catalyst for the reduction of N2O. The results of this study may open new avenues in searching low cost and highly active BN-based catalysts for low temperature reduction of N2O.

  16. A comparative study of silver-graphene oxide nanocomposites as a recyclable catalyst for the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol: Support effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahed, Bahareh; Hosseini-Monfared, Hassan, E-mail: monfared@znu.ac.ir

    2015-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Characteristics of three different graphene oxide (GO) are studied as a support for Ag nanoparticles. • The required conditions for a best support are determined. • For the first time the silver nanoparticles decorated GO as catalyst for aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol and the effects of the degree of reduction of GO on AgNPs on GO are reported. - Abstract: Three different nanocomposites of silver and graphene oxide, namely silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) immobilized on reduced graphene oxide (AgNPs/rGO), partially reduced graphene oxide (AgNPs/GO) and thiolated partially reduced graphene oxide (AgNPs/GOSH), were synthesized in order to compare their properties. Characterizations were carried out by infrared and UV–Vis and Raman spectroscopy, ICP, X-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM, confirming both the targeted chemical modification and the composite formation. The nanocomposites were successfully employed in the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol at atmospheric pressure. AgNPs/GOSH is stable and recyclable catalyst which showed the highest activity in the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol in the presence of N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI) to give benzaldehyde with 58% selectivity in 24 h at 61% conversion. The favorite properties of AgNPs/GOSH are reasonably attributed to the stable and well distributed AgNPs over GOSH due to strong adhesion between AgNPs and GOSH.

  17. Theoretical study of methanol synthesis from CO2 and CO hydrogenation on the surface of ZrO2 supported In2O3 catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Maobin; Zhang, Minhua; Chen, Yifei; Yu, Yingzhe

    2018-06-01

    The interactions between ZrO2 support and In2O3 catalyst play pivotal role in the catalytic conversion of CO2 to methanol. Herein, a density functional theory study has been conducted to research the mechanism of methanol synthesis from CO2 and CO hydrogenation on the defective ZrO2 supported In2O3(110) surface (D surface). The calculations reveal that methanol is produced mainly via the HCOO reaction pathway from CO2 hydrogenation on D surface, and the hydrogenation of HCOO to form H2COO species with an activation barrier of 1.21 eV plays the rate determining step for the HCOO reaction pathway. The direct dissociation of CO2 to CO on D surface is kinetically and energetically prohibited. Methanol synthesis from CO hydrogenation on D surface is much facile comparing with the elementary steps involved in CO2 hydrogenation. The rate determining step of CO hydrogenation to methanol is the formation of H3CO species on the vacancy site with a barrier of 0.51 eV. ZrO2 support has significant effect on the suppressing of the dissociation of CO2 and stabilization of H2COO species on the surface of In2O3 catalyst.

  18. XPS and STEM study of the interface formation between ultra-thin Ru and Ir OER catalyst layers and perylene red support whiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasoska Ljiljana L.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interface formation between nano-structured perylene red (PR whiskers and oxygen evolution reaction (OER catalysts ruthenium and iridium has been studied systematically by XPS and STEM. The OER catalyst over-layers with thicknesses ranging from ~0.1 to ~50 nm were vapor deposited onto PR ex-situ. STEM images demonstrate that, with increasing thickness, Ru and Ir transform from amorphous clusters to crystalline nanoparticles, which agglomerate with increased over-layer thickness. XPS data show a strong interaction between Ru and PR. Ir also interacts with PR although not to the extent seen for Ru. At low coverages, the entire Ru deposit is in the reacted state while a small portion of the deposited Ir remains metallic. Ru and Ir bonding occur at the PR carbonyl sites as evidenced by the attenuation of carbonyl photoemission and the emergence of new peak assigned to C-O single bond. The curve fitting analysis and the derived stoichiometry indicates the formation of metallo-organic bonds. The co-existence of oxide bonds is also apparent.

  19. Self-regeneration mechanism of a perovskite-based catalyst studied with synchrotron radiation X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Nishihata, Y

    2003-01-01

    A perovskite-based catalyst, LaFe sub 0 sub . sub 5 sub 7 Co sub 0 sub . sub 3 sub 8 Pd sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 5 O sub 3 , maintains its high level of activity with high metal dispersion to control automotive emissions, such as nitrogen oxides (NO sub x), carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbons (HC). It has been demonstrated using X-ray anomalous diffraction (XAD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) techniques that palladium reversibly moves between the inside and outside of the perovskite lattice, and that the agglomeration and growth of the metal particles is suppressed as a result of structural responses to the redox fluctuation in the exhaust-gas composition of current gasoline engines. (author)

  20. Li-doped MgO as catalysts for oxidative coupling of methane: A positron annihilation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, G. H.; Yan, Q. J.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Q. S.

