WorldWideScience

Sample records for tetrahymena tropicalis triggers

  1. Arctocephalus tropicalis in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The breeding sites of A. tropicalis are situated on tempe- rate islands north of the Antartic Convergence. The main colonies are Gough Island (the largest colony), Amsterdam,. Marion and Prince Edward Islands. In addition, it breeds on. Tristan da Cunha and St Paul and Crozet Islands, (Bester. 1980, 1984; Kerley 1983, ...

  2. Tetrahymena in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua J; Wiley, Emily A; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    Tetrahymena has been a useful model in basic research in part due to the fact it is easy to grow in culture and exhibits a range of complex processes, all within a single cell. For these same reasons Tetrahymena has shown enormous potential as a teaching tool for fundamental principles of biology at multiple science education levels that can be integrated into K-12 classrooms and undergraduate and graduate college laboratory courses. These Tetrahymena-based teaching modules are inquiry-based experiences that are also effective at teaching scientific concepts, retaining students in science, and exciting students about the scientific process. Two learning communities have been developed that utilize Tetrahymena-based teaching modules. Advancing Secondary Science Education with Tetrahymena (ASSET) and the Ciliate Genomics Consortium (CGC) have developed modules for K-12 students and college-level curriculums, respectively. These modules range from addressing topics in ecology, taxonomy, and environmental toxicity to more advanced concepts in biochemistry, proteomics, bioinformatics, cell biology, and molecular biology. An overview of the current modules and their learning outcomes are discussed, as are assessment, dissemination, and sustainability strategies for K-12 and college-level curriculum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The hardware of the trigger components has been mostly finished. The ECAL Endcap Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC) are in production while Barrel TCC firmware has been upgraded, and the Trigger Primitives can now be stored by the Data Concentrator Card for readout by the DAQ. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) system is complete, and the timing is being finalized. All 502 HCAL trigger links to RCT run without error. The HCAL muon trigger timing has been equalized with DT, RPC, CSC and ECAL. The hardware and firmware for the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) jet triggers are being commissioned and data from these triggers is available for readout. The GCT energy sums from rings of trigger towers around the beam pipe beam have been changed to include two rings from both sides. The firmware for Drift Tube Track Finder, Barrel Sorter and Wedge Sorter has been upgraded, and the synchronization of the DT trigger is satisfactory. The CSC local trigger has operated flawlessly u...

  4. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberta Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Studies Group (TSG) The Trigger Studies Group has just concluded its third 2013 workshop, where all POGs presented the improvements to the physics object reconstruction, and all PAGs have shown their plans for Trigger development aimed at the 2015 High Level Trigger (HLT) menu. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger menu development, path timing, Trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – this last task in collaboration with PdmV (Physics Data and Monte Carlo Validation group). In the last months the group has delivered several HLT rate estimates and comparisons, using the available data and Monte Carlo samples. The studies were presented at the Trigger workshops in September and December, and STEAM has contacted POGs and PAGs to understand the origin of the discrepancies observed between 8 TeV data and Monte Carlo simulations. The most recent results show what the...

  5. Triggers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breitbarth, A.; van Riemsdijk, H.C.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of 'trigger' is a core concept of Chomsky's Minimalist Program. The idea that certain types of movement are triggered by some property of the target position is at least as old as the notion that the movement of noun phrases to the subject position is triggered by their need to receive

  6. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger synchronization procedures for running with cosmic muons and operating with the LHC were reviewed during the May electronics week. Firmware maintenance issues were also reviewed. Link tests between the new ECAL endcap trigger concentrator cards (TCC48) and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger have been performed. Firmware for the energy sum triggers and an upgraded tau trigger of the Global Calorimeter Triggers has been developed and is under test. The optical fiber receiver boards for the Track-Finder trigger theta links of the DT chambers are now all installed. The RPC trigger is being made more robust by additional chamber and cable shielding and also by firmware upgrades. For the CSC’s the front-end and trigger motherboard firmware have been updated. New RPC patterns and DT/CSC lookup tables taking into account phi asymmetries in the magnetic field configuration are under study. The motherboard for the new pipeline synchronizer of the Global Trigg...

  7. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2012-01-01

      Level-1 Trigger The Level-1 Trigger group is ready to deploy improvements to the L1 Trigger algorithms for 2012. These include new high-PT patterns for the RPC endcap, an improved CSC PT assignment, a new PT-matching algorithm for the Global Muon Trigger, and new calibrations for ECAL, HCAL, and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger. These should improve the efficiency, rate, and stability of the L1 Trigger. The L1 Trigger group also is migrating the online systems to SLC5. To make the data transfer from the Global Calorimeter Trigger to the Global Trigger more reliable and also to allow checking the data integrity online, a new optical link system has been developed by the GCT and GT groups and successfully tested at the CMS electronics integration facility in building 904. This new system is now undergoing further tests at Point 5 before being deployed for data-taking this year. New L1 trigger menus have recently been studied and proposed by Emmanuelle Perez and the L1 Detector Performance Group...

  8. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the March meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, the program of trigger pattern tests and vertical slice tests and planning for the Global Runs starting this summer. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and integration testing is in full swing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. After full checkout, trigger subsystems will be then operated in the CMS Global Runs. Continuous...

  9. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The production of the trigger hardware is now basically finished, and in time for the turn-on of the LHC. The last boards produced are the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcaps (TCC-EE). After the recent installation of the four EE Dees, the TCC-EE prototypes were used for their commissioning. Production boards are arriving and are being tested continuously, with the last ones expected in November. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger hardware is fully integrated after installation of the last EE cables. Pattern tests from the HCAL up to the GCT have been performed successfully. The HCAL triggers are fully operational, including the connection of the HCAL-outer and forward-HCAL (HO/HF) technical triggers to the Global Trigger. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) board firmware has been updated to permit recording of the tower “feature bit” in the data. The Global Calorimeter Trigger hardware is installed, but some firmware developments are still n...

  10. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The overall status of the L1 trigger has been excellent and the running efficiency has been high during physics fills. The timing is good to about 1%. The fine-tuning of the time synchronization of muon triggers is ongoing and will be completed after more than 10 nb-1 of data have been recorded. The CSC trigger primitive and RPC trigger timing have been refined. A new configuration for the CSC Track Finder featured modified beam halo cuts and improved ghost cancellation logic. More direct control was provided for the DT opto-receivers. New RPC Cosmic Trigger (RBC/TTU) trigger algorithms were enabled for collision runs. There is further work planned during the next technical stop to investigate a few of the links from the ECAL to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT). New firmware and a new configuration to handle trigger rate spikes in the ECAL barrel are also being tested. A board newly developed by the tracker group (ReTRI) has been installed and activated to block re...

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The Level-1 Trigger hardware has performed well during both the recent proton-proton and heavy ion running. Efforts were made to improve the visibility and handling of alarms and warnings. The tracker ReTRI boards that prevent fixed frequencies of Level-1 Triggers are now configured through the Trigger Supervisor. The Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) team has introduced a buffer cleanup procedure at stops and a reset of the QPLL during configuring to ensure recalibration in case of a switch from the LHC clock to the local clock. A device to test the cables between the Regional Calorimeter Trigger and the GCT has been manufactured. A wrong charge bit was fixed in the CSC Trigger. The ECAL group is improving crystal masking and spike suppression in the trigger primitives. New firmware for the Drift Tube Track Finder (DTTF) sorters was developed to improve fake track tagging and sorting. Zero suppression was implemented in the DT Sector Collector readout. The track finder b...

  12. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Trigger Hardware The status of the trigger components was presented during the September CMS Week and Annual Review and at the monthly trigger meetings in October and November. Procedures for cold and warm starts (e.g. refreshing of trigger parameters stored in registers) of the trigger subsystems have been studied. Reviews of parts of the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) and the Global Trigger (GT) have taken place in October and November. The CERN group summarized the status of the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) system. All TTC crates and boards are installed in the underground counting room, USC55. The central clock system will be upgraded in December (after the Global Run at the end of November GREN) to the new RF2TTC LHC machine interface timing module. Migration of subsystem's TTC PCs to SLC4/ XDAQ 3.12 is being prepared. Work is on going to unify the access to Local Timing Control (LTC) and TTC CMS interface module (TTCci) via SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol, a lightweight XML-based messaging ...

  13. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Since nearly all of the Level-1 (L1) Trigger hardware at Point 5 has been commissioned, activities during the past months focused on the fine-tuning of synchronization, particularly for the ECAL and the CSC systems, on firmware upgrades and on improving trigger operation and monitoring. Periodic resynchronizations or hard resets and a shortened luminosity section interval of 23 seconds were implemented. For the DT sector collectors, an automatic power-off was installed in case of high temperatures, and the monitoring capabilities of the opto-receivers and the mini-crates were enhanced. The DTTF and the CSCTF now have improved memory lookup tables. The HCAL trigger primitive logic implemented a new algorithm providing better stability of the energy measurement in the presence of any phase misalignment. For the Global Calorimeter Trigger, additional Source Cards have been manufactured and tested. Testing of the new tau, missing ET and missing HT algorithms is underw...

  14. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The final parts of the Level-1 trigger hardware are now being put in place. For the ECAL endcaps, more than half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are now available at CERN, such that one complete endcap can be covered. The Global Trigger now correctly handles ECAL calibration sequences, without being influenced by backpressure. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) hardware is complete and working in USC55. Intra-crate tests of all 18 RCT crates and the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) are regularly taking place. Pattern tests have successfully captured data from HCAL through RCT to the GCT Source Cards. HB/HE trigger data are being compared with emulator results to track down the very few remaining hardware problems. The treatment of hot and dead cells, including their recording in the database, has been defined. For the GCT, excellent agreement between the emulator and data has been achieved for jets and HF ET sums. There is still som...

  15. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger system has been constantly in use in cosmic and commissioning data taking periods. During CRAFT running it delivered 300 million muon and calorimeter triggers to CMS. It has performed stably and reliably. During the abort gaps it has also provided laser and other calibration triggers. Timing issues, namely synchronization and latency issues, have been solved. About half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are installed, and the firmware is being worked on. The production of the other half has started. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) card firmware has been updated, and new features such as fast parallel zero-suppression have been included. Repairs of drift tube (DT) trigger mini-crates, optical links and receivers of sector collectors are under way and have been completed on YB0. New firmware for the optical receivers of the theta links to the drift tube track finder is being installed. In parallel, tests with new eta track finde...

  16. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Carlin with contributions from D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Data-taking continues at cruising speed, with high availability of all components of the Level-1 trigger. We have operated the trigger up to a luminosity of 7.6E33, where we approached 100 kHz using the 7E33 prescale column.  Recently, the pause without triggers in case of an automatic "RESYNC" signal (the "settle" and "recover" time) was reduced in order to minimise the overall dead-time. This may become very important when the LHC comes back with higher energy and luminosity after LS1. We are also preparing for data-taking in the proton-lead run in early 2013. The CASTOR detector will make its comeback into CMS and triggering capabilities are being prepared for this. Steps to be taken include improved cooperation with the TOTEM trigger system and using the LHC clock during the injection and ramp phases of LHC. Studies are being finalised that will have a bearing on the Trigger Technical Design Report (TDR), which is to be rea...

  17. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the December meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, and results from the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) phase II. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and moving towards integration testing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. This is combined with operations and testing without beam that will continue until startup. The plans for start-up, pilot and early running tri...

  18. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software New Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) for rapidity gap measurements have been installed and integrated into the Trigger recently. For the Global Muon Trigger, tuning of quality criteria has led to improvements in muon trigger efficiencies. Several subsystems have started campaigns to increase spares by recovering boards or producing new ones. The barrel muon sector collector test system has been reactivated, new η track finder boards are in production, and φ track finder boards are under revision. In the CSC track finder, an η asymmetry problem has been corrected. New pT look-up tables have also improved efficiency. RPC patterns were changed from four out of six coincident layers to three out of six in the barrel, which led to a significant increase in efficiency. A new PAC firmware to trigger on heavy stable charged particles allows looking for chamber hit coincidences in two consecutive bunch-crossings. The redesign of the L1 Trigger Emulator...

  19. TRIGGER

    CERN Document Server

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos, I. Mikulec, J. Varela and C. Wulz.

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Over the past few months, the Level-1 trigger has successfully recorded data with cosmic rays over long continuous stretches as well as LHC splash events, beam halo, and collision events. The L1 trigger hardware, firmware, synchronization, performance and readiness for beam operation were reviewed in October. All L1 trigger hardware is now installed at Point 5, and most of it is completely commissioned. While the barrel ECAL Trigger Concentrator Cards are fully operational, the recently delivered endcap ECAL TCC system is still being commissioned. For most systems there is a sufficient number of spares available, but for a few systems additional reserve modules are needed. It was decided to increase the overall L1 latency by three bunch crossings to increase the safety margin for trigger timing adjustments. In order for CMS to continue data taking during LHC frequency ramps, the clock distribution tree needs to be reset. The procedures for this have been tested. A repl...

  20. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The road map for the final commissioning of the level-1 trigger system has been set. The software for the trigger subsystems is being upgraded to run under CERN Scientific Linux 4 (SLC4). There is also a new release for the Trigger Supervisor (TS 1.4), which implies upgrade work by the subsystems. As reported by the CERN group, a campaign to tidy the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) racks has begun. The machine interface was upgraded by installing the new RF2TTC module, which receives RF signals from LHC Point 4. Two Beam Synchronous Timing (BST) signals, one for each beam, can now be received in CMS. The machine group will define the exact format of the information content shortly. The margin on the locking range of the CMS QPLL is planned for study for different subsystems in the next Global Runs, using a function generator. The TTC software has been successfully tested on SLC4. Some TTC subsystems have already been upgraded to SLC4. The TTCci Trigger Supervisor ...

  1. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith, from contributions of D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

      The L1 Trigger group deployed several major improvements this year. Compared to 2011, the single-muon trigger rate has been reduced by a factor of 2 and the η coverage has been restored to 2.4, with high efficiency. During the current technical stop, a higher jet seed threshold will be applied in the Global Calorimeter Trigger in order to significantly reduce the strong pile-up dependence of the HT and multi-jet triggers. The currently deployed L1 menu, with the “6E33” prescales, has a total rate of less than 100 kHz and operates with detector readout dead time of less than 3% for luminosities up to 6.5 × 1033 cm–2s–1. Further prescale sets have been created for 7 and 8 × 1033 cm–2s–1 luminosities. The L1 DPG is evaluating the performance of the Trigger for upcoming conferences and publication. Progress on the Trigger upgrade was reviewed during the May Upgrade Week. We are investigating scenarios for stagin...

  2. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

      In 2013 the Trigger Studies Group (TSG) has been restructured in three sub-groups: STEAM, for the development of new HLT menus and monitoring their performance; STORM, for the development of HLT tools, code and actual configurations; and FOG, responsible for the online operations of the High Level Trigger. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger Menu development, path timing, trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Since the end of proton-proton data taking, the group has started preparing for 2015 data taking, with collisions at 13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing. The reliability of the extrapolation to higher energy is being evaluated comparing the trigger rates on 7 and 8 TeV Monte Carlo samples with the data taken in the past two years. The effect of 25 ns bunch spacing is being studied on the d...

  3. Targeted integration of genes in Xenopus tropicalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Zhaoying; Tian, Dandan; Xin, Huhu

    2017-01-01

    With the successful establishment of both targeted gene disruption and integration methods in the true diploid frog Xenopus tropicalis, this excellent vertebrate genetic model now is making a unique contribution to modelling human diseases. Here, we summarize our efforts on establishing homologous...... recombination-mediated targeted integration in Xenopus tropicalis, the usefulness, and limitation of targeted integration via the homology-independent strategy, and future directions on how to further improve targeted gene integration in Xenopus tropicalis....

  4. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Overall the L1 trigger hardware has been running very smoothly during the last months of proton running. Modifications for the heavy-ion run have been made where necessary. The maximal design rate of 100 kHz can be sustained without problems. All L1 latencies have been rechecked. The recently installed Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) are being used in the heavy ion run. The ZDC scintillators have been dismantled, but the calorimeter itself remains. We now send the L1 accept signal and other control signals to TOTEM. Trigger cables from TOTEM to CMS will be installed during the Christmas shutdown, so that the TOTEM data can be fully integrated within the CMS readout. New beam gas triggers have been developed, since the BSC-based trigger is no longer usable at high luminosities. In particular, a special BPTX signal is used after a quiet period with no collisions. There is an ongoing campaign to provide enough spare modules for the different subsystems. For example...

  5. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Alimena

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Strategy Group The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for the development of future High-Level Trigger menus, as well as of its DQM and validation, in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Taking into account the beam energy and luminosity expected in 2015, a rough estimate of the trigger rates indicates a factor four increase with respect to 2012 conditions. Assuming that a factor two can be tolerated thanks to the increase in offline storage and processing capabilities, a toy menu has been developed using the new OpenHLT workflow to estimate the transverse energy/momentum thresholds that would halve the current trigger rates. The CPU time needed to run the HLT has been compared between data taken with 25 ns and 50 ns bunch spacing, for equivalent pile-up: no significant difference was observed on the global time per event distribution at the only available data point, corresponding to a pile-up of about 10 interactions. Using th...

  6. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software After the winter shutdown minor hardware problems in several subsystems appeared and were corrected. A reassessment of the overall latency has been made. In the TTC system shorter cables between TTCci and TTCex have been installed, which saved one bunch crossing, but which may have required an adjustment of the RPC timing. In order to tackle Pixel out-of-syncs without influencing other subsystems, a special hardware/firmware re-sync protocol has been introduced in the Global Trigger. The link between the Global Calorimeter Trigger and the Global Trigger with the new optical Global Trigger Interface and optical receiver daughterboards has been successfully tested in the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. New firmware in the GCT now allows a setting to remove the HF towers from energy sums. The HF sleeves have been replaced, which should lead to reduced rates of anomalous signals, which may allow their inclusion after this is validated. For ECAL, improvements i...

  7. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware The CERN group is working on the TTC system. Seven out of nine sub-detector TTC VME crates with all fibers cabled are installed in USC55. 17 Local Trigger Controller (LTC) boards have been received from production and are in the process of being tested. The RF2TTC module replacing the TTCmi machine interface has been delivered and will replace the TTCci module used to mimic the LHC clock. 11 out of 12 crates housing the barrel ECAL off-detector electronics have been installed in USC55 after commissioning at the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. The cabling to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) is terminated. The Lisbon group has completed the Synchronization and Link mezzanine board (SLB) production. The Palaiseau group has fully tested and installed 33 out of 40 Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC). The seven remaining boards are being remade. The barrel TCC boards have been tested at the H4 test beam, and good agreement with emulator predictions were found. The cons...

  8. LYSOSOMAL PHYSIOLOGY IN TETRAHYMENA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Thomas L.; Blum, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The ingestion of 14C-labeled 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene particles, the extracellular release of acid phosphatase, ribonuclease, and α-glucosidase, and the egestion of preingested dimethylbenzanthracene particles by Tetrahymena taken from logarithmically growing cultures and resuspended in a dilute salt solution were followed in the presence of several pharmacologic agents. Serotonin, caffeine, and, to a lesser extent, dibutyryl cyclic AMP increased the rate of particle ingestion, but did not alter the rate of release of the three acid hydrolases studied. Added catecholamines did not affect either particle ingestion or acid hydrolase release, but particle ingestion was inhibited by the catecholamine antagonists, dichloroisoproterenol, desmethylimipramine, reserpine, and phenoxybenzamine. These drugs also increased the release of acid phosphatase and ribonuclease in 5-h incubations. Desmethylimipramine acted within 1 h to increase acid hydrolase release, but the effect of dichloroisoproterenol developed more slowly and was secondary to a change in cellular content of the hydrolases. Desmethylimipramine increased the energy of activation for the release of acid phosphatase, while dichloroisoproterenol did not. Both of these drugs enhanced the egestion of preingested dimethylbenzanthracene particles, supporting the view that acid hydrolase release occurs through a cytoproct egestion mechanism. Particle ingestion was also inhibited by colchicine, vinblastine, and cytochalasin B, but these agents had no effect on acid hydrolase release, thus further differentiating the properties of the ingestion mechanism from those of the egestion mechanism. It appears that both microtubules and microfilaments play a role in the ingestion process and that this process may be controlled in part by a cyclic AMP-mediated serotoninergic and adrenergic system. PMID:4152946

  9. Metabolism of extracellular phospholipids in Tetrahymena pyriformis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arai, H; Nishikawa, K; Inoue, K; Nozawa, Y; Nojima, S

    1987-01-01

    ...: Cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of endocytosis, suppressed the metabolism almost completely. Phospholipid vesicles were incorporated into a phagosome-like structure in Tetrahymena cells, as observed under an electron microscope...

  10. Metabolism of extracellular phospholipids in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, H; Nishikawa, K; Inoue, K; Nozawa, Y; Nojima, S

    1987-05-01

    We studied the metabolism of phospholipids exogenously added to cultures of the protozoan, Tetrahymena pyriformis. Tetrahymena cells were found to metabolize the extracellular phospholipids and the fatty acyl chains of the latter were accumulated predominantly as a form of triacylglycerol in the cells. This metabolism was considered to be initiated via endocytosis of phospholipid vesicles, as judged from the following facts: Cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of endocytosis, suppressed the metabolism almost completely. Phospholipid vesicles were incorporated into a phagosome-like structure in Tetrahymena cells, as observed under an electron microscope. When phospholipids doubly labeled with 14C and 3H at the glycerol moiety and fatty acyl chain, respectively, were incubated with Tetrahymena cells, the glycerol moiety and fatty acyl chain at the sn-2-position of the exogenous phospholipids were incorporated into the cellular triacylglycerol fraction in a 1 to 1 ratio. Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase activity was detected in the microsomal fraction of Tetrahymena cells. From these results, together with those of our previous study on lysosomal phospholipid hydrolysis in Tetrahymena (J. Biochem. 99, 125-133 (1986)), it is suggested that the extracellular phospholipids which were taken up by the cells via endocytosis were hydrolyzed through the action of lysosomal phospholipases A1 and C, and also that one of the products, sn-2-monoacylglycerol, served as an acyl acceptor for the synthesis of triacylglycerol via the microsomal "monoacylglycerol pathway."

  11. Bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaldau, Niels Christian; Brorson, Stig; Jensen, Poul Einar

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei, and review the literature on Candida osteomyelitis.......We present a case of bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei, and review the literature on Candida osteomyelitis....

  12. Comparison of TALEN scaffolds in Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nakajima

    2013-11-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs are facile and potent tools used to modify a gene of interest for targeted gene knockout. TALENs consist of an N-terminal domain, a DNA-binding domain, and a C-terminal domain, which are derived from a transcription activator-like effector, and the non-specific nuclease domain of FokI. Using Xenopus tropicalis (X. tropicalis, we compared the toxicities and somatic mutation activities of four TALEN architectures in a side-by-side manner: a basic TALEN, a scaffold with the same truncated N- and C-terminal domains as GoldyTALEN, a scaffold with the truncated N- and C-terminal domains and an obligate heterodimeric nuclease domain, and a scaffold with the truncated N- and C-terminal domains and an obligate heterodimeric Sharkey nuclease domain. The strongest phenotype and targeted somatic gene mutation were induced by the injection of TALEN mRNAs containing the truncated N- and C-terminal domains and an obligate heterodimeric nuclease domain. The obligate heterodimeric TALENs exhibited reduced toxicity compared to the homodimeric TALENs, and the homodimeric GoldyTALEN-type scaffold showed both a high activity of somatic gene modification and high toxicity. The Sharkey mutation in the heterodimeric nuclease domain reduced the TALEN-mediated somatic mutagenesis.

  13. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E.; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-01-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies.

  14. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-09-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sexual Biofilm Formation in Candida tropicalis Opaque Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen K.; Hirakawa, Matthew P.; Bennett, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are opportunistic fungal pathogens that can transition between white and opaque phenotypic states. White and opaque cells differ both morphologically and in their responses to environmental signals. In C. albicans, opaque cells respond to sexual pheromones by undergoing conjugation, while white cells are induced by pheromones to form sexual biofilms. Here, we show that sexual biofilm formation also occurs in C. tropicalis but, unlike C. albicans, biofilms are formed exclusively by opaque cells. C. tropicalis biofilm formation was dependent on the pheromone receptors Ste2 and Ste3, confirming the role of pheromone signaling in sexual biofilm development. Structural analysis of C. tropicalis sexual biofilms revealed stratified communities consisting of a basal layer of yeast cells and an upper layer of filamentous cells, together with an extracellular matrix. Transcriptional profiling showed that genes involved in pheromone signaling and conjugation were upregulated in sexual biofilms. Furthermore, FGR23, which encodes an agglutinin-like protein, was found to enhance both mating and sexual biofilm formation. Together, these studies reveal that C. tropicalis opaque cells form sexual biofilms with a complex architecture, and suggest a conserved role for sexual agglutinins in mediating mating, cell cohesion and biofilm formation. PMID:24612417

  16. [Blomia tropicalis: A house dust mite in the tropics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilleminault, L; Viala-Gastan, C

    2017-10-01

    Blomia tropicalis is a mite that belongs to the superfamily of Glycyphagidae. Initially described as a storage mite, it is now considered as a house dust mite of tropical and sub-tropical areas. Sensitization to this mite is very common in South America and Southeast Asia. Epidemiological studies have also found sensitization to this mite in Africa and Central America. Blo t 5 is the major allergen of B. tropicalis. Co-sensitization to other house dust mites such as Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f) is very common. Cross-reactivity has been described but recombinant allergens revealed by molecular biology techniques do not explain this cross-reactivity. Sensitization to B. tropicalis seems to begin at the age of 36 months, the incidence increases until adulthood, and decreases from the age of 50. The involvement of B. tropicalis in allergic rhinitis and asthma is well described. It is also implicated in other allergic diseases. Few studies have assessed the therapeutic strategies available against this mite but immunotherapy is widely used. Studies are needed to better understand the role of B. tropicalis in human diseases and to develop specific treatments. Copyright © 2017 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Citrate synthase purified from Tetrahymena mitochondria is identical with Tetrahymena 14-nm filament protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, H; Chiba, J; Watanabe, Y; Numata, O

    1995-07-01

    A 14-nm filament protein (designated as 49K protein) was purified from a ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena, using the polymerization and depolymerization procedure. Previous studies in our laboratory showed that its primary structure shared a high sequence identity with citrate synthases known so far and that the 49K protein possessed citrate synthase activity. To ascertain whether or not Tetrahymena's mitochondrial citrate synthase is identical to the 49K protein, citrate synthase was purified from Tetrahymena mitochondria using ammonium sulfate fractionation, Butyl-Toyopearl and SP-Toyopearl column chromatographies, based on monitoring of the enzymatic activity. The molecular weight of the purified citrate synthase was estimated to be 49 kDa, as was that of the 49K protein and the enzyme cross-reacted with an anti-49K protein antiserum. The purified citrate synthase showed much the same optimum pH, optimum KCl concentration, effects of substrate concentrations (acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate), and inhibitory effect by ATP as those of purified 49K protein. Furthermore, an anti-49K protein monoclonal antibody strongly suppressed the enzymatic activity of the purified citrate synthase. Thus, we suggest that mitochondrial citrate synthase and the 49K protein are identical and that the 49K protein has dual functions in the cytoskeleton in cytoplasm and as a TCA cycle enzyme, citrate synthase, in mitochondria.

  18. On the taxonomic status of Delphinus tropicalis van Bree, 1971 (Notes on Cetacea, Delphinoidea IX)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bree, van P.J.H.; Gallagher, M.D.

    1978-01-01

    Three recently found skulls of Delphinus tropicalis are discussed and compared with other skulls of the same taxon. The occurrence of Delphinus delphis in the same area as Delphinus tropicalis makes it plausible that D. tropicalis is a distinct species and not a subspecies of D. delphis. A dolphin

  19. Parameters oprimization for xylitol production by Candida tropicalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ashraf

    2011-11-02

    Nov 2, 2011 ... Nutritional and environmental conditions of the xylose utilizing yeast Candida tropicalis were optimized on a shake-flask scale using a statistical factorial design to maximize the production of xylitol. Effects of the three growth medium components (rice bran, ammonium sulfate and xylose) on the xylitol.

  20. Helminth parasites of Silurana tropicalis from the Okomu National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Silurana tropicalis, the edible clawed-frog, collected from the Okomu National Park, Edo State, Nigeria, was examined for helminth parasitic infections. From 142 specimens collected, ten endo-helminth parasites spread across four classes were recovered. These included Cestoda: Cephalochlamys compactus and the cyst ...

  1. Endoparasites of the subantarctic fur seal Arctocephalus tropicalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-03-03

    Mar 3, 1989 ... A. tropicalis is a new host record for the tetraphyllidean cestode ... of the subantarctic fur seal population of Gough Island. Necropsies were .... Seals of the world. British Mus. (Nat. Hist.) London. PAULIAN, P. 1964. Contribution a I'etude de I'otarie de l'ile Amsterdam. Mammalia 28: 1-146. SHAUGHNESSY ...

  2. Biochemical and molecular characterisation of Tetrahymena thermophila extracellular cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiedtke Arno

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decades molecular biologic techniques have been developed to alter the genome and proteome of Tetrahymena thermophila thereby providing the basis for recombinant protein expression including functional human enzymes. The biotechnological potential of Tetrahymena has been proved in numerous publications, demonstrating fast growth, high biomass, fermentation in ordinary bacterial/yeast equipment, up-scalability, existence of cheap and chemical defined media. For these reasons Tetrahymena offers promising opportunities for the development of a high expression system. Yet optimised high yield strains with protease deficiency such as commonly used in yeast and bacterial systems are not available. Results This work presents the molecular identification of predominant proteases secreted into the medium by Tetrahymena thermophila. A one-step purification of the proteolytic enzymes is described. Conclusion The information provided will allow silencing of protease activity by either knock out methods or by Tetrahymena specific antisense-ribosome-techniques. This will facilitate the next step in the advancement of this exciting organism for recombinant protein production.

  3. Targeting of liposomes containing methotrexate towards Tetrahymena pyriformis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsifaki, H; Kapoulas, V; Deliconstantinos, G

    1985-01-01

    The uptake of liposomes containing methotrexate by Tetrahymena pyriformis cells was investigated with the aim of producing liposome-cell association enabling methotrexate to be introduced into the cytoplasm of intact cells. Incubation of liposomes containing methotrexate with tetrahymena pyriformis cells resulted in a time and concentration-dependent uptake of entrapped methotrexate by the cells. The uptake by Tetrahymena pyriformis cells (at 1 hr) of liposomes prepared by phospholipids and gangliosides extracted from Tetrahymena pyriformis cells was approximately three fold higher than that of liposomes prepared by commercial phospholipids. Approximately 90% of liposome uptake could be inhibited by cytochalasin B and also by NaN3 and 2-deoxyglucose. This was consistent with the uptake being the result of endocytosis. The remaining uptake was probably the result of adhesion of liposomes to the cell membrane. The rate of efflux vs time of methotrexate entrapped in liposomes was much slower than that of free methotrexate which reinforces the concept that endocytosis is the main mode of liposomes uptake by the cells. Liposomes containing methotrexate at concentrations as low as 4.5 microM effectively inhibited the activity of dihydrofolate reductase which was used as a function parameter in this study. Similar inhibition of the enzyme activity by free methotrexate was achieved only at concentrations as high as 880 microM. The influence of liposomes lipid composition on the targeting of liposomes to Tetrahymena pyriformis cells was discussed.

  4. Induction of anti-actin drug resistance in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackroff, Robert V; Hufnagel, Linda A

    2002-01-01

    Both cytochalasin D and latrunculin B reversibly inhibited Tetrahymena phagocytosis at concentrations similar to those effective in mammalian systems, even though ciliate actins are known to be highly divergent from mammalian actins. Overnight exposure to relatively low (0.25 microM) concentrations of latrunculin B induced resistance in Tetrahymena to the inhibitory effects of that drug, as well as cross-resistance to cytochalasin D. However, much higher (> 30 microM) concentrations of cytochalasin D were required for induction of cross-resistance to latrunculin B. Anti-actin drug resistance in Tetrahymena may involve a general multidrug resistance mechanism and/or specific feedback regulation of F-actin assembly and stability.

  5. The Genome of the Western Clawed Frog Xenopus tropicalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellsten, Uffe; Harland, Richard M.; Gilchrist, Michael J.; Hendrix, David; Jurka, Jerzy; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Shu, Shengqiang; Taher, Leila; Blitz, Ira L.; Blumberg, Bruce; Dichmann, Darwin S.; Dubchak, Inna; Amaya, Enrique; Detter, John C.; Fletcher, Russell; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Goodstein, David; Graves, Tina; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Grimwood, Jane; Kawashima, Takeshi; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan M.; Mead, Paul E.; Mitros, Therese; Ogino, Hajime; Ohta, Yuko; Poliakov, Alexander V.; Pollet, Nicolas; Robert, Jacques; Salamov, Asaf; Sater, Amy K.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Terry, Astrid; Vize, Peter D.; Warren, Wesley C.; Wells, Dan; Wills, Andrea; Wilson, Richard K.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.; Zorn, Aaron M.; Grainger, Robert; Grammer, Timothy; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Richardson, Paul M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2009-10-01

    The western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis is an important model for vertebrate development that combines experimental advantages of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis with more tractable genetics. Here we present a draft genome sequence assembly of X. tropicalis. This genome encodes over 20,000 protein-coding genes, including orthologs of at least 1,700 human disease genes. Over a million expressed sequence tags validated the annotation. More than one-third of the genome consists of transposable elements, with unusually prevalent DNA transposons. Like other tetrapods, the genome contains gene deserts enriched for conserved non-coding elements. The genome exhibits remarkable shared synteny with human and chicken over major parts of large chromosomes, broken by lineage-specific chromosome fusions and fissions, mainly in the mammalian lineage.

  6. A Xenopus tropicalis oligonucleotide microarray works across species using RNA from Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Andrew D; Goldstone, Kim; Smith, James C; Gilchrist, Mike; Amaya, Enrique; Papalopulu, Nancy

    2005-03-01

    Microarrays have great potential for the study of developmental biology. As a model system Xenopus is well suited for making the most of this potential. However, Xenopus laevis has undergone a genome wide duplication meaning that most genes are represented by two paralogues. This causes a number of problems. Most importantly the presence of duplicated genes mean that a X. laevis microarray will have less or even half the coverage of a similar sized microarray from the closely related but diploid frog Xenopus tropicalis. However, to date, X. laevis is the most commonly used amphibian system for experimental embryology. Therefore, we have tested if a microarray based on sequences from X. tropicalis will work across species using RNA from X. laevis. We produced a pilot oligonucleotide microarray based on sequences from X. tropicalis. The microarray was used to identify genes whose expression levels changed during early X. tropicalis development. The same assay was then carried out using RNA from X. laevis. The cross species experiments gave similar results to those using X. tropicalis RNA. This was true at the whole microarray level and for individual genes, with most genes giving similar results using RNA from X. laevis and X. tropicalis. Furthermore, the overlap in genes identified between a X. laevis and a X. tropicalis set of experiments was only 12% less than the overlap between two sets of X. tropicalis experiments. Therefore researchers can work with X. laevis and still make use of the advantages offered by X. tropicalis microarrays.

  7. Effect of Voriconazole on Candida tropicalis Biofilms: Relation with ERG Genes Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tânia; Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-10-01

    Candida tropicalis has emerged as the third most prevalent fungal pathogens and its ability to form biofilms has been considered one of the most important virulence factors, since biofilms represent high tolerance to antifungal agents. However, the mechanisms of C. tropicalis biofilm resistance to antifungals remain poorly understood. Thus, the main aim of this work was to infer about the effect of voriconazole on the formation and control of C. tropicalis biofilms and disclose its relationship with ERG genes' expression. Planktonic cells tolerance of several C. tropicalis clinical isolates to voriconazole was determined through of antifungal susceptibility test, and the effect of this azole against C. tropicalis biofilm formation and pre-formed biofilms was evaluated by cultivable cells determination and total biomass quantification. ERG genes expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. This work showed that C. tropicalis resistance to voriconazole is strain dependent and that voriconazole was able to partially control biofilm formation, but was unable to eradicate C. tropicalis pre-formed biofilms. Moreover, C. tropicalis biofilms resistance to voriconazole seems to be associated with alterations of sterol content in the cell membrane, resulting in ERG genes overexpression. Voriconazole is unable to control C. tropicalis biofilms, and the overexpression of ERG genes is a possible mechanism of biofilm resistance.

  8. Small phosphatidate phosphatase (TtPAH2) of Tetrahymena ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phosphatidate phosphatases (PAH) play a central role in lipid metabolism and intracellular signaling. Herein, we report thepresence of a low-molecular-weight PAH homolog in the single-celled ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. In vitro phosphataseassay showed that TtPAH2 belongs to the magnesium-dependent ...

  9. Tetrahymena dynamin-related protein 6 self-assembles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Usha P Kar

    2017-12-30

    Dec 30, 2017 ... Self-assembly on target membranes is one of the important properties of all dynamin family proteins. Drp6, a dynamin- related protein in Tetrahymena, controls nuclear remodelling and undergoes cycles of assembly/disassembly on the nuclear envelope. To elucidate the mechanism of Drp6 function, we ...

  10. Remobilization of Tol2 transposons in Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells Dan E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Class II DNA transposons are mobile genetic elements that move DNA sequence from one position in the genome to another. We have previously demonstrated that the naturally occurring Tol2 element from Oryzias latipes efficiently integrates its corresponding non-autonomous transposable element into the genome of the diploid frog, Xenopus tropicalis. Tol2 transposons are stable in the frog genome and are transmitted to the offspring at the expected Mendelian frequency. Results To test whether Tol2 transposons integrated in the Xenopus tropicalis genome are substrates for remobilization, we injected in vitro transcribed Tol2 mRNA into one-cell embryos harbouring a single copy of a Tol2 transposon. Integration site analysis of injected embryos from two founder lines showed at least one somatic remobilization event per embryo. We also demonstrate that the remobilized transposons are transmitted through the germline and re-integration can result in the generation of novel GFP expression patterns in the developing tadpole. Although the parental line contained a single Tol2 transposon, the resulting remobilized tadpoles frequently inherit multiple copies of the transposon. This is likely to be due to the Tol2 transposase acting in discrete blastomeres of the developing injected embryo during the cell cycle after DNA synthesis but prior to mitosis. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that single copy Tol2 transposons integrated into the Xenopus tropicalis genome are effective substrates for excision and random re-integration and that the remobilized transposons are transmitted through the germline. This is an important step in the development of 'transposon hopping' strategies for insertional mutagenesis, gene trap and enhancer trap screens in this highly tractable developmental model organism.

  11. A record of the sub-Antarctic fur seal Arctocephalus tropicalis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A record of the sub-Antarctic fur seal Arctocephalus tropicalis in Angola. T Carr, Nicole Carr, J.H.M. David. Abstract. Two individuals of the sub-Antarctic fur seal, Arctocephalus tropicalis, one of which was photographed, were seen on the beach 1 km south of the mouth of the Kwanza River, Angola, on 2 October 1983.

  12. DNA transformations of Candida tropicalis with replicating and integrative vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanglard, D; Fiechter, A

    1992-12-01

    The alkane-assimilating yeast Candida tropicalis was used as a host for DNA transformations. A stable ade2 mutant (Ha900) obtained by UV-mutagenesis was used as a recipient for different vectors carrying selectable markers. A first vector, pMK16, that was developed for the transformation of C. albicans and carries an ADE2 gene marker and a Candida autonomously replicating sequence (CARS) element promoting autonomous replication, was compatible for transforming Ha900. Two transformant types were observed: (i) pink transformants which easily lose pMK16 under non-selective growth conditions; (ii) white transformants, in which the same plasmid exhibited a higher mitotic stability. In both cases pMK16 could be rescued from these cells in Escherichia coli. A second vector, pADE2, containing the isolated C. tropicalis ADE2, gene, was used to transform Ha900. This vector integrated in the yeast genome at homologous sites of the ade2 locus. Different integration types were observed at one or both ade2 alleles in single or in tandem repeats.

  13. Inhibition of Tetrahymena pyriformis growth by Aliphatic Alcohols ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Une étude Relation Quantitative Structure- Activité (QSAR) a été réalisée pour évaluer la toxicité relative d'un mélange composé de 21 alcools (à chaînes linéaires et ramifiées) et 9 amines aliphatiques normales, en terme de concentration d'inhibition 50% de la croissance (IGC50) de Tetrahymena pyriformis . L'approche ...

  14. Comparative Proteome Bioinformatics: Identification of Phosphotyrosine Signaling Proteins in the Unicellular Protozoan Ciliate Tetrahymena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Steen; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Joachimiak, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Tetrahymena, bioinformatics, cilia, evolution, signaling, TtPTK1, PTK, Grb2, SH-PTP 2, Plcy, Src, PTP, PI3K, SH2, SH3, PH......Tetrahymena, bioinformatics, cilia, evolution, signaling, TtPTK1, PTK, Grb2, SH-PTP 2, Plcy, Src, PTP, PI3K, SH2, SH3, PH...

  15. Multilocus sequence typing indicates diverse origins of invasive Candida tropicalis isolates in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xin; Xiao, Meng; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Kong, Fanrong; Lu, Juan; Hu, Zhidong; Kang, Mei; Xu, Yingchun

    2014-01-01

    According to data from the China Hospital Invasive Fungal Surveillance Net (CHIF-NET) 2010, Candida tropicalis (C. tropicalis) is the third most common pathogen causing invasive candidiasis. Moreover, the majority of fluconazole-resistant C. tropicalis isolates were from a single hospital. Therefore, a molecular epidemiological survey is necessary to investigate the genetic relatedness of C. tropicalis isolates in China. In this study, 48 C. tropicalis isolates causing invasive fungal infections from four tertiary hospitals in China were studied. All the isolates were identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region. Antifungal susceptibility to triazoles, amphotericin B, and caspofungin was determined by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute standard broth microdilution method. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed, and phylogenetic analysis was further performed by the eBURST and maximum parsimony (MP) methods to characterize the genetic relatedness of isolates. MLST discriminated 40 diploid sequence types (DSTs) among 48 isolates, including 36 novel DSTs, and the XYR1 gene showed the highest discriminatory power. The DSTs obtained from this study were compared with those of previously reported C. tropicalis isolates, and there was poor type alignment with regional strains. Nine groups and 11 singletons were identified by eBURST, whereas two groups and 10 subgroups were clustered by MP analysis. Generally, there were no obvious correlations between clonal clusters generated and the specimen source or hospital origin. Seven fluconazole-resistant isolates were confirmed and assigned to three distinguishable branches. The results suggested diverse origins of invasive C. tropicalis isolates in China. Although most invasive C. tropicalis strains in the mainland of China were clustered with previously characterized Asian isolates, major C. tropicalis clusters identified in this study were genetically distinct from those of other

  16. Comparative study of infection with Tetrahymena of different ornamental fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, G; Pimenta Leibowitz, M; Chettri, J Kumar; Isakov, N; Zilberg, D

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahymena is a ciliated protozoan that can infect a wide range of fish species, although it is most commonly reported in guppies (Poecilia reticulata). The aim of this study was to compare the susceptibility to infection with Tetrahymena of five different ornamental fish species from two different super orders. The species examined were platy (Xiphophorus), molly (Poecilia sphenops) and angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) of the Acanthopterygii super order (which also includes guppies) and goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) and koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) of the Ostariophysi super order. These two super orders are phylogenetically distant from each other. Infection with Tetrahymena resulted in parasite invasion of internal organs, skin and muscle in all fish species. A relatively strong inflammatory response was observed in infected goldfish and koi, with negligible response in fish species of the Acanthopterygii super order. Guppies were the most susceptible to Tetrahymena infection, exhibiting a mortality rate of 87% and 100% in two separate experiments. A high mortality rate was also observed in platy (77%), while that of molly and angelfish was significantly lower (23% and 33%, respectively). Goldfish and koi carp were less susceptible to infection compared with guppies (24% and 59% mortality, respectively). Immunization studies revealed that the Tetrahymena are immunogenic, since infection of koi carp increased their Tetrahymena immobilization response by approximately three-fold at 3 weeks post infection, while immunization with Tetrahymena plus adjuvant increased their immobilization response by approximately 30-fold. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of Human and Soil Candida tropicalis Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Fluconazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Liang; Lin, Chih-Chao; Chang, Te-Pin; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Chen, Hui-Ting; Lee, Ching-Fu; Hsieh, Chih-Wen; Chen, Pei-Chen; Lo, Hsiu-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by treatment-resistant non-albicans Candida species, such as C. tropicalis, has increased, which is an emerging challenge in the management of fungal infections. Genetically related diploid sequence type (DST) strains of C. tropicalis exhibiting reduced susceptibility to fluconazole circulated widely in Taiwan. To identify the potential source of these wildly distributed DST strains, we investigated the possibility of the presence in soil of such C. tropicalis strains by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DST typing methods. A total of 56 C. tropicalis isolates were recovered from 26 out of 477 soil samples. Among the 18 isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole, 9 belonged to DST149 and 3 belonged to DST140. Both DSTs have been recovered from our previous studies on clinical isolates from the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance of Yeasts (TSARY) program. Furthermore, these isolates were more resistant to agricultural azoles. We have found genetically related C. tropicalis exhibiting reduced susceptibility to fluconazole from the human hosts and environmental samples. Therefore, to prevent patients from acquiring C. tropicalis with reduced susceptibility to azoles, prudent use of azoles in both clinical and agricultural settings is advocated. PMID:22496832

  18. The repertoire of G-protein-coupled receptors in Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Yinghe

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily represents the largest protein family in the human genome. These proteins have a variety of physiological functions that give them well recognized roles in clinical medicine. In Xenopus tropicalis, a widely used animal model for physiology research, the repertoire of GPCRs may help link the GPCR evolutionary history in vertebrates from teleost fish to mammals. Results We have identified 1452 GPCRs in the X. tropicalis genome. Phylogenetic analyses classified these receptors into the following seven families: Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled, Secretin, Taste 2 and Vomeronasal 1. Nearly 70% of X. tropicalis GPCRs are represented by the following three types of receptors thought to receive chemosensory information from the outside world: olfactory, vomeronasal 1 and vomeronasal 2 receptors. Conclusion X. tropicalis shares a more similar repertoire of GPCRs with mammals than it does with fish. An examination of the three major groups of receptors related to olfactory/pheromone detection shows that in X. tropicalis, these groups have undergone lineage specific expansion. A comparison of GPCRs in X. tropicalis, teleost fish and mammals reveals the GPCR evolutionary history in vertebrates.

  19. Genotypic variability and antifungal susceptibility of Candida tropicalis isolated from patients with candiduria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Nakamura, Sandra Sayuri; Fiorini, Adriana; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de

    2015-01-01

    Candida tropicalis is an emerging major human pathogen in nosocomial infections, and it is considered the second or third species of Candida most isolated from urine cultures. The study aimed at characterizing genotypically C. tropicalis strains from patients with candiduria in a university hospital, and assessed the antifungal susceptibility profile. The study was conducted with hospitalized patients who developed urinary tract infection from C. tropicalis from June 2010 to June 2011 at the Grande Dourados University Hospital of the Federal University, Dourados, MS, Brazil. Susceptibility to the antifungal agents amphotericin B and fluconazole was determined by broth microdilution. The genotypic variability of isolates of C. tropicalis was analyzed by microsatellite markers and RAPD-PCR. Only one isolate was resistant to amphotericin B (MIC→16μg/ml); the others were susceptible to fluconazole and amphotericin B. The genotypic variability by RAPD-PCR resulted in distinct profiles for RAPD markers. A total of 10 alleles were observed for the microsatellite loci, URA3 and CT14, which were grouped differently, and four associations were observed for locus URA3 and eight for locus CT14. C. tropicalis isolates from urine were susceptible to the antifungal agents tested. The genotyping techniques make possible proving the similarity and genetic diversity among isolates of C. tropicalis involved in nosocomial infections. This knowledge is important for the control and prevention of nosocomial infections caused by this yeast species. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Protective immunization against Tetrahymena sp. infection in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettri, J Kumar; Leibowitz, M Pimenta; Ofir, R; Zilberg, D

    2009-08-01

    Systemic tetrahymenosis constitutes a serious problem in guppy (Poecilia reticulata) production worldwide and no therapeutic solution is available for this disease. Three immunization trials were conducted, testing the effectiveness of different Tetrahymena preparations applied by intraperitoneal injection (IP) with or without Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and with or without booster dose. In trial 1, immunization with the pathogenic Tet-NI 6 lysate and live attenuated Tet-NI 1 did not provide significant protection from infection, although infection rates were significantly lower in the Tet-NI 6-immunized group than in controls. In trial 2, mortality in Tet-NI 6 + FCA-immunized fish was 10%, significantly lower than in all other treatment groups, including Tet-NI 6 lysate, live attenuated Tet-NI 1 and controls (77, 67 and 73%, respectively). In trial 3, the lowest mortality rates were obtained in the Tet-NI 6 + FCA + booster-immunized group (15%). These levels were lower but not significantly different from the non-boostered Tet-NI 6-immunized group (28%) and the groups immunized with Tet-NI 1, with and without booster (32 and 34%, respectively). Mortality in these four groups was significantly lower than in controls, including adjuvant- and PBS-injected groups (72 and 81%, respectively). Body homogenates of immunized fish immobilized Tetrahymena in-vitro, as compared to no or very little immobilization in controls. Lysozyme levels in the Tet-NI 6 + FCA + booster group were significantly higher than in all other treatments in trial 2 and controls in trial 3. There was no significant difference in anti-protease activity among the differently immunized fish. We conclude that immunization with Tetrahymena lysates in FCA confers a high degree of protection from infection, suggesting this preparation as a basis for vaccine development.

  1. Radiation-induced inhibition of RNA synthesis in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, S G; Rustad, R C; Oleinick, N L

    1975-07-01

    Radiation-induced disturbances in RNA synthesis were investigated in exponentially growing Tetrahymena. Sub-lethal doses of gamma-radiation lead to a transient, dose-dependent decrease in the rate of total RNA synthesis measured by 3H-uridine incorporation, without an alteration of 3H-uridine uptake by the cells. The rate of 3H-uridine incorporation decreases exponentially with dose. In contrast, the duration of inhibition of RNA synthesis is linearly dependent on dose. Target-theory calculations suggest that the sensitive molecule has a molecular weight of about 2 X 10(7) Daltons.

  2. The anthraquinones rubiadin and its 1-methyl ether isolated from Heterophyllaea pustulata reduces Candida tropicalis biofilms formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marioni, Juliana; da Silva, María Angel; Cabrera, José Luis; Montoya, Susana C Núñez; Paraje, María Gabriela

    2016-11-15

    Candida tropicalis is increasingly becoming among the most commonly isolated pathogens causing fungal infections with an important biofilm-forming capacity. This study addresses the antifungal effect of rubiadin (AQ1) and rubiadin 1-methyl ether (AQ2), two photosensitizing anthraquinones (AQs) isolated from Heterophyllaea pustulata, against C. tropicalis biofilms, by studying the cellular stress and antioxidant response in two experimental conditions: darkness and irradiation. The combination with Amphotericin B (AmB) was assayed to evaluate the synergic effect. Biofilms of clinical isolates and reference strain of Candida tropicalis were treated with AQs (AQ1 or AQ2) and/or AmB, and the biofilms depletion was studied by crystal violet and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The oxidant metabolites production and the response of antioxidant defense system were also evaluated under dark and irradiation conditions, being the light a trigger for photo-activation of the AQs. The Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) were detected by the reduction of Nitro Blue Tetrazolium test, and Reactive Nitrogen Intermediates (RNI) by the Griess assay. ROS accumulation was also detected inside biofilms by using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) probe, which was visualized by CSLM. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and the total antioxidant capacity of biofilms were measured by spectrophotometric methods. The minimun inhibitory concentration for sessile cells (SMIC) was determined for each AQs and AmB. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) was calculated for the combinations of each AQ with AmB by the checkerboard microdilution method. Biofilm reduction of both strains was more effective with AQ1 than with AQ2. The antifungal effect was mediated by an oxidative and nitrosative stress under irradiation, with a significant accumulation of endogenous ROS detected by CSLM and an increase in the SOD activity. Thus, the prooxidant-antioxidant balance was

  3. Experimental identification and analysis of macronuclear non-coding RNAs from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Langebjerg; Nielsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is an important eukaryotic model organism that has been used in pioneering studies of general phenomena, such as ribozymes, telomeres, chromatin structure and genome reorganization. Recent work has shown that Tetrahymena has many classes of small RNA molecules...... class was small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), many of which are formed by an unusual maturation pathway. The modifications guided by the snoRNAs were analyzed bioinformatically and experimentally and many Tetrahymena-specific modifications were found, including several in an essential, but not conserved...

  4. Dynamic triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  5. Isolation and characterization of the actin gene from Tetrahymena thermophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Claire G.; Pearlman, Ronald E.

    1986-01-01

    The macronucleus of Tetrahymena thermophila contains a single actin gene. We have isolated this gene from a partial plasmid library by using the yeast actin gene as a probe. The nucleotide sequence of the gene has been determined and the amino acid sequence of the potential protein deduced. The encoded protein is 375 amino acids long, one amino acid longer than the yeast actin. It is one of the most divergent actins sequenced to date, being only 75% homologous to yeast actin. Unlike the actin genes from most other organisms, it does not contain introns. The coding region contains TAA and TAG codons; the translation termination codon is TGA. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of the Tetrahymena actin with that of actins from other organisms suggests that TAG may code for glutamic acid. The gene is transcribed from multiple initiation sites between 57 and 98 nucleotides upstream of the translation start codon. The 5′ flanking region is very A+T-rich and contains numerous “TATA-like” sequences upstream of the transcription start sites. Images PMID:16593729

  6. Netrin-1 Peptide Is a Chemorepellent in Tetrahymena thermophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Kuruvilla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Netrin-1 is a highly conserved, pleiotropic signaling molecule that can serve as a neuronal chemorepellent during vertebrate development. In vertebrates, chemorepellent signaling is mediated through the tyrosine kinase, src-1, and the tyrosine phosphatase, shp-2. Tetrahymena thermophila has been used as a model system for chemorepellent signaling because its avoidance response is easily characterized under a light microscope. Our experiments showed that netrin-1 peptide is a chemorepellent in T. thermophila at micromolar concentrations. T. thermophila adapts to netrin-1 over a time course of about 10 minutes. Netrin-adapted cells still avoid GTP, PACAP-38, and nociceptin, suggesting that netrin does not use the same signaling machinery as any of these other repellents. Avoidance of netrin-1 peptide was effectively eliminated by the addition of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, to the assay buffer; however, immunostaining using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody showed similar fluorescence levels in control and netrin-1 exposed cells, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation is not required for signaling to occur. In addition, ELISA indicates that a netrin-like peptide is present in both whole cell extract and secreted protein obtained from Tetrahymena thermophila. Further study will be required in order to fully elucidate the signaling mechanism of netrin-1 peptide in this organism.

  7. Fermentation profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida tropicalis as starter cultures on barley malt medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloue-Boraud, Wazé Aimée Mireille; N'Guessan, Kouadio Florent; Djeni, N'Dédé Théodore; Hiligsmann, Serge; Djè, Koffi Marcellin; Delvigne, Franck

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae C8-5 and Candida tropicalis F0-5 isolated from traditional sorghum beer were tested for kinetic parameters on barley malt extract, YPD (863 medium) and for alcohol production. The results showed that C. tropicalis has the highest maximum growth rate and the lowest doubling time. Values were 0.22 and 0.32 h(-1) for maximum growth rate, 3 h 09 min and 2 h 09 min for doubling time respectively on barley malt extract and YPD. On contrary, glucose consumption was the fastest with S. cerevisiae (-0.36 and -0.722 g/l/h respectively on barley malt extract and YPD). When these two yeasts were used as starters in pure culture and co-culture at proportion of 1:1 and 2:1 (cell/cell) for barley malt extract fermentation, we noticed that maltose content increased first from 12.12 g/l to 13.62-16.46 g/l and then decreased. The highest increase was obtained with starter C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1. On contrary, glucose content decreased throughout all the fermentation process. For all the starters used, the major part of the ethanol was produced at 16 h of fermentation. Values obtained in the final beers were 11.4, 11.6, 10.4 and 10.9 g/l for fermentation conducted with S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis, C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 1:1 and C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1. Cell viability measurement during the fermentation by using flow cytometry revealed that the lowest mean channel fluorescence for FL3 (yeast rate of death) was obtained with C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1 after 48 h of fermentation.

  8. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Clara Jana-Lui; Vogt, Alexander; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-07-13

    Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymena and localizes to the macronucleus where it induces precise recombination at two loxP sequences in direct orientation in the Tetrahymena macronuclear chromosome. This Cre/loxP recombination can be used to remove a loxP-flanked drug-resistance marker from an N-terminal tagging construct after it is integrated into the macronucleus. The system established in this study allows us to express an N-terminal epitope tagged gene from its own endogenous promoter in Tetrahymena.

  9. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena

    OpenAIRE

    Mochizuki Kazufumi; Vogt Alexander; Busch Clara

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. Results In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymen...

