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Sample records for testosterone replacement therapy

  1. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Sahar

    2016-04-01

    As testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has emerged as a commonly prescribed therapy for symptomatic low testosterone, conflicting data have been reported in terms of both its efficacy and potential adverse outcomes. One of the most controversial associations has been that of TRT and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review briefly provides background on the history of TRT, the indications for TRT, and the data behind TRT for symptomatic low testosterone. It then specifically delves into the rather limited data for cardiovascular outcomes of those with low endogenous testosterone and those who receive TRT. The available body of literature strongly suggests that more work, by way of clinical trials, needs to be done to better understand the impact of testosterone and TRT on the cardiovascular system.

  2. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, M Iftekhar; Riche, Daniel M; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule. PMID:24470750

  3. The benefits and risks of testosterone replacement therapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazem Bassil

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nazem Bassil1, Saad Alkaade2, John E Morley1,31Division of Geriatric Medicine; 2Internal Medicine, Saint Louis University Health Sciences Center, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; 3GRECC, VA Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri, USAAbstract: Increased longevity and population aging will increase the number of men with late onset hypogonadism. It is a common condition, but often underdiagnosed and undertreated. The indication of testosterone-replacement therapy (TRT treatment requires the presence of low testosterone level, and symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Although controversy remains regarding indications for testosterone supplementation in aging men due to lack of large-scale, long-term studies assessing the benefits and risks of testosterone-replacement therapy in men, reports indicate that TRT may produce a wide range of benefits for men with hypogonadism that include improvement in libido and sexual function, bone density, muscle mass, body composition, mood, erythropoiesis, cognition, quality of life and cardiovascular disease. Perhaps the most controversial area is the issue of risk, especially possible stimulation of prostate cancer by testosterone, even though no evidence to support this risk exists. Other possible risks include worsening symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, liver toxicity, hyperviscosity, erythrocytosis, worsening untreated sleep apnea or severe heart failure. Despite this controversy, testosterone supplementation in the United States has increased substantially over the past several years. The physician should discuss with the patient the potential benefits and risks of TRT. The purpose of this review is to discuss what is known and not known regarding the benefits and risks of TRT.Keywords: hypogonadism, testosterone replacement therapy, erectile dysfunction, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease

  4. Testosterone replacement therapy in the climacteric: benefits beyond sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Hugo; Casoy, Julio; Valente, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Testosterone therapy during menopause has a wide range of benefits that reach beyond the realm of human sexuality. This is a consequence not only of the widespread distribution of androgen receptors in various extragonadal tissues but also of the conversion of androgens to estrogens in the tissues in which aromatase expression is present. For this reason, testosterone therapy during the climacteric years will not only supply androgens but will also stimulate estrogen production in tissues that express aromatase. Furthermore, the bioavailability of androgens to the tissues depends not only on the rate of their production by the postmenopausal ovaries and adrenals but also on the circulating levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Tibolone inhibits SHBG production in the liver, thus increasing free testosterone levels. The association of tibolone with testosterone as a form of androgen replacement therapy during the climacteric is discussed, as is the use of low-dose testosterone, tibolone or the association of both in perimenopausal patients with signs of androgen deficiency. Testosterone treatment has a boosting effect not only on human sexuality but also on the sensation of well-being, a stimulatory effect conferred by the increase in beta-endorphins.

  5. Testosterone replacement therapy for treatment refractory cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Mark J

    2006-06-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics and laboratory findings of cluster headache patients whose headaches responded to testosterone replacement therapy. Current evidence points to hypothalamic dysfunction, with increased metabolic hyperactivity in the region of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, as being important in the genesis of cluster headaches. This is clinically borne out in the circadian and diurnal behavior of these headaches. For years it has been recognized that male cluster headache patients appear overmasculinized. Recent neuroendocrine and sleep studies now point to an association between gonadotropin and corticotropin levels and hypothalamically entrained pineal secretion of melatonin. Seven male and 2 female patients, seen between July 2004 and February 2005, and between the ages of 32 and 56, are reported with histories of treatment resistant cluster headaches accompanied by borderline low or low serum testosterone levels. The patients failed to respond to individually tailored medical regimens, including melatonin doses of 12 mg a day or higher, high flow oxygen, maximally tolerated verapamil, antiepileptic agents, and parenteral serotonin agonists. Seven of the 9 patients met 2004 International Classification for the Diagnosis of Headache criteria for chronic cluster headaches; the other 2 patients had episodic cluster headaches of several months duration. After neurological and physical examination all patients had laboratory investigations including fasting lipid panel, PSA (where indicated), LH, FSH, and testosterone levels (both free and total). All 9 patients demonstrated either abnormally low or low, normal testosterone levels. After supplementation with either pure testosterone in 5 of 7 male patients or combination testosterone/estrogen therapy in both female patients, the patients achieved cluster headache freedom for the first 24 hours. Four male chronic cluster patients, all with abnormally low testosterone levels, achieved remission

  6. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Mortality in Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, G I

    2016-02-01

    While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the last decade with lower trends in Europe, debate continues over the risks, benefits and appropriate use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Several authors blame advertising and the availability of more convenient formulations, whilst others have pointed out that the routine testing of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) (a significant marker of cardiovascular risk) and those with diabetes would inevitably increase the diagnosis of hypogonadism and lead to an increase in totally appropriate prescribing. They commented that this was merely an appropriate correction of previous under-diagnosis and under-treatment in line with evidence based guidelines. It is unlikely that persuasive advertising or convenient formulations could grow a market over such a sustained period if the treatment was not effective. Urologists and primary care physicians are the most frequent initiators of TRT usually for ED. Benefits are clearly established for sexual function, increase in lean muscle mass and strength, mood and cognitive function, with a possible reduction in frailty and osteoporosis. There remains no evidence that TRT is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer or symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, yet the decision to initiate and continue therapy is often decided by urologists. The cardiovascular issues associated with TRT have been clarified by recent studies showing that therapy associated with clear increases in serum testosterone levels to the normal range is associated with reduced all-cause mortality. Studies reporting to show increased risk have been subject to flawed designs with inadequate baseline diagnosis and follow-up testing. Effectively, they have compared non-treated patients with under-treated or non-compliant subjects involving a range of different therapy regimes. Recent evidence suggests long-acting injections may be associated with decreased cardiovascular risk, but the

  7. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Polycythemia in HIV-infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkas, Charles Kyriakos; Vaamonde, Carlos M.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to assess testosterone use as a primary risk factor for polycythemia in 21 HIV-infected men. Any testosterone use within two months of first elevated hemoglobin was associated with polycythemia (matched odds ratio 6.55; 95% CI 1.83-23.4; P=0.004) and intramuscular administration demonstrated a stronger association than topical use. No adverse cardiovascular or thrombotic events were observed. HIV-infected patients taking testosterone should undergo routine hematologic monitoring with adjustment of therapy when appropriate. PMID:22008652

  8. An update on the role of testosterone replacement therapy in the management of hypogonadism

    OpenAIRE

    Hackett, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the last decade with lower trends in Europe, debate continues over the risks, benefits and appropriate use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Some authors blame advertising and the availability of more convenient formulations whilst other have pointed out that the routine testing of men with erectile dysfunction (a significant marker of cardiovascular risk) and those with diabetes would inevitably increase the diagnosis of hypogonadi...

  9. Testosterone Replacement Therapy: Long-Term Safety and Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corona

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent position statements and guidelines have raised the distinction between a true and false, age-related hypogonadism (HG or late-onset hypogonadism (LOH. The former is the consequence of congenital or acquired “organic” damage of the brain centers or of the testis. The latter is mainly secondary to age-related comorbidities and does not require testosterone (T therapy (TTh. In addition, concerns related to cardiovascular (CV safety have further increased the scepticism related to TTh. In this paper, we reviewed the available evidence supporting the efficacy of TTh in non-organic HG and its long term safety. A large amount of evidence has documented that sexual symptoms are the most specific correlates of T deficiency. TTh is able to improve all aspects of sexual function independent of the pathogenetic origin of the disease supporting the scientific demonstration that LOH does exist according to an “ex-juvantibus” criterion. Although the presence of metabolic derangements could mitigate the efficacy of TTh on erectile dysfunction, the positive effect of TTh on body composition and insulin sensitivity might counterbalance the lower efficacy. CV safety concerns related to TTh are essentially based on a limited number of observational and randomized controlled trials which present important methodological flaws. When HG is properly diagnosed and TTh correctly performed no CV and prostate risk have been documented.

  10. Development of a men's Preference for Testosterone Replacement Therapy (P-TRT instrument

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    Szeinbach SL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sheryl L Szeinbach,1 Enrique Seoane-Vazquez,2 Kent H Summers31Ohio State University, College of Pharmacy, Columbus, OH, USA; 2International Center for Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Boston, MA, 3Endo Health Solutions, Chadds Ford, PA, USABackground: This study used a standard research approach to create a final conceptual model and the Preference for the Testosterone Replacement Therapy (P-TRT instrument.Methods: A discussion guide was developed from a literature review and expert opinion to direct one-on-one interviews with participants who used testosterone replacement therapy and consented to participate in the study. Data from telephone interviews were transcribed for theme analysis using NVivo 9 qualitative analysis software, analyzed descriptively from a saturation grid, and used to evaluate men's P-TRT. Data from cognitive debriefing for five participants were used to evaluate the final conceptual model and validate the initial P-TRT instrument.Results: Item saturation and theme exhaustion was achieved by 58 male participants of mean age 55.0 ± 10.0 (22–69 years who had used testosterone replacement therapy for a mean of 175.0 ± 299.2 days. The conceptual model was developed from items and themes obtained from the participant interviews and saturation grid. Items comprising eight dimensions were used for instrument development, ie, ease of use, effect on libido, product characteristics, physiological impact, psychological impact, side effects, treatment experience, and preference. Results from the testosterone replacement therapy preference evaluation provide a detailed insight into why most men preferred a topical gel product over an injection or patch.Conclusion: Items and themes relating to use of testosterone replacement therapy were in concordance with the final conceptual model and 29-item P-TRT instrument. The standard research approach used in this study produced the

  11. Testosterone replacement therapy among elderly males: the Testim Registry in the US (TRiUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya RK

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rajib K Bhattacharya,1 Mohit Khera,2 Gary Blick,3 Harvey Kushner,4 Martin M Miner51Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA; 2Scott Department of Urology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Circle Medical LLC, Norwalk, CT, USA; 4Biometrics, Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Malvern, PA, USA; 5Men's Health Center, Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USABackground: Testosterone levels naturally decline with age in men, often resulting in testosterone deficiency (hypogonadism. However, few studies have examined hypogonadal characteristics and treatment in older (≥65 years men.Objective: To compare data at baseline and after 12 months of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT in hypogonadal men ≥65 vs <65 years old. Data for participants 65–74 vs ≥75 years old were also compared.Methods: Data were from TRiUS (Testim Registry in the United States, which enrolled 849 hypogonadal men treated with Testim® 1% (50–100 mg testosterone gel/day for the first time. Anthropometric, laboratory, and clinical measures were taken at baseline and 12 months, including primary outcomes of total testosterone (TT, free testosterone (FT, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels. Comparisons of parameters were made using Fisher's exact test or analysis of variance. Nonparametric Spearman's ρ and first-order partial correlation coefficients adjusted for the effect of age were used to examine bivariate correlations among parameters.Results: Of the registry participants at baseline with available age information, 16% (133/845 were ≥65 years old. They were similar to men <65 years old in the duration of hypogonadism prior to enrollment (~1 year, TT and FT levels at baseline, TT and FT levels at 12-month follow-up, and in reported compliance with treatment. Older patients were more likely to receive lower doses of TRT. PSA levels did not statistically differ between groups after 12 months of TRT (2.18 ± 2.18 ng

  12. 'Forever Young'-Testosterone replacement therapy: a blockbuster drug despite flabby evidence and broken promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busnelli, Andrea; Somigliana, Edgardo; Vercellini, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been increasingly prescribed to treat a controversial condition known as 'late-onset hypogonadism (LOH)'. This syndrome is diagnosed in men who, for no discernible reason other than older age, obesity or ill health have serum testosterone concentrations below the normal range for healthy young men and report one or more of the following symptoms: muscle weakness or wasting, mood, behaviour and cognition-related symptoms and sexual function or libido impairment. However, recent evidence has demonstrated that testosterone drugs do not substantially ameliorate these symptoms and, more worryingly, that their long-term use may be associated with severe adverse effects (i.e. increased risk of prostate cancer, stroke and myocardial infarction, worsening of benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms and testicular atrophy). Nonetheless, testosterone drugs have exhibited extraordinary commercial success and their pharmaceutical sales are steadily rising. Behind this apparently unjustifiable trend there are deliberate, well designed direct and indirect pharmaceutical marketing initiatives that exploit the conviction rooted in contemporary society that testosterone can reverse the effects of ageing and ensure social accomplishment. Commercial mechanisms have laid the foundation for disease mongering of LOH and also have resulted a considerable expansion of the indications for treatment. This promotion model deserves particular attention since it is applicable to any drug with a purportedly favourable risk-benefit ratio not supported by evidence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Survival and cardiovascular events in men treated with testosterone replacement therapy: an intention-to-treat observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Christopher J D; Lo, Kirk; Lee, Yuna; Krakowsky, Yonah; Garbens, Alaina; Satkunasivam, Raj; Herschorn, Sender; Kodama, Ronald T; Cheung, Patrick; Narod, Steven A; Nam, Robert K

    2016-06-01

    Conflicting evidence exists for the association between testosterone replacement therapy and mortality and cardiovascular events. The US Food and Drug Administration recently cautioned that testosterone replacement therapy might increase risk of heart attack and stroke, based on evidence from studies with short treatment duration and follow-up. No previous study has assessed the effect of duration of testosterone treatment on these outcomes. We aimed to assess the association between long-term use of testosterone replacement therapy and mortality, cardiovascular events, and prostate cancer diagnoses, using a time-varying exposure analysis. We did a population-based matched cohort study of men aged 66 years or older newly treated with testosterone replacement therapy and controls matched for age, region of residence, comorbidity, diabetes status, and index year from 2007-12 in Ontario, Canada, using data from the Ontario Drug Benefit database, the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) Discharge Abstract Database, the CIHI National Ambulatory Care Reporting System, the Ontario Health Insurance Plan database, the Ontario Myocardial Infarction Database, the Ontario Diabetes Database, the Ontario Cancer Registry, and the Registered Persons database. We assessed the association between cumulative testosterone replacement therapy exposure and mortality, cardiovascular events, and prostate cancer using marginal models with a time-varying testosterone exposure. We included 10 311 men treated with testosterone replacement therapy and 28 029 controls between Jan 1, 2007, and June 30, 2012. Over a median follow-up of 5·3 years (IQR 3·6-7·5) in the testosterone replacement therapy group and 5·1 years (3·4-7·4) in the control group, patients treated with testosterone replacement therapy had lower mortality than did controls (hazard ratio [HR] 0·88, 95% CI 0·84-0·93). Patients in the lowest tertile of testosterone exposure had increased risk of mortality

  14. Outcomes of Prostate Biopsy in Men with Hypogonadism Prior or During Testosterone Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Shoskes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The relationship between Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT and prostate cancer remains controversial. Most TRT studies show no change in prostate specific antigen (PSA but some men do have PSA rise or develop an abnormal digital rectal exam (aDRE. Our objective was to examine the biopsy results of men with symptomatic hypogonadism before or during therapy. Materials and Methods: Data was extracted from our medical record on men with hypogonadism who had a prostate biopsy within the past 4 years done by 3 Urologists with guideline driven practice patterns. Results: 96 men were identified. Mean age at biopsy was 63 (range 40–85 and median PSA was 3.78ng/dL (0.5–662. Of the 61 men not on TRT, median PSA was 4.34 (0.5 to 662 and mean total testosterone 254 (191–341. There were 29 (47.5% prostate cancers found (6 Gleason score 6, 13 Gleason score 7, 10 Gleason score 8 or 9. Of the 35 men on TRT, median PSA was 3.27 (0.5 to 13.7. The %PSA increase ranged from 2 to 251% (mean 93.5%. Mean total testosterone was 383 (146–792. Of the 14 men treated < 2 years, none had cancer. Of the 21 men treated 2 or more years 5 had cancer (2 Gleason score 6, 3 Gleason score 7. Conclusions: Men with hypogonadism and a clinical indication for biopsy often have prostate cancer, many high grade. No men with an initial PSA rise on TRT had cancer. Men on long term TRT should be monitored with PSA and DRE per guidelines.

  15. An update on the role of testosterone replacement therapy in the management of hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the last decade with lower trends in Europe, debate continues over the risks, benefits and appropriate use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Some authors blame advertising and the availability of more convenient formulations whilst other have pointed out that the routine testing of men with erectile dysfunction (a significant marker of cardiovascular risk) and those with diabetes would inevitably increase the diagnosis of hypogonadism and lead to an increase in totally appropriate prescribing. They commented that this was merely an appropriate correction of previous underdiagnosis and undertreatment by adherence to evidence-based guidelines. Urologists and primary care physicians are the most frequent initiators of TRT, usually for erectile dysfunction. Benefits are clearly established for sexual function, increase in lean muscle mass and strength, mood and cognitive function, with possible reduction in frailty and osteoporosis. There remains no evidence that TRT is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer or symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, yet the decision to initiate and continue therapy is often decided by urologists. The cardiovascular issues associated with TRT have been clarified by recent studies showing clearly that therapy associated with clear rise in testosterone levels are associated with reduced mortality. Studies reporting to show increased risk have been subject to flawed designs with inadequate baseline diagnosis and follow-up testing. Effectively they have compared nontreated patients with undertreated or on-compliant subjects involving a range of different therapy regimens. Recent evidence suggests long acting injections may be associated with decreased cardiovascular risk but the transdermal route may be associated with potentially relatively greater risk because of conversion to dihydrotestosterone by the effect of 5α reductase in skin. The multiple effects of TRT

  16. Testosterone replacement therapy improves the health-related quality of life of men diagnosed with late-onset hypogonadism

    OpenAIRE

    Almehmadi, Yousef; Yassin, Aksam A.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Saad, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) improves the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of men with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH), as studies have shown that sub-physiological testosterone levels have a negative impact on psychological (e.g. mood, vitality, libido and sexual interest) and physical features (e.g. erectile function and physical strength), all of which contribute to a sense of well-being. Patients and methods In all, 261 patien...