    1991-08-01

    Magnesium oxides intentionally doped with lithium (with a maximum Li content of 40 tool%) for use as catalysts for oxidative coupling of methane were characterized by means of positron annihilation. The positron lifetime spectra, which could be reasonably well interpreted within the framework of the well-known trapping model, depend on the amount of Li doping of the MgO suggesting that positrons are trapped at dispersed small Li 2CO 3 precipitates. Very similar dependencies on lithium doping of the C 2 selectivity and the positron trapping rate ϰ imply an intimate relationship between the concentration of [Li] 0-centers (also referred to as [Li +O -] centers) and the selective activity of Li/MgO during catalytic reactions.

  1. Novel Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni and iron (Fe. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR. The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2–5 nm PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g−1 catalyst.

  2. Novel anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, S; Kamarudin, S K; Daud, W R W; Yaakob, Z; Kadhum, A A H

    2014-01-01

    PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe). Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA) tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2-5 nm) PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g(-1) catalyst.

  3. Sulfur deactivation of fatty ester hydrogenolysis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brands, D.S.; U-A-Sai, G.; Poels, E.K.; Bliek, A. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-08-15

    Trace organosulfur compounds present as natural impurities in oleochemical feedstocks may lead to activation of copper-containing catalysts applied for hydrogenolysis of esters toward fatty alcohols. In this paper, the sulfur deactivation of Cu/SiO{sub 2} and Cu/ZnO/SiO{sub 2} catalysts was studied in the liquid-phase hydrogenolysis of methyl palmitate. The rate of deactivation is fast and increases as a function of the sulfur-containing compound present: octadecanethiol {approx} dihexadecyl disulfide < benzyl isothiocyanate < methyl p-toluene sulfonate < dihexadecyl sulfide < dibenzothiophene. The rapid deactivation is caused by the fact that sulfur is quantitatively removed from the reaction mixture and because mainly surface sulfides are formed under hydrogenolysis conditions. The life time of a zinc-promoted catalyst is up to two times higher than that of the Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalyst, most likely due to zinc surface sulfide formation. The maximum sulfur coverage obtained after full catalyst deactivation with dibenzothiophene and dihexadecyl sulfide--the sulfur compounds that cause the fastest deactivation--may be as low as 0.07. This is due to the fact that decomposition of these compounds as well as the hydrogenolysis reaction itself proceeds on ensembles of copper atoms. Catalyst regeneration studies reveal that activity cannot be regained by reduction or combined oxidation/reduction treatments. XRD, TPR, and TPO results confirm that no distinct bulk copper or zinc sulfide or sulfate phases are present.

  4. Homogeneous deuterium exchange using rhenium and platinum chloride catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawdry, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies of homogeneous hydrogen isotope exchange are mostly confined to one catalyst, the tetrachloroplatinite salt. Recent reports have indicated that chloride salts of iridium and rhodium may also be homogeneous exchange catalysts similar to the tetrachloroplatinite, but with much lower activities. Exchange by these homogeneous catalysts is frequently accompanied by metal precipitation with the termination of homogeneous exchange, particularly in the case of alkane exchange. The studies presented in this thesis describe two different approaches to overcome this limitation of homogeneous hydrogen isotope exchange catalysts. The first approach was to improve the stability of an existing homogeneous catalyst and the second was to develop a new homogeneous exchange catalyst which is free of the instability limitation

  5. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.H.

    1998-07-22

    The goal of the proposed work described in this Final Report was the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The work described here has optimized the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for a low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work has been conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies have been conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors have been studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance has been determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  6. Studies on the catalysts for coal liquefaction. ; Kinetic discussion in initial stage of coal liquefaction. Sekitan ekikayo shokubai ni kansuru kenkyu. ; Sekitan ekika shoki dankai no sokudoronteki kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, T; Ikenaga, N; Oda, H; Yokokawa, C [Kansai University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1990-11-29

    Discussions were given on features of various kinds of coal liquefaction catalysts exhibited by them in hydrocracking of coal (Taiheiyo coal), and particularly on selectivity of the reaction in its initial stage. Four kinds of catalysts were tested: Adkins catalyst which is an oxide of copper and chromium, Fe2O3+S, Mo-TiO2 and MoS3-Al2O3. Three grams of coal and 0.3 gram each of the catalysts were charged into an autoclave reactor and experiment was conducted under an initial hydrogen pressure of 10 MPa, temperatures from 653 K to 693 K and for durations of 0 to 120 minutes to derive apparent reaction rate constants. The MoS3-Al2O3 catalyst has promoting the reaction apparently in the primary reaction at any temperature, while the other catalysts had the rate constants varied in the initial and the later stages. It was recognized that the temperature dependence of rate constants varies considerably according to the types of catalyst. Particularly the MoO3-TiO3 catalyst has small temperature dependence in the rate constants, and high molecular weight reducing power. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. A Study of Deactivating Carbon Species during Methanation on a Ni/Al2O3 Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sine Ellemann

     natural gas and as the infrastructure is already in place for natural gas, it is an attractive alternative to depleting oil resources. Catalysts based on nickel are the most common choice within industry due to the relatively low price of nickel and its acceptable performance. However, nickel catalysts...