  10. Cellular characterisation of Candida tropicalis presenting fluconazole-related trailing growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Dornelas-Ribeiro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed fluconazole susceptibility in 52 Candida tropicalis clinical strains using seven antifungal susceptibility methods, including broth microdilution (BMD [standard M27 A3 (with neutral and acid pH, ATB Fungus 3, Vitek 2 system and flow cytometric analysis] and agar-based methods (disk diffusion and E-test. Trailing growth, detection of cell-associated secreted aspartic proteases (Saps and morphological and ultrastructural traits of these clinical strains were also examined. The ranges of fluconazole 24 h-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values were similar among all methods. The essential agreement among the methods used for MIC determinations was excellent and all methods categorised all strains as susceptible, except for one strain that showed a minor error. The presence of the trailing effect was assessed by six methods. Trailing positivity was observed for 86.5-100% of the strains. The exception was the BMD-Ac method where trailing growth was not observed. Morphological and ultrastructural alterations were detected in C. tropicalis trailing cells, including mitochondrial swelling and cell walls with irregular shapes. We tested the production of Saps in 13 C. tropicalis strains expressing trailing growth through flow cytometry. Our results showed that all of the C. tropicalis strains up-regulated surface Sap expression after 24 h or 48 h of exposure to fluconazole, which was not observed in untreated yeast strains. We concluded that C. tropicalis strains expressing trailing growth presented some particular features on both biological and ultrastructural levels.

  11. Culture media profoundly affect Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis growth, adhesion and biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekera, Manjula M; Wijesinghe, Gayan K; Jayarathna, Thilini A; Gunasekara, Chinthika P; Fernando, Neluka; Kottegoda, Nilwala; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-11-01

    As there are sparse data on the impact of growth media on the phenomenon of biofilm development for Candida we evaluated the efficacy of three culture media on growth, adhesion and biofilm formation of two pathogenic yeasts, Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis. The planktonic phase yeast growth, either as monocultures or mixed cultures, in sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB), yeast nitrogen base (YNB), and RPMI 1640 was compared, and adhesion as well as biofilm formation were monitored using MTT and crystal violet (CV) assays and scanning electron microscopy. Planktonic cells of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and their 1:1 co-culture showed maximal growth in SDB. C. albicans/C. tropicalis adhesion was significantly facilitated in RPMI 1640 although the YNB elicited the maximum growth for C. tropicalis. Similarly, the biofilm growth was uniformly higher for both species in RPMI 1640, and C. tropicalis was the slower biofilm former in all three media. Scanning electron microscopy images tended to confirm the results of MTT and CV assay. Taken together, our data indicate that researchers should pay heed to the choice of laboratory culture media when comparing relative planktonic/biofilm growth of Candida. There is also a need for standardisation of biofilm development media so as to facilitate cross comparisons between laboratories.

  12. pH-dependent effects of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) on proliferation, endocytosis, fine structure and DNP resistance in Tetrahymena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jytte R.

    1995-01-01

    Biologi, 2,4-dinitrophenol, pH-dependence, fine structure, cell proliferation, phagocytosis, Tetrahymena pyriformis......Biologi, 2,4-dinitrophenol, pH-dependence, fine structure, cell proliferation, phagocytosis, Tetrahymena pyriformis...

  13. Bioethanol Production From Cellulose by Candida tropicalis, as An Alternative Microbial Agent to Produce Ethanol from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermansyah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Candida tropicalis isolated from Tuak is a potentially useful microorganism for the ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass and it can be alterbative agent replacing Saccharomyces cerevisae for fermentation process. Although C.tropicalis could not convert all carbohydrates content of lignocellulosic into bioethanol, however it is able to grow on medium in the presence of either xylose or arabinose as carbon source. Our result showed that fermentation of 10 % (w/v cellulosic as sole carbon source produced 2.88% (v/v ethanol by C.tropicalis. This ethanol production was lower than usage of 10% (w/v dextrose as sole carbon source medium which producing 5.51% (v/v ethanol. Based upon our expreiment indicated that C.tropicalis is able to conduct two main process in converting of cellulosic material- to ethanol which is hydrolysis the degradation of cellulose into glucose, and fermentation the process the conversion glucose into bioethanol. Keywords : Candida tropicalis, bioethanol, fermentation, cellulosic Abstrak (Indonesian: Candida tropicalis yang diisiolasi dari Tuak adalah agen yang berpotensi dalam produksi etanol dari biomasa lignoselulosa dan dapat dijadikan agen alternatif menggantikan Saccharomyces cerevisiae pada proses fernentasi. Walaupun C.tropicalis tidak dapat mengkonversi semua kandungan karbohidrat lignoselulosamenjadi etanol, akan tetapi C.tropicalis mampu tumbuh pada media dengan xilosa atau arabinosa sebagaisumber karbon. Hasil kami menunjukkan bahwa dengan mengguankan C.tropicalis fermentasi 10% (w/v selulosa sebagai satu-satunya sumber karbon menghasilkan 2,88% (v/v etanol, Produksi etanol ini lebih rendah jika menggunakan 10% (w/v dekstrosa sebagai satu satunya sumber karbon yang menghasilkan 5,51% (v/v etanol. Berdasarkan percobaan menunjukkan bahwa C.tropicalis mampu melakukan dua proses utama dalam mengkonversi material selulosa menjadi etanol yaitu hidrolisis degradasi selulosa menjadi glukosa, dan

  14. Pilot morpholino screen in Xenopus tropicalis identifies a novel gene involved in head development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenwrick, Sue; Amaya, Enrique; Papalopulu, Nancy

    2004-02-01

    The diploid frog X. tropicalis has recently been adopted as a model genetic system, but loss-of-function screens in Xenopus have not yet been performed. We have undertaken a pilot functional knockdown screen in X. tropicalis for genes involved in nervous system development by injecting antisense morpholino (MO) oligos directed against X. tropicalis mRNAs. Twenty-six genes with primary expression in the nervous system were selected as targets based on an expression screen previously conducted in X. laevis. Reproducible phenotypes were observed for six and for four of these, a second MO gave a similar result. One of these genes encodes a novel protein with previously unknown function. Knocking down this gene, designated pinhead, results in severe microcephaly, whereas, overexpression results in macrocephaly. Together with the early embryonic expression in the anterior neural plate, these data indicate that pinhead is a novel gene involved in controlling head development. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Candida tropicalis brain abscess in a neonate: An emerging nosocomial menace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Yoganathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are a relatively uncommon cause of brain abscess in neonates and early infancy. They are usually associated with predisposing factors like prematurity, low birth weight, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. Candida tropicalis (C. tropicalis is rapidly emerging as a nosocomial threat in the neonatal intensive care settings. This case report describes a neonate with C. tropicalis brain abscess who was diagnosed early and managed aggressively with a favorable outcome. Inadvertent use of intravenous antibiotics can have serious complications such as invasive fungal infection. Correct microbiological diagnosis is the key to successful treatment of deep-seated pyogenic infection. Fungal etiology should always be studied in relevant clinical settings.

  16. Transcriptomic profiling in Silurana tropicalis testes exposed to finasteride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissegger, Sonja; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Langlois, Valérie S

    2014-07-01

    Investigations of endocrine disrupting chemicals found in aquatic ecosystems with estrogenic and androgenic modes of action have increased over the past two decades due to a surge of evidence of adverse effects in wildlife. Chemicals that disrupt androgen signalling and steroidogenesis can result in an imbalanced conversion of testosterone (T) into 17β-estradiol (E2) and other androgens such as 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT). Therefore, a better understanding of how chemicals perturb these pathways is warranted. In this study, the brain, liver, and testes of Silurana tropicalis were exposed ex vivo to the human drug finasteride, a potent steroid 5α-reductase inhibitor and a model compound to study the inhibition of the conversion of T into 5α-DHT. These experiments were conducted (1) to determine organ specific changes in sex steroid production after treatment, and (2) to elucidate the transcriptomic response to finasteride in testicular tissue. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to measure hormone levels in media following finasteride incubation for 6 h. Finasteride significantly increased T levels in the media of liver and testis tissue, but did not induce any changes in E2 and 5α-DHT production. Gene expression analysis was performed in frog testes and data revealed that finasteride treatment significantly altered 1,434 gene probes. Gene networks associated with male reproduction such as meiosis, hormone biosynthesis, sperm entry, gonadotropin releasing hormone were affected by finasteride exposure as well as other pathways such as oxysterol synthesis, apoptosis, and epigenetic regulation. For example, this study suggests that the mode of action by which finasteride induces cellular damage in testicular tissue as reported by others, is via oxidative stress in testes. This data also suggests that 5-reductase inhibition disrupts the expression of genes related to reproduction. It is proposed that androgen-disrupting chemicals may mediate their

  17. Fermentation profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida tropicalis as starter cultures on barley malt medium

    OpenAIRE

    Alloue-Boraud, Wazé Aimée Mireille; N’Guessan, Kouadio Florent; Djeni, N’Dédé Théodore; Hiligsmann, Serge; Djè, Koffi Marcellin; Delvigne, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae C8-5 and Candida tropicalis F0-5 isolated from traditional sorghum beer were tested for kinetic parameters on barley malt extract, YPD (863 medium) and for alcohol production. The results showed that C. tropicalis has the highest maximum growth rate and the lowest doubling time. Values were 0.22 and 0.32 h−1 for maximum growth rate, 3 h 09 min and 2 h 09 min for doubling time respectively on barley malt extract and YPD. On contrary, glucose consumption was the fastest...

  18. Tratamiento con caspofungina de endocarditis por Candida tropicalis resistente a fluconazol Treatment with caspofungin of Candida tropicalis endocarditis resistant to fluconazol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo del Castillo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Las endocarditis causadas por hongos, (Candida en particular, requieren tratamiento médico-quirúrgico, siendo la anfotericina B la droga de elección. Caspofungina es una equinocandina con gran actividad sobre Candida y Aspergillus. Se presenta un paciente con una endocarditis por Candida tropicalis resistente a fluconazol tratado con caspofungina bajo un esquema de salvataje, luego de haber presentado efectos adversos por anfotericina B. El paciente tuvo respuesta microbiológica.Fungal endocarditis, in particular due to Candida species, requires medical and surgical treatment and amphotericin B is the drug of choice. Caspofungin is an echinocandin very effective against Candida and Aspergillus. We present a patient with Candida tropicalis endocarditis, fluconazol resistant, treated with caspofungin, on a compassional basis as a result of adverse effects with amphotericin B. The patient had a microbiological response.

  19. PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF THE CYTOCHROME P450 LANOSTEROL 14A-DEMETHYLASE GENE FROM CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the nucleotide sequence of the gene and flanking DNA for the cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14 alpha-demethylase (14DM) from the yeast Candida tropicalis ATCC750. An open reading frame (ORF) of 528 codons encoding a 60.9-kD protein is identified. This ORF includes a charact...

  20. Effects of Endocrine Disruptors Ethinylestradiol and Procloraz on the vocal system of the frog Xenopus tropicalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna; Nørum, Ulrik; Korsgaard, Bodil

    2009-01-01

    for studying the effects of endocrine disruptors on sexual differentiation. We exposed tadpoles and metamorphs of the species Xenopus tropicalis to the synthetic estrogen ethinylestradiol and the fungicide prochloraz. Prochloraz masculinized the larynx of female frogs while ethinylestradiol had no effect...

  1. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression during Xenopus tropicalis tadpole tail regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Love Nick R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms governing vertebrate appendage regeneration remain poorly understood. Uncovering these mechanisms may lead to novel therapies aimed at alleviating human disfigurement and visible loss of function following injury. Here, we explore tadpole tail regeneration in Xenopus tropicalis, a diploid frog with a sequenced genome. Results We found that, like the traditionally used Xenopus laevis, the Xenopus tropicalis tadpole has the capacity to regenerate its tail following amputation, including its spinal cord, muscle, and major blood vessels. We examined gene expression using the Xenopus tropicalis Affymetrix genome array during three phases of regeneration, uncovering more than 1,000 genes that are significantly modulated during tail regeneration. Target validation, using RT-qPCR followed by gene ontology (GO analysis, revealed a dynamic regulation of genes involved in the inflammatory response, intracellular metabolism, and energy regulation. Meta-analyses of the array data and validation by RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization uncovered a subset of genes upregulated during the early and intermediate phases of regeneration that are involved in the generation of NADP/H, suggesting that these pathways may be important for proper tail regeneration. Conclusions The Xenopus tropicalis tadpole is a powerful model to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of vertebrate appendage regeneration. We have produced a novel and substantial microarray data set examining gene expression during vertebrate appendage regeneration.

  2. An Update on Candida tropicalis Based on Basic and Clinical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza-Alves, Diana L.; Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison P.; Chaves, Guilherme M.

    2017-01-01

    Candida tropicalis has emerged as one of the most important Candida species. It has been widely considered the second most virulent Candida species, only preceded by C. albicans. Besides, this species has been recognized as a very strong biofilm producer, surpassing C. albicans in most of the studies. In addition, it produces a wide range of other virulence factors, including: adhesion to buccal epithelial and endothelial cells; the secretion of lytic enzymes, such as proteinases, phospholipases, and hemolysins, bud-to-hyphae transition (also called morphogenesis) and the phenomenon called phenotypic switching. This is a species very closely related to C. albicans and has been easily identified with both phenotypic and molecular methods. In addition, no cryptic sibling species were yet described in the literature, what is contradictory to some other medically important Candida species. C. tropicalis is a clinically relevant species and may be the second or third etiological agent of candidemia, specifically in Latin American countries and Asia. Antifungal resistance to the azoles, polyenes, and echinocandins has already been described. Apart from all these characteristics, C. tropicalis has been considered an osmotolerant microorganism and this ability to survive to high salt concentration may be important for fungal persistence in saline environments. This physiological characteristic makes this species suitable for use in biotechnology processes. Here we describe an update of C. tropicalis, focusing on all these previously mentioned subjects. PMID:29081766

  3. Asterionellopsis tropicalis (Bacillariophyceae): a new tropical species found in diatom accumulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Andréa de Oliveira da Rocha; They, Ng Haig; Canani, Luis Gustavo de Castro; Maggioni, Rodrigo; Odebrecht, Clarisse

    2016-10-01

    The diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis sensu lato forms high-density patches in the surf zone of some sandy beaches worldwide and was until recently considered a cosmopolitan species. With the recent description of four cryptic species, the identity of specimens found in these accumulations remains uncertain. In this study, diatom patches were sampled from two sandy beaches of the Brazilian coast: one tropical (Futuro Beach, 3° S; 38° W) and one subtropical (Cassino Beach, 32° S; 52° W). Fine structure of frustules and the sequencing of three phylogenetic markers revealed the subtropical strains to be A. guyunusae and the tropical strains to be a new species, here described as Asterionellopsis tropicalis sp. nov. A. tropicalis was differentiated morphologically by the number of striae in 10 μm at the foot pole and head (39-44; 38-45, respectively), from A. lenisilicea (46-55; 46-64), A. maritima (46-51; 46-60), and A. thurstonii (42-58; 55-70). The number of striae at the head region of the valvocopula (10 μm) helped to distinguish A. tropicalis (56-62) from A. guyunusae (61-64), but A. tropicalis was morphologically undistinguishable from A. glacialis. The sequence divergence from other identified Asterionellopsis species was 13%-16% (Cox1), 11%-12% (5.8S + ITS2) and 2%-6% (RbcL), and A. tropicalis formed a distinct monophyletic clade with high support in all analyzed phylogenetic trees (single or multi-locus). This work will aid in the understanding of the ecological and physiological diversity of diatom patches that are key to the trophic webs of sandy beaches. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  4. Comparative study of infection with Tetrahymena of different ornamental fish species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharon, G.; Leibowitz, M. Pimenta; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahymena is a ciliated protozoan that can infect a wide range of fish species, although it is most commonly reported in guppies (Poecilia reticulata). The aim of this study was to compare the susceptibility to infection with Tetrahymena of five different ornamental fish species from two...... different super orders. The species examined were platy (Xiphophorus), molly (Poecilia sphenops) and angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) of the Acanthopterygii super order (which also includes guppies) and goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) and koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) of the Ostariophysi super order...... of the Acanthopterygii super order. Guppies were the most susceptible to Tetrahymena infection, exhibiting a mortality rate of 87% and 100% in two separate experiments. A high mortality rate was also observed in platy (77%), while that of molly and angelfish was significantly lower (23% and 33%, respectively). Goldfish...

  5. Environmental and physiological conditions affecting Tetrahymena sp. infection in guppies, Poecilia reticulata Peters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta Leibowitz, M; Ariav, R; Zilberg, D

    2005-09-01

    Parasitic infections caused by Tetrahymena sp. constitute a serious problem in guppies, Poecilia reticulata. Tetrahymena was isolated from skin lesions of naturally infected guppies in a commercial aquaculture farm, cultured in vitro and used in subsequent experimental infections. In addition to guppies, angelfish, Pterophyllum scalare, platyfish, Xiphophorus maculates, and neontetra, Paracheirodon innesi, were susceptible, whereas tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus xO. aureus) was resistant. The ciliate had a high affinity for dead fish. Skin abrasion did not affect the infection, but fish with gas bubble disease exhibited a significantly higher infection than non-affected fish. Infection was significantly higher when fish were exposed to high levels of ammonia, high organic load and low water temperatures. Under shipment conditions, infection was significantly elevated. Full recovery was achieved at a low fish density. Results suggest that poor environmental and physiological conditions enhance infection with Tetrahymena sp.

  6. In the polymorphic ciliate Tetrahymena vorax, the non-selective phagocytosis seen in microstomes changes to a highly selective process in macrostomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønlien, Heidi K; Berg, Trond; Løvlie, Arne M

    2002-07-01

    Ciliates use phagocytosis to acquire edible particles. The polymorphic ciliate Tetrahymena vorax appears in two forms ('microstomes' and 'macrostomes'). Transformation of microstomes into macrostomes takes place in the presence of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila and enables the macrostome to phagocytose the latter species. The non-specific, constitutive phagocytosis in microstomes thereby changes into a specific inducible process in macrostomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the phagocytotic process in macrostomes is specifically aimed at catching T. thermophila. The two forms of phagocytosis represent an interesting model system for studying the mechanism whereby phagosomes are formed. The macrostomal form capture deciliated and ciliated Tetrahymena thermophila, latex beads with diameters of 20.3 and 30.0 microm and small microstomal cells. However, the macrostomes select T. thermophila as a prey when they have the opportunity to choose between deciliated T. thermophila and latex beads and between T. thermophila and microstomes. The non-selective formation of phagosomes seen in microstomes changes to a highly selective process during the transformation to macrostomes. Unlike microstomes, macrostomes do not form a closed vacuole after capturing a latex bead, indicating that mechanical stimulation by the prey does not in itself trigger phagocytosis in the macrostomal form of T. vorax. Although macrostomes captured T. thermophila in preference to microstomes, phagocytosis of microstomes started immediately following capture, indicating that the substance/molecule that triggers the formation of the phagosome is not specific for T. thermophila cells. After capturing a T. thermophila cell, the macrostomal cell, which normally swims in a forward direction, reverses direction and swims backwards for a short time before starting to rotate. Macrostomal cells did not change their swimming pattern after capturing a latex bead. We believe, therefore

  7. Resistência a antifúngicos de Candida tropicalis isoladas no Estado do Ceará Antifungal resistance of Candida tropicalis isolated in the State of Ceará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everardo Albuquerque Menezes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo, foi avaliada a resistência a drogas antifúngicas em 51 cepas de Candida tropicalis isoladas de amostras clínicas no Estado do Ceará, Brasil. Resistência antifúngica foi um evento raro no nosso estudo e foi restrita a 3 (5,9% das cepas de Candida tropicalis, que exibiram resistência a fluconazol e itraconazol.In this study, the resistance to antifungal drugs was investigated among 51 strains of Candida tropicalis isolated from clinical samples in the State of Ceará, Brazil. Antifungal resistance was a rare finding in our study and was restricted to three (5.9% of the strains of Candida tropicalis. These exhibited resistance to both fluconazole and itraconazole.

  8. Triggering Klystrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  9. Optimized Production of Xylitol from Xylose Using a Hyper-Acidophilic Candida tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tamburini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Candida tropicalis DSM 7524 produces xylitol, a natural, low-calorie sweetener, by fermentation of xylose. In order to increase xylitol production rate during the submerged fermentation process, some parameters-substrate (xylose concentration, pH, aeration rate, temperature and fermentation strategy-have been optimized. The maximum xylitol yield reached at 60–80 g/L initial xylose concentration, pH 5.5 at 37 °C was 83.66% (w/w on consumed xylose in microaerophilic conditions (kLa = 2·h−1. Scaling up on 3 L fermenter, with a fed-batch strategy, the best xylitol yield was 86.84% (w/w, against a 90% of theoretical yield. The hyper-acidophilic behaviour of C. tropicalis makes this strain particularly promising for industrial application, due to the possibility to work in non-sterile conditions.

  10. Septic arthritis as the first sign of Candida tropicalis fungaemia in an acute lymphoid leukemia patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicari Perla

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections caused by Candida species have increased in incidence during the past two decades in England, North America and Europe. Candidal arthritis is rare in patients who are not intravenous drug users or are who not using a prostheses. We report the case of a 24-year-old man with acute lymphoid leukemia, who developed Candida tropicalis arthritis during an aplastic period after chemotherapy. This is the eighth case described in the literature of C. tropicalis causing arthritis without intra-articular inoculation. We call attention to an unusual first sign of fungal infection: septic arthritis without intra-articular inoculation. However, this case differs from the other seven, since despite therapy a fast and lethal evolution was observed. We reviewed reported cases, incidence, risk factors, mortality and treatment of neutropenic patients with fungal infections.

  11. Syringomyelia associated with post-meningitic spinal arachnoiditis due to Candida tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanthumchinda, K.; Kaoropthum, S.

    1991-01-01

    A 63 year old man who suffered from syringomyelia related to post-meningitic spinal arachnoiditis caused by Candida tropicalis is reported. The clinical syndrome of syringomyelia developed gradually and a definite diagnosis was delayed for more than 10 years. The patient has partially recovered after surgical treatment. This form of fungal infection and its delayed neurological complication in the form of syringomyelia has not been reported previously, to our knowledge. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1754530

  12. Exploring nervous system transcriptomes during embryogenesis and metamorphosis in Xenopus tropicalis using EST analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegnez Maurice

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The western African clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis is an anuran amphibian species now used as model in vertebrate comparative genomics. It provides the same advantages as Xenopus laevis but is diploid and has a smaller genome of 1.7 Gbp. Therefore X. tropicalis is more amenable to systematic transcriptome surveys. We initiated a large-scale partial cDNA sequencing project to provide a functional genomics resource on genes expressed in the nervous system during early embryogenesis and metamorphosis in X. tropicalis. Results A gene index was defined and analysed after the collection of over 48,785 high quality sequences. These partial cDNA sequences were obtained from an embryonic head and retina library (30,272 sequences and from a metamorphic brain and spinal cord library (27,602 sequences. These ESTs are estimated to represent 9,693 transcripts derived from an estimated 6,000 genes. Comparison of these cDNA sequences with protein databases indicates that 46% contain their start codon. Further annotation included Gene Ontology functional classification, InterPro domain analysis, alternative splicing and non-coding RNA identification. Gene expression profiles were derived from EST counts and used to define transcripts specific to metamorphic stages of development. Moreover, these ESTs allowed identification of a set of 225 polymorphic microsatellites that can be used as genetic markers. Conclusion These cDNA sequences permit in silico cloning of numerous genes and will facilitate studies aimed at deciphering the roles of cognate genes expressed in the nervous system during neural development and metamorphosis. The genomic resources developed to study X. tropicalis biology will accelerate exploration of amphibian physiology and genetics. In particular, the model will facilitate analysis of key questions related to anuran embryogenesis and metamorphosis and its associated regulatory processes.

  13. The A395T mutation in ERG11 gene confers fluconazole resistance in Candida tropicalis causing candidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jingwen; Zhang, Jinqing; Chen, Wei; Sun, Yi; Wan, Zhe; Li, Ruoyu; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida tropicalis is still unclear. Recently, we isolated a fluconazole-resistant strain of C. tropicalis from the blood specimen of a patient with candidemia in China. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of the isolate was determined by using CLSI M27-A3 and E-test methods. The sequence of ERG11 gene was then analyzed, and the three-dimensional model of Erg11p encoded by ERG11 gene was also investigated. The sequencing of ERG11 gene revealed the mutation of A395T in this fluconazole-resistant isolate of C. tropicalis, resulting in the Y132F substitution in Erg11p. Sequence alignment and three-dimensional model comparison of Erg11ps showed high similarity between fluconazole-susceptible isolates of C. tropicalis and Candida albicans. The comparison of the three-dimensional models of Erg11ps demonstrated that the position of the Y132F substitution in this isolate of C. tropicalis is identical to the isolate of C. albicans with fluconazole resistance resulting from Y132F substitution in Erg11p. Hence, we ascertain that the Y132F substitution of Erg11p caused by A395T mutation in ERG11 gene confers the fluconazole resistance in C. tropicalis.

  14. Association phenothiazine and laser on growth of C. tropicalis fluconazole-resistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Júnior, Rafael Araújo; de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.

    2014-02-01

    Candidiasis is caused by Candida species found on the skin, gastrointestinal tract and mucous cavities of the humans and may be acute, chronic, localized or systemic. Alhough C. albicans is the species most often identified as responsible for this type of infection C. Tropicalis has been considered an emerging cause. The effect of the association of phenothiazine - PTZ and laser on fluconazole-resistant C.tropicalis growth was tested. 2.5 x 106 CFU/mL 100mg/mL of phenothiazine with the pre-irradiation time of 10 min were irradiated with laser light (660 nm; 4.8 and 12 J/cm2 (L1 and L2 respectively) 40 mW) followed by incubation in RPMI for 24h. The following conditions were tested: control (control), laser (L1 and L2), phenothiazine (F1 and F2), and PACT (F1L1 and F2L2). Statistically significant diferences were seen between groups (L-F +) and (F + L +) for both conditions of the laser, with a growth inhibition of the yeast around 67 and 51%, respectively, however, when using only the laser there was an increase of 18% in the survival of these cells. PACT's efficacy on fluconazole-resistant C. tropicalis depended on both the time of pre-irradiation and concentration of the PTZ.

  15. Hedgehog inhibition causes complete loss of limb outgrowth and transformation of digit identity in Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopper, Geffrey F; Richards-Hrdlicka, Kathryn L; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-03-01

    The study of the tetrapod limb has contributed greatly to our understanding of developmental pathways and how changes to these pathways affect the evolution of morphology. Most of our understanding of tetrapod limb development comes from research on amniotes, with far less known about mechanisms of limb development in amphibians. To better understand the mechanisms of limb development in anuran amphibians, we used cyclopamine to inhibit Hedgehog signaling at various stages of development in the western clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis, and observed resulting morphologies. We also analyzed gene expression changes resulting from similar experiments in Xenopus laevis. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling in X. tropicalis results in limb abnormalities including reduced digit number, missing skeletal elements, and complete absence of limbs. In addition, posterior digits assume an anterior identity by developing claws that are usually only found on anterior digits, confirming Sonic hedgehog's role in digit identity determination. Thus, Sonic hedgehog appears to play mechanistically separable roles in digit number specification and digit identity specification as in other studied tetrapods. The complete limb loss observed in response to reduced Hedgehog signaling in X. tropicalis, however, is striking, as this functional role for Hedgehog signaling has not been found in any other tetrapod. This changed mechanism may represent a substantial developmental constraint to digit number evolution in frogs. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 9999B:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Defining synphenotype groups in Xenopus tropicalis by use of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Ahmed Rana

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available To identify novel genes involved in early development, and as proof-of-principle of a large-scale reverse genetics approach in a vertebrate embryo, we have carried out an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO screen in Xenopus tropicalis, in the course of which we have targeted 202 genes expressed during gastrula stages. MOs were designed to complement sequence between -80 and +25 bases of the initiating AUG codons of the target mRNAs, and the specificities of many were tested by (i designing different non-overlapping MOs directed against the same mRNA, (ii injecting MOs differing in five bases, and (iii performing "rescue" experiments. About 65% of the MOs caused X. tropicalis embryos to develop abnormally (59% of those targeted against novel genes, and we have divided the genes into "synphenotype groups," members of which cause similar loss-of-function phenotypes and that may function in the same developmental pathways. Analysis of the expression patterns of the 202 genes indicates that members of a synphenotype group are not necessarily members of the same synexpression group. This screen provides new insights into early vertebrate development and paves the way for a more comprehensive MO-based analysis of gene function in X. tropicalis.

  17. Cloning, expression and purification of squalene synthase from Candida tropicalis in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pey Yee; Yong, Voon Chen; Rosli, Rozita; Gam, Lay Harn; Chong, Pei Pei

    2014-02-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) is the key precursor and first committed enzyme of the sterol biosynthesis pathway. In a previous work, SS has been identified as one of the immunogenic proteins that could be a potential diagnostic candidate for the pathogenic fungus Candida tropicalis. In this study, SS from C. tropicalis was cloned and expressed as recombinant protein in Pichia pastoris to investigate its reactivity with serum antibodies. ERG9 gene that encodes for SS was amplified by PCR and cloned in-frame into pPICZB expression vector. The recombinant construct was then transformed into P. pastoris GS115 host strain. Expression of the recombinant protein was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis using anti-His tag probe. Optimal protein production was achieved by cultivating the culture with 1.0% methanol for 72h. The recombinant protein was purified to approximately 97% pure in a single step immobilized metal affinity chromatography with a yield of 70.3%. Besides, the purified protein exhibited specific reactivity with immune sera on Western blot. This is the first report on heterologous expression of antigenic SS from C. tropicalis in P. pastoris which can be exploited for large-scale production and further research. The results also suggested that the protein might be of great value as antigen candidate for serodiagnosis of Candida infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Coexistence of Y, W, and Z sex chromosomes in Xenopus tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roco, Álvaro S.; Olmstead, Allen W.; Degitz, Sigmund J.; Amano, Tosikazu; Zimmerman, Lyle B.; Bullejos, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Homomorphic sex chromosomes and rapid turnover of sex-determining genes can complicate establishing the sex chromosome system operating in a given species. This difficulty exists in Xenopus tropicalis, an anuran quickly becoming a relevant model for genetic, genomic, biochemical, and ecotoxicological research. Despite the recent interest attracted by this species, little is known about its sex chromosome system. Direct evidence that females are the heterogametic sex, as in the related species Xenopus laevis, has yet to be presented. Furthermore, X. laevis’ sex-determining gene, DM-W, does not exist in X. tropicalis, and the sex chromosomes in the two species are not homologous. Here we identify X. tropicalis’ sex chromosome system by integrating data from (i) breeding sex-reversed individuals, (ii) gynogenesis, (iii) triploids, and (iv) crosses among several strains. Our results indicate that at least three different types of sex chromosomes exist: Y, W, and Z, observed in YZ, YW, and ZZ males and in ZW and WW females. Because some combinations of parental sex chromosomes produce unisex offspring and other distorted sex ratios, understanding the sex-determination systems in X. tropicalis is critical for developing this flexible animal model for genetics and ecotoxicology. PMID:26216983

  19. Inbreeding Ratio and Genetic Relationships among Strains of the Western Clawed Frog, Xenopus tropicalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Igawa

    Full Text Available The Western clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis, is a highly promising model amphibian, especially in developmental and physiological research, and as a tool for understanding disease. It was originally found in the West African rainforest belt, and was introduced to the research community in the 1990s. The major strains thus far known include the Nigerian and Ivory Coast strains. However, due to its short history as an experimental animal, the genetic relationship among the various strains has not yet been clarified, and establishment of inbred strains has not yet been achieved. Since 2003 the Institute for Amphibian Biology (IAB, Hiroshima University has maintained stocks of multiple X. tropicalis strains and conducted consecutive breeding as part of the National BioResource Project. In the present study we investigated the inbreeding ratio and genetic relationship of four inbred strains at IAB, as well as stocks from other institutions, using highly polymorphic microsatellite markers and mitochondrial haplotypes. Our results show successive reduction of heterozygosity in the genome of the IAB inbred strains. The Ivory Coast strains clearly differed from the Nigerian strains genetically, and three subgroups were identified within both the Nigerian and Ivory Coast strains. It is noteworthy that the Ivory Coast strains have an evolutionary divergent genetic background. Our results serve as a guide for the most effective use of X. tropicalis strains, and the long-term maintenance of multiple strains will contribute to further research efforts.

  20. Updating rDNA restriction enzyme maps of Tetrahymena reveals four new intron-containing species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Simon, E M; Engberg, J

    1985-01-01

    The extrachromosomal rDNA molecules from a number of Tetrahymena strains were characterized by restriction enzyme mapping using three different restriction enzymes combined with gel blotting and hybridization analysis. Strains from four out of six recently described species were found to contain...

  1. Role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF in programmed nuclear death during conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endoh Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed nuclear death (PND, which is also referred to as nuclear apoptosis, is a remarkable process that occurs in ciliates during sexual reproduction (conjugation. In Tetrahymena thermophila, when the new macronucleus differentiates, the parental macronucleus is selectively eliminated from the cytoplasm of the progeny, concomitant with apoptotic nuclear events. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not well understood. The parental macronucleus is engulfed by a large autophagosome, which contains numerous mitochondria that have lost their membrane potential. In animals, mitochondrial depolarization precedes apoptotic cell death, which involves DNA fragmentation and subsequent nuclear degradation. Results We focused on the role of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF during PND in Tetrahymena. The disruption of AIF delays the normal progression of PND, specifically, nuclear condensation and kilobase-size DNA fragmentation. AIF is localized in Tetrahymena mitochondria and is released into the macronucleus prior to nuclear condensation. In addition, AIF associates and co-operates with the mitochondrial DNase to facilitate the degradation of kilobase-size DNA, which is followed by oligonucleosome-size DNA laddering. Conclusions Our results suggest that Tetrahymena AIF plays an important role in the degradation of DNA at an early stage of PND, which supports the notion that the mitochondrion-initiated apoptotic DNA degradation pathway is widely conserved among eukaryotes.

  2. Poliovirus and echovirus survival in Tetrahymena pyriformis culture in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danes, L; Cerva, L

    1984-01-01

    Axenic cultures of Tetrahymena pyriformis, strain I MT IV, grown in a defined medium at room temperature, were used to study interactions of these protozoa with vaccination strain L Sc 2ab of poliovirus type 1, vaccination strain P 712 of poliovirus type 2 and with type 30 echovirus, strain 480/78. T. pyriformis cultures in media containing 10(3.0) TCD50/1 ml of type poliovirus, 10(3.0) TCD50/1 ml of type 2 poliovirus or 10(2.5) TCD50/1 ml echovirus 30 and in virus-free medium did not differ one from another in their growth and die-away kinetics during the 21 days of observation. Two-day T. pyriformis cultures were infected with poliovirus 1 (initial concentration 10(3.2) TCD50/1 ml), and poliovirus 2 and echovirus 30 (initial concentrations 10(3.0) TCD50/1 ml). Viruses were titrated in test tube cultures of BGM cells. The supernatant fluid, standardized sediment and samples of control virus suspension free of protozoa were titrated after 0, 2, 6, 10, 13, 18, 28 and 30 days. Most of the virus in culture was found associated with the sediment, both in the period of active growth and during the die-away phase of T. pyriformis protozoa. The virus in sediment was present at higher titres and its survival time was longer than in virus in liquid phase. Thirteen days after the first contact between T. pyriformis and virus the sediment and supernatant fluid of the old protozoan culture and the T. pyriformis-free control viral suspension were taken and used as inocula for new two-day T. pyriformis cultures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochizuki Kazufumi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. Results In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymena and localizes to the macronucleus where it induces precise recombination at two loxP sequences in direct orientation in the Tetrahymena macronuclear chromosome. This Cre/loxP recombination can be used to remove a loxP-flanked drug-resistance marker from an N-terminal tagging construct after it is integrated into the macronucleus. Conclusions The system established in this study allows us to express an N-terminal epitope tagged gene from its own endogenous promoter in Tetrahymena.

  4. Correlation of cutaneous reactivity between allergenic extracts of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae with Blomis tropicalis in patients with allergic rinitis and asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morales-de-León, Guadalupe; López-García, Aída; Arana-Muñoz, Oswaldo; Carcaño-Pérez, Y; Papaqui-Tapia, Sergio; Caballero-López, C G; Martínez-Villegas, M; Ríos-López, J J

    2012-01-01

    .... to estimate the correlation of skin reactivity to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae antigens with that of Blomia tropicalis in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma...

  5. Triggering Artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst; Robinson, Mike

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a general critique of the use of conceptual frameworks in design, illustrated by the well known synchronous/asynchronous, co-located/non-co-located framework. It argues that while frameworks are a necessary and inevitable starting point for design, the business of tailoring...... and adapting them to specific situations need not be ad hoc.Triggering artefacts are a way of systematically challenging both designers' preunderstandings and the conservatism of work practice. Experiences from the Great Belt tunnel and bridge project are used to illustrate howtriggering artefacts change...

  6. Effect of Cerophyl growth medium on exocytosis in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesciotta, D M; Satir, B H

    1985-10-01

    Culturing the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila in Cerophyl has provided an opportunity for studying the assembly and/or synthesis of the intramembrane particle array, the rosette, which marks the site of exocytosis in these cells. Cultures grown in this medium cease cell division after only 12h and enter 'stationary phase' earlier (12h of growth) relative to growth in standard medium (proteose peptone). In addition, the cell changes from the normally observed pear-shaped body to a thinner more ellipsoid form. Despite the initial similarities to starving cells, several differences are observed in the Cerophyl-grown cells. One is that cell size remains constant for at least 72h in contrast to starved cells. Secondly, in spite of this block in cell division, results from freeze-fracture replicas of the cell membrane of these cells show that they continue to assemble rosettes, the number of which increases approximately six times, from 0.34 rosette/microgram2 to 2.1 rosettes/microgram2. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (6h exposure), during growth in Cerophyl shows that 70% of rosettes can be assembled, despite the blockage of translation, by using pre-existing component(s) from a pool. The remaining 30% must involve de novo synthesis of one or more components; this percentage can be increased with longer exposure to the drug. Thirdly, an apparent increase in the number of mucocysts is observed by thin-section electron microscopy. At first (12-24h) only docked mucocysts seem to accumulate in the cell. However, by 36h a considerable increase seems to have taken place, particularly in the number of mucocysts located in the cytoplasm. In the cycloheximide-treated cells this increase in mucocysts begins to be blocked after 6h of exposure to the drug. These observations are in agreement with the results obtained from the freeze-fracture data on the concomitant increase in number of rosettes. This system therefore offers the first possibility of

  7. A comparative survey of the frequency and distribution of polymorphism in the genome of Xenopus tropicalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Showell

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring DNA sequence variation within a species underlies evolutionary adaptation and can give rise to phenotypic changes that provide novel insight into biological questions. This variation exists in laboratory populations just as in wild populations and, in addition to being a source of useful alleles for genetic studies, can impact efforts to identify induced mutations in sequence-based genetic screens. The Western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis (X. tropicalis has been adopted as a model system for studying the genetic control of embryonic development and a variety of other areas of research. Its diploid genome has been extensively sequenced and efforts are underway to isolate mutants by phenotype- and genotype-based approaches. Here, we describe a study of genetic polymorphism in laboratory strains of X. tropicalis. Polymorphism was detected in the coding and non-coding regions of developmental genes distributed widely across the genome. Laboratory strains exhibit unexpectedly high frequencies of genetic polymorphism, with alleles carrying a variety of synonymous and non-synonymous codon substitutions and nucleotide insertions/deletions. Inter-strain comparisons of polymorphism uncover a high proportion of shared alleles between Nigerian and Ivory Coast strains, in spite of their distinct geographical origins. These observations will likely influence the design of future sequence-based mutation screens, particularly those using DNA mismatch-based detection methods which can be disrupted by the presence of naturally occurring sequence variants. The existence of a significant reservoir of alleles also suggests that existing laboratory stocks may be a useful source of novel alleles for mapping and functional studies.

  8. Contenido de carotenos en el follaje de Pinus caribaea Morelet y Pinus tropicalis Morelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Quert Álvarez

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un análisis del material vegetal de las especies Pinus caribaea Morelet y Pinus tropicalis Morelet, con el objetivo de determinar su contenido de caroteno tomando como base las condiciones y tiempo de exposición del follaje de las especies objeto de estudio al sol y a la sombra, y teniendo en cuenta la extracción del aceite esencias como factores influyentes en la variación de las concentraciones de caroteno. Para determinar el contenido de caroteno se tomaron muestras del follaje entre 1 y 20 d, expuesto a las condiciones de trabajo en intervalos de 1, 3, 6, 10 y 20 d, tanto antes como después de extraer el aceite esencial. Los resultados obtenidos para ambas especies demostraron que el follaje expuesto a la sombra contiene un mayor porcentaje de caroteno que el expuesto al sol, como era de esperar; el tiempo de exposición influye significativamente en este contenido, así como la extracción del aceite esencial que aumenta el contenido de caroteno; los valores máximos fueron de 130,7 y 157,2 mg/kg de follaje y los mínimos de 55,3 y 57,2 mg/kg de follaje para Pinus caribaea Morelet y Pinus tropicalis Morelet respectivamente.An analysis of the vegetable material from the species Pinus cariabaea Morelet and Pinus tropicalis Morelet was carried out and their content of carotene was determined taking as the basis the conditions and time of exposure of the foliage of the species studied to the sun and shade, and also taking into account the extraction of the essential oil as factors influencing on the variation of carotene concentrations. For the determination of the carotene content, samples of the foliage between 1 and 20 exposed to working conditions at intervals of 1, 3, 6, 10 and 20 d were taken, both before and after the extraction of the essential oil. Results obteined from both species showed that the foliage exposed to shade contains a higher percentage of carotene than the one exposed to the sun, as it was expected to

  9. Involvement of a putative intercellular signal-recognizing G protein-coupled receptor in the engulfment of Salmonella by the protozoan Tetrahymena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.N. Agbedanu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to investigate the molecular basis of protozoa engulfment-mediated hypervirulence of Salmonella in cattle, we evaluated protozoan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs as transducers of Salmonella engulfment by the model protozoan Tetrahymena. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that non-pathogenic protozoa (including Tetrahymena engulf Salmonella and then exacerbate its virulence in cattle, but the mechanistic details of the phenomenon are not fully understood. GPCRs were investigated since these receptors facilitate phagocytosis of particulates by Tetrahymena, and a GPCR apparently modulates bacterial engulfment for the pathogenic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. A database search identified three putative Tetrahymena GPCRs, based on sequence homologies and predicted transmembrane domains, that were the focus of this study. Salmonella engulfment by Tetrahymena was assessed in the presence of suramin, a non-specific GPCR inhibitor. Salmonella engulfment was also assessed in Tetrahymena in which expression of putative GPCRs was knocked-down using RNAi. A candidate GPCR was then expressed in a heterologous yeast expression system for further characterization. Our results revealed that Tetrahymena were less efficient at engulfing Salmonella in the presence of suramin. Engulfment was reduced concordantly with a reduction in the density of protozoa. RNAi-based studies revealed that knock-down of one the Tetrahymena GPCRs caused diminished engulfment of Salmonella. Tetrahymena lysates activated this receptor in the heterologous expression system. These data demonstrate that the Tetrahymena receptor is a putative GPCR that facilitates bacterial engulfment by Tetrahymena. Activation of the putative GPCR seemed to be related to protozoan cell density, suggesting that its cognate ligand is an intercellular signaling molecule.

  10. Firearm trigger assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  11. QSAR studies for the acute toxicity of nitrobenzenes to the Tetrahymena pyriformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dan-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR models play a key role in finding the relationship between molecular structures and the toxicity of nitrobenzenes to Tetrahymena pyriformis. In this work, genetic algorithm, along with partial least square (GA-PLS was employed to select optimal subset of descriptors that have significant contribution to the toxicity of nitrobenzenes to Tetrahymena pyriformis. A set of five descriptors, namely G2, HOMT, G(Cl…Cl, Mor03v and MAXDP, was used for the prediction of the toxicity of 45 nitrobenzene derivatives and then were used to build the model by multiple linear regression (MLR method. It turned out that the built model, whose stability was confirmed using the leave-one-out validation and external validation test, showed high statistical significance (R2=0.963, Q2LOO=0.944. Moreover, Y-scrambling test indicated there was no chance correlation in this model.

  12. Modeling the toxicity of chemicals to Tetrahymena pyriformis using molecular fragment descriptors and probabilistic neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, S P; Kaiser, K L; Schultz, T W

    2000-10-01

    The results of an investigation into the use of a probabilistic neural network (PNN)-based methodology to model the 48-h ICG50 (inhibitory concentration for population growth) sublethal toxicity of 825 chemicals to the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis are presented. The information fed into the neural networks is solely based on simple molecular descriptors as can be derived from the chemical structure. In contrast to most other toxicological models, the octanol/water partition coefficient is not used as an input parameter, and no rules of thumb or other substance selection criteria are employed. The cross-validation and external validation experiments confirmed excellent recognitive and predictive capabilities of the resulting models and recommend their future use in evaluating the potential of most organic molecules to be toxic to Tetrahymena.

  13. MTL-independent phenotypic switching in Candida tropicalis and a dual role for Wor1 in regulating switching and filamentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M Porman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic switching allows for rapid transitions between alternative cell states and is important in pathogenic fungi for colonization and infection of different host niches. In Candida albicans, the white-opaque phenotypic switch plays a central role in regulating the program of sexual mating as well as interactions with the mammalian host. White-opaque switching is controlled by genes encoded at the MTL (mating-type-like locus that ensures that only a or α cells can switch from the white state to the mating-competent opaque state, while a/α cells are refractory to switching. Here, we show that the related pathogen C. tropicalis undergoes white-opaque switching in all three cell types (a, α, and a/α, and thus switching is independent of MTL control. We also demonstrate that C. tropicalis white cells are themselves mating-competent, albeit at a lower efficiency than opaque cells. Transcriptional profiling of C. tropicalis white and opaque cells reveals significant overlap between switch-regulated genes in MTL homozygous and MTL heterozygous cells, although twice as many genes are white-opaque regulated in a/α cells as in a cells. In C. albicans, the transcription factor Wor1 is the master regulator of the white-opaque switch, and we show that Wor1 also regulates switching in C. tropicalis; deletion of WOR1 locks a, α, and a/α cells in the white state, while WOR1 overexpression induces these cells to adopt the opaque state. Furthermore, we show that WOR1 overexpression promotes both filamentous growth and biofilm formation in C. tropicalis, independent of the white-opaque switch. These results demonstrate an expanded role for C. tropicalis Wor1, including the regulation of processes necessary for infection of the mammalian host. We discuss these findings in light of the ancestral role of Wor1 as a transcriptional regulator of the transition between yeast form and filamentous growth.

  14. Cysteine proteases and acid phosphatases contribute to Tetrahymena spp. pathogenicity in guppies, Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, M Pimenta; Ofir, R; Golan-Goldhirsh, A; Zilberg, D

    2009-12-03

    Systemic tetrahymenosis caused by the protozoan parasite Tetrahymena spp. is a serious problem in guppy (Poecilia reticulata) farms worldwide. There is no therapeutic solution for the systemic form of this disease. Guppies severely infected with Tetrahymena spp. were imported by a commercial ornamental fish farm and brought to our laboratory. Tetrahymena sp. (Tet-NI) was isolated and in vitro cultured. Isolates maintained in culture for different time periods (as reflected by different numbers of passages in culture) were analyzed-Tet-NI 1, 4, 5 and 6, with Tet-NI 1 being cultured for the longest period (about 15 months, 54 passages) and Tet-NI 6 for the shortest (2.5 months, 10 passages). Controlled internal infection was successfully achieved by IP injection with most isolates, except for Tet-NI 1 which produced no infection. The isolate Tet-NI 6 induced the highest infection rates in internal organs (80% vs. 50% and 64% for Tet-NI 4 and 5, respectively) and mortality rates (67% vs. 20% and 27% for Tet-NI 4 and 5, respectively, and 6.7% for Tet-NI 1). The correlation between pathogenicity and Tetrahymena enzymatic activity was studied. Electrophoretic analyses revealed at least two bands of gelanolytic activity in Tet-NI 4 and 5, three bands in Tet-NI 6, and no activity in Tet-NI 1. Total inhibition of gelanolytic activity was observed after pretreatment of Tet-NI 6 with E-64, a highly selective cysteine protease inhibitor. Using hemoglobin as a substrate, Tet-NI 6 had two bands of proteolytic activity and no bands were observed in Tet-NI 1. A correlation was observed between pathogenicity and acid phosphatase activities (analyzed by commercial fluorescence kit) for Tet-NI 1 and Tet-NI 6.

  15. Use of Tetrahymena thermophila To Study the Role of Protozoa in Inactivation of Viruses in Water▿

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Marcel D. O.; Power, Mary E.; Butler, Barbara J.; Dayeh, Vivian R.; Slawson, Robin; Lee, Lucy E. J.; Lynn, Denis H.; Bols, Niels C.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of a ciliate to inactivate bacteriophage was studied because these viruses are known to influence the size and diversity of bacterial populations, which affect nutrient cycling in natural waters and effluent quality in sewage treatment, and because ciliates are ubiquitous in aquatic environments, including sewage treatment plants. Tetrahymena thermophila was used as a representative ciliate; T4 was used as a model bacteriophage. The T4 titer was monitored on Escherichia coli B in ...

  16. Use of Tetrahymena thermophila to study the role of protozoa in inactivation of viruses in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Marcel D O; Power, Mary E; Butler, Barbara J; Dayeh, Vivian R; Slawson, Robin; Lee, Lucy E J; Lynn, Denis H; Bols, Niels C

    2007-01-01

    The ability of a ciliate to inactivate bacteriophage was studied because these viruses are known to influence the size and diversity of bacterial populations, which affect nutrient cycling in natural waters and effluent quality in sewage treatment, and because ciliates are ubiquitous in aquatic environments, including sewage treatment plants. Tetrahymena thermophila was used as a representative ciliate; T4 was used as a model bacteriophage. The T4 titer was monitored on Escherichia coli B in a double-agar overlay assay. T4 and the ciliate were incubated together under different conditions and for various times, after which the mixture was centrifuged through a step gradient, producing a top layer free of ciliates. The T4 titer in this layer decreased as coincubation time increased, but no decrease was seen if phage were incubated with formalin-fixed Tetrahymena. The T4 titer associated with the pellet of living ciliates was very low, suggesting that removal of the phage by Tetrahymena inactivated T4. When Tetrahymena cells were incubated with SYBR gold-labeled phage, fluorescence was localized in structures that had the shape and position of food vacuoles. Incubation of the phage and ciliate with cytochalasin B or at 4 degrees C impaired T4 inactivation. These results suggest the active removal of T4 bacteriophage from fluid by macropinocytosis, followed by digestion in food vacuoles. Such ciliate virophagy may be a mechanism occurring in natural waters and sewage treatment, and the methods described here could be used to study the factors influencing inactivation and possibly water quality.

  17. Use of Tetrahymena thermophila To Study the Role of Protozoa in Inactivation of Viruses in Water▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Marcel D. O.; Power, Mary E.; Butler, Barbara J.; Dayeh, Vivian R.; Slawson, Robin; Lee, Lucy E. J.; Lynn, Denis H.; Bols, Niels C.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of a ciliate to inactivate bacteriophage was studied because these viruses are known to influence the size and diversity of bacterial populations, which affect nutrient cycling in natural waters and effluent quality in sewage treatment, and because ciliates are ubiquitous in aquatic environments, including sewage treatment plants. Tetrahymena thermophila was used as a representative ciliate; T4 was used as a model bacteriophage. The T4 titer was monitored on Escherichia coli B in a double-agar overlay assay. T4 and the ciliate were incubated together under different conditions and for various times, after which the mixture was centrifuged through a step gradient, producing a top layer free of ciliates. The T4 titer in this layer decreased as coincubation time increased, but no decrease was seen if phage were incubated with formalin-fixed Tetrahymena. The T4 titer associated with the pellet of living ciliates was very low, suggesting that removal of the phage by Tetrahymena inactivated T4. When Tetrahymena cells were incubated with SYBR gold-labeled phage, fluorescence was localized in structures that had the shape and position of food vacuoles. Incubation of the phage and ciliate with cytochalasin B or at 4°C impaired T4 inactivation. These results suggest the active removal of T4 bacteriophage from fluid by macropinocytosis, followed by digestion in food vacuoles. Such ciliate virophagy may be a mechanism occurring in natural waters and sewage treatment, and the methods described here could be used to study the factors influencing inactivation and possibly water quality. PMID:17114327

  18. Expression of a cell surface immobilization antigen during serotype transformation in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, N. E.; Doerder, F. P.; Ron, A

    1985-01-01

    A temperature shift from 40 to 28 degrees C rapidly induced expression of a specific immobilization antigen at the cell surface in Tetrahymena thermophila. This transformation was inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide but not by colchicine or cytochalasin B. The major surface antigen expressed at 28 degrees C in cells homozygous for the SerH3 allele was partially purified, and an antiserum against this preparation was raised in rabbits. Electrophoresis, immunoblot, and [35S]methionine ...

  19. Toxicity of Nine (Doped) Rare Earth Metal Oxides and Respective Individual Metals to Aquatic Microorganisms Vibrio fischeri and Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurvet, Imbi; Juganson, Katre; Vija, Heiki; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Blinova, Irina; Syvertsen-Wiig, Guttorm; Kahru, Anne

    2017-07-05

    Despite the increasing use of rare earth elements (REEs) and oxides (REOs) in various technologies, the information on their ecotoxicological hazard is scarce. Here, the effects of La(3+), Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Nd(3+), Gd(3+), CeO₂, and eight doped REOs to marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and freshwater protozoa Tetrahymena thermophila were studied in parallel with REO dopant metals (Co(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Sr(2+)). The highest concentrations of REOs tested were 100 mg/L with protozoa in deionized water and 500 mg/L with bacteria in 2% NaCl. Although (i) most REOs produced reactive oxygen species; (ii) all studied soluble REEs were toxic to bacteria (half-effective concentration, EC50 3.5-21 mg metal/L; minimal bactericidal concentration, MBC 6.3-63 mg/L) and to protozoa (EC50 28-42 mg/L); and (iii) also some dopant metals (Ni(2+), Fe(3+)) proved toxic (EC50 ≤ 3 mg/L), no toxicity of REOs to protozoa (EC50 > 100 mg/L) and bacteria (EC50 > 500 mg/L; MBC > 500 mg/L) was observed except for La₂NiO₄ (MBC 25 mg/L). According to kinetics of V. fischeri bioluminescence, the toxicity of REEs was triggered by disturbing cellular membrane integrity. Fortunately, as REEs and REOs are currently produced in moderate amounts and form in the environment insoluble salts and/or oxides, they apparently present no harm to aquatic bacteria and protozoa.

  20. Treatment development for systemic Tetrahymena sp. infection in guppies, Poecilia reticulata Peters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, M Pimenta; Chettri, J Kumar; Ofir, R; Zilberg, D

    2010-06-01

    Antibacterial and antiparasitic agents and a cysteine protease inhibitor (E-64) were tested against Tetrahymena infection, a serious problem in guppy production worldwide. Chemicals were tested in vitro by a colorimetric assay for Tetrahymena survival. The most effective were niclosamide, albendazole and chloroquine, with 23%, 35% and 60% survival, respectively, following 2-h exposure to 100 ppm. Longer incubation periods resulted in greater reductions in survival. Niclosamide was further studied in vivo at different dosages, administered orally to Tetrahymena-infected guppies. Mortality rates were significantly lower in all treatment groups; in trial I, 30% and 33% mortality in 5 and 40 mg kg(-1) niclosamide-fed fish vs. 59% mortality in controls; in trial II, 35%, 13% and 10% in 50, 100 and 200 mg kg(-1) niclosamide-fed fish vs. 64% in controls. The effect of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64 was tested in tissue culture, by measuring histolytic activity of the parasite (Tet-NI) on a guppy-fin cell line, based on cell depletion. Tet-NI feeding activity was significantly reduced following pretreatment with E-64 relative to non-treated Tet-NI. E-64-pretreated Tet-NI was injected i.p. into guppies: recorded mortality rates were significantly lower (35%) than that in non-treated Tet-NI (60%), suggesting inhibition of the parasite's cysteine protease as a possible therapeutic approach.

  1. The relationship between energy-dependent phagocytosis and the rate of oxygen consumption in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skriver, L; Nilsson, J R

    1978-12-01

    The induction of high rates of food vacuole formation in Tetrahymena pyriformis increased the rate of respiration in exponentially growing cells by 17% and in starving cells by 47.5%. The increased rate of oxygen uptake was caused by phagocytosis itself, as shown by comparing the rates of respiration of a Tetrahymena mutant exposed to particles at the permissive or restrictive temperatures for food vacuole formation. During cell division, heat-synchronized cells in rich, particle-supplemented medium showed a significant decrease in the rate of respiration. Furthermore, dimethyl sulphoxide, in concentrations sufficient to block food vacuole formation, suppressed the rate of respiration to a level similar to that of starved cells. Cytochalasin B, fowever, did not reduce the rate of oxygen uptake despite the inability of the cells to complete the formation of food vacuoles during treatment; a possible explanation for this finding is discussed. There was a strong correlation between formation of food vacuoles and a high metabolic rate in Tetrahymena.