  17. Recovery of spermatogenesis following testosterone replacement therapy or anabolic-androgenic steroid use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Abram McBride

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT for hypogonadism continues to rise, particularly in younger men who may wish to remain fertile. Concurrently, awareness of a more pervasive use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS within the general population has been appreciated. Both TRT and AAS can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis resulting in diminution of spermatogenesis. Therefore, it is important that clinicians recognize previous TRT or AAS use in patients presenting for infertility treatment. Cessation of TRT or AAS use may result in spontaneous recovery of normal spermatogenesis in a reasonable number of patients if allowed sufficient time for recovery. However, some patients may not recover normal spermatogenesis or tolerate waiting for spontaneous recovery. In such cases, clinicians must be aware of the pathophysiologic derangements of the HPG axis related to TRT or AAS use and the pharmacologic agents available to reverse them. The available agents include injectable gonadotropins, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and aromatase inhibitors, but their off-label use is poorly described in the literature, potentially creating a knowledge gap for the clinician. Reviewing their use clinically for the treatment of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and other HPG axis abnormalities can familiarize the clinician with the manner in which they can be used to recover spermatogenesis after TRT or AAS use.

  18. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wender Nascimento Rouver

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium-dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM, castrated (CAST, castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin (BK was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO, L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT. We observed significant endothelium-dependent, BK-induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP.

  19. A randomized double-blind study of testosterone replacement therapy or placebo in testicular cancer survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency (Einstein-intervention)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, Mikkel; Jørgensen, Niels; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    with low grade inflammation and increased risk of metabolic syndrome. However, so far, no studies have evaluated whether testosterone substitution improves metabolic dysfunction in TC survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency. Methods/design: This is a single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo......Background: Elevated serum levels of luteinizing hormone and slightly decreased serum levels of testosterone (mild Leydig cell insufficiency) is a common hormonal disturbance in testicular cancer (TC) survivors. A number of studies have shown that low serum levels of testosterone is associated......-controlled study, designed to evaluate the effect of testosterone replacement therapy in TC survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency. Seventy subjects will be randomized to receive either testosterone replacement therapy or placebo. The subjects will be invited for an information meeting where informed...

  20. Testosterone replacement therapy improves the health-related quality of life of men diagnosed with late-onset hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almehmadi, Yousef; Yassin, Aksam A; Nettleship, Joanne E; Saad, Farid

    2016-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) improves the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of men with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH), as studies have shown that sub-physiological testosterone levels have a negative impact on psychological (e.g. mood, vitality, libido and sexual interest) and physical features (e.g. erectile function and physical strength), all of which contribute to a sense of well-being. In all, 261 patients (mean age 58 years) diagnosed with LOH were treated with long-acting intramuscular testosterone undecanoate (TU) for up to 5 years. Health quality indicators including the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5), the Aging Males' Symptoms (AMS) scale, and the percentage of patients reporting joint and muscle pain were measured at baseline and at each visit. The means were then plotted over time in parallel with mean total testosterone (TT) levels. Both the mean IPSS and AMS scores fell significantly within the first 3 months and the mean IIEF-5 score and TT levels increased within the first 3 months. All four parameters continued to improve over the course of the trial. The percentage of patients reporting both joint and muscle pain decreased during TRT. This prospective, observational and longitudinal analysis shows a clear improvement in both psychological and physical characteristics as physiological testosterone levels are reached and maintained contributing to an improvement in the HRQoL in men with diagnosed LOH.

  1. Treatment situation of male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in pediatrics and proposal of testosterone and gonadotropins replacement therapy protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Arisaka, Osamu; Ozono, Keiichi; Amemiya, Shin; Kikuchi, Toru; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Harada, Shohei; Miyata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (MHH), a disorder associated with infertility, is treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and/or gonadotropins replacement therapy (GRT) (TRT and GRT, together with HRT hormone replacement therapy). In Japan, guidelines have been set for treatment during adolescence. Due to the risk of rapid maturation of bone age, low doses of testosterone or gonadotropins have been used. However, the optimal timing and methods of therapeutic intervention have not yet been established. The objective of this study was to investigate the current situation of treatment for children with MHH in Japan and to review a primary survey involving councilors of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and a secondary survey obtained from 26 facilities conducting HRT. The subjects were 55 patients with MHH who reached their adult height after HRT. The breakdown of the patients is as follows: 7 patients with Kallmann syndrome, 6 patients with isolated gonadotropin deficiency, 18 patients with acquired hypopituitarism due to intracranial and pituitary tumor, 22 patients with classical idiopathic hypopituitarism due to breech delivery, and 2 patients with CHARGE syndrome. The mean age at the start of HRT was 15.7 yrs and mean height was 157.2 cm. The mean age at reaching adult height was 19.4 yrs, and the mean adult height was 171.0 cm. The starting age of HRT was later than the normal pubertal age and showed a significant negative correlation with pubertal height gain, but it showed no correlation with adult height. As for spermatogenesis, 76% of the above patients treated with hCG-rFSH combined therapy showed positive results, though ranging in levels; impaired spermatogenesis was observed in some with congenital MHH, and favorable spermatogenesis was observed in all with acquired MHH. From the above, we propose the establishment of a treatment protocol for the start low-dose testosterone or low-dose gonadotropins by dividing

  2. Dose-response analysis of testosterone replacement therapy in patients with female to male gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Aya; Watanabe, Masami; Sugimoto, Morito; Sako, Tomoko; Mahmood, Sabina; Kaku, Haruki; Nasu, Yasutomo; Ishii, Kazushi; Nagai, Atsushi; Kumon, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID) is a conflict between a person's actual physical gender and the one they identify him or herself with. Testosterone is the key agent in the medical treatment of female to male GID patients. We conducted a dose-response analysis of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in 138 patients to determine the onset of the therapeutic effects. The TRT consisted of intramuscular injection of testosterone enanthate and patients were divided into three groups; 250 mg every two weeks, 250 mg every three weeks and 125 mg every two weeks. The onset of deepening of voice, increase in facial hair and cessation of menses was evaluated in each group. At one month after the start of TRT, the onset of these physical changes was more prevalent in the group receiving the higher dose of testosterone, and there were dose-dependent effects observed between the three treatment groups. On the other hand, at six months after the start of TRT, most of the patients had achieved treatment responses and there were no dose-dependent effects with regard to the percentage of patients with therapeutic effects. No significant side effects were observed in any of the treatment groups. We demonstrated that the early onset of the treatment effects of TRT is dose-dependent, but within six months of starting TRT, all three doses were highly effective. Current study provides useful information to determine the initial dose of TRT and to suggest possible changes that should be made in the continuous dosage for long term TRT.

  3. Testosterone replacement therapy in hypogonadal men is associated with increased expression of LAMP-2 (CD107b) by circulating monocytes and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, J J; Almeida, M; Martín-Martín, L; Miralles, J M; Orfao, A

    2014-04-01

    Accumulated experimental data indicates that androgen therapy has effects on inflammation and protects from autoimmune disorders. Despite this, the in vivo effects of testosterone replacement therapy on human antigen-presenting cells-for example, monocytes and dendritic cells- remain unknown. We monitored the effects of testosterone replacement therapy on the number and the functionality -as assessed by the expression of CD107b (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2, LAMP-2)- of resting and in vitro-stimulated peripheral blood (classical and nonclassical) monocytes and dendritic cells (myeloid and plasmacytoid) from hypogonadal men. Our results show that testosterone replacement therapy induces overexpression of CD107b by circulating monocytes and dendritic cells from hypogonadal men, both under resting (i.e. nonstimulated) conditions and after in vitro stimulation. CD107b overexpression mostly involved monocytes and in vitro stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. Of note, a strong correlation was found between CD107b expression on monocytes and serum gonadotrophins levels. These results support the existence of an effect of testosterone therapy, and potentially also of gonadotrophins, on circulating antigen-presenting cells. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hypogonadism and testosterone replacement theraphy: the controversy and the evidence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    ... with energy loss; impaired cognition; decreased bone density, muscle mass, and strength; and sexual dysfunction. (2) In addition, low serum testosterone levels have been linked with an adverse metabolic profile and increased mortality of all causes (3,4) Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is available in several formulations that are approved by ...

  5. The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor axis during testosterone replacement therapy in GH-treated hypopituitary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Nørrelund, Helene; Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    in relation to two testosterone injections. Mean baseline IGF-I levels were 352 +/- 135 microg/L, and they remained unaltered during the study period (analysis of variance (ANOVA), P = 0.88). Free IGF-I levels did not change either (ANOVA, P = 0.35). Serum IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and acid...... (ANOVA, P = 0.08). Prostate-specific antigen tended slightly to increase after each testosterone injection (ANOVA, P = 0.08, post hoc, NS). We conclude that major changes in total IGF-I are not induced during conventional intramuscular testosterone replacement in GH-treated hypopituitary males......, suggesting that testosterone effects on IGF-I are likely to be secondary to a stimulation of endogenous GH release....

  6. Association of Testosterone Replacement Therapy and the Incidence of a Composite of Postoperative In-hospital Mortality and Cardiovascular Events in Men Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argalious, Maged Y; You, Jing; Mao, Guangmei; Ramos, Daniel; Khanna, Sandeep; Maheshwari, Kamal; Trombetta, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    Whether patients on testosterone replacement therapy undergoing noncardiac surgery have an increased risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular events remains unknown. We therefore sought to identify the impact of testosterone replacement on the incidence of a composite of postoperative in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular events in men undergoing noncardiac surgery. Data from male American Society of Anesthesiologists I through IV patients 40 yr or older who underwent noncardiac surgery between May 2005 and December 2015 at the Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio) main campus were included. The primary exposure was preoperative testosterone use. The primary outcome was a composite of postoperative in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular events. We compared patients who received testosterone and those who did not using propensity score matching within surgical procedure matches. Among 49,273 patients who met inclusion and exclusion criteria, 947 patients on testosterone were matched to 4,598 nontestosterone patients. The incidence of in-hospital mortality was 1.3% in the testosterone group and 1.1% in the nontestosterone group, giving an odds ratio of 1.17 (99% CI, 0.51 to 2.68; P = 0.63). The incidence of myocardial infarction was 0.2% in the testosterone group and 0.6% in the nontestosterone group (odds ratio = 0.34; 99% CI, 0.05 to 2.28; P = 0.15). Similarly, no significant difference was found in stroke (testosterone vs. nontestosterone: 2.0% vs. 2.1%), pulmonary embolism (0.5% vs. 0.7%), or deep venous thrombosis (2.0% vs. 1.7%). Preoperative testosterone is not associated with an increased incidence of a composite of postoperative in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular events.

  7. Testosterone replacement therapy promotes angiogenesis after acute myocardial infarction by enhancing expression of cytokines HIF-1a, SDF-1a and VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yeping; Fu, Lu; Han, Ying; Teng, Yueqiu; Sun, Junfeng; Xie, Rongsheng; Cao, Junxian

    2012-06-05

    In order to investigate the effects of testosterone-replacement therapy on peripheral blood stem cells and angiogenesis after acute myocardial infarction, a castrated rat acute myocardial infarction model was established by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary followed by treatment with testosterone. CD34(+) cells in myocardium and in peripheral blood after 1 and 3 days were measured by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, respectively. In the early phase of acute myocardial infarction, the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF-1a), stromal cell-derived factor 1a (SDF-1a) and vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) in ischemic myocardium were determined by real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Infarct size, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, capillary density and cardiac function were assessed after 28 days. These results showed that the number of CD34(+) cells in the peripheral blood and in myocardium was significantly decreased in castrated rats, and the early expression levels of HIF-1a, SDF-1a and VEGF in the myocardium were also decreased. Furthermore, reduced capillary density, worsened cardiac function, increased infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis at 28 days post-infarction were found in castrated rats. But these adverse effects could be reversed by testosterone-replacement therapy. These findings suggested that testosterone can increase the mobilization and homing of CD34(+) cells into the ischemic myocardium and further promote neoangiogenesis after myocardial infarction. The pro-angiogenesis effect of testosterone-replacement therapy is associated with the enhanced expression of HIF-1a, SDF-1a and VEGF in myocardium after myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of 12 months of testosterone replacement therapy on metabolic syndrome components in hypogonadal men: data from the Testim Registry in the US (TRiUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushner Harvey

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that there may be a bidirectional, physiological link between hypogonadism and metabolic syndrome (MetS, and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT has been shown to improve some symptoms of MetS in small patient populations. We examined the effect of 12 months of TRT on MetS components in a large cohort of hypogonadal men. Methods Data were obtained from TRiUS (Testim® Registry in the United States, a 12-month, multicenter, prospective observational registry (N = 849 of hypogonadal men prescribed Testim 1% testosterone gel (5-10 g/day. Data analyzed included age, total testosterone (TT, free testosterone (FT, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG, and MetS components: waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, plasma triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol. Results Of evaluable patients (581/849 at baseline, 37% were MetS+ (n = 213 and 63% were MetS- (n = 368. MetS+ patients had significantly lower TT (p Conclusion Hypogonadal MetS+ patients were more likely than their MetS- counterparts to have lower baseline TT levels and present with more comorbid conditions. MetS+ patients and those in the lowest TT quartile showed improvement in some metabolic syndrome components after 12 months of TRT. While it is currently unclear if further cardiometabolic benefit can be seen with longer TRT use in this population, testing for low testosterone may be warranted in MetS+ men with hypogonadal symptoms.

  9. Testosterone replacement therapy improves health-related quality of life for patients with late-onset hypogonadism: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Y; Ding, M; Hu, S; He, H; Cheng, S; Yi, L; Li, Y; Wang, Y

    2017-05-01

    Although testosterone replacement therapy can restore serum testosterone concentrations to normal level in late-onset hypogonadism patients, whether it can improve patients' quality of life remains uncertain. Therefore, we perform a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials on this issue. Five randomized controlled trials total 1,212 patients were included. Fixed-effect model was used to calculate the weighted mean difference of score of Aging Males' Symptom rating scale. Our result reveals that testosterone replacement therapy improves patients' health-related quality of life in terms of the decrease in the AMS total score [WMD = -2.96 (-4.21, -1.71), p < .00001] and the psychological [WMD = -0.89 (-1.41, -0.37), p = .0008], somatic [WMD = -0.89 (-1.41, -0.37), p = .0008] and sexual [WMD = -1.29 (-1.75, -0.83), p < .00001] subscale score. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Effects of testosterone replacement therapy on bone metabolism in male post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: focus on the role of androgen receptor CAG polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, G; delli Muti, N; Gioia, A; Biagioli, A; Lenzi, A; Balercia, G

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between androgen receptor (AR) CAG polymorphism and bone metabolism is highly controversial. We, therefore, aimed to evaluate the independent role of AR CAG repeat polymorphism on bone metabolism improvement induced by testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in male post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition frequently associated with hypopituitarism and in which the effects of TRT have to be distinguished from those resulting from concomitant administration of pituitary function replacing hormones. 12 men affected by post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism [mean duration of hypogonadism 8.3 ± 2.05 (SD) months] were retrospectively assessed before and after TRT (from 74 to 84 weeks after the beginning of therapy). The following measures were studied: parameters of bone metabolism [serum markers and bone mineral density (BMD)], pituitary dependent hormones and genetic analysis (AR CAG repeat number). Total testosterone, estradiol, free T4 (FT4) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased between the two phases, while follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) decreased. While serum markers did not vary significantly between the two phases, BMD improved slightly but significantly in all the studied sites. The number of CAG triplets correlated negatively and significantly with all the variations (Δ-) of BMDs. Conversely, Δ-testosterone correlated positively and significantly with all studied Δ-BMDs, while Δ-FSH, Δ-estradiol, Δ-FT4, and Δ-IGF-1 did not correlate significantly with any of the Δ-BMDs. Multiple linear regression analysis, after correction for Δ-testosterone, showed that CAG repeat length was negatively and significantly associated with ∆-BMD of all measured sites. Our data suggest that, in post-surgical male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, shorter AR CAG tract is independently associated with greater TRT-induced improvement of BMD.