  8. Cerium-containing catalysts for obtaining ethylene from ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusman Dossumov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The catalysts Се/γ-Al2O3 и Се-La/γ-Al2O3 were studied by methods of electron microscopy (EM and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD of ammonia. Their activity was studied in reaction of ethanol dehydration with formation of ethylene. Modification of Се/γ-Al2O3 catalyst by Lanthanum promotes dispersion of the catalyst and increases the amount of acidic sites. This modification positively affects the catalyst activity.

  9. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Iron Manganese Catalysts: Effect of Preparation and Operating Conditions on Catalyst Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Mirzaei

    2009-01-01

    molar basis which is the most active catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas to light olefins. The effects of different promoters and supports with loading of optimum support on the catalytic performance of catalysts are also studied. It was found that the catalyst containing 50%Fe/50%Mn/5 wt.%Al2O3 is an optimum-modified catalyst. The catalytic performance of optimal catalyst has been studied in operation conditions such as a range of reaction temperatures, H2/CO molar feed ratios and a range of total pressures. Characterization of both precursors and calcined catalysts is carried out by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, BET specific surface area and thermal analysis methods such as TGA and DSC.

  10. Selective oxidation of i-butene and i-butene to methacrolein and methacrylic acid over Keggin-type polyoxometalate and MoVTeNbOx catalysts. A comparative catalytic and in situ-spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentrup, U.; Brueckner, A.; Kant, M.; Kolf, S.; Dingerdissen, U. [Institut fuer Angewandte Chemie Berlin-Adlershof e.V. (Germany); Jansen, S.; Maschmeyer, D.; Sieger, H.; Zanthoff, H.W. [Degussa AG, Marl (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    An alternative to overcome the drawbacks connected with POM catalysts may be the development of suitable mixed metal oxide catalysts. MoVTeNbO{sub x} materials could be promising candidates since they revaled remarkable performance in the selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid. However, up to now their behaviour in the selective oxidation of i-butane has rarely been studied. The investigations presented in this paper are focused on the interaction of feed components (i-butane / i-butene, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O) with Keggin-type polyoxometalate and MoVTeNbO{sub x} catalysts. FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify adsorbed intermediates and products while the novel simultaneous operando-EPR/UV-vis/Raman/GC technique revealed to be an excellent tool to follow the behaviour of V and Mo sites. In relation to the results of catalytic tests, structure-reactivity relationships are derived. (orig.)

  11. Niobium, catalyst repair kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that niobium oxides, when small amounts are added to known catalysts, enhance catalytic activity and selectivity and prolong catalyst life. Moreover, niobium oxides exhibit a pronounced effect as supports of metal or metal oxide catalysts. Recently we found that the surface acidity of hydrated niobium pentoxide, niobic acid (Nb 2 O 5 · nH 2 O), corresponds to the acidity of 70% sulfuric acid and exhibits high catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability for acid-catalyzed reactions in which water molecules participate. Although there are few differences in electronegativity and ionic radius between niobium and its neighbors in the periodic table, it is interesting that the promoter effect, support effect, and acidic nature of niobium compounds are quite different from those of compounds of the surrounding elements. Here we review what's known of niobium compounds from the viewpoint of their pronounced catalytic behavior

  12. Study of polyoxide catalysts of methane combustion on Mn, Cu, Ni, rare earth elements, alkaline earth elements base by the X-ray fluorescence analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'eva, V.P.; Popova, N.M.; Zheksenbaeva, Z.T.; Sass, A.S.; Salakhova, R.Kh.; Dosumov, K.D.

    2002-01-01

    The results of X-ray fluorescence analysis of polyoxide catalysts on of Mn, Cu, Ni, rare earth elements, alkaline earth elements base supported on 2 % Ce/θ-Al 2 O 3 are presented. This polyoxide catalysts are using for deep methane oxidation. DRON-4-7 X-ray diffractometers was applied for the analysis. It was found, that oxides in Ni-Cu-Cr catalysts after long time heating up to 1200 deg. C have been interacted with catalyst supports with Ni(Cu)Al 2 O 3 aluminates formation and due to its decomposition transformation degree of CH 4 to CO 2 are reduced. Activity of MnBaSrCeLa catalysts after heating up to 1200 deg. C does not changed

  13. From Nanoparticles to Process An Aberration Corrected TEM Study of Fischer Tropsch Catalysts at Various Steps of the Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braidy, N.; Blanchard, J.; Abatzoglou, N.; Andrei, C.