  2. Construction of genetically engineered Candida tropicalis for conversion of L-arabinose to L-ribulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, In-Seok; Shim, Woo-Yong; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2018-01-30

    For the biological production of L-ribulose, conversion by enzymes or resting cells has been investigated. However, expensive or concentrated substrates, an additional purification step to remove borate and the requirement for cell cultivation and harvest steps before utilization of resting cells make the production process complex and unfavorable. Microbial fermentation may help overcome these limitations. In this study, we constructed a genetically engineered Candida tropicalis strain to produce L-ribulose by fermentation with a glucose/L-arabinose mixture. For the uptake of L-arabinose as a substrate and conversion of L-arabinose to L-ribulose, two heterologous genes coding for L-arabinose transporter and L-arabinose isomerase, were constitutively expressed in C. tropicalis under the GAPDH promoter. The Arabidopsis thaliana-originated L-arabinose transporter gene (STP2)-expressing strain exhibited a high L-arabinose uptake rate of 0.103 g/g cell/h and the expression of L-arabinose isomerase from Lactobacillus sakei 23K showed 30% of conversion (9 g/L) from 30 g/L of L-arabinose. This genetically engineered strain can be used for L-ribulose production by fermentation using mixed sugars of glucose and L-arabinose. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Remobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in the germline of Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yergeau Donald A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system has been used for germline transgenesis of the diploid frog, Xenopus tropicalis. Injecting one-cell embryos with plasmid DNA harboring an SB transposon substrate together with mRNA encoding the SB transposase enzyme resulted in non-canonical integration of small-order concatemers of the transposon. Here, we demonstrate that SB transposons stably integrated into the frog genome are effective substrates for remobilization. Results Transgenic frogs that express the SB10 transposase were bred with SB transposon-harboring animals to yield double-transgenic 'hopper' frogs. Remobilization events were observed in the progeny of the hopper frogs and were verified by Southern blot analysis and cloning of the novel integrations sites. Unlike the co-injection method used to generate founder lines, transgenic remobilization resulted in canonical transposition of the SB transposons. The remobilized SB transposons frequently integrated near the site of the donor locus; approximately 80% re-integrated with 3 Mb of the donor locus, a phenomenon known as 'local hopping'. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that SB transposons integrated into the X. tropicalis genome are effective substrates for excision and re-integration, and that the remobilized transposons are transmitted through the germline. This is an important step in the development of large-scale transposon-mediated gene- and enhancer-trap strategies in this highly tractable developmental model system.

  4. Nitric Acid-Treated Carbon Fibers with Enhanced Hydrophilicity for Candida tropicalis Immobilization in Xylitol Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitric acid (HNO3-treated carbon fiber (CF rich in hydrophilic groups was applied as a cell-immobilized carrier for xylitol fermentation. Using scanning electron microscopy, we characterized the morphology of the HNO3-treated CF. Additionally, we evaluated the immobilized efficiency (IE of Candida tropicalis and xylitol fermentation yield by investigating the surface properties of nitric acid treated CF, specifically, the acidic group content, zero charge point, degree of moisture and contact angle. We found that adhesion is the major mechanism for cell immobilization and that it is greatly affected by the hydrophilic–hydrophilic surface properties. In our experiments, we found 3 hto be the optimal time for treating CF with nitric acid, resulting in an improved IE of Candida tropicalis of 0.98 g∙g−1 and the highest xylitol yield and volumetric productivity (70.13% and 1.22 g∙L−1∙h−1, respectively. The HNO3-treated CF represents a promising method for preparing biocompatible biocarriers for multi-batch fermentation.

  5. Synergistic Effects of Amiodarone and Fluconazole on Candida tropicalis Resistant to Fluconazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cecília Rocha; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Ângelo, Maria Rozzelê Ferreira; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Macedo, Danielle Silveira; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Lobo, Marina Duarte Pinto; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    There have recently been significant increases in the prevalence of systemic invasive fungal infections. However, the number of antifungal drugs on the market is limited in comparison to the number of available antibacterial drugs. This fact, coupled with the increased frequency of cross-resistance, makes it necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies. Combination drug therapies have become one of the most widely used and effective strategies to alleviate this problem. Amiodarone (AMD) is classically used for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and is the drug of choice for patients with arrhythmia. Recent studies have shown broad antifungal activity of the drug when administered in combination with fluconazole (FLC). In the present study, we induced resistance to fluconazole in six strains of Candida tropicalis and evaluated potential synergism between fluconazole and amiodarone. The evaluation of drug interaction was determined by calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration and by performing flow cytometry. We conclude that amiodarone, when administered in combination with fluconazole, exhibits activity against strains of C. tropicalis that are resistant to fluconazole, which most likely occurs via changes in the integrity of the yeast cell membrane and the generation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and DNA damage that could lead to cell death by apoptosis. PMID:23357774

  6. Synergistic effects of amiodarone and fluconazole on Candida tropicalis resistant to fluconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cecília Rocha; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Angelo, Maria Rozzelê Ferreira; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Macedo, Danielle Silveira; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Lobo, Marina Duarte Pinto; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Nobre Júnior, Hélio Vitoriano

    2013-04-01

    There have recently been significant increases in the prevalence of systemic invasive fungal infections. However, the number of antifungal drugs on the market is limited in comparison to the number of available antibacterial drugs. This fact, coupled with the increased frequency of cross-resistance, makes it necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies. Combination drug therapies have become one of the most widely used and effective strategies to alleviate this problem. Amiodarone (AMD) is classically used for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and is the drug of choice for patients with arrhythmia. Recent studies have shown broad antifungal activity of the drug when administered in combination with fluconazole (FLC). In the present study, we induced resistance to fluconazole in six strains of Candida tropicalis and evaluated potential synergism between fluconazole and amiodarone. The evaluation of drug interaction was determined by calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration and by performing flow cytometry. We conclude that amiodarone, when administered in combination with fluconazole, exhibits activity against strains of C. tropicalis that are resistant to fluconazole, which most likely occurs via changes in the integrity of the yeast cell membrane and the generation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and DNA damage that could lead to cell death by apoptosis.

  7. Presence of the yeast Candida tropicalis in figs infected by the fruit fly Zaprionus indianus (dip.: Drosophilidae Presença da levedura Candida tropicalis em figos infestados pela mosca da fruta Zaprionus indianus (dip.: Drosophilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz H. Gomes

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the fruit fly Zapronius indianus became the most important plague of Brazilian fig production. A fermentation process is associated with infection of the fruit by this fly. A single yeast species, Candida tropicalis, was identified in all the infected figs. The presence of one species and the low genetic variability (RAPD of the isolates indicates an uncommonly strict interaction between C. tropicalis and Z. indianus.Nos últimos anos, a mosca-africana-do-figo Zaprionus indianus tem se tornado a praga mais importante desta cultura no Brasil. Um processo fermentativo está associado com a infecção dos frutos por esta mosca. Uma única espécie de levedura, Candida tropicalis, foi identificada nos figos infectados. A presença de uma única espécie de levedura e a baixa variabilidade genética (RAPD dos isolados indica uma relação muito estreita entre C. tropicalis e Z. indianus.

  8. The Blomia tropicalis allergen Blo t 7 stimulates innate immune signaling pathways through TLR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soongrung, Tewarit; Mongkorntanyatipa, Karntichar; Peepim, Termsri; Buaklin, Arun; Le Mignon, Maxime; Malainual, Nat; Nony, Emmanuel; Jacquet, Alain

    2018-01-22

    Although the house dust mite species Blomia tropicalis is a leading cause of allergic diseases in tropical and subtropical regions, the identification and characterization of the allergenic proteins remains incomplete. We aimed to characterize a recombinant form of Blo t 7 (rBlo t 7) in terms of IgE reactivity, lipid binding activity and ability to stimulate innate immunity. The mature Blo t 7 cDNA was cloned by PCR methods for the expression of a secreted form of the allergen in P. pastoris. The IgE reactivity to purified rBlo t 7 as well as the potential cross-reactivity with Der p 7 were determined by ELISA. The lipid binding capacity of rBlo t 7 was assayed using fluorescent lipid probes. The stimulation of TLR2 signaling pathway by rBlo t 7 was examined in cell activation and reporter assays. The amplified mature Blo t 7 cDNA revealed the presence of a 60 base pair insertion compared with the reference sequence registered in the GENBANK database. Multiple protein sequence alignments of group 7 mite allergens confirmed that this longer deduced amino acid sequence was the authentic Blo t 7 polypeptide chain. Analysis of IgE reactivity can classify rBlo t 7 as an intermediate B. tropicalis allergen which displayed weak cross-reactivity with Der p 7. Purified rBlo t 7 was shown to bind selectively the naturally fluorescent lipid probe cis-parinaric (cPNA) with a dissociation constant of 2 μM. The group 7 Blomia allergen stimulated the TLR2-, NF-kB- and MAPK-dependent production of IL-8 and GM-CSF in respiratory epithelial cells. Through its propensity to transport fatty acids/lipids and to stimulate TLR2 signaling pathways in airway epithelial cells, Blo t 7 can represent a key allergen for the initiation of the B. tropicalis-induced airway inflammation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Fermentation and antimicrobial characteristics of Lactobacillus plantarum and Candida tropicalis from Nigerian fermented maize (akamu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Chisa Obinna-Echem

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the ability of Lactobacillus plantarum strains (NGL5 and NGL7 and Candida tropicalis (NGY1 previously identified from akamu-a Nigerian fermented maize food with probiotic L. plantarum LpTx and Saccharomyces boulardii SB20 to ferment ground maize slurries based on pH, acidity, microbial biomass, levels of sugars and organic acids, and their antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis NCTC 5188, Escherichia coli NCTC 11560, Bacillus cereus NCIMB 11925, Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 3750 and Listeria monocytogenes NCTC 7973 using an agar spot assay. L. plantarum strains either as single or mixed starter cultures with the yeasts had growth rates ≥0.15 h-1,with pH significantly (p≤0.05 decreased to ≤3.93 after 12 h and then to ≤3.52 after 72 h and lactic acid >84 mmol L-1. The yeasts had growth rates ≥0.18 h-1 but pH was ≥4.57 with lactic acid levels ≤20.23 mmol L-1 after 72 h in the single culture fermentation. There was no inhibition in modified MRS agar: 0.2% glucose and 0.2% glucose without Tween 80. Inhibition halos in MRS agar varied from 10.6 to 23.9 mm. S. bourladii was more inhibitory towards L. monocytogenes (8.6 mm and B. cereus (5.4 mm than was C. tropicalis (1.1 and 3.3 mm for L. monocytogenes NCTC 7973 and B. cereus NCIMB 11925 respectively (0.9 mm in malt extract agar. This study showed that C. tropicalis was less inhibitory to the pathogens while antimicrobial activities of the L. plantarum strains were mainly due to acidity and the L. plantarum strains either as single or mixed cultures with the yeasts demonstrated strong fermentation ability, with significant decrease in pH which is vital in the choice of starter for product safety.

  10. Multilocus sequence analyses reveal extensive diversity and multiple origins of fluconazole resistance in Candida tropicalis from tropical China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Yan; Guo, Hong; Wang, Hua-Min; Yi, Guo-Hui; Zhou, Li-Min; He, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Jianping

    2017-02-10

    Candida tropicalis is among the most prevalent human pathogenic yeast species, second only to C. albicans in certain geographic regions such as East Asia and Brazil. However, compared to C. albicans, relatively little is known about the patterns of genetic variation in C. tropicalis. This study analyzed the genetic diversity and relationships among isolates of C. tropicalis from the southern Chinese island of Hainan. A total of 116 isolates were obtained from seven geographic regions located across the Island. For each isolate, a total of 2677 bp from six gene loci were sequenced and 79 (2.96%) polymorphic nucleotide sites were found in our sample. Comparisons with strains reported from other parts of the world identified significant novel diversities in Hainan, including an average of six novel sequences (with a range 1 to 14) per locus and 80 novel diploid sequence types. Most of the genetic variation was found within individual strains and there was abundant evidence for gene flow among the seven geographic locations within Hainan. Interestingly, our analyses identified no significant correlation between the diploid sequence types at the six loci and fluconazole susceptibility, consistent with multiple origins of fluconazole resistance in the Hainan population of C. tropicalis.

  11. Stepwise Development of a Homozygous S80P Substitution in Fks1p, Conferring Echinocandin Resistance in Candida tropicalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2013-01-01

    Three Candida tropicalis isolates were obtained from a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The first isolate was susceptible to all drug classes, while isolates 2 and 3, obtained after 8 and 8.5 weeks of caspofungin treatment, respectively, were resistant to the three echinocandins...

  12. ISOLATION OF THE CANDIDA TROPICALIS GENE FOR P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE AND ITS EXPRESSION IN SACCAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have isolated the gene for cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14-demethylase (14DM) from the yeast Candida tropicalis. This was accomplished by screening genomic libraries of strain ATCC750 in E. coli using a DNA fragment containing the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14DM gene. Identi...

  13. A New Nomenclature of Xenopus laevis Chromosomes Based on the Phylogenetic Relationship to Silurana/Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Kondo, Mariko; Gilchrist, Michael J; Zorn, Aaron M; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Schmid, Michael; Taira, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Xenopus laevis (XLA) is an allotetraploid species which appears to have undergone whole-genome duplication after the interspecific hybridization of 2 diploid species closely related to Silurana/Xenopus tropicalis (XTR). Previous cDNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments have identified 9 sets of homoeologous chromosomes in X. laevis, in which 8 sets correspond to chromosomes 1-8 of X. tropicalis (XTR1-XTR8), and the last set corresponds to a fusion of XTR9 and XTR10. In addition, recent X. laevis genome sequencing and BAC-FISH experiments support this physiological relationship and show no gross chromosome translocation in the X. laevis karyotype. Therefore, for the benefit of both comparative cytogenetics and genome research, we here propose a new chromosome nomenclature for X. laevis based on the phylogenetic relationship and chromosome length, i.e. XLA1L, XLA1S, XLA2L, XLA2S, and so on, in which the numbering of XLA chromosomes corresponds to that in X. tropicalis and the postfixes 'L' and 'S' stand for 'long' and 'short' chromosomes in the homoeologous pairs, which can be distinguished cytologically by their relative size. The last chromosome set is named XLA9L and XLA9S, in which XLA9 corresponds to both XTR9 and XTR10, and hence, to emphasize the phylogenetic relationship to X. tropicalis, XLA9_10L and XLA9_10S are also used as synonyms.

  14. Isolation of the alkane inducible cytochrome P450 (P450alk) gene from the yeast Candida tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a λgt11 library. Isolation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. Transcripts of this gene were i...

  15. Biodegradation of crude petroleum oil and environmental pollutants by Candida tropicalis strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Farag

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A local yeast isolate named A was isolated from polluted area of Abou-Qir gulf (Alexandria, Egypt, identified according to a partial sequence of 18sRNA as Candida tropicalis. The isolate showed a high potency in petroleum oil biodegradation as well some hydrocarbons. Morphological changes in cell diameter of this yeast were recognized upon growing the target cell in sea water medium supplemented with petroleum oil as sole carbon source in comparison to the growth in enriched medium. Statistically-based experimental design was applied to evaluate the significance of factors on petroleum oil biodegradation by this yeast isolate. Eleven culture conditions were examined by implementing Plackett-Burman factorial design where aeration, NH4Cl and K2HPO4 had the most positive significance on oil degradation.

  16. Enhancement of xylitol production by attenuation of intracellular xylitol dehydrogenase activity in Candida tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Byoung Sam; Kim, Dong-Min; Yoon, Byoung Hoon; Bai, Suk; Lee, Hyeon Yong; Kim, Jung Hoe; Kim, Il-Chul

    2011-06-01

    To construct Candida tropicalis strains that produce a high yield of xylitol with no requirement for co-substrates, we engineered the yeast with an attenuated xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) and then assessed the efficiency of xylitol production The mutants, strains XDH-5 (with only one copy of the XDH gene), and ARSdR-16 (with a mutated XDH gene) showed 70 and 40% of wild type (WT) XDH activity, respectively. Conversions of xylose to xylitol by WT, XDH-5, and ARSdR-16 were 62, 64, and 75%, respectively, with productivities of 0.52, 0.54, and 0.62 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively. The ARSdR-16 mutant strain produced xylitol with high yield and high productivity in a simple process that required no co-substrates, such as glycerol. This strain represents a promising alternative for efficient and cost-effective xylitol production.

  17. Defining a large set of full-length clones from a Xenopus tropicalis EST project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Michael J; Zorn, Aaron M; Voigt, Jana; Smith, James C; Papalopulu, Nancy; Amaya, Enrique

    2004-07-15

    Amphibian embryos from the genus Xenopus are among the best species for understanding early vertebrate development and for studying basic cell biological processes. Xenopus, and in particular the diploid Xenopus tropicalis, is also ideal for functional genomics. Understanding the behavior of genes in this accessible model system will have a significant and beneficial impact on the understanding of similar genes in other vertebrate systems. Here we describe the analysis of 219,270 X. tropicalis expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from four early developmental stages. From these, we have deduced a set of unique expressed sequences comprising approximately 20,000 clusters and 16,000 singletons. Furthermore, we developed a computational method to identify clones that contain the complete coding sequence and describe the creation for the first time of a set of approximately 7000 such clones, the full-length (FL) clone set. The entire EST set is cloned in a eukaryotic expression vector and is flanked by bacteriophage promoters for in vitro transcription, allowing functional experiments to be carried out without further subcloning. We have created a publicly available database containing the FL clone set and related clustering data (http://www.gurdon.cam.ac.uk/informatics/Xenopus.html) and we make the FL clone set publicly available as a resource to accelerate the process of gene discovery and function in this model organism. The creation of the unique set of expressed sequences and the FL clone set pave the way toward a large-scale systematic analysis of gene sequence, gene expression, and gene function in this vertebrate species.

  18. RNA sequencing reveals a diverse and dynamic repertoire of the Xenopus tropicalis transcriptome over development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Meng How; Au, Kin Fai; Yablonovitch, Arielle L; Wills, Andrea E; Chuang, Jason; Baker, Julie C; Wong, Wing Hung; Li, Jin Billy

    2013-01-01

    The Xenopus embryo has provided key insights into fate specification, the cell cycle, and other fundamental developmental and cellular processes, yet a comprehensive understanding of its transcriptome is lacking. Here, we used paired end RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to explore the transcriptome of Xenopus tropicalis in 23 distinct developmental stages. We determined expression levels of all genes annotated in RefSeq and Ensembl and showed for the first time on a genome-wide scale that, despite a general state of transcriptional silence in the earliest stages of development, approximately 150 genes are transcribed prior to the midblastula transition. In addition, our splicing analysis uncovered more than 10,000 novel splice junctions at each stage and revealed that many known genes have additional unannotated isoforms. Furthermore, we used Cufflinks to reconstruct transcripts from our RNA-seq data and found that ∼13.5% of the final contigs are derived from novel transcribed regions, both within introns and in intergenic regions. We then developed a filtering pipeline to separate protein-coding transcripts from noncoding RNAs and identified a confident set of 6686 noncoding transcripts in 3859 genomic loci. Since the current reference genome, XenTro3, consists of hundreds of scaffolds instead of full chromosomes, we also performed de novo reconstruction of the transcriptome using Trinity and uncovered hundreds of transcripts that are missing from the genome. Collectively, our data will not only aid in completing the assembly of the Xenopus tropicalis genome but will also serve as a valuable resource for gene discovery and for unraveling the fundamental mechanisms of vertebrate embryogenesis.

  19. Microbial Protein Production from Candida tropicalis ATCC13803 in a Submerged Batch Fermentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Golaghaiee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Microbial protein production can resolve one of the major world challenges, i.e. lack of protein sources. Candida tropicalis growth was investigated to specify a medium to reach the highest cell proliferation and protein production.Material and Methods: Fractional factorial design and the index of signal to noise ratio were applied for optimization of microbial protein production. Optimization process was conducted based on the experimental results of Taguchi approach designs. Fermentationwas performed at 25oC and the agitation speed of 300 rpm for 70 h. Ammonium sulfate, iron sulfate, glycine and glucose concentrations were considered as process variables. Optimization of the culture medium composition was conducted in order to obtain the highest cell biomass concentration and protein content. Experiment design was performed based on the Taguchi approach and L-16 orthogonal arrays using Qualitek-4 software.Results and Conclusion: Maximum biomass of 8.72 log (CFU ml-1 was obtained using the optimized medium with 0.3, 0.15, 2 and 80 g l-1 of ammonium sulfate, iron sulfate, glycine and glucose, respectively. Iron sulfate and ammonium sulfate with 41.76% (w w-1 and 35.27% (w w-1 contributions, respectively, were recognized as the main components for cell growth. Glucose and glycine with 17.12% and 5.86% (w w-1 contributions,respectively, also affected cell production. The highest interaction severity index of +54.16% was observed between glycine and glucose while the least one of +0.43% was recorded for ammonium sulfate and glycine. A deviation of 7% between the highestpredicted cell numbers and the experimented count confirms the suitability of the applied statistical method. High protein content of 52.16% (w w-1 as well as low fat and nucleic acids content suggest that Candida tropicalis is a suitable case for commercial processes.Conflict of interest: The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

  20. Sensibilización a Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides siboney y Blomia tropicalis en niños de tres consultorios Sensitization to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides siboney and Blomia tropicalis in children from three family physician’s offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Lázaro Castro Almarales

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available La morbilidad de las enfermedades alérgicas mediadas por el anticuerpo IgE, se ha incrementado en los últimos 40 años, y además, se han identificado a los ácaros domésticos como sus principales agentes causales. En Cuba, los ácaros más frecuentemente son: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides siboney (D. siboney y Blomia tropicalis (B. tropicalis. En este estudio investigamos si la sensibilización a estos ácaros constituye un problema de salud en nuestra población infantil, y su relación con la exposición al polvo doméstico. Se seleccionaron 103 niños alérgicos del pueblo de Guatao, que se clasificaron según su grado de exposición al polvo doméstico. A todos se les realizó la prueba por punción cutánea por duplicado en ambos antebrazos y se utilizaron los extractos alergénicos estandarizados VALERGEN-BT Ò (Blomia tropicalis, VALERGEN-DS Ò (Dermatophagoides siboney y VALERGEN-DP Ò (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, todos de producción nacional en el Centro Nacional de Biopreparados. La sensibilización fue mayor de forma significativa (pMorbidity of allergic diseases mediated by the IgE antibody has increased in the last 40 years and the house mites have been identified as their main causal agents. In Cuba, the most common mites are Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides siboney (D. siboney and Blomia tropicalis (B. tropicalis. In this study, it was investigated if the sensitization to these mites is a health problem in our infantile population and its connection with the exposure to house dust. 103 allergic children from the Guatao town were selected. All of them underwent the skin puncture test in both forearms and the VALERGEN-BT Ò (Blomia tropicalis, VALERGEN-DS Ò (Dermatophagoides siboney and VALERGEN-DP Ò (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus standardized allergenic extracts, which were produced in our country by the National Centre of Biopreparations, were used

  1. The effects of nucleoside analogs on telomerase and telomeres in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahl, C; Blackburn, E H

    1994-03-25

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase is a specialized type of cellular reverse transcriptase which synthesizes one strand of telomeric DNA, using as the template a sequence in the RNA moiety of telomerase. We analyzed the effects of various nucleoside analogs, known to be chain-terminating inhibitors of retroviral reverse transcriptases, on Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase activity in vitro. We also analyzed the effects of such analogs on telomere length and maintenance in vivo, and on vegetative growth and mating of Tetrahymena cells. Arabinofuranyl-guanosine triphosphate (Ara-GTP) and ddGTP both efficiently inhibited telomerase activity in vitro, while azidothymidine triphosphate (AZT-TP), dideoxyinosine triphosphate (ddITP) or ddTTP were less efficient inhibitors. All of these nucleoside triphosphate analogs, however, produced analog-specific alterations of the normal banding patterns seen upon gel electrophoresis of the synthesis products of telomerase, suggesting that their chain terminating and/or competitive actions differ at different positions along the RNA template. The analogs AZT, 3'-deoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine (d4T) and Ara-G in nucleoside form caused consistent and rapid telomere shortening in vegetatively growing Tetrahymena. In contrast, ddG or ddI had no effect on telomere length or cell growth rates. AZT caused growth rates and viability to decrease in a fraction of cells, while Ara-G had no such effects even after several weeks in culture. Neither AZT, Ara-G, acycloguanosine (Acyclo-G), ddG nor ddI had any detectable effect on cell mating, as assayed by quantitation of the efficiency of formation of progeny from mated cells. However, AZT decreased the efficiency of programmed de novo telomere addition during macronuclear development in mating cells.

  2. Tetrahymena thermophila acidic ribosomal protein L37 contains an archaebacterial type of C-terminus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T S; Andreasen, P H; Dreisig, H

    1991-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a Tetrahymena thermophila macronuclear gene (L37) encoding the acidic ribosomal protein (A-protein) L37. The gene contains a single intron located in the 3'-part of the coding region. Two major and three minor transcription start points (tsp) were mapped 39 to 63...... nucleotides upstream from the translational start codon. The uppermost tsp mapped to the first T in a putative T. thermophila RNA polymerase II initiator element, TATAA. The coding region of L37 predicts a protein of 109 amino acid (aa) residues. A substantial part of the deduced aa sequence was verified...

  3. Functional intron+ and intron- rDNA in the same macronucleus of the ciliate Tetrahymena pigmentosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1985-01-01

    alleles was followed in the total culture and in single cells during their vegetative segregation and it was observed that replication was non-preferential with respect to the two alleles. The diallelic clones were also used to demonstrate that intron-containing rDNA was transcribed and the transcript......Diallelic clones of Tetrahymena pigmentosa containing equal amounts of intron+ and intron- rDNA in the macronucleus were constructed. The macronucleus of the resulting strains divides amitotically during vegetative growth and the diallelic genotype is therefore unstable. The coexistence of the two...

  4. Reclassification of Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 as Candida tropicalis based on molecular phylogenetic analysis Reclassificação de Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 como Candida tropicalis baseada na análise filogenética molecular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luanne Helena Augusto Lima

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts of the genus Candida are of clinical importance and also have many industrial applications, mainly in the food industry. The yeast Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 has been extensively studied in order to establish a biotechnological process for the production of xylitol. The goal of this study was to verify the taxonomic classification of this strain based on the analysis of rDNA sequences and the xyl1 gene. DNA fragments from these sequences were amplified by PCR and BLAST analysis revealed strong identity with the corresponding sequences from Candida tropicalis. Based on these results, we propose that C. guilliermondii FTI 20037 must be reclassified as C. tropicalis.As leveduras do gênero Candida possuem tanto importância clínica como diversas aplicações industriais, principalmente na indústria de alimentos. A levedura Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 tem sido exaustivamente estudada pois pretende-se utilizá-la no estabelecimento de um processo biotecnológico para a produção de xilitol. O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a classificação taxonômica desta levedura por análise de sequências do rDNA e do gene xyl1. Fragmentos correspondentes a estas regiões foram amplificados por PCR e a análise destas sequências por BLAST revelou alta identidade com sequências correspondentes de Candida tropicalis. Estes resultados nos levam a propor que C. guilliermondii FTI 20037 deva ser reclassificada como C. tropicalis.

  5. Phylogenetic evidence for the acquisition of ribosomal RNA introns subsequent to the divergence of some of the major Tetrahymena groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogin, M L; Ingold, A; Karlok, M

    1986-01-01

    . In an attempt to evaluate the evolutionary origins of the intervening sequences, we have now determined complete small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences from 13 species of Tetrahymena and the absolute number of nucleotide differences between the sequences was used to construct a phylogenetic tree...

  6. Effects of protein kinase C activators and staurosporine on protein kinase activity, cell survival, and proliferation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straarup, EM; Schousboe, P; Hansen, HQ

    1997-01-01

    Autocrine factors prevent cell death in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, a unicellular eukaryote, in a chemically defined medium. At certain growth conditions these factors are released at a sufficient concentration by > 500 cells ml-1 to support cell survival and proliferation. The protein k...

  7. Candida tropicalis arthritis of the elbow in a patient with Ewing’s sarcoma that successfully responded to itraconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Youn Kim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections are rarely responsible for arthritis. Few cases of fungal arthritis have been reported, even in immunocompromised hosts susceptible to low-virulence organisms. Herein, the authors report the first case of Candida tropicalis arthritis in a child with a solid tumor. A 13-year-old boy with Ewing’s sarcoma developed arthritis in his elbow during the neutropenic period after chemotherapy. Despite treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, his condition did not improve and serial blood cultures failed to reveal any causative organisms. After surgical drainage, culture of the joint fluid revealed the presence of C. tropicalis . Itraconazole treatment was started and after 3 months of therapy, the patient completely recovered full elbow function.

  8. Elucidation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in tetrahymena reveals an evolutionarily convergent recruitment of dynamin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nels C Elde

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Ciliates, although single-celled organisms, contain numerous subcellular structures and pathways usually associated with metazoans. How this cell biological complexity relates to the evolution of molecular elements is unclear, because features in these cells have been defined mainly at the morphological level. Among these ciliate features are structures resembling clathrin-coated, endocytic pits associated with plasma membrane invaginations called parasomal sacs. The combination of genome-wide sequencing in Tetrahymena thermophila with tools for gene expression and replacement has allowed us to examine this pathway in detail. Here we demonstrate that parasomal sacs are sites of clathrin-dependent endocytosis and that AP-2 localizes to these sites. Unexpectedly, endocytosis in Tetrahymena also involves a protein in the dynamin family, Drp1p (Dynamin-related protein 1. While phylogenetic analysis of AP subunits indicates a primitive origin for clathrin-mediated endocytosis, similar analysis of dynamin-related proteins suggests, strikingly, that the recruitment of dynamin-family proteins to the endocytic pathway occurred independently during the course of the ciliate and metazoan radiations. Consistent with this, our functional analysis suggests that the precise roles of dynamins in endocytosis, as well as the mechanisms of targeting, differ in metazoans and ciliates.

  9. Elucidation of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis in Tetrahymena Reveals an Evolutionarily Convergent Recruitment of Dynamin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Ciliates, although single-celled organisms, contain numerous subcellular structures and pathways usually associated with metazoans. How this cell biological complexity relates to the evolution of molecular elements is unclear, because features in these cells have been defined mainly at the morphological level. Among these ciliate features are structures resembling clathrin-coated, endocytic pits associated with plasma membrane invaginations called parasomal sacs. The combination of genome-wide sequencing in Tetrahymena thermophila with tools for gene expression and replacement has allowed us to examine this pathway in detail. Here we demonstrate that parasomal sacs are sites of clathrin-dependent endocytosis and that AP-2 localizes to these sites. Unexpectedly, endocytosis in Tetrahymena also involves a protein in the dynamin family, Drp1p (Dynamin-related protein 1. While phylogenetic analysis of AP subunits indicates a primitive origin for clathrin-mediated endocytosis, similar analysis of dynamin-related proteins suggests, strikingly, that the recruitment of dynamin-family proteins to the endocytic pathway occurred independently during the course of the ciliate and metazoan radiations. Consistent with this, our functional analysis suggests that the precise roles of dynamins in endocytosis, as well as the mechanisms of targeting, differ in metazoans and ciliates.

  10. Developmental regulation of DNA replication: replication fork barriers and programmed gene amplification in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Macalpine, D M; Kapler, G M

    1997-01-01

    The palindromic Tetrahymena ribosomal DNA (rDNA) minichromosome is amplified 10,000-fold during development. Subsequent vegetative replication is cell cycle regulated. rDNA replication differs fundamentally in cycling vegetative and nondividing amplifying cells. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we show for the first time that replication origins that direct gene amplification also function in normal dividing cells. Two classes of amplification intermediates were identified. The first class is indistinguishable from vegetative rDNA, initiating in just one of the two 5' nontranscribed spacer (NTS) copies in the rDNA palindrome at either of two closely spaced origins. Thus, these origins are active throughout the life cycle and their regulation changes at different developmental stages. The second, novel class of amplification intermediates is generated by multiple initiation events. Intermediates with mass greater than fully replicated DNA were observed, suggesting that onionskin replication occurs at this stage. Unlike amplified rDNA in Xenopus laevis, the novel Tetrahymena species are not produced by random initiation; replication also initiates in the 5' NTS. Surprisingly, a replication fork barrier which is activated only in these amplifying molecules blocks the progression of forks near the center of the palindrome. Whereas barriers have been previously described, this is the first instance in which programmed regulation of replication fork progression has been demonstrated in a eukaryote. PMID:9315675

  11. Tetrahymena sp. infection in guppies, Poecilia reticulata Peters: parasite characterization and pathology of infected fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, M P; Zilberg, D

    2009-10-01

    Tetrahymena sp. infection was diagnosed in guppies imported from Singapore. The parasite was isolated (Tet-NI) and optimally cultured in vitro in RM-9 medium. Cytological analyses [silver-staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] revealed a pyriform-shaped, 64 x 41-microm holotrich ciliate without caudal cilium, containing a macro-nucleus (18.25 x 16.83 microm) and micro-nucleus (5.73 x 5.40 microm). Wet-mount examination and histological analyses of fish exposed to the parasite by co-habitation, immersion and infection by i.p. (intra-peritoneal) and i.m. (intra-muscular) injection revealed numerous ciliates on the skin, and in the gill and caudal fin blood vessels. Ciliates surrounded internal organs, the peri-orbital region of the eye, and were observed inside developing guppy embryos. Some muscle necrosis was associated with infection, but little or no inflammatory response. Immersion, co-habitation and i.m. injection caused relatively high infection rates and levels in the skin and tail, and lower infection in the gill blood vessels and internal organs; i.p. injection caused higher infection in the gill blood vessels and internal organs. Co-habited fish had relatively high infection levels in the hind-gut sub-mucosa. This is the first report of controlled systemic infection by Tetrahymena sp.

  12. Sodium-dependent transport of [3H](1D)chiro-inositol by Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, Michael C; Ryals, Phillip E

    2004-01-01

    The transport characteristics of (1D)chiro-inositol by the ciliate Tetrahymena were examined in competition studies employing [3H](1D)chiro-inositol. (1D)chiro-Inositol transport was competed by unlabeled (1D)chiro-inositol, myo-inositol, scyllo-inositol, and D-glucose in a concentration-dependent manner. Conversely, (1D)chiro-inositol competed for [3H]myo- and [3H]scyllo-inositol transport. Lineweaver-Burke analysis of the competition data indicated a Km of 10.3 mM and a Bmax of 4.7 nmol/min/mg for (1D)chiro-inositol. Transport of (1D)chiro-inositol was inhibited by cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of facilitated glucose transporters, and phlorizin, an inhibitor of sodium-dependent transporters. Removal of sodium from the radiolabeling buffer also inhibited uptake. The presence of 0.64 mM calcium or magnesium ions exerted negligible effects on transport, although potassium was inhibitory. [3H](1D)chiro-Inositol was shown to be incorporated into Tetrahymena phosphoinositides.

  13. Metabolomic approach for identifying and visualizing molecular tissue markers in tadpoles of Xenopus tropicalis by mass spectrometry imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Goto-Inoue

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In developmental and cell biology it is crucial to evaluate the dynamic profiles of metabolites. An emerging frog model system using Xenopus tropicalis, whose genome sequence and inbred strains are available, is now ready for metabolomics investigation in amphibians. In this study we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MSI analysis to identify and visualize metabolomic molecular markers in tadpoles of Xenopus tropicalis. We detected tissue-specific peaks and visualized their distribution in tissues, and distinguished 19 tissues and their specific peaks. We identified, for the first time, some of their molecular localizations via tandem mass spectrometric analysis: hydrocortisone in artery, L-DOPA in rhombencephalon, taurine in eye, corticosterone in gill, heme in heart, inosine monophosphate and carnosine in muscle, dopamine in nerves, and phosphatidylethanolamine (16:0/20:4 in pharynx. This is the first MALDI-MSI study of X. tropicalis tadpoles, as in small tadpoles it is hard to distinguish and dissect the various organs. Furthermore, until now there has been no data about the metabolomic profile of each organ. Our results suggest that MALDI-MSI is potentially a powerful tool for examining the dynamics of metabolomics in metamorphosis as well as conformational changes due to metabolic changes.

  14. Phylogeny, Functional Annotation, and Protein Interaction Network Analyses of the Xenopus tropicalis Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors

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    Wuyi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The previous survey identified 70 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins, but it was proved to be incomplete, and the functional information and regulatory networks of frog bHLH transcription factors were not fully known. Therefore, we conducted an updated genome-wide survey in the Xenopus tropicalis genome project databases and identified 105 bHLH sequences. Among the retrieved 105 sequences, phylogenetic analyses revealed that 103 bHLH proteins belonged to 43 families or subfamilies with 46, 26, 11, 3, 15, and 4 members in the corresponding supergroups. Next, gene ontology (GO enrichment analyses showed 65 significant GO annotations of biological processes and molecular functions and KEGG pathways counted in frequency. To explore the functional pathways, regulatory gene networks, and/or related gene groups coding for Xenopus tropicalis bHLH proteins, the identified bHLH genes were put into the databases KOBAS and STRING to get the signaling information of pathways and protein interaction networks according to available public databases and known protein interactions. From the genome annotation and pathway analysis using KOBAS, we identified 16 pathways in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. From the STRING interaction analysis, 68 hub proteins were identified, and many hub proteins created a tight network or a functional module within the protein families.

  15. The Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) receives trigger information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors, as well as from other sources of trigger. It makes the Level-1 decision (L1A) based on a trigger menu.

  16. Anaerobic treatment of olive mill wastewater and piggery effluents fermented with Candida tropicalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Garcia, Gregorio [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD Sheffield (United Kingdom); Johnson, Anbu Clemensis, E-mail: acj265@yahoo.com [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD Sheffield (United Kingdom)] [School of Environmental Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 02600 Jejawi, Perlis (Malaysia); Bachmann, Robert T. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD Sheffield (United Kingdom)] [Malaysian Institute of Chemical and Bioengineering Technology, Universiti Kuala Lumpur, 1988 Vendor City, 7800 Taboh Naning, Alor Gajah, Melaka (Malaysia); Williams, Ceri J. [Yorkshire-Forward, Victoria House, Victoria Place, LS11 5AE Leeds (United Kingdom); Burgoyne, Andrea; Edyvean, Robert G.J. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-30

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) contains high concentrations of phenolic compounds that are inhibitory to many microorganisms making it difficult to treat biologically prior to discharge in waterways. The total mono-cyclic phenol reduction in OMW in this study was carried out by aerobic pre-treatment using the yeast Candida tropicalis in a 18 L batch reactor at 30 deg. C for 12 days followed by anaerobic co-digestion. A COD removal of 62% and a reduction in the total mono-cyclic phenol content by 51% of the mixture was achieved in the aerobic pre-treatment. Pig slurry was added as co-substrate to supplement the low nitrogen levels in the olive mill wastewater. Subsequent anaerobic treatment was carried out in a 20 L fixed-bed reactor at 37 deg. C and HRT between 11 and 45 days. After a long start-up period, the OLR was increased from 1.25 to 5 kg COD m{sup -3} day{sup -1} during the last 30 days, resulting in subsequent increase in overall COD removal and biogas production, up to maximum values of 85% and 29 L{sub biogas}L{sub reactor}{sup -1}day{sup -1}, respectively. Methane content of the biogas produced from the anaerobic digestion ranged between 65% and 74%.

  17. Optimization of fed-batch fermentation for xylitol production by Candida tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-H; Han, K-C; Koh, Y-H; Ryu, Y-W; Seo, J-H

    2002-07-01

    Xylitol, a functional sweetener, was produced from xylose by biological conversion using Candida tropicalis ATCC 13803. Based on a two-substrate fermentation using glucose for cell growth and xylose for xylitol production, fed-batch fermentations were undertaken to increase the final xylitol concentration. The effects of xylose and xylitol on xylitol production rate were studied to determine the optimum concentrations for fed-batch fermentation. Xylose concentration in the medium (100 g l(-1)) and less than 200 g l(-1) total xylose plus xylitol concentration were determined as optimum for maximum xylitol production rate and xylitol yield. Increasing the concentrations of xylose and xylitol decreased the rate and yield of xylitol production and the specific cell growth rate, probably because of an increase in osmotic stress that would interfere with xylose transport, xylitol flux to secretion to cell metabolism. The feeding rate of xylose solution during the fed-batch mode of operation was determined by using the mass balance equations and kinetic parameters involved in the equations in order to increase final xylitol concentration without affecting xylitol and productivity. The optimized fed-batch fermentation resulted in 187 g l(-1) xylitol concentration, 0.75 g xylitol g xylose(-1) xylitol yield and 3.9 g xylitol l(-1) h(-1) volumetric productivity.

  18. Structural and functional characteristics of xenavidin, the first frog avidin from Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airenne Tomi T

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avidins are proteins with extraordinarily high ligand-binding affinity, a property which is used in a wide array of life science applications. Even though useful for biotechnology and nanotechnology, the biological function of avidins is not fully understood. Here we structurally and functionally characterise a novel avidin named xenavidin, which is to our knowledge the first reported avidin from a frog. Results Xenavidin was identified from an EST sequence database for Xenopus tropicalis and produced in insect cells using a baculovirus expression system. The recombinant xenavidin was found to be homotetrameric based on gel filtration analysis. Biacore sensor analysis, fluorescently labelled biotin and radioactive biotin were used to evaluate the biotin-binding properties of xenavidin - it binds biotin with high affinity though less tightly than do chicken avidin and bacterial streptavidin. X-ray crystallography revealed structural conservation around the ligand-binding site, while some of the loop regions have a unique design. The location of structural water molecules at the entrance and/or within the ligand-binding site may have a role in determining the characteristic biotin-binding properties of xenavidin. Conclusion The novel data reported here provide information about the biochemically and structurally important determinants of biotin binding. This information may facilitate the discovery of novel tools for biotechnology.

  19. Cyberlindnera tropicalis f.a., sp. nov., a novel yeast isolated from tropical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boontham, Wanatchaporn; Limtong, Savitree; Rosa, Carlos A; Lopes, Mariana R; Vital, Marcos J S; Srisuk, Nantana

    2017-08-01

    Two yeast strains, DMKU-WBBC14 and UFMG-CM-Y3283, were isolated from soil in Samutprakarn province in the central part of Thailand and from rotting wood in an Amazonian forest site in the Roraima State in Brazil, respectively. The two strains showed identical sequences of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene and different sequences by three nucleotide substitutions of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. Therefore, these two strains represented a single species which was most closely related to Cyberlindnera mengyuniae CBS 10845T. The nucleotide sequence differences between the two strains of the novel species and the type strain Cyberlindnera mengyuniae CBS 10845T were 10 substitutions in the D1/D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene and 46 substitutions in the ITS region. DMKU-WBBC14 and UFMG-CM-Y3283 differed in growth temperature profiles. Moreover, they also exhibited different carbon assimilation profiles and growth temperature profiles from the type strain of Cyberlindnera mengyuniae, CBS 10845T. The name Cyberlindnera tropicalis f.a., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DMKU-WBBC14T (=CBS 14558T=TBRC 6562T). The Mycobank number is MB 819722.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of the model protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila, using Deep RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xiong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila is a well-studied single-celled eukaryote model organism for cellular and molecular biology. However, the lack of extensive T. thermophila cDNA libraries or a large expressed sequence tag (EST database limited the quality of the original genome annotation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This RNA-seq study describes the first deep sequencing analysis of the T. thermophila transcriptome during the three major stages of the life cycle: growth, starvation and conjugation. Uniquely mapped reads covered more than 96% of the 24,725 predicted gene models in the somatic genome. More than 1,000 new transcribed regions were identified. The great dynamic range of RNA-seq allowed detection of a nearly six order-of-magnitude range of measurable gene expression orchestrated by this cell. RNA-seq also allowed the first prediction of transcript untranslated regions (UTRs and an updated (larger size estimate of the T. thermophila transcriptome: 57 Mb, or about 55% of the somatic genome. Our study identified nearly 1,500 alternative splicing (AS events distributed over 5.2% of T. thermophila genes. This percentage represents a two order-of-magnitude increase over previous EST-based estimates in Tetrahymena. Evidence of stage-specific regulation of alternative splicing was also obtained. Finally, our study allowed us to completely confirm about 26.8% of the genes originally predicted by the gene finder, to correct coding sequence boundaries and intron-exon junctions for about a third, and to reassign microarray probes and correct earlier microarray data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RNA-seq data significantly improve the genome annotation and provide a fully comprehensive view of the global transcriptome of T. thermophila. To our knowledge, 5.2% of T. thermophila genes with AS is the highest percentage of genes showing AS reported in a unicellular eukaryote. Tetrahymena thus becomes an excellent unicellular

  1. A community model of ciliate Tetrahymena and bacteria E. coli. Part 1: Individual-based models of Tetrahymena and E. coli populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworska, J.S.; Hallam, T.G.; Schultz, T.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The dynamics of a microbial community consisting of a eucaryotic ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis and procaryotic. Escherichia coli in a batch culture is explored by employing an individual-based approach. In this portion of the article, Part 1, population models are presented. Because both models are individual-based, models of individual organisms are developed prior to construction of the population models. The individual models use an energy budget method in which growth depends on energy gain from feeding and energy sinks such as maintenance and reproduction. These models are not limited by simplifying assumptions about constant yield, constant energy sinks and Monod growth kinetics as are traditional models of microbial organisms. Population models are generated from individual models by creating distinct individual types and assigning to each type the number of real individuals they represent. A population is a compilation of individual types that vary in a phase of cell cycle and physiological parameters such as filtering rate for ciliates and maximum anabolic rate for bacteria. An advantage of the developed models is that they realistically describe the growth of the individual cells feeding on resource which varies in density and composition. Part 2, the core of the project, integrates models into a dynamic microbial community and provides model analysis based upon available data.

  2. The ALICE trigger electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Krivda, M; Evans, D; Jones, G T; Jovanovic, P; Jusko, A; Králik, I; Lazzeroni, C; Lietava, R; Scott, H; Sándor, L; Tapia Takaki, D; Urbán, J; Villalobos Baillie, O

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE trigger system (TRG) consists of a Central Trigger Processor (CTP) and up to 24 Local Trigger Units (LTU) for each sub-detector. The CTP receives and processes trigger signals from trigger detectors and the outputs from the CTP are 3 levels of hardware triggers: L0, L1 and L2. The 24 sub-detectors are dynamically partitioned in up to 6 independent clusters. The trigger information is propagated through the LTUs to the Front-end electronics (FEE) of each sub-detector via LVDS cables and optical fibres. The trigger information sent from LTU to FEE can be monitored online for possible errors using the newly developed TTCit board. After testing and commissioning of the trigger system itself on the surface, the ALICE trigger electronics has been installed and tested in the experimental cavern with appropriate ALICE experimental software. Testing the Alice trigger system with detectors on the surface and in the experimental cavern in parallel is progressing very well. Currently one setup is used for testi...

  3. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification...... and where cutaneous and mucosal trigger zones are located. Methods Clinical characteristics focusing on trigger factors were collected from 140 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, in a cross-sectional study design. Results Provocation of paroxysmal pain by various trigger manoeuvres was reported by 136...... of the 140 patients. The most frequent manoeuvres were gentle touching of the face (79%) and talking (54%). Trigger zones were predominantly reported in the perioral and nasal region. Conclusion This study confirms that in trigeminal neuralgia, paroxysmal pain is associated with triggers in virtually all...

  4. Hormonal responses to extreme fasting in subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Delphine; Atkinson, Shannon; Guinet, Christophe; Groscolas, René; Arnould, John P Y

    2012-04-15

    Surviving prolonged fasting implies closely regulated alterations in fuel provisioning to meet metabolic requirements, while preserving homeostasis. Little is known, however, of the endocrine regulations governing such metabolic adaptations in naturally fasting free-ranging animals. The hormonal responses to natural prolonged fasting and how they correlate to the metabolic adaptations observed, were investigated in subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) pups, which, because of the intermittent pattern of maternal attendance, repeatedly endure exceptionally long fasting episodes throughout their development (1-3 mo). Phase I fasting was characterized by a dramatic decrease in plasma insulin, glucagon, leptin, and total l-thyroxine (T(4)) associated with reductions in mass-specific resting metabolic rate (RMR), plasma triglycerides, glycerol, and urea-to-creatine ratio, while nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and β-OHB increased. In contrast, the metabolic steady-state of phase II fasting reached within 6 days was associated with minimal concentrations of insulin, glucagon, and leptin; unchanged cortisol and triiodothyronine (T(3)); and moderately increased T(4). The early fall in insulin and leptin may mediate the shift to the strategy of energy conservation, protein sparing, and primary reliance on body lipids observed in response to the cessation of feeding. In contrast to the typical mammalian starvation response, nonelevated cortisol and minimal glucagon levels may contribute to body protein preservation and downregulation of catabolic pathways, in general. Furthermore, thyroid hormones may be involved in a process of energy conservation, independent of pups' nutritional state. These original hormonal settings might reflect an adaptation to the otariid repeated fasting pattern and emphasize the crucial importance of a tight physiological control over metabolism to survive extreme energetic constraints.

  5. Decolorization of a recalcitrant organic compound (Melanoidin by a novel thermotolerant yeast, Candida tropicalis RG-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwari Soni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugarcane distilleries use molasses for ethanol production and generate large volume of effluent containing high biological oxygen demand (BOD and chemical oxygen demand (COD along with melanoidin pigment. Melanoidin is a recalcitrant compound that causes several toxic effects on living system, therefore, may be treated before disposal. The aim of this study was to isolate a potential thermotolerant melanoidin decolorizing yeast from natural resources, and optimized different physico-chemical and nutritional parameters. Results Total 24 yeasts were isolated from the soil samples of near by distillery site, in which isolate Y-9 showed maximum decolorization and identified as Candida tropicalis by Microbial Type Culture Collection (MTCC Chandigarh, India. The decolorization yield was expressed as the decrease in the absorbance at 475 nm against initial absorbance at the same wavelength. Uninoculated medium served as control. Yeast showed maximum decolorization (75% at 45°C using 0.2%, glucose; 0.2%, peptone; 0.05%, MgSO4; 0.01%, KH2PO4; pH-5.5 within 24 h of incubation under static condition. Decolorizing ability of yeast was also confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis. Conclusion The yeast strain efficiently decolorized melanoidin pigment of distillery effluent at higher temperature than the other earlier reported strains of yeast, therefore, this strain could also be used at industrial level for melanoidin decolorization as it tolerated a wide range of temperature and pH with very small amount of carbon and nitrogen sources.

  6. Genome-wide transcriptional response of Silurana (Xenopus tropicalis to infection with the deadly chytrid fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Bree Rosenblum

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases are of great concern for both wildlife and humans. Several highly virulent fungal pathogens have recently been discovered in natural populations, highlighting the need for a better understanding of fungal-vertebrate host-pathogen interactions. Because most fungal pathogens are not fatal in the absence of other predisposing conditions, host-pathogen dynamics for deadly fungal pathogens are of particular interest. The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (hereafter Bd infects hundreds of species of frogs in the wild. It is found worldwide and is a significant contributor to the current global amphibian decline. However, the mechanism by which Bd causes death in amphibians, and the response of the host to Bd infection, remain largely unknown. Here we use whole-genome microarrays to monitor the transcriptional responses to Bd infection in the model frog species, Silurana (Xenopus tropicalis, which is susceptible to chytridiomycosis. To elucidate the immune response to Bd and evaluate the physiological effects of chytridiomycosis, we measured gene expression changes in several tissues (liver, skin, spleen following exposure to Bd. We detected a strong transcriptional response for genes involved in physiological processes that can help explain some clinical symptoms of chytridiomycosis at the organismal level. However, we detected surprisingly little evidence of an immune response to Bd exposure, suggesting that this susceptible species may not be mounting efficient innate and adaptive immune responses against Bd. The weak immune response may be partially explained by the thermal conditions of the experiment, which were optimal for Bd growth. However, many immune genes exhibited decreased expression in Bd-exposed frogs compared to control frogs, suggesting a more complex effect of Bd on the immune system than simple temperature-mediated immune suppression. This study generates important baseline data for ongoing

  7. Molecular asymmetry in the 8-cell stage Xenopus tropicalis embryo described by single blastomere transcript sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Domenico, Elena; Owens, Nick D L; Grant, Ian M; Gomes-Faria, Rosa; Gilchrist, Michael J

    2015-12-15

    Correct development of the vertebrate body plan requires the early definition of two asymmetric, perpendicular axes. The first axis is established during oocyte maturation, and the second is established by symmetry breaking shortly after fertilization. The physical processes generating the second asymmetric, or dorsal-ventral, axis are well understood, but the specific molecular determinants, presumed to be maternal gene products, are poorly characterized. Whilst enrichment of maternal mRNAs at the animal and vegetal poles in both the oocyte and the early embryo has been studied, little is known about the distribution of maternal mRNAs along either the dorsal-ventral or left-right axes during the early cleavage stages. Here we report an unbiased analysis of the distribution of maternal mRNA on all axes of the Xenopus tropicalis 8-cell stage embryo, based on sequencing of single blastomeres whose positions within the embryo are known. Analysis of pooled data from complete sets of blastomeres from four embryos has identified 908 mRNAs enriched in either the animal or vegetal blastomeres, of which 793 are not previously reported as enriched. In contrast, we find no evidence for asymmetric distribution along either the dorsal-ventral or left-right axes. We confirm that animal pole enrichment is on average distinctly lower than vegetal pole enrichment, and that considerable variation is found between reported enrichment levels in different studies. We use publicly available data to show that there is a significant association between genes with human disease annotation and enrichment at the animal pole. Mutations in the human ortholog of the most animally enriched novel gene, Slc35d1, are causative for Schneckenbecken dysplasia, and we show that a similar phenotype is produced by depletion of the orthologous protein in Xenopus embryos. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Product analysis illuminates the final steps of IES deletion in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, S V; Cox, M M

    2001-06-15

    DNA sequences (IES elements) eliminated from the developing macronucleus in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila are released as linear fragments, which have now been detected and isolated. A PCR-mediated examination of fragment end structures reveals three types of strand scission events, reflecting three steps in the deletion process. New evidence is provided for two steps proposed previously: an initiating double-stranded cleavage, and strand transfer to create a branched deletion intermediate. The fragment ends provide evidence for a previously uncharacterized third step: the branched DNA strand is cleaved at one of several defined sites located within 15-16 nucleotides of the IES boundary, liberating the deleted DNA in a linear form.

  9. Probabilistic neural network modeling of the toxicity of chemicals to Tetrahymena pyriformis with molecular fragment descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, K L E; Niculescu, S P; Schultz, T W

    2002-03-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the use of a probabilistic neural network (PNN) based methodology to model the 48-60-h ICG50 (inhibitory concentration for population growth) sublethal toxicity to the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. The information fed into the neural network is solely based on simple molecular descriptors as can be derived from the chemical structure. In contrast to most other toxicological models, the octanol/water partition coefficient is not used as an input parameter and no rules of thumb, or other substance selection-criteria, are involved. The model was trained on a 1,000 substances data set and validated using an 84 substances external test set. The associated analysis of errors confirms the excellent recognitive and predictive capabilities of the model.

  10. Fine structure and RNA synthesis of Tetrahymena during cytochalasin B inhibition of phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, J R

    1977-01-01

    Cytochalasin B inhibits the formation of normal-sized food vacuoles in Tetrahymena but the cells do not starve. Treated cells differ from starved cells in that they retain a high rate of incorporation of tritiated uridine. Large numbers of smaller vacuoles, about 1 micrometer in diameter, are formed, presumably by pinocytic activity of the cytopharyngeal membrane. This effect may perhaps be due to interference with the mechanism by which food vacuoles are sealed off at the cytostome, in which microfilaments may participate. Inhibited organisms may form tubes continuous with the cytopharynx instead of separate food vacuoles. It is not clear, however, why the formation of the small vacuoles is resistant to the drug.

  11. Expression of a cell surface immobilization antigen during serotype transformation in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, N E; Doerder, F P; Ron, A

    1985-08-01

    A temperature shift from 40 to 28 degrees C rapidly induced expression of a specific immobilization antigen at the cell surface in Tetrahymena thermophila. This transformation was inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide but not by colchicine or cytochalasin B. The major surface antigen expressed at 28 degrees C in cells homozygous for the SerH3 allele was partially purified, and an antiserum against this preparation was raised in rabbits. Electrophoresis, immunoblot, and [35S]methionine incorporation studies are reported which support the conclusion that the H3 antigen is an acidic protein with an Mr of approximately 52,000 daltons. An induced synthesis of the H3 immobilization antigen was detected within 30 min after a shift from 40 to 28 degrees C. This protein appeared to be synthesized in the microsomal fraction and transferred without cleavage to the cell surface, where it was inserted first into nonciliated regions.