  11. Effects of two-year testosterone replacement therapy on cognition, emotions and quality of life in young and middle-aged hypogonadal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lašaitė, L; Čeponis, J; Preikša, R T; Žilaitienė, B

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of two-year testosterone replacement therapy on cognitive functioning, emotional state and quality of life in young and middle-aged men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Nineteen males diagnosed with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism participated in the study. Cognitive functions were assessed by Trail Making Test and Digit Span Test of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. Emotional state was evaluated by Profile of Mood States. Quality of life was evaluated by WHO Brief Quality of Life Questionnaire. Changes after two-year testosterone replacement therapy were detected in Trail Making A (42.9 ± 22.3 vs. 36.2 ± 22.5, p = .050) and B (90.6 ± 55.3 vs. 65.6 ± 21.4, p = .025) tests, showing improvement in attention and visual scanning abilities, executive function and psychomotor speed, as well as in Digit Span Test forward score (5.4 ± 2.0 vs. 6.1 ± 2.6, p = .046), showing improvement in attention capacity and psychomotor speed. No significant differences were observed in emotional state and quality of life. In conclusion, beneficial effect in cognitive functioning (improved attention and visual scanning ability, executive function and psychomotor speed), but not in emotional state and quality of life, was observed in young and middle-aged hypogonadal men after two-year testosterone replacement therapy. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Effects of testosterone replacement therapy withdrawal and re-treatment in hypogonadal elderly men upon obesity, voiding function and prostate safety parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Aksam; Nettleship, Joanne E; Talib, Raidh A; Almehmadi, Yousef; Doros, Gheorge

    2016-01-01

    Whether testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is a lifelong treatment for men with hypogonadism remains unknown. We investigated long-term TRT and TRT withdrawal on obesity and prostate-related parameters. Two hundred and sixty-two hypogonadal patients (mean age 59.5) received testosterone undecanoate in 12-week intervals for a maximum of 11 years. One hundred and forty-seven men had TRT interrupted for a mean of 16.9 months and resumed thereafter (Group A). The remaining 115 patients were treated continuously (Group B). Prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), residual voiding volume, bladder wall thickness, C-reactive protein (CRP), aging male symptoms (AMS), International Index of erectile function - erectile function (IIEF-EF) and International Prostate Symptoms Scores (IPSS) were measured over the study period with anthropometric parameters of obesity, including weight, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Prior to interruption, TRT resulted in improvements in residual voiding volume, bladder wall thickness, CRP, AMS, IIEF-EF, IPSS and obesity parameters while PSA and prostate volume increased. TRT interruption reduced total testosterone to hypogonadal levels in Group A and resulted in worsening of obesity parameters, AMS, IPSS, residual voiding volume and bladder wall thickness, IIEF-EF and PSA while CRP and prostate volume were unchanged until treatment resumed whereby these effects were reversed. TRT interruption results in worsening of symptoms. Hypogonadism may require lifelong TRT.

  13. Testosterone replacement therapy with long-acting testosterone undecanoate improves sexual function and quality-of-life parameters vs. placebo in a population of men with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Geoffrey; Cole, Nigel; Bhartia, Mithun; Kennedy, David; Raju, Jessie; Wilkinson, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction, particularly erectile dysfunction (ED), is common in men with type 2 diabetes, occurring in up to 75% of cases. The prevalence of hypogonadism is also high in men with diabetes and low testosterone is associated with both sexual dysfunction and a reduced response to oral therapy for ED. This study aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement with long-acting Testosterone Undecanoate (TU) on sexual function, mood and quality of life vs. placebo over a treatment period of 30 weeks followed by 52 weeks of open-label medication. The study was conducted in a primary care population of men with type 2 diabetes attending their primary care physician for routine visits. The male diabetic populations of seven general practices were screened at routine diabetes visits to detect symptomatic men with total testosterone levels of 12 nmol/L or less or with free testosterones of 250 pmol/L or less. Two hundred eleven men were screened. A double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted in 199 men with type 2 diabetes and hypogonadism treated for 30 weeks with either 1,000 mg of TU or matching placebo followed by 52-week open-label follow on. The primary outcome measure, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), was used to evaluate sexual dysfunction, and the Ageing Male Symptom (AMS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Global Efficacy Question were used as secondary outcome measures to assess mood and self-reported quality of life. Testosterone replacement therapy with long-acting TU improved all domains of sexual function at 30 weeks (erectile function [EF], P = 0.005; intercourse satisfaction, P = 0.015; sexual desire, P = 0.001; overall satisfaction, P = 0.05; and orgasm, P = 0.04), with benefit as early as 6 weeks. Improvements in AMS score were significant in men without depression (P = 0.02) and the presence of depression at baseline was associated with marked reduction in response to both sexual function and psychological

  14. Effects of testosterone replacement therapy on nocturia and quality of life in men with hypogonadism: a subanalysis of a previous prospective randomized controlled study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Konaka, Hiroyuki; Koh, Eitetsu; Izumi, Koji; Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Mizokami, Atsushi; Nakashima, Takao; Shimamura, Masayoshi; Iwamoto, Teruaki; Namiki, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) on nocturia and general health among men with hypogonadism and nocturia. From our previous EARTH study population, 64 patients with a clinical diagnosis of nocturia (two or more times per one night) and hypogonadism, comprising the TRT group (n = 31) and controls (n = 33), were included in this analysis. The TRT group was administered 250 mg of testosterone enanthate as an intramuscular injection every 4 weeks for 6 months. All patients responded to the following questionnaires: International Prostatic Symptoms Score (IPSS), Aging Male Symptoms (AMS) score and Short Form-36 health survey at baseline and 6-month visit. These categories were compared based on changes from baseline to the 6-month visit between TRT and control groups. At the 6-month visit, the TRT group had a significant decrease in IPSS question no. 7 and AMS question no. 4, whereas no significant changes were observed in the control group. Additionally, role limitation because of health program, vitality and mental health domains were significantly improved in the TRT group. Six-month TRT may improve nocturia, sleep conditions and quality of life among men with hypogonadism and nocturia.

  15. Metabolic effects of testosterone replacement therapy on hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Cai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review was aimed at assessing the metabolic effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT on hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. A literature search was performed using the Cochrane Library, EMBASE and PubMed. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. Two reviewers retrieved articles and evaluated the study quality using an appropriate scoring method. Outcomes including glucose metabolism, lipid parameters, body fat and blood pressure were pooled using a random effects model and tested for heterogeneity. We used the Cochrane Collaboration's Review Manager 5.2 software for statistical analysis. Five RCTs including 351 participants with a mean follow-up time of 6.5-months were identified that strictly met our eligibility criteria. A meta-analysis of the extractable data showed that testosterone reduced fasting plasma glucose levels (mean difference (MD: −1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI (−1.88, −0.31, fasting serum insulin levels (MD: −2.73; 95% CI (−3.62, −1.84, HbA1c % (MD: −0.87; 95% CI (−1.32, −0.42 and triglyceride levels (MD: −0.35; 95% CI (−0.62, −0.07. The testosterone and control groups demonstrated no significant difference for other outcomes. In conclusion, we found that TRT can improve glycemic control and decrease triglyceride levels of hypogonadal men with T2DM. Considering the limited number of participants and the confounding factors in our systematic review; additional large, well-designed RCTs are needed to address the metabolic effects of TRT and its long-term influence on hypogonadal men with T2DM.

  16. Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Adolescents With Sickle Cell Disease Reverses Hypogonadism Without Promoting Priapism: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda F. Morrison

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Delayed puberty secondary to hypogonadism is commonly seen in sickle cell disease (SCD, affecting normal growth and development. The condition is rarely treated in SCD for fear of inducing priapism episodes. We present a case report of an Afro-Jamaican adolescent male at 16 years of age who presented with symptoms of delayed puberty as well as frequent stuttering priapism episodes. Endocrinological assessment revealed low serum total testosterone levels. Treatment was commenced monthly with testosterone enanthate which resulted in improved symptoms of delayed puberty, improvement in anthropometric parameters while apparently ameliorating priapism episodes.

  17. Controversies in testosterone supplementation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Khera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone has now become one of the most widely used medications throughout the world. The rapid growth of the testosterone market in the past 10 years is due to many factors. We currently have a worldwide aging population. In the US, the number of men 65 years old or older is increasing 2-3 times faster than the number of men younger than 65 years. In addition, poor general health and certain medical conditions such as diabetes/metabolic syndrome (MetS, cardiovascular disease (CVD, and osteoporosis have been associated with low serum testosterone levels. [1],[2],[3] There are now fewer concerns regarding the development of prostate cancer (PCa after testosterone therapy, making it a more attractive treatment option. Finally, the introduction of different forms of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST with increased promotion, marketing, and direct-to-consumer advertising is also driving market growth. As the demand for TST continues to grow, it is becoming more important for clinicians to understand how to diagnose and treat patients with low testosterone.

  18. Testosterone replacement, cardiovascular system and risk factors in the aging male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigna, G B; Bergami, E

    2005-01-01

    Investigations concerning the role of testosterone replacement on cardiovascular risk show conflicting results. Treatments with supraphysiological doses seem detrimental in animal models and men. On the other hand, cross-sectional, prospective and angiographic studies frequently find an inverse, favorable relationship between plasma testosterone and cardiovascular events. Testosterone replacement therapy in the hypogonadic elderly has a positive or at least neutral effect on several coronary disease risk factors. Testosterone appears to decrease LDL-cholesterol without adversely affecting HDL cholesterol, and improve insulin sensibility and the thrombotic/fibrinolytic balance; testosterone does not negatively influence the inflammatory response and arterial wall vasoreactivity. These findings provide a measure of reassurance concerning potential adverse heart effects of testosterone substitutional therapy in older men, even if more specific trials than reported are needed to overcome residual suspicions.

  19. Early weight loss predicts the reduction of obesity in men with erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism undergoing long-term testosterone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Mahmoud; Yassin, Dany-Jan; Shoukfeh, Huda; Nettleship, Joanne Elisabeth; Yassin, Aksam

    2017-03-01

    We and others have previously shown that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) results in sustained weight loss in the majority of middle-aged hypogonadal men. Previously, however, a small proportion failed to lose at least 5% of their baseline weight. The reason for this is not yet understood. In the present study, we sought to identify early indicators that may predict successful long-term weight loss, defined as a reduction of at least 5% of total body weight relative to baseline weight (T0), in men with hypogonadism undergoing TRT. Eight parameters measured were assessed as potential predictors of sustained weight loss: loss of 3% or more of baseline weight after 1 year of TU treatment, severe hypogonadism, BMI, waist circumference, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), age and use of vardenafil. Among the eight measured parameters, three factors were significantly associated with sustained weight loss over the entire period of TU treatment: (1) a loss of 3% of the baseline body weight after 1 year of TRT; (2) baseline BMI over 30; and (3) a waist circumference >102 cm. Age was not a predictor of weight loss.

  20. Testosterone Therapy: Review of Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Ryan C; Brooks, Nathan A

    2017-10-01

    Testosterone therapy is increasingly common in the United States, and many of these prescriptions are written by primary care physicians. There is conflicting evidence on the benefit of male testosterone therapy for age-related declines in testosterone. Physicians should not measure testosterone levels unless a patient has signs and symptoms of hypogonadism, such as loss of body hair, sexual dysfunction, hot flashes, or gynecomastia. Depressed mood, fatigue, decreased strength, and a decreased sense of vitality are less specific to male hypogonadism. Testosterone therapy should be initiated only after two morning total serum testosterone measurements show decreased levels, and all patients should be counseled on the potential risks and benefits before starting therapy. Potential benefits of therapy include increased libido, improved sexual function, improved mood and well-being, and increased muscle mass and bone density; however, there is little or mixed evidence confirming clinically significant benefits. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns that testosterone therapy may increase the risk of cardiovascular complications. Other possible risks include rising prostate-specific antigen levels, worsening lower urinary tract symptoms, polycythemia, and increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Patients receiving testosterone therapy should be monitored to ensure testosterone levels rise appropriately, clinical improvement occurs, and no complications develop. Testosterone therapy may also be used to treat hypoactive sexual desire disorder in postmenopausal women and to produce physical male sex characteristics in female-to-male transgender patients.

  1. Increased frequency of anxiety, depression, quality of life and sexual life in young hypogonadotropic hypogonadal males and impacts of testosterone replacement therapy on these conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Umit; Aydogdu, Aydogan; Akbulut, Halil; Sonmez, Alper; Yuksel, Servet; Basaran, Yalcin; Uzun, Ozcan; Bolu, Erol; Saglam, Kenan

    2012-01-01

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is defined as the failure in production of gonadal hormones, thus resulting in lower amounts of testosterone. Depression, anxiety and decreased quality of life are the most common psychopathological conditions in young hypogonadal men. The aim of the present study was to assess the still debated relationship with testosterone levels and psychological symptoms in young male patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH). Thirty-nine young male patients with CHH and 40 age-matched healthy males were enrolled in the present study. The impact of testosterone replacement treatment (TRT) on the patients' anxiety and depression levels, sexual function and quality of life were assessed before and after 6 months of treatment using valid and reliable scales, including the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Arizona Sexual Experiences (ASEX). Patients with CHH had significantly higher scores for BDI, BAI, and ASEX than the control subjects at baseline (p=0.011, p=0.036, psexual dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and worse quality of life. After 6 months of TRT, we observed improvements in the above parameters, suggesting that low endogenous levels of testosterone might be related to the increased incidence of psychological symptoms.

  2. Chronic Testosterone Replacement Exerts Cardioprotection against Cardiac Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Attenuating Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Testosterone-Deprived Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongkan, Wanpitak; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2015-01-01

    Background Although testosterone deficiency is associated with increased risks of heart disease, the benefits of testosterone therapy are controversial. Moreover, current understanding on the cardiac effect of testosterone during cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) periods is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that testosterone replacement attenuates the impairment of left ventricular (LV) function and heart rate variability (HRV), and reduces the infarct size and arrhythmias caused by I/R injury in orchiectomized (ORX) rats. Methodology ORX or sham-operated male Wistar rats (n = 24) were randomly divided and received either testosterone (2 mg/kg, subcutaneously administered) or the vehicle for 8 weeks. The ejection fraction (EF) and HRV were determined at baseline and the 4th and 8th week. I/R was performed by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation for 30 minutes, followed by a 120-minute reperfusion. LV pressure, arrhythmia scores, infarct size and cardiac mitochondrial function were determined. Results Prior to I/R, EF and HRV were impaired in the ORX group, but were restored in the testosterone-treated group. During I/R, arrhythmia scores and the infarct size were greater, and cardiac mitochondrial function was impaired, whereas the time to 1st VT/VF onset and the LV end-systolic pressure were decreased in the ORX group when compared to the sham group. Testosterone replacement attenuated the impairment of these parameters in ORX rats during I/R injury, but did not show any benefit or adverse effect in non-ORX rats. Conclusions Testosterone replacement restores cardiac function and autonomic regulation, and exerts cardioprotective effects during the I/R period via mitochondrial protection in ORX rats. PMID:25822979

  3. Nicotine replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoking cessation - nicotine replacement; Tobacco - nicotine replacement therapy ... Before you start using a nicotine replacement product, here are some things to know: The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher the dose you may need to ...

  4. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Pai, Ping-Ching; Toh, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Chi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Hypogonadism was defined as total serum testosterone levels of operative magnetic resonance images. We prescribed testosterone to patients with defined hypogonadism or clinical symptoms of hypogonadism. Hormone replacement for longer than 1 year was considered as long-term therapy. The need for long-term post-operative testosterone replacement was significantly associated with larger pre-operative tumor volume (p = 0.0067), and lower pre-operative testosterone level (p = 0.0101). There was no significant difference between the gross total tumor resection and subtotal resection groups (p = 0.1059). The pre-operative tumor volume and testosterone level impact post-operative hypogonadism. By measuring the tumor volume and the testosterone level and by performing adequate tumor resection, surgeons will be able to predict post-operative hypogonadism and the need for long-term hormone replacement. PMID:26537232

  5. Re: Could Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Hypogonadal Men Ameliorate Anemia, a Cardiovascular Risk Factor? An Observational, 54-week Cumulative Registry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Bakırcıoğlu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone deficiency syndrome may associate with erectile dysfunction, increased abdominal fat and reduced muscle mass. Low serum testosterone is also related with anemia, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In this study, the authors investigated if testosterone undecanoate (TU reduces anemia and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with hypogonadism A total of 58 participants with a total testosterone level of less than 2.35 ng/ml received an injection of 1.000 mg TU 6 times; at initial visit, 6, 18, 30, 42 and 54 weeks. They observed that total testosterone and free testosterone levels were restored by TU. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels significantly increased while anemia and total cholesterol levels significantly reduced. Although there are some limitations of this study e.g. it is not a randomized controlled and a long-term study, TU treatment in hypogonadal men decreased the prevalence of anemia, improved lipid profiles and lowered the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  6. Effects of intermission and resumption of long-term testosterone replacement therapy on body weight and metabolic parameters in hypogonadal in middle-aged and elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Aksam; Almehmadi, Yousef; Saad, Farid; Doros, Gheorghe; Gooren, Louis

    2016-01-01

    In addition to primary and secondary ('classical') hypogonadism, hypogonadism occurring in middle-aged and elderly men has been recognized. There is evidence that restoring T levels to normal improves body weight, serum lipids and glucose levels. Observational registry study. Two hundred and sixty-two hypogonadal, middle-aged and elderly, men received testosterone replacement treatment (TRT). After having been on TRT for a mean duration of 65·5 months, TRT was temporarily intermitted in 147 patients for a mean of 16·9 months (Group I) due to cost reimbursement issues and in seven men due to prostate cancer. All these men resumed TRT for a mean period of 14·5 months. Of the cohort, 115 men were treated continuously (designated as Group C). To compare on-treatment to off-treatment periods, three periods of equal duration were defined: pre-intermission (on TRT), during intermission (off TRT) and post-intermission (on TRT after resumption of TRT). For proper comparison, the same periods were analysed for those patients who continued TRT throughout (Group C). Variables of body weight, glucose metabolism, lipids, blood pressure and C-reactive protein (CRP). In Group C there was a continuous improvement of body weight, serum lipids, glucose, HbA1c , blood pressure and CRP. In Group I there was a similar initial improvement which was reversed upon intermission of T administration but which appeared again when T treatment was reinstated. Our observation indicates that T administration improves body weight and metabolic factors in men with hypogonadism but withdrawal of T reverses these beneficial effects to appear again when TRT is resumed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effects of long-term testosterone replacement therapy, with a temporary intermission, on glycemic control of nine hypogonadal men with type 1 diabetes mellitus - a series of case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Farid; Yassin, Aksam; Almehmadi, Yousef; Doros, Gheorghe; Gooren, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is often associated with obesity and subnormal serum testosterone (T) levels. Until 5 years ago there was no indication that men with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) had subnormal serum T. But recent studies indicate that about 10% of men with T1DM suffer from hypogonadism, as a rule aged men and men with obesity. While hypogonadal men with T2DM benefit from normalization of their serum T, this has not been investigated in men with T1DM. Nine men with T1DM, erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism (total testosterone ≤ 12 nmol/L) received testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). In seven men TRT was intermitted: one man with prostate malignancy and six men because of problems of reimbursement. Incidentally, this provided an opportunity to monitor the effects of withdrawal and of the reinstatement of TRT. In all men, glycemic control (serum glucose and HbA1c), weight, waist circumference, lipid profiles and erectile function improved upon TRT. The seven men whose TRT was intermitted showed a deterioration which improved again upon reinstatement of TRT. The data suggest that aging and obese men with T1DM might have subnormal T levels and that their glycemic control, lipid profiles and erectile function might benefit from TRT.