    2011-01-01

    χThe nanostructure of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) Fe carbides are investigated using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plasma-generated Fe carbides are analyzed just after synthesis, following reduction via a H2 treatment step and once used as FT catalyst and deactivated. The as-produced nanoparticles (NPs) are seen to be abundantly covered with graphitic and amorphous carbon. Using the extended information limit from the spherical aberration-corrected TEM, the NPs could be indexed as a mixture of NPs in the θ-Fe 3 C and χ-Fe 5 C 2 phases. The reduction treatment exposed the NPs by removing most of the carbonaceous speSubscript textcies while retaining the χ-Fe 5 C 2 . Fe-carbides NPs submitted to conditions typical to FT synthesis develop a Fe3O4 shell which eventually consumes the NPs up to a point where 3-4 nm residual carbide is left at the center of the particle. Subscript textVarious mechanisms explaining the formation of such a microstructure are discussed. (author)

  14. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  15. Recycling of platinum group metals from the automotive catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benevit, Mariana; Petter, Patricia Melo Halmenschlager; Veit, Hugo Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Currently it is very important to use alternative sources of raw material for obtaining metals, avoiding the traditional mining. This work aims to characterize and evaluate the recoverability of platinum group metals present in automotive catalysts. Thus, the catalysts were divided into two groups: the first was catalysts used in 1.0 cars and the second was catalyst used in 2.0 cars. DRX and FRX techniques and chemical analysis performed by ICP/OES was used to characterized these materials. The results showed that there is a significant amount of platinum group elements in catalyst waste, which can be separated and reused. In the next step, hydro and pyrometallurgical routes, for metals extraction from catalyst waste, will be studied. (author)

  16. Structural changes of noble metal catalysts during ignition and extinction of the partial oxidation of methane studied by advanced QEXAFS techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Beier, M.; Kimmerle, B.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of the ignition and extinction of the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane to hydrogen and carbon monoxide over Pt-Rh/Al2O3 and Pt/Al2O3 were studied in the subsecond timescale using quick-EXAFS with a novel cam-driven X-ray monochromator employing Si(111) and Si(311) crystals...... to discuss the potential and limitation of this technique in catalysis and related areas. With respect to the noble metal catalysed partial oxidation of methane, several interesting observations were made: structural changes during ignition were-independent of the chosen reaction conditions......-significantly faster than during the extinction of the reaction. The dynamic behavior of the catalysts was dependent on the flow conditions and the respective noble metal component(s). Higher reaction gas flow led to a faster ignition process. While the ignition over Pt-Rh/Al2O3 occurred at lower temperature than over...

  17. Density functional study on the heterogeneous oxidation of NO over α-Fe_2O_3 catalyst by H_2O_2: Effect of oxygen vacancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Zijian; Wang, Ben; Yu, Jie; Ma, Chuan; Zhou, Changsong; Chen, Tao; Yan, Qianqian; Wang, Ke; Sun, Lushi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • NO and H_2O_2 adsorption on perfect and oxygen defect α-Fe_2O_3 (0 0 1) surface were studied by DFT calculations. • H_2O_2 shows high chemical reactivity for its adsorption on oxygen defect α-Fe_2O_3 (0 0 1) surface. • Oxygen vacancy plays an important role of the catalytic oxidation of NO by H_2O_2 over the α-Fe_2O_3 catalyst surfaces. • Mechanism of NO oxidation over α-Fe_2O_3 (0 0 1) surface by H_2O_2 was explained. - Abstract: Catalytic oxidation with H_2O_2 is a promising method for NOx emission control in coal-fired power plants. Hematite-based catalysts are attracting increased attention because of their surface redox reactivity. To elucidate the NO oxidation mechanism on α-Fe_2O_3 surfaces, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted by investigating the adsorption characteristics of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H_2O_2) on perfect and oxygen defect α-Fe_2O_3 (0 0 1) surfaces. Results show that NO was molecularly adsorbed on two kinds of surfaces. H_2O_2 adsorption on perfect surface was also in a molecular form; however, H_2O_2 dissociation occurred on oxygen defect α-Fe_2O_3 (0 0 1) surface. The adsorption intensities of the two gas molecules in perfect α-Fe_2O_3 (0 0 1) surface followed the order NO > H_2O_2, and the opposite was true for the oxygen defect α-Fe_2O_3 (0 0 1). Oxygen vacancy remarkably enhanced the adsorption intensities of NO and H_2O_2 and promoted H_2O_2 decomposition on catalyst surface. As an oxidative product of NO, HNO_2 was synthesized when NO and H_2O_2 co-adsorbed on the oxygen defect α-Fe_2O_3 (0 0 1) surface. Analyses of Mulliken population, electron density difference, and partial density of states showed that H_2O_2 decomposition followed the Haber–Weiss mechanism. The trends of equilibrium constants suggested that NO adsorption on α-Fe_2O_3 (0 0 1) surface was more favorable at low than at high temperatures, whereas H_2O_2 adsorption was favorable between 375 and