  12. Transgenerational function of Tetrahymena Piwi protein Twi8p at distinctive noncoding RNA loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Brian M; Collins, Kathleen

    2017-04-01

    Transgenerational transmission of genome-regulatory epigenetic information can determine phenotypes in the progeny of sexual reproduction. Sequence specificity of transgenerational regulation derives from small RNAs assembled into Piwi-protein complexes. Known targets of transgenerational regulation are primarily transposons and transposon-derived sequences. Here, we extend the scope of Piwi-mediated transgenerational regulation to include unique noncoding RNA loci. Ciliates such as Tetrahymena have a phenotypically silent germline micronucleus and an expressed somatic macronucleus, which is differentiated anew from a germline genome copy in sexual reproduction. We show that the nuclear-localized Tetrahymena Piwi protein Twi8p shuttles from parental to zygotic macronuclei. Genetic elimination of Twi8p has no phenotype for cells in asexual growth. On the other hand, cells lacking Twi8p arrest in sexual reproduction with zygotic nuclei that retain the germline genome structure, without the DNA elimination and fragmentation required to generate a functional macronucleus. Twi8p-bound small RNAs originate from long-noncoding RNAs with a terminal hairpin, which become detectable in the absence of Twi8p. Curiously, the loci that generate Twi8p-bound small RNAs are essential for asexual cell growth, even though Twi8 RNPs are essential only in sexual reproduction. Our findings suggest the model that Twi8 RNPs act on silent germline chromosomes to permit their conversion to expressed macronuclear chromosomes. Overall this work reveals that a Piwi protein carrying small RNAs from long-noncoding RNA loci has transgenerational function in establishing zygotic nucleus competence for gene expression. © 2017 Farley and Collins; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. Distribution of BDE-99 and effects on metamorphosis of BDE-99 and -47 after oral exposure in Xenopus tropicalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Gunnar [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden) and Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU), P.O. Box 7054, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)]. E-mail: gunnar.carlsson@bvf.slu.se; Kulkarni, Pushkar [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Larsson, Pia [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Norrgren, Leif [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU), P.O. Box 7054, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    The high concentrations of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) in the environment have raised the need for generating more information about the impact of these substances on animals. To study the distribution of {sup 14}C-labelled 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether ({sup 14}C-BDE-99) in Xenopus tropicalis (West African clawed frog) {sup 14}C-BDE-99 was administered by dietary exposure to tadpoles at stage 54 or to juvenile frogs at stage 66. Whole-body autoradiography and liquid scintillation counting were used to examine the distribution of the substance at different survival times. Further, X. tropicalis tadpoles were dietarily exposed to the PBDE congeners BDE-47 and BDE-99 to study the effects on metamorphosis process. Measurements like body weight, body length, hind limb length and developmental stage as well as histological measurements on thyroid glands were performed after 14 days of exposure. Autoradiograms revealed high concentrations and long term retention of {sup 14}C-BDE-99 in adipose tissue and melanin in frogs exposed both as tadpoles and juveniles. Further, a difference in uptake was recorded between the exposures at stages 54 and 66, implying that the juvenile frogs have higher uptake and more prolonged retention of the chemical than the tadpoles. Hind limb length was reduced in tadpoles dietarily exposed to 1 mg/g feed of both BDE congeners. This was associated with reduced body weight and body length for BDE-47, suggesting general toxicity. Tadpoles exposed to BDE-99 also showed lower developmental stage but no effects on body weight or body length, suggesting possible thyroid hormone disruption. Higher concentrations of both congeners caused increased mortality. Thus, it can be concluded that in the present study, BDE-99 was retained for a longer period in the juvenile frogs than in metamorphosing tadpoles and that BDE-99 had an impact on X. tropicalis metamorphosis that might be of thyroid disrupting origin.

  14. Depletion of UBC9 Causes Nuclear Defects during the Vegetative and Sexual Life Cycles in Tetrahymena thermophila

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qianyi; Nasir, Amjad M.; Coyne, Robert S.; Forney, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Ubc9p is the sole E2-conjugating enzyme for SUMOylation, and its proper function is required for regulating key nuclear events such as transcription, DNA repair, and mitosis. In Tetrahymena thermophila, the genome is separated into a diploid germ line micronucleus (MIC) that divides by mitosis and a polyploid somatic macronucleus (MAC) that divides amitotically. This unusual nuclear organization provides novel opportunities for the study of SUMOylation and Ubc9p function. We identified the UB...

  15. Grazing of a Tetrahymena sp. on Adhered Bacteria in Percolated Columns Monitored by In Situ Hybridization with Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenmann, Heinrich; Harms, Hauke; Meckenstock, Rainer; Meyer, Elisabeth I.; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.

    1998-01-01

    Predation of attached Pseudomonas putida mt2 by the small ciliate Tetrahymena sp. was investigated with a percolated column system. Grazing rates were examined under static and dynamic conditions and were compared to grazing rates in batch systems containing suspended prey. The prey densities were 2 × 108 bacteria per ml of pore space and 2 × 108 bacteria per ml of suspension, respectively. Postingestion in situ hybridization of bacteria with fluorescent oligonucleotide probes was used to qua...

  16. ADF/cofilin is not essential but is critically important for actin activities during phagocytosis in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Nanami; Nakano, Kentaro; Kushida, Yasuharu; Noguchi, Taro Q P; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Wloga, Dorota; Dave, Drashti; Vasudevan, Krishna Kumar; Gaertig, Jacek; Numata, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    ADF/cofilin is a highly conserved actin-modulating protein. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in vivo through severing and depolymerizing of F-actin by this protein is essential for various cellular events, such as endocytosis, phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and cell migration. We show that in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, the ADF/cofilin homologue Adf73p associates with actin on nascent food vacuoles. Overexpression of Adf73p disrupted the proper localization of actin and inhibited the formation of food vacuoles. In vitro, recombinant Adf73p promoted the depolymerization of filaments made of T. thermophila actin (Act1p). Knockout cells lacking the ADF73 gene are viable but grow extremely slowly and have a severely decreased rate of food vacuole formation. Knockout cells have abnormal aggregates of actin in the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, unlike the case in animals and yeasts, in Tetrahymena, ADF/cofilin is not required for cytokinesis. Thus, the Tetrahymena model shows promise for future studies of the role of ADF/cofilin in vivo.

  17. Trigger Monitoring at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the trigger behavior through all the trigger level is of fundamental importance to assess the quality of the data taken, to give fast feedback for the trigger configuration design and to monitor the stability of the HLT farm components. In this paper we will present the online monitoring framework and the various tools available in the ATLAS trigger system going from the ones that build the basic monitoring infrastructure and test the basic functionalities of the system to the more elaborated ones that checks the quality of the data taking looking at physics variables reconstructed online. The early experience in the 2009 cosmics data taking period will also be shown.

  18. N1-Src Kinase Is Required for Primary Neurogenesis in Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Philip A; Bradley, Isobel C; Pizzey, Alastair R; Isaacs, Harry V; Evans, Gareth J O

    2017-08-30

    The presence of the neuronal-specific N1-Src splice variant of the C-Src tyrosine kinase is conserved through vertebrate evolution, suggesting an important role in complex nervous systems. Alternative splicing involving an N1-Src-specific microexon leads to a 5 or 6 aa insertion into the SH3 domain of Src. A prevailing model suggests that N1-Src regulates neuronal differentiation via cytoskeletal dynamics in the growth cone. Here we investigated the role of n1-src in the early development of the amphibian Xenopus tropicalis, and found that n1-src expression is regulated in embryogenesis, with highest levels detected during the phases of primary and secondary neurogenesis. In situ hybridization analysis, using locked nucleic acid oligo probes complementary to the n1-src microexon, indicates that n1-src expression is highly enriched in the open neural plate during neurula stages and in the neural tissue of adult frogs. Given the n1-src expression pattern, we investigated a possible role for n1-src in neurogenesis. Using splice site-specific antisense morpholino oligos, we inhibited n1-src splicing, while preserving c-src expression. Differentiation of neurons in the primary nervous system is reduced in n1-src-knockdown embryos, accompanied by a severely impaired touch response in later development. These data reveal an essential role for n1-src in amphibian neural development and suggest that alternative splicing of C-Src in the developing vertebrate nervous system evolved to regulate neurogenesis.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The Src family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases acts in signaling pathways that regulate cell migration, cell adhesion, and proliferation. Srcs are also enriched in the brain, where they play key roles in neuronal development and neurotransmission. Vertebrates have evolved a neuron-specific splice variant of C-Src, N1-Src, which differs from C-Src by just 5 or 6 aa. N1-Src is poorly understood and its high similarity to C-Src has made it difficult to

  19. Lessons from (triggered) tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    I test a “clock-advance” model that implies triggered tremor is ambient tremor that occurs at a sped-up rate as a result of loading from passing seismic waves. This proposed model predicts that triggering probability is proportional to the product of the ambient tremor rate and a function describing the efficacy of the triggering wave to initiate a tremor event. Using data mostly from Cascadia, I have compared qualitatively a suite of teleseismic waves that did and did not trigger tremor with ambient tremor rates. Many of the observations are consistent with the model if the efficacy of the triggering wave depends on wave amplitude. One triggered tremor observation clearly violates the clock-advance model. The model prediction that larger triggering waves result in larger triggered tremor signals also appears inconsistent with the measurements. I conclude that the tremor source process is a more complex system than that described by the clock-advance model predictions tested. Results of this and previous studies also demonstrate that (1) conditions suitable for tremor generation exist in many tectonic environments, but, within each, only occur at particular spots whose locations change with time; (2) any fluid flow must be restricted to less than a meter; (3) the degree to which delayed failure and secondary triggering occurs is likely insignificant; and 4) both shear and dilatational deformations may trigger tremor. Triggered and ambient tremor rates correlate more strongly with stress than stressing rate, suggesting tremor sources result from time-dependent weakening processes rather than simple Coulomb failure.

  20. Distinct functional roles of β-tubulin isotypes in microtubule arrays of Tetrahymena thermophila, a model single-celled organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciarelli, Sandra; Ballarini, Patrizia; Sparvoli, Daniela; Barchetta, Sabrina; Yu, Ting; Detrich, H William; Miceli, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The multi-tubulin hypothesis proposes that each tubulin isotype performs a unique role, or subset of roles, in the universe of microtubule function(s). To test this hypothesis, we are investigating the functions of the recently discovered, noncanonical β-like tubulins (BLTs) of the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Tetrahymena forms 17 distinct microtubular structures whose assembly had been thought to be based on single α- and β-isotypes. However, completion of the macronuclear genome sequence of Tetrahymena demonstrated that this ciliate possessed a β-tubulin multigene family: two synonymous genes (BTU1 and BTU2) encode the canonical β-tubulin, BTU2, and six genes (BLT1-6) yield five divergent β-tubulin isotypes. In this report, we examine the structural features and functions of two of the BLTs (BLT1 and BLT4) and compare them to those of BTU2. With respect to BTU2, BLT1 and BLT4 had multiple sequence substitutions in their GTP-binding sites, in their interaction surfaces, and in their microtubule-targeting motifs, which together suggest that they have specialized functions. To assess the roles of these tubulins in vivo, we transformed Tetrahymena with expression vectors that direct the synthesis of GFP-tagged versions of the isotypes. We show that GFP-BLT1 and GFP-BLT4 were not detectable in somatic cilia and basal bodies, whereas GFP-BTU2 strongly labeled these structures. During cell division, GFP-BLT1 and GFP-BLT4, but not GFP-BTU2, were incorporated into the microtubule arrays of the macronucleus and into the mitotic apparatus of the micronucleus. GFP-BLT1 also participated in formation of the microtubules of the meiotic apparatus of the micronucleus during conjugation. Partitioning of the isotypes between nuclear and ciliary microtubules was confirmed biochemically. We conclude that Tetrahymena uses a family of distinct β-tubulin isotypes to construct subsets of functionally different microtubules, a result that provides strong support for the multi

  1. Identification of signature volatiles to discriminate Candida albicans, glabrata, krusei and tropicalis using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Moritz; Hartwig, Stefan; Schütte, Eyke; Gillissen, Bernhard; Preissner, Robert; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea Maria; Paris, Sebastian; Kastner, Isabell; Preissner, Saskia

    2016-02-01

    Oral candidiasis is the most frequent fungal infection of the oral cavity. Clinical diagnoses require mycological confirmation, which is time-consuming in case of culture testing. The aim of the study was to identify signature volatiles to develop a chairside breath test to diagnose oral candidiasis. Headspaces above Candida albicans, glabrata, tropicalis, krusei cultures, and growth media as control were analysed after eight and 24 h using offline gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The identification of signature volatiles was assisted using various microbial databases. Retrieved volatile patterns enabled Candida species discrimination in vitro. For C. albicans 3-methyl-2-butanone and styrene and for C. krusei a combination of p-xylene, 2-octanone, 2-heptanone and n-butyl acetate were found to be specific. 1-hexanol was found in C. tropicalis, but is emitted by a variety of other microorganisms. C. glabrata was characterised through the absence of these volatiles. The development of a breath test is a promising approach in confirming suspicions of oral candidiasis. To confirm the retrieved results in vivo, breath tests in affected and healthy subjects have to be performed. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. AMY trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Yoshihide [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  3. Light induced toxicity reduction of silver nanoparticles to Tetrahymena Pyriformis: Effect of particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Junpeng; Xu, Bin; Sun, Xia; Ma, Chunyan; Yu, Changping [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Jimei Road 1799, Xiamen 361021 (China); Zhang, Hongwu, E-mail: hwzhang@iue.ac.cn [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Jimei Road 1799, Xiamen 361021 (China)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Small AgNPs had higher toxicity than large to Tetrahymena pyriformis under dark. ► AgNPs toxicity was decreased by light. ► The decrease of small AgNP toxicity induced by light was more notable than that of large AGNPs. ► Light can influence Ag{sup +} release from, particle size of, and aggregation of AgNPs. -- Abstract: As a result of the extensive application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), their potential hazards, once they are released into the natural environment, are of great concern to people. Since silver is very sensitive to light, the toxicity of AgNPs released into the natural environment will be inevitably affected by light. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between light, toxicity, and particle size of AgNPs and deduce the possible mechanism of any interaction. Our study revealed that there was negative correlation between the particle size and the toxicity: small AgNPs (5–10 nm) had higher toxicity than large AgNPs (15–25 nm) to Tetrahymena pyriformis (T. pyriformis) under dark condition. Comparing the size dependent AgNPs toxicity under dark and light conditions, the effect of light to size dependent AgNPs toxicity was ascertained. The results indicated that AgNPs toxicity was decreased by light and the most important discovery was that the change of size dependent AgNPs toxicity had significant difference under light irradiation. The decrease of small AgNPs toxicity induced by light was more notable than large AgNPs. The decreased level of cell toxicity for small AgNPs was 32 ± 0.7%, whereas it was only 10.6 ± 5.2% for large AgNPs kept 24 h under light irradiation. The further investigation indicated that the above changes induced by light can be attributed to the decrease of released silver ions, particle growth and aggregation of AgNPs under light irradiation. The obtained results showed that the light irradiation can promote the rapid growth of small AgNPs and result in the obvious increase of

  4. ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, B A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During the data taking period from 2009 until 2011, the ATLAS trigger has been very successfully used to collect proton-proton data at LHC centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The three-level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. Using custom electronics with input from the calorimeter and muon detectors, the first level rejects most background collisions in less than 2.5 microseconds. Then follow two levels of software-based triggers. The trigger system is designed to select events by identifying muons, electrons, photons, taus, jets and B hadron candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the strategy and performance of the different trigger selections based mainly on the experience during the 2011 LHC run, where the trigger menu needed quick adaptations to the continuous increase of luminosity throughout the year. Examples of trigger e...

  5. Identification of CUG-BP1/EDEN-BP target mRNAs in Xenopus tropicalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Graindorge, Antoine; Le Tonquèze, Olivier; Thuret, Raphaël; Pollet, Nicolas; Osborne, Howard Beverley; Audic, Yann

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The early development of many animals relies on the posttranscriptional regulations of maternally stored mRNAs. In particular, the translation of maternal mRNAs is tightly controlled during oocyte maturation and early mitotic cycles in Xenopus. The Embryonic Deadenylation ElemeNt (EDEN) and its associated protein EDEN-BP are known to trigger deadenylation and translational silencing to several mRNAs bearing an EDEN. This Xenopus RNA-binding protein is an ortholog of th...

  6. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Hauser, R

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is one of two general-purpose detectors at the next generation proton-proton collider, the LHC. The high rate of interactions and the large number of read-out channels make the trigger system for ATLAS a challenging task. The initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz has to be reduced to about 200 Hz while preserving the physics signals against a large background. ATLAS uses a three-level trigger system, with the first level implemented in custom hardware, while the high level trigger systems are implemented in software on commodity hardware. This note describes the physics motivation, the various selection strategies for different channels as well as the physical implementation of the trigger system.

  7. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the fingers glide easily with the help of pulleys. These pulleys hold the tendons close to the bone. This ... rod (Figure 1). Trigger finger occurs when the pulley becomes too thick, so the tendon cannot glide ...

  8. Calo trigger acquisition system

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Calo trigger acquisition system - Evolution of the acquisition system from a multiple boards system (upper, orange cables) to a single board one (below, light blue cables) where all the channels are collected in a single board.

  9. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma. Dogs, cats, rodents (including hamsters and guinea pigs) and other warm-blooded mammals can trigger asthma ... Page Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem. Asthma Indoor Air Quality ...

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS: IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW P450 FAMILY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The P450alk gene, which is inducible by the assimilation of alkane in Candida tropicalis, was sequenced and characterized. Structural features described in promoter and terminator regions of Saccharomyces yeast genes are present in the P450alk gene and some particular structures ...

  11. 2017 Tau Trigger Efficiencies

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Triggers selecting events with hadronically decaying $\\tau$ leptons ($\\tau_h$) are used in a wide variety of CMS analyses, in particular those targeting processes with a $H \\rightarrow \\tau\\tau$ decay. The performance of the $\\tau_h$ triggers is presented for data collected in 2017, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 41.5\\,fb$^{-1}$ at 13 TeV, and compared with simulation.

  12. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Rhys Edward; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment employs a complex trigger system to enable the collaborations physics program. The LHC is now well in to its second running period delivering proton proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with high instantaneous luminosity. This talk will describe the two level hardware and software trigger used to select events in this environment including recent improvements and the latest performance results.

  13. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein phosphorylation networks in Tetrahymena thermophila, a model single-celled organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Miao; Chen, Xiulan; Xiong, Qian; Xiong, Jie; Xiao, Chuanle; Ge, Feng; Yang, Fuquan; Miao, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila is a widely used unicellular eukaryotic model organism in biological research and contains more than 1000 protein kinases and phosphatases with specificity for Ser/Thr/Tyr residues. However, only a few dozen phosphorylation sites in T. thermophila are known, presenting a major obstacle to further understanding of the regulatory roles of reversible phosphorylation in this organism. In this study, we used high-accuracy mass-spectrometry-based proteomics to conduct global and site-specific phosphoproteome profiling of T. thermophila. In total, 1384 phosphopeptides and 2238 phosphorylation sites from 1008 T. thermophila proteins were identified through the combined use of peptide prefractionation, TiO2 enrichment, and two-dimensional LC-MS/MS analysis. The identified phosphoproteins are implicated in the regulation of various biological processes such as transport, gene expression, and mRNA metabolic process. Moreover, integrated analysis of the T. thermophila phosphoproteome and gene network revealed the potential biological functions of many previously unannotated proteins and predicted some putative kinase-substrate pairs. Our data provide the first global survey of phosphorylation in T. thermophila using a phosphoproteomic approach and suggest a wide-ranging regulatory scope of this modification. The provided dataset is a valuable resource for the future understanding of signaling pathways in this important model organism.

  14. Machine learning-based models to predict modes of toxic action of phenols to Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Garit, J A; Casañola-Martin, G M; Barigye, S J; Pham-The, H; Torrens, F; Torreblanca, A

    2017-09-01

    The phenols are structurally heterogeneous pollutants and they present a variety of modes of toxic action (MOA), including polar narcotics, weak acid respiratory uncouplers, pro-electrophiles, and soft electrophiles. Because it is often difficult to determine correctly the mechanism of action of a compound, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods, which have proved their interest in toxicity prediction, can be used. In this work, several QSAR models for the prediction of MOA of 221 phenols to the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis, using Chemistry Development Kit descriptors, are reported. Four machine learning techniques (ML), k-nearest neighbours, support vector machine, classification trees, and artificial neural networks, have been used to develop several models with higher accuracies and predictive capabilities for distinguishing between four MOAs. They showed global accuracy values between 95.9% and 97.7% and area under Receiver Operator Curve values between 0.978 and 0.998; additionally, false alarm rate values were below 8.2% for training set. In order to validate our models, cross-validation (10-folds-out) and external test-set were performed with good behaviour in all cases. These models, obtained with ML techniques, were compared with others previously reported by other researchers, and the improvement was significant.

  15. Characterization of the Tetrahymena ribozyme folding pathway using the kinetic footprinting reagent peroxynitrous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaulk, S G; MacMillan, A M

    2000-01-11

    Large RNAs fold into complex structures which determine their biological activities. A full understanding of both RNA structure and dynamics will include the description of the pathways by which these structures are formed. Kinetic footprinting [Sclavi, B., et al. (1997) J. Mol. Biol. 266, 144-159] has been shown to be a powerful method for the study of dynamic processes involving RNA. Here we describe the use of a readily available reagent, peroxynitrous acid, as a kinetic footprinting tool for the study of RNA folding. Hydroxyl radicals generated from this reagent were used to footprint the Tetrahymena ribozyme during its magnesium-dependent folding-in agreement with synchroton X-ray footprinting [Sclavi, B., et al. (1998) Science 279, 1940-1943] and oligonucleotide/hybridization cleavage experiments [Zarrinkar, P. P., and Williamson, J. R. (1994) Science 265, 918-924], this work suggests an ordered, hierarchical folding pathway for the ribozyme. Several slow steps in the folding pathway were observed in the peroxynitrous acid footprinting, but none of these corresponded to the rate-determining step of folding. This suggests that the formation of the global, protected structure is followed by one or more slow local rearrangements to yield the final active structure. These studies illustrate the utility of peroxynitrous acid as a reagent for the elucidation of RNA folding pathways and the study of RNA dynamics.

  16. Is Evolution of Mating Preferences Inevitable? Random Mating in the Multisex System of Tetrahymena thermophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujal S. Phadke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ciliate mating systems are highly diversified, providing unique opportunities to study sexual differentiation and its implications for mating dynamics. Many species of ciliates have multiple (>2 sexes. More sexes may mean more choice and an opportunity for evolution of preferential mating. We asked if the multiple sexes of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila mate preferentially among each other. We quantified pairing frequencies among four sexes of T. thermophila using experiments that allowed the sexes to compete as mating partners. We found that all sexes mated equally frequently among each other, that is, we found no evidence of preferential mating with respect to sex. This suggests that the “mate choice” in this ciliate is binary, between whether to form a pair or not and, in this regard, sex facilitates only self-/non-self-distinction. Thus, presence of multiple sexes does not necessarily result in the evolution of mating bias, which could decrease the maximum amount of mating that would otherwise be possible in a population. Our result of random mating verifies a key assumption in the theoretical model of sex ratio evolution in T. thermophila. Investigation into molecular differences between the sexes will be necessary to reveal the mechanistic basis of random mating among them.

  17. Delineating cellular interactions between ciliates and fish by co-culturing Tetrahymena thermophila with fish cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Marcel D O; Bols, Niels C

    2014-10-01

    Although several species of Tetrahymena are often described as histophagous and opportunistic pathogens of fish, little is known about ciliate/fish cell interactions, but one approach for studying these is in vitro with cell lines. In this study, T. thermophila, B1975 (wild type) and NP1 (temperature sensitive mutant for phagocytosis) were cultured on monolayers of 3 fish epithelial cell lines, CHSE-214, RTgill-W1, and ZEB2J, and the rabbit kidney epithelial cell line, RK-13. Generally the ciliates flourished, whereas the monolayers died, being completely consumed over several days. The destruction of monolayers required that the ciliates could make contact with the animal cells through swimming, which appeared to dislodge or loosen cells so that they could be phagocytosed. The ciliates internalized into food vacuoles ZEB2J from cell monolayers as well as from cell suspensions. Phagocytosis was essential for monolayer destruction as monolayers remained intact under conditions where phagocytosis was impeded, such as 37°C for NP1 and 4°C for B1975. Monolayers of fish cells supported the proliferation of ciliates. Thus T. thermophila can 'eat' animal cells or be histophagous in vitro, with the potential to be histophagous in vivo. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  18. Negative Regulators of an RNAi-Heterochromatin Positive Feedback Loop Safeguard Somatic Genome Integrity in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhren, Jan H; Noto, Tomoko; Kataoka, Kensuke; Gao, Shan; Liu, Yifan; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2017-03-07

    RNAi-mediated positive feedback loops are pivotal for the maintenance of heterochromatin, but how they are downregulated at heterochromatin-euchromatin borders is not well understood. In the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena, heterochromatin is formed exclusively on the sequences that are removed from the somatic genome by programmed DNA elimination, and an RNAi-mediated feedback loop is important for assembling heterochromatin on the eliminated sequences. In this study, we show that the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1)-like protein Coi6p, its interaction partners Coi7p and Lia5p, and the histone demethylase Jmj1p are crucial for confining the production of small RNAs and the formation of heterochromatin to the eliminated sequences. The loss of Coi6p, Coi7p, or Jmj1p causes ectopic DNA elimination. The results provide direct evidence for the existence of a dedicated mechanism that counteracts a positive feedback loop between RNAi and heterochromatin at heterochromatin-euchromatin borders to maintain the integrity of the somatic genome. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo synthesis of nano-selenium by Tetrahymena thermophila SB210.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yin-Hua; Li, Ling-Li; Zhou, Nan-Qing; Liu, Jing-Hua; Huang, Qing; Wang, Hui-Juan; Tian, Jie; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Nano-selenium has a great potential to be used in chemical, biological, medical and environmental fields. Biological methods for nano-selenium synthesis have attracted wide interests, because they can be operated at ambient temperature and pressure without complicated equipments. In this work, a protozoa, Tetrahymena thermophila (T. thermophila) SB210, was used to in vivo synthesize nano-selenium. The biosynthesized nano-selenium was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The synthesized amorphous spherical selenium nanoparticles had diameters of 50-500nm with the coexistence of irregular nano-selenium. The expressions of glutathione (GSH) synthesis related gene glutathione synthase, cysteine-rich protein metallothionein related gene metallothionein-1 and [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding protein related gene were up-regulated in the nano-selenium producing group. Also, the subsequent GSH detection and in vitro synthesis experimental results suggest the three proteins were likely to be involved in the nano-selenium synthesis process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The key role of CYC2 during meiosis in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qianlan; Wang, Ruoyu; Ghanam, A R; Yan, Guanxiong; Miao, Wei; Song, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    Meiotic recombination is carried out through a specialized pathway for the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) made by the Spo11 protein. The present study shed light on the functional role of cyclin, CYC2, in Tetrahymena thermophila which has transcriptionally high expression level during meiosis process. Knocking out the CYC2 gene results in arrest of meiotic conjugation process at 2.5-3.5 h after conjugation initiation, before the meiosis division starts, and in company with the absence of DSBs. To investigate the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon, a complete transcriptome profile was performed between wild-type strain and CYC2 knock-out strain. Functional analysis of RNA-Seq results identifies related differentially expressed genes (DEGs) including SPO11 and these DEGs are enriched in DNA repair/mismatch repair (MMR) terms in homologous recombination (HR), which indicates that CYC2 could play a crucial role in meiosis by regulating SPO11 and participating in HR.

  1. Distinct localization of a beta-tubulin epitope in the Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium caudatum cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libusová, L; Sulimenko, T; Sulimenko, V; Janisch, R; Hozák, P; Dráber, P

    2005-10-01

    Many of the highly organized microtubular arrangements in ciliates are located in the cortical area containing membrane vesicles and vacuoles. In Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium caudatum, immunofluorescence microscopy with the monoclonal antibody TU-06, directed against beta-tubulin, revealed distinct staining of this cortical region alone, while the cilia and other microtubular structures were unstained. The specificity of the antibody was confirmed by immunoblotting and by preabsorption of the antibody with purified tubulin. Double-label immunofluorescence with antibodies against gamma-tubulin, detyrosinated alpha-tubulin, and centrin showed that the TU-06 epitope is localized outside the basal body region. This was also confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy of thin sections. Proteolytic digestion of porcine brain beta-tubulin combined with a peptide scan of immobilized, overlapping peptides disclosed that the epitope was in the beta-tubulin region beta81-95, a region which is phylogenetically highly conserved. As known posttranslational modifications of beta-tubulin are located outside this area, the observed staining pattern cannot be interpreted as evidence of subcellular sequestration of modified tubulin. The limited distribution of the epitope could rather reflect the dependence of TU-06 epitope exposition on conformations of tubulin molecules in microtubule arrangements or on differential masking by interacting proteins.

  2. A model for endosymbiosis: interaction between Tetrahymena pyriformis and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Lisa; Burmester, Anke; Fischer, Martin S; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2013-11-01

    Endosymbiosis in ciliates is a common and highly diverse phenomenon in nature, but its development at the mechanistic level and the origins are not easy to understand, since these associations may have arisen at any time during evolution. Therefore a laboratory model is helpful. It could be provided by the interaction of Tetrahymena pyriformis and Escherichia coli. Microscopic analyses with a genetically manipulated fluorescent strain of E. coli show single bacteria leaving food vacuoles and escaping digestion, an important prerequisite for further experiments. Under selective conditions, beneficial for T. pyriformis, the ciliate was shown to internalize E. coli cells. After feeding, bacteria, transformed with the plasmids pBS-neoTet or pNeo4, provide T. pyriformis with the ability to handle toxic conditions, caused by the aminoglykoside antibiotic paromomycin. Axenic cultures or cocultures with untransformed bacteria show lower cell numbers and survival rates compared to cocultures with transformed bacteria after transfer to paromomycin containing media. PCR detects bacterial DNA inside T. pyriformis cells. Additionally, microscopical analysis of selectively grown cocultures reveals fluorescing particles in the cytoplasm of T. pyriformis containing DNA and lipids, corresponding in size to E. coli. This system could be a reasonable model for understanding mechanisms of endosymbiosis establishment in ciliates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. QSAR analysis of nitroaromatics' toxicity in Tetrahymena pyriformis: structural factors and possible modes of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, A.G.; Muratov, E. N.; Kuz’min, V.E.; Muratov, N.N.; Varlamova, E.V.; Kuz'mina, A.V.; Gorb, L. G.; Golius, A.; Hill, F.C.; Leszczynski, J.; Tropsha, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Hierarchical Technology for Quantitative Structure - Activity Relationships (HiT QSAR) was applied to 95 diverse nitroaromatic compounds (including some widely known explosives) tested for their toxicity (50% inhibition growth concentration, IGC50) against the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. The dataset was divided into subsets according to putative mechanisms of toxicity. Classification and Regression Trees (CART) approach implemented within HiT QSAR has been used for prediction of mechanism of toxicity for new compounds. The resulting models were shown to have ~80% accuracy for external datasets indicating that the mechanistic dataset division was sensible. Then, Partial Least Squares (PLS) statistical approach was used for the development of 2D QSAR models. Validated PLS models were explored to (i) elucidate the effects of different substituents in nitroaromatic compounds on toxicity; (ii) differentiate compounds by probable mechanisms of toxicity based on their structural descriptors; (iii) analyze the role of various physical-chemical factors responsible for compounds’ toxicity. Models were interpreted in terms of molecular fragments promoting or interfering with toxicity. It was also shown that mutual influence of substituents in benzene ring plays the determining role in toxicity variation. Although chemical mechanism based models were statistically significant and externally predictive (R2ext=0.64 for the external set of 63 nitroaromatics identified after all calculations have been completed), they were also shown to have limited coverage (57% for modeling and 76% for external set). PMID:21714735

  4. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00400931; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-23

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. ...

  5. Topological Trigger Developments

    CERN Multimedia

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected an almost 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%, and its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and uBoost. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. These inclu...

  6. Toxicity of the azo dyes Acid Red 97 and Bismarck Brown Y to Western clawed frog (Silurana tropicalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Jeriel J; Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Norman, Grant; de Solla, Shane R; Langlois, Valérie S

    2014-03-01

    Azo compounds are used in a variety of industrial applications, such as textile colorant. Azo dyes have been found to contaminate aquatic environments and it has been shown that these compounds could potentially be toxic or induce endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. However, there are few data available on the toxicity of these dyes, specifically Acid Red 97 (AR97) and Bismarck Brown Y (BBY). The aim of this study was to determine the toxicity and the endocrine-disrupting properties of AR97 and BBY in frogs. As fugacity modeling predicted that both compounds would sorb to sediment, sediment exposures were performed using a geometric range of concentrations (0, 1, 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm). Both AR97 and BBY dyes were not lethal to Silurana tropicalis embryos; however, BBY significantly induced malformations. Gene expression analysis of oxidative stress and mutagen-related genes was performed in BBY-treated larvae. There were significant two-fold increases of the tumor-suppressing protein p53 and heat shock protein 70 mRNA at 1,000 ppm suggesting that BBY induces cellular stress in early S. tropicalis development. Transcripts of the heat shock protein 90 did not change. Furthermore, reproductive-related genes were assessed and a 2.1-fold change was observed in the mRNA of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein while steroid 5 alpha-reductase type 2 and androgen receptor transcript levels did not vary among treatments. In conclusion, high concentrations of BBY lead to increased developmental defects in frog embryogenesis and early larval development.

  7. Synergistic Effect of the Flavonoid Catechin, Quercetin, or Epigallocatechin Gallate with Fluconazole Induces Apoptosis in Candida tropicalis Resistant to Fluconazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cecília Rocha; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; de Sousa Campos, Rosana; Figueiredo, Narjara Silvestre; Sampaio, Letícia Serpa; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; Gaspar, Danielle Macêdo; de Andrade, Geanne Matos; Lima, Iri Sandro Pampolha; de Barros Viana, Glauce Socorro; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Lobo, Marina Duarte Pinto; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are a class of phenolic compounds commonly found in fruits, vegetables, grains, flowers, tea, and wine. They differ in their chemical structures and characteristics. Such compounds show various biological functions and have antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro interactions of flavonoids with fluconazole against Candida tropicalis strains resistant to fluconazole, investigating the mechanism of synergism. Three combinations formed by the flavonoids (+)-catechin hydrated, hydrated quercetin, and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate at a fixed concentration with fluconazole were tested. Flavonoids alone had no antifungal activity within the concentration range tested, but when they were used as a cotreatment with fluconazole, there was significant synergistic activity. From this result, we set out to evaluate the possible mechanisms of cell death involved in this synergism. Isolated flavonoids did not induce morphological changes or changes in membrane integrity in the strains tested, but when they were used as a cotreatment with fluconazole, these changes were quite significant. When evaluating mitochondrial damage and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) only in the cotreatment, changes were observed. Flavonoids combined with fluconazole were shown to cause a significant increase in the rate of damage and the frequency of DNA damage in the tested strains. The cotreatment also induced an increase in the externalization of phosphatidylserine, an important marker of early apoptosis. It is concluded that flavonoids, when combined with fluconazole, show activity against strains of C. tropicalis resistant to fluconazole, promoting apoptosis by exposure of phosphatidylserine in the plasma membrane and morphological changes, mitochondrial depolarization, intracellular accumulation of ROS, condensation, and DNA fragmentation. PMID:24366745

  8. Evaluation of Bruker Biotyper and Vitek MS for the identification of Candida tropicalis on different solid culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Li, Ying; Fan, Xin; Chiueh, Tzong-Shi; Xu, Ying-Chun; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2017-11-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Vitek MS systems for identification of genetically-confirmed blood isolates of Candida tropicalis that had been grown on several types of culture media commonly used for primary fungal isolation. Isolates included 105 from the National China Hospital Invasive Fungal Surveillance Net program (CHIF-NET) and 120 from National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). Culture media tested for CHIF-NET isolates included trypticase soy agar supplemented with 5% sheep blood (BAP), Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA-C), CHROMagar, China blue agar (CBA), chocolate agar supplemented with vancomycin (CAP-VA), and MacConkey agar (MAC). Culture media used for NTUH isolates included BAP, SDA, CHROMagar, eosin methylene blue (EMB), inhibitory mold agar (IMA), Mycosel agar, and cornmeal agar (CMA). The Bruker Biotyper correctly identified all CHIF-NET isolates to the species level on all six agar media tested and correctly identified the majority of NTUH isolates with the exception of isolates grown on SDA (85.8%) and CMA (52.5%). The Vitek MS system correctly identified all CHIF-NET isolates to the species level with the exception of isolates grown on CHROMagar (84.8%), and correctly identified the majority of NTUH isolates with the exception of isolates grown on SDA (51.7%), Mycosel agar (57.5%), and CMA (9.2%) for NTUH isolates. Clinical microbiologists should be aware that different culture media can affect the performance of the Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek MS systems in identifying C. tropicalis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. CMS Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    During its second run of operation (Run 2) which started in 2015, the LHC will deliver a peak instantaneous luminosity that may reach $2 \\cdot 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with an average pile-up of about 55, far larger than the design value. Under these conditions, the online event selection is a very challenging task. In CMS, it is realized by a two-level trigger system the Level-1 (L1) Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has been through a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT go through big improvements; in particular, new appr...

  10. The CMS trigger system

    Science.gov (United States)

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J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Chowdhury, S. Roy; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. 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A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Kierzkowski, K.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Oklinski, W.; Olszewski, M.; Pozniak, K.; Walczak, M.; Zabolotny, W.; Bargassa, P.; Silva, C. Beirão Da Cruz E.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. 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V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova PANEVA, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. W.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, τ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  11. The CMS trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; El Sawy, Mai; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kothekar, Kunal; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Cocoros, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-24

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, $\\tau$ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  12. Trigger Monitoring at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The Trigger and Data Acquisition system for the ATLAS experiment has to reduce the 40 MHz of LHC bunch crossing rate to ~200 Hz of recording rate. This is achieved through a complex distributed system composed by $sim$ 1.000 CPUs, about a third of the expected final size of the system. Monitoring the trigger behavior through all the trigger level is of fundamental importance to assess the quality of the data taken, to give fast feedback for the trigger configuration design and to monitor the stability of the HLT farm components. In this paper we will present the online monitoring framework and the various tools available in the ATLAS trigger system going from the ones that build the basic monitoring infrastructure and test the basic functionalities of the system to the more elaborated ones that checks the quality of the data taking looking at physics variables reconstructed online. The early experience in the 2009 cosmics data taking period will also be shown.

  13. Developmental Trigger Thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Jonathan; Angeles, Jovito

    2016-04-01

    Developmental trigger thumb, although uncommon, can be easily identifiable in the pediatric outpatient visit. Patients often present with their thumb locked in flexion and a firm nodule at the base of the thumb. The thumb is usually passively correctable and nonpainful. It is important to examine the opposite thumb as bilateral trigger thumbs occur at a rate of 25% to 30%. Nonsurgical options have been proposed in the past including watchful waiting, extension exercises, splinting, and steroid injections with mixed results. Surgical intervention is indicated when there is painful triggering or the thumb is not passively correctable. Surgical treatment is an outpatient procedure that involves releasing the thumb flexor tendon from a small fibrous sheath called the A1 pulley. The overall recurrence rate after surgery is 1.4%. Our recommendation is for early referral to a pediatric orthopedic surgeon to evaluate for the need for surgical intervention. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Physics processes involving tau leptons play a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the high energy frontier. The ability to efficiently trigger on events containing hadronic tau decays is therefore of particular importance to the ATLAS experiment. During the 2012 run, the Large Hadronic Collder (LHC) reached instantaneous luminosities of nearly $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with bunch crossings occurring every $50 ns$. This resulted in a huge event rate and a high probability of overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up). With this in mind it was necessary to design an ATLAS tau trigger system that could reduce the event rate to a manageable level, while efficiently extracting the most interesting physics events in a pile-up robust manner. In this poster the ATLAS tau trigger is described, its performance during 2012 is presented, and the outlook for the LHC Run II is briefly summarized.

  15. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM; Schare, Joshua M [Albuquerque, NM; Bunch, Kyle [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  16. ALICE High Level Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    Alt, T

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is a computing farm designed and build for the real-time, online processing of the raw data produced by the ALICE detectors. Events are fully reconstructed from the raw data, analyzed and compressed. The analysis summary together with the compressed data and a trigger decision is sent to the DAQ. In addition the reconstruction of the events allows for on-line monitoring of physical observables and this information is provided to the Data Quality Monitor (DQM). The HLT can process event rates of up to 2 kHz for proton-proton and 200 Hz for Pb-Pb central collisions.

  17. Effects of Pluronic F-68 on Tetrahymena cells: protection against chemical and physical stress and prolongation of survival under toxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellung-Larsen, P; Assaad, F; Pankratova, Stanislava

    2000-01-01

    The effects of the non-ionic surfactant Pluronic F-68 (0.01% w/v) on Tetrahymena cells have been studied. A marked protection against chemical and physical stress was observed. The chemical stress effects were studied in cells suspended in buffer (starvation) or in buffers with added ingredients ...

  18. Comparison of primary and secondary 26S rRNA structures in two Tetrahymena species: evidence for a strong evolutionary and structural constraint in expansion segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Nielsen, Henrik; Lenaers, G

    1990-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the 26S large subunit (LSU) rRNA genes for two Tetrahymena species, T. thermophila and T. pyriformis. The inferred rRNA sequences are presented in their most probable secondary structures based on compensatory mutations, energy, and conservation...

  19. ATP-binding cassette transporter enhances tolerance to DDT in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, YingZhi; Dang, Huai; Liu, GuangLong; Xiong, Jie; Yuan, DongXia; Feng, LiFang; Miao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    The reuse of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) as an indoor residual spray was permitted by the World Health Organization in 2007, and approximately 14 countries still use DDT to control disease vectors. The extensive exposure of insects to DDT has resulted in the emergence of DDT resistance, especially in mosquitoes, and the mechanism for this resistance in mosquitoes has been widely reported. Spraying can also introduce DDT directly into surface water, and DDT can subsequently accumulate in microorganisms, but the mechanism for the resistance to DDT degradation in microorganisms is unclear. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we detected an abcb15 gene that was up-regulated in a specific manner by DDT treatment in T. thermophile. The deduced ABCB15 peptide sequence had two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to form the structure TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD, and each NBD contained three conserved motifs: Walker-A, C-loop, and Walker-B, which indicated the T. thermophila abcb15 was a typical ABC transporter gene. The expression of ABCB15 fused with a C-terminal green fluorescent protein was found to be on the periphery of the cell, suggesting that ABCB15 was a membrane pump protein. In addition, cells with abcb15 partially knocked down (abcb15-KD) grew slower than wild-type cells in the presence of 256 mg L(-1) DDT, indicating the tolerance of abcb15-KD strain to DDT exposure was decreased. Thus, we suggest that in Tetrahymena, the membrane pump protein encoded by ABCT gene abcb15 can enhance the tolerance to DDT and protect cells from this exogenous toxin by efficiently pumping it to the extracellular space.

  20. Encystment/excystment response and serotypic variation in the gastropod parasite Tetrahymena rostrata (Ciliophora, Tetrahymenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segade, P; García, N; García Estévez, J M; Arias, C; Iglesias, R

    2016-02-01

    Tetrahymena rostrata, which is characterized by a particular encystment-excystment cycle involving autogamy, has been recently found infecting the kidney of edible Helix aspersa snails under farming conditions. In this work, the effects of several factors on its encystment/excystment behaviour and the occurrence of different serotypes were investigated. The encystment/excystment response under starvation conditions was seriously affected by temperature. While a peak of encystment at 48 h followed by a progressive spontaneous excystment was observed at 18 and 25 °C, the encystment response was practically inhibited at 5 °C and clearly slowed down at 10 °C. At 30 °C, most of surviving ciliates remained encysted throughout the experiment, with spontaneous excystment being detected only after switching the temperature to 18 °C. Soil components also affected the encystment/excystment behaviour at 18 °C, with spontaneous excystment occurring in the presence of a sterile-filtered soil extract or mineral water but being strongly minimized with a non-filtered soil extract. Resting cysts formed in the latter extract exhibited a 3–4 times thicker and ultrastructurally more complex wall than that formed in mineral water and retained the excystment ability for about 4 weeks. Incomplete desiccation did not affect significantly the encystment response, while the mucus and kidney extracts from snails as well as a ciliate extract strongly stimulated a rapid excystment. Finally, two different serotypes infecting H. aspersa in heliciculture farms of Galicia (NW Spain) were identified, but no differences were observed between the encystment/excystment responses exhibited by two isolates belonging to each serotype.

  1. MtnBD is a multifunctional fusion enzyme in the methionine salvage pathway of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Nakano

    Full Text Available To recycle reduced sulfur to methionine in the methionine salvage pathway (MSP, 5-methylthioribulose-1-phosphate is converted to 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyrate, the methionine precursor, by four steps; dehydratase, enolase, phosphatase, and dioxygenase reactions (catalyzed by MtnB, MtnW, MtnX and MtnD, respectively, in Bacillus subtilis. It has been proposed that the MtnBD fusion enzyme in Tetrahymena thermophila catalyzes four sequential reactions from the dehydratase to dioxygenase steps, based on the results of molecular biological analyses of mutant yeast strains with knocked-out MSP genes, suggesting that new catalytic function can be acquired by fusion of enzymes. This result raises the question of how the MtnBD fusion enzyme can catalyze four very different reactions, especially since there are no homologous domains for enolase and phosphatase (MtnW and MtnX, respectively, in B. subtilis in the peptide. Here, we tried to identify the domains responsible for catalyzing the four reactions using recombinant proteins of full-length MtnBD and each domain alone. UV-visible and ¹H-NMR spectral analyses of reaction products revealed that the MtnB domain catalyzes dehydration and enolization and the MtnD domain catalyzes dioxygenation. Contrary to a previous report, conversion of 5-methylthioribulose-1-phosphate to 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyrate was dependent on addition of an exogenous phosphatase from B. subtilis. This was observed for both the MtnB domain and full-length MtnBD, suggesting that MtnBD does not catalyze the phosphatase reaction. Our results suggest that the MtnB domain of T. thermophila MtnBD acquired the new function to catalyze both the dehydratase and enolase reactions through evolutionary gene mutations, rather than fusion of MSP genes.

  2. Loading and pre-loading processes generate a distinct siRNA population in Tetrahymena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Kazufumi, E-mail: kazufumi.mochizuki@imba.oeaw.ac.at; Kurth, Henriette M.

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •The Tetrahymena Argonaute protein Twi1p binds to ∼28–30-nt siRNAs called scnRNAs. •The size of scnRNAs is determined during a pre-loading process. •The 5′ uracil bias of scnRNAs is attributed to pre-loading and loading processes. •The thermodynamic asymmetry of scnRNA duplex doesnot affect the guide strand decision. •scnRNAs may be produced non-sequentially from dsRNA substrates by Dicer. -- Abstract: The various properties of small RNAs, such as length, terminal nucleotide, thermodynamic asymmetry and duplex mismatches, can impact their sorting into different Argonaute proteins in diverse eukaryotes. The developmentally regulated 26- to 32-nt siRNAs (scnRNAs) are loaded to the Argonaute protein Twi1p and display a strong bias for uracil at the 5′ end. In this study, we used deep sequencing to analyze loaded and unloaded populations of scnRNAs. We show that the size of the scnRNA is determined during a pre-loading process, whereas their 5′ uracil bias is attributed to both pre-loading and loading processes. We also demonstrate that scnRNAs have a strong bias for adenine at the third base from the 3′ terminus, suggesting that most scnRNAs are direct Dicer products. Furthermore, we show that the thermodynamic asymmetry of the scnRNA duplex does not affect the guide and passenger strand decision. Finally, we show that scnRNAs frequently have templated uracil at the last base without a strong bias for adenine at the second base indicating non-sequential production of scnRNAs from substrates. These findings provide a biochemical basis for the varying attributes of scnRNAs, which should help improve our understanding of the production and turnover of scnRNAs in vivo.

  3. Effects of Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) Phosphate (TDCPP) in Tetrahymena Thermophila: Targeting the Ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Giesy, John P.; Yu, Liqin; Li, Guangyu; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-05-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) has been frequently detected in the environment, and exposure to TDCPP appears widespread. It has been implicated to cause toxicity in vertebrates, but its potential to affect lower-trophic-level species remains unknown. In the present study, the ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila, was used as a model to evaluate toxic effects of TDCPP and explore molecular mechanisms by integrating phenotypic observation, RNA-Seq and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) Imaging technologies. Exposure to 0.01, 0.1 or 1 μM TDCPP for 5 days significantly decreased the relative biomass by reducing number of cells, size of cells and quantity of cilia in a dose-dependent manner. RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that expression of twenty-one ribosome protein genes was down-regulated and these genes were enriched in “ribosome” term in KEGG pathway analysis. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes expressing ribosome proteins was accompanied by decreased ribosome quantity in rough endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm and enlarged ribosome size. Therefore, taken together, the data from the present study suggest that exposure to TDCPP affects growth and reproduction of Tetrahymena thermophila by targeting the ribosome. This information might provide insights into critical mechanisms of toxic action in other species and lead to useful bioindicators of exposure to TDCPP.

  4. Depletion of UBC9 Causes Nuclear Defects during the Vegetative and Sexual Life Cycles in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qianyi; Nasir, Amjad M; Coyne, Robert S; Forney, James D

    2015-12-01

    Ubc9p is the sole E2-conjugating enzyme for SUMOylation, and its proper function is required for regulating key nuclear events such as transcription, DNA repair, and mitosis. In Tetrahymena thermophila, the genome is separated into a diploid germ line micronucleus (MIC) that divides by mitosis and a polyploid somatic macronucleus (MAC) that divides amitotically. This unusual nuclear organization provides novel opportunities for the study of SUMOylation and Ubc9p function. We identified the UBC9 gene and demonstrated that its complete deletion from both MIC and MAC genomes is lethal. Rescue of the lethal phenotype with a GFP-UBC9 fusion gene driven by a metallothionein promoter generated a cell line with CdCl2-dependent expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Ubc9p. Depletion of Ubc9p in vegetative cells resulted in the loss of MICs, but MACs continued to divide. In contrast, expression of catalytically inactive Ubc9p resulted in the accumulation of multiple MICs. Critical roles for Ubc9p were also identified during the sexual life cycle of Tetrahymena. Cell lines that were depleted for Ubc9p did not form mating pairs and therefore could not complete any of the subsequent stages of conjugation, including meiosis and macronuclear development. Mating between cells expressing catalytically inactive Ubc9p resulted in arrest during macronuclear development, consistent with our observation that Ubc9p accumulates in the developing macronucleus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes virulence factor Listeriolysin O favors bacterial growth in co-culture with the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis, causes protozoan encystment and promotes bacterial survival inside cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermolaeva Svetlana A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is widely spread in the nature. L. monocytogenes was reported to be isolated from soil, water, sewage and sludge. Listeriolysin O (LLO is a L. monocytogenes major virulence factor. In the course of infection in mammals, LLO is required for intracellular survival and apoptosis induction in lymphocytes. In this study, we explored the potential of LLO to promote interactions between L. monocytogenes and the ubiquitous inhabitant of natural ecosystems bacteriovorous free-living ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Results Wild type L. monocytogenes reduced T. pyriformis trophozoite counts and stimulated encystment. The effects were observed starting from 48 h of co-incubation. On the day 14, trophozoites were eliminated from the co-culture while about 5 × 104 cells/ml remained in the axenic T. pyriformis culture. The deficient in the LLO-encoding hly gene L. monocytogenes strain failed to cause mortality among protozoa and to trigger protozoan encystment. Replenishment of the hly gene in the mutant strain restored toxicity towards protozoa and induction of protozoan encystment. The saprophytic non-haemolytic species L. innocua transformed with the LLO-expressing plasmid caused extensive mortality and encystment in ciliates. During the first week of co-incubation, LLO-producing L. monocytogenes demonstrated higher growth rates in association with T. pyriformis than the LLO-deficient isogenic strain. At latter stages of co-incubation bacterial counts were similar for both strains. T. pyriformis cysts infected with wild type L. monocytogenes caused listerial infection in guinea pigs upon ocular and oral inoculation. The infection was proved by bacterial plating from the internal organs. Conclusions The L. monocytogenes virulence factor LLO promotes bacterial survival and growth in the presence of bacteriovorous ciliate T. pyriformis. LLO is responsible for L. monocytogenes

  6. Atributos ecológicos para el manejo de Pinus tropicalis Morelet en la localidad de Galalón, Pinar del Río

    OpenAIRE

    Valdés Sáenz, María Adela

    2013-01-01

    En esta investigación se evaluaron los atributos ecológicos de la población natural de Pinus tropicalis Morelet en Galalón. Se establecieron seis parcelas de 400 m2 para la caracterización del suelo, clima, vegetación, estado de conservación, estructura florística y los atributos morfofisiológicos de la especie. La riqueza florística resultó con 30 géneros, 22 familias botánicas y 31 especies, siendo un área pobre florísticamente donde predomina P. tropicalis asociado con P. caribaea var. car...

  7. Characterization of the neuropeptide Y system in the frog Silurana tropicalis (Pipidae): three peptides and six receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, G; Xu, B; Larsson, T A; Heldin, J; Bergqvist, C A; Fredriksson, R; Conlon, J M; Lundell, I; Denver, R J; Larhammar, D

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y and its related peptides PYY and PP (pancreatic polypeptide) are involved in feeding behavior, regulation of the pituitary and the gastrointestinal tract, and numerous other functions. The peptides act on a family of G-protein coupled receptors with 4-7 members in jawed vertebrates. We describe here the NPY system of the Western clawed frog Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis. Three peptides, NPY, PYY and PP, were identified together with six receptors, namely subtypes Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5, Y7 and Y8. Thus, this frog has all but one of the ancestral seven gnathostome NPY-family receptors, in contrast to mammals which have lost 2-3 of the receptors. Expression levels of mRNA for the peptide and receptor genes were analyzed in a panel of 19 frog tissues using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR. The peptide mRNAs had broad distribution with highest expression in skin, blood and small intestine. NPY mRNA was present in the three brain regions investigated, but PYY and PP mRNAs were not detectable in any of these. All receptor mRNAs had similar expression profiles with high expression in skin, blood, muscle and heart. Three of the receptors, Y5, Y7 and Y8, could be functionally expressed in HEK-293 cells and characterized with binding studies using the three frog peptides. PYY had the highest affinity for all three receptors (K(i) 0.042-0.34 nM). Also NPY and PP bound to the Y8 receptor with high affinity (0.14 and 0.50 nM). The low affinity of NPY for the Y5 receptor (100-fold lower than PYY) differs from mammals and chicken. This may suggest a less important role of NPY on Y5 in appetite stimulation in the frog compared with amniotes. In conclusion, our characterization of the NPY system in S. tropicalis with its six receptors demonstrates not only greater complexity than in mammals but also some interesting differences in ligand-receptor preferences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ and Zʹ), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented.

  9. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ′ and Zʹ′), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this poster, and the latest performance measurements are presented.

  10. Physics issues on triggering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detector at the international linear collider (ILC) should be able to run 'trig- gerless' which means that all events can be read out and then be analysed with the offline reconstruction program in a trigger farm. The event rates for 'high Q2' events like W-pairs or q¯q are low, about 0.1/train. However, there is a significant.

  11. Neural networks for triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, B. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Campbell, M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Bedeschi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Nesti, F. (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding

  13. Abundant and dynamically expressed miRNAs, piRNAs, and other small RNAs in the vertebrate Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armisen, Javier; Gilchrist, Michael J; Wilczynska, Anna; Standart, Nancy; Miska, Eric A

    2009-10-01

    Small regulatory RNAs have recently emerged as key regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. Here we used high-throughput sequencing to determine small RNA populations in the germline and soma of the African clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis. We identified a number of miRNAs that were expressed in the female germline. miRNA expression profiling revealed that miR-202-5p is an oocyte-enriched miRNA. We identified two novel miRNAs that were expressed in the soma. In addition, we sequenced large numbers of Piwi-associated RNAs (piRNAs) and other endogenous small RNAs, likely representing endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs). Of these, only piRNAs were restricted to the germline, suggesting that endo-siRNAs are an abundant class of small RNAs in the vertebrate soma. In the germline, both endogenous small RNAs and piRNAs mapped to many high copy number loci. Furthermore, endogenous small RNAs mapped to the same specific subsets of repetitive elements in both the soma and the germline, suggesting that these RNAs might act to silence repetitive elements in both compartments. Data presented here suggest a conserved role for miRNAs in the vertebrate germline. Furthermore, this study provides a basis for the functional analysis of small regulatory RNAs in an important vertebrate model system.