  8. Testosterone therapy decreases subcutaneous fat and adiponectin in aging men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, L.; Højlund, K.; Hougaard, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Testosterone therapy increases lean body mass and decreases total fat mass in aging men with low normal testosterone levels. The major challenge is, however, to determine whether the metabolic consequences of testosterone therapy are overall positive. We have previously reported that 6......-month testosterone therapy did not improve insulin sensitivity. We investigated the effect of testosterone therapy on regional body fat distribution and on the levels of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin, in aging men with low normal bioavailable testosterone levels. DESIGN: A randomized......, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study on 6-month testosterone treatment (gel) in 38 men, aged 60–78 years, with bioavailable testosterone 94 cm. METHODS: Central fat mass (CFM) and lower extremity fat mass (LEFM) were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT...

  9. Testosterone therapy in women: myths and misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Rebecca; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2013-03-01

    Although testosterone therapy is being increasingly prescribed for men, there remain many questions and concerns about testosterone (T) and in particular, T therapy in women. A literature search was performed to elucidate the origin of, and scientific basis behind many of the concerns and assumptions about T and T therapy in women. This paper refutes 10 common myths and misconceptions, and provides evidence to support what is physiologically plausible and scientifically evident: T is the most abundant biologically active female hormone, T is essential for physical and mental health in women, T is not masculinizing, T does not cause hoarseness, T increases scalp hair growth, T is cardiac protective, parenteral T does not adversely affect the liver or increase clotting factors, T is mood stabilizing and does not increase aggression, T is breast protective, and the safety of T therapy in women is under research and being established. Abandoning myths, misconceptions and unfounded concerns about T and T therapy in women will enable physicians to provide evidenced based recommendations and appropriate therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Testosterone replacement does not normalize carcass composition in chronically decerebrate male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ruth B S; Kelso, Emily W; Flatt, William P; Grill, Harvey J; Bartness, Timothy J

    2009-06-01

    Chronically decerebrate (CD) rats, in which the forebrain and its descending projections are completely neurally isolated from hindbrain and rostral projections, gain substantial amounts of body fat, lose lean tissue, and have low circulating testosterone concentrations. We tested whether testosterone replacement would normalize body composition of male CD rats. Five groups of rats were used: CD placebo, CD testosterone, control placebo, castrate placebo, and castrate testosterone. Testosterone replacement was initiated at the first stage of CD surgery in both CDs and castrate controls. The second stage of CD surgery occurred 8 days later, and the study ended 15 days later. Testosterone implants produced 10-fold normal circulating concentrations. Food intake was fixed for all rats by tube feeding. CD rats had substantially more body fat and less lean tissue than neurally intact rats. Testosterone replacement did not affect adiposity of CD rats but did increase carcass water content. Energy expenditure of CD rats was significantly lower than that of control placebo and castrated rats. Testosterone lowered respiratory equivalency ratio and ameliorated a fall in energy expenditure late in the intermeal interval in CD rats. Castration increased, and testosterone decreased luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in neurally intact controls. LH was undetectable, and FSH was equivalent to neurally intact controls in CD rats, and neither was affected by testosterone. Collectively, low testosterone did not explain obesity or decreased lean body mass of CD rats, although CD rats exhibited abnormal levels of circulating reproductive hormones and disrupted testosterone negative feedback.

  11. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should...... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  12. Microvesicles Correlated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Men with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Lowered Testosterone Levels But Were Unaltered by Testosterone Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botha, Jaco; Velling Magnussen, Line; Nielsen, Morten Hjuler

    2017-01-01

    not correlate with any microvesicle phenotypes. Microvesicle levels were unaffected by testosterone therapy. Conclusions. Metabolic syndrome components and hepatic fat accumulation correlated with microvesicle phenotypes, supporting the involvement of especially CD36 on monocytes in metabolic syndrome......Aims. To investigate how circulating microvesicle phenotypes correlate with insulin sensitivity, body composition, plasma lipids, and hepatic fat accumulation. We hypothesized that changes elicited by testosterone replacement therapy are reflected in levels of microvesicles. Methods. Thirty......-nine type 2 diabetic males with lowered testosterone levels were assigned to either testosterone replacement therapy or placebo and evaluated at baseline and after 24 weeks. Microvesicles were analysed by flow cytometry and defined as lactadherin-binding particles within the 0.1-1.0 μm gate. Microvesicles...

  13. Free Testosterone During Androgen Deprivation Therapy Predicts Castration-Resistant Progression Better Than Total Testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Lucas; Planas, Jacques; Carles, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Comas, Inma; Ferrer, Roser; Morote, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The optimal degree of testosterone suppression in patients with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy remains in question. Furthermore, serum free testosterone, which is the active form of testosterone, seems to correlate with intraprostatic testosterone. Here we compared free and total serum testosterone as predictors of survival free of castration resistance. Total testosterone (chemiluminescent assay, lower sensitivity 10 ng/dl) and free testosterone (analogue-ligand radioimmunoassay, lower sensitivity 0.05 pg/ml) were determined at 6 months of LHRH agonist treatment in a prospective cohort of 126 patients with prostate cancer. During a mean follow-up of 67 months (9-120), 75 (59.5%) events of castration-resistant progression were identified. Multivariate analysis and survival analysis according to total testosterone cutoffs of 50, 32, and 20 ng/dl, and free testosterone cutoffs of 1.7, 1.1, and 0.7 pg/ml were performed. Metastatic spread was the most powerful predictor of castration resistance, HR: 2.09 (95%CI: 1.18-3.72), P = 0.012. Gleason score, baseline PSA and PSA at 6 months were also independents predictors, but not free and total testosterone. Stratified analysis was conducted on the basis of the status of metastatic diseases and free testosterone was found to be an independent predictor of survival free of castration resistance in the subgroup of patients without metastasis, HR: 2.12 (95%CI: 1.16-3.85), P = 0.014. The lowest threshold of free testosterone which showed significant differences was 1.7 pg/ml, P = 0.003. Free testosterone at 6 months of LHRH agonist treatment seems to be a better surrogate than total testosterone to predict castration resistance in no metastatic prostate cancer patients. Prostate 77:114-120, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Their Reduction After Testosterone Replacement in Men With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Sandeep; Ghanim, Husam; Batra, Manav; Kuhadiya, Nitesh D.; Abuaysheh, Sanaa; Sandhu, Sartaj; Green, Kelly; Makdissi, Antoine; Hejna, Jeanne; Chaudhuri, Ajay; Punyanitya, Mark

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE One-third of men with type 2 diabetes have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of testosterone replacement on insulin resistance in men with type 2 diabetes and HH. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 94 men with type 2 diabetes were recruited into the study; 50 men were eugonadal, while 44 men had HH. Insulin sensitivity was calculated from the glucose infusion rate (GIR) during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Lean body mass and fat mass were measured by DEXA and MRI. Subcutaneous fat samples were taken to assess insulin signaling genes. Men with HH were randomized to receive intramuscular testosterone (250 mg) or placebo (1 mL saline) every 2 weeks for 24 weeks. RESULTS Men with HH had higher subcutaneous and visceral fat mass than eugonadal men. GIR was 36% lower in men with HH. GIR increased by 32% after 24 weeks of testosterone therapy but did not change after placebo (P = 0.03 for comparison). There was a decrease in subcutaneous fat mass (−3.3 kg) and increase in lean mass (3.4 kg) after testosterone treatment (P testosterone treatment. Testosterone treatment also caused a significant fall in circulating concentrations of free fatty acids, C-reactive protein, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leptin (P Testosterone treatment in men with type 2 diabetes and HH increases insulin sensitivity, increases lean mass, and decreases subcutaneous fat. PMID:26622051

  15. Testosterone Replacement and Bone Mineral Density in Male Pituitary Tumor Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jeong Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHypopituitarism is associated with osteoporosis and osteopenia especially when hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is present. Despite hypopituitarism being an important cause of secondary osteoporosis, osteoporosis in patients receiving surgery for pituitary tumors in Korea has not been studied. In this study, we evaluated the effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT on bone mineral density (BMD in postoperative hypogonadal patients with pituitary tumors.MethodsTo examine the effect of TRT on BMD, we performed a retrospective observational study in 21 postoperative male patients who underwent pituitary tumor surgery between 2003 and 2012 at the Ajou University Hospital. Testosterone was replaced in postoperative hypogonadal patients by regular intramuscular injection, daily oral medication, or application of transdermal gel. BMD (g/cm2 measurements of central skeletal sites (lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total femur were obtained using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (GE Lunar. For lumbar spine BMD, L1 to L4 values were chosen for analysis. Femur neck and total femur were also analyzed.ResultsDuring the follow-up period (mean, 56 months; range, 12 to 99 months serum testosterone levels increased with the administration of TRT (P=0.007. There was significant improvement (4.56%±9.81% in the lumbar spine BMD compared to baseline BMD. There were no significant changes in the femur neck BMD or total femur BMD. We did not find any statistically significant relationships between changes in testosterone levels and BMD using Spearman correlation analysis.ConclusionOur results indicated that TRT used in the postoperative period for hypogonadal pituitary tumor surgery patients may have beneficial effects on the BMD of the spine.

  16. NIH-Supported Trials Test Hormonal Therapy in Older Men with Low Testosterone Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test hormonal therapy in older men with low testosterone levels Testosterone treatment improved sexual function, had smaller effect on walking, vitality. A preliminary study of testosterone therapy in older men with low levels of ...

  17. Switch to restoration therapy in a testosterone treated central hypogonadism with erythrocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Cangiano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of severe erythrocytosis caused by testosterone replacement therapy in a 66-year-old man affected with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH determining osteoporosis, resolved by switching to restoration therapy with clomiphene citrate. The patient complained fatigue, loss of libido and defective erections and a spontaneous vertebral fracture despite bisphosphonate therapy and vitamin D supplementation. The examinations proved isolated HH and he was therefore treated with testosterone gel with regression of specific manifestations but elevated hemoglobin and hematocrit values. Therefore, it was decided to switch to a restoration therapy with clomiphene citrate 25 mg/die, which resulted in the resolution of symptoms without evident side effects. In a couple of months, the patient showed normalization of testosterone levels and increment of testicular volume. Since secondary hypogonadism is the consequence of an insufficient stimulation of the gonads by hypothalamic–pituitary axis, therapeutic approaches aimed to restore endogenous testosterone production should be considered in alternative to testosterone replacement, particularly if side effects intervene. Among these strategies, clomiphene citrate seems to have a high efficacy and safety profile also in the elderly with isolated HH and no evident pituitary lesion.

  18. Effects of short-term testosterone replacement on areal bone mineral density and bone turnover in young hypogonadal males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasun Deb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Effect of parenteral testosterone esters administration on bone-mineral density (BMD and bone turnover in young age onset male hypogonadism is not studied in Indian subjects. Aims: To prospectively study the effect of short-term (6 months replacement therapy with parenteral testosterone enanthate-propionate combination on BMD and bone turnover markers in hypogonadal adult patients. Settings and Design: Prospective, tertiary care academic center. Materials and Methods: Thirteen young, otherwise healthy hypogonadal males (age 25.5 ± 4.9 yrs, serum testosterone 2.56 ± 4.29 nmol/l were subjected to BMD measurements (DXA and estimation of urinary Crosslaps™ and serum osteocalcin at baseline. Twelve healthy age and BMI-matched males served as controls for BMD measurements. The hypogonadal patients were administered parenteral testosterone esters (as mixed enanthate and propionate 250 mg i.m. every 2-3 weeks, and prospectively followed for 6 months. BMD and bone markers were studied at the end of 6 months. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann-Whitney nonparametric test, paired t-test and Pearson′s test of two-tail significance. Results: At baseline, BMD was significantly lower in hypogonadal males as compared to that in controls. With testosterone replacement, there was significant improvement in BMD, both at trabecular and cortical sites, There was a decline in bone turnover with treatment (Ur Crosslaps™:creatinine ratio: pretreatment 72.8 ± 40.4, post-treatment 35.5 ± 23.8 μg/mmol, P = 0.098; serum osteocalcin: pre-treatment 41.0 ± 16.8, post-treatment 31.7 ± 2.1 ng/ml, P = 0.393. Conclusions: Short-term parenteral testosterone replacement significantly improves BMD at the hip, lumbar spine and forearm in hypogonadal young males.

  19. Testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to evaluate signs of abnormal testosterone such as: Early or late puberty (in boys) Infertility, erectile dysfunction, low level of ... brain that control hormones Low thyroid function Delayed ... much body fat (obesity) Increased total testosterone level may be due to: ...

  20. Renal replacement therapy in ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Deepa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing and managing critically ill patients with renal dysfunction is a part of the daily routine of an intensivist. Acute kidney insufficiency substantially contributes to the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. Renal replacement therapy (RRT not only does play a significant role in the treatment of patients with renal failure, acute as well as chronic, but also has spread its domains to the treatment of many other disease conditions such as myaesthenia gravis, septic shock and acute on chronic liver failure. This article briefly outlines the role of renal replacement therapy in ICU.

  1. Estrogen and Progestin (Hormone Replacement Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Estrogen and progestin are two female sex hormones. Hormone replacement therapy works by replacing estrogen hormone that is no ... menopausal women. Progestin is added to estrogen in hormone replacement therapy to reduce the risk of uterine cancer in ...

  2. Renal replacement therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordzij, Marlies; Kramer, Anneke; Abad Diez, José M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article provides a summary of the 2011 ERA-EDTA Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org). METHODS: Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from national and regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the ...

  3. Testosterone replacement elevates the serum uric acid levels in patients with female to male gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurahashi, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Masami; Sugimoto, Morito; Ariyoshi, Yuichi; Mahmood, Sabina; Araki, Motoo; Ishii, Kazushi; Nasu, Yasutomo; Nagai, Atsushi; Kumon, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID) results from a disagreement between a person's biological sex and the gender to which he or she identifies. With respect to the treatment of female to male GID, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is available. The uric acid (UA) level can be influenced by testosterone; however, the early effects and dose-dependency of TRT on the serum UA concentration have not been evaluated in this population. We herein conducted a dose-response analysis of TRT in 160 patients with female to male GID. The TRT consisted of three treatment groups who received intramuscular injections of testosterone enanthate: 125 mg every two weeks, 250 mg every three weeks and 250 mg every two weeks. Consequently, serum UA elevation was observed after three months of TRT and there was a tendency toward testosterone dose-dependency. The onset of hyperuricemia was more prevalent in the group who received the higher dose. We also demonstrated a positive correlation between increased levels of serum UA and serum creatinine. Since the level of serum creatinine represents an individual's muscle volume and the muscle is a major source of purine, which induces UA upregulation, the serum UA elevation observed during TRT is at least partially attributed to an increase in muscle mass. This is the first study showing an association between serum UA elevation and a TRT-induced increase in muscle mass. The current study provides important information regarding TRT for the follow-up and management of the serum UA levels in GID patients.

  4. Testosterone therapy preserves muscle strength and power in aging men with type 2 diabete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, L V; Hvid, L G; Hermann, A P

    2017-01-01

    function was assessed by Nottingham Leg Rig (leg extension power) and isokinetic dynamometry (knee extensor maximal isometric contraction, rate of force development (RFD100), maximal dynamic contraction (Dyn180)). Physical function was assessed by gait speed. Body composition was assessed by whole body...... dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (total lean body mass, lean leg mass, total fat mass, leg fat mass). Levels of total testosterone (TotalT), BioT, free testosterone (FreeT), and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured from fasting blood samples. Coefficients (b) represent the placebo-controlled mean...... effect of intervention. Maximal isometric contraction (b = 18.4 Nm, p = 0.039), RFD100 (b = 195.0 Nm/s, p = 0.017) and Dyn180 (b = 10.2 Nm, p = 0.019) increased during testosterone replacement therapy compared with placebo. No changes were observed in leg power or gait speed. Total lean body mass (b = 1...

  5. Testosterone therapy increased muscle mass and lipid oxidation in aging men

    OpenAIRE

    Frederiksen, Louise; Højlund, Kurt; Hougaard, David M.; Brixen, Kim; Andersen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    The indication for testosterone therapy in aging hypogonadal men without hypothalamic, pituitary, or testicular disease remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of testosterone therapy on insulin sensitivity, substrate metabolism, body composition, and lipids in aging men with low normal bioavailable testosterone levels using a predefined cutoff level for bioavailable testosterone. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of testosterone trea...