  18. Characterization of the impregnated iron based catalyst for direct coal liquefaction by EXAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianli; Zhun Jisheng; Liu Zhenyu; Zhong Bing

    2002-01-01

    Catalyst plays an important role in direct coal liquefaction (DCL). Iron catalysts are regarded as the most attractive catalysts for DCL. To maximize catalytic effect and minimize catalysts usage, ultra-fine size catalysts are preferred. The most effective catalysts are found to be those impregnated onto coal because of their high dispersion on coal surface and intimate contact with coal particles. Besides the physical size, chemical form of a catalyst or a catalyst precursor is also important in determination of DCL activity. The expended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy technique were used in this study. It was shown that the catalysts tested are in nanomater range and have structure mainly in the form of γ-FeOOH and FeS, or possibly of Fe/O/S. The presence of γ-FeOOH can be attributed to the interaction between Fe and the oxygen containing groups of coal or oxygen from moisture

  19. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...... one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treating an catalyst for conferring thereon an improved resistance to alkali poisoning....

  20. Kinetic Study of Oxygen Adsorption over Nanosized Au/γ-Al2O3 Supported Catalysts under Selective CO Oxidation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Karaiskakis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available O2 adsorption is a key process for further understanding the mechanism of selective CO oxidation (SCO on gold catalysts. Rate constants related to the elementary steps of O2 adsorption, desorption and surface bonding, as well as the respective activation energies, over a nanosized Au/γ-Al2O3 catalyst, were determined by Reversed-Flow Inverse Gas Chromatography (RF-IGC. The present study, carried-out in a wide temperature range (50–300 °C, both in excess as well as in the absence of H2, resulted in mechanistic insights and kinetic as well as energetic comparisons, on the sorption processes of SCO reactants. In the absence of H2, the rate of O2 binding, over Au/γ-Al2O3, drastically changes with rising temperature, indicating possible O2 dissociation at elevated temperatures. H2 facilitates stronger O2 bonding at higher temperatures, while low temperature binding remains practically unaffected. The lower energy barriers observed, under H2 rich conditions, can be correlated to O2 dissociation after hydrogenation. Although, H2 enhances both selective CO reactant’s desorption, O2 desorption is more favored than that of CO, in agreement with the well-known mild bonding of SCO reactant’s at lower temperatures. The experimentally observed drastic change in the strength of CO and O2 binding is consistent both with well-known high activity of SCO at ambient temperatures, as well as with the loss of selectivity at higher temperatures.

  1. Kinetic Study of Oxygen Adsorption over Nanosized Au/γ-Al2O3 Supported Catalysts under Selective CO Oxidation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Karaiskakis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available O2 adsorption is a key process for further understanding the mechanism of selective CO oxidation (SCO on gold catalysts. Rate constants related to the elementary steps of O2 adsorption, desorption and surface bonding, as well as the respective activation energies, over a nanosized Au/γ-Al2O3 catalyst, were determined by Reversed-Flow Inverse Gas Chromatography (RF-IGC. The present study, carried-out in a wide temperature range (50–300 °C, both in excess as well as in the absence of H2, resulted in mechanistic insights and kinetic as well as energetic comparisons, on the sorption processes of SCO reactants. In the absence of H2, the rate of O2 binding, over Au/γ-Al2O3, drastically changes with rising temperature, indicating possible O2 dissociation at elevated temperatures. H2 facilitates stronger O2 bonding at higher temperatures, while low temperature binding remains practically unaffected. The lower energy barriers observed, under H2 rich conditions, can be correlated to O2 dissociation after hydrogenation. Although, H2 enhances both selective CO reactant’s desorption, O2 desorption is more favored than that of CO, in agreement with the well-known mild bonding of SCO reactant’s at lower temperatures. The experimentally observed drastic change in the strength of CO and O2 binding is consistent both with well-known high activity of SCO at ambient temperatures, as well as with the loss of selectivity at higher temperatures.

  2. In situ XAFS studies of the oxygen reduction reaction on carbon supported platinum and platinum nickel nano-scale alloys as cathode catalysts in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qingying