  14. Presumptive identification of Candida species other than C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis with the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Lynn L

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CHROMagar Candida (CaC is increasingly being reported as a medium used to differentiate Candida albicans from non-albicans Candida (NAC species. Rapid identification of NAC can assist the clinician in selecting appropriate antifungal therapy. CaC is a differential chromogenic medium designed to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis based on colony color and morphology. Some reports have proposed that CaC can also reliably identify C. dubliniensis and C. glabrata. Methods We evaluated the usefulness of CaC in the identification of C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. firmetaria, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. inconspicua, C. kefyr, C. lipolytica, C. lusitaniae, C. norvegensis, C. parapsilosis, and C. rugosa. Results Most NAC produced colonies that were shades of pink, lavender, or ivory. Several isolates of C. firmetaria and all C. inconspicua produced colonies difficult to differentiate from C. krusei. Most C. rugosa isolates produced unique colonies with morphology like C. krusei except in a light blue-green color. C. glabrata isolates produced small dark violet colonies that could be differentiated from the pink and lavender colors produced by other species. All seventeen isolates of C. dubliniensis produced green colonies similar to those produced by C. albicans. Conclusion C. glabrata and C. rugosa appear distinguishable from other species using CaC. Some NAC, including C. firmetaria and C. inconspicua, could be confused with C. krusei using this medium.

  15. Presumptive identification of Candida species other than C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis with the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Beckius, Miriam L; Floyd, Karon L; Horvath, Lynn L; Murray, Clinton K

    2006-01-03

    CHROMagar Candida (CaC) is increasingly being reported as a medium used to differentiate Candida albicans from non-albicans Candida (NAC) species. Rapid identification of NAC can assist the clinician in selecting appropriate antifungal therapy. CaC is a differential chromogenic medium designed to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis based on colony color and morphology. Some reports have proposed that CaC can also reliably identify C. dubliniensis and C. glabrata. We evaluated the usefulness of CaC in the identification of C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. firmetaria, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. inconspicua, C. kefyr, C. lipolytica, C. lusitaniae, C. norvegensis, C. parapsilosis, and C. rugosa. Most NAC produced colonies that were shades of pink, lavender, or ivory. Several isolates of C. firmetaria and all C. inconspicua produced colonies difficult to differentiate from C. krusei. Most C. rugosa isolates produced unique colonies with morphology like C. krusei except in a light blue-green color. C. glabrata isolates produced small dark violet colonies that could be differentiated from the pink and lavender colors produced by other species. All seventeen isolates of C. dubliniensis produced green colonies similar to those produced by C. albicans. C. glabrata and C. rugosa appear distinguishable from other species using CaC. Some NAC, including C. firmetaria and C. inconspicua, could be confused with C. krusei using this medium.

  16. Jumping performance in the highly aquatic frog, Xenopus tropicalis: sex-specific relationships between morphology and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Herrel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Frogs are characterized by a morphology that has been suggested to be related to their unique jumping specialization. Yet, the functional demands associated with jumping and swimming may not be that different as suggested by studies with semi-aquatic frogs. Here, we explore whether features previously identified as indicative of good burst swimming performance also predict jumping performance in a highly aquatic frog, Xenopus tropicalis. Moreover, we test whether the morphological determinants of jumping performance are similar in the two sexes and whether jumping performance differs in the two sexes. Finally we test whether jumping capacity is positively associated with burst swimming and terrestrial endurance capacity in both sexes. Our results show sex-specific differences in jumping performance when correcting for differences in body size. Moreover, the features determining jumping performance are different in the two sexes. Finally, the relationships between different performance traits are sex-dependent as well with females, but not males, showing a trade-off between peak jumping force and the time jumped to exhaustion. This suggests that different selective pressures operate on the two sexes, with females being subjected to constraints on locomotion due to their greater body mass and investment in reproductive capacity. In contrast, males appear to invest more in locomotor capacity giving them higher performance for a given body size compared to females.

  17. Macronuclear genome sequence of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, a model eukaryote.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Eisen

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is a model organism for molecular and cellular biology. Like other ciliates, this species has separate germline and soma functions that are embodied by distinct nuclei within a single cell. The germline-like micronucleus (MIC has its genome held in reserve for sexual reproduction. The soma-like macronucleus (MAC, which possesses a genome processed from that of the MIC, is the center of gene expression and does not directly contribute DNA to sexual progeny. We report here the shotgun sequencing, assembly, and analysis of the MAC genome of T. thermophila, which is approximately 104 Mb in length and composed of approximately 225 chromosomes. Overall, the gene set is robust, with more than 27,000 predicted protein-coding genes, 15,000 of which have strong matches to genes in other organisms. The functional diversity encoded by these genes is substantial and reflects the complexity of processes required for a free-living, predatory, single-celled organism. This is highlighted by the abundance of lineage-specific duplications of genes with predicted roles in sensing and responding to environmental conditions (e.g., kinases, using diverse resources (e.g., proteases and transporters, and generating structural complexity (e.g., kinesins and dyneins. In contrast to the other lineages of alveolates (apicomplexans and dinoflagellates, no compelling evidence could be found for plastid-derived genes in the genome. UGA, the only T. thermophila stop codon, is used in some genes to encode selenocysteine, thus making this organism the first known with the potential to translate all 64 codons in nuclear genes into amino acids. We present genomic evidence supporting the hypothesis that the excision of DNA from the MIC to generate the MAC specifically targets foreign DNA as a form of genome self-defense. The combination of the genome sequence, the functional diversity encoded therein, and the presence of some pathways missing from

  18. Synthesis of Trigger Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferman, Orna; Vardi, Moshe Y.

    In automated synthesis, we transform a specification into a system that is guaranteed to satisfy the specification. In spite of the rich theory developed for temporal synthesis, little of this theory has been reduced to practice. This is in contrast with model-checking theory, which has led to industrial development and use of formal verification tools. We address this problem here by considering a certain class of PSL properties; this class covers most of the properties used in practice by system designers. We refer to this class as the class of trigger properties.

  19. The bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase thymidylate synthase of Tetrahymena thermophila provides a tool for molecular and biotechnology applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiedtke Arno

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR and thymidylate synthase (TS are crucial enzymes in DNA synthesis. In alveolata both enzymes are expressed as one bifunctional enzyme. Results Loss of this essential enzyme activities after successful allelic assortment of knock out alleles yields an auxotrophic marker in ciliates. Here the cloning, characterisation and functional analysis of Tetrahymena thermophila's DHFR-TS is presented. A first aspect of the presented work relates to destruction of DHFR-TS enzyme function in an alveolate thereby causing an auxotrophy for thymidine. A second aspect is to knock in an expression cassette encoding for a foreign gene with subsequent expression of the target protein. Conclusion This system avoids the use of antibiotics or other drugs and therefore is of high interest for biotechnological applications.

  20. Germination, growth, and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in excreted food vacuoles of the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasherob, R; Ben-Dov, E; Zaritsky, A; Barak, Z

    1998-05-01

    Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and their toxic crystals are bioencapsulated in the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis, in which the toxin remains stable. Each T. pyriformis cell concentrates the spores and crystals in its food vacuoles, thus delivering them to mosquito larvae, which rapidly die. Vacuoles containing undigested material are later excreted from the cells. The fate of spores and toxin inside the food vacuoles was determined at various times after excretion by phase-contrast and electron microscopy as well as by viable-cell counting. Excreted food vacuoles gradually aggregated, and vegetative growth of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis was observed after 7 h as filaments that stemmed from the aggregates. The outgrown cells sporulated between 27 and 42 h. The spore multiplication values in this system are low compared to those obtained in carcasses of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis-killed larvae and pupae, but this bioencapsulation represents a new possible mode of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis recycling in nontarget organisms.

  1. Spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs of Tetrahymena thermophila and some possible snRNA-snRNA base-pairing interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, H; Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1991-01-01

    organisms. Furthermore, secondary structures closely similar to phylogenetically proven models can be inferred from the T. thermophila data. Analysis of the snRNA sequences identifies three potential snRNA-snRNA base-pairing interactions, all of which are consistent with available phylogenetic data. Two......We have identified and characterized the full set of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs; U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6) from the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. With the exception of U4 snRNA, the sizes of the T. thermophila snRNAs are closely similar to their metazoan homologues. The T....... thermophila snRNAs all have unique 5' ends, which start with an adenine residue. In contrast, with the exception of U6, their 3' ends show some size heterogeneity. The primary sequences of the T. thermophila snRNAs contain the sequence motifs shown, or proposed, to be of functional importance in other...

  2. Cyc17, a meiosis-specific cyclin, is essential for anaphase initiation and chromosome segregation in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guan-Xiong; Dang, Huai; Tian, Miao; Zhang, Jing; Shodhan, Anura; Ning, Ying-Zhi; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei

    2016-07-17

    Although the role of cyclins in controlling nuclear division is well established, their function in ciliate meiosis remains unknown. In ciliates, the cyclin family has undergone massive expansion which suggests that diverse cell cycle systems exist, and this warrants further investigation. A screen for cyclins in the model ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila showed that there are 34 cyclins in this organism. Only 1 cyclin, Cyc17, contains the complete cyclin core and is specifically expressed during meiosis. Deletion of CYC17 led to meiotic arrest at the diakinesis-like metaphase I stage. Expression of genes involved in DNA metabolism and chromosome organization (chromatin remodeling and basic chromosomal structure) was repressed in cyc17 knockout matings. Further investigation suggested that Cyc17 is involved in regulating spindle pole attachment, and is thus essential for chromosome segregation at meiosis. These findings suggest a simple model in which chromosome segregation is influenced by Cyc17.

  3. The oral apparatus of Tetrahymena pyriformis, strain WH-6. II. Cytochalasin B inhibition of oral apparatus morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, R H

    1976-07-01

    The effects of cytochalasin B on oral apparatus morphogenesis and cell division were studied in synchronized Tetrahymena pyriformis, strain WH-6 syngen 1. Cytochalasin B brought about the rapid arrest of oral apparatus primordium development when added prior to the completion of oral apparatus membranelle differentiation. Cells arrested in development did not divide. When cytochalasin B was added after this transition point, oral apparatus morphogenesis and cell division were completed. The effects of cytochalasin B could be reversed by washing it from the medium. Even though cytochalasin B (at 400 mug/ml) reduced protein synthesis by 30%, the data are consistent with the interpretation that cytochalasin B prevents an assembly process during the membranelle differentiation phase of oral apparatus development.

  4. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Belanger-Champagne, C; Bosman, M; Brenner, R; Casado, MP; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Demers, S; Farrington, S; Igonkina, O; Kalinowski, A; Kanaya, N; Osuna, C; Pérez, E; Ptacek, E; Reinsch, A; Saavedra, A; Sopczak, A; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Tsuno, S; Vorwerk, V; Watson, A; Xella, S

    2008-01-01

    Moving to the high energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons will become a necessary and very powerful tool, allowing a discovery of physics beyond Standard Model. Many models, among them light SM Higgs and various SUSY models, predict an abundant production of taus with respect to other leptons. The reconstruction of hadronic tau decays, although a very challenging task in hadronic enviroments, allows to increase a signal efficiency by at least of factor 2, and provides an independent control sample to disantangle lepton tau decays from prompt electrons and muons. Thanks to the advanced calorimetry and tracking, the ATLAS experiment has developed tools to efficiently identify hadronic taus at the trigger level. In this presentation we will review the characteristics of taus and the methods to suppress low-multiplicity, low-energy jets contributions as well as we will address the tau trigger chain which provide a rejection rate of 10^5. We will further present plans for commissioning the ATLA...

  6. Efectos de quemas prescritas sobre las propiedades del suelo en bosques de Pinus tropicalis Morelet, en Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. W. Martínez Becerra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available El experimento se desarrolló en la Empresa Forestal Integral “La Palma”, provincia Pinar del Río, Cuba. Su objetivo fue evaluar el efecto de las quemas prescritas sobre las propiedades del suelo en bosques naturales de Pinus tropicalis Morelet. Se ubicaron cuatro parcelas de 1,000 m2. Una fue el testigo y en las restantes se aplicó quema. Para la obtención de los datos fueron colocados aleatoriamente cinco puntos de muestreo en cada parcela. Una semana antes, una después y al año de aplicada las quemas prescritas, se tomaron muestras de suelo a profundidades de 0 a 10 cm y de 10 a 20 cm. Los datos se analizaron a través de pruebas de comparación de medias (ANOVA. Los resultados muestran un ligero aumento (no significativo para el pH, el P2O5 (fósforo cambiable, el Mg y el K (potasio asimilable, al año de efectuadas las quemas, por otra parte, disminuyeron no significativamente el K2O (cambiable, la materia orgánica (MO y el Ca. Al año de efectuada la quema aumenta significativamente el contenido de Na, disminuyendo significativamente la acidez hidrolítica y la capacidad de cambio catiónico a las dos profundidades antes y después de la quema. La relación entre los nutrientes del suelo se encuentra dentro de los rangos típicos de estos suelos pobres.

  7. Chronic toxicity of 1,3,5-triazine herbicides in the postembryonic development of the western clawed frog Silurana tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Masahiro; Tada, Noriko; Kamata, Yoichi

    2018-01-01

    Seven 1,3,5- triazine (s-triazine) herbicides (ametryn, prometryn, dimethametryn, simazine, atrazine, propazine, and cyanazine) were tested using an amphibian (Silurana tropicalis) metamorphosis assay focusing on morphometric, gravimetric, and thyroid-histological endpoints. Premetamorphic tadpoles were exposed to each s-triazine at 2 concentrations between 1/1000 and 1/10 of the 96-h acute toxicity values, until all tadpoles in the control group reached either the late prometamorphosic stages or the initial stage of metamorphic climax. All s-triazines tested induced significant retardation in growth and development at the higher concentrations (0.2-1.0mg/L), and some of them induced similar effects even at the lower concentrations (0.02-0.1mg/L) while each showing a linear dose-response. Total size of the thyroid glands tended to be reduced corresponding to the delayed development, but without showing histomorphological lesions typical of anti-thyroid chemicals. These consistent results suggest that the s-triazines can act as a chemical stressor inhibiting tadpole growth and development, possibly without disrupting the thyroid axis. In addition, tadpoles exhibiting spinal curvatures appeared in either one or both of the lower and higher concentration groups for each s-triazine tested. The incidence rate in the s-triazine exposure groups where tadpoles with scoliosis were observed ranged from 3.3% to 63.3%, some of which were significantly higher than that in the respective control groups (0-6.7%). It is speculated that the s-triazines may promote to occur axial malformations in developing tadpoles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxidative stress, glutathione level and antioxidant response to heavy metals in multi-resistant pathogen, Candida tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Sidra; Rehman, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explored the multiple heavy metal-resistant yeast isolated from heavy metal-polluted environment. The isolated yeast showed maximum growth at 30 °C, pH 7.0, and the strain was identified as Candida tropicalis through 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence analysis. Yeast cells grew well in medium containing different concentrations of heavy metal ions [CdCl₂, Pb(NO₃)₂, NaAsO₂, CuSO₄ and K₂Cr₂O₇]. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against different metal ions was ranged from 5 to 19 mM, and the metal resistance value against each metal observed by yeast cells was 5 mM (Cr), 10 mM (Cd), 15 mM (As), 14 mM (Cu) and 19 mM (Pb) and increased in the following order: Pb > Cu > As ≥ Cd > Cr. The total cellular glutathione, GSH/GSSG redox couple and metallothioneins like protein (MT) were assayed by growing cultures for 24 h and exposed to 100 mg/L of each heavy metal ion. Remarkable increase in γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine (GSH) level was determined in arsenic and cadmium treatment followed by chromium, lead and copper. Stressed cells had much more oxidized GSH than unstressed cells. GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly increased in cadmium and copper treatment in contrast to chromium, arsenic and lead. Statistical analysis revealed significantly higher cysteine level in all metal-treated samples as compared to control. Antioxidant glutathione transferase activity was not detected in metal-treated and untreated yeast samples. One-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins revealed marked differences in banding pattern of heavy metal-exposed yeast samples. A prominent 20 kDa band was observed in all treated samples suggesting that some differential proteins could be over-expressed during heavy metal treatment and might be involved in cell resistance mechanisms.

  9. Gene expression and localization of two types of AQP5 in Xenopus tropicalis under hydration and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yuki; Sano, Takahiro; Tsuchiya, Nobuhito; Okada, Reiko; Mochida, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2014-07-01

    Two types of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) genes (aqp-xt5a and aqp-xt5b) were identified in the genome of Xenopus tropicalis by synteny comparison and molecular phylogenetic analysis. When the frogs were in water, AQP-xt5a mRNA was expressed in the skin and urinary bladder. The expression of AQP-xt5a mRNA was significantly increased in dehydrated frogs. AQP-xt5b mRNA was also detected in the skin and increased in response to dehydration. Additionally, AQP-xt5b mRNA began to be slightly expressed in the lung and stomach after dehydration. For the pelvic skin of hydrated frogs, immunofluorescence staining localized AQP-xt5a and AQP-xt5b to the cytoplasm of secretory cells of the granular glands and the apical plasma membrane of secretory cells of the small granular glands, respectively. After dehydration, the locations of both AQPs in their respective glands did not change, but AQP-xt5a was visualized in the cytoplasm of secretory cells of the small granular glands. For the urinary bladder, AQP-xt5a was observed in the apical plasma membrane and cytoplasm of a number of granular cells under normal hydration. After dehydration, AQP-xt5a was found in the apical membrane and cytoplasm of most granular cells. Injection of vasotocin into hydrated frogs did not induce these changes in the localization of AQP-xt5a in the small granular glands and urinary bladder, however. The results suggest that AQP-xt5a might be involved in water reabsorption from the urinary bladder during dehydration, whereas AQP-xt5b might play a role in water secretion from the small granular gland. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Latent myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2011-10-01

    A latent myofascial trigger point (MTP) is defined as a focus of hyperirritability in a muscle taut band that is clinically associated with local twitch response and tenderness and/or referred pain upon manual examination. Current evidence suggests that the temporal profile of the spontaneous electrical activity at an MTP is similar to focal muscle fiber contraction and/or muscle cramp potentials, which contribute significantly to the induction of local tenderness and pain and motor dysfunctions. This review highlights the potential mechanisms underlying the sensory-motor dysfunctions associated with latent MTPs and discusses the contribution of central sensitization associated with latent MTPs and the MTP network to the spatial propagation of pain and motor dysfunctions. Treating latent MTPs in patients with musculoskeletal pain may not only decrease pain sensitivity and improve motor functions, but also prevent latent MTPs from transforming into active MTPs, and hence, prevent the development of myofascial pain syndrome.

  11. Expression of Tetrahymena snRNA gene variants including a U1 gene with mutations in the 5' splice site recognition sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Hagemeister, J J; Hellung-Larsen, P

    1997-01-01

    The expression of U1, U2 and U5 snRNA gene variants has been studied under different physiological states of Tetrahymena. Variants of all three snRNA genes are expressed. Among the snRNAs detected is U1-3, a variant with 66 mutations compared to the normal U1 snRNA. Three of these mutations affec...... the 5' splice site recognition sequence. The U1-3 snRNA is present in a few hundred copies per cell. The expression of Tetrahymena snRNA genes is independent of the physiological state of the cell.......The expression of U1, U2 and U5 snRNA gene variants has been studied under different physiological states of Tetrahymena. Variants of all three snRNA genes are expressed. Among the snRNAs detected is U1-3, a variant with 66 mutations compared to the normal U1 snRNA. Three of these mutations affect...

  12. The CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running on the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. Here we will present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simpler single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We will discuss the optimisation of the triggers and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  13. The CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  14. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naive inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau trig...

  15. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naïve inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau tri...

  16. Flexible trigger menu implementation on the Global Trigger for the CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUSHITA, Takashi; CMS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has continued to explore physics at the high-energy frontier in 2016. The integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2016 was 41 fb‑1 with a peak luminosity of 1.5 × 1034 cm‑2s‑1 and peak mean pile-up of about 50, all exceeding the initial estimations for 2016. The CMS experiment has upgraded its hardware-based Level-1 trigger system to maintain its performance for new physics searches and precision measurements at high luminosities. The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects from calorimeter and muon triggers, for reducing the 40 MHz collision rate to 100 kHz. The Global Trigger has been upgraded with state-of-the-art FPGA processors on Advanced Mezzanine Cards with optical links running at 10 GHz in a MicroTCA crate. The powerful processing resources of the upgraded system enable implementation of more algorithms at a time than previously possible, allowing CMS to be more flexible in how it handles the available trigger bandwidth. Algorithms for a trigger menu, including topological requirements on multi-objects, can be realised in the Global Trigger using the newly developed trigger menu specification grammar. Analysis-like trigger algorithms can be represented in an intuitive manner and the algorithms are translated to corresponding VHDL code blocks to build a firmware. The grammar can be extended in future as the needs arise. The experience of implementing trigger menus on the upgraded Global Trigger system will be presented.

  17. Cloning of Interleukin-10 from African Clawed Frog (Xenopus tropicalis), with the Finding of IL-19/20 Homologue in the IL-10 Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Zhitao; Zhang, Qihuan; Wang, Zisheng; Zhao, Weihong; Gao, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays an important role in immune system. In the present study, the IL-10 gene of African clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis) was first cloned, and its expression pattern and 3D structure were also analyzed. The frog IL-10 mRNA encoded 172 amino acids which possessed several conserved features found in IL-10s from other species, including five-exon/four-intron genomic structure, conserved four cysteine residues, IL-10 family motif, and six ?-...

  18. Muon triggers in the High Level Trigger of LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel

    2011-01-01

    The muon trigger selections for both levels of the LHCb software trigger (HLT1 and 2) are described and their performance is evaluated using $B^{+} \\to J/\\psi K^{+}$ signals reconstructed in 330 pb$^{-1}$ of data which were collected in the first half 2011.

  19. Trigger and data acquisition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Gaspar, C

    2001-01-01

    Past LEP experiments generate data at 0.5 MByte/s from particle detectors with over a quarter of a million readout channels. The process of reading out the electronic channels, treating them, and storing the date produced by each collision for further analysis by the physicists is called "Data Acquisition". Not all beam crossings produce interesting physics "events", picking the interesting ones is the task of the "Trigger" system. In order to make sure that the data is collected in good conditions the experiment's operation has to be constantly verified. In all, at LEP experiments over 100 000 parameters were monitored, controlled, and synchronized by the "Monotoring and control" system. In the future, LHC experiments will produce as much data in a single day as a LEP detector did in a full year's running with a raw data rate of 10 - 100 MBytes/s and will have to cope with some 800 million proton-proton collisions a second of these collisions only one in 100 million million is interesting for new particle se...

  20. Upgrade trigger: Biannual performance update

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Couturier, Ben; Esen, Sevda; De Cian, Michel; De Vries, Jacco Andreas; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Grillo, Lucia; Hasse, Christoph; Jones, Christopher Rob; Le Gac, Renaud; Matev, Rosen; Neufeld, Niko; Nikodem, Thomas; Polci, Francesco; Del Buono, Luigi; Quagliani, Renato; Schwemmer, Rainer; Seyfert, Paul; Stahl, Sascha; Szumlak, Tomasz; Vesterinen, Mika Anton; Wanczyk, Joanna; Williams, Mark Richard James; Yin, Hang; Zacharjasz, Emilia Anna

    2017-01-01

    This document presents the performance of the LHCb Upgrade trigger reconstruction sequence, incorporating changes to the underlying reconstruction algorithms and detector description since the Trigger and Online Upgrade TDR. An updated extrapolation is presented using the most recent example of an Event Filter Farm node.

  1. Photon-triggered nanowire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungkil; Lee, Hoo-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Min-Soo; Park, Jin-Sung; Lee, Jung Min; So, Jae-Pil; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; Kwon, Soon-Hong; Barrelet, Carl J.; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2017-10-01

    Photon-triggered electronic circuits have been a long-standing goal of photonics. Recent demonstrations include either all-optical transistors in which photons control other photons or phototransistors with the gate response tuned or enhanced by photons. However, only a few studies report on devices in which electronic currents are optically switched and amplified without an electrical gate. Here we show photon-triggered nanowire (NW) transistors, photon-triggered NW logic gates and a single NW photodetection system. NWs are synthesized with long crystalline silicon (CSi) segments connected by short porous silicon (PSi) segments. In a fabricated device, the electrical contacts on both ends of the NW are connected to a single PSi segment in the middle. Exposing the PSi segment to light triggers a current in the NW with a high on/off ratio of >8 × 106. A device that contains two PSi segments along the NW can be triggered using two independent optical input signals. Using localized pump lasers, we demonstrate photon-triggered logic gates including AND, OR and NAND gates. A photon-triggered NW transistor of diameter 25 nm with a single 100 nm PSi segment requires less than 300 pW of power. Furthermore, we take advantage of the high photosensitivity and fabricate a submicrometre-resolution photodetection system. Photon-triggered transistors offer a new venue towards multifunctional device applications such as programmable logic elements and ultrasensitive photodetectors.

  2. GnRH agonist triggering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Humaidan, Peter; Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær

    2013-01-01

    The concept that a bolus of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) can replace human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) as a trigger of final oocyte maturation was introduced several years ago. Recent developments in the area strengthen this premise. GnRHa trigger offers important advantages,...

  3. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilchriese, M.G.D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  4. Aerobic decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by growing cells of a newly isolated yeast Candida tropicalis TL-F1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang; Ning, Shuxiang; Zhang, Xuwang; Shi, Shengnan

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by growing cells of a new yeast strain TL-F1 which was isolated from the sea mud. Strain TL-F1 was identified as Candida tropicalis on the basis of 28S rDNA analysis. Various azo dyes (20mg/L) were efficiently decolorized through aerobic degradation. Meantime, the effects of different parameters on both decolorization of Acid Brilliant Scarlet GR and growth of strain TL-F1 were investigated. Furthermore, possible degradation pathway of the dye GR was proposed through analysis of metabolic products using UV-Vis spectroscopy and HPLC-MS methods. As far as it is known, it is the first systematic research on a C. tropicalis strain which is capable of efficiently decolorizing various azo dyes under aerobic condition. This work provides a potentially useful microbial strain TL-F1 for treatment of azo dye contaminated wastewater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antifungal Activity of Naphthoquinoidal Compounds In Vitro against Fluconazole-Resistant Strains of Different Candida Species: A Special Emphasis on Mechanisms of Action on Candida tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, João B. A.; da Silva, Cecília R.; Neta, Maria A. S.; Campos, Rosana S.; Siebra, Janaína T.; Silva, Rose A. C.; Gaspar, Danielle M.; Magalhães, Hemerson I. F.; de Moraes, Manoel O.; Lobo, Marina D. P.; Grangeiro, Thalles B.; Carvalho, Tatiane S. C.; Diogo, Emilay B. T.; da Silva Júnior, Eufrânio N.; Rodrigues, Felipe A. R.; Cavalcanti, Bruno C.; Júnior, Hélio V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the incidence of candidemia in tertiary hospitals worldwide has substantially increased. These infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality; in addition, they prolong hospital stays and raise the costs associated with treatment. Studies have reported a significant increase in infections by non-albicans Candida species, especially C. tropicalis. The number of antifungal drugs on the market is small in comparison to the number of antibacterial agents available. The limited number of treatment options, coupled with the increasing frequency of cross-resistance, makes it necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the antifungal activities of three semisynthetic naphthofuranquinone molecules against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains. These results allowed to us to evaluate the antifungal effects of three naphthofuranquinones on fluconazole-resistant C. tropicalis. The toxicity of these compounds was manifested as increased intracellular ROS, which resulted in membrane damage and changes in cell size/granularity, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and DNA damage (including oxidation and strand breakage). In conclusion, the tested naphthofuranquinones (compounds 1–3) exhibited in vitro cytotoxicity against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains. PMID:24817320

  6. Arctocephalus tropicalis in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Received 3 September 1984; accepted 12 November 1984. Two individuals of the sub-Antarctic fur seal, Aretoeephalus tropiealis, one of which was photographed, were seen on the beach 1 kmsouth of the mouth of the Kwanza River,. Angola, on 2 October 1983. This record represents a northerly extension by some 2 700 ...

  7. The ATLAS Missing ET trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Beauchemin, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few months, the ATLAS detector collected 900 GeV LHC collision events which allowed for the study the performance of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system (TDAQ). With the 7 TeV collision data collected recently, the performance studies of the trigger system are critical for a successful physics program. In particular a large spectrum of physics results will rely on the capacity of the ATLAS TDAQ system to collect events based on the estimate of the missing transverse energy (MET) contained in each event. The MET trigger would be, for example, the primary trigger to be used in new physics searches for processes involving new weakly interacting particles, which could account for the astronomically observed dark matter. In addition to discovery perspectives, the MET trigger can also be used in combination with other triggers to control the rate of signatures involving low energy objects. For example, the MET trigger is necessary in order to measure non-boosted W in the tau channel. Finally...

  8. Structural organization of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs U1 to U6 of Tetrahymena thermophila is very similar to that of plant small nuclear RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, H; Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1992-01-01

    We report the sequences of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) U1 to U6 of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The genes of the individual snRNAs exist in two to six slightly different copies per haploid genome. Sequence analyses of the gene-flanking regions indicate that there ar......We report the sequences of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) U1 to U6 of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The genes of the individual snRNAs exist in two to six slightly different copies per haploid genome. Sequence analyses of the gene-flanking regions indicate...

  9. ATLAS FTK: Fast Track Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Amerio, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Andreazza, A; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Bevacqua, V; Bogdan, M; Bossini, E; Boveia, A; Cavaliere, V; Canelli, F; Blazey, G; Cervigni, F; Cheng, Y; Citterio, M; Crescioli, F; Dell’Orso, M; Drake, G; Dunford, M; Giannetti, P; Giorgi, F; Hoff, J; Kapliy, A; Kasten, M; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Lanza, A; Liberali, V; Liu, T; Magalotti, D; McCarn, A; Melachrinos, C; Meroni, C; Negri, A; Neubauer, M; Penning, B; Piendibene, M; Proudfoot, J; Riva, M; Roda, C; Sabatini, F; Sacco, I; Shochet, M; Stabile, A; Tang, F; Tang, J; Tripiccione, R; Tuggle, J; Vercesi, V; Verzocchi, M; Villa, M; Vitillo, R A; Volpi, G; Webster, J; Wu, J; Yorita, K; Zhang, J

    2011-01-01

    A track reconstruction system for the trigger of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is described. The Fast Tracker is a highly parallel hardware system designed to operate at the Level-1 trigger output rate. It will provide high-quality tracks reconstructed over the entire inner detector by the start of processing in the Level-2 trigger. The system is based on associative memories for pattern recognition and fast FPGA’s for track reconstruction. Its design and expected performance under instantaneous luminosities up to 3 × 10^34/cm^2/s are discussed.

  10. Seismology: dynamic triggering of earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2005-10-06

    After an earthquake, numerous smaller shocks are triggered over distances comparable to the dimensions of the mainshock fault rupture, although they are rare at larger distances. Here we analyse the scaling of dynamic deformations (the stresses and strains associated with seismic waves) with distance from, and magnitude of, their triggering earthquake, and show that they can cause further earthquakes at any distance if their amplitude exceeds several microstrain, regardless of their frequency content. These triggering requirements are remarkably similar to those measured in the laboratory for inducing dynamic elastic nonlinear behaviour, which suggests that the underlying physics is similar.

  11. Usual and unusual biochemical properties of ADF/cofilin-like protein Adf73p in ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Nanami; Nakano, Kentaro; Takaine, Masak; Abe, Hiroshi; Numata, Osamu

    2009-12-04

    Actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is a well-conserved actin-modulating protein, which induces reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton by severing and depolymerizing F-actin. ADF/cofilin also binds to G-actin and inhibits nucleotide exchange, and hence, is supposed to regulate the nucleotide-bound state of the cellular G-actin pool cooperating with profilin, another well-conserved G-actin-binding protein that promotes nucleotide exchange. In this report, we investigated the biochemical properties of the ADF/cofilin-like protein Adf73p from ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Adf73p also binds to both G- and F-actin and severs and depolymerizes F-actin. Unlike canonical ADF/cofilin, however, Adf73p accelerates nucleotide exchange on actin and allows repolymerization of disassembled actin. These results suggest that the actin cytoskeleton of T. thermophila is regulated by Adf73p in a different way from those of mammals, plants, and yeasts.

  12. Heteroagglomeration of zinc oxide nanoparticles with clay mineral modulates the bioavailability and toxicity of nanoparticle in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Senapati, Violet Aileen; Dhawan, Alok; Shanker, Rishi

    2017-06-01

    The extensive use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in cosmetics, sunscreens and healthcare products increases their release in the aquatic environment. The present study explored the possible interaction of ZnO NPs with montmorillonite clay minerals in aqueous conditions. An addition of ZnO NPs on clay suspension significantly (pclay particles from 1652±90nm to 2158±13nm due to heteroagglomeration. The electrokinetic measurements showed a significant (pclay association (-1.37±0.03μmcm/Vs) that results to the electrostatic interaction between ZnO NPs and clay particles. The attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of ZnO NPs-clay association demonstrated the binding of ZnO NPs with the Si-O-Al region on the edges of clay particles. The increase in size of ZnO NPs-clay heteroagglomerates further leads to their sedimentation at 24h. Although, the stability of ZnO NPs in the clay suspension was decreased due to heteroagglomeration, but the bioavailability and toxicity of ZnO NPs-clay heteroagglomerates in Tetrahymena pyriformis was enhanced. These observations provide an evidence on possible mechanisms available in natural environment that can facilitate nanoparticles entry into the organisms present in lower trophic levels of the food web. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genome-wide prediction of the polymorphic Ser gene family in Tetrahymena thermophila based on motif analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsuwanna, Patrath; Kümpornsin, Krittikorn; Chookajorn, Thanat

    2014-01-01

    Even though antigenic variation is employed among parasitic protozoa for host immune evasion, Tetrahymena thermophila, a free-living ciliate, can also change its surface protein antigens. These cysteine-rich glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked surface proteins are encoded by a family of polymorphic Ser genes. Despite the availability of T. thermophila genome, a comprehensive analysis of the Ser family is limited by its high degree of polymorphism. In order to overcome this problem, a new approach was adopted by searching for Ser candidates with common motif sequences, namely length-specific repetitive cysteine pattern and GPI anchor site. The candidate genes were phylogenetically compared with the previously identified Ser genes and classified into subtypes. Ser candidates were often found to be located as tandem arrays of the same subtypes on several chromosomal scaffolds. Certain Ser candidates located in the same chromosomal arrays were transcriptionally expressed at specific T. thermophila developmental stages. These Ser candidates selected by the motif analysis approach can form the foundation for a systematic identification of the entire Ser gene family, which will contribute to the understanding of their function and the basis of T. thermophila antigenic variation.

  14. Ecological Traits of the Algae-Bearing Tetrahymena utriculariae (Ciliophora) from Traps of the Aquatic Carnivorous Plant Utricularia reflexa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimek, Karel; Pitsch, Gianna; Salcher, Michaela M; Sirová, Dagmara; Shabarova, Tanja; Adamec, Lubomír; Posch, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Trap fluid of aquatic carnivorous plants of the genus Utricularia hosts specific microbiomes consisting of commensal pro- and eukaryotes of largely unknown ecology. We examined the characteristics and dynamics of bacteria and the three dominant eukaryotes, i.e. the algae-bearing ciliate Tetrahymena utriculariae (Ciliophora), a green flagellate Euglena agilis (Euglenophyta), and the alga Scenedesmus alternans (Chlorophyta), associated with the traps of Utricularia reflexa. Our study focused on ecological traits and life strategies of the highly abundant ciliate whose biomass by far exceeds that of other eukaryotes and bacteria independent of the trap age. The ciliate was the only bacterivore in the traps, driving rapid turnover of bacterial standing stock. However, given the large size of the ciliate and the cell-specific uptake rates of bacteria we estimated that bacterivory alone would likely be insufficient to support its apparent rapid growth in traps. We suggest that mixotrophy based on algal symbionts contributes significantly to the diet and survival strategy of the ciliate in the extreme (anaerobic, low pH) trap-fluid environment. We propose a revised concept of major microbial interactions in the trap fluid where ciliate bacterivory plays a central role in regeneration of nutrients bound in rapidly growing bacterial biomass. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  15. A Comparative Study of Two Quantum Chemical Descriptors in Predicting Toxicity of Aliphatic Compounds towards Tetrahymena pyriformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Hussain Pandith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum chemical parameters such as LUMO energy, HOMO energy, ionization energy (I, electron affinity (A, chemical potential (μ, hardness (η electronegativity (χ, philicity (ωα, and electrophilicity (ω of a series of aliphatic compounds are calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d level of theory. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR models are developed for predicting the toxicity (pIGC50 of 13 classes of aliphatic compounds, including 171 electron acceptors and 81 electron donors, towards Tetrahymena pyriformis. The multiple linear regression modeling of toxicity of these compounds is performed by using the molecular descriptor log P (1-octanol/water partition coefficient in conjunction with two other quantum chemical descriptors, electrophilicity (ω and energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO. A comparison is made towards the toxicity predicting the ability of electrophilicity (ω versus ELUMO as a global chemical reactivity descriptor in addition to log P. The former works marginally better in most cases. There is a slight improvement in the quality of regression by changing the unit of IGC50 from mg/L to molarity and by removing the racemates and the diastereoisomers from the data set.

  16. DNA content alterations in Tetrahymena pyriformis macronucleus after exposure to food preservatives sodium nitrate and sodium benzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutsidou, Ariadni C; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Chasapis, C T; Terzoudi, Georgia I; Spiliopoulou, Chara A; Stefanidou, Maria E

    2012-12-01

    The toxicity, in terms of changes in the DNA content, of two food preservatives, sodium nitrate and sodium benzoate was studied on the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis using DNA image analysis technology. For this purpose, selected doses of both food additives were administered for 2 h to protozoa cultures and DNA image analysis of T. pyriformis nuclei was performed. The analysis was based on the measurement of the Mean Optical Density which represents the cellular DNA content. The results have shown that after exposure of the protozoan cultures to doses equivalent to ADI, a statistically significant increase in the macronuclear DNA content compared to the unexposed control samples was observed. The observed increase in the macronuclear DNA content is indicative of the stimulation of the mitotic process and the observed increase in MOD, accompanied by a stimulation of the protozoan proliferation activity is in consistence with this assumption. Since alterations at the DNA level such as DNA content and uncontrolled mitogenic stimulation have been linked with chemical carcinogenesis, the results of the present study add information on the toxicogenomic profile of the selected chemicals and may potentially lead to reconsideration of the excessive use of nitrates aiming to protect public health.

  17. The C-terminal domain of Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase holoenzyme protein p65 induces multiple structural changes in telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Benjamin M.; Loper, John; Najarro, Kevin; Stone, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The unique cellular activity of the telomerase reverse transcriptase ribonucleoprotein (RNP) requires proper assembly of protein and RNA components into a functional complex. In the ciliate model organism Tetrahymena thermophila, the La-domain protein p65 is required for in vivo assembly of telomerase. Single-molecule and biochemical studies have shown that p65 promotes efficient RNA assembly with the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein, in part by inducing a bend in the conserved stem IV region of telomerase RNA (TER). The domain architecture of p65 consists of an N-terminal domain, a La-RRM motif, and a C-terminal domain (CTD). Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET), we demonstrate the p65CTD is necessary for the RNA remodeling activity of the protein and is sufficient to induce a substantial conformational change in stem IV of TER. Moreover, nuclease protection assays directly map the site of p65CTD interaction to stem IV and reveal that, in addition to bending stem IV, p65 binding reorganizes nucleotides that comprise the low-affinity TERT binding site within stem–loop IV. PMID:22315458

  18. Tile Calorimeter Muon Trigger Signal

    CERN Document Server

    Cerqueira, A S; Usai, G L

    2002-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter contributes to the first level trigger with the fast analog signal coming from the trigger summing boards, so-called analog adder. The adders provide two kinds of output: the total energy sum in a trigger tower and the signal from the respective cell of the last radial calorimeter layer, which can be used for identifying muons, thus making the muon first level trigger more robust. This note reviews the adder specifications and laboratory tests, whereas the main focus is put on the data analysis from the testbeam periods in~2001. Several improvements achieved by tuning the read-out are described. Using the testbeam results, the ability to identify muons in the last radial Tilecal layer is discussed. The experimental results obtained at the testbeams are completed with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Trigger points: an anatomical substratum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akamatsu, Flávia Emi; Ayres, Bernardo Rodrigues; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Andrade, Mauro; Hsing, Wu Tu; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs...

  20. FERMIGTRIG - Fermi GBM Trigger Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by one or more of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO). Note that there are two Browse catalogs resulting from GBM...

  1. Flexible trigger menu implementation on the Global Trigger for the CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has continued to explore physics at the high-energy frontier in 2016. The integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2016 was 41~fb$^{-1}$ with a peak luminosity of 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and peak mean pile-up of about 50, all exceeding the initial estimations for 2016. The CMS experiment has upgraded its hardware-based Level-1 trigger system to maintain its performance for new physics searches and precision measurements at high luminosities. The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS \\mbox{Level-1} trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects from calorimeter and muon triggers, for reducing the 40 MHz collision rate to 100 kHz. The Global Trigger has been upgraded with state-of-the-art FPGA processors on Advanced Mezzanine Cards with optical links running at 10 GHz in a MicroTCA crate. The powerful processing resources of the upgraded system enable implemen...

  2. Análise dos fatores de virulência e proteoma de Candida tropicalis sensível e resistente ao fluconazol

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Lumi Kanoshiki

    2010-01-01

    Espécies de Candida são agentes oportunistas mais frequentes em infecções fúngicas. Embora Candida albicans seja a principal e a mais estudada espécie do gênero Candida, espécies não-albicans vêm emergindo como importantes agentes de candidíases. Entre as espécies não-albicans relata-se C. tropicalis como importante agente etiológico de candidemia em pacientes com câncer, principalmente aqueles com leucemia. Em países da América Latina, esta espécie é bastante frequente, mesmo entre pacientes...

  3. 1.15 A crystal structure of the X. tropicalis Spred1 EVH1 domain suggests a fourth distinct peptide-binding mechanism within the EVH1 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Nicholas J; Sivak, Jeremy M; Amaya, Enrique; Blundell, Tom L

    2005-02-14

    The recently described Spred protein family has been implicated in the modulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. We report the crystal structure of the Enabled/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 (EVH1) domain from Xenopus tropicalis Spred1, solved to 1.15 A resolution. This structure confirms that the Spred EVH1 adopts the pleckstrin-homology fold, with a similar secondary structure to Enabled. A translation of one of the peptide-binding groove beta-strands narrows this groove, whilst one end of the groove shows structural flexibility. We propose that Spred1 will bind peptides that are less proline-rich than other EVH1 domains, with conformational changes indicating an induced fit.

  4. ANALISIS DE LA LOCALIZACION SUBCELULAR DE XTRIC-8A Y DE SU PARTICIPACION EN LA POLARIZACION CELULAR EN EMBRIONES DE X. TROPICALIS

    OpenAIRE

    ARRIAGADA MOMBERG, CECILIA LORENA

    2012-01-01

    Inicialmente Ric-8 fue identificada promoviendo la vía de liberación de vesículas sinápticas en C.elegans y participando durante la división asimétrica en la embriogénesis de Drosophila. Por otro lado, en nuestro laboratorio hemos observado que ensayos de pérdida de función de Ric-8A en X. tropicalis, generan un fenotipo con células que presentan un retardo en la división celular y defectos en la pigmentación en las primeras etapas del desarrollo embrionario, un fenotipo que previame...

  5. External triggering and triggered targeting strategies for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfei; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2017-06-01

    Drug delivery systems that are externally triggered to release drugs and/or target tissues hold considerable promise for improving the treatment of many diseases by minimizing nonspecific toxicity and enhancing the efficacy of therapy. These drug delivery systems are constructed from materials that are sensitive to a wide range of external stimuli, including light, ultrasound, electrical and magnetic fields, and specific molecules. The responsiveness conferred by these materials allows the release of therapeutics to be triggered on demand and remotely by a physician or patient. In this Review, we describe the rationales for such systems and the types of stimuli that can be deployed, and provide an outlook for the field.

  6. Trigger processing using reconfigurable logic in the CMS calorimeter trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Brooke, J J; Heath, G P; Maddox, A J; Newbold, D; Rabbetts, P D

    2001-01-01

    We present the design of the Global Calorimeter Trigger processor for the CMS detector at LHC. This is a fully pipelined processor system which collects data from all the CMS calorimeters and produces summary information used in forming the Level-1 trigger decision for each event. The design in based on the use of state-of-the-art reconfigurable logic devices (FPGAs) and fast data links. We present the results of device testing using a low-latency pipelined sort algorithm, which demonstrate that an FPGA can be used to perform processing previously foreseen to require custom ASICs. Our design approach results in a powerful, flexible and compact processor system. (0 refs).

  7. Blomia tropicalis-Specific TCR Transgenic Th2 Cells Induce Inducible BALT and Severe Asthma in Mice by an IL-4/IL-13-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Yen Leong; Liong, Ka Hang; Huang, Chiung-Hui; Wong, Hok Sum; Zhou, Qian; Ler, Say Siong; Tang, Yafang; Low, Chin Pei; Koh, Hui Yu; Kuo, I-Chun; Zhang, Yongliang; Wong, W S Fred; Peh, Hong Yong; Lim, Hwee Ying; Ge, Moyar Qing; Haczku, Angela; Angeli, Veronique; MacAry, Paul A; Chua, Kaw Yan; Kemeny, David M

    2016-11-15

    Previous studies have highlighted the importance of lung-draining lymph nodes in the respiratory allergic immune response, whereas the lung parenchymal immune system has been largely neglected. We describe a new in vivo model of respiratory sensitization to Blomia tropicalis, the principal asthma allergen in the tropics, in which the immune response is focused on the lung parenchyma by transfer of Th2 cells from a novel TCR transgenic mouse, specific for the major B. tropicalis allergen Blo t 5, that targets the lung rather than the draining lymph nodes. Transfer of highly polarized transgenic CD4 effector Th2 cells, termed BT-II, followed by repeated inhalation of Blo t 5 expands these cells in the lung >100-fold, and subsequent Blo t 5 challenge induced decreased body temperature, reduction in movement, and a fall in specific lung compliance unseen in conventional mouse asthma models following a physiological allergen challenge. These mice exhibit lung eosinophilia; smooth muscle cell, collagen, and goblet cell hyperplasia; hyper IgE syndrome; mucus plugging; and extensive inducible BALT. In addition, there is a fall in total lung volume and forced expiratory volume at 100 ms. These pathophysiological changes were substantially reduced and, in some cases, completely abolished by administration of neutralizing mAbs specific for IL-4 and IL-13 on weeks 1, 2, and 3. This IL-4/IL-13-dependent inducible BALT model will be useful for investigating the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie asthma and the development of more effective drugs for treating severe asthma. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. A trigger processor for ARGUS

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, H D

    1981-01-01

    The ARGUS detector at the electron-positron storage ring DORIS consists of various particle detectors arranged in cylindrical symmetry in and around an axial magnetic field. A fast secondary trigger processor has been designed to find and count circular tracks in the r- phi -plane of the detector that originate from the interaction point. The processor serves as a filter in the trigger system of the ARGUS detector and is expected to reduce the rate of background triggers by two orders of magnitude. The processor hardware is built in ECL to perform simple operations with very high speed and partly in parallel. The track finding process takes about 9 mu s plus 3 mu s for each encountered track element. Control information is stored in memories that may be loaded via CAMAC from the online computer allowing easy adaption of the processor to different experimental conditions. (1 refs).

  9. Lysosomal physiology in Tetrahymena. 3. Pharmacological studies on acid hydrolase release and the ingestion and egestion of dimethylbenzanthracene particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, T L; Blum, J J

    1974-09-01

    The ingestion of (14)C-labeled 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene particles, the extracellular release of acid phosphatase, ribonuclease, and alpha-glucosidase, and the egestion of preingested dimethylbenzanthracene particles by Tetrahymena taken from logarithmically growing cultures and resuspended in a dilute salt solution were followed in the presence of several pharmacologic agents. Serotonin, caffeine, and, to a lesser extent, dibutyryl cyclic AMP increased the rate of particle ingestion, but did not alter the rate of release of the three acid hydrolases studied. Added catecholamines did not affect either particle ingestion or acid hydrolase release, but particle ingestion was inhibited by the catecholamine antagonists, dichloroisoproterenol, desmethylimipramine, reserpine, and phenoxybenzamine. These drugs also increased the release of acid phosphatase and ribonuclease in 5-h incubations. Desmethylimipramine acted within 1 h to increase acid hydrolase release, but the effect of dichloroisoproterenol developed more slowly and was secondary to a change in cellular content of the hydrolases. Desmethylimipramine increased the energy of activation for the release of acid phosphatase, while dichloroisoproterenol did not. Both of these drugs enhanced the egestion of preingested dimethylbenzanthracene particles, supporting the view that acid hydrolase release occurs through a cytoproct egestion mechanism. Particle ingestion was also inhibited by colchicine, vinblastine, and cytochalasin B, but these agents had no effect on acid hydrolase release, thus further differentiating the properties of the ingestion mechanism from those of the egestion mechanism. It appears that both microtubules and microfilaments play a role in the ingestion process and that this process may be controlled in part by a cyclic AMP-mediated serotoninergic and adrenergic system.

  10. Upgrade trigger: Bandwidth strategy proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Conor; Meloni, Simone; Boettcher, Thomas Julian; Whitehead, Mark Peter; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Vesterinen, Mika Anton

    2017-01-01

    This document describes a selection strategy for the upgrade trigger using charm signals as a benchmark. The Upgrade trigger uses a 'Run 2-like' sequence consisting of a first and second stage, in between which the calibration and alignment is performed. The first stage, HLT1, uses an inclusive strategy to select beauty and charm decays, while the second stage uses offline-quality exclusive selections. A novel genetic algorithm-based bandwidth division is performed at the second stage to distribute the output bandwidth among different physics channels, maximising the efficiency for useful physics events. The performance is then studied as a function of the available output bandwidth.

  11. ATLAS FTK Fast Track Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Iizawa, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Fast TracKer (FTK) will perform global track reconstruction after each Level-1 trigger accept signal to enable the software-based higher level trigger to have early access to tracking information. FTK is a dedicated processor based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) form an important part of the system architecture, and the large level of computing power required for pattern recognition is provided by incorporating standard-cell ASICs named Associative Memory (AM). Motivation and the architecture of the FTK system will be presented, and the status of hardware and simulation will be following.

  12. LHCb Run 2 Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00038235

    2016-01-01

    During the first long shutdown of the LHC (2013-2014, LS1), the LHCb detector remained essentially unchanged, while the trigger system has been completely revisited. Upgrades to the LHCb computing infrastructure have allowed for high quality decay information to be calculated by the software trigger making a separate offline event reconstruction unnecessary. Reaching the ultimate precision of the LHCb experiment already in real time as the data arrive has the power to transform the experimental approach to processing large quantities of data

  13. Small phosphatidate phosphatase (TtPAH2) of Tetrahymena complements respiratory function and not membrane biogenesis function of yeast PAH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Anoop Narayana; Shukla, Sushmita; Gautam, Sudhanshu; Rahaman, Abdur

    2017-12-01

    Phosphatidate phosphatases (PAH) play a central role in lipid metabolism and intracellular signaling. Herein, we report the presence of a low-molecular-weight PAH homolog in the single-celled ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. In vitro phosphatase assay showed that TtPAH2 belongs to the magnesium-dependent phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) family. Loss of function of TtPAH2 did not affect the growth of Tetrahymena. Unlike other known PAH homologs, TtPAH2 did not regulate lipid droplet number and ER morphology. TtPAH2 did not rescue growth and ER/nuclear membrane defects of the pah1Δ yeast cells, suggesting that the phosphatidate phosphatase activity of the protein is not sufficient to perform these cellular functions. Surprisingly, TtPAH2 complemented the respiratory defect in the pah1Δ yeast cells indicating a specific role of TtPAH2 in respiration. Overall, our results indicate that TtPAH2 possesses the minimal function of PAH protein family in respiration. We suggest that the amino acid sequences absent from TtPAH2 but present in all other known PAH homologs are critical for lipid homeostasis and membrane biogenesis.

  14. The zinc finger protein Zfr1p is localized specifically to conjugation junction and required for sexual development in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    Full Text Available Conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila involves a developmental program consisting of three prezygotic nuclear divisions, pronuclear exchange and fusion, and postzygotic and exconjugant stages. The conjugation junction structure appears during the initiation of conjugation development, and disappears during the exconjugant stage. Many structural and functional proteins are involved in the establishment and maintenance of the junction structure in T. thermophila. In the present study, a zinc finger protein-encoding gene ZFR1 was found to be expressed specifically during conjugation and to localize specifically to the conjugation junction region. Truncated Zfr1p localized at the plasma membrane in ordered arrays and decorated Golgi apparatus located adjacent to basal body. The N-terminal zinc finger and C-terminal hydrophobic domains of Zfr1p were found to be required for its specific conjugation junction localization. Conjugation development of ZFR1 somatic knockout cells was aborted at the pronuclear exchange and fusion conjugation stages. Furthermore, Zfr1p was found to be important for conjugation junction stability during the prezygotic nuclear division stage. Taken together, our data reveal that Zfr1p is required for the stability and integrity of the conjugation junction structure and essential for the sexual life cycle of the Tetrahymena cell.

  15. DT Local Trigger performance in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Local Trigger system of the CMS Drift Tube chambers (DT) was checked applying similar methods as in the LHC Run 1 (2012). The main variables shown in this note are the trigger efficiency, the trigger quality and the fraction of trigger ghosts. The performance was found to be comparable or better than in Run 1.

  16. Etiology of myofascial trigger points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, C.; Dommerholt, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is described as the sensory, motor, and autonomic symptoms caused by myofascial trigger points (TrPs). Knowing the potential causes of TrPs is important to prevent their development and recurrence, but also to inactivate and eliminate existing TrPs. There is general

  17. Hints for Metal-Preference Protein Sequence Determinants: Different Metal Binding Features of the Five Tetrahymena thermophila Metallothioneins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espart, Anna; Marín, Maribel; Gil-Moreno, Selene; Palacios, Òscar; Amaro, Francisco; Martín-González, Ana; Gutiérrez, Juan C.; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    The metal binding preference of metallothioneins (MTs) groups them in two extreme subsets, the Zn/Cd- and the Cu-thioneins. Ciliates harbor the largest MT gene/protein family reported so far, including 5 paralogs that exhibit relatively low sequence similarity, excepting MTT2 and MTT4. In Tetrahymena thermophila, three MTs (MTT1, MTT3 and MTT5) were considered Cd-thioneins and two (MTT2 and MTT4) Cu-thioneins, according to gene expression inducibility and phylogenetic analysis. In this study, the metal-binding abilities of the five MTT proteins were characterized, to obtain information about the folding and stability of their cognate- and non-cognate metal complexes, and to characterize the T. thermophila MT system at protein level. Hence, the five MTTs were recombinantly synthesized as Zn2+-, Cd2+- or Cu+-complexes, which were analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), circular dichroism (CD), and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Among the Cd-thioneins, MTT1 and MTT5 were optimal for Cd2+ coordination, yielding unique Cd17- and Cd8- complexes, respectively. When binding Zn2+, they rendered a mixture of Zn-species. Only MTT5 was capable to coordinate Cu+, although yielding heteronuclear Zn-, Cu-species or highly unstable Cu-homometallic species. MTT3 exhibited poor binding abilities both for Cd2+ and for Cu+, and although not optimally, it yielded the best result when coordinating Zn2+. The two Cu-thioneins, MTT2 and MTT4 isoforms formed homometallic Cu-complexes (major Cu20-MTT) upon synthesis in Cu-supplemented hosts. Contrarily, they were unable to fold into stable Cd-complexes, while Zn-MTT species were only recovered for MTT4 (major Zn10-MTT4). Thus, the metal binding preferences of the five T. thermophila MTs correlate well with their previous classification as Cd- and Cu-thioneins, and globally, they can be classified from Zn/Cd- to Cu-thioneins according to the gradation: MTT1>MTT5>MTT3>MTT4>MTT2. The main mechanisms underlying the evolution and

  18. ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Daniel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has introduced and recently commissioned a completely new hardware sub-system of its first-level trigger: the topological processor (L1Topo). L1Topo consist of two AdvancedTCA blades mounting state-of-the-art FPGA processors, providing high input bandwidth (up to 4 Gb/s) and low latency data processing (200 ns). L1Topo is able to select collision events by applying kinematic and topological requirements on candidate objects (energy clusters, jets, and muons) measured by calorimeters and muon sub-detectors. Results from data recorded using the L1Topo trigger will be presented. These results demonstrate a significantly improved background event rejection, thus allowing for a rate reduction without efficiency loss. This improvement has been shown for several physics processes leading to low-pT leptons, including H->tau tau and J/Psi->mu mu. In addition to describing the L1Topo trigger system, we will discuss the use of an accurate L1Topo simulation as a powerful tool to validate and optimize...

  19. ATLAS FTK: Fast Track Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Volpi, Guido; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the ATLAS Fast Tracker processor is presented, reporting the design of the system, its expected performance, and the integration status. The next LHC runs, with a significant increase in instantaneous luminosity, will provide a big challenge to the trigger and data acquisition systems of all the experiments. An intensive use of the tracking information at the trigger level will be important to keep high efficiency in interesting events, despite the increase in multiple p-p collisions per bunch crossing (pile-up). In order to increase the use of tracks within the High Level Trigger (HLT), the ATLAS experiment planned the installation of an hardware processor dedicated to tracking: the Fast TracKer (FTK) processor. The FTK is designed to perform full scan track reconstruction at every Level-1 accept. To achieve this goal, the FTK uses a fully parallel architecture, with algorithms designed to exploit the computing power of custom VLSI chips, the Associative Memory, as well as modern FPGAs. The FT...