  6. Testosterone replacement attenuates mitochondrial damage in a rat model of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyue; Yang, Jing; Sun, Junfeng; Dong, Yanli; Zhao, Hong; Shi, Hui; Fu, Lu

    2015-05-01

    Testosterone can affect cardiovascular disease, but its effects on mitochondrial dynamics in the post-infarct myocardium remain unclear. To observe the effects of testosterone replacement, a rat model of castration-myocardial infarction (MI) was established by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery 2 weeks after castration with or without testosterone treatment. Expression of mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins was detected by western blot and immunofluorescence 14 days after MI. Cardiac function, myocardial inflammatory infiltration and fibrosis, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, mitochondrial microstructure, and ATP levels were also assessed. Compared with MI rats, castrated rats showed aggravated mitochondrial and myocardial insults, including mitochondrial swelling and disordered arrangement; loss of cristae, reduced mitochondrial length; decreased ATP levels; cardiomyocyte apoptosis; and impaired cardiac function. Results of western blotting analyses indicated that castration downregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1A) and mitofusin 2, but upregulated dynamin-related protein 1. The results were also supported by results obtained using immunofluorescence. However, these detrimental effects were reversed by testosterone supplementation, which also elevated the upstream AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation of PGC1A. Thus, testosterone can protect mitochondria in the post-infarct myocardium, partly via the AMPK-PGC1A pathway, thereby decreasing mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The effects of testosterone were confirmed by the results of ELISA analyses. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. Testosterone therapy preserves muscle strength and power in aging men with type 2 diabetes - a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Line Velling; Hvid, Lars Næsby; Hermann, Anne Pernille

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether testosterone replacement therapy improves muscle mechanical and physical function in addition to increasing lean leg mass and total lean body mass in aging men with type 2 diabetes and lowered bio-available testosterone (BioT) levels. Thirty-nine men...... aged 50-70 years with type 2 diabetes and BioT levels therapy, n = 20) or placebo (n = 19) for 24 weeks, applying a double-blinded design. Muscle mechanical...... effect of intervention. Maximal isometric contraction (b = 18.4 Nm, p = 0.039), RFD100 (b = 195.0 Nm/s, p = 0.017) and Dyn180 (b = 10.2 Nm, p = 0.019) increased during testosterone replacement therapy compared with placebo. No changes were observed in leg power or gait speed. Total lean body mass (b = 1...

  8. Alternatives for optimal hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitruk-Ware, R

    2003-08-01

    To satisfy the needs of women with a wide variety of different medical histories and preferences, a wide choice of various forms of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is desirable. The potential long-term benefits of HRT, in terms of osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and dementia, require good compliance, which in turn requires an HRT formulation that is highly acceptable. An absence of weight gain and lack of androgenic effects are of great importance, as are predictable bleeding and positive effects on postmenopausal symptoms and quality of life. HRT should be tailored to each woman's needs by the choice of appropriate estrogens and particularly a progestogen with a suitable pharmacological profile. An ideal progestogen should be targeted at preventing endometrial hyperplasia without opposing the effects of estrogen on the vessels. Several new progestogens have been synthesized in recent years. Dienogest, the progestogenic component of a new hormone replacement therapy with estradiol valerate, has many desirable features, including antiandrogenic properties; in this respect, it is unique amongst progestogens derived from testosterone. Tailored HRT should treat symptoms, minimize risk factors, meet personal preferences and lifestyle needs, and not be contraindicated for concomitant diseases. During the next decade, optimal HRT must match a number of trends, including an aging population, and is likely to be influenced by the outcome of major trials such as the Women's Health Initiative trial whose negative results will impact the prescriptions, the advent of new compounds--particularly the selective estrogen receptor modulators and progestogen receptor modulators--and the introduction of new methods of delivery, including vaginal rings and medicated intrauterine systems.

  9. [Enzyme replacement therapy for hypophosphatasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    2014-02-01

    Hypophosphatasia is caused by abnormal tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALP), leading to impaired calcification in bone. Patients with severe hypophosphatasia have difficulties in respiratory function from early days after birth and the rate of lethality is extremely high. Enzyme replacement therapy using bone-targeting recombinant ALP, which has 10 aspartic acids in the C-terminal tail has developed. The efficacy of ERT was firstly observed in model mice of hypophosphatasia. In clinical trial including perinatal and infantile types of hypophosphatasia, efficacy and safety have been reported. Expanded clinical trial is underway and the results of the clinical trial might be reported by the end of the next year.

  10. [Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepari, G; Inguaggiato, P; Gigliola, G; Bainotti, S; Formica, M

    2006-01-01

    Several techniques are currently available in the continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) spectrum, adhering to different clinical conditions and illness severity. Commercially available machines have become more user-friendly, even for non-dialysis staff however, nephrologists need specific knowledge to give an adequate prescription that must be different from chronic hemodialysis. Competence and experience in the technical possibilities of CRRT lead to an individual ultra-filtration and treatment dose prescription. Clearances of solutes with different molecular weight can be modulated by coupling (combining) diffusion and convection, and by changing the fluid infusion rate. In addition, CRRT has an important impact on metabolism with its cooling effect, removal of nourishing substances and modification of electrolytic and acid-base balance. In septic patients standard CRRT has no specific indications in the absence of acute renal failure. Other extracorporeal therapies, such as high volume hemofiltration coupled with plasma filtration-adsorption (CPFA), have been developed aiming for a major influence on sepsis evolution. The versatility of CRRT has great value not only in adapting the treatment schedule to clinical conditions, but also in performing extracorporeal therapies in a wide array of logistical circumstances.

  11. Cross-sex testosterone therapy in ovariectomized mice: addition of low-dose estrogen preserves bone architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Laura G; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Devlin, Maureen J; Robbins, Amy E; Majidi-Zolbin, Masoumeh; Taylor, Hugh S

    2017-11-01

    Cross-sex hormone therapy (XHT) is widely used by transgender people to alter secondary sex characteristics to match their desired gender presentation. Here, we investigate the long-term effects of XHT on bone health using a murine model. Female mice underwent ovariectomy at either 6 or 10 wk and began weekly testosterone or vehicle injections. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed (20 wk) to measure bone mineral density (BMD), and microcomputed tomography was performed to compare femoral cortical and trabecular bone architecture. The 6-wk testosterone group had comparable BMD with controls by DXA but reduced bone volume fraction, trabecular number, and cortical area fraction and increased trabecular separation by microcomputed tomography. Ten-week ovariectomy/XHT maintained microarchitecture, suggesting that estrogen is critical for bone acquisition during adolescence and that late, but not early, estrogen loss can be sufficiently replaced by testosterone alone. Given these findings, we then compared effects of testosterone with effects of weekly estrogen or combined testosterone/low-dose estrogen treatment after a 6-wk ovariectomy. Estrogen treatment increased spine BMD and microarchitecture, including bone volume fraction, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and connectivity density, and decreased trabecular separation. Combined testosterone-estrogen therapy caused similar increases in femur and spine BMD and improved architecture (increased bone volume fraction, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and connectivity density) to estrogen therapy and were superior compared with mice treated with testosterone only. These results demonstrate estradiol is critical for bone acquisition and suggest a new cross-sex hormone therapy adding estrogens to testosterone treatments with potential future clinical implications for treating transgender youth or men with estrogen deficiency. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. [Hemodialysis as kidney replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descoeudres, C

    1989-08-08

    Haemodialysis is the most frequently used renal replacement therapy and in Europe keeps alive more than 80,000 patients with end-stage renal failure. Three times weekly the patient is connected to the artificial kidney and uraemic toxins are removed using a filter permeable for water and small solutes. This treatment lasts about 3-4 hours and can be performed in hospitals, dialysis centers or in the patient's own home. With haemodialysis, patients can survive for many years with a good quality of life. However, dialysis treatment is time-consuming, there are dietary restrictions, and the patients become increasingly dependent on medical personnel and relatives. It is therefore not surprising that most dialysis patients hope for a kidney transplantation.

  13. Controversies in hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baziad

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of estrogen hormone will result in either long-term or short-term health problems which may reduce the quality of life. There are numerous methods by which the quality of female life can be achieved. Since the problems occuring are due to the deficiency of estrogen hormone, the appropriate method to tackle the problem is by administration of estrogen hormone. The administration of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with estrogen may eliminate climacteric complaints, prevent osteoporosis, coronary heart disease, dementia, and colon cancer. Although HRT has a great deal of advantage, its use is still low and may result in controversies. These controversies are due to fact that both doctor and patient still hold on to the old, outmoded views which are not supported by numerous studies. Currently, the use of HRT is not only based on experience, or temporary observation, but more on evidence based medicine. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 182-6Keywords: controversies, HRT

  14. Effect of chronic cabergoline treatment and testosterone replacement on metabolism in male patients with prolactinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriemma, Renata S; Galdiero, Mariano; Vitale, Pasquale; Granieri, Luciana; Lo Calzo, Fabio; Salzano, Ciro; Ferreri, Lucia; Pivonello, Claudia; Cariati, Federica; Coppola, Giorgio; de Angelis, Cristina; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Hyperprolactinemia and hypogonadism are reportedly associated with an impaired metabolic profile. The current study aimed at investigating the effects of testosterone replacement and cabergoline (CAB) treatment on the metabolic profile in male hyperprolactinemic patients. Thirty-two men with prolactinomas, including 22 with total testosterone (TT) 8 nmol/l (non-HG, 31%), were entered in the study. In all patients, metabolic parameters were assessed at diagnosis and after 12- and 24-month treatment. Compared to non-HG patients, at baseline the HG patients had higher waist circumference (WC). TT significantly correlated with body mass index (BMI). Twelve-month CAB induced PRL normalization in 84%. HG prevalence significantly decreased (28%) and non-HG prevalence significantly increased (72%). Anthropometric and lipid parameters, fasting insulin (FI), insulin sensitivity index (ISI0), homeostatic model assessment of insulin secretion (HOMA-β) and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) significantly improved compared to baseline. TT was the best predictor for FI. Percent change (Δ) of TT significantly correlated with ΔCholesterol, ΔWeight and ΔBMI. Compared to non-HG patients, the HG patients had a higher weight, BMI, WC and HOMA-β. In HG, testosterone replacement was started. After 24 months, PRL normalized in 97%. HG prevalence significantly decreased (6%) and non-HG prevalence significantly increased (94%). Anthropometric and lipid parameters, FI, ISI0, HOMA-β and HOMA-IR significantly improved compared to baseline, with FI, ISI0, HOMA-β and HOMA-IR further ameliorating compared to the 12-month evaluation. Compared to non-HG patients, the HG patients still had a higher weight, BMI and WC. In hyperprolactinemic hypogonal men, proper testosterone replacement induces a significant improvement in the metabolic profile, even though the amelioration in the lipid profile might reflect the direct action of CAB. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy and your heart Are you taking — or considering — hormone therapy to treat bothersome menopausal symptoms? Understand ... for you. By Mayo Clinic Staff Long-term hormone replacement therapy used to be routinely prescribed for postmenopausal women ...

  16. The assessment of testosterone and radioisotopic index of bone metabolism and bone mineral density in men with testosterone deficiency after one year of testosterone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryniszewski, Wieslaw; Kamiński, Grzegorz; Maziarz, Zbigniew; Nowak, Michal; Gadzicki, Mariusz; Radek, Maciej

    2018-01-10

    Testosterone deficiency in men is characterized by typical symptoms of hypogonadism and negative influence on the preservation of bone mass. In this study, we analysed the relationship between testosterone concentration and bone metabolism. Moreover, we assessed the impact of one-year compensation of testosterone deficiency in elderly men on bone metabolism and bone mineral density. Radioisotopic methods of bone metabolism assessment provide new research opportunities. Men with total testosterone concentration (TT) ≤ 3 ng/ml were included into this study. Patients with disorders or injuries of bone system, elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA), enlarged prostate, disorders of thyroid and liver, diabetes mellitus or a history of chemotherapy as well as those treated for a long time with antibiotics were excluded from this study. The results of 50 men aged 57.52 ± 6.71 years obtained before the treatment (I test) and after one year of oral testosterone supplementation (test II) were analysed in this study. The following examinations and analyses were performed: interview and physical examination, orthopaedic, neurological and urological consultations, blood biochemistry, determination of hormones levels, assessment of Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome (TDS), densitometric and radioisotope assessment of bone metabolism. Moreover, radioisotopic index of bone metabolism was calculated. Testosterone therapy with oral preparation Undestor Testo Caps (Organon) containing 40 mg of testosterone lasted for 12 months. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica 12 and Excel 2010 programs. Correlations between results before and after treatment were analysed. After 12 months of treatment, testosterone concentration increased by mean 78% and the level of luteinizing hormone (LH) decreased by 62%. TDS index increased from 0.53 ± 0.21 (in test I) to 1.91 ± 0.60 (in test II). After the therapy this index was significantly higher in all men (p Metabolism). We observed

  17. Hormonal replacement therapy with HCG and HU-FSH in thalassaemic patients affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisternino, M; Manzoni, S M; Coslovich, E; Autelli, M

    1998-01-01

    Gonadotropin (Gn) replacement therapy using HCG plus HU-FSH was administered to 24 patients affected by beta-thalassaemia major with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism aged 18-40 years (25.2 +/- 5.4 yr, m +/- SEM). The age range at the start of treatment was 14.5-24.5 years (16.7 +/- 2.6 yr); the mean duration of Gn treatment was 8.6 +/- 3.9 years (range 1-15.2 yr). Gn therapy was begun with HCG alone, the dosage being initially 500 IU twice a week and then increased to a maximum of 3000 IU twice a week, according to the individual serum testosterone levels obtained. HU-FSH (75 IU twice a week) was added to initiate spermatogenesis in all cases when the HCG-induced testosterone serum levels normalized. The duration of HU-FSH treatment ranged from 1-2 years and then therapy was continued with HCG alone. In nine patients Gn therapy was discontinued after 6-14 years and was replaced by testosterone depot therapy, 75-100 mg i.m. twice a month, for a period ranging from 1-1.5 years. Using Gn therapy, the testosterone levels normalized. The compliant patients obtained good virilization and normal sexual function; testicular volume increased within the normal adult range and spermatogenesis was achieved. When Gn therapy was replaced by testosterone-depot therapy, a marked decrease in testicular volume and sperm count was observed, but the patients complied better and showed a slight increase in coarse hair. In conclusion gonadotropins are an effective replacement therapy for male hypogonadism in thalassaemic patients. If we consider the advantages and disadvantages of this therapy, the former seem to outweigh the latter. Finally, it should be emphasized that physicians caring for these patients must foster compliance during frequent check-ups and examinations.

  18. Mechanical muscle function and lean body mass during supervised strength training and testosterone therapy in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvorning, Thue; Christensen, Louise L; Madsen, Klavs

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effect of strength training and testosterone therapy on mechanical muscle function and lean body mass (LBM) in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study.......To examine the effect of strength training and testosterone therapy on mechanical muscle function and lean body mass (LBM) in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study....

  19. Testosterone therapy and cardiovascular risk: advances and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgentaler, Abraham; Miner, Martin M; Caliber, Monica; Guay, Andre T; Khera, Mohit; Traish, Abdulmaged M

    2015-02-01

    Two recent studies raised new concerns regarding cardiovascular (CV) risks with testosterone (T) therapy. This article reviews those studies as well as the extensive literature on T and CV risks. A MEDLINE search was performed for the years 1940 to August 2014 using the following key words: testosterone, androgens, human, male, cardiovascular, stroke, cerebrovascular accident, myocardial infarction, heart attack, death, and mortality. The weight and direction of evidence was evaluated and level of evidence (LOE) assigned. Only 4 articles were identified that suggested increased CV risks with T prescriptions: 2 retrospective analyses with serious methodological limitations, 1 placebo-controlled trial with few major adverse cardiac events, and 1 meta-analysis that included questionable studies and events. In contrast, several dozen studies have reported a beneficial effect of normal T levels on CV risks and mortality. Mortality and incident coronary artery disease are inversely associated with serum T concentrations (LOE IIa), as is severity of coronary artery disease (LOE IIa). Testosterone therapy is associated with reduced obesity, fat mass, and waist circumference (LOE Ib) and also improves glycemic control (LOE IIa). Mortality was reduced with T therapy in 2 retrospective studies. Several RCTs in men with coronary artery disease or heart failure reported improved function in men who received T compared with placebo. The largest meta-analysis to date revealed no increase in CV risks in men who received T and reduced CV risk among those with metabolic disease. In summary, there is no convincing evidence of increased CV risks with T therapy. On the contrary, there appears to be a strong beneficial relationship between normal T and CV health that has not yet been widely appreciated.

  20. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The global population in the 21st century has reached 6.2 billion people, by the year 2025 it is to be around 8.3-8.5 billion, and will increase further. Elderly people are expected to grow rapidly than other groups. The fastest increase in the elderly population will take place in Asia. Life expectancy is increasing steadily throughout developed and developing countries. For many  menopausal women, increased life expectancy will accompanied by many health problems. The consequences of estrogen deficiency are the menopausal symptoms. The treatment of menopause related complaints and diseases became an  important socioeconomic and medical issue. Long term symptoms, such as the increase in osteoporosis fractures, cardio and cerebrovascular disesses and dementia, created a large financial burden on individuals and society. All these health problems can be lreated or prevented by hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Natural HRT is usually prefened. Synthetic  estrogen in oral contraceptives (oc are not recommended for HRT. Many contra-indications for oc, but now it is widely usedfor HRT. The main reasons for discontinuing HRT are unwanted bleeding, fear of cancer, and negative side effects. Until now there are sill debates about the rebrtonship between HRT and the incidence of breast cancer. Many data showed that there were no clear relationship between the use of HRT and breast cancer. ThereÎore, nwny experts advocate the use of HRTfrom the first sign of climacteric complaints until death. (Med J Indones 2001;10: 242-51Keywords: estrogen deficiency, climacteric phases, tibolone.