    Platinum based bimetallic alloys have been investigated by conducting Pt L3 and Ni K edge in situ XAFS measurements on carbon supported Pt and PtNi(1:1) nanoscale catalysts under a wide range of operating potentials. We observed that (1) the Pt-Pt bond distance in PtNi alloys is shorter than that of Pt, and the bond distance between Pt and oxygen adsorbate is longer for PtNi. (2) Pt has a tendency to stay on the surface while Ni is mostly underneath the surface. (3) While a change in oxidation of pure Pt was clearly observed at different potentials, the Pt in the PtNi alloy remained nearly oxygen-free at all potentials, but an accompanying oxidation change of Ni was observed instead. (4) PtNi has higher open circuit voltage than Pt/C. These results indicate that the chemisorption energy between Pt and oxygen adsorbate is reduced in PtNi alloys, which prevents the poison of oxygen adsorbate and hence improves the reactivity. In addition, the strain and ligand effects in PtNi nanoparticle alloys were studied by FEW calculations using experimental data as a guide to understand the factors causing the reduction of chemisorptions energy of Pt. Our calculation indicates that Pt d-band is broader and lower in energy when the bond distance between Pt is shorter, resulting in weaker chemisorption energy between Pt and absorbed oxygen atom on top, and vice verse. Meanwhile, the investigation of ligand effect shows two trends in modifying Pt's properties within alloyed transition metals. The strain effect dominates in PtNi bimetallic system, corresponding to weaker chemisorptions energy and lower white intensity of Pt L3 edge, which is in consistent with our experimental results. The implications of these results afford a good guideline in understanding the reactivity enhancement mechanism and in the context of alloy catalysts design.

  3. Hydroconversion of Waste Cooking Oil into Green Biofuel over Hierarchical USY-Supported NiMo Catalyst: A Comparative Study of Desilication and Dealumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongwei Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The hydroconversion of waste cooking oil into hydrocarbon fuel was investigated over the hierarchical USY zeolite-supported NiMo catalysts which were prepared by dealumination ((NH42SiF6/desilication (NaOH. The physical and acidity properties of the hierarchical catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine (Py-IR, ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD, and H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR. The Brønsted/Lewis (B/L acid distribution was little affected by dealumination and the acid density decreased significantly. However, the highly-desilicated catalysts decreased the B/L ratio obviously. Therefore, many more Mo species in the NiMoO4− and MoO3 phases were produced in the AHFS-treated catalysts, while more high-valence-state Mo species in the NiMoO4− phase were formed in the NaOH-treated catalysts. The AHFS-treated catalysts showed higher catalytic activity and better DCO2 selectivity and selective cracking for jet fuel. The 42.3% selectivity of jet fuel and 13.5% selectivity of jet-range aromatics was achieved over the 8 wt % (NH42SiF6-treated catalyst with 67% DCO2 selectivity.

  4. Study on the influence of nickel and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support on MoS{sub 2} as hydrodenitrogenation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, J.; Hrabar, A.; Gutierrez, O.Y.; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Catalysis Research Center

    2012-07-01

    Alumina-supported Mo and Ni-Mo catalysts as well as an unsupported NiMo catalyst were characterized and tested in the hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline in the presence of dibenzothiophene (DBT). The supported catalysts had a well dispersed MoS{sub 2} phase with an average stacking degree around two and slabs length below 10 nm. The unsupported NiMo sulfide catalyst exhibited long, multistacked MoS{sub 2} slabs and contained segregated Ni{sub x}S{sub y} phases. The formation of the Ni-Mo-S phase in both Ni containing catalysts was verified by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, whereas the concentration of coordinatively unsaturated sites was higher for the supported Mo and Ni-Mo catalysts than for the unsupported one. All catalysts were active in the HDN of quinoline and hydrodesulfurization of DBT. The catalytic activity increased in the order Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} < NiMo/unsupported < Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Thus, the influence on the catalytic activity of the promoter metal Ni is more important than the presence of a support due to the formation of the Ni-Mo-S phase (more active than MoS{sub 2}). (orig.)

  5. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  6. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  7. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  8. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  9. Finding Furfural Hydrogenation Catalysts via Predictive Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberger, Zea; Mooijman, Maurice; Ruijter, Eelco; Alberts, Albert H; Maldonado, Ana G; Orru, Romano V A; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2010-09-10

    We combine multicomponent reactions, catalytic performance studies and predictive modelling to find transfer hydrogenation catalysts. An initial set of 18 ruthenium-carbene complexes were synthesized and screened in the transfer hydrogenation of furfural to furfurol with isopropyl alcohol complexes gave varied yields, from 62% up to >99.9%, with no obvious structure/activity correlations. Control experiments proved that the carbene ligand remains coordinated to the ruthenium centre throughout the reaction. Deuterium-labelling studies showed a secondary isotope effect (k(H):k(D)=1.5). Further mechanistic studies showed that this transfer hydrogenation follows the so-called monohydride pathway. Using these data, we built a predictive model for 13 of the catalysts, based on 2D and 3D molecular descriptors. We tested and validated the model using the remaining five catalysts (cross-validation, R(2)=0.913). Then, with this model, the conversion and selectivity were predicted for four completely new ruthenium-carbene complexes. These four catalysts were then synthesized and tested. The results were within 3% of the model's predictions, demonstrating the validity and value of predictive modelling in catalyst optimization.