  20. Muon Trigger for Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisyak, M.; Usvyatsov, M.; Mulhearn, M.; Shimmin, C.; Ustyuzhanin, A.

    2017-10-01

    The CRAYFIS experiment proposes to use privately owned mobile phones as a ground detector array for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays. Upon interacting with Earth’s atmosphere, these events produce extensive particle showers which can be detected by cameras on mobile phones. A typical shower contains minimally-ionizing particles such as muons. As these particles interact with CMOS image sensors, they may leave tracks of faintly-activated pixels that are sometimes hard to distinguish from random detector noise. Triggers that rely on the presence of very bright pixels within an image frame are not efficient in this case. We present a trigger algorithm based on Convolutional Neural Networks which selects images containing such tracks and are evaluated in a lazy manner: the response of each successive layer is computed only if activation of the current layer satisfies a continuation criterion. Usage of neural networks increases the sensitivity considerably comparable with image thresholding, while the lazy evaluation allows for execution of the trigger under the limited computational power of mobile phones.

  1. Stimulus conflict triggers behavioral avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignath, David; Eder, Andreas B

    2015-12-01

    According to a recent extension of the conflict-monitoring theory, conflict between two competing response tendencies is registered as an aversive event and triggers a motivation to avoid the source of conflict. In the present study, we tested this assumption. Over five experiments, we examined whether conflict is associated with an avoidance motivation and whether stimulus conflict or response conflict triggers an avoidance tendency. Participants first performed a color Stroop task. In a subsequent motivation test, participants responded to Stroop stimuli with approach- and avoidance-related lever movements. These results showed that Stroop-conflict stimuli increased the frequency of avoidance responses in a free-choice motivation test, and also increased the speed of avoidance relative to approach responses in a forced-choice test. High and low proportions of response conflict in the Stroop task had no effect on avoidance in the motivation test. Avoidance of conflict was, however, obtained even with new conflict stimuli that had not been presented before in a Stroop task, and when the Stroop task was replaced with an unrelated filler task. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulus conflict is sufficient to trigger avoidance.

  2. Performance of the CMS Regional Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Klabbers, P; Dasu, S; Efron, J; Fobes, R; Gorski, T; Grogg, K; Grothe, M; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Weinberg, M

    2009-01-01

    The CMS Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) receives eight-bit energies and a data quality bit from the HCAL and ECAL Trigger Primitive Generators (TPGs). The RCT uses these trigger primitives to find e/γ candidates and calculate regional calorimeter sums that are sent to the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) for sorting and further processing. The RCT hardware consists of one clock distribution crate and 18 double-sided crates containing custom boards, ASICs, and backplanes. The RCT electronics have been completely installed since 2007. The RCT has been integrated into the CMS Level-1 Trigger chain. Regular runs, triggering on cosmic rays, prepare the CMS detector for the restart of the LHC. During this running, the RCT control is handled centrally by CMS Run Control and Monitor System communicating with the Trigger Supervisor. Online Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) evaluates the performance of the RCT during these runs. Offline DQM allows more detailed studies, including trigger efficiencies. These and other r...

  3. Novel Proresolving Aspirin-Triggered DHA Pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serhan, Charles N; Fredman, Gabrielle; Yang, Rong; Karamnov, Sergey; Belayev, Ludmila S; Bazan, Nicolas G; Zhu, Min; Winkler, Jeremy W; Petasis, Nicos A

    2011-01-01

    .... We report an aspirin-triggered DHA metabolome that biosynthesizes a potent product in inflammatory exudates and human leukocytes, namely aspirin-triggered Neuroprotectin D1/Protectin D1 [AT-(NPD1/PD1...

  4. The Trigger System of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Felcini, Marta

    2008-01-01

    We give an overview of the main features of the CMS trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) system. Then, we illustrate the strategies and trigger configurations (trigger tables) developed for the detector calibration and physics program of the CMS experiment, at start-up of LHC operations, as well as their possible evolution with increasing luminosity. Finally, we discuss the expected CPU time performance of the trigger algorithms and the CPU requirements for the event filter farm at start-up.

  5. Comparison of primary and secondary 26S rRNA structures in two Tetrahymena species: evidence for a strong evolutionary and structural constraint in expansion segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Nielsen, Henrik; Lenaers, G

    1990-01-01

    . These are regions within the common core of secondary structure where expansions have taken place during the evolution of the rRNA of higher eukaryotes. The dispensable nature of some of the expansion segments has been taken as evidence of their non-functionality. However, our data show that a considerable......We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the 26S large subunit (LSU) rRNA genes for two Tetrahymena species, T. thermophila and T. pyriformis. The inferred rRNA sequences are presented in their most probable secondary structures based on compensatory mutations, energy, and conservation...... selective constraint has operated to preserve the secondary structure of these segments. Especially in the case of the D2 and D8 segments, the presence of a considerable number of compensatory base changes suggests that the secondary structure of these regions is of functional importance. Alternatively...

  6. Bee algorithm and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system as tools for QSAR study toxicity of substituted benzenes to Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Kobra; Atabati, Morteza; Kor, Kamalodin

    2014-06-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) was developed to predict the toxicity of substituted benzenes to Tetrahymena pyriformis. A set of 1,497 zero- to three-dimensional descriptors were used for each molecule in the data set. A major problem of QSAR is the high dimensionality of the descriptor space; therefore, descriptor selection is one of the most important steps. In this paper, bee algorithm was used to select the best descriptors. Three descriptors were selected and used as inputs for adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). Then the model was corrected for unstable compounds (the compounds that can be ionized in the aqueous solutions or can easily metabolize under some conditions). Finally squared correlation coefficients were obtained as 0.8769, 0.8649 and 0.8301 for training, test and validation sets, respectively. The results showed bee-ANFIS can be used as a powerful model for prediction of toxicity of substituted benzenes to T. pyriformis.

  7. 8-Methoxypsoralen DNA interstrand cross-linking of the ribosomal RNA genes in Tetrahymena thermophila. Distribution, repair and effect on rRNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fengquin, X; Nielsen, Henrik; Zhen, W

    1993-01-01

    The distribution and repair of 8-methoxypsoralen-DNA interstrand cross-links in the ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) in Tetrahymena thermophila have been studied in vivo by Southern blot analysis. It is found that the cross-links at a density of ... between three domains (terminal spacer, transcribed region and central spacer) as defined by restriction enzyme analysis (BamHI and ClaI). It is furthermore shown that a dosage resulting in approximately one cross-link per rDNA molecule (21 kbp, two genes) is sufficient to block RNA synthesis. Finally......, it is shown that the cross-links in the rDNA molecules are repaired at equal rate in all three domains within 24 h and that RNA synthesis is partly restored during this repair period. The majority of the cells also go through one to two cell divisions in this period but do not survive....

  8. Sodium-dependent uptake of [3H]scyllo-inositol by Tetrahymena: incorporation into phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol-linked glycans, and polyphosphoinositols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryals, P E; Kersting, M C

    1999-06-15

    [3H]Scyllo-inositol was taken up by Tetrahymena cells through a sodium-dependent pathway wherein unlabeled scyllo- and myo-inositol competed for uptake. d-Glucose was a competitor of [3H]myo-inositol uptake, but did not appear to compete for [3H]scyllo-inositol uptake. Transport of [3H]scyllo- and [3H]myo-inositol was inhibited when sodium was removed from the labeling buffer and by phlorizin, an inhibitor of sodium-dependent transporters. Cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of facilitated glucose transporters, had no significant effect on inositol transport. Internalized [3H]scyllo-inositol was readily incorporated intact into phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol-linked glycans, and polyphosphoinositols. Distribution of [3H]scyllo- and [3H]myo-inositol radioactivity into individual polyphosphoinositols was found to differ. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. The oral apparatus of Tetrahymena pyriformis, strain WH-6. III. The binding of 3H-cytochalasin B by the isolated oral apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, R H

    1976-07-01

    The binding of tritium-labelled cytochalasin B by the isolated oral apparatus of Tetrahymena pyriformis, strain WH-6, syngen 1, was investigated. Equilibrium binding studies revealed approximately 1.4 x 10(5) cytochalasin B binding sites per oral apparatus. A Scatchard plot indicates a single class of binding affinities with an association constant of 10(5) liters/mole. Rapid release of oral apparatus-bound cytochalasin B occurred when oral apparatuses were washed and resuspended in 1 mM TRIS without cytochalasin B. Because cytochalasin B binding to oral apparatus microtubular protein was not detected, microtubules are probably not the cytochalasin B binding site. The probable nature of the cytochalasin B binding site within the oral apparatus is discussed.

  10. The ATLAS level-1 Central Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Spiwoks, R; Berge, D; Caracinha, D; Ellis, Nick; Farthouat, P; Gällnö, P; Haas, S; Klofver, P; Krasznahorkay, A; Messina, A; Ohm, C; Pauly, T; Perantoni, M; Pessoa Lima Junior, H; Schuler, G; De Seixas, J M; Wengler, T; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger consists of the Muon-to-Central-Trigger-Processor Interface (MUCTPI), the Central Trigger Processor (CTP), and the Timing, Trigger and Control (TTC) partitions of the sub-detectors. The MUCTPI connects the output of the muon trigger system to the CTP. At every bunch crossing it receives information on muon candidates from each of the 208 muon trigger sectors and calculates the total multiplicity for each of six pT thresholds. The CTP combines information from the calorimeter trigger and the MUCTPI and makes the final Level-1 Accept (L1A) decision on the basis of lists of selection criteria (trigger menus). The MUCTPI and the CTP provide trigger summary information to the Level-2 trigger and to the data acquisition (DAQ) for every event selected at the Level-1. They further provide accumulated and, for the CTP, bunch-by-bunch counter data for monitoring of the trigger, detector and beam conditions. The TTC partitions send timing, trigger and control signals from the CTP to the...

  11. Molecular footprinting of skeletal tissues in the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula and the clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis identifies conserved and derived features of vertebrate calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eEnault

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolutionary emergence and subsequent diversification of the vertebrate skeleton requires a comprehensive view of the diverse skeletal cell types found in distinct developmental contexts, tissues and species. To date, our knowledge of the molecular nature of the shark calcified extracellular matrix, and its relationships with osteichthyan skeletal tissues, remain scarce. Here, based on specific combinations of expression patterns of the Col1a1, Col1a2 and Col2a1 fibrillar collagen genes, we compare the molecular footprint of endoskeletal elements from the chondrichthyan Scyliorhinus canicula and the tetrapod Xenopus tropicalis. We find that, depending on the anatomical location, Scyliorhinus skeletal calcification is associated to cell types expressing different subsets of fibrillar collagen genes, such as high levels of Col1a1 and Col1a2 in the neural arches, high levels of Col2a1 in the tesserae, or associated to a drastic Col2a1 downregulation in the centrum. We detect low Col2a1 levels in Xenopus osteoblasts, thereby revealing that the osteoblastic expression of this gene was significantly reduced in the tetrapod lineage. Finally, we uncover a striking parallel, from a molecular and histological perspective, between the vertebral cartilage calcification of both species and discuss the evolutionary origin of endochondral ossification.

  12. Cloning of Interleukin-10 from African Clawed Frog (Xenopus tropicalis, with the Finding of IL-19/20 Homologue in the IL-10 Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitao Qi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays an important role in immune system. In the present study, the IL-10 gene of African clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis was first cloned, and its expression pattern and 3D structure were also analyzed. The frog IL-10 mRNA encoded 172 amino acids which possessed several conserved features found in IL-10s from other species, including five-exon/four-intron genomic structure, conserved four cysteine residues, IL-10 family motif, and six α-helices. Real-time PCR showed that frog IL-10 mRNA was ubiquitous expressed in all examined tissues, highly in some immune related tissues including kidney, spleen, and intestine and lowly in heart, stomach, and liver. The frog IL-10 mRNA was upregulated at 24 h after LPS stimulation, indicating that it plays a part in the host immune response to bacterial infection. Another IL, termed as IL-20, was identified from the frog IL-10 locus, which might be the homologue of mammalian IL-19/20 according to the analysis results of the phylogenetic tree and the sequence identities.

  13. Effect of Eugenol on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Adhesion, and Biofilm of Candida tropicalis and Candida dubliniensis Isolated from Oral Cavity of HIV-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Balero de Paula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most Candida spp. infections are associated with biofilm formation on host surfaces. Cells within these communities display a phenotype resistant to antimicrobials and host defenses, so biofilm-associated infections are difficult to treat, representing a source of reinfections. The present study evaluated the effect of eugenol on the adherence properties and biofilm formation capacity of Candida dubliniensis and Candida tropicalis isolated from the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients. All isolates were able to form biofilms on different substrate surfaces. Eugenol showed inhibitory activity against planktonic and sessile cells of Candida spp. No metabolic activity in biofilm was detected after 24 h of treatment. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that eugenol drastically reduced the number of sessile cells on denture material surfaces. Most Candida species showed hydrophobic behavior and a significant difference in cell surface hydrophobicity was observed after exposure of planktonic cells to eugenol for 1 h. Eugenol also caused a significant reduction in adhesion of most Candida spp. to HEp-2 cells and to polystyrene. These findings corroborate the effectiveness of eugenol against Candida species other than C. albicans, reinforcing its potential as an antifungal applied to limit both the growth of planktonic cells and biofilm formation on different surfaces.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic data of 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase 2 domain of Candida tropicalis peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, M Kristian; Haapalainen, Antti M; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Glumoff, Tuomo

    2003-07-01

    In yeast, the second and the third reaction of the fatty-acid beta-oxidation spiral are catalysed by peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 2 (Mfe2p/Fox2p). This protein has two (3R)-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase domains and a C-terminal 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase 2 domain. Here, the purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the hydratase 2 domain [CtMfe2p(dh(a+b)Delta)] from Candida tropicalis Mfe2p is reported. CtMfe2p(dh(a+b)Delta) was overexpressed as an enzymatically active recombinant protein and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 178.57, b = 60.46, c = 130.85 A, beta = 94.48 degrees. Selenomethionine-labelled protein was used for a multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) experiment. A three-wavelength data set suitable for MAD phasing was collected to 2.25 A resolution using synchrotron radiation.

  15. Cloning of interleukin-10 from African clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis), with the Finding of IL-19/20 homologue in the IL-10 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhitao; Zhang, Qihuan; Wang, Zisheng; Zhao, Weihong; Gao, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays an important role in immune system. In the present study, the IL-10 gene of African clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis) was first cloned, and its expression pattern and 3D structure were also analyzed. The frog IL-10 mRNA encoded 172 amino acids which possessed several conserved features found in IL-10s from other species, including five-exon/four-intron genomic structure, conserved four cysteine residues, IL-10 family motif, and six α-helices. Real-time PCR showed that frog IL-10 mRNA was ubiquitous expressed in all examined tissues, highly in some immune related tissues including kidney, spleen, and intestine and lowly in heart, stomach, and liver. The frog IL-10 mRNA was upregulated at 24 h after LPS stimulation, indicating that it plays a part in the host immune response to bacterial infection. Another IL, termed as IL-20, was identified from the frog IL-10 locus, which might be the homologue of mammalian IL-19/20 according to the analysis results of the phylogenetic tree and the sequence identities.

  16. Efek Proteksi Ekstrak Air Panas Buah Mahkota Dewa Phaleria macrocarpa SCHEFF. BOERL. terhadap Stres Oksidasi akibat Ferri Sitrat pada Khamir Candida tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heddy Julistiono

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Yeast Candida tropiclis had been used as a cell model to investigate effects of drugs in cell level. Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff. Boerl., is traditionally used in Indonesia as medicinal plant. This study was to evaluate the antioxidant property of P. macrocarpa in cell level by using yeast C. tropicalis induced with ferric citrate. Ferric citrate of 1 mM or 5 mM induced oxidative stress inthe the yeast, marked with increasing of an oxidative damage marker, malon dialdehyde (MDA. Concentration of 5 mM of Ferric citrate caused cell mortality but concentration of 1 mM did not affect cell viability. Hot water extract of P. macrocarpa of 1 mg/ml attenuated MDA level in yeast cell induced with 1 mM ferric citrate. Whereas, 1 mg/ml of P. macrocarpa decreased cell mortality of the yeast induced with 5 mM ferric citrate with out decreasing level of MDA. However, 4 mg/ml of P. macrocarpa induced oxidative damage in yeast cell. The data may indicate the potential use of Indonesian traditional plant P. macrocarpa as herbal medicine for protecting human cell from oxidation damage.

  17. A Hardware Track Trigger (FTK) for the ATLAS Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The design and studies of the performance for the ATLAS hardware Fast TracKer (FTK) are presented. The existing trigger system of the ATLAS experiment is deployed to reduce the event rate from the bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz to < 1 KHz for permanent storage at the LHC design luminosity of 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. The LHC has performed exceptionally well and routinely exceeds the design luminosity and from 2015 is due to operate with higher still luminosities. This will place a significant load on the High Level trigger (HLT) system, both due to the need for more sophisticated algorithms to reject background, and from the larger data volumes that will need to be processed. The Fast TracKer is a custom electronics system that will operate at the full Level-1 accepted rate of 100 KHz and provide high quality tracks at the beginning of processing in the HLT. This will be performing by track reconstruction using hardware with massive parallelism using associative memories (AM) and FPGAs. The availability of the full...

  18. Cloning and characterization of the major histone H2A genes completes the cloning and sequencing of known histone genes of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Gorovsky, M A

    1996-01-01

    A truncated cDNA clone encoding Tetrahymena thermophila histone H2A2 was isolated using synthetic degenerate oligonucleotide probes derived from H2A protein sequences of Tetrahymena pyriformis. The cDNA clone was used as a homologous probe to isolate a truncated genomic clone encoding H2A1. The remaining regions of the genes for H2A1 (HTA1) and H2A2 (HTA2) were then isolated using inverse PCR on circularized genomic DNA fragments. These partial clones were assembled into intact HTA1 and HTA2 clones. Nucleotide sequences of the two genes were highly homologous within the coding region but not in the noncoding regions. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences with protein sequences of T. pyriformis H2As showed only two and three differences respectively, in a total of 137 amino acids for H2A1, and 132 amino acids for H2A2, indicating the two genes arose before the divergence of these two species. The HTA2 gene contains a TAA triplet within the coding region, encoding a glutamine residue. In contrast with the T. thermophila HHO and HTA3 genes, no introns were identified within the two genes. The 5'- and 3'-ends of the histone H2A mRNAs; were determined by RNase protection and by PCR mapping using RACE and RLM-RACE methods. Both genes encode polyadenylated mRNAs and are highly expressed in vegetatively growing cells but only weakly expressed in starved cultures. With the inclusion of these two genes, T. thermophila is the first organism whose entire complement of known core and linker histones, including replication-dependent and basal variants, has been cloned and sequenced. PMID:8760889

  19. Genome-wide identification and evolution of ATP-binding cassette transporters in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila: A case of functional divergence in a multigene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Dongxia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, ABC transporters that utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to expel cellular substrates into the environment are responsible for most of the efflux from cells. Many members of the superfamily of ABC transporters have been linked with resistance to multiple drugs or toxins. Owing to their medical and toxicological importance, members of the ABC superfamily have been studied in several model organisms and warrant examination in newly sequenced genomes. Results A total of 165 ABC transporter genes, constituting a highly expanded superfamily relative to its size in other eukaryotes, were identified in the macronuclear genome of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Based on ortholog comparisons, phylogenetic topologies and intron characterizations, each highly expanded ABC transporter family of T. thermophila was classified into several distinct groups, and hypotheses about their evolutionary relationships are presented. A comprehensive microarray analysis revealed divergent expression patterns among the members of the ABC transporter superfamily during different states of physiology and development. Many of the relatively recently formed duplicate pairs within individual ABC transporter families exhibit significantly different expression patterns. Further analysis showed that multiple mechanisms have led to functional divergence that is responsible for the preservation of duplicated genes. Conclusion Gene duplications have resulted in an extensive expansion of the superfamily of ABC transporters in the Tetrahymena genome, making it the largest example of its kind reported in any organism to date. Multiple independent duplications and subsequent divergence contributed to the formation of different families of ABC transporter genes. Many of the members within a gene family exhibit different expression patterns. The combination of gene duplication followed by both sequence divergence and acquisition of new patterns of

  20. LHCb Level-0 Trigger Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sarti, Alessio

    2006-01-01

    The calorimeter and muon systems are essential components to provide a trigger for the LHCb experiment. The calorimeter system comprises a scintillating pad detector and pre-shower, followed by electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters. The calorimeter system allows photons, electrons and hadrons to be identified, and their energy to be measured. The muon system consists of five measuring stations equipped with Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) and triple-Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, separated by iron filters. It allows the muons identification and transverse momentum measurement. The status of the two systems and their expected performance is presented.

  1. Configuration of the ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Elsing, M; Armstrong, S; Baines, J T M; Bee, C P; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, A; Boisvert, V; Bosman, M; Brandt, S; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Cervetto, M; Comune, G; Corso-Radu, A; Di Mattia, A; Díaz-Gómez, M; Dos Anjos, A; Drohan, J; Ellis, Nick; Epp, B; Etienne, F; Falciano, S; Farilla, A; George, S; Ghete, V M; González, S; Grothe, M; Kaczmarska, A; Karr, K M; Khomich, A; Konstantinidis, N P; Krasny, W; Li, W; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Ma, H; Meessen, C; Mello, A G; Merino, G; Morettini, P; Moyse, E; Nairz, A; Negri, A; Nikitin, N V; Nisati, A; Padilla, C; Parodi, F; Pérez-Réale, V; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, P; Polesello, G; Qian, Z; Rajagopalan, S; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Segura, E; De Seixas, J M; Shears, T G; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Smizanska, M; Soluk, R A; Stanescu, C; Tapprogge, Stefan; Touchard, F; Vercesi, V; Watson, A; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Zobernig, G; CHEP 2003 Computing in High Energy Physics

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a conceptual overview is given of the software foreseen to configure the ATLAS trigger system. Two functional software prototypes have been developed to configure the ATLAS Level-1 emulation and the High-Level Trigger software. Emphasis has been put so far on following a consistent approach between the two trigger systems and on addressing their requirements, taking into account the specific use-case of the `Region-of-Interest' mechanism for the ATLAS Level-2 trigger. In the future the configuration of the two systems will be combined to ensure a consistent selection configuration for the entire ATLAS trigger system.

  2. Metabolic triggered inflammation in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Hunter, D; Xu, J; Ding, C

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic joint disorder with a multifactorial etiology including genetic and environmental factors. Metabolic triggered inflammation, induced by nutrient overload and metabolic surplus, consists of components such as obesity, pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines, abnormal metabolites, acute phase proteins, vitamin D deficiency, and deregulated microRNAs that may play a role in OA pathophysiology. Obesity-related metabolic factors, especially adipokines, contribute to OA development by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and degradative enzymes, leading to cartilage matrix impairment and subchondral bone remodeling. Ectopic metabolite deposition and low-grade systemic inflammation can contribute to a toxic internal environment that exacerbates OA. Complement components highly expressed in osteoarthritic joints have also been proposed as causative factors. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with obesity and is implicated to be associated with cartilage loss in OA. Metabolic microRNAs may explain the inflammatory link between obesity and OA. Therapies targeting metabolic-triggered inflammation and its components are anticipated to have potential for the treatment of OA. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The UA1 trigger processor

    CERN Document Server

    Grayer, G H

    1981-01-01

    Experiment UA1 is a large multipurpose spectrometer at the CERN proton-antiproton collider. The principal trigger is formed on the basis of the energy deposition in calorimeters. A trigger decision taken in under 2.4 microseconds can avoid dead-time losses due to the bunched nature of the beam. To achieve this fast 8-bit charge to digital converters have been built followed by two identical digital processors tailored to the experiment. The outputs of groups of the 2440 photomultipliers in the calorimeters are summed to form a total of 288 input channels to the ADCs. A look-up table in RAM is used to convert the digitised photomultiplier signals to energy in one processor, and to transverse energy in the other. Each processor forms four sums from a chosen combination of input channels, and also counts the number of clusters with electromagnetic or hadronic energy above pre-determined levels. Up to twelve combinations of these conditions, together with external information, may be combined in coincidence or in...

  4. The Database Driven ATLAS Trigger Configuration System

    CERN Document Server

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This contribution describes the trigger selection configuration system of the ATLAS low- and high-level trigger (HLT) and the upgrades it received in preparation for LHC Run 2. The ATLAS trigger configuration system is responsible for applying the physics selection parameters for the online data taking at both trigger levels and the proper connection of the trigger lines across those levels. Here the low-level trigger consists of the already existing central trigger (CT) and the new Level-1 Topological trigger (L1Topo), which has been added for Run 2. In detail the tasks of the configuration system during the online data taking are Application of the selection criteria, e.g. energy cuts, minimum multiplicities, trigger object correlation, at the three trigger components L1Topo, CT, and HLT On-the-fly, e.g. rate-dependent, generation and application of prescale factors to the CT and HLT to adjust the trigger rates to the data taking conditions, such as falling luminosity or rate spikes in the detector readout ...

  5. Hadronic triggers and trigger object-level analysis at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zaripovas, Donatas Ramilas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic signatures are critical to the high energy physics analysis program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and are broadly used for both Standard Model measurements and searches for new physics. These signatures include generic quark and gluon jets, as well as jets originating from b-quarks or the decay of massive particles (such as electroweak bosons or top quarks). Additionally missing transverse momentum from non-interacting particles provides an interesting probe in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Developing trigger selections that target these events is a huge challenge at the LHC due to the enormous event rates associated with these signatures. This challenge is exacerbated by the amount of pile-up activity, which continues to grow. In order to address these challenges, several new techniques have been developed during the past year in order to significantly improve the potential of the 2017 dataset and overcome the limiting factors, such as storage and computing requirements...

  6. Hadronic Triggers and trigger-object level analysis at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zaripovas, Donatas Ramilas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic signatures are critical to the high energy physics analysis program, and are broadly used for both Standard Model measurements and searches for new physics. These signatures include generic quark and gluon jets, as well as jets originating from b-quarks or the decay of massive particles (such as electroweak bosons or top quarks). Additionally missing transverse momentum from non-interacting particles provides an interesting probe in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Developing trigger selections that target these events is a huge challenge at the LHC due to the enormous rates associated with these signatures. This challenge is exacerbated by the amount of pile-up activity, which continues to grow. In order to address these challenges, several new techniques have been developed during the past year in order to significantly improve the potential of the 2017 dataset and overcome the limiting factors to more deeply probing for new physics, such as storage and computing requirements f...

  7. The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Stockton, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 trigger system is responsible for reducing the anticipated LHC collision rate from 40 MHz to less than 100 kHz. The custom-built electronics of the ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger receives inputs from the ATLAS Level-1 Triggers and the LHC. The Level-1 calorimeter triggers are based on coarse detector information to identify high-ET jets, electrons/photons and hadrons, along with missing and total energy. In addition there are dedicated muon and forward detectors, providing triggers for different energy thresholds. The Level-1 Central Trigger combines these trigger inputs to form a Level-1 accept. This, along with trigger summary information, is then passed onto the higher levels of the trigger. From the LHC itself the Level-1 Central Trigger passes the bunch clock to all ATLAS sub-detectors. We present how the rigger information, along with dead-time rates, are monitored and logged by the online system for physics analysis, data quality assurance and operational debugging. Also presented are ...

  8. Wired and Wireless Camera Triggering with Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhanen, H.; Rönnholm, P.

    2017-10-01

    Synchronous triggering is an important task that allows simultaneous data capture from multiple cameras. Accurate synchronization enables 3D measurements of moving objects or from a moving platform. In this paper, we describe one wired and four wireless variations of Arduino-based low-cost remote trigger systems designed to provide a synchronous trigger signal for industrial cameras. Our wireless systems utilize 315 MHz or 434 MHz frequencies with noise filtering capacitors. In order to validate the synchronization accuracy, we developed a prototype of a rotating trigger detection system (named RoTriDeS). This system is suitable to detect the triggering accuracy of global shutter cameras. As a result, the wired system indicated an 8.91 μs mean triggering time difference between two cameras. Corresponding mean values for the four wireless triggering systems varied between 7.92 and 9.42 μs. Presented values include both camera-based and trigger-based desynchronization. Arduino-based triggering systems appeared to be feasible, and they have the potential to be extended to more complicated triggering systems.

  9. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jennrich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includes various well-documented pathomechanisms. In the sense of primary and secondary prevention, the cancer-triggering potential of aluminium and its use in anti-perspirant deodorants must be re-evaluated. For the same reason the access to a targeted diagnosis and treatment of aluminium loading must be facilitated.

  10. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow motion and slow, deep

  11. Degradation of a textile reactive azo dye by a combined biological-photocatalytic process: Candida tropicalis Jks2 -Tio2/Uv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narjes Jafari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the decolorization and degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5 azo dye was investigated by biological, photocatalytic (UV/TiO2 and combined processes.Application of Candida tropicalis JKS2 in treatment of the synthetic medium containing RB5 indicated complete decolorization of the dye with 200 mg/L in less than 24 h. Degradation ofthe aromatic rings, resulting from the destruction of the dye, did not occur during the biological treatment. Mineralization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution was obtained after 80 min by photocatalytic process (in presence of 0.2 g/L TiO2. COD (chemical oxygen demand wasnot detectable after complete decolorization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution. However,photocatalytic process was not effective in the removal of the dye at high concentrations (≥200 mg/L. With 200 mg/L concentration, 74.9% of decolorization was achieved after 4 hillumination under photocatalytic process and the absorbance peak in UV region (attributed to aromatic rings was not completely removed. A two-step treatment process, namely,biological treatment by yeast followed by photocatalytic degradation, was also assessed. In the combined process (with 200 mg/L RB5, absorbance peak in UV region significantly disappeared after 2 h illumination and about 60 % COD removal was achieved in the biological step. It is suggested that the combined process is more effective than the biological and photocatalytic treatments in the remediation of aromatic rings.

  12. Degradation of a textile reactive azo dye by a combined biological-photocatalytic process: Candida tropicalis Jks2 -Tio2/Uv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Narjes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, the decolorization and degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5 azo dye was investigated by biological, photocatalytic (UV/TiO2 and combined processes. Application of Candida tropicalis JKS2 in treatment of the synthetic medium containing RB5 indicated complete decolorization of the dye with 200 mg/L in less than 24 h. Degradation of the aromatic rings, resulting from the destruction of the dye, did not occur during the biological treatment. Mineralization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution was obtained after 80 min by photocatalytic process (in presence of 0.2 g/L TiO2. COD (chemical oxygen demand was not detectable after complete decolorization of 50 mg/L RB5 solution. However, photocatalytic process was not effective in the removal of the dye at high concentrations (≥200 mg/L. With 200 mg/L concentration, 74.9% of decolorization was achieved after 4 h illumination under photocatalytic process and the absorbance peak in UV region (attributed to aromatic rings was not completely removed. A two-step treatment process, namely, biological treatment by yeast followed by photocatalytic degradation, was also assessed. In the combined process (with 200 mg/L RB5, absorbance peak in UV region significantly disappeared after 2 h illumination and about 60% COD removal was achieved in the biological step. It is suggested that the combined process is more effective than the biological and photocatalytic treatments in the remediation of aromatic rings.

  13. Triggers of oral lichen planus flares and the potential role of trigger avoidance in disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hannah X; Blasiak, Rachel; Kim, Edwin; Padilla, Ricardo; Culton, Donna A

    2017-09-01

    Many patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) report triggers of flares, some of which overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, including oral allergy syndrome and oral contact dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of commonly reported triggers of OLP flares, their overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, and the potential role of trigger avoidance as a management strategy. Questionnaire-based survey of 51 patients with biopsy-proven lichen planus with oral involvement seen in an academic dermatology specialty clinic and/or oral pathology clinic between June 2014 and June 2015. Of the participants, 94% identified at least one trigger of their OLP flares. Approximately half of the participants (51%) reported at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral allergy syndrome, and 63% identified at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral contact dermatitis. Emotional stress was the most commonly reported trigger (77%). Regarding avoidance, 79% of the study participants reported avoiding their known triggers in daily life. Of those who actively avoided triggers, 89% reported an improvement in symptoms and 70% reported a decrease in the frequency of flares. Trigger identification and avoidance can play a potentially effective role in the management of OLP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  15. Trigger selections for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, M; Brodzicka, J; Fitzpatrick, C; Gligorov, V V; Ilten, P; Vesterinen, M

    2014-01-01

    A study of selections for an all-software trigger to be implemented in the LHCb upgrade is presented. It is demonstrated that the strategy of using both inclusive and exclusive selections will work in the upgrade running conditions. The unique capabilities of the all-software trigger are also demonstrated. Finally, the scope and composition of the LHCb physics program are studied in the context of various trigger output rate scenarios.

  16. Data analysis at Level-1 Trigger level

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmann, Johannes; Aradi, Gregor; Bergauer, Herbert; Jeitler, Manfred; Wulz, Claudia; Apanasevich, Leonard; Winer, Brian; Puigh, Darren Michael

    2017-01-01

    With ever increasing luminosity at the LHC, optimum online data selection is getting more and more important. While in the case of some experiments (LHCb and ALICE) this task is being completely transferred to computer farms, the others - ATLAS and CMS - will not be able to do this in the medium-term future for technological, detector-related reasons. Therefore, these experiments pursue the complementary approach of migrating more and more of the offline and High-Level Trigger intelligence into the trigger electronics. This paper illustrates how the Level-1 Trigger of the CMS experiment and in particular its concluding stage, the Global Trigger, take up this challenge.

  17. The ATLAS Muon and Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Dell'Asta, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    [Muon] The ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) deploys a three-levels processing scheme for the trigger system. The level-1 muon trigger system gets its input from fast muon trigger detectors. Fast sector logic boards select muon candidates, which are passed via an interface board to the central trigger processor and then to the High Level Trigger (HLT). The muon HLT is purely software based and encompasses a level-2 (L2) trigger followed by an event filter (EF) for a staged trigger approach. It has access to the data of the precision muon detectors and other detector elements to refine the muon hypothesis. Trigger-specific algorithms were developed and are used for the L2 to increase processing speed for instance by making use of look-up tables and simpler algorithms, while the EF muon triggers mostly benefit from offline reconstruction software to obtain most precise determination of the track parameters. There are two algorithms with different approaches, namely inside-out and outside-in...

  18. Clinical characteristics of the first cases of invasive candidiasis in China due to pan-echinocandin-resistant Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata isolates with delineation of their resistance mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sharon CA; Wang, He; Kong, Fanrong; Chu, Yun-Zhuo; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2018-01-01

    Echinocandin antifungal agents have become the first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis (IC) in many countries. Despite their increasing use, resistance to this class of drug is, overall, still uncommon. Here, we report two patients from the People’s Republic of China with IC, one with infection caused by pan-echinocandin-resistant Candida tropicalis and the other by pan-echinocandin-resistant Candida glabrata. We also describe the mechanisms of drug resistance of these isolates. The echinocandin-resistant C. glabrata isolate was cultured from ascitic fluid of a 46-year-old male patient with intra-abdominal IC developing after surgery in 2012. This patient had had no prior antifungal exposure. The echinocandin-resistant C. tropicalis isolate was cultured from chest drainage fluid of a 60-year-old female patient with severe coronary disease and lung infection. Prior to culture and identification of the isolate, the patient had received micafungin treatment for 19 days. Both isolates were cross-resistant to micafungin, anidulafungin, and caspofungin, with minimum inhibitory concentration values of ≥2 µg/mL. The amino acid substitution E655K was found adjacent to the FKS2 HS1 region of the C. glabrata isolate, while the substitution S80P were found in the FKS1 HS1 region of the C. tropicalis isolate. This report highlights the emergence of echinocandin resistance in two important non-albicans Candida species. Although the overall prevalence of echinocandin resistance is low in the People’s Republic of China, monitoring of antifungal susceptibility trends in all Candida species is warranted.

  19. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Emi Akamatsu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs. Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches.

  20. Intrasaccadic perception triggers pupillary constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan Mathôt

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly believed that vision is impaired during saccadic eye movements. However, here we report that some visual stimuli are clearly visible during saccades, and trigger a constriction of the eye’s pupil. Participants viewed sinusoid gratings that changed polarity 150 times per second (every 6.67 ms. At this rate of flicker, the gratings were perceived as homogeneous surfaces while participants fixated. However, the flickering gratings contained ambiguous motion: rightward and leftward motion for vertical gratings; upward and downward motion for horizontal gratings. When participants made a saccade perpendicular to the gratings’ orientation (e.g., a leftward saccade for a vertical grating, the eye’s peak velocity matched the gratings’ motion. As a result, the retinal image was approximately stable for a brief moment during the saccade, and this gave rise to an intrasaccadic percept: A normally invisible stimulus became visible when eye velocity was maximal. Our results confirm and extend previous studies by demonstrating intrasaccadic perception using a reflexive measure (pupillometry that does not rely on subjective report. Our results further show that intrasaccadic perception affects all stages of visual processing, from the pupillary response to visual awareness.

  1. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knuth, Matthew W [WISCONSIN; Kaproth, Bryan M [PENN STATE; Carpenter, Brett [PENN STATE; Guyer, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daub, Eric G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marone, Chris [PENN STATE

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  2. The menacing phantom: what pulls the trigger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giummarra, Melita J; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Nicholls, Michael E R; Gibson, Stephen J; Chou, Michael; Bradshaw, John L

    2011-08-01

    Phantom phenomena are frequent following amputation, but how this often painful experience is modified or triggered by spontaneous events or sensations often puzzles amputees and clinicians alike. We explored triggers of phantom phenomena in a heterogeneous sample of 264 upper and lower limb adult amputees with phantom sensations. Participants completed a structured questionnaire to determine the prevalence and nature of the triggers of phantom phenomena. The four categories of triggers identified include: (a) a quarter of participants experiencing psychological, emotional or autonomic triggers; (b) half experiencing behavioral triggers, "forgetting" the limb's absence and attempting to use the phantom; (c) one-fifth experiencing weather-induced triggers; and (d) one-third experiencing sensations referred from parts of the body. Upper limb amputees; and were more likely to experience weather-induced phantom phenomena than lower limb amputees; and upper and lower limb amputees were equally likely to experience referred sensations from the genitals, contradicting the homuncular remapping hypothesis. Traumatic amputees were more likely to report emotional triggers. Further, while those with emotional triggers exhibited poorer acceptance of the limitations of amputation, they were more likely to employ adaptive coping mechanisms. Finally, habitual "forgetting" behaviors were most common soon after amputation, whereas other more adaptive schemata (e.g., self-defense) were equally likely to be performed at any time following amputation. Various likely inter-related mechanisms are discussed in relation to phantom triggers. Ultimately, optimizing stump and neuroma management, as well as restoring function of central networks for pain, limb movement, and amputation-related memories, should help manage spontaneously triggered phantom phenomena. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. All rights reserved.

  3. Triggered Templated Assembly of Protein Polymersomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.; Wolf, de F.A.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Stuart, M.A.C.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Trigger the block: Stable biocompatible protein polymersomes can be generated by a triggered templated self-assembly route (see picture). Pluronic L121 vesicles (red core with blue corona) take up a biosynthetic triblock copolymer CSXSXC into their unilamellar shell. In response to changes in pH

  4. Supine Breast MRI Using Respiratory Triggering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Natasja N. Y.; ter Beek, Leon C.; Loo, Claudette E.; Winter-Warnars, Gonneke; Lange, Charlotte A. H.; van Loveren, Marjolein; Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate if navigator-echo respiratory-triggered magnetic resonance acquisition can acquire supine high-quality breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Supine respiratory-triggered magnetic resonance imaging (Trig-MRI) was compared to supine non-Trig-MRI to evaluate

  5. The LVL2 trigger goes online

    CERN Multimedia

    David Berge

    On Friday, the 9th of February, the ATLAS TDAQ community reached an important milestone. In a successful integration test, cosmic-ray muons were recorded with parts of the muon spectrometer, the central-trigger system and a second-level trigger algorithm. This was actually the first time that a full trigger slice all the way from the first-level trigger muon chambers up to event building after event selection by the second-level trigger ran online with cosmic rays. The ATLAS trigger and data acquisition system has a three-tier structure that is designed to cope with the enormous demands of proton-proton collisions at a bunch-crossing frequency of 40 MHz, with a typical event size of 1-2 MB. The online event selection has to reduce the incoming rate by a factor of roughly 200,000 to 200 Hz, a rate digestible by the archival-storage and offline-processing facilities. ATLAS has a mixed system: the first-level trigger (LVL1) is in hardware, while the other two consecutive levels, the second-level trigger (LVL2)...

  6. The ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00371751; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHC will collide protons in the ATLAS detector with increasing luminosity through 2016, placing stringent operational and physical requirements to the ATLAS trigger system in order to reduce the 40 MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 1 kHz, while not rejecting interesting physics events. The Level-1 trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS trigger system with an output rate of 100 kHz and decision latency smaller than 2.5 μs. It consists of a calorimeter trigger, muon trigger and a central trigger processor. During the LHC shutdown after the Run 1 finished in 2013, the Level-1 trigger system was upgraded including hardware, firmware and software updates. In particular, new electronics modules were introduced in the real-time data processing path: the Topological Processor System (L1Topo). It consists of a single AdvancedCTA shelf equipped with two Level-1 topological processor blades. They receive real-time information from the Level-1 calorimeter and muon triggers, which...

  7. Do episodes of anger trigger myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, J; Hallqvist, J; Diderichsen, Finn

    1999-01-01

    Our objectives were to study anger as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to explore potential effect modification by usual behavioral patterns related to hostility.......Our objectives were to study anger as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to explore potential effect modification by usual behavioral patterns related to hostility....

  8. Intelligent trigger processor for the crystal box

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, G H; Cooper, M D; Hart, G W; Hoffman, C M; Hogan, G E; Hughes, E B; Matis, H S; Rolfe, J; Sandberg, V D; Williams, R A; Wilson, S; Zeman, H

    1981-01-01

    A large solid angle angular modular NaI(Tl) detector with 432 phototubes and 88 trigger scintillators is being used to search simultaneously for three lepton flavor-changing decays of the muon. A beam of up to 10/sup 6/ muons stopping per second with a 6% duty factor would yield up to 1000 triggers per second from random triple coincidences. A reduction of the trigger rate to 10 Hz is required from a hardwired primary trigger processor. Further reduction to <1 Hz is achieved by a microprocessor-based secondary trigger processor. The primary trigger hardware imposes voter coincidence logic, stringent timing requirements, and a non-adjacency requirement in the trigger scintillators defined by hardwired circuits. Sophisticated geometric requirements are imposed by a PROM-based matrix logic, and energy and vector-momentum cuts are imposed by a hardwired processor using LSI flash ADC's and digital arithmetic logic. The secondary trigger employs four satellite microprocessors to do a sparse data scan, multiplex ...

  9. The Run-2 ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, Savanna Marie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger has been successfully collecting collision data during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware Level-1 (L1) and a software based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. In Run-2, the LHC will operate at centre-of-mass energies of 13 and 14 TeV resulting in roughly five times higher trigger rates. We will briefly review the ATLAS trigger system upgrades that were implemented during the shutdown, allowing us to cope with the increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving our efficiency to select relevant physics processes. This includes changes to the L1 calorimeter and muon trigger systems, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger module and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single event filter farm. At hand of a few examples, we will show the ...

  10. Trigger factors for familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Hauge, Anne Werner; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample.......The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample....

  11. Event triggered architectures versus timed triggered architectures for real-time control systems

    OpenAIRE

    Doina Zmaranda; Gianina Gabor

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the system engineering of safety-critical real-time systems making a comparison between event-triggered and timed triggered architectures. Main advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are investigated in the context of utilization for real-time control systems development. Finally, an example of implementation based on the time-triggered architecture is presented.

  12. MR imaging findings of trigger thumb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chen, Karen C.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Trigger finger (or trigger thumb), also known as sclerosing tenosynovitis, is a common clinical diagnosis that rarely presents for imaging. Because of this selection bias, many radiologists may not be familiar with the process. Furthermore, patients who do present for imaging frequently have misleading examination indications. To our knowledge, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of trigger thumb have not been previously reported in the literature. In this article, we review the entity of trigger thumb, the anatomy involved, and associated imaging findings, which include flexor pollicis longus tendinosis with a distinct nodule, A1 pulley thickening, and tenosynovitis. In addition, in some cases, an abnormal Av pulley is apparent. In the rare cases of trigger finger that present for MR imaging, accurate diagnosis by the radiologist can allow initiation of treatment and avoid further unnecessary workup. (orig.)

  13. The LHCb Trigger: Present and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is a single arm spectrometer covering the pseudo-rapidity range between 1.9 and 4.9, and has been optimised to perform flavour physics measurements at the LHC. The present two stage trigger system is able to select charm and beauty decay products with high efficiency due the highly inclusive approach of triggering on partially reconstructed decays and the use of a novel multivariate classifier at the second stage. The trigger can select both leptonic and purely hadronic decays. The performance of the trigger is determined from the data itself without having to rely on Monte-Carlo simulation and is presented. LHCb has recently submitted their upgrade LOI, which mainly aims at profiting from much larger luminosities by moving towards a single fully software based trigger. The upgrade strategy and expected performance are presented.

  14. Synchronous ten trigger finger: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Yildiran

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trigger finger is a disorder that presents with a blocking feeling and pain during finger movements. This condition more commonly occurs in the 2nd finger with involvement of multiple digits being extremely rare. There are very few known cases in which trigger finger was developed in all ten fingers. Here, an unusual case of ten-digit finger trigger is presented. A 44-year-old female housewife visited our clinic with painful blocking feeling in her hand. Her examination was compatible with trigger finger. Her hands were operated on in different sessions and A1 pulleys of all fingers were released. After the operations, blocking feeling and pain during flexion disappeared and normal range of motion was obtained. On the occasion of this very rare case, the etiology and approach for multiple trigger fingers is discussed. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 84-87

  15. Application of Vector Triggering Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Ibrahim, S. R.; Brincker, Rune

    1997-01-01

    result is a Random Decrement function from each measurement. In traditional Random Decrement estimation the triggering condition is a scalar condition, which should only be fulfilled in a single measurement. In vector triggering Random Decrement the triggering condition is a vector condition....... The advantage of this new approach should be a reduction in estimation time without a significant loss of accuracy, since the vector triggering conditions ensure cross information between the measurements in the Random Decrement functions. The different problems with this technique is highlighted in two......This paper deals with applications of the vector triggering Random Decrement technique. This technique is new and developed with the aim of minimizing estimation time and identification errors. The theory behind the technique is discussed in an accompanying paper. The results presented...

  16. Application of Vector Triggering Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Ibrahim, S. R.; Brincker, Rune

    result is a Random Decrement function from each measurement. In traditional Random Decrement estimation the triggering condition is a scalar condition, which should only be fulfilled in a single measurement. In vector triggering Random Decrement the triggering condition is a vector condition....... The advantage of this new approach should be a reduction in estimation time without a significant loss of accuracy, since the vector triggering conditions ensure cross information between the measurements in the Random Decrement functions. The different problems with this technique is highlighted in two......This paper deals with applications of the vector triggering Random Decrement technique. This technique is new and developed with the aim of minimizing estimation time and identification errors. The theory behind the technique is discussed in an accompanying paper. The results presented...

  17. Xylitol production from waste xylose mother liquor containing miscellaneous sugars and inhibitors: one-pot biotransformation by Candida tropicalis and recombinant Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hengwei; Li, Lijuan; Zhang, Lebin; An, Jin; Cheng, Hairong; Deng, Zixin

    2016-05-16

    The process of industrial xylitol production is a massive source of organic pollutants, such as waste xylose mother liquor (WXML), a viscous reddish-brown liquid. Currently, WXML is difficult to reuse due to its miscellaneous low-cost sugars, high content of inhibitors and complex composition. WXML, as an organic pollutant of hemicellulosic hydrolysates, accumulates and has become an issue of industrial concern in China. Previous studies have focused only on the catalysis of xylose in the hydrolysates into xylitol using one strain, without considering the removal of other miscellaneous sugars, thus creating an obstacle to subsequent large-scale purification. In the present study, we aimed to develop a simple one-pot biotransformation to produce high-purity xylitol from WXML to improve its economic value. In the present study, we developed a procedure to produce xylitol from WXML, which combines detoxification, biotransformation and removal of by-product sugars (purification) in one bioreactor using two complementary strains, Candida tropicalis X828 and Bacillus subtilis Bs12. At the first stage of micro-aerobic biotransformation, the yeast cells were allowed to grow and metabolized glucose and the inhibitors furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF), and converted xylose into xylitol. At the second stage of aerobic biotransformation, B. subtilis Bs12 was activated and depleted the by-product sugars. The one-pot process was successfully scaled up from shake flasks to 5, 150 L and 30 m(3) bioreactors. Approximately 95 g/L of pure xylitol could be obtained from the medium containing 400 g/L of WXML at a yield of 0.75 g/g xylose consumed, and the by-product sugars glucose, L-arabinose and galactose were depleted simultaneously. Our results demonstrate that the one-pot procedure is a viable option for the industrial application of WXML to produce value-added chemicals. The integration of complementary strains in the biotransformation of hemicellulosic hydrolysates is

  18. Designing signal-enriched triggers for boosted jets.

    CERN Document Server

    Toumazou, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Triggers designed to favour the selection of hadronically decaying massive particles have been studied. Both triggers using solely ET and mass cuts (similar to new 2017 triggers) and triggers exploiting polarization information have been studied. The mass cut triggers show substantial gains in rate reduction, while the benefits of polarization triggers are less obvious. The final conclusion is that it is more useful to identify and trigger on generic boosted decays, irrespective of the polarization of the decaying particle

  19. GnRHa trigger for final oocyte maturation: is HCG trigger history?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, Peter; Alsbjerg, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    gonadotrophin (HCG) trigger. Early trials showed a severe luteal phase insufficiency after GnRHa trigger despite the application of standard luteal phase support protocols. Subsequent research has led to modifications of the luteal phase support, resulting in reproductive outcome comparable to that seen after...... HCG trigger in normal- and high-responders. GnRHa trigger facilitates a tailored approach to subsequent luteal phase support, taking into account the ovarian response to stimulation. In the future, GnRHa is likely to be used for trigger in all women co-treated with GnRH antagonists....

  20. Prediction of acute toxicity of phenol derivatives using multiple linear regression approach for Tetrahymena pyriformis contaminant identification in a median-size database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez-Santana, Karel; Pham-The, Hai; Villegas-Aguilar, Pedro J; Le-Thi-Thu, Huong; Castillo-Garit, Juan A; Casañola-Martin, Gerardo M

    2016-12-01

    In this article, the modeling of inhibitory grown activity against Tetrahymena pyriformis is described. The 0-2D Dragon descriptors based on structural aspects to gain some knowledge of factors influencing aquatic toxicity are mainly used. Besides, it is done by some enlarged data of phenol derivatives described for the first time and composed of 358 chemicals. It overcomes the previous datasets with about one hundred compounds. Moreover, the results of the model evaluation by the parameters in the training, prediction and validation give adequate results comparable with those of the previous works. The more influential descriptors included in the model are: X3A, MWC02, MWC10 and piPC03 with positive contributions to the dependent variable; and MWC09, piPC02 and TPC with negative contributions. In a next step, a median-size database of nearly 8000 phenolic compounds extracted from ChEMBL was evaluated with the quantitative-structure toxicity relationship (QSTR) model developed providing some clues (SARs) for identification of ecotoxicological compounds. The outcome of this report is very useful to screen chemical databases for finding the compounds responsible of aquatic contamination in the biomarker used in the current work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Climatic triggers for peatland initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul J.; Swindles, Graeme T.; Valdes, Paul J.; Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Gregoire, Lauren J.; Smith, Mark W.; Tarasov, Lev; Haywood, Alan M.; Bacon, Karen L.

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are carbon-dense wetlands characterised by waterlogged, organic-rich soils. Modern-day peatlands have formed mainly since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and despite covering only 3 % of the Earth's land surface are thought to store more than a third of all global soil carbon in the form of poorly decomposed plant detritus. Concern exists that this globally important carbon store may be vulnerable to near-future warming and changes in precipitation patterns, although the links between peatland development and climate are contested. The climatic and other environmental conditions that facilitate the initiation of peat are particularly poorly understood. We present the results of a novel, global study into the climate space of peat initiation since the LGM. We compiled a catalogue of radiocarbon dates of peat initiation from 942 sites that span a range of latitudes and biomes. We used the locations and ages of these peatlands to interrogate downscaled climate hindcasts at 500-yr intervals from a coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation general circulation model, HadCM3. This powerful combination of modelling and observational data provides a globally-consistent, temporally-extensive estimate of the climate spaces of peat initiation. In particular, it allows us to identify local and regional climatic changes that may have acted as triggers for peat formation. Peatlands in mid- and high-latitudes of both hemispheres, particularly in maritime locations, developed shortly after local increases in the time integral of growing season temperatures, and were seemingly not influenced by rainfall regime. Peat initiation at such sites appears to have been stimulated by temperature-driven increases in plant productivity in cold, postglacial landscapes, and was not water limited. The exception is the large peatland complex of the Western Siberian Lowlands, which was not glaciated during the last glacial period, and which appears to have been prompted instead by a strong

  2. The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Stockton, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 trigger system is responsible for reducing the anticipated LHC collision rate from 40 MHz to less than 100 kHz. This Level-1 selection identifies, jet, tau/hadron, electron/photon and muon candidates, with additional triggers for missing and total energy. These inputs are used by the Level-1 Central Trigger to form a Level-1 Accept decision. This decision, along with summary information, is then passed into the higher levels of the trigger system and sub-detectors, which also receive the clock from the Level-1 Central trigger. The performance of the Central Trigger during the first collisions will be shown. This includes details of how the trigger information, along with dead-time rates, are monitored and logged by the online system for physics analysis, data quality assurance and operational debugging. Also presented are the software tools used to efficiently display the relevant information in the control room in a way useful for shifters and experts.

  3. The ATLAS high level trigger steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, N.; Bold, T.; Eifert, T.; Fischer, G.; George, S.; Haller, J.; Hoecker, A.; Masik, J.; Nedden, M. Z.; Reale, V. P.; Risler, C.; Schiavi, C.; Stelzer, J.; Wu, X.

    2008-07-01

    The High Level Trigger (HLT) of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider receives events which pass the LVL1 trigger at ~75 kHz and has to reduce the rate to ~200 Hz while retaining the most interesting physics. It is a software trigger and performs the reduction in two stages: the LVL2 trigger and the Event Filter (EF). At the heart of the HLT is the Steering software. To minimise processing time and data transfers it implements the novel event selection strategies of seeded, step-wise reconstruction and early rejection. The HLT is seeded by regions of interest identified at LVL1. These and the static configuration determine which algorithms are run to reconstruct event data and test the validity of trigger signatures. The decision to reject the event or continue is based on the valid signatures, taking into account pre-scale and pass-through. After the EF, event classification tags are assigned for streaming purposes. Several new features for commissioning and operation have been added: comprehensive monitoring is now built in to the framework; for validation and debugging, reconstructed data can be written out; the steering is integrated with the new configuration (presented separately), and topological and global triggers have been added. This paper will present details of the final design and its implementation, the principles behind it, and the requirements and constraints it is subject to. The experience gained from technical runs with realistic trigger menus will be described.

  4. The ATLAS Electron and Photon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Samuel David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs boson. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based Level-1 trigger and a software-based high-level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the LHC shutdown in preparation for Run-2 operation. To cope with the increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, the trigger selections at each level are optimized to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. To achieve this goal multivariate analysis techniques are used. The ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance with Run 2 dat...

  5. The ATLAS Electron and Photon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Samuel David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs boson. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based Level-1 trigger and a software-based high-level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the LHC shutdown in preparation for Run-2 operation. To cope with the increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, the trigger selections at each level are optimized to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. To achieve this goal multivariate analysis techniques are used. The ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance with Run 2 dat...

  6. Upgrade of the CMS Global Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jeitler, Manfred; Rabady, Dinyar; Sakulin, Hannes; Stahl, Achim

    2015-01-01

    The increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity for Run-II of the Large Hadron Collider poses new challenges for the trigger systems of the experiments. To keep triggering with a similar performance as in Run-I, the CMS muon trigger is currently being upgraded. The new algorithms will provide higher resolution, especially for the muon transverse momentum and will make use of isolation criteria that combine calorimeter with muon information already in the level-1 trigger. The demands of the new algorithms can only be met by upgrading the level-1 trigger system to new powerful FPGAs with high bandwidth I/O. The processing boards will be based on the new μTCA standard. We report on the planned algorithms for the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (μGMT) which sorts and removes duplicates from boundaries of the muon trigger sub-systems. Furthermore, it determines how isolated the muon candidates are based on calorimetric energy deposits. The μGMT will be implemented using a processing board that features a larg...