  1. Effect of testosterone replacement treatment on constitutional and sexual symptoms in type 2 diabetic men: need for rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotios Dimitriadis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In a recent publication, Gianatti and colleagues investigated the effect of testosterone treatment in obese, aging men with type 2 diabetes (T2D with mild to moderate symptoms, a modest reduction in testosterone levels, mild to moderate aging male symptoms, and erectile dysfunction. [1] The authors could not show any significant improvement in constitutional or sexual symptoms in this group of men. This randomized double-blind, parallel, and placebo-controlled trial among other critically emphasizes the increased testosterone prescriptions worldwide and together with other corroborating or contradictory studies awakes the need for guidelines in the androgen replacement treatment.

  2. Effect of testosterone replacement treatment on constitutional and sexual symptoms in type 2 diabetic men: need for rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Fotios; Sofikitis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    In a recent publication, Gianatti and colleagues investigated the effect of testosterone treatment in obese, aging men with type 2 diabetes (T2D) with mild to moderate symptoms, a modest reduction in testosterone levels, mild to moderate aging male symptoms, and erectile dysfunction. [1] The authors could not show any significant improvement in constitutional or sexual symptoms in this group of men. This randomized double-blind, parallel, and placebo-controlled trial among other critically emphasizes the increased testosterone prescriptions worldwide and together with other corroborating or contradictory studies awakes the need for guidelines in the androgen replacement treatment.

  3. Testosterone therapy increased muscle mass and lipid oxidation in aging men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Louise; Højlund, Kurt; Hougaard, David M

    2011-01-01

    The indication for testosterone therapy in aging hypogonadal men without hypothalamic, pituitary, or testicular disease remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of testosterone therapy on insulin sensitivity, substrate metabolism, body composition, and lipids...... in aging men with low normal bioavailable testosterone levels using a predefined cutoff level for bioavailable testosterone. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of testosterone treatment (gel) was done on 38 men, aged 60-78 years, with bioavailable testosterone 94 cm. Insulin......-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) and substrate oxidation were assessed by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps combined with indirect calorimetry. Lean body mass (LBM) and total fat mass (TFM) were measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry, and serum total testosterone was measured by tandem mass spectrometry...

  4. Testosterone Therapy in a Man with Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer: Pro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgentaler, Abraham

    2017-10-05

    The original prohibition of testosterone therapy for men with prostate cancer was based on outdated concepts developed more than 70 yr ago. Current evidence, although limited, provides consistently reassuring results that testosterone therapy may be reasonably offered to many men with prostate cancer. These men may experience valuable benefits in quality of life if they suffer from symptoms of testosterone deficiency (hypogonadism). Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hormone replacement therapy in menopause

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pardini, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Although estrogen has been clinically available for more than six decades, women have been confused by different opinions regarding the risks and benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (HT), estrogen therapy (ET...

  6. Advances in hormone replacement therapy: making the menopause manageable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palacios Santiago

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The importance of the results of some large, randomized controlled trials (RCTs on Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT has modified the risk/benefit perception of HRT. Recent literature review supports a different management. The differences in age at initiation and the duration of HRT are key points. HRT appears to decrease coronary disease in younger women, near menopause; yet, in older women, HRT increases risk of a coronary event. Although HRT is a recognized method in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, it is not licensed for the prevention of osteoporosis as a first-line treatment. The effectiveness of low and ultra-low estrogen doses has been demonstrated for the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, genital atrophy and the prevention of bone loss, with fewer side-effects than the standard dose therapy. Further research, however, is needed to determine the effect both on fractures, as well as on cardiovascular and breast diseases. Newer progestins show effects that are remarkably different from those of other assays. The effectiveness of testosterone at improving both sexual desire and response in surgically and naturally postmenopausal women is shown by the testosterone patch. The intention, dose and regimen of HRT need to be individualized, based on the principle of choosing the lowest appropriate dose in relation to the severity of symptoms and the time and menopause age.

  7. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    . This review is based on the English-language literature on the effect of estrogen therapy and estrogen plus progestin therapy on postmenopausal women. The advantages of hormone replacement therapy are regulation of dysfunctional uterine bleeding, relief of hot flushes, and prevention of atrophic changes......The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy...... in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin...

  8. Breast Cancer, Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy, and Sexual Functioning: A Pilot Study of the Effects of Vaginal Testosterone Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Dahir, DNP, IF

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: The use of a compounded testosterone vaginal cream applied daily for 4 weeks improves reported sexual health quality of life in women with breast cancer taking AIs. Dahir M and Travers‐Gustafson D. Breast cancer, aromatase inhibitor therapy, and sexual functioning: A pilot study of the effects of vaginal testosterone therapy. Sex Med 2014;2:8–15.

  9. [Hormone replacement therapy: curse or blessing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Fink, D; Lang, U; Kimmig, R

    2006-01-01

    There is a controversial discussion on the risks and benefits of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), and many women and doctors have revised their opinions of HRT over the last few years. Complementary and alternative therapies can be considered an option to treat menopausal symptoms. The following issue summarizes the actual knowledge of treatment options of menopausal symptoms.

  10. Safety of physiological testosterone therapy in women: lessons from female-to-male transsexuals (FMT) treated with pharmacological testosterone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M; Gooren, Louis J

    2010-11-01

    The safety of long-term physiological doses of testosterone (T) therapy in women with sexual dysfunction is a contentious issue, in part, because of fear of adverse effects, such as breast cancer, vascular disease, and excessive virilization. This unsubstantiated fear has hampered progress in treating women with sexual dysfunction using T therapy in physiological doses to achieve circulating levels in the normal range. To examine evidence derived from studies in female-to-male transsexuals (FMT) treated with supraphysiological (pharmacological) doses of T for long periods of time with no apparent major adverse effects. A comprehensive literature search of relevant articles published between 1980 and 2010 pertaining to the topic of T in FMTs was performed using PubMed. The following key words were used: female-to-male transsexuals; testosterone; virilization; gender re-assignment; and androgen therapy in women. Relevant articles were retrieved, reviewed, and the information was analyzed and evaluated for study methodology and major findings. Data from peer-reviewed publications were critically analyzed and the information was summarized. The data from the studies reported in the literature to date strongly suggest that treatment of FMTs with supra-physiological doses of T had minimal adverse effects. No increase in mortality, breast cancer, vascular disease, or other major health problems were reported. No significant serious adverse effects were reported in FMTs treated with pharmacological doses of T. In light of the findings with supraphysiological doses of T, we suggest that treatment with T at doses producing physiological levels in women with sexual dysfunction are expected to produce limited and minimal adverse effects. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  11. Hormone replacement therapy in morphine-induced hypogonadic male chronic pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravaioli Laura

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In male patients suffering from chronic pain, opioid administration induces severe hypogonadism, leading to impaired physical and psychological conditions such as fatigue, anaemia and depression. Hormone replacement therapy is rarely considered for these hypogonadic patients, notwithstanding the various pharmacological solutions available. Methods To treat hypogonadism and to evaluate the consequent endocrine, physical and psychological changes in male chronic pain patients treated with morphine (epidural route, we tested the administration of testosterone via a gel formulation for one year. Hormonal (total testosterone, estradiol, free testosterone, DHT, cortisol, pain (VAS and other pain questionnaires, andrological (Ageing Males' Symptoms Scale - AMS and psychological (POMS, CES-D and SF-36 parameters were evaluated at baseline (T0 and after 3, 6 and 12 months (T3, T6, T12 respectively. Results The daily administration of testosterone increased total and free testosterone and DHT at T3, and the levels remained high until T12. Pain rating indexes (QUID progressively improved from T3 to T12 while the other pain parameters (VAS, Area% remained unchanged. The AMS sexual dimension and SF-36 Mental Index displayed a significant improvement over time. Conclusions In conclusion, our results suggest that a constant, long-term supply of testosterone can induce a general improvement of the male chronic pain patient's quality of life, an important clinical aspect of pain management.

  12. Dispelling Myths about Nicotine Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... L, Mant D, Fowler G. 2004. Nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev :CD000146 2. Luty ... A, Fanelli C, et al. Effect of cigarette smoking and of a transdermal nicotine delivery system on glucoregulation ... Cardiol. 1999;22:357-360. 18. Working ...

  13. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Several studies indicate that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increased risk of intracranial meningioma, while associations between HRT use and risk of other brain tumors have been less explored. We investigated the influence of HRT use on the risk of glioma...

  14. Hormone Replacement Therapy: Can It Cause Vaginal Bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy: Can it cause vaginal bleeding? I'm taking hormone therapy for menopause symptoms, and my monthly ... www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menopause/expert-answers/hormone-replacement-therapy/FAQ-20058499 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  15. EMAS position statement : Testosterone replacement therapy in the aging male‏

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimopoulou, Christina; Ceausu, Iuliana; Depypere, Herman; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Mueck, Alfred; Pérez-López, Faustino R; Rees, Margaret; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Senturk, Levent M; Simonsini, Tommaso; Stevenson, John C; Stute, Petra; Goulis, Dimitrios G

    INTRODUCTION: Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) represents a common clinical entity in aging males, characterized by the presence of symptoms (most usually of a sexual nature, such as decreased libido, decreased spontaneous erections and erectile dysfunction) and signs, in combination with low serum

  16. Reduction of calprotectin and phosphate during testosterone therapy in aging men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L; Christensen, L. L.; Pedersen, Susanne Møller

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of testosterone treatment on biomarkers calprotectin, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), soluble Klotho, phosphate, calcium, parathyroid hormone, creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Design: Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study....... Setting: Odense Androgen Study—the effect of Testim and training in hypogonadal men. Participants: Men aged 60–78 years old with a low normal concentration of free of bioavailable testosterone 94 cm recruited from 2008 to 2009 (N = 48) by advertisement. Intervention......: Participants were randomized to receive 5–10 g gel/50–100 mg testosterone (Testim®, Ipsen, France) or 5–10 g gel/placebo. Results: The plasma levels of calprotectin and phosphate were significantly reduced in the group receiving testosterone therapy (gel) compared to the placebo group (p Testosterone...

  17. The many faces of testosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerald Bain

    2008-01-01

    much less of an issue with testosterone replacement therapy.Keywords: testosterone, androgens, male hypogonadism, anabolic steroids

  18. Study protocol to investigate the effects of testosterone therapy as an adjunct to exercise rehabilitation in hypogonadal males with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur Atish

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Testosterone deficiency is a common occurrence in men with chronic heart failure (CHF and may underpin features of advanced disease, including reduced skeletal muscle mass and fatigue. It is positively correlated with cardiac output and exercise capacity in patients with CHF, whereas a significant improvement in both these parameters has been observed following testosterone replacement therapy. Testosterone therapy has also been shown to reduce circulating levels of inflammatory markers, (TNF-α, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 in patients with established coronary artery disease and testosterone deficiency. This pilot study will assess the feasibility of a combined exercise rehabilitation and adjunctive testosterone therapy intervention for evoking improvements in exercise capacity, circulating inflammatory markers, cardiac and skeletal muscle function, indices of psychological health status and quality of life in hypogonadal males with chronic heart failure. Methods/design Following ethical approval, 36 patients will be randomly allocated to one of two groups: testosterone or placebo therapy during exercise rehabilitation. A combined programme of moderate intensity aerobic exercise and resistance (strength training will be used. The primary outcome measure is exercise capacity, assessed using an incremental shuttle walk test. Secondary outcome measures include measures of peak oxygen uptake, cardiac function, lower-limb skeletal muscle contractile function and oxygenation during exercise, circulating inflammatory markers, psychological health status and quality of life. Discussion Exercise rehabilitation can safely increase exercise capacity in stable CHF patients but there is a need for studies which are aimed at evaluating the long-term effects of physical training on functional status, morbidity and mortality. This pilot study will provide valuable preliminary data on the efficacy of testosterone therapy as an adjunct to exercise

  19. Factitious increases in serum testosterone concentrations related to phenylbutazone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzan, Bernard; Dumont-Fischer, Dominique; Lahlou, Najiba; Bihan, Hélène; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Alvarez, Jean-Claude; Perret, Gérard-Yves; Cohen, Régis

    2008-04-01

    We report 6 additional observations of a drug/hormone assay interaction between serum testosterone and phenylbutazone intake. This interaction had been described previously only once. We discuss its potential mechanisms, based upon our experimental findings, and its clinical implications.

  20. Testosterone Deficiency, Cardiac Health, and Older Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hackett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low levels of testosterone are manifested by erectile dysfunction, reduced sexual desire, and loss of morning erections with increasing numbers of men are being diagnosed and require treatment. The prevalence rates of testosterone deficiency vary according to different studies but may be as high as 40% in populations of patients with type 2 diabetes. There is increasing evidence that testosterone deficiency is associated with increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Screening for low testosterone is recommended in a number of high risk groups including those with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. There are recent data to suggest that testosterone replacement therapy may reduce cardiovascular mortality as well as improving multiple surrogate markers for cardiovascular events. Specific clinical trials of testosterone replacement therapy are needed in selected populations but in the meantime we must treat patients based on the best current evidence.

  1. Testosterone replacement attenuates intimal hyperplasia development in an androgen deficient model of vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Brian M; Univers, Junior; Fisher, Richard K; Kirkpatrick, Stacy S; Klein, Frederick A; Freeman, Michael B; Mountain, Deidra J H; Grandas, Oscar H

    2017-01-01

    Androgen deficiency (AD) is associated with increased risk of vascular disease. Dysfunctional remodeling of the vessel wall and atypical proliferative potential of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are fundamental processes in the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH). We have demonstrated an inverse relationship between dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and VSMC migration and proliferation in vitro. Here, we investigated the role of AD and testosterone (TST) replacement in IH development in an animal model of vascular injury to elucidate mechanisms modulated by AD that could be playing a role in the development of vascular pathogenesis. Aged orchiectomized male rats underwent TST supplementation via controlled release pellet (0.5-35 mg). Young adult and middle-age adult intact (MI) and orchiectomized placebo (Plac) groups served as controls. All groups underwent balloon angioplasty of the left common carotid at a 14-d post-TST. Carotid tissue was collected at a 14-d post-balloon angioplasty and subjected to morphologic and immunohistochemical analyses. Human male VSMCs were treated with DHT (0-3000 nM) for 24 h then subjected to quantitative PCR for gene expression analyses and costained for F-actin and G-actin for visualization of cytoskeletal organization. I:M ratio was increased in Plac, subphysiological, low-physiological, and high pharmacologic level TST animals compared with MI controls but was decreased with high-physiological TST supplementation. Injury-induced expression of previously defined matrix metalloproteinase remodeling enzymes was not significantly affected by TST status. Urotensin (UTS) receptor (UTSR) staining was low in injured vessels of all young adult intact, MI, and Plac controls but was significantly upregulated in all groups receiving exogenous TST supplementation, irrespective of dose. In vitro DHT exposure increased the expression of UTSR in VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. However, this did

  2. Reduction of calprotectin and phosphate during testosterone therapy in aging men: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, L; Christensen, L L; Pedersen, S M; Andersen, M

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of testosterone treatment on biomarkers calprotectin, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), soluble Klotho, phosphate, calcium, parathyroid hormone, creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Odense Androgen Study-the effect of Testim and training in hypogonadal men. Men aged 60-78 years old with a low normal concentration of free of bioavailable testosterone 94 cm recruited from 2008 to 2009 (N = 48) by advertisement. Participants were randomized to receive 5-10 g gel/50-100 mg testosterone (Testim®, Ipsen, France) or 5-10 g gel/placebo. The plasma levels of calprotectin and phosphate were significantly reduced in the group receiving testosterone therapy (gel) compared to the placebo group (p Testosterone treatment did not have any significant effect on plasma levels of FGF23 or soluble Klotho. The reduction in phosphate levels was inversely associated with bioavailable testosterone. Compared to the placebo group, 6 months of testosterone therapy (gel) reduced calprotectin and phosphate levels suggesting decreased inflammation and decreased cardiovascular risk.

  3. IMPLANT WITH RISELLE IN HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Badoi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important roles of hormone replacement therapy is to remove the symptoms of menopause, especially the vaso-motor and urogenital tract appeared immediately after oophorectomy. The decreased risks of cardiovascular diseases are the long-term benefits. The cardiovascular protective effect of estrogen occurs by different mechanisms, all leading to reduction or slowing atherosclerotic processes and this improves cardiovascular performance. After 2 years of treatment no patient in group 1 interrupted therapy.

  4. Drug Dosing During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, A. Jill

    2008-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are used to manage fluid overload and/or renal failure. The continuous nature of the fluid and solute removal has less impact on hemodynamic variables in critically ill patients, making CRRT preferred over intermittent hemodialysis for some patients in the intensive care arena. The impact of CRRT on drug removal is variable depending on the CRRT modality, the ultrafiltrate and dialysate flow rates, the filter, and the patient's residual renal func...

  5. UGT2B17 genotype and the pharmacokinetic serum profile of testosterone during substitution therapy with testosterone undecanoate. A retrospective experience from 207 men with hypogonadism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Kirstine; Jørgensen, Niels; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Testosterone (T) is mainly excreted in the urine as testosterone glucuronide (TG). This glucuronidation is partly dependent on the UGT2B17 genotype, and TG excretion is therefore lower in men having the UGT2B17 deletion. However, the possible influence of UGT2B17 genotype on serum T...... during androgen therapy is unknown. We retrospectively investigated the possible association between the UGT2B17 gene polymorphism and serum T levels in hypogonadal men during Testosterone undecanoate (TU) substitution therapy. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred and seven patients treated with TU (Nebido...