  10. Finding Furfural Hydrogenation Catalysts via Predictive Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberger, Zea; Mooijman, Maurice; Ruijter, Eelco; Alberts, Albert H; Maldonado, Ana G; Orru, Romano V A; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We combine multicomponent reactions, catalytic performance studies and predictive modelling to find transfer hydrogenation catalysts. An initial set of 18 ruthenium-carbene complexes were synthesized and screened in the transfer hydrogenation of furfural to furfurol with isopropyl alcohol complexes gave varied yields, from 62% up to >99.9%, with no obvious structure/activity correlations. Control experiments proved that the carbene ligand remains coordinated to the ruthenium centre throughout the reaction. Deuterium-labelling studies showed a secondary isotope effect (kH:kD=1.5). Further mechanistic studies showed that this transfer hydrogenation follows the so-called monohydride pathway. Using these data, we built a predictive model for 13 of the catalysts, based on 2D and 3D molecular descriptors. We tested and validated the model using the remaining five catalysts (cross-validation, R2=0.913). Then, with this model, the conversion and selectivity were predicted for four completely new ruthenium-carbene complexes. These four catalysts were then synthesized and tested. The results were within 3% of the model’s predictions, demonstrating the validity and value of predictive modelling in catalyst optimization. PMID:23193388

  11. Stability of a Bifunctional Cu-Based Core@Zeolite Shell Catalyst for Dimethyl Ether Synthesis Under Redox Conditions Studied by Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy and In Situ X-Ray Ptychography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baier, Sina; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Klumpp, Michael

    2017-01-01

    When using bifunctional core@shell catalysts, the stability of both the shell and core-shell interface is crucial for catalytic applications. In the present study, we elucidate the stability of a CuO/ZnO/Al2O3@ZSM-5 core@shell material, used for one-stage synthesis of dimethyl ether from synthesi...

  12. Effect of the nickel precursor on the impregnation and drying of γ-Al2O3 catalyst bodies: a UV-vis and IR micro-spectroscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espinosa Alonso, L.; de Jong, K.P.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    The elemental preparation steps of impregnation and drying of Ni/g-Al2O3 catalyst bodies have been studied by combining UV-vis and IR microspectroscopy. The influence of the number of chelating ligands in [Ni(en)x(H2O)6-2x]2+ precursor complexes (with en ) ethylenediamine and x ) 0-3) has been

  13. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  14. Co-Assembled Supported Catalysts: Synthesis of Nano-Structured Supported Catalysts with Hierarchic Pores through Combined Flow and Radiation Induced Co-Assembled Nano-Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galip Akay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel generic method of silica supported catalyst system generation from a fluid state is presented. The technique is based on the combined flow and radiation (such as microwave, thermal or UV induced co-assembly of the support and catalyst precursors forming nano-reactors, followed by catalyst precursor decomposition. The transformation from the precursor to supported catalyst oxide state can be controlled from a few seconds to several minutes. The resulting nano-structured micro-porous silica supported catalyst system has a surface area approaching 300 m2/g and X-ray Diffraction (XRD-based catalyst size controlled in the range of 1–10 nm in which the catalyst structure appears as lamellar sheets sandwiched between the catalyst support. These catalyst characteristics are dependent primarily on the processing history as well as the catalyst (Fe, Co and Ni studied when the catalyst/support molar ratio is typically 0.1–2. In addition, Ca, Mn and Cu were used as co-catalysts with Fe and Co in the evaluation of the mechanism of catalyst generation. Based on extensive XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM studies, the micro- and nano-structure of the catalyst system were evaluated. It was found that the catalyst and silica support form extensive 0.6–2 nm thick lamellar sheets of 10–100 nm planar dimensions. In these lamellae, the alternate silica support and catalyst layer appear in the form of a bar-code structure. When these lamellae structures pack, they form the walls of a micro-porous catalyst system which typically has a density of 0.2 g/cm3. A tentative mechanism of catalyst nano-structure formation is provided based on the rheology and fluid mechanics of the catalyst/support precursor fluid as well as co-assembly nano-reactor formation during processing. In order to achieve these structures and characteristics, catalyst support must be in the form of silane coated silica nano

  15. Preparation of Monodispersed Fe-Mo Nanoparticles as the Catalyst for CVD Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Yongqian; Wang, Zhong L

    2001-01-01

    ...particles were systematically studied. The prepared nanoparticles were used as catalysts for single-walled carbon nanotube growth and the results indicate that there is an upper limit for the size of the catalyst particles to nucleate singlewalled carbon nanotubes.

  16. Catalysts for synthetic liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, L.A.; Turney, T.W.

    1987-12-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysts have been designed, characterized and tested for the selective production of hydrocarbons suitable as synthetic liquid transport fuels from synthesis gas (i.e., by the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen). It was found that hydrocarbons in the middle distillate range, or suitable for conversion to that range, could be produced over several of the new catalyst systems. The various catalysts examined included: (1) synthetic cobalt clays, mainly cobalt chlorites; (2) cobalt hydrotalcites; (3) ruthenium metal supported on rare earth oxides of high surface area; and (4) a novel promoted cobalt catalyst. Active and selective catalysts have been obtained, in each category. With the exception of the clays, reproducibility of catalyst performance has been good. Catalysts in groups 2 and 4 have exhibited very high activity, with long lifetimes and easy regeneration.