  7. Triggered tremor sweet spots in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Prejean, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    To better understand what controls fault slip along plate boundaries, we have exploited the abundance of seismic and geodetic data available from the richly varied tectonic environments composing Alaska. A search for tremor triggered by 11 large earthquakes throughout all of seismically monitored Alaska reveals two tremor “sweet spots”—regions where large-amplitude seismic waves repeatedly triggered tremor between 2006 and 2012. The two sweet spots locate in very different tectonic environments—one just trenchward and between the Aleutian islands of Unalaska and Akutan and the other in central mainland Alaska. The Unalaska/Akutan spot corroborates previous evidence that the region is ripe for tremor, perhaps because it is located where plate-interface frictional properties transition between stick-slip and stably sliding in both the dip direction and laterally. The mainland sweet spot coincides with a region of complex and uncertain plate interactions, and where no slow slip events or major crustal faults have been noted previously. Analyses showed that larger triggering wave amplitudes, and perhaps lower frequencies (probability of triggering tremor. However, neither the maximum amplitude in the time domain or in a particular frequency band, nor the geometric relationship of the wavefield to the tremor source faults alone ensures a high probability of triggering. Triggered tremor at the two sweet spots also does not occur during slow slip events visually detectable in GPS data, although slow slip below the detection threshold may have facilitated tremor triggering.

  8. The ATLAS Trigger Performance and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, B A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During the data taking period from 2009 until 2012, the ATLAS trigger has been very successfully used to collect proton-proton data at LHC centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8 TeV. The three-level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. Using custom electronics with input from the calorimeter and muon detectors, the first level rejects most background collisions in less than 2.5 microseconds. Then follow two levels of software-based triggers. The trigger system is designed to select events by identifying muons, electrons, photons, taus, jets and B hadron candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the strategy and performance of the different trigger selections based mainly on the experience during the 2011-2012 LHC run, where the trigger menu needed quick adaptations to the continuous increase of luminosity. Examples of trigger efficiencies and...

  9. Introduction to myofascial trigger points in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Rick

    2014-06-01

    In dogs, muscles make up 44%-57% of total body weight and can serve as source of both pain and dysfunction when myofascial trigger points are present. However, rarely is muscle mentioned as a generator of pain in dogs, and even less mentioned is muscle dysfunction. The veterinary practitioner with interest in pain management, rehabilitation, orthopedics, and sports medicine must be familiar with the characteristics, etiology, and precipitating factors of myofascial trigger points. Additionally, the development of examination and treatment skill is needed to effectively manage myofascial trigger points in dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Revisiting Pneumatic Nail Gun Trigger Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, James; Lowe, Brian; Lipscomb, Hester; Hudock, Stephen; Dement, John; Evanoff, Bradley; Fullen, Mark; Gillen, Matt; Kaskutas, Vicki; Nolan, James; Patterson, Dennis; Platner, James; Pompeii, Lisa; Schoenfisch, Ashley

    2015-03-01

    Use of a pneumatic nail gun with a sequential actuation trigger (SAT) significantly diminishes the risk for acute traumatic injury compared to use of a contact actuation trigger (CAT) nail gun. A theoretically-based increased risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders from use of a SAT nail gun, relative to CAT, appears unlikely and remains unproven. Based on current knowledge, the use of CAT nail guns cannot be justified as a safe alternative to SAT nail guns. This letter provides a perspective of ergonomists and occupational safety researchers recommending the use of the sequential actuation trigger for all nail gun tasks in the construction industry.

  11. Trigger tracking for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Dungs, K

    2014-01-01

    This poster presents a trigger system for the upgraded LHCb detector, scheduled to begin operation in 2020. The proposed trigger system is implemented entirely in software. We show that track reconstruction of a similar quality to that available in the offline algorithms can be performed on the full inelastic pp-collision rate. A track finding efficiency of 98.8% relative to offline can be achieved for good trigger tracks. The CPU time required for this reconstruction is less than 60% of the available budget.

  12. The LHCb trigger in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Michielin, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb trigger system has been upgraded to allow alignment, calibration and physics analysis to be performed in real time. An increased CPU capacity and improvements in the software have allowed lifetime unbiased selections of beauty and charm decays in the high level trigger. Thanks to offline quality event reconstruction already available online, physics analyses can be performed directly on this information and for the majority of charm physics selections a reduced event format can be written out. Beauty hadron decays are more efficiently triggered by re-optimised inclusive selections, and the HLT2 output event rate is increased by a factor of three.

  13. Mechanochemical triggers for self-healing polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickenboth, Charles Robert

    Including self-healing and self-toughening elements into structural polymer systems are one of several approaches for extending the lifetimes of materials and preventing catastrophic failure. As an alternative strategy to reduce the extent of damage necessary to initiate healing, a molecular-based approach is sought in which a chemical unit initiates toughening and healing before crack growth begins. We envision that this type of trigger would be coupled directly to the mechanical load stored within a failing polymer. Several mechanochemical triggers were designed and studied, including azo-based triggers, enediyne-based triggers and benzocyclobutene-based triggers. It was found that flow-induced mechanical forces, induced by ultrasound, were able to accelerate the homolytic extrusion of nitrogen from azo triggers by a factor of 105 at 9°C. The degradation leads to site-specific cleavage of polymers containing the trigger, resulting in one type of end group and degradation products of low polydispersity. Mechanochemical triggers based on enediynes were designed, computationally studied and synthesized. It was found computationally that the level of stress activation is highly sensitive the shape of the trigger, as well as the substituent pattern. These triggers were incorporated into PMMA polymer microspheres, and their reactivity under thermal and mechanical conditions was studied. No conclusions were able to be drawn on the stress-sensitivity of enediyne-based mechanochemical triggers, due to the absence of an efficient means of detecting reactivity. Mechanochemical triggers based on the electrocyclic ring opening of both trans and cis substituted benzocyclobutenes was studied. The products of mechanically-accelerated ring opening were studied by trapping experiments. Ultrasound induces ring opening at 10°C, whereas thermal activation only took place at temperatures over 105°C. It was found that the substitution pattern around the four-membered ring influenced

  14. Triggered creep as a possible mechanism for delayed dynamic triggering of tremor and earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Peng, Zhigang; Hill, David P.; Aiken, Chastity

    2011-01-01

    The passage of radiating seismic waves generates transient stresses in the Earth's crust that can trigger slip on faults far away from the original earthquake source. The triggered fault slip is detectable in the form of earthquakes and seismic tremor. However, the significance of these triggered events remains controversial, in part because they often occur with some delay, long after the triggering stress has passed. Here we scrutinize the location and timing of tremor on the San Andreas fault between 2001 and 2010 in relation to distant earthquakes. We observe tremor on the San Andreas fault that is initiated by passing seismic waves, yet migrates along the fault at a much slower velocity than the radiating seismic waves. We suggest that the migrating tremor records triggered slow slip of the San Andreas fault as a propagating creep event. We find that the triggered tremor and fault creep can be initiated by distant earthquakes as small as magnitude 5.4 and can persist for several days after the seismic waves have passed. Our observations of prolonged tremor activity provide a clear example of the delayed dynamic triggering of seismic events. Fault creep has been shown to trigger earthquakes, and we therefore suggest that the dynamic triggering of prolonged fault creep could provide a mechanism for the delayed triggering of earthquakes. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  15. The Trigger Processor and Trigger Processor Algorithms for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Lazovich, Tomo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS New Small Wheel (NSW) is an upgrade to the ATLAS muon endcap detectors that will be installed during the next long shutdown of the LHC. Comprising both MicroMegas (MMs) and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGCs), this system will drastically improve the performance of the muon system in a high cavern background environment. The NSW trigger, in particular, will significantly reduce the rate of fake triggers coming from track segments in the endcap not originating from the interaction point. We will present an overview of the trigger, the proposed sTGC and MM trigger algorithms, and the hardware implementation of the trigger. In particular, we will discuss both the heart of the trigger, an ATCA system with FPGA-based trigger processors (using the same hardware platform for both MM and sTGC triggers), as well as the full trigger electronics chain, including dedicated cards for transmission of data via GBT optical links. Finally, we will detail the challenges of ensuring that the trigger electronics can ...

  16. Tracking at High Level Trigger in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mia

    2014-01-01

    A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with detector readout, offline storage and analysis capability. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger (L1T), implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a trade-off between the complexity of the algorithms, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. With the computing power available during the 2012 data taking the maximum reconstruction time at HLT was about 200 ms per event, at the nominal L1T rate of 100 kHz. Track reconstruction algorithms are widely used in the HLT, for the reconstruction of the physics objects as well as in the identification of b-jets and lepton iso...

  17. The dangers of being trigger-happy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, J. E.; Haworth, T. J.; Bressert, E.

    2015-06-01

    We examine the evidence offered for triggered star formation against the backdrop provided by recent numerical simulations of feedback from massive stars at or below giant molecular cloud sizescales. We compile a catalogue of 67 observational papers, mostly published over the last decade, and examine the signposts most commonly used to infer the presence of triggered star formation. We then determine how well these signposts perform in a recent suite of hydrodynamic simulations of star formation including feedback from O-type stars performed by Dale et al. We find that none of the observational markers improve the chances of correctly identifying a given star as triggered by more than factors of 2 at most. This limits the fidelity of these techniques in interpreting star formation histories. We therefore urge caution in interpreting observations of star formation near feedback-driven structures in terms of triggering.

  18. Frontal Cortex Mediates Unconsciously Triggered Inhibitory Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Gaal, Simon; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Scholte, H. Steven; Lamme, Victor A. F

    2008-01-01

    ... with the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Behaviorally, unconscious No-Go signals sometimes triggered response inhibition to the level of complete response termination and yielded a slow down in the speed of responses that were not...

  19. New Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk

    2017-02-01

    The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors and the introduction of the Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) will significantly reduce the space available for the new trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) will be built. FIT will be the main forward trigger, luminometer, and interaction-time detector. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane of heavy-ion collisions. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov quartz radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a plastic scintillator ring. By increasing the overall acceptance of FIT, the scintillator will improve centrality and event plane resolution. It will also add sensitivity for the detection of beam-gas events and provide some degree of redundancy. FIT is currently undergoing an intense R&D and prototyping period. It is scheduled for installation in ALICE during 2020.

  20. New Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk

    2017-02-11

    The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors and the introduction of the Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) will significantly reduce the space available for the new trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) will be built. FIT will be the main forward trigger, luminometer, and interaction-time detector. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane of heavy-ion collisions. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov quartz radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a plastic scintillator ring. By increasing the overall acceptance of FIT, the scintillator will improve centrality and event plane resolution. It will also add sensitivity for the detection of beam-gas events and provide some degree of redundancy. FIT is currently undergoing an intense R&D and prototyping period. It is scheduled for installation in ALICE during 2020.

  1. High-Power Triggered Gas Switches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giri, David

    1999-01-01

    .... There are several reasons to build triggered versions of the basic high-voltage spark gap. They include synchronization with an external event, timed-array antenna for steering directed energy systems etc...

  2. Trigger factors in migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, A W; Kirchmann, M; Olesen, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify trigger factors in migraine with aura (MA). A total of 629 MA patients representative of the Danish population were sent a questionnaire listing 16 trigger factors thought to be relevant as well as space for free text. Distinction was made between...... attacks with or without aura within each patient. The questionnaire was returned by 522 patients of whom 347 had current MA attacks. In total 80% with current attacks (278/347) indicated that at least one factor triggered their migraine, and 67% (187/278) in this group indicated that they were aware...... of at least one factor often or always giving rise to an attack of MA. Forty-one per cent (113/278) had co-occurring attacks of migraine without aura (MO). Stress (following stress), bright light, intense emotional influences, stress (during stress) and sleeping too much or too little were the trigger factors...

  3. Pulling the trigger on LHC electronics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    The conditions at CERN's Large Hadron Collider pose severe challenges for the designers and builders of front-end, trigger and data acquisition electronics. A recent workshop reviewed the encouraging progress so far and discussed what remains to be done. The LHC experiments have addressed level one trigger systems with a variety of high-speed hardware. The CMS Calorimeter Level One Regional Trigger uses 160 MHz logic boards plugged into the front and back of a custom backplane, which provides point-to-point links between the cards. Much of the processing in this system is performed by five types of 160 MHz digital applications-specific integrated circuits designed using Vitesse submicron high-integration gallium arsenide gate array technology. The LHC experiments make extensive use of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). These offer programmable reconfigurable logic, which has the flexibility that trigger designers need to be able to alter algorithms so that they can follow the physics and detector perform...

  4. Management of myofascial trigger point pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baldry, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Successful management of myofascial trigger point (MTrP) pain depends on the practitioner finding all of the MTrPs from which the pain is emanating, and then deactivating them by one of several currently used methods...

  5. The CMS trigger in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mia

    2017-01-01

    In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has undergone a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT went through big improvements; in particula...

  6. Algorithms for the ATLAS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, S R; Bee, C P; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, A; Boisvert, V; Bosman, M; Brandt, S; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Cervetto, M; Comune, G; Corso-Radu, A; Di Mattia, A; Gomez, M D; Dos Anjos, A; Drohan, J; Ellis, Nick; Elsing, M; Epp, B; Etienne, F; Falciano, S; Farilla, A; George, S; Ghete, V M; González, S; Grothe, M; Kaczmarska, A; Karr, K; Khomich, A; Konstantinidis, N P; Krasny, W; Li, W; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Meessen, C; Mello, A G; Merino, G; Morettini, P; Moyse, E; Nairz, A; Negri, A; Nikitin, N V; Nisati, A; Padilla, C; Parodi, F; Pérez-Réale, V; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, P; Polesello, G; Qian, Z; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Segura, E; Seixas, J M; Shears, T G; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Smizanska, M; Soluk, R A; Stanescu, C; Tapprogge, Stefan; Touchard, F; Vercesi, V; Watson, A T; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Zobernig, H

    2004-01-01

    Following rigorous software design and analysis methods, an object-based architecture has been developed to derive the second- and third-level trigger decisions for the future ATLAS detector at the LHC. The functional components within this system responsible for generating elements of the trigger decisions are algorithms running within the software architecture. Relevant aspects of the architecture are reviewed along with concrete examples of specific algorithms and their performance in "vertical" slices of various physics selection strategies.

  7. The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) upgrade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krivda, M.; Alexandre, D.; Barnby, L. S.; Evans, D.; Johnes, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Lietava, R.; Pospíšil, Jan; Baillie, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, MAR (2016), C03051 ISSN 1748-0221. [Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics (TWEPP). Lisbon, 28.09.2015-02.10.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Trigger concepts and systems * Trigger algorithms * digital electronics circuits Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  8. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The ATLAS Trigger Commissioning with cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abolins, M; Adragna, P; Aielli, G; Aleksandrov, E; Aleksandrov, I; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Amorim, A; Anderson, K; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Antonelli, S; Aracena, I; Ask, S; Asquith, L; Avolio, G; Backlund, S; Badescu, E; Bahat Treidel, O; Baines, J; Barnett, B M; Barria, P; Bartoldus, R; Batreanu, S; Bauss, B; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Bell, P; Bell, W H; Bellagamba, L; Bellomo, M; Ben Ami, S; Bendel, M; Benhammou, Ya; Benslama, K; Berge, D; Berger, N; Berry, T; Bianco, M; Biglietti, M; Blair, R R; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Bold, T; Booth, J R A; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boyd, J; Brawn, I P; Brelier, B; Bressler, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Buda, S; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Buttar, C; Camarri, P; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Caprini, M; Caracinha, D; Cardarelli, R; Carlino, G; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cerri, A; Charlton, D G; Chiodini, G; Ciapetti, G; Cimino, D; Ciobotaru, M; Clements, D; Coccaro, A; Coluccia, M R; Conde-Muíño, P; Constantin, S; Conventi, F; Corso-Radu, A; Costa, M J; Coura Torres, R; Cranfield, R; Cranmer, K; Crone, G; Curtis, C J; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Davis, A O; Dawson, I; Dawson, J; De Almeida Simoes, J; De Cecco, S; De Pedis, D; De Santo, A; DeAsmundis, R; DellaPietra, M; DellaVolpe, D; Delsart, P A; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Mattia, A; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Girolamo, A; Dionisi, C; Djilkibaev, R; Dobinson, Robert W; Dobson, M; Dogaru, M; Dotti, A; Dova, M; Drake, G; Dufour, M -A; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E F; Ellis, Nick; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Ermoline, Y; Eschrich, I; Etzion, E; Facius, K; Falciano, S; Farthouat, P; Faulkner, P J W F; Feng, E; Ferland, J; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Fischer, G; Fonseca-Martin, T; Francis, D; Fukunaga, C; Föhlisch, F; Gadomski, S; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gaudio, G; Gaumer, O; Gee, C N P; George, S; Geweniger, C; Giagu, S; Gillman, A R; Giusti, P; Goncalo, R; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gowdy, S; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grancagnolo, F; Grancagnolo, S; Green, B; Galllno, P; Haas, S; Haberichter, W; Hadavand, H; Haeberli, C; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hasegawa, Y; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Head, S; Hellman, S; Hidvegi, A; Hillier, S J; Höcker, A; Hrynóva, T; Hughes-Jones, R; Huston, J; Iacobucci, G; Idarraga, J; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Ikeno, M; Inada, M; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Izzo, V; Jain, V; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Joos, M; Kadosaka, T; Kajomovitz, E; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kazarov, A; Kehoe, R; Khoriauli, G; Kieft, G; Kilvington, G; Kirk, J; Kiyamura, H; Klofver, P; Klous, S; Kluge, E E; Kobayashi, T; Kolos, S; Kono, T; Konstantinidis, N; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kotov, V; Krasznahorkay, A; Kubota, T; Kugel, A; Kuhn, D; Kurashige, H; Kurasige, H; Kuwabara, T; Kwee, R; Landon, M; Lankford, A; LeCompte, T; Leahu, L; Leahu, M; Ledroit, F; Lehmann-Miotto, G; Lei, X; Lellouch, D; Lendermann, V; Levinson, L; Leyton, M; Li, S; Liberti, B; Lifshitz, R; Lim, H; Lohse, T; Losada, M; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lupu, N; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Mapelli, L; Marchese, F; Martin, B; Martin, B T; Martínez, A; Marzano, F; Masik, J; McMahon, T; McPherson, R; Medinnis, M; Meessen, C; Meier, K; Meirosu, C; Messina, A; Migliaccio, A; Mikenberg, G; Mincer, A; Mineev, M; Misiejuk, A; Mönig, K; Monticelli, F; Moraes, A; Moreno, D; Morettini, P; Murillo Garcia, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Negri, A; Némethy, P; Neusiedl, A; Nisati, A; Niwa, T; Nomachi, M; Nomoto, H; Nozaki, M; Nozicka, M; Ochi, A; Ohm, C; Okumura, Y; Omachi, C; Osculati, B; Oshita, H; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panikashvili, N; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pastore, F; Patricelli, S; Pauly, T; Pectu, M; Perantoni, M; Perera, V; Perera, V J O; Pérez, E; Pérez-Réale, V; Perrino, R; Pessoa Lima Junior, H; Petersen, J; Petrolo, E; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pinto, F; Pinzon, G; Polini, A; Pope, B; Potter, C; Prieur, D P F; Primavera, M; Qian, W; Radescu, V; Rajagopalan, S; Renkel, P; Rescigno, M; Rieke, S; Risler, C; Riu, I; Robertson, S; Roda, C; Rodríguez, D; Rogriquez, Y; Roich, A; Romeo, G; Rosati, S; Ryabov, Yu; Ryan, P; Rühr, F; Sakamoto, H; Salamon, A; Salvatore, D; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santamarina-Rios, C; Santonico, R; Sasaki, O; Scannicchio, D; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Schlereth, J L; Schmitt, K; Scholtes, I; Schooltz, D; Schuler, G; Schultz-Coulon, H -C; Schäfer, U; Scott, W; Segura, E; Sekhniaidze, G; Shimbo, N; Sidoti, A; Silva, L; Silverstein, S; Siragusa, G; Sivoklokov, S; Sloper, J E; Smizanska, M; Solfaroli, E; Soloviev, I; Soluk, R; Spagnolo, S; Spila, F; Spiwoks, R; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stancu, S; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, J; Stradling, A; Strom, D; Strong, J; Su, D; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Szymocha, T; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tanaka, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thomas, J P; Tokoshuku, K; Tomoto, M; Torrence, E; Touchard, F; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tripiana, M; Usai, G; Vachon, B; Vandelli, W; Vari, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Vercesi, V; Vermeulen, J; Von Der Schmitt, J; Wang, M; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, P; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Wickens, F; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wilkens, H; Winklmeier, F; Woerling, E E; Wu, S -L; Wu, X; Xella, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamazaki, Y; Yasu, Y; Yu, M; Zanello, L; Zema, F; Zhang, J; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; De Seixas, J M; Dos Anjos, A; Zur Nedden, M; Ozcan, E; Ünel, G; International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's LHC will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. At the design luminosity there are roughly 23 collisions per bunch crossing. ATLAS has designed a three-level trigger system to select potentially interesting events. The first-level trigger, implemented in custom-built electronics, reduces the incoming rate to less than 100 kHz with a total latency of less than 2.5$\\mu$s. The next two trigger levels run in software on commercial PC farms. They reduce the output rate to 100-200 Hz. In preparation for collision data-taking which is scheduled to commence in May 2008, several cosmic-ray commissioning runs have been performed. Among the first sub-detectors available for commissioning runs are parts of the barrel muon detector including the RPC detectors that are used in the first-level trigger. Data have been taken with a full slice of the muon trigger and readout chain, from the detectors in one sector of the RPC system, to the second-level trigger algorit...

  10. The LHCb trigger and data acquisition system

    CERN Document Server

    Dufey, J P; Harris, F; Harvey, J; Jost, B; Mato, P; Müller, E

    2000-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is the most recently approved of the 4 experiments under construction at CERNs LHC accelerator. It is a special purpose experiment designed to precisely measure the CP violation parameters in the B-B system. Triggering poses special problems since the interesting events containing B-mesons are immersed in a large background of inelastic p-p reactions. We therefore decided to implement a 4 level triggering scheme. The LHCb Data Acquisition (DAQ) system will have to cope with an average trigger rate of ~40 kHz, after two levels of hardware triggers, and an average event size of ~100 kB. Thus an event-building network which can sustain an average bandwidth of 4 GB/s is required. A powerful software trigger farm will have to be installed to reduce the rate from the 40 kHz to ~100 Hz of events written to permanent storage. In this paper we outline the general architecture of the Trigger and DAQ system and the readout protocols we plan to implement. First results of simulations of the behavior o...

  11. The LHCb trigger system: performance and outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Langenbruch, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to the study of heavy flavour at the LHC. The LHCb trigger system plays a key role in selecting signal events and rejecting background. The bulk of the LHCb trigger is implemented in software and deployed on a farm of 29,000 processor cores. This system, called the high level trigger, is responsible for reducing the event rate from 1 MHz, at which the LHCb detector can be read out, to 5 kHz, which can be written to disk. With its flexible design, the LHCb trigger can quickly adapt to changing running conditions and has performed far beyond its design in terms of signal efficiencies. The trigger system showcases a number of pioneering concepts, among them the use of multivariate classifiers to identify b -hadrons and the buffering of events to local disks and their processing at a later time, when the LHC is not producing collisions. The design of the trigger system, its performance during 2011 and 2012 and planned improvements for data taking in 2015 and beyond are discussed

  12. The Zeus calorimeter first level trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1989-04-01

    The design of the Zeus Detector Calorimeter Level Trigger is presented. The Zeus detector is being built for operation at HERA, a new storage ring that will provide collisions between 820 GeV protons and 30 GeV electrons in 1990. The calorimeter is made of depleted uranium plates and plastic scintillator read out by wavelength shifter bars into 12,864 photomultiplier tubes. These signals are combined into 974 trigger towers with separate electromagnetic and hadronic sums. The calorimeter first level trigger is pipelined with a decision provided 5 {mu}sec after each beam crossing, occurring every 96 nsec. The trigger determines the total energy, the total transverse energy, the missing energy, and the energy and number of isolated electrons and muons. It also provides information on the number and energy of clusters. The trigger rate needs to be held to 1 kHz against a rate of proton-beam gas interactions of approximately 500 kHz. The summed trigger tower pulseheights are digitized by flash ADC`s. The digital values are linearized, stored and used for sums and pattern tests.

  13. Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostino, Lorenzo; et al.

    2009-08-01

    The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

  14. Progress on the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    Eric Eisenhandler

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo) has recently passed a number of major hurdles. The various electronic modules that make up the trigger are either in full production or are about to be, and preparations in the ATLAS pit are well advanced. L1Calo has three main subsystems. The PreProcessor converts analogue calorimeter signals to digital, associates the rather broad trigger pulses with the correct proton-proton bunch crossing, and does a final calibration in transverse energy before sending digital data streams to the two algorithmic trigger processors. The Cluster Processor identifies and counts electrons, photons and taus, and the Jet/Energy-sum Processor looks for jets and also sums missing and total transverse energy. Readout drivers allow the performance of the trigger to be monitored online and offline, and also send region-of-interest information to the Level-2 Trigger. The PreProcessor (Heidelberg) is the L1Calo subsystem with the largest number of electronic modules (124), and most of its fu...

  15. The ATLAS trigger performance and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bartsch, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During the data taking period from 2009 until 2012, the ATLAS trigger has been very successfully used to collect proton-proton data at LHC centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8 TeV at record breaking luminosities. The three level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch crossing rate of up to 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. Using custom electronics with input from the calorimeter and muon detectors, the first level rejects most background collisions in less than 2.5,$mu$s. Then follow two levels of software based triggers. The trigger system is designed to select events by identifying muons, electrons, photons, taus, jets, and B hadron candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. The high trigger efficiencies illustrate that we have achieved a very good level of understanding of both the detector and trigger performance and successfully selected suitable streamed data samples for analysis.

  16. The ATLAS Trigger Performance and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bartsch, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During the data taking period from 2009 until 2012, the ATLAS trigger has been very successfully used to collect proton-proton data at LHC centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8 TeV at record breaking luminosities. The three‐level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch‐crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. Using custom electronics with input from the calorimeter and muon detectors, the first level rejects most background collisions in less than 2.5 μs. Then follow two levels of software‐based triggers. The trigger system is designed to select events by identifying muons, electrons, photons, taus, jets, and B hadron candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the strategy and performance of the different trigger selections during the 2011-2012 run. We also discuss the trigger evolution and redesign put in place to cope with the continuously rising luminosity and in particular t...

  17. Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger starts firing

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephen Hillier

    2007-01-01

    L1Calo is one of the major components of ATLAS First Level trigger, along with the Muon Trigger and Central Trigger Processor. It forms all of the first-level calorimeter-based triggers, including electron, jet, tau and missing ET. The final system consists of over 250 custom designed 9U VME boards, most containing a dense array of FPGAs or ASICs. It is subdivided into a PreProcessor, which digitises the incoming trigger signals from the Liquid Argon and Tile calorimeters, and two separate processor systems, which perform the physics algorithms. All of these are highly flexible, allowing the possibility to adapt to beam conditions and luminosity. All parts of the system are read out through Read-Out Drivers, which provide monitoring data and Region of Interest (RoI) information for the Level-2 trigger. Production of the modules is now essentially complete, and enough modules exist to populate the full scale system in USA15. Installation is proceeding rapidly - approximately 90% of the final modules are insta...

  18. Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Agostino, Lorenzo; Beccati, Barbara; Behrens, Ulf; Berryhil, Jeffrey; Biery, Kurt; Bose, Tulika; Brett, Angela; Branson, James; Cano, Eric; Cheung, Harry; Ciganek, Marek; Cittolin, Sergio; Coarasa, Jose Antonio; Dahmes, Bryan; Deldicque, Christian; Dusinberre, Elizabeth; Erhan, Samim; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino, Robert; Gutleber, Johannes; Hatton, Derek; Laurens, Jean-Francois; Loizides, Constantin; Ma, Frank; Meijers, Frans; Meschi, Emilio; Meyer, Andreas; Mommsen, Remigius K; Moser, Roland; O'Dell, Vivian; Oh, Alexander; Orsini, Luciano; Patras, Vaios; Paus, Christoph; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Racz, Attila; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schieferdeckerd, Philipp; Schwick, Christoph; Serrano Margaleff, Josep Francesc; Shpakov, Dennis; Simon, Sean; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sungho Yoon, Andre; Wittich, Peter; Zanetti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

  19. Level-1 Jets and Sums Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the first long shutdown, the LHC has restarted at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The LHC is expected to achieve an instantaneous luminosity larger than $10^{34} \\rm{cm}^{-2} \\rm{s}^{-1}$ and an average number of pile-up interactions of at least 40. The CMS Level-1 trigger architecture has undergone a full upgrade in order to maintain and improve the trigger performance under these new conditions. It will allow CMS to keep the trigger rate under control and to avoid a significant increase in trigger thresholds that would have a negative impact on the CMS physics programme. First studies of the performance of the calorimeter trigger upgrade for jets and energy sums are shown. Details of the algorithms and commissioning may be found in CMS-DP-2015-051 and the CMS Technical Design Report for the Level-1 Trigger upgrade: CERN-LHCC-2013-011, CMS-TDR-12 (2013)

  20. Design studies for the Double Chooz trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucoanes, Andi Sebastian

    2009-07-24

    The main characteristic of the neutrino mixing effect is assumed to be the coupling between the flavor and the mass eigenstates. Three mixing angles ({theta}{sub 12}, {theta}{sub 23}, {theta}{sub 13}) are describing the magnitude of this effect. Still unknown, {theta}{sub 13} is considered very small, based on the measurement done by the CHOOZ experiment. A leading experiment will be Double Chooz, placed in the Ardennes region, on the same site as used by CHOOZ. The Double Chooz goal is the exploration of {proportional_to}80% from the currently allowed {theta}{sub 13} region, by searching the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos. Double Chooz will use two similar detectors, located at different distances from the reactor cores: a near one at {proportional_to}150 m where no oscillations are expected and a far one at 1.05 km distance, close to the first minimum of the survival probability function. The measurement foresees a precise comparison of neutrino rates and spectra between both detectors. The detection mechanism is based on the inverse {beta}-decay. The Double Chooz detectors have been designed to minimize the rate of random background. In a simplified view, two optically separated regions are considered. The target, filled with Gd-doped liquid scintillator, is the main antineutrino interaction volume. Surrounding the target, the inner veto region aims to tag the cosmogenic muon background which hits the detector. Both regions are viewed by photomultipliers. The Double Chooz trigger system has to be highly efficient for antineutrino events as well as for several types of background. The trigger analyzes discriminated signals from the central region and the inner veto photomultipliers. The trigger logic is fully programmable and can combine the input signals. The trigger conditions are based on the total energy released in event and on the PMT groups multiplicity. For redundancy, two independent trigger boards will be used for the central region, each of

  1. In silico prediction of toxicity of phenols to Tetrahymena pyriformis by using genetic algorithm and decision tree-based modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasitabar, Fatemeh; Zare-Shahabadi, Vahid

    2017-04-01

    Risk assessment of chemicals is an important issue in environmental protection; however, there is a huge lack of experimental data for a large number of end-points. The experimental determination of toxicity of chemicals involves high costs and time-consuming process. In silico tools such as quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models, which are constructed on the basis of computational molecular descriptors, can predict missing data for toxic end-points for existing or even not yet synthesized chemicals. Phenol derivatives are known to be aquatic pollutants. With this background, we aimed to develop an accurate and reliable QSTR model for the prediction of toxicity of 206 phenols to Tetrahymena pyriformis. A multiple linear regression (MLR)-based QSTR was obtained using a powerful descriptor selection tool named Memorized_ACO algorithm. Statistical parameters of the model were 0.72 and 0.68 for R training 2 and R test 2 , respectively. To develop a high-quality QSTR model, classification and regression tree (CART) was employed. Two approaches were considered: (1) phenols were classified into different modes of action using CART and (2) the phenols in the training set were partitioned to several subsets by a tree in such a manner that in each subset, a high-quality MLR could be developed. For the first approach, the statistical parameters of the resultant QSTR model were improved to 0.83 and 0.75 for R training 2 and R test 2 , respectively. Genetic algorithm was employed in the second approach to obtain an optimal tree, and it was shown that the final QSTR model provided excellent prediction accuracy for the training and test sets (R training 2 and R test 2 were 0.91 and 0.93, respectively). The mean absolute error for the test set was computed as 0.1615. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gravity-dependent changes in bioconvection of Tetrahymena and Chlamydomonas during parabolic flight: increases in wave number induced by pre- and post-parabola hypergravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kage, Azusa; Asato, Eriko; Chiba, Yoko; Wada, Yuuko; Katsu-Kimura, Yumiko; Kubota, Ayami; Sawai, Satoe; Niihori, Maki; Baba, Shoji A; Mogami, Yoshihiro

    2011-03-01

    Bioconvection emerges in a dense suspension of swimming protists as a consequence of their negative-gravitactic upward migration and later settling as a blob of density greater than that of water. Thus, gravity is an important parameter governing bioconvective pattern formation. However, inconsistencies are found in previous studies dealing with the response of bioconvection patterns to increased gravity acceleration (hypergravity); the wave number of the patterns has been reported to decrease during the hypergravity phases of parabolic aircraft flight, while it increases in centrifugal hypergravity. In this paper, we reassess the responses of bioconvection to altered gravity during parabolic flight on the basis of vertical and horizontal observations of the patterns formed by Tetrahymena thermophila and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Spatiotemporal analyses of the horizontal patterns revealed an increase in the pattern wave number in both pre- and post-parabola hypergravity. Vertical pattern analysis was generally in line with the horizontal pattern analysis, and further revealed that hypergravity-induced changes preceded at the top layer of the suspensions while microgravity-induced changes appeared to occur from the bottom part of the settling blobs. The responses to altered gravity were rather different between the two sample species: T. thermophila tended to drastically modify its bioconvection patterns in response to changes in gravity level, while the patterns of C. reinhardtii responded to a much lesser extent. This difference can be attributed to the distinct physical and physiological properties of the individual organisms, suggesting a significant contribution of the gyrotactic property to the swimming behavior of some protists.

  3. Efficient expression of codon-adapted affinity tagged super folder green fluorescent protein for synchronous protein localization and affinity purification studies in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gürkan; Arslanyolu, Muhittin

    2015-03-25

    A superior Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) mutant, known as superfolder GFP (sfGFP), is more soluble, faster folding, and is the brightest of the known GFP mutants. This study aimed to create a codon-adapted sfGFP tag (TtsfGFP) for simultaneous protein localization and affinity purification in Tetrahymena thermophila. In vivo fluorescence spectroscopic analyses of clones carrying a codon-adapted and 6 × His tagged TtsfGFP cassette showed approximately 2-4-fold increased fluorescence emission compared with the control groups at 3 h. Fluorescence microscopy also revealed that TtsfGFP reached its emission maxima at 100 min, which was much earlier than controls expressing EGFP and sfGFP (240 min). A T. thermophila ATP-dependent DNA ligase domain containing hypothetical gene (H) was cloned into the 3' end of 6 × His-TtsfGFP to assess the affinity/localization dual tag feature. Fluorescence microscopy of the 6 × His-TtsfGFP-H clone confirmed its localization in the macro- and micronucleus of vegetative T. thermophila. Simultaneous affinity purification of TtsfGFP and TtsfGFP-H with Ni-NTA beads was feasible, as shown by Ni-NTA purified proteins analysis by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. We successfully codon adapted the N-terminal 6 × His-TtsfGFP tag and showed that it could be used for protein localization and affinity purification simultaneously in T. thermophila. We believe that this dual tag will advance T. thermophila studies by providing strong visual traceability of the target protein in vivo and in vitro during recombinant production of heterologous and homologous proteins.

  4. Rate Predictions and Trigger/DAQ Resource Monitoring in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, D M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Since starting in 2010, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has pro- duced collisions at an ever increasing rate. The ATLAS experiment successfully records the collision data with high eciency and excel- lent data quality. Events are selected using a three-level trigger system, where each level makes a more re ned selection. The level-1 trigger (L1) consists of a custom-designed hardware trigger which seeds two higher software based trigger levels. Over 300 triggers compose a trig- ger menu which selects physics signatures such as electrons, muons, particle jets, etc. Each trigger consumes computing resources of the ATLAS trigger system and oine storage. The LHC instantaneous luminosity conditions, desired physics goals of the collaboration, and the limits of the trigger infrastructure determine the composition of the ATLAS trigger menu. We describe a trigger monitoring frame- work for computing the costs of individual trigger algorithms such as data request rates and CPU consumption. This framework has been used...

  5. DZERO Level 3 DAQ/Trigger Closeout

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The Tevatron Collider, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, delivered its last 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions on September 30th, 2011. The DZERO experiment continues to take cosmic data for final alignment for several more months . Since Run 2 started, in March 2001, all DZERO data has been collected by the DZERO Level 3 Trigger/DAQ System. The system is a modern, networked, commodity hardware trigger and data acquisition system based around a large central switch with about 60 front ends and 200 trigger computers. DZERO front end crates are VME based. Single Board Computer interfaces between detector data on VME and the network transport for the DAQ system. Event flow is controlled by the Routing Master which can steer events to clusters of farm nodes based on the low level trigger bits that fired. The farm nodes are multi-core commodity computer boxes, without special hardware, that run isolated software to make the final Level 3 trigger decision. Passed events are transferred to th...

  6. Tracking at High Level Trigger in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mia

    2016-01-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabili- ties of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with detector readout, offline storage and analysis capability. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger (L1T), implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a stream- lined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a trade-off between the complexity of the algorithms, the sustainable out- put rate, and the selection efficiency. With the computing power available during the 2012 data taking the maximum reconstruction time at HLT was about 200 ms per event, at the nominal L1T rate of 100 kHz. Track reconstruction algorithms are widely used in the HLT, for the reconstruction of the physics objects as well as in the identification of b-jets and ...

  7. The LHCb level 1 vertex trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Koratzinos, M

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. The Level 1 Vertex trigger of LHCb has certain features that make it unique amongst the LHC experiment trigger schemes: The problem it addresses is a reduction factor of 25 for minimum bias events while retaining good efficiency for signal B events. The best way to achieve such reduction factors is to rely on the most striking property of those B events, the long decay time of the B particles. The trigger therefore has to reconstruct the event around the interaction region and tag signal events using topological criteria. An accurate vertex detector is one of the key components of LHCb and a natural choice for providing the data for such a triggering scheme. The algorithm for the reconstruction of the event is complicated and not readily parallelisable in its totality. We are therefore proposing an architecture that resembles a high-level trigger architecture, where the event building function is performed by a switch network and each event is processed by a single processor, part of ...

  8. CMS Triggers for the LHC Startup

    CERN Document Server

    Nhan Nguyen, Chi

    2009-01-01

    The LHC will collide proton beams at a bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz. At the design luminosity of $10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ each crossing results in an average of about 20 inelastic pp events. The CMS trigger system is designed to reduce the input rate to about 100 Hz. This task is carried out in two steps, namely the Level-1 (L1) and the High-Level trigger (HLT). The L1 trigger is built of customized fast electronics and is designed to reduce the rate to 100 kHz. The HLT is implemented in a filter farm running on hundreds of CPUs and is designed to reduce the rate by another factor of ~1000. It combines the traditional L2 and L3 trigger components in a novel way and allows the coherent tuning of the HLT algorithms to accommodate multiple physics channels. We will discuss the strategies for optimizing triggers covering the experiment`s early physics program.

  9. Tools for Trigger Rate Monitoring at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Geoffrey; Wightman, Andrew Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2017, we expect the LHC to deliver an instantaneous luminosity of roughly $2.0 \\times 10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ to the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, with about 60 simultaneous proton-proton collisions (pileup) per event. In these challenging conditions, it is important to be able to intelligently monitor the rate at which data are being collected (the trigger rate). It is not enough to simply look at the trigger rate; it is equally important to compare the trigger rate with expectations. We present a set of software tools that have been developed to accomplish this. The tools include a real-time component - a script that monitors the rates of individual triggers during data-taking, and activates an alarm if rates deviate significantly from expectation. Fits are made to previously collected data and extrapolated to higher pileup. The behavior of triggers as a function of pileup is then monitored as data are collected - plots are automatically produced on an hourly basis and uploaded to a web area...

  10. Software Validation Infrastructure for the ATLAS Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Adorisio, C; Beauchemin, P; Bell, P; Biglietti, M; Coccaro, A; Damazio, D; Ehrenfeld, W; Faulkner, P; George, S; Giagu, S; Goncalo, R; Hamilton, A; Jones, G; Kirk, J; Kwee, R; Lane, J; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Masik, J; Mincer, A; Monticelli, F; Omachi, C; Oyarzun, A; Panikashvili, N; Potter, C; Quinonez, F; Reinsch, A; Robinson, M; Rodríguez, D; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sidoti, A; Sinev, N; Strom, D; Sutton, M; Ventura, A; Winklmeier, F; Zhao, L

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger system is responsible for selecting the interesting collision events delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS trigger will need to achieve a ~10^-7 rejection factor against random proton-proton collisions, and still be able to efficiently select interesting events. After a first processing level based on hardware, the final event selection is based on custom software running on two CPU farms, containing around two thousand multi-core machines. This is known as the high-level trigger. Running the trigger online during long periods demands very high quality software. It must be fast, performant, and essentially bug-free. With more than 100 contributors and around 250 different packages, a thorough validation of the HLT software is essential. This relies on a variety of unit and integration tests as well as on software metrics, and uses both in-house and open source software. This presentation presents the existing infrastructure used for validating the high-level trigger softwar...

  11. Graphical processors for HEP trigger systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammendola, R. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Biagioni, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Di Lorenzo, S. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, L. Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Fantechi, R. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, L. Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fiorini, M. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Università di Ferrara, Via Ludovico Ariosto 35, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Frezza, O. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Lamanna, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P.S.; Pastorelli, E. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Piandani, R. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, L. Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Pontisso, L., E-mail: luca.pontisso@cern.ch [INFN Sezione di Pisa, L. Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Rossetti, D. [NVIDIA Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Simula, F. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Sozzi, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, L. Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); and others

    2017-02-11

    General-purpose computing on GPUs is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to employ GPUs as accelerators in offline computations. With the steady decrease of GPU latencies and the increase in link and memory throughputs, time is ripe for real-time applications using GPUs in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems. We will discuss the use of online parallel computing on GPUs for synchronous low level trigger systems, focusing on tests performed on the trigger of the CERN NA62 experiment. Latencies of all components need analysing, networking being the most critical. To keep it under control, we envisioned NaNet, an FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card (NIC) enabling GPUDirect connection. Moreover, we discuss how specific trigger algorithms can be parallelised and thus benefit from a GPU implementation, in terms of increased execution speed. Such improvements are particularly relevant for the foreseen LHC luminosity upgrade where highly selective algorithms will be crucial to maintain sustainable trigger rates with very high pileup.

  12. Validation of ATLAS L1 Topological Triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Praderio, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The Topological trigger (L1Topo) is a new component of the ATLAS L1 (Level-1) trigger. Its purpose is that of reducing the otherwise too high rate of data collection from the LHC by rejecting those events considered “uninteresting” (meaning that they have already been studied). This event rate reduction is achieved by applying topological requirements to the physical objects present in each event. It is very important to make sure that this trigger does not reject any “interesting” event. Therefore we need to verify its correct functioning. The goal of this summer student project is to study the response of two L1Topo algorithms (concerning ∆R and invariant mass). To do so I will compare the trigger decisions produced by the L1Topo hardware with the ones produced by the “official” L1Topo simulation. This way I will be able to identify events that could be incorrectly rejected. Simultaneously I will produce an emulation of these triggers that will help me understand the cause of disagreements bet...

  13. Upgrades of the ATLAS trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    Pastore, Francesca; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In coming years the LHC is expected to undergo upgrades to increase both the energy of proton-proton collisions and the instantaneous luminosity. In order to cope with these more challenging LHC conditions, upgrades of the ATLAS trigger system will be required. This talk will focus on some of the key aspects of these upgrades. Firstly, the upgrade period between 2019-2021 will see an increase in instantaneous luminosity to $3\\times10^{34} \\rm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. Upgrades to the Level 1 trigger system during this time will include improvements for both the muon and calorimeter triggers. These include the upgrade of the first-level Endcap Muon trigger, the calorimeter trigger electronics and the addition of new calorimeter feature extractor hardware, such as the Global Feature Extractor (gFEX). An overview will be given on the design and development status the aforementioned systems, along with the latest testing and validation results. \\\\ By 2026, the High Luminosity LHC will be able to deliver 14 TeV collisions ...

  14. Tracking at High Level Trigger in CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, M.

    2016-04-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with detector readout, offline storage and analysis capability. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger (L1T), implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a trade-off between the complexity of the algorithms, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. With the computing power available during the 2012 data taking the maximum reconstruction time at HLT was about 200 ms per event, at the nominal L1T rate of 100 kHz. Track reconstruction algorithms are widely used in the HLT, for the reconstruction of the physics objects as well as in the identification of b-jets and lepton isolation. Reconstructed tracks are also used to distinguish the primary vertex, which identifies the hard interaction process, from the pileup ones. This task is particularly important in the LHC environment given the large number of interactions per bunch crossing: on average 25 in 2012, and expected to be around 40 in Run II. We will present the performance of HLT tracking algorithms, discussing its impact on CMS physics program, as well as new developments done towards the next data taking in 2015.

  15. The ATLAS High Level Trigger Steering

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, N; Eifert, T; Fischer, G; George, S; Haller, J; Höcker, A; Masik, J; Zur Nedden, M; Pérez-Réale, V; Risler, C; Schiavi, C; Stelzer, J; Wu, X; International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    2008-01-01

    The High Level Trigger (HLT) of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider receives events which pass the LVL1 trigger at ~75 kHz and has to reduce the rate to ~200 Hz while retaining the most interesting physics. It is a software trigger and performs the reduction in two stages: the LVL2 trigger and the Event Filter (EF). At the heart of the HLT is the Steering software. To minimise processing time and data transfers it implements the novel event selection strategies of seeded, step-wise reconstruction and early rejection. The HLT is seeded by regions of interest identified at LVL1. These and the static configuration determine which algorithms are run to reconstruct event data and test the validity of trigger signatures. The decision to reject the event or continue is based on the valid signatures, taking into account pre-scale and pass-through. After the EF, event classification tags are assigned for streaming purposes. Several powerful new features for commissioning and operation have been added: co...

  16. Dietary aspects of migraine trigger factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, Fernanda C; de Oliveira, Vanessa R; Castro, Kamila; Chaves, Márcia L F; Perla, Alexandre da S; Perry, Ingrid D S

    2012-06-01

    The significance of dietary factors as triggers for migraines is controversial, and the assessment of this topic is complex and inconclusive. In order to evaluate the published evidence on dietary triggers, a critical review of the literature was performed by conducting a search for food item descriptors linked to migraines in the PubMed and SciELO databases. Reviews and relevant references cited within the articles that resulted from the search were also included. Of the 45 studies reviewed, 16 were population studies that involved the association between migraines and eating habits or the prevalence of related dietary factors; 12 involved interventions or analyzed observational prospective cohorts; and 17 were retrospective studies. Approximately 30 dietary triggers were explored in total, although only seven of these were addressed experimentally. In the prospective studies, patients were instructed to keep a diary; two of these studies involved dietary interventions. Conclusions that are based on nonpharmacological prophylactic strategies with a scientific basis and that show an association between certain dietary factors and the triggering of migraines are limited by the lack of prospective studies with clear experimental designs. Nevertheless, the high frequency of possible specific dietary triggers validates efforts to elucidate the involvement of food-related factors in precipitating migraines. © 2012 International Life Sciences Institute.

  17. Graphical processors for HEP trigger systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Di Lorenzo, S.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Piandani, R.; Pontisso, L.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2017-02-01

    General-purpose computing on GPUs is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to employ GPUs as accelerators in offline computations. With the steady decrease of GPU latencies and the increase in link and memory throughputs, time is ripe for real-time applications using GPUs in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems. We will discuss the use of online parallel computing on GPUs for synchronous low level trigger systems, focusing on tests performed on the trigger of the CERN NA62 experiment. Latencies of all components need analysing, networking being the most critical. To keep it under control, we envisioned NaNet, an FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card (NIC) enabling GPUDirect connection. Moreover, we discuss how specific trigger algorithms can be parallelised and thus benefit from a GPU implementation, in terms of increased execution speed. Such improvements are particularly relevant for the foreseen LHC luminosity upgrade where highly selective algorithms will be crucial to maintain sustainable trigger rates with very high pileup.

  18. The Fast Interaction Trigger Upgrade for ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Solis, Edmundo

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major detector upgrade for the second LHC long shutdown (2019–20). The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors. Furthermore, the introduction of a new Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) will significantly reduce the space available for the upgraded trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) has been designed. FIT will be the primary forward trigger, luminosity, and collision time measurement detector. The FIT will be capable of triggering at an interaction rate of 50 kHz, with a time resolution better than 30 ps, with 99% efficiency. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a single, large-size scintillator ring. The arrays will be placed on both sides of the interaction point (IP). Because of the presence of the h...

  19. Software for implementing trigger algorithms on the upgraded CMS Global Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 Trigger andimplements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied tothe final list of trigger objects. The conditions for trigger objectselection, with possible topological requirements on multi-object triggers,are combined by simple combinatorial logic to form the algorithms.The LHC has resumed its operation in 2015, the collision-energy will beincreased to 13~TeV with the luminosity expected to go upto~2$\\times$10$^{34}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. The CMS Level-1 trigger systemwill be upgraded to improve its performance for selecting interestingphysics events and to operate within the predefined data-acquisition ratein the challenging environment expected at LHC Run~2.The Global Trigger will be re-implemented on modern FPGAs on an AdvancedMezzanine Card in MicroTCA crate. The upgraded system will benefit fromthe ability to process complex algorithms with DSP slices and increasedprocessing resources with optical links running at~10 Gbit/s, enablingm...

  20. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger and Phase-1 Upgrade of Level-1 Endcap Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Mizukami, Atsushi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment utilises a trigger system to efficiently record interesting events. It consists of first-level and high-level triggers. The first-level trigger is implemented with custom-built hardware to reduce the event rate from 40 MHz to100 kHz. Then the software-based high-level triggers refine the trigger decisions reducing the output rate down to 1 kHz. Events with muons in the final state are an important signature for many physics topics at the LHC. An efficient trigger on muons and a detailed understanding of its performance are required. Trigger efficiencies are, for example, obtained from the muon decay of Z boson, with a Tag&Probe method, using proton-proton collision data collected in 2016 at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The LHC is expected to increase its instantaneous luminosity to $3\\times10^{34} \\rm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$ after the phase-1 upgrade between 2018-2020. The upgrade of the ATLAS trigger system is mandatory to cope with this high-luminosity. In the phase-1 upgrade, new det...

  1. Level-1 muon trigger performance in 2017 data and comparison with the legacy muon trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This document describes the performance of the CMS Level-1 muon trigger using data collected during 2017. The efficiency is greater than 90\\% for the dataset considered. This document includes a comparison of the performance of the upgrade and the legacy systems, showing a large reduction in trigger rate for similar efficiency.

  2. Dendrite Injury Triggers DLK-Independent Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Stone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Axon injury triggers regeneration through activation of a conserved kinase cascade, which includes the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK. Although dendrites are damaged during stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure, it is not known whether mature neurons monitor dendrite injury and initiate regeneration. We probed the response to dendrite damage using model Drosophila neurons. Two larval neuron types regrew dendrites in distinct ways after all dendrites were removed. Dendrite regeneration was also triggered by injury in adults. Next, we tested whether dendrite injury was initiated with the same machinery as axon injury. Surprisingly, DLK, JNK, and fos were dispensable for dendrite regeneration. Moreover, this MAP kinase pathway was not activated by injury to dendrites. Thus, neurons respond to dendrite damage and initiate regeneration without using the conserved DLK cascade that triggers axon regeneration.

  3. BTeV trigger/DAQ innovations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Votava, Margaret; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    BTeV was a proposed high-energy physics (HEP) collider experiment designed for the study of B-physics and CP Violation at the Tevatron at Fermilab. BTeV included a large-scale, high-speed trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) system, reading data from the detector at 500 Gbytes/sec and writing data to mass storage at a rate of 200 Mbytes/sec. The design of the trigger/DAQ system was innovative while remaining realistic in terms of technical feasibility, schedule and cost. This paper will give an overview of the BTeV trigger/DAQ architecture, highlight some of the technical challenges, and describe the approach that was used to solve these challenges.

  4. A self triggered intensified CCD (STIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Y.; Laniece, P.; Bendali, M.; Gaillard, J. M.; Leblanc, M.; Mastrippolito, R.; Tricoire, H.; Valentin, L.

    1991-12-01

    We are developing a new device based on the results reported previously of the successful coincidence detection of β - particles with a high spatial resolution. The novelty of the device consists in triggering and intensified CCD, i.e. a CCD coupled to an image intensifier (II), by an electrical signal collected from the II itself. This is a suitable procedure for detecting low light and rare events with high efficiency and high resolution. The trigger pulse is obtained from the secondary electrons produced by multiplication in a double microchannel plate (MCP) and collected on the aluminized layer protecting the phosphor screen in the II. Triggering efficiencies up to 80% have already been achieved.

  5. Combining Triggers in HEP Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Lendermann, Victor; Herbst, Michael; Kruger, Katja; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Stamen, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Modern high-energy physics experiments collect data using dedicated complex multi-level trigger systems which perform an online selection of potentially interesting events. In general, this selection suffers from inefficiencies. A further loss of statistics occurs when the rate of accepted events is artificially scaled down in order to meet bandwidth constraints. An offline analysis of the recorded data must correct for the resulting losses in order to determine the original statistics of the analysed data sample. This is particularly challenging when data samples recorded by several triggers are combined. In this paper we present methods for the calculation of the offline corrections and study their statistical performance. Implications on building and operating trigger systems are discussed.

  6. Alcoholic drinks as triggers in primary headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panconesi, Alessandro; Franchini, Michela; Bartolozzi, Maria Letizia; Mugnai, Stefania; Guidi, Leonello

    2013-08-01

    This project aims to investigate the role of alcoholic drinks (ADs) as triggers for primary headaches. Patients followed in the Headache Centre and presenting with migraine without aura, migraine with aura (MA), chronic migraine (CM), and tension-type headache (TH) were asked if their headache was precipitated by AD and also about their alcohol habits. Individual characteristics and drink habits were evaluated within two binary logistic models. About one half (49.7%) of patients were abstainers, 17.6% were habitual consumers, and 32.5% were occasional consumers. Out of 448 patients, only 22 (4.9%), all with migraine, reported AD as a trigger factor. None of 44 patients with MA and none of 47 patients with TH reported AD as a trigger factor. Among those patients with migraine who consume AD, only 8% reported that AD can precipitate their headache. Multivariate analyses showed that AD use, both occasional and habitual, is unrelated to TH. Moreover, analysis performed among migraine patients, points out that occasional and habitual drinkers have a lower risk of presenting with CM than abstainers, although statistical significance occurred only among occasional drinkers. Only 3% of migraine patients who abstain from AD reported that they do not consume alcohol because it triggers their headache. Our study shows that AD acts as headache triggers in a small percentage of migraine patients. Differing from some prior studies, our data suggest that AD do not trigger MA and TH attacks. Moreover, the percentage of abstainers in our sample is higher compared with that reported in general population surveys. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The CMS High-Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Covarelli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    At the startup of the LHC, the CMS data acquisition is expected to be able to sustain an event readout rate of up to 100 kHz from the Level-1 trigger. These events will be read into a large processor farm which will run the "High-Level Trigger" (HLT) selection algorithms and will output a rate of about 150 Hz for permanent data storage. In this report HLT performances are shown for selections based on muons, electrons, photons, jets, missing transverse energy, tau leptons and b quarks: expected efficiencies, background rates and CPU time consumption are reported as well as relaxation criteria foreseen for a LHC startup instantaneous luminosity.