  6. Osteoprotegerin Levels Decrease During Testosterone Therapy in Aging Men and are Associated with Changed Distribution of Regional Fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, L; Glintborg, D; Højlund, K

    2013-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of testosterone treatment are debated. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is an independent marker of cardiovascular risk. We investigated the effect of testosterone therapy on OPG levels in aging men with low normal bioavailable testosterone levels. A randomized, double......-blinded, placebo-controlled study of 6 months testosterone therapy (gel) in 38 men aged 60-78 years with bioavailable testosterone 94 cm was performed. Clinical evaluation, OPG, and C-reactive protein (CRP) measurements were carried out. Lean body mass (LBM), total fat mass, and bone mineral density (BMD) were...... established by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Power calculation was based on an increase in LBM during testosterone therapy and responders were defined as testosterone treated patients with increased...

  7. Hypoparathyroidism: Replacement Therapy with Parathyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rejnmark

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT is characterized by low serum calcium levels caused by an insufficient secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH. Despite normalization of serum calcium levels by treatment with activated vitamin D analogues and calcium supplementation, patients are suffering from impaired quality of life (QoL and are at increased risk of a number of comorbidities. Thus, despite normalization of calcium levels in response to conventional therapy, this should only be considered as an apparent normalization, as patients are suffering from a number of complications and calcium-phosphate homeostasis is not normalized in a physiological manner. In a number of recent studies, replacement therapy with recombinant human PTH (rhPTH(1-84 as well as therapy with the N-terminal PTH fragment (rhPTH(1-34 have been investigated. Both drugs have been shown to normalize serum calcium while reducing needs for activated vitamin D and calcium supplements. However, once a day injections cause large fluctuations in serum calcium. Twice a day injections diminish fluctuations, but don't restore the normal physiology of calcium homeostasis. Recent studies using pump-delivery have shown promising results on maintaining normocalcemia with minimal fluctuations in calcium levels. Further studies are needed to determine whether this may improve QoL and lower risk of complications. Such data are needed before replacement with the missing hormone can be recommended as standard therapy.

  8. Testosterone replacement maintains smooth muscle content in the corpus cavernosum of orchiectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziele Halmenschlager

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Normal testosterone levels maintain CC smooth muscle content and do not influence elastic fibers, collagen content and apoptotic index. Further studies should be performed in order to investigate the mechanisms by which androgen mediates its effects on CC structure.

  9. Testosterone therapy and prostate cancer--safety concerns are well founded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is a potent hormone with a variety of physiological effects. The diagnosis of androgen deficiency has increased dramatically over the past decade, along with the widespread use of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST). The long-term effects of TST are uncertain, and the risk of overdiagnosis and overtreatment of men who have a normal age-related decline in testosterone is substantial. The biology of the androgen receptor (AR) pathway is complex, and the saturation model does not take the heterogeneity of human prostate cancer into account. Large-scale trials to confirm the safety of testosterone with respect to the risks of prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease with reasonable confidence limits have not been done, and existing data are insufficient to exclude these adverse events. Instead, evidence suggests that prostate cancer could, in fact, be stimulated by TST, and that the risk of cardiovascular events is increased. Overall, TST seems to impose significant risks, and should be used with caution.

  10. Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin G replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Francisco A

    2016-11-01

    Human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) for therapeutic use has been available for decades. This drug was developed for treatment of antibody deficiency (replacement therapy), although its use has expanded into many anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory applications in recent years. This review focuses on IgG prescribing for replacement therapy. IgG for replacement is most often administered via the intravenous IgG (IVIG) or subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) routes. IVIG is usually administered every 34 weeks, and SCIG is usually administered weekly, although variations may be considered in all cases. Recently, a new product became available that uses hyaluronidase to facilitate absorption of large doses of SCIG less frequently (every 34 weeks, as with IVIG). There are important differences between the pharmacokinetics of these three routes of administration. IVIG therapy leads to high peaks and low troughs between infusions. IgG concentration fluctuates much less over time with SCIG. Hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIG is intermediate. SCIG may have lower bioavailability in comparison with IVIG and may require higher doses over time; this is not true for hyaluronidase SCIG. However, there are large variations in IgG half-life among individuals and with different products. Therefore, individualization of therapy is essential. Mild systemic flu-like adverse effects may affect up to 2025% of patients who receive IVIG, smaller fractions may experience more-severe symptoms, whereas anaphylaxis is exceedingly rare. General flu-like systemic adverse effects are minimal with SCIG (intermediate with hyaluronidase SCIG), but transient (24 hours), mild, local inflammatory symptoms at infusion sites are relatively common with both forms. Additional rare but important complications of IgG therapy include thrombotic events and hemolysis that can be seen at high doses with any route of administration. Renal adverse effects may occur with IVIG as well. The variety of IgG products and routes of

  11. Testosterone in women-the clinical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Susan R; Jacobsen, Sarah Wåhlin

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is an essential hormone for women, with physiological actions mediated directly or via aromatisation to oestradiol throughout the body. Despite the crucial role of testosterone and the high circulating concentrations of this hormone relative to oestradiol in women, studies of its...... action and the effects of testosterone deficiency and replacement in women are scarce. The primary indication for the prescription of testosterone for women is loss of sexual desire, which causes affected women substantial concern. That no formulation has been approved for this purpose has not impeded...... the widespread use of testosterone by women-either off-label or as compounded therapy. Observational studies indicate that testosterone has favourable cardiovascular effects measured by surrogate outcomes; however, associations between endogenous testosterone and the risk of cardiovascular disease and total...

  12. Renal Replacement Therapy in Austere Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobinuric renal failure is the classically described acute renal event occurring in disaster environments—commonly after an earthquake—which most tests the ingenuity and flexibility of local and regional nephrology resources. In recent decades, several nephrology organizations have developed response teams and planning protocols to address disaster events, largely focusing on patients at risk for, or with, acute kidney injury (AKI. In this paper we briefly review the epidemiology and outcomes of patients with dialysis-requiring AKI after such events, while providing greater focus on the management of the end-stage renal disease population after a disaster which incapacitates a pre-existing nephrologic infrastructure (if it existed at all. “Austere” dialysis, as such, is defined as the provision of renal replacement therapy in any setting in which traditional, first-world therapies and resources are limited, incapacitated, or nonexistent.

  13. [Fulminant acne in Klinefelter syndrome treated with testosterone. A side effect of anti-tallness therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, A A; Burg, G

    1989-08-01

    Acne lesions usually do not occur in patients with Klinefelter's syndrome (47 XXXY). But a 19 year old patient with Klinefelter's syndrome, under therapy with testosteronenantat (500 mg every two weeks over a period of 18 months) for treatment of excessively tall stature developed acne fulminans. Following discontinuation of testosterone treatment and isotretinoin therapy over 16 weeks skin lesions healed almost completely although with severe scars. In conclusion, high doses testosterone-treatment in excessively tall boys needs the additional care of dermatologist when mostly after a 7 months period acne begins to develop under this treatment.

  14. Neonatal varicella pneumonia, surfactant replacement therapy

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    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox is a very contagious viral disease that caused by varicella-zoster virus, which appears in the first week of life secondary to transplacental transmission of infection from the affected mother. When mother catches the disease five days before and up to two days after the delivery, the chance of varicella in neonate in first week of life is 17%. A generalized papulovesicular lesion is the most common clinical feature. Respiratory involvement may lead to giant cell pneumonia and respiratory failure. The mortality rate is up to 30% in the case of no treatment, often due to pneumonia. Treatment includes hospitalization, isolation and administration of intravenous acyclovir. The aim of this case report is to introduce the exogenous surfactant replacement therapy after intubation and mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in neonatal chickenpox pneumonia and respiratory distress. Case Presentation: A seven-day-old neonate boy was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Babol, north of Iran, with generalized papulovesicular lesions and respiratory distress. His mother has had a history of Varicella 4 days before delivery. He was isolated and given supportive care, intravenous acyclovir and antibiotics. On the second day, he was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilator due to severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Because of sever pulmonary involvement evidenced by Chest X-Ray and high ventilators set-up requirement, intratracheal surfactant was administered in two doses separated by 12 hours. He was discharged after 14 days without any complication with good general condition. Conclusion: Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy can be useful as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of respiratory failure due to neonatal chickenpox.

  15. Acne of the fulminans type following testosterone therapy in three excessively tall boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traupe, H; von Mühlendahl, K E; Brämswig, J; Happle, R

    1988-03-01

    Ulcerative acne was observed in three boys who underwent long-term treatment with high doses of testosterone for excessively tall stature. Even after withdrawal of testosterone therapy, this devastating type of acne still persisted for several months. After starting isotretinoin treatment, two cases progressed to full-blown acne fulminans with systemic manifestations. In these two cases, oral isotretinoin therapy induced multiple lesions of hyperproliferative granulation tissue resembling pyogenic granuloma. Topical steroid treatment proved to be beneficial for this adverse effect. Systemic corticosteroid treatment was administered in one case. High testosterone levels during puberty may be an important trigger mechanism of acne fulminans and may explain why this disease almost exclusively affects male adolescents.

  16. Testosterone replacement alters the cell size in visceral fat but not in subcutaneous fat in hypogonadal aged male rats as a late-onset hypogonadism animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhamed A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Amr Abdelhamed,1,2 Shin-ichi Hisasue,1 Masato Shirai,3 Kazuhito Matsushita,1 Yoshiaki Wakumoto,1 Akira Tsujimura,1 Taiji Tsukamoto,4 Shigeo Horie1 1Department of Urology, Juntendo University, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Andrology, Sohag University, Graduate School of Medicine, Sohag, Egypt; 3Department of Urology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu, Japan; 4Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, Japan Background: Patients with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH benefit from testosterone replacement by improvement in the parameters of the metabolic syndrome, but fat cell morphology in these patients is still unclear. This study aims to determine the effect of testosterone replacement on the morphology of fat cells in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue and on erectile function in hypogonadal aged male rats as a model of LOH. Methods: Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 20–22 months were randomly allocated to two groups, ie, aged male controls (control group, n=5 and aged males treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT group, n=5. Testosterone enanthate 25 mg was injected subcutaneously every 2 weeks for 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the intracavernous pressure (ICP and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP ratio was assessed. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue specimens were collected and analyzed using Image-J software. Results: Body weight at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after TRT was 800.0±35.4 g, 767.5±46.3 g, and 780±40.4 g, respectively (not statistically significant. The ICP/MAP ratio was 0.341±0.015 in the TRT group and 0.274±0.049 in the control group (not statistically significant. The median subcutaneous fat cell size was 4.85×103 (range 0.85–12.53×103 µm2 in the control group and 4.93×103 (range 6.42–19.7×103 µm2 in the TRT group (not statistically significant. In contrast, median visceral fat cell size was significantly

  17. Testosterone as potential effective therapy in treatment of obesity in men with testosterone deficiency: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Farid; Aversa, Antonio; Isidori, Andrea M; Gooren, Louis J

    2012-03-01

    Obesity negatively affects human health. Limiting food intake, while producing some weight loss, results in reduction of lean body mass. Combined with moderate exercise it produces significant weight loss, maintains lean body mass and improves insulin sensitivity, but appears difficult to adhere to. Bariatric surgery is clinically effective for severely obese individuals compared with non-surgical interventions, but has limitations. Clinical and pre-clinical studies have implicated a role for testosterone (T) in the patho-physiology of obesity. A literature search in PubMed on the role of T in counteracting obesity and its complications. Obesity per se impairs testicular T biosynthesis. Furthermore, lower-than-normal T levels increase accumulation of fat depots, particularly abdominal (visceral) fat. This fat distribution is associated with development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its sequels, namely type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). T treatment reverses fat accumulation with significant improvement in lean body mass, insulin sensitivity and biochemical profiles of cardiovascular risk. The contribution of T to combating obesity in hypogonadal men remains largely unknown to medical professionals managing patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Many physicians associate T treatment in men with risks for prostate malignancy and CVD. These beliefs are not supported by recent insights. While overall treatment of obesity is unsuccessful, T treatment of hypogonadal men may be effective, also because it improves mood, energy, reduces fatigue and may motivate men to adhere to diet and exercise regimens designed to combat obesity. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers

  18. [Medical quality circles for drug replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tönies, Hans; Maier, Manfred; Bäwert, Andjela

    2006-08-01

    Drug replacement therapy using synthetic opioids is in Vienna mostly carried out by primary care physicians. Group teaching in quality assurance groups has been installed in order to give these doctors the necessary personal and informational assistance. Evaluation has shown that: 1. 90% of the doctors were highly or well satisfied with the teaching. Only 10% were slightly critical. 2. They could better communicate with, and were able to show more tolerance towards, the "difficult" patients. 3. Specialized knowledge increased (risk of infection, "management of hepatitis", contact with authorities, co-medication). 4. Some critical remarks pointed towards ways in which this particular further education could in future be better organized and dealt with more intensively.

  19. Hormonal replacement therapy after gynaecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglia, Nicoletta; Mariani, Luca; Marenco, Davide; Robba, Claudio; Peano, Elisa; Kubatzki, Franziska; Sismondi, Piero

    2006-01-01

    Thousands of women are treated each year for gynaecological cancers; many of these are already in menopause, while other younger patients will go into early menopause due to surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy to the pelvic region. The aim of this paper is to review the biological and clinical evidence in favour and against hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use after gynaecological cancers. With the exception of breast and endometrial cancer, there is no biological evidence that HRT may increase the recurrence risk. In women with previous endometrial cancer, HRT use is not supported by univocal and conclusive data to formulate specific recommendations, whereas most authors suggest that oestrogens may be used after adequate information about risks and benefits. The use of HRT in breast cancer patients is, at present, considered contra-indicated, even if results of clinical trials are not concordant. Therapeutic non-hormonal alternatives may be proposed to these patients.

  20. GH-replacement therapy in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, J S; Jørgensen, J O; Pedersen, S A

    1991-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency in adults, whether GH deficient since childhood or patients rendered GH deficient in adult life, is associated with psychosocial maladjustment, reduced muscle strength and reduced exercise capacity. Body composition is significantly altered with increased fat...... and decreased muscle volume as compared to healthy subjects. Kidney function is subnormal, and so is sweat secretion. Epidemiological data suggest premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease in hypopituitary patients. Short-term GH treatment trials have shown improved psychosocial performance......, normalization of body composition, increased muscle strength, improved exercise capacity, increased cardiac performance and increase in bone mineral mass as well as in serum markers of bone turnover, and normalization of kidney function. Thus GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient adults exhibits potential long...

  1. Delayed Infusion Reactions to Enzyme Replacement Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Zahra; Whitley, Chester B; Rudser, Kyle D; Utz, Jeanine R Jarnes

    2017-01-01

    There are currently ten intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) products available for the treatment of eight different lysosomal diseases (LD) in the USA. Additional ERT products are in clinical trials. The most common ERT adverse events are infusion reactions (IR). While IR are often defined as hypersensitivity or anaphylactoid reactions occurring concurrently with (i.e., during) infusion administration (CIR), there exists the potential for delayed infusion reactions (DIR), which present after completion of infusion administration. Concurrent infusion reactions (CIR) are not the only infusion reactions associated with enzyme therapy. This study evaluated the occurrence of infusion reactions in 46 patients with LD who had received ERT for a minimum of 2 years. Infusion reactions were evaluated according to symptoms, time of onset, and duration of reactions. The frequency of infusion reactions with each ERT product was compared to that reported in the FDA-approved product package insert. In this study, DIR were observed and occurred as often as CIR in the study population, despite not being characterized or reported in most ERT product package inserts. Effective methods for managing DIR and CIR differed, thus emphasizing the importance of monitoring for both types of infusion reactions in order to optimize outcomes for patients using ERT.

  2. Drug dosing during continuous renal replacement therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A Jill

    2008-04-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are used to manage fluid overload and/or renal failure. The continuous nature of the fluid and solute removal has less impact on hemodynamic variables in critically ill patients, making CRRT preferred over intermittent hemodialysis for some patients in the intensive care arena. The impact of CRRT on drug removal is variable depending on the CRRT modality, the ultrafiltrate and dialysate flow rates, the filter, and the patient's residual renal function; all of these may change from patient to patient or even in the same patient depending on the clinical status. However, CRRT modalities are generally more efficient than intermittent hemodialysis at drug removal, in some cases approximating or even exceeding normal renal function, resulting in a significant risk of subtherapeutic dosing if conventional hemodialysis dosing recommendations are followed. This annotated bibliography provides a summary of publications analyzing drug removal during CRRT, including CRRT settings and drug clearance values found in each study. Caution is warranted as findings from one study may not be generalizable to all patients due to the many factors that influence drug removal. Serum drug concentrations should be monitored when available, and patient clinical status is exceedingly important for following expected and unexpected responses to drug therapies. Reviews on general drug dosing calculations in CRRT are available elsewhere.

  3. Acute Renal Replacement Therapy in Pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajit K. Basu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI independently increases morbidity and mortality in children admitted to the hospital. Renal replacement therapy (RRT is an essential therapy in the setting of AKI and fluid overload. The decision to initiate RRT is complex and often complicated by concerns related to patient hemodynamic and thermodynamic instability. The choice of which RRT modality to use depends on numerous criteria that are both patient and treatment center specific. Surprisingly, despite decades of use, no randomized, controlled trial study involving RRT in pediatrics has been performed. Because of these factors, clear-cut consensus is lacking regarding key questions surrounding RRT delivery. In this paper, we will summarize existing data concerning RRT use in children. We discuss the major modalities and the data-driven specifics of each, followed by controversies in RRT. As no standard of care is in widespread use for RRT in AKI or in multiorgan disease, we conclude in this paper that prospective studies of RRT are needed to identify best practice guidelines.