  17. Study of Catalysts and Electrocatalysts for NO{sub x} Removal in Combustion Gases ELECTRONOX Project Final Report; Estudio de Catalizadores y Electrocatalizadores para la Eliminacion de NO{sub x} en Gases de Combustion. Informe Final Proyecto ELECTRONOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Martinez, E; Marono Bujan, M; Sanchez-Hervas, J M

    2009-12-11

    The final aim of the ELECTRONOX project was to develop new methodologies and technologies for NO{sub x} removal. To fulfil this objective, studies of selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with hydrocarbons, both conventional and with electrochemical promotion, have been undertaken at pilot plant level, using appropriate catalyst/electrocatalysts configurations and in conditions similar to those required in their possible practical application. None of the catalysts/electrocatalysts studied is active and stable enough, under realistic conditions, to consider its possible industrial application, because the value of NO{sub x} conversion achieved by selective catalytic reduction with hydrocarbons, both conventional and with electrochemical promotion, decreases in presence of the different inhibitors and poisons present in the combustion gas, while the promotional effect on the catalytic activity and selectivity is more pronounced. In addition, the catalysts/electrocatalysts suffer from different deactivation processes, such as: sulphur poisoning, carbon deposition and sintering. However, the developed electrochemical catalyst looks promising for NO{sub x} removal in combustion gases, because it can be promoted under realistic operating conditions. (Author) 23 refs.

  18. Computational Study of the Effect of Confinement within Microporous Structures on the Activity and Selectivity of Metallocene Catalysts for Ethylene Oligomerization

    KAUST Repository

    Toulhoat, Hervé; Lontsi Fomena, Mireille; de Bruin, Theodorus

    2011-01-01

    The effect of confinement within some zeolitic structures on the activity and selectivity of metallocene catalysts for the ethylene oligomerization has been investigated using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations (GCMC). The following zeolite

  19. Vibration measurements of automobile catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatola, Seppo

    1994-09-01

    Vibration of catalyst cell, which is inside the casing of the catalyst, is difficult to measure with usual measuring instrumentation. When catalyst is in use, there is hot exhaust gas flow though the catalyst cell and temperature of the cell is approximately +900 degree(s)C. Therefore non-contact Laser- Doppler-Vibrometer was used to measure vibration velocity of the catalyst cell. The laser beam was directed towards the cell through pipe which was put through and welded to the casing of the catalyst. The outer end of the pipe was screw down with a tempered class to prevent exhaust gas flow from the pipe. The inner end of the pipe was open and few millimeters away from the measuring point. Catalyst was attached to the engine with two ways, rigidly close to the engine and flexible under the engine. The engine was running in test bench under controlled conditions. Vibration measurements were carried out during constant running speeds of the engine. Vibration signals were captured and analyzed with FFT-analyzer. Vibration of catalyst cell was strongest at running speed of 5000 rpm, from 10 to 20 g (1 g equals 9.81 ms-2), when catalyst was attached rigidly close to the engine. At running speed of 3000 rpm, vibration of catalyst cell was from 2 to 3 g in most cases, when catalyst was attached either rigidly or flexible to the engine. It is estimated that in real life, i.e. when catalyst is attached to car with same engine, vibration of catalyst cell at running speed of 5000 rpm is somewhere between 1 and 10 g. At running speed of 3000 rpm, which may be more often used when driving car (car speed approximately 100 kmh-1), vibration of catalyst cell is probably few g's.

  20. Thermal decomposition of supported lithium nitrate catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Maria Lucia [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Lick, Ileana Daniela [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ponzi, Marta Isabel [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Castellon, Enrique Rodriguez; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Ponzi, Esther Natalia, E-mail: eponzi@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-02-20

    New catalysts for soot combustion were prepared by impregnation of different supports (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) with a LiNO{sub 3} solution and then characterized by means of FTIR, XPS, TGA and UV-vis spectroscopy, whereby the presence of lithium nitrate in the prepared catalysts was identified and quantified. The soot combustion rate using this series of catalysts (LiNO{sub 3}/support) was compared with the activity of a series of impregnated catalysts prepared using LiOH (Li{sub 2}O/supports). Catalysts prepared using LiNO{sub 3} are found to be more active than those prepared using LiOH. The catalytic performance was also studied with a NO/O{sub 2} mixture in the feed, demonstrating that NO increases the combustion rate of soot, probably as a consequence of lithium oxide forming an 'in situ' nitrate ion.