  8. Event reconstruction algorithms for the ATLAS trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca-Martin, T; Adragna, P; Aleksandrov, E; Aleksandrov, I; Amorim, A; Anderson, K; Anduaga, X; Aracena, I; Asquith, L; Avolio, G; Backlund, S; Badescu, E; Baines, J; Barria, P; Bartoldus, R; Batreanu, S; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Bell, P; Bell, W H; Bellomo, M; Benslama, K; Berge, D; Berger, N; Berry, T; Biglietti, M; Blair, R R; Bogaerts, A; Bold, T; Bosman, M; Boyd, J; Brelier, B; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Buttar, C; Campanelli, M; Caprini, M; Carlino, G; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cimino, D; Ciobotaru, M; Clements, D; Coccaro, A; Conde-Muíño, P; Conventi, F; Corso-Radu, A; Costa, M J; Coura Torres, R; Cranfeld, R; Cranmer, K; Crone, G; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Dawson, I; Dawson, J; De Almeida Simoes, J; De Cecco, S; De Santo, A; DellaPietra, M; Delsart, P A; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Mattia, A; Dionisi, C; Djilkibaev, R; Dobinson, R; Dobson, M; Dotti, A; Dova, M; Drake, G; Dufour, M A; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Ellis, Nick; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Ermoline, Y; Eschrich, I; Facius, K; Falciano, S; Farthouat, P; Feng, E; Ferland, J; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Fischer, G; Francis, D; Gadomski, S; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gaudio, G; Gaumer, O; George, S; Giagu, S; Goncalo, R; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gowdy, S; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grancagnolo, S; Green, B; Haas, S; Haberichter, W; Hadavand, H; Haeberli, C; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hansen, J R; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Head, S; Hillier, S J; Höcker, A; Hrynóva, T; Hughes-Jones, R; Huston, J; Idarraga, J; Igonkina, O; Inada, M; Jain, V; Johns, K; Joos, M; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kazarov, A; Kehoe, R; Khoriauli, G; Kieft, G; Kilvington, G; Kirk, J; Kiyamura, H; Kolos, S; Kono, T; Konstantinidis, N; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kotov, V; Krasznahorkay, A; Kubota, T; Kugel, A; Kuhn, D; Kurasige, H; Kuwabara, T; Kwee, R; Lankford, A; LeCompte, T; Leahu, L; Leahu, M; Ledroit, F; Lehmann-Miotto, G; Lei, X; Lellouch, D; Leyton, M; Li, S; Lim, H; Lohse, T; Losada, M; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Mapelli, L; Martin, B; Martin, B T; Marzano, F; Masik, J; McMahon, T; McPherson, R; Medinnis, M; Meessen, C; Meirosu, C; Messina, A; Mincer, A; Mineev, M; Misiejuk, A; Mönig, K; Monticelli, F; Moraes, A; Moreno, D; Morettini, P; Murillo Garcia, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Negri, A; Némethy, P; Neusiedl, A; Nisati, A; Nozicka, M; Omachi, C; Osculati, B; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panikashvili, N; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pauly, T; Perera, V; Pérez, E; Pérez-Réale, V; Petersen, J; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pinzon, G; Pope, B; Potter, C; Primavera, M; Radescu, V; Rajagopalan, S; Renkel, P; Rescigno, M; Rieke, S; Risler, C; Riu, I; Robertson, S; Roda, C; Rodríguez, D; Rogriquez, Y; Ryabov, Yu; Ryan, P; Salvatore, D; Santamarina, C; Santamarina-Rios, C; Scannicchio, D; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Schlereth, J L; Scholtes, I; Schooltz, D; Scott, W; Segura, E; Shimbo, N; Sidoti, A; Siragusa, G; Sivoklokov, S; Sloper, J E; Smizanska, M; Soloviev, I; Soluk, R; Spagnolo, S; Spiwoks, R; Stancu, S; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, J; Stradling, A; Strom, David M; Strong, J; Su, D; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Szymocha, T; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Teixeira-Dias, P; Tokoshuku, K; Torrence, E; Touchard, F; Tremblet, L; Tripiana, M; Usai, G; Vachon, B; Vandelli, W; Ventura, A; Vercesi, V; Vermeulen, J; Von Der Schmitt, J; Wang, M; Watson, A; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Wickens, F; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wilkens, H; Winklmeier, F; Woerling, E E; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Xella, S; Yamazaki, Y; Yu, M; Zema, F; Zhang, J; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; Dos Anjos, A; Zur Nedden, M; Ozcan, E; Ünel, G

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment under construction at CERN is due to begin operation at the end of 2007. The detector will record the results of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. The trigger is a three-tier system designed to identify in real-time potentially interesting events that are then saved for detailed offline analysis. The trigger system will select approximately 200 Hz of potentially interesting events out of the 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate (with 109 interactions per second at the nominal luminosity).

  9. Run 2 ATLAS Trigger and Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Solovyanov, Oleg; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The 2nd LHC run has started in June 2015 with a proton-proton centre-of-mass collision energy of 13 TeV. During the years 2016 and 2017, LHC delivered an unprecedented amount of luminosity under the ever-increasing challenging conditions in terms of peak luminosity, pile-up and trigger rates. In this talk, the LHC running conditions and the improvements made to the ATLAS experiment in the course of Run 2 will be discussed, and the latest ATLAS detector and ATLAS trigger performance results from the Run 2 will be presented.

  10. Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Triggered by Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kolm

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The origin of collagen autoimmune diseases is not fully understood. Some studies postulate a mechanism of molecular mimicry or heterologous immunity following viral infections triggering autoimmunity. Apart from infections, other exogenous factors such as visible light or X-rays have been reported to incite autoimmunity. Case Report: We report a case of histologically and serologically confirmed subacute lupus erythematosus (SCLE following radiotherapy for breast cancer. Discussion: The close temporal and spatial correlation between radiotherapy and onset of SCLE in this patient suggests that an autoimmune reaction may have been triggered locally by functionally altering the immune system and breaking self-tolerance.

  11. Hardware Trigger Processor for the MDT System

    CERN Document Server

    Costa De Paiva, Thiago; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We are developing a low-latency hardware trigger processor for the Monitored Drift Tube system in the ATLAS Muon spectrometer. The processor will fit candidate Muon tracks in the drift tubes in real time, improving significantly the momentum resolution provided by the dedicated trigger chambers. We present a novel pure-FPGA implementation of a Legendre transform segment finder, an associative-memory alternative implementation, an ARM (Zynq) processor-based track fitter, and compact ATCA carrier board architecture. The ATCA architecture is designed to allow a modular, staged approach to deployment of the system and exploration of alternative technologies.

  12. Development and Online Opertation of Minimum Bias Triggers in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The design of minimum bias triggers should allow for a highly efficient selection on pp-collisions, while minimising any possible bias in the event selection. In ATLAS two main minimum bias triggers have been developed using complementary technologies. A hardware based first level trigger, consisting of 32 plastic scintillators, has proven to efficienctly select pp-interactions. In particular during the start-up phase this trigger played a crucial role for the commissioning of the central trigger processor and detector sub-systems. A complementary selection is achieved by a multi-level minimum bias trigger, seeded off a random trigger on filled bunches. For the event selection at higher trigger levels a dedicated algorithm was developed, able to cope with around 86 millions of detector signals per bunch-crossing. We will present these trigger systems and their deployment online, highlighting their performance and trigger efficiencies. We outline as well the operation with increasing beam intensities and lumin...

  13. The CMS Barrel Muon Trigger Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Triossi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The increase of luminosity expected by LHC during Phase 1 will impose several constrains for rate reduction while maintaining high efficiency in the CMS Level 1 trigger system. The TwinMux system is the early layer of the muon barrel region that concentrates the information from different subdetectors DT, RPC and HO. It arranges and fan-out the slow optical trigger links from the detector chambers into faster links (10 Gbps) that are sent to the track finders. Results, from collision runs, that confirm the satisfactory operation of the trigger system up to the output of the barrel track finder, will be shown. SUMMARY: In view of the increase of luminosity during phase 1 upgrade of LHC, the muon trigger chain of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment underwent considerable improvements. The muon detector was designed for preserving the complementarity and redundancy of three separate muon detection systems, Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC), Drift Tubes (DT) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC), until ...

  14. CMS Trigger Improvements towards Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067212

    2016-01-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with detector readout, offline storage and analysis capability. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system the Level-1 Trigger (L1T), implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. Both systems need to provide an efficient and fast selection of events, to keep the average write-out rate below 450Hz. For Run II, the doubling of both the center of mass energy to 13 TeV and the collision rate to 40 MHz, will imply increased cross sections and out-of-time pile-up. We will present the improvements brought to both L1T and HLT strategies to meet those new challenges.

  15. Aircraft Detectors, Trap Triggers and Combination Locks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Aircraft Detectors, Trap Triggers and Combination Locks - Functional Diversity of Insect Mechanosensory Hairs. Jürgen Tautz. General Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 32-38 ...

  16. Self-triggered coordination with ternary controllers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Persis, Claudio; Frasca, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    This paper regards coordination of networked systems with ternary controllers. We develop a hybrid coordination system which implements a self-triggered communication policy, based on polling the neighbors upon need. We prove that the proposed scheme ensures finite-time convergence to a neighborhood

  17. Reflex epilepsy: triggers and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okudan ZV

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeynep Vildan Okudan,1 Çiğdem Özkara2 1Department of Neurology, Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Education and Research Hospital, 2Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, University of Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract: Reflex epilepsies (REs are identified as epileptic seizures that are consistently induced by identifiable and objective-specific triggers, which may be an afferent stimulus or by the patient’s own activity. RE may have different subtypes depending on the stimulus characteristic. There are significant clinical and electrophysiologic differences between different RE types. Visual stimuli-sensitive or photosensitive epilepsies constitute a large proportion of the RE and are mainly related to genetic causes. Reflex epilepsies may present with focal or generalized seizures due to specific triggers, and sometimes seizures may occur spontaneously. The stimuli can be external (light flashes, hot water, internal (emotion, thinking, or both and should be distinguished from triggering precipitants, which most epileptic patients could report such as emotional stress, sleep deprivation, alcohol, and menstrual cycle. Different genetic and acquired factors may play a role in etiology of RE. This review will provide a current overview of the triggering factors and management of reflex seizures. Keywords: seizure, reflex epilepsy, photosensitivity, hot water, reading, thinking

  18. Chaotropes trigger conformational rearrangements differently in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, the mechanism of denaturation varied with the studied conditions, like different SDS concentrations and hydronium ion potentials, wherein the proteinundergoes a conformational rearrangement from β-sheet to α-helix. Moreover, GdnHCl triggered complete denaturation of ConA into a predominantly random coil ...

  19. Prostate cancer may trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jakob Kristian; Zakharia, Elias Raja; Boysen, Anders Kindberg Fossø

    2013-01-01

    -Hu antibody test the patient was diagnosed with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to prostate cancer. The patient died within 6 months. We review the literature on prostate cancer-related paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. High-risk prostate cancer can trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis...

  20. Thermally triggered degradation of transient electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Woo; Kang, Seung-Kyun; Hernandez, Hector Lopez; Kaitz, Joshua A; Wie, Dae Seung; Shin, Jiho; Lee, Olivia P; Sottos, Nancy R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rogers, John A; White, Scott R

    2015-07-01

    Thermally triggered transient electronics using wax-encapsulated acid, which enable rapid device destruction via acidic degradation of the metal electronic components are reported. Using a cyclic poly(phthalaldehyde) (cPPA) substrate affords a more rapid destruction of the device due to acidic depolymerization of cPPA. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Moisture-triggered physically transient electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xu; Sim, Kyoseung; Liu, Jingshen; Chen, Ji; Feng, Xue; Xu, Hangxun; Yu, Cunjiang

    2017-09-01

    Physically transient electronics, a form of electronics that can physically disappear in a controllable manner, is very promising for emerging applications. Most of the transient processes reported so far only occur in aqueous solutions or biofluids, offering limited control over the triggering and degradation processes. We report novel moisture-triggered physically transient electronics, which exempt the needs of resorption solutions and can completely disappear within well-controlled time frames. The triggered transient process starts with the hydrolysis of the polyanhydride substrate in the presence of trace amounts of moisture in the air, a process that can generate products of corrosive organic acids to digest various inorganic electronic materials and components. Polyanhydride is the only example of polymer that undergoes surface erosion, a distinct feature that enables stable operation of the functional devices over a predefined time frame. Clear advantages of this novel triggered transience mode include that the lifetime of the devices can be precisely controlled by varying the moisture levels and changing the composition of the polymer substrate. The transience time scale can be tuned from days to weeks. Various transient devices, ranging from passive electronics (such as antenna, resistor, and capacitor) to active electronics (such as transistor, diodes, optoelectronics, and memories), and an integrated system as a platform demonstration have been developed to illustrate the concept and verify the feasibility of this design strategy.

  2. Multiple output timing and trigger generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheat, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

  3. Data driven trigger efficiency determination at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Tolk, S; Dettori, F; Pellegrino, A

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate in detail the trigger efficiency evaluation of the LHCb trigger system purely on data with the so-called TISTOS method. The discussion includes an explicit overview of the uncertainty propagation. Additionally, we present a way to reduce the systematic uncertainty of the TISTOS method by binning the phase space. As an example, the binning is performed in the $B$ meson phase space for $B^+ \\to J/\\psi K^+$ decays. A large sample of simulated events is used to determine the systematic uncertainties. Following the procedure discussed in this note, the trigger efficiency can be correctly determined for any dataset of sufficient size, including a realistic determination of systematic uncertainties. The developed method is used to measure the trigger efficiency of $B^+ \\to J/\\psi K^+$ events in a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$, collected in 2011 and 2012. The numerical values determined here have been used for the 3 fb$^{-1}$ measurement of the branching fraction of t...

  4. Triggering and Delivery Algorithms for AGN Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meece, Gregory R.; Voit, G. Mark; O'Shea, Brian W.

    2017-06-01

    We compare several common subgrid implementations of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, focusing on the effects of different triggering mechanisms and the differences between thermal and kinetic feedback. Our main result is that pure thermal feedback that is centrally injected behaves differently from feedback with even a small kinetic component. Specifically, pure thermal feedback results in excessive condensation and smothering of the AGN by cold gas because the feedback energy does not propagate to large enough radii. We do not see large differences between implementations of different triggering mechanisms, as long as the spatial resolution is sufficiently high, probably because all of the implementations tested here trigger strong AGN feedback under similar conditions. In order to assess the role of resolution, we vary the size of the “accretion zone” in which properties are measured to determine the AGN accretion rate and resulting feedback power. We find that a larger accretion zone results in steadier jets but can also allow too much cold gas condensation in simulations with a Bondi-like triggering algorithm. We also vary the opening angle of jet precession and find that a larger precession angle causes more of the jet energy to thermalize closer to the AGN, thereby producing results similar to pure thermal feedback. Our simulations confirm that AGNs can regulate the thermal state of cool-core galaxy clusters and maintain the core in a state that is marginally susceptible to thermal instability followed by precipitation.

  5. An overview of the ATLAS trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Le Dû, P

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. This paper gives an overview of the event selection for ATLAS, prior to event building, with the emphasis on the level-2 trigger. (A further stage of selection after event building is described in a separate presentation-ref Event Filter overview.) The level-1 trigger based on custom hardware processes coarse-grain data from the calorimeters and dedicated muon trigger chambers to give a selection of approximately one interaction in 10**5 (one bunch crossing in 10**3). The level-2 trigger processes selected fine-grain data from all detectors to give a further selection of one in 10**2. Studies of the estimated physics rates and detector data volumes have led to a sequential level-2 selection strategy guided by Region of Interest pointers from level-1. The influence of low luminosity (b physics) and high luminosity (high pT) running on the strategy and the architectural options is discussed. The models and testbeds used in developing and testing the strategy are described. Finally the t...

  6. ATLAS LEVEL-1 CALORIMETER AND TOPOLOGICAL TRIGGER

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Sebastian Mario; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In Run 2 at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, the ATLAS detector uses a two-level trigger system to reduce the event rate from the nominal collision rate of 40 MHz to the event storage rate of 1 kHz, while preserving interesting physics events. The first step of the trigger system, Level-1, reduces the event rate to 100 kHz with a latency of less than 2.5 μs. One component of this system is the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo), which uses coarse-granularity information from the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters to identify regions of interest corresponding to electrons, photons, taus, jets, and large amounts of transverse energy and missing transverse energy. In this talk, we will discuss the improved performance of the L1Calo system in the challenging, high-luminosity conditions provided by the LHC in Run 2. As the LHC exceeds its design luminosity, it is becoming even more critical to reduce event rates while preserving physics. A new feature of the ATLAS Run 2 trigger system is the Level-1 Topolog...

  7. Is stress a trigger factor for migraine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonman, G.G.; Evers, D.J.; Ballieux, B.E.; de Geus, E.J.C.; de Kloet, E.R.; Terwindt, G.M.; van Dijk, J.G.; Ferrari, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although mental stress is commonly considered to be an important trigger factor for migraine, experimental evidence for this belief is yet lacking. Objective: To study the temporal relationship between changes in stress-related parameters (both subjective and objective) and the onset of

  8. ATLAS Phase-II trigger upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Sankey, Dave; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This talk for ACES summarises the current status of the ATLAS Phase-II trigger upgrade, describing and comparing the two architectures under consideration, namely the two hardware level system described in the Phase-II Upgrade Scoping Document and the more recent single hardware level system.

  9. FPGA Trigger System to Run Klystrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Darius; /Texas A-M /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The Klystron Department is in need of a new trigger system to update the laboratory capabilities. The objective of the research is to develop the trigger system using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology with a user interface that will allow one to communicate with the FPGA via a Universal Serial Bus (USB). This trigger system will be used for the testing of klystrons. The key materials used consists of the Xilinx Integrated Software Environment (ISE) Foundation, a Programmable Read Only Memory (Prom) XCF04S, a Xilinx Spartan 3E 35S500E FPGA, Xilinx Platform Cable USB II, a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), a 100 MHz oscillator, and an oscilloscope. Key considerations include eight triggers, two of which have variable phase shifting capabilities. Once the project was completed the output signals were able to be manipulated via a Graphical User Interface by varying the delay and width of the signal. This was as planned; however, the ability to vary the phase was not completed. Future work could consist of being able to vary the phase. This project will give the operators in the Klystron Department more flexibility to run various tests.

  10. Triggered star formation and its consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shule; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2014-11-01

    Star formation can be triggered by compression from wind or supernova-driven shock waves that sweep over molecular clouds. Because these shocks will likely contain processed elements, triggered star formation has been proposed as an explanation for short-lived radioactive isotopes (SLRIs) in the Solar system. Previous studies have tracked the triggering event to the earliest phases of collapse and have focused on the shock properties required for both successful star formation and mixing of SLRIs. In this paper, we use adaptive mesh refinement simulation methods, including sink particles, to simulate the full collapse and subsequent evolution of a stable Bonnor- Ebert sphere subjected to a shock and post-shock wind. We track the flow of the cloud material after a star (a sink particle) has formed. For non-rotating clouds, we find robust triggered collapse and little bound circumstellar material remaining around the post-shock collapsed core. When we add initial cloud rotation, we observe the formation of discs around the collapsed core which then interact with the post-shock flow. Our results indicate that these circumstellar discs are massive enough to form planets and are long lived, in spite of the ablation driven by post-shock-flow ram pressure. As a function of the initial conditions, we also track the time evolution of the accretion rates and particle mixing between the ambient wind and cloud material. The latter is maximized for cases of highest Mach number.

  11. Myofacial trigger points in advanced cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Hasuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation.We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points.

  12. Level 1 Tau trigger performance in 2016 data and VBF seeds at Level 1 trigger

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the first long shutdown, the LHC has restarted at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. In 2016, the LHC achieved an instantaneous luminosity larger than $10^{34}$ $\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\cdot \\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ and a peak average pile-up of more than 40. The CMS Level-1 trigger architecture has undergone a full upgrade in order to maintain and improve the trigger performance under these new conditions. It allows CMS to keep the trigger rate under control and to avoid a significant increase in trigger thresholds that would have a negative impact on the CMS physics program. Studies of the performance of the calorimeter trigger upgrade for tau leptons, using the full 2016 dataset (35.9 $\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$), are shown. Details of the Level-1 trigger algorithms and commissioning may be found in CMS-DP-2015-009, CMS-DP-2015-003, CMS-DP-2015-051 and the CMS Technical Design Report for the Level-1 Trigger upgrade: CERN-LHCC-2013-011, CMS-TDR-12 (2013). Previous performance results, based on the ICHEP 2016 dataset (12.9 ...

  13. Remote Dynamic Earthquake Triggering in Shale Gas Basins in Canada and Implications for Triggering Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Rebecca M.; Liu, Yajing; Wang, Bei; Kao, Honn; Yu, Hongyu

    2017-04-01

    Here we investigate the occurrence of remote dynamic triggering in three sedimentary basins in Canada where recent fluid injection activity is correlated with increasing numbers of earthquakes. In efforts to count as many small, local earthquakes as possible for the statistical test of triggering, we apply a multi-station matched-filter detection method to continuous waveforms to detect uncataloged local earthquakes in 10-day time windows surrounding triggering mainshocks occurring between 2013-2015 with an estimated local peak ground velocity exceeding 0.01 cm/s. We count the number of earthquakes in 24-hour bins and use a statistical p-value test to determine if the changes in seismicity levels after the mainshock waves have passed are statistically significant. The p-value tests show occurrences of triggering following transient stress perturbations of sites that suggest local faults may remain critically stressed over periods similar to the time frame of our study ( 2 years) or longer, potentially due to maintained high pore pressures in tight shale formations following injection. The time window over which seismicity rates change varies at each site, with more delayed triggering occurring at sites where production history is longer. The observations combined with new modeling results suggest that the poroelastic response of the medium may be the dominant factor influencing instantaneous triggering, particularly in low-permeability tight shales. At sites where production history is longer and permeabilities have been increased, both pore pressure diffusion and the poroelastic response of the medium may work together to promote both instantaneous and delayed triggering. Not only does the interplay of the poroelastic response of the medium and pore pressure diffusion have implications for triggering induced earthquakes near injection sites, but it may be a plausible explanation for observations of instantaneous and delayed earthquake triggering in general.

  14. The ATLAS online High Level Trigger framework experience reusing offline software components in the ATLAS trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedenmann, W

    2009-01-01

    Event selection in the Atlas High Level Trigger is accomplished to a large extent by reusing software components and event selection algorithms developed and tested in an offline environment. Many of these offline software modules are not specifically designed to run in a heavily multi-threaded online data flow environment. The Atlas High Level Trigger (HLT) framework based on the Gaudi and Atlas Athena frameworks, forms the interface layer, which allows the execution of the HLT selection and monitoring code within the online run control and data flow software. While such an approach provides a unified environment for trigger event selection across all of Atlas, it also poses strict requirements on the reused software components in terms of performance, memory usage and stability. Experience of running the HLT selection software in the different environments and especially on large multi-node trigger farms has been gained in several commissioning periods using preloaded Monte Carlo events, in data taking peri...

  15. High Level Trigger Configuration and Handling of Trigger Tables in the CMS Filter Farm

    CERN Document Server

    Meschi, E; Behrens, Ulf; Boyer, Vincent; Branson, James; Brett, Angela; Cano, Eric; Carboni, Andrea; Ciganek, Marek; Cittolin, Sergio; O’dell, Vivian; Erhan, Samim; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino, Robert; Gulmini, Michele; Gutleber, Johannes; Hollar, Jonathan; Lange, David; Cheol Kim, Jin; Klute, Markus; Lipeles, Elliot; Lopez Perez, Juan Antonio; Maron, Gaetano; Meijers, Frans; Moser, Roland; Gutiérrez-Mlot, Estebán; Murray, Steven; Oh, Alexander; Orsini, Luciano; Paus, Christoph; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Pollet, Lucien; Racz, Attila; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schwick, Christoph; Sumorok, Konstanty; Suzuki, Ichiro; Tsirigkas, Dimitrios; Varela, Joao

    2008-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is currently being commissioned and is scheduled to collect the first pp collision data in 2008. CMS features a two-level trigger system. The Level-1 trigger, based on custom hardware, is designed to reduce the collision rate of 40 MHz to approximately 100 kHz. Data for events accepted by the Level-1 trigger are read out and assembled by an Event Builder. The High Level Trigger (HLT) employs a set of sophisticated software algorithms, to analyze the complete event information, and further reduce the accepted event rate for permanent storage and analysis. This paper describes the design and implementation of the HLT Configuration Management system. First experiences with commissioning of the HLT system are also reported.

  16. Performance of muon-based triggers at the CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Alimena, Juliette

    2014-01-01

    The trigger systems of the CERN LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with the detector readout, offline storage and analysis capabilities. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS reconstruction and analysis software running on a computer farm. Here we will present the design and performance of the main muon triggers used during the Run I data taking. We will show how these triggers contributed to the 2012 physics results. We will then present the improvements foreseen to meet the challenges of the Run II data taking. We will discuss the improvements being made at L1, and at various stages in the HLT reconstruction, ranging from the local drift tube and cathode strip chamber reconstruction, to ...

  17. Machine learning techniques for razor triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Kolosova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    My project was focused on the development of a neural network which can predict if an event passes or not a razor trigger. Using synthetic data containing jets and missing transverse energy we built and trained a razor network by supervised learning. We accomplished a ∼ 91% agreement between the output of the neural network and the target while the other 10% was due to the noise of the neural network. We could apply such networks during the L1 trigger using neuromorhic hardware. Neuromorphic chips are electronic systems that function in a way similar to an actual brain, they are faster than GPUs or CPUs, but they can only be used with spiking neural networks.

  18. Iatrogenic urological triggers of autonomic dysreflexia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, N; Zhou, M; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a systematic review. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to review the literature on iatrogenic urological triggers of autonomic dysreflexia (AD). SETTING: This study was conducted in an international setting. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted from Pub......Med search using AD/ autonomic hyperreflexia and spinal cord injury (SCI). Studies selected for review involved iatrogenic urological triggers of AD in individuals with SCI, including original articles, previous practice guidelines, case reports and literature reviews. Studies that did not report AD or blood...... pressure (BP) assessments during urological procedures were excluded. RESULTS: Forty studies were included for analysis and categorized into four groups: (1) urodynamics and cystometry; (2) cystoscopy and transurethral litholapaxy; (3) extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL); and (4) other procedures...

  19. Does heavy physical exertion trigger myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallqvist, J; Möller, J; Ahlbom, A

    2000-01-01

    To study possible triggering of first events of acute myocardial infarction by heavy physical exertion, the authors conducted a case-crossover analysis (1993-1994) within a population-based case-referent study in Stockholm County, Sweden (the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program). Interviews were...... million person-hours, and the attributable proportion was 5.7 percent. The risk was modified by physical fitness, with an increased risk being seen among sedentary subjects as in earlier studies, but the data also suggested a U-shaped association. In addition, the trigger effect was modified......, and a standard case-referent analysis) were applied to overcome the threat of misclassification of control exposure information. A case-crossover analysis in a random sample of healthy subjects resulted in a relative risk close to unity, as expected....

  20. Effect of treatment on trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majlesi, Javid; Unalan, Halil

    2010-10-01

    Patients with muscle pain complaints commonly are seen by clinicians treating pain, especially pain of musculoskeletal origin. Myofascial trigger points merit special attention because its diagnosis requires examinations skills and its treatment requires specific techniques. If undiagnosed, the patients tend to be overinvestigated and undertreated, leading to chronic pain syndrome. Patients with myofascial pain syndrome present primarily with painful muscle(s) and restricted range of motion of the relevant joint. Palpable painful taut bands are named trigger points and are the main and pathognomonic finding on physical examination. Eliciting local twitch response and referred pain requires experience and examination skills. It may be useful to classify the patient as having acute or chronic, and as having primary or secondary, myofascial pain so the decision on the details of treatment can be curtailed to the needs of each patient. Effective treatment modalities are local heat and cold, stretching exercises, spray-and-stretch, needling, local injection, and high-power pain threshold ultrasound.

  1. Conservative treatment for trigger thumb in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H; Hamada, Y; Toshima, T; Nagasawa, K

    2001-07-01

    Conservative treatment was performed for 60 trigger thumbs (19 right, 17 left, 12 bilateral) in 48 children (19 boys, 29 girls); the age at initial diagnosis ranged from 0 to 48 months old (mean 26 months). In this approach, only passive exercise of the affected thumb was performed by the mother. As a result, two patients (two thumbs) dropped out of treatment. Fifty-six thumbs out of 58 showed a satisfactory result (96%). Sixteen thumbs (in stage 2) and eight thumbs (in stage 3) showed completely recovery. Four thumbs (in stage 3) have not yet improved. In conclusion, we suggest that conservative treatment is effective for trigger thumbs in stage 2, while surgical therapy was thought to be indicated for stage 3 before the age of 3 years to avoid flexion deformity.

  2. Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the claim that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity, might play a role in triggering earthquakes. We count the number of earthquakes having magnitudes that exceed chosen thresholds in calendar years, months, and days, and we order these counts by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure the statistical significance of the difference between the earthquake-number distributions below and above the median of the solar-terrestrial averages by χ2 and Student's t tests. Across a range of earthquake magnitude thresholds, we find no consistent and statistically significant distributional differences. We also introduce time lags between the solar-terrestrial variables and the number of earthquakes, but again no statistically significant distributional difference is found. We cannot reject the null hypothesis of no solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes.

  3. Particle combinations in the LHCb Upgrade trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Fanyi

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during long shutdown II (2018-2020) to process inelastic proton-proton collisions at 30MHz in a software application and run at a higher instantaneous luminosity of $2\\times 10^{33}cm^{−2}s^{−1}$. Each of these collisions will contain substantially more proton-proton interactions and charged particles. It is important to identify the decay vertices of heavy-flavour hadrons produced by the primary proton-proton interaction in an efficient, CPU-performant manner. In this project, I will learn about the LHCb trigger and experimental programme and investigate alternative models for reconstructing these vertices, which may scale more efficiently to the upgraded trigger conditions than the current model.

  4. The ATLAS Trigger Simulation with Legacy Software

    CERN Document Server

    Bernius, Catrin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Physics analyses at the LHC which search for rare physics processes or measure Standard Model parameters with high precision require accurate simulations of the detector response and the event selection processes. The accurate simulation of the trigger response is crucial for determination of overall selection efficiencies and signal sensitivities. For the generation and the reconstruction of simulated event data, generally the most recent software releases are used to ensure the best agreement between simulated data and real data. For the simulation of the trigger selection process, however, the same software release with which real data were taken should be ideally used. This requires potentially running with software dating many years back, the so-called legacy software. Therefore having a strategy for running legacy software in a modern environment becomes essential when data simulated for past years start to present a sizeable fraction of the total. The requirements and possibilities for such a simulatio...

  5. Checkpoint triggering in a computer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cher, Chen-Yong

    2016-09-06

    According to an aspect, a method for triggering creation of a checkpoint in a computer system includes executing a task in a processing node of the computer system and determining whether it is time to read a monitor associated with a metric of the task. The monitor is read to determine a value of the metric based on determining that it is time to read the monitor. A threshold for triggering creation of the checkpoint is determined based on the value of the metric. Based on determining that the value of the metric has crossed the threshold, the checkpoint including state data of the task is created to enable restarting execution of the task upon a restart operation.

  6. A self-triggered picoinjector in microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based microfluidics has recently emerged as a potential platform for studies of single-cell, directed evolution, and genetic sequencing. In droplet-based microfluidics, adding reagents into drops is one of the most important functions. In this paper, we develop a new self-triggered picoinjector to add controlled volumes of reagent into droplets at kilohertz rates. In the picoinjector, the reagent injecting is triggered by the coming droplet itself, without needing a droplet detection module. Meanwhile, the dosing volume can be precisely controlled. These features make the system more practical and reliable. We expect the new picoinjector will find important applications of droplet-based microfluidics in automated biological assay, directed evolution, enzyme assay, and so on.

  7. A self-triggered picoinjector in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiming; Liu, Songsheng; Jia, Chunping; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhou, Hongbo

    2016-12-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has recently emerged as a potential platform for studies of single-cell, directed evolution, and genetic sequencing. In droplet-based microfluidics, adding reagents into drops is one of the most important functions. In this paper, we develop a new self-triggered picoinjector to add controlled volumes of reagent into droplets at kilohertz rates. In the picoinjector, the reagent injecting is triggered by the coming droplet itself, without needing a droplet detection module. Meanwhile, the dosing volume can be precisely controlled. These features make the system more practical and reliable. We expect the new picoinjector will find important applications of droplet-based microfluidics in automated biological assay, directed evolution, enzyme assay, and so on.

  8. Cell Biology of Ca2+-Triggered Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Zhiping P.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ triggers many forms of exocytosis in different types of eukaryotic cells, for example synaptic vesicle exocytosis in neurons, granule exocytosis in mast cells, and hormone exocytosis in endocrine cells. Work over the last two decades has shown that synaptotagmins function as the primary Ca2+-sensors for most of these forms of exocytosis, and that synaptotagmins act via Ca2+-dependent interactions with both the fusing phospholipid membranes and the membrane fusion machinery. However, some...

  9. Mechanism for Triggered Waves in Atrial Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiferaw, Yohannes; Aistrup, Gary L; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2017-08-08

    Excitation-contraction coupling in atrial cells is mediated by calcium (Ca) signaling between L-type Ca channels and Ryanodine receptors that occurs mainly at the cell boundary. This unique architecture dictates essential aspects of Ca signaling under both normal and diseased conditions. In this study we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy, along with an experimentally based computational model, to understand the Ca cycling dynamics of an atrial cell subjected to rapid pacing. Our main finding is that when an atrial cell is paced under Ca overload conditions, Ca waves can then nucleate on the cell boundary and propagate to the cell interior. These propagating Ca waves are referred to as "triggered waves" because they are initiated by L-type Ca channel openings during the action potential. These excitations are distinct from spontaneous Ca waves originating from random fluctuations of Ryanodine receptor channels, and which occur after much longer waiting times. Furthermore, we argue that the onset of these triggered waves is a highly nonlinear function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca load. This strong nonlinearity leads to aperiodic response of Ca at rapid pacing rates that is caused by the complex interplay between paced Ca release and triggered waves. We argue further that this feature of atrial cells leads to dynamic instabilities that may underlie atrial arrhythmias. These studies will serve as a starting point to explore the nonlinear dynamics of atrial cells and will yield insights into the trigger and maintenance of atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The LHCb trigger system: performance and outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Stracka, Simone

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is a spectrometer dedicated to the study of heavy flavor at the LHC. The rate of proton-proton collisions at the LHC is 15 MHz, of which only 5 kHz can be written to storage for offline analysis. The trigger system plays a key role in selecting signal events and rejecting background, and is comprised of a hardware level (L0), reducing the rate to the maxi- mum at which the detector can be fully read out, and a High Level Trigger (HLT) -implemented in software and deployed on a farm of roughly 25000 parallel processing cores- responsible for reducing the rate to the 5 kHz which can be processed offline. The LHCb trigger system allowed LHCb to run at twice its design luminosity in 2012, and performed beyond the nominal design in terms of signal yields. The design and performance of the selection algorithms are discussed in the context of the 2012 data taking, and planned improvements for RunII are presented

  11. Initial experience with the CDF SVT trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Ashmanskas, B; Bardi, A; Bari, M; Baumgart, M; Belforte, S; Berryhill, J W; Bogdan, M; Carosi, R; Cerri, A; Chlachidze, G; Culberston, R; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Donati, S; Fiori, I; Frisch, H; Galeotti, S; Giannetti, P; Glagolev, V; Léger, A; Liu, Y; Meschi, E; Moneta, L; Morsani, F; Nakaya, T; Punzi, G; Rescigno, M; Ristori, L; Sanders, H; Sarkar, S; Semenov, A; Shochet, M; Speer, T; Spinella, F; Vataga, H; Wu, X; Yang, U; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A M

    2003-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is a device that works inside the CDF Level 2 trigger to find and fit tracks in real time using the central silicon vertex detector information. SVT starts from tracks found by the Level 1 central chamber fast trigger and adds the silicon information to compute transverse track parameters with offline quality in about 15 mu s. The CDF SVT is fully installed and functional and has been exercised with real data during the spring and summer 2001. It is a complex digital device of more than 100 VME boards that performs a dramatic data reduction (only about one event in a thousand is accepted by the trigger). Diagnosing rare failures poses a special challenge and SVT internal data flow is monitored by dedicated hardware and software. This paper briefly covers the SVT architecture and design and reports on the SVT building/commissioning experience (hardware and software) and on the first results from the initial running.

  12. Initial experience with the CDF SVT trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmanskas, B.; Barchiesi, A.; Bardi, A.; Bari, M.; Baumgart, M.; Belforte, Stefano; Berryhill, J.; Bogdan, M.; Carosi, R.; Cerri, A.; Chlachidze, G.; Culberston, R.; Dell'Orso, M.; Donati, S.; Fiori, I.; Frisch, H.; Galeotti, S.; Giannetti, P.; Glagolev, V.; Leger, A.; Liu, Y.; Meschi, E.; Moneta, L.; Morsani, F.; Nakaya, T.; Punzi, G.; Rescigno, M.; Ristori, L.; Sanders, H.; Sarkar, S.; Semenov, A.; Shochet, M.; Speer, T.; Spinella, F.; Vataga, H.; Wu, X.; Yang, U.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A. M.

    2003-03-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is a device that works inside the CDF Level 2 trigger to find and fit tracks in real time using the central silicon vertex detector information. SVT starts from tracks found by the Level 1 central chamber fast trigger and adds the silicon information to compute transverse track parameters with offline quality in about 15 μs. The CDF SVT is fully installed and functional and has been exercised with real data during the spring and summer 2001. It is a complex digital device of more than 100 VME boards that performs a dramatic data reduction (only about one event in a thousand is accepted by the trigger). Diagnosing rare failures poses a special challenge and SVT internal data flow is monitored by dedicated hardware and software. This paper briefly covers the SVT architecture and design and reports on the SVT building/commissioning experience (hardware and software) and on the first results from the initial running.

  13. A Hardware Track Finder for ATLAS Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Volpi, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Andreazza, A; Citterio, M; Favareto, A; Liberali, V; Meroni, C; Riva, M; Sabatini, F; Stabile, A; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Castegnaro, A; Bevacqua, V; Crescioli, F; Francesco, C; Dell'Orso, M; Giannetti, P; Magalotti, D; Piendibene, M; Roda, C; Sacco, I; Tripiccione, R; Fabbri, L; Franchini, M; Giorgi, F; Giannuzzi, F; Lasagni, F; Sbarra, C; Valentinetti, S; Villa, M; Zoccoli, A; Lanza, A; Negri, A; Vercesi, V; Bogdan, M; Boveia, A; Canelli, F; Cheng, Y; Dunford, M; Li, H L; Kapliy, A; Kim, Y K; Melachrinos, C; Shochet, M; Tang, F; Tang, J; Tuggle, J; Tompkins, L; Webster, J; Atkinson, M; Cavaliere, V; Chang, P; Kasten, M; McCarn, A; Neubauer, M; Hoff, J; Liu, T; Okumura, Y; Olsen, J; Penning, B; Todri, A; Wu, J; Drake, G; Proudfoot, J; Zhang, J; Blair, R; Anderson, J; Auerbach, B; Blazey, G; Kimura, N; Yorita, K; Sakurai, Y; Mitani, T; Iizawa, T

    2012-01-01

    The existing three level ATLAS trigger system is deployed to reduce the event rate from the bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz to ~400 Hz for permanent storage at the LHC design luminosity of 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. When the LHC reaches beyond the design luminosity, the load on the Level-2 trigger system will significantly increase due to both the need for more sophisticated algorithms to suppress background and the larger event sizes. The Fast TracKer (FTK) is a custom electronics system that will operate at the full Level-1 accepted rate of 100 KHz and provide high quality tracks at the beginning of processing in the Level-2 trigger, by performing track reconstruction in hardware with massive parallelism of associative memories and FPGAs. The performance in important physics areas including b-tagging, tau-tagging and lepton isolation will be demonstrated with the ATLAS MC simulation at different LHC luminosities. The system design will be overviewed. The latest R&amp;amp;D progress of individual components...

  14. Trigger chemistries for better industrial formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsuan-Chin; Zhang, Yanfeng; Possanza, Catherine M; Zimmerman, Steven C; Cheng, Jianjun; Moore, Jeffrey S; Harris, Keith; Katz, Joshua S

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, innovations and consumer demands have led to increasingly complex liquid formulations. These growing complexities have provided industrial players and their customers access to new markets through product differentiation, improved performance, and compatibility/stability with other products. One strategy for enabling more complex formulations is the use of active encapsulation. When encapsulation is employed, strategies are required to effect the release of the active at the desired location and time of action. One particular route that has received significant academic research effort is the employment of triggers to induce active release upon a specific stimulus, though little has translated for industrial use to date. To address emerging industrial formulation needs, in this review, we discuss areas of trigger release chemistries and their applications specifically as relevant to industrial use. We focus the discussion on the use of heat, light, shear, and pH triggers as applied in several model polymeric systems for inducing active release. The goal is that through this review trends will emerge for how technologies can be better developed to maximize their value through industrial adaptation.

  15. Diffraction in ALICE and trigger efficiencies

    CERN Document Server

    Navin, Sparsh; Lietava, Roman

    ALICE is built to measure the properties of strongly interacting matter created in heavy-ion collisions. In addition, taking advantage of the low pT acceptance in the central barrel, ALICE is playing an important role in understanding pp collisions with minimum bias triggers at LHC energies. The work presented in this thesis is based on pp data simulated by the ALICE collaboration and early data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. A procedure to calculate trigger efficiencies and an estimate of the systematic uncertainty due to the limited acceptance of the detector are shown. A kinematic comparison between Monte Carlo event generators, PYTHIA 6, PYTHIA 8 and PHOJET is also presented. To improve the description of diffraction in PYTHIA, a hard diffractive component was added to PYTHIA 8 in 2009, which is described. Finally a trigger with a high efficiency for picking diffractive events is used to select a sample with an enhanced diffractive component from pp data. These data are compared to Monte ...

  16. Clinical implication of latent myofascial trigger point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Derya; Mutlu, Ebru Kaya

    2013-08-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are hyperirritable points located within a taut band of skeletal muscle or fascia, which cause referred pain, local tenderness and autonomic changes when compressed. There are fundamental differences between the effects produced by the two basic types of MTrPs (active and latent). Active trigger points (ATrPs) usually produce referred pain and tenderness. In contrast, latent trigger points (LTrPs) are foci of hyperirritability in a taut band of muscle, which are clinically associated with a local twitch response, tenderness and/or referred pain upon manual examination. LTrPs may be found in many pain-free skeletal muscles and may be "activated" and converted to ATrPs by continuous detrimental stimuli. ATrPs can be inactivated by different treatment strategies; however, they never fully disappear but rather convert to the latent form. Therefore, the diagnosis and treatment of LTrPs is important. This review highlights the clinical implication of LTrPs.

  17. Surgical Treatment of Trigger Finger: Open Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, open A1 pulley release results were evaluated in patients with a trigger finger diagnosis. 45 patients (29 females, 16 males, mean age 50.7 ± 11.9; range (24-79, 45 trigger fingers were released via open surgical technique. On the 25 of 45 cases were involved in the right hand and 16 of them were at the thumb, 2 at index, 6 at the middle and 1 at ring finger. Similarly, at the left hand, 15 of 20 cases were at the thumb, 1 at the index finger, 2 at middle finger and 2 at ring finger. Average follow-up time was 10.2 ± 2.7 (range, 6-15 months. Comorbidities in patients were; diabetes mellitus at 6 cases (13.3%, hypertension at 11 cases (24.4%, hyperthyroidism at 2 cases (4.4%, dyslipidemia at 2 cases (4.4% and lastly 2 cases had carpal tunnel syndrome operation. The mean time between the onset of symptoms to surgery was 6.9 ± 4.8 (range, 2-24 months. Patient satisfaction was very good in 34 cases (75.4% and good in 11 (24.6% patients. The distance between the pulpa of the operated finger and the palm was normal in every case postoperatively. We have not encountered any postoperative complications. We can recommend that; A1 pulley release via open incision is an effective and reliable method in trigger finger surgery.

  18. The ATLAS Level-2 Trigger Pilot Project

    CERN Document Server

    Blair, R; Haberichter, W N; Schlereth, J L; Bock, R; Bogaerts, A; Boosten, M; Dobinson, Robert W; Dobson, M; Ellis, Nick; Elsing, M; Giacomini, F; Knezo, E; Martin, B; Shears, T G; Tapprogge, Stefan; Werner, P; Hansen, J R; Wäänänen, A; Korcyl, K; Lokier, J; George, S; Green, B; Strong, J; Clarke, P; Cranfield, R; Crone, G J; Sherwood, P; Wheeler, S; Hughes-Jones, R E; Kolya, S; Mercer, D; Hinkelbein, C; Kornmesser, K; Kugel, A; Männer, R; Müller, M; Sessler, M; Simmler, H; Singpiel, H; Abolins, M; Ermoline, Y; González-Pineiro, B; Hauser, R; Pope, B; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Boterenbrood, H; Jansweijer, P; Kieft, G; Scholte, R; Slopsema, R; Vermeulen, J C; Baines, J T M; Belias, A; Botterill, David R; Middleton, R; Wickens, F J; Falciano, S; Bystrický, J; Calvet, D; Gachelin, O; Huet, M; Le Dû, P; Mandjavidze, I D; Levinson, L; González, S; Wiedenmann, W; Zobernig, H

    2002-01-01

    The Level-2 Trigger Pilot Project of ATLAS, one of the two general purpose LHC experiments, is part of the on-going program to develop the ATLAS high-level triggers (HLT). The Level-2 Trigger will receive events at up to 100 kHz, which has to be reduced to a rate suitable for full event-building of the order of 1 kHz. To reduce the data collection bandwidth and processing power required for the challenging Level-2 task it is planned to use Region of Interest guidance (from Level-1) and sequential processing. The Pilot Project included the construction and use of testbeds of up to 48 processing nodes, development of optimized components and computer simulations of a full system. It has shown how the required performance can be achieved, using largely commodity components and operating systems, and validated an architecture for the Level-2 system. This paper describes the principal achievements and conclusions of this project. (28 refs).

  19. Characterization of consistent triggers of migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, Anne Werner; Kirchmann, Malene; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize perceived consistent triggers of migraine with aura (MA).......The aim of the present study was to characterize perceived consistent triggers of migraine with aura (MA)....

  20. Diverticulitis Diet: Can Certain Foods Trigger an Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there trigger foods I should avoid to prevent diverticulitis attacks? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L. ... Actually, no specific foods are known to trigger diverticulitis attacks. And no special diet has been proved ...

  1. GnRH agonist for triggering of final oocyte maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær; Kol, S; Papanikolaou, E G

    2011-01-01

    GnRH agonist (GnRHa) triggering has been shown to significantly reduce the occurrence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) compared with hCG triggering; however, initially a poor reproductive outcome was reported after GnRHa triggering, due to an apparently uncorrectable luteal phase...... deficiency. Therefore, the challenge has been to rescue the luteal phase. Studies now report a luteal phase rescue, with a reproductive outcome comparable to that seen after hCG triggering....

  2. Trigger pointy v širších souvislostech

    OpenAIRE

    Sobotková, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Title: Terminology problems in myofascial trigger points concept Objectives: The main aim of this work is to organize information in the field of myofascial pain syndrome and myofascial trigger points, and to show unclearness in using terminology. Another aim is to describe trigger points from the view of the etiology, the diagnosis and the therapy. Subsidiary aim is to evaluate the relation among trigger points, tender points and acupuncture points. Methods: Design review was used in this th...

  3. Performance of e/gamma-based triggers at the CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Demiragli, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with the detector readout, offline storage and analysis capabilities. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS reconstruction and analysis software running on a computer farm.In order to achieve a good rate reduction with as little as possible impact on the physics efficiency, the algorithms used at HLT are designed to follow as closely as possible the ones used in the offline reconstruction. Here, we will present the algorithms used for the online reconstruction of electrons and photons, both at L1 and HLT, and their performance. We will show how some of these triggers contributed to the 2012 physics results. We will further prese...

  4. Performance of electron, photon and muon triggers at the CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069734

    2016-01-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with the detector readout, offline storage and analysis capabilities. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS reconstruction and analysis software running on a computer farm. Here we will present the design and performance of the main muon, electron and photon triggers, in view of the more challenging conditions for the LHC Run 2. For the muon case, we discuss the improvements in the isolation algorithm with the usage of Particle Flow techniques, which allow for better discrimination power between processes with prompt muons and the the effect of jets penetrating through the hadronic calorimeter into the muon chambers. For the ele...

  5. Performance of the ATLAS Tau Trigger in Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Ikai, Takashi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    As proton-proton collisions at the LHC reach instantaneous luminosities of over 10^{34}cm^{-2}s{-1}, tau trigger operation is more challenging. Hadronic tau trigger plays a important role and is used to measure Yukawa coupling constant and to search physics of Beyond Standard Model. This presents tau trigger system, operation, performance in Run2 and strategy in the future.

  6. Chemiluminescent reductive acridinium triggering (CRAT) - mechanism and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooter, I.M.; Jedynska, A.D.; Zomer, B.; Collé, L.; Pasterkamp, G.; Bloemen, H.

    2011-01-01

    Acridinium esters traditionally are triggered using basic hydrogen peroxide. By serendipity, we have found that acridinium esters can also be triggered with emission of chemiluminescence by reductive triggering, e.g., by zinc metal or reduced forms of ferric and cupric salts. Furthermore, organic

  7. Landslide database dominated by rainfall triggered events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoli, G.; Strauch, W.; Álvarez, A.

    2009-04-01

    A digital landslide database has been created for Nicaragua to provide the scientific community and national authorities with a tool for landslide hazard assessment. Valuable information on landslide events has been obtained from a great variety of sources. On the basis of the data stored in the database, preliminary analyses performed at national scale aimed to characterize landslides in terms of spatial and temporal distribution, types of slope movements, triggering mechanisms, number of casualties and damage to infrastructure. A total of about 17000 events spatially distributed in mountainous and volcanic terrains have been collected in the database. The events are temporally distributed between 1826 and 2003, but a large number of the records (62% of the total number) occurred during the disastrous Hurricane Mitch in October 1998. The results showed that debris flows are the most common types of landslides recorded in the database (66% of the total amount), but other types, including rockfalls and slides, have also been identified. Rainfall, also associated with tropical cyclones, is the most frequent triggering mechanism of landslides in Nicaragua, but also seismic and volcanic activities are important triggers or, especially, the combination of one of them with rainfall. Rainfall has caused all types of failures, but debris flows and translational shallow slides are more frequent types. Earthquakes have most frequently triggered rockfalls and slides, while volcanic eruptions rockfalls and debris flows. Landslides triggered by rainfall were limited in time to the wet season that lasts from May to October and an increase in the number of events is observed during the months of September and October, which is in accord with the period of the rainy season in the Pacific and Northern and Central regions and when the country has the highest probability of being impacted by hurricanes. Both Atlantic and Pacific tropical cyclones have triggered landslides. At the

  8. Performance of e/$\\gamma$-based Triggers at the CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00238076

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS reconstruction and analysis software running on a computer farm. In order to achieve a good rate reduction with as little as possible impact on the physics efficiency, the algorithms used at HLT are designed to follow as closely as possible the ones used in the offline reconstruction. Here, we will present the algorithms used for the online reconstruction of electrons and photons (e/$\\gamma$), both at L1 and HLT, and their performance and the planned improvements of these HLT objects.

  9. New methods for trigger electronics development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, W.E.; Stern, E.G. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The large and complex nature of RHIC experiments and the tight time schedule for their construction requires that new techniques for designing the electronics should be employed. This is particularly true of the trigger and data acquisition electronics which has to be ready for turn-on of the experiment. We describe the use of the Workview package from VIEWlogic Inc. for design, simulation, and verification of a flash ADC readout system. We also show how field-programmable gate arrays such as the Xilinx 4000 might be employed to construct or prototype circuits with a large number of gates while preserving flexibility.

  10. Boredom and Passion: Triggers of Habitual Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sabine; Neergaard, Helle

    . The case based, the study identifies eight factors, which contribute to consecutive venture creation. The findings suggest that boredom and passion are necessary conditions triggering habitual entrepreneurship. Other important mechanisms included the joy of discovering and exploiting an opportunity......To date, habitual entrepreneurship research has mainly focused on comparing novice with habitual business founders and creating typologies. The purpose of this paper is to examine and explain the underlying reasons why habitual entrepreneurs establish new businesses repeatedly and continually......, the need for continuous achievement, and entrepreneurship as a  meaningful choice of career....

  11. Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria‐triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self‐regulating system provides the basis for the development of device‐relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics...... in dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  12. Bacteria‐Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen‐Chi; Tolker‐Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria‐triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self‐regulating system provides the basis for the development of device‐relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics...... in dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  13. Data analysis at the CMS level-1 trigger: migrating complex selection algorithms from offline analysis and high-level trigger to the trigger electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wulz, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    With ever increasing luminosity at the LHC, optimum online data selection is becoming more and more important. While in the case of some experiments (LHCb and ALICE) this task is being completely transferred to computer farms, the others -- ATLAS and CMS -- will not be able to do this in the medium-term future for technological, detector-related reasons. Therefore, these experiments pursue the complementary approach of migrating more and more of the offline and high-level trigger intelligence into the trigger electronics. The presentation illustrates how the level-1 trigger of the CMS experiment and in particular its concluding stage, the so-called ``Global Trigger", take up this challenge.

  14. Empty follicle syndrome after GnRHa triggering versus hCG triggering in COS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Juan C; Garcia-Velasco, Juan; Humaidan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the incidence of empty follicle syndrome (EFS) in oocyte donors who had final oocyte maturation triggered with GnRHa and to compare the incidence of EFS in this group of patients with IVF patients who had final oocyte maturation with hCG.......This study aimed to explore the incidence of empty follicle syndrome (EFS) in oocyte donors who had final oocyte maturation triggered with GnRHa and to compare the incidence of EFS in this group of patients with IVF patients who had final oocyte maturation with hCG....

  15. Agonist trigger: what is the best approach? Agonist trigger and low dose hCG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, Peter; Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær

    2012-01-01

    Low-dose hCG supplementation after GnRH agonist trigger may normalize reproductive outcome while minimizing the occurrence of OHSS in high risk IVF patients. (Fertil Steril (R) 2012;97:529-30. (C) 2012 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine.)......Low-dose hCG supplementation after GnRH agonist trigger may normalize reproductive outcome while minimizing the occurrence of OHSS in high risk IVF patients. (Fertil Steril (R) 2012;97:529-30. (C) 2012 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine.)...

  16. Sequences coding for the ribosomal protein L14 in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis; homologies in the 5' untranslated region are shared with other r-protein mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccari, E; Mazzetti, P; Mileo, A; Bozzoni, I; Pierandrei-Amaldi, P; Amaldi, F

    1986-01-01

    In the haploid genome of Xenopus laevis there are two genes coding for the r-protein L14. It is not known if they are located on the same chromosome. cDNA clones deriving from the transcripts of the two genes have been isolated from an oocyte messenger cDNA bank showing that they are both expressed. We have studied the structure of one of the L14 genes by Electron Microscopy, restriction mapping and sequencing. An allelic form of the L14 gene was also isolated. It contains a large deletion covering the 5' end region up to the middle of the third intron. The 5' end of the X. laevis L14 gene was compared to that of the corresponding gene in the closely related species X. tropicalis and found to be highly conserved. The L14 gene has multiple initiation sites, but the large majority of the transcripts start in the middle of a pyrimidine tract not preceded by a canonical TATA box as in other eukaryotic housekeeping genes. The X. laevis L1 and L14 genes have a common decanucleotide in the first exon in the same position with regard to the initiator ATG which just precedes the first intron. The decanucleotide shows homology with the X. laevis 18S rRNA. Images PMID:3774540

  17. Simulation of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Trigger Sysmtem

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Tomoyuki; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the original design value to explore higher energy scale. In order to benefit from the expected high luminosity performance, the first station of the ATLAS muon end-cap Small Wheel system will be replaced by a New Small Wheel (NSW) detector. The NSW provide precise track segment information to the muon Level-1 trigger to reduce fake triggers. This contribution will summarize a detail of the NSW trigger decision system, track reconstruction algorithm implemented into the trigger processor and results of performance studies on the trigger system.

  18. ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade for Phase-I

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Trigger requires several upgrades to maintain physics sensitivity as the LHC luminosity is raised. One of the most challenging is the electron trigger, with a major development planned for installation in 2018. New on-detector electronics will be installed to digitize electromagnetic calorimetry signals, providing trigger access to shower profile information. The trigger processing will be ATCA-based, with each multi-FPGA module processing ~1 Tbit/s of calorimeter digits within the current 2.5 microseconds Level-1 Trigger latency limit. This paper will address the system architecture and design, and give the status of a current technology demonstrator.

  19. SQL Triggers Reacting on Time Events: An Extension Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, Andreas; Dorau, Christian; Manthey, Rainer

    Being able to activate triggers at timepoints reached or after time intervals elapsed has been acknowledged by many authors as a valuable functionality of a DBMS. Recently, the interest in time-based triggers has been renewed in the context of data stream monitoring. However, up till now SQL triggers react to data changes only, even though research proposals and prototypes have been supporting several other event types, in particular time-based ones, since long. We therefore propose a seamless extension of the SQL trigger concept by time-based triggers, focussing on semantic issues arising from such an extension.

  20. Progress in the High Level Trigger Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Cristobal Padilla

    2007-01-01

    During the week from March 19th to March 23rd, the DAQ/HLT group performed another of its technical runs. On this occasion the focus was on integrating the Level 2 and Event Filter triggers, with a much fuller integration of HLT components than had been done previously. For the first time this included complete trigger slices, with a menu to run the selection algorithms for muons, electrons, jets and taus at the Level-2 and Event Filter levels. This Technical run again used the "Pre-Series" system (a vertical slice prototype of the DAQ/HLT system, see the ATLAS e-news January issue for details). Simulated events, provided by our colleagues working in the streaming tests, were pre-loaded into the ROS (Read Out System) nodes. These are the PC's where the data from the detector is stored after coming out of the front-end electronics, the "first part of the TDAQ system" and the interface to the detectors. These events used a realistic beam interaction mixture and had been subjected to a Level-1 selection. The...