  4. Delayed testosterone replacement restores nitric oxide synthase-containing nerve fibres and the erectile response in rat penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, K; Yajima, M; Carrier, S; Morgan, D M; Nunes, L; Lue, T F; Iwamoto, T

    2000-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of testosterone on penile innervation. Materials and methods Three groups of six rats each were assessed; two groups (1 and 2) were castrated and the third (group 3) underwent a sham operation (control). Eight weeks after castration, group 2 received a subcutaneous injection with testosterone. At 8 weeks, the rats in group 1 and 3 underwent a final functional analysis while those in group 2 did so at 12 weeks. The evaluation included a subcutaneous injection with apomorphine to study centrally mediated erection, and cavernosal nerve electrostimulation and papaverine injection to study peripherally mediated erection. At death a penile mid-shaft specimen was taken for NADPH-diaphorase staining. In the apomorphine study, castration resulted in significantly fewer yawns and erections than in the control, and those in group 2 significantly better central erectile function than in the controls. The mean (SEM) number of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing nerve fibres in the corpora cavernosa and both dorsal nerves of castrated rats, at 46.2 (9.1) and 203 (32.1), respectively, were significantly lower than in rats in group 2, at 84.1 (11.2) and 300.6 (17.1), and than in the controls, at 88.6 (10.9) and 306.3 (22.9), respectively. The intracavernosal pressure decreased significantly in the absence of testosterone, both after electrostimulation and intracavernosal papaverine injection. However, there was no difference between the control and group 2 rats in either the number of NOS-containing nerve fibres or in the peripheral erectile functional study. Testosterone acts on the nervous system to mediate erection; when it is absent there may be down-regulation of both the production and activity of NO, thereby decreasing the response to peripheral stimulation via the NO pathway. The restoration of erectile function seen in rats in group 2 supports this phenomenon. Delayed testosterone replacement has no detrimental effect on the restoration of the

  5. Combined administration of testosterone plus an ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor as a selective prostate-sparing anabolic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasuja, Ravi; Costello, James C; Singh, Rajan; Gupta, Vandana; Spina, Catherine S; Toraldo, Gianluca; Jang, Hyeran; Li, Hu; Serra, Carlo; Guo, Wen; Chauhan, Pratibha; Narula, Navjot S; Guarneri, Tyler; Ergun, Ayla; Travison, Thomas G; Collins, James J; Bhasin, Shalender

    2014-04-01

    Because of its anabolic effects on muscle, testosterone is being explored as a function-promoting anabolic therapy for functional limitations associated with aging; however, concerns about testosterone's adverse effects on prostate have inspired efforts to develop strategies that selectively increase muscle mass while sparing the prostate. Testosterone's promyogenic effects are mediated through upregulation of follistatin. We show here that the administration of recombinant follistatin (rFst) increased muscle mass in mice, but had no effect on prostate mass. Consistent with the results of rFst administration, follistatin transgenic mice with constitutively elevated follistatin levels displayed greater muscle mass than controls, but had similar prostate weights. To elucidate signaling pathways regulated differentially by testosterone and rFst in prostate and muscle, we performed microarray analysis of mRNAs from prostate and levator ani of castrated male mice treated with vehicle, testosterone, or rFst. Testosterone and rFst shared the regulation of many transcripts in levator ani; however, in prostate, 593 transcripts in several growth-promoting pathways were differentially expressed after testosterone treatment, while rFst showed a negligible effect with only 9 transcripts differentially expressed. Among pathways that were differentially responsive to testosterone in prostate, we identified ornithine decarboxylase (Odc1), an enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, as a testosterone-responsive gene that is unresponsive to rFst. Accordingly, we administered testosterone with and without α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an Odc1 inhibitor, to castrated mice. DFMO selectively blocked testosterone's effects on prostate, but did not affect testosterone's anabolic effects on muscle. Co-administration of testosterone and Odc1 inhibitor presents a novel therapeutic strategy for prostate-sparing anabolic therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical

  6. The Effect of Special Operations Training on Testosterone, Lean Body Mass, and Strength and the Potential for Therapeutic Testosterone Replacement: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    and muscle function during SOF training or sustained operations.  15. SUBJECT TERMS Androgenic, anabolic, cachexia, fatigue 16. SECURITY...Testosterone. Both testosterone and AAS have been used therapeutically to prevent cachexia, muscle wasting, and fatigue in patients living with HIV and...stopped. JAMA . 1992; 267(3):397-399. 26. Griggs RC, Kingston W, Jozefowicz RF, Herr BE, Forbes G, Halliday D. Effect of testosterone on muscle mass

  7. Neurosteroid replacement therapy for catamenial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Doodipala S; Rogawski, Michael A

    2009-04-01

    Perimenstrual catamenial epilepsy, the cyclical occurrence of seizure exacerbations near the time of menstruation, affects a high proportion of women of reproductive age with drug-refractory epilepsy. Enhanced seizure susceptibility in perimenstrual catamenial epilepsy is believed to be due to the withdrawal of the progesterone-derived GABA(A) receptor modulating neurosteroid allopregnanolone as a result of the fall in progesterone at the time of menstruation. Studies in a rat pseudopregnancy model of catamenial epilepsy indicate that after neurosteroid withdrawal there is enhanced susceptibility to chemoconvulsant seizures. There is also a transitory increase in the frequency of spontaneous seizures in epileptic rats that had experienced pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. In the catamenial epilepsy model, there is a marked reduction in the antiseizure potency of anticonvulsant drugs, including benzodiazepines and valproate, but an increase in the anticonvulsant potency and protective index of neurosteroids such as allopregnanolone and the neurosteroid analog ganaxolone. The enhanced seizure susceptibility and benzodiazepine-resistance subsequent to neurosteroid withdrawal may be related to reduced expression and altered kinetics of synaptic GABA(A) receptors and increased expression of GABA(A) receptor subunits (such as alpha4) that confer benzodiazepine insensitivity. The enhanced potency of neurosteroids may be due to a relative increase after neurosteroid withdrawal in the expression of neurosteroid-sensitive delta-subunit-containing perisynaptic or extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors. Positive allosteric modulatory neurosteroids and synthetic analogs such as ganaxolone may be administered to prevent catamenial seizure exacerbations, in what we call neurosteroid replacement therapy.

  8. [Risk discourse in Hormone Replacement Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zxy-Yann Jane; Chen, Hai-Chiao; Juan, Yueh-Ching

    2006-02-01

    The medical world has used Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) on menopausal women for over 70 years, but controversy surrounding the treatment remains. Findings reported by the NIH, U.S.A. in July 2002 indicated that HRT might cause cardiovascular and cancer risks, and resulted in serious concern among menopausal women using HRT in Taiwan. One after the other, members of the medical profession in Taiwan have argued that the medicine used in the research was different (from that used in Taiwan) and that the constitutions of western women are different from those of Taiwanese women, attempting to limit the negative impact of this research. HRT is one of the most widely used, but also one of the most controversial of medical technologies. The technico-scientific and sociocultural perspectives are two major approaches to the conceptualization of risk in relation to technology. Based on cognitive science, the technico-scientific discourse of risk emphasizes human forecasting of harmful events and scientific measures for preventing risk. The sociocultural perspective emphasizes that the risk is socially constructed and applies to control deviance. In addition, surveillance and regulated measures are applied to high-risk populations, as normalizing technology with moral implications. This paper suggests that health care professionals examine how HRT users interpret the meanings of risk. Reflection on the process and criteria for identifying high-risk populations is also suggested. Partnership with and empowerment of HRT users is advocated in preference to the use of regulating and normalizing measures.

  9. Drug dosing during continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchwell, Mariann D; Mueller, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has given clinicians an important option in the care of critically ill patients. The slow and continuous dialysate and ultrafiltrate flow rates that are employed with CRRT can yield drug clearances similar to an analogous glomerular filtration rate of the native kidneys. Advantages such as superior volume control, excellent metabolic control, and hemodynamic tolerance by critically ill patients are well documented, but an understanding of drug dosing for CRRT is still a bit of a mystery. Although some pharmaceutical companies have dedicated postmarket research in this direction, many pharmaceutical companies have chosen not to pursue this information as it is not mandated and represents a relatively small part of their market. This lack of valuable information has created many challenges in the care of the critically ill patient as intermittent hemodialysis drug dosing recommendations cannot be extrapolated to CRRT. This drug dosing review will highlight factors that clinicians should consider when determining a pharmacotherapy regimen for a patient receiving CRRT.

  10. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Taixiang; Fu, Ping

    2014-06-15

    Rhabdomyolysis is a condition that is characterised by the breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue and leakage of intracellular myocyte contents into circulating blood. Rhabdomyolysis can lead to acute kidney injury (AKI) and is a potentially life-threatening condition. Studies have indicated that continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) may provide benefits for people with rhabdomyolysis by removing potentially damaging myoglobin and stabilising haemodynamic and metabolic status. We aimed to: i) assess the efficacy of CRRT in removing myoglobin; ii) investigate the influence of CRRT on mortality and kidney-related outcomes; and iii) evaluate the safety of CRRT for the treatment of people with rhabdomyolysis. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register to 6 January 2014 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. We also searched China National Knowledge Infrastructure (from 1 January 1979 to 16 April 2013) and the Chinese Clinical Trials Register (to 16 April 2013). All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that investigated clinical outcomes of CRRT for people with rhabdomyolysis were included. Two authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data. We derived risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data and mean differences (MD) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Methodological risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Of the three included studies (101 participants), one evaluated continuous arteriovenous haemodialysis and two investigated continuous venovenous haemofiltration; all included conventional therapy as control.We found significant decreases in myoglobin in patients among whom CRRT therapy was initiated on days four, eight, and 10 (day 4: MD -11.00 (μg/L), 95% CI -20.65 to -1.35; Day 8: MD -23.00 (μg/L), 95% CI -30.92 to -15.08; day 10: MD -341.87 (μg/L), 95% CI -626.15 to -57.59) compared with those who

  11. [Renal replacement therapy by hemodialysis: an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Claude

    2009-07-01

    The replacement of renal function by hemodialysis (HD) demonstrated for the first time that at least the most vital functions of a complex organ could be replaced by a man-made device. The Founding Father of dialysis is the Scottish chemist Thomas Graham who in 1861 found that colloid and crystalloid substances contained in fluids could be separated by diffusion of crystalloids through vegetable parchment acting as a semipermeable membrane. He coined this phenomenon as "dialysis". Fifty years later, using collodion as dialysis membrane and hirudin as anticoagulant (ATG), Abel et al. in Baltimore performed the first dialysis in dogs with a "vivi-diffusion" apparatus shortly after named "artificial kidney"(AK). In 1924, Haas in Germany treated for the first time uremia in man with dialysis using a collodion membrane and a new ATG: "heparin". Disappointed by unsuccessful results achieved with HD, Haas gave up his trials in 1928. HD revived in the early forties when Willem Kolff in the Netherlands built a "rotating drum kidney" using cellophane as dialysis membrane. The first recovery of a patient undergoing HD for acute renal failure (ARF) was reported by Kolff in 1945, paving the way for a rapidly worldwide expanding treatment of ARF with dialysis. The concept of applying HD to patients with end-stage chronic renal failure (ESRF), first pioneered by Alwall in Sweden as far back as 1948, became reality in 1960 when Scribner, Quinton et al. designed an external arteriovenous by pass made of Teflon tubing which allowed a permanent access to the bloodstream without requirement of permanent anticoagulation. The Teflon AV shunt, later improved with the use of a silicone rubber material (Silastic) has been the cornerstone for implementing the long-term treatment of ESRF patients with maintenance HD. The next major breakthrough in this area consisted in the surgically created AV fistula performed in 1966 by Cimino, Brescia et al. which considerably reduced the complications

  12. Renal replacement therapy after cardiac surgery; renal function recovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin Julia; Kandler, Kristian; Agerlin Windeløv, Nis

    2013-01-01

    To assess renal outcome in patients discharged from hospital following cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) with need for renal replacement therapy.......To assess renal outcome in patients discharged from hospital following cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) with need for renal replacement therapy....

  13. Continuous renal replacement therapy for critically ill infants and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Jepsen, Søren Bruun; Toft, Palle

    2012-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is an important treatment in critically ill children with acute kidney injury (AKI). Over the past decade, CRRT has been the preferred method of renal replacement therapy. We compared children with CRRT-treated adults with AKI in terms of return of kidney...

  14. Improving compliance with hormonal replacement therapy in primary osteoporosis prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, P; Hermann, A P; Gram, J

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate whether introduction of treatment alternatives would improve compliance with hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) as primary osteoporosis prevention in women not tolerating the first line osteoporosis prevention schedule.......To evaluate whether introduction of treatment alternatives would improve compliance with hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) as primary osteoporosis prevention in women not tolerating the first line osteoporosis prevention schedule....

  15. Hormone replacement therapy increases the risk of cranial meningioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the risk of meningioma in a population-based setting.......We investigated the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the risk of meningioma in a population-based setting....

  16. Testosterone Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Content View Sources Also Known As Total Testosterone Free Testosterone Bioavailable Testosterone Formal Name Testosterone This article ... small percent (less than 4%) circulates as free testosterone. Free testosterone plus the testosterone bound to albumin is ...

  17. Hormone replacement therapy and mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A

    2002-07-01

    The benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with oestrogen are well known and have led to widespread usage of HRT in post-menopausal women. There is an increased relative risk of breast cancer with prolonged HRT use of 1.7 at worst and this does not warrant more frequent screening. HRT itself makes mammographic screening less effective by adversely affecting both the sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography. A number of large studies have shown a reduction in the sensitivity of screening mammography of between 7% and 21% in current HRT users. This reduction in sensitivity is seen only in women over the age of 50 and is more marked when using single view mammography. The reduction in sensitivity is largely confined to those women who have a dense mammographic background pattern while on HRT. HRT use is also associated with a reduction in specificity of between 12% and almost 50%. This reduction in specificity is mainly found at incident screens. What can be done to minimize the adverse effects of HRT on mammographic screening? The imminent introduction of two views at all screens within the National Health Breast Screening Programme will be helpful. Short-term cessation of HRT use may deter attendance for screening by HRT users and is unproven. Combined oestrogen and progesterone preparations taken continuously appear to be particularly associated with adverse breast screening performance, while tibolone may have little effect on mammographic density. Manipulation of the type of HRT preparations used may allow the adverse effects of HRT on breast screening to be reduced. Evans, A. (2002)

  18. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on pituitary hormone secretion and hormone replacement therapies in GHD adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubina, Erika; Mersebach, Henriette; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2004-01-01

    We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes....

  19. Nonrenal indications for continuous renal replacement therapy: A report from the Prospective Pediatric Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Registry Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Geoffrey M; Walters, Scott; Goldstein, Stuart L; Alexander, Steven R; Baum, Michelle A; Blowey, Douglas L; Bunchman, Timothy E; Chua, Annabelle N; Fletcher, Sarah A; Flores, Francisco X; Fortenberry, James D; Hackbarth, Richard; McBryde, Kevin; Somers, Michael J G; Symons, Jordan M; Brophy, Patrick D

    2012-09-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy is the most often implemented dialysis modality in the pediatric intensive care unit setting for patients with acute kidney injury. However, it also has a role in the management of patients with nonrenal indications such as clearance of drugs and intermediates of disordered cellular metabolism. Using data from the multicenter Prospective Pediatric Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Registry, we report a cohort of pediatric patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy for nonrenal indications. Nonrenal indications were obtained from the combination of "other" category for continuous renal replacement therapy initiation and patient diagnosis (both primary and secondary). This cohort was further divided into three subgroups: inborn errors of metabolism, drug toxicity, and tumor lysis syndrome. From 2000 to 2005, a total of 50 continuous renal replacement therapy events with nonrenal indications for therapy were included in the Prospective Pediatric Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Registry. Indication-specific survival of the subgroups was 62% (inborn errors of metabolism), 82% (tumor lysis syndrome), and 95% (drug toxicity). The median small solute dose delivered among the subgroups ranged from 2125 to 8213 mL/1.73 m/hr, with 54%-59% receiving solely diffusion-based clearance as continuous venovenous hemodialysis. No association was established between survival and dose delivered, modality of continuous renal replacement therapy, or use of intermittent hemodialysis prior to continuous renal replacement therapy. Pediatric patients requiring continuous renal replacement therapy for nonrenal indications are a distinct cohort within the population receiving renal replacement therapy with little published experience of outcomes for this group. Survival within this cohort varies by indication for continuous renal replacement therapy and is not associated with continuous renal replacement therapy modality. Additionally

  20. BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN PATIENTS WITH ADDISON DISEASE ON REPLACEMENT THERAPY WITH PREDNISOLONE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandy, David D; Bhatia, Eesh

    2016-04-01

    In primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI), replacement with prednisolone may result in lower bone mineral density (BMD) compared with hydrocortisone therapy. However, the number of patients studied on prednisolone is small and the results are conflicting. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine BMD and its relation with therapy in patients on physiologic doses of prednisolone replacement. Forty-one consecutive patients (31 males, age [mean ± SD] 50.9 ± 13.0 years), receiving prednisolone (hydrocortisone equivalent [HCE] 13.0 ± 3.0 mg/m(2)) for 104 ± 95 months were studied. BMD was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and compared with an age- and sex-matched reference group of healthy Indian subjects (n = 677). Among males, BMD Z-scores (mean [95% confidence interval {CI}]) at lumbar spine (-0.42 [-0.80, -0.04]), femoral neck (-0.50 [-0.95, -0.06]) and total hip (-0.58 [-0.90, -0.26]) were significantly lower than the reference population. Z-scores in female patients did not differ from controls. Among postmenopausal females and males >50 years, 43% had osteoporosis (T-score ≤-2.5), as compared with 25% in the reference group (P = .04). There was no correlation between BMD Z-scores and HCE dose or duration of therapy. On multivariate regression analysis, body mass index was the only significant predictor of BMD. A high proportion of males (45%) had low serum testosterone (<300 ng/dL), but there was no correlation between testosterone and BMD. Male patients with PAI receiving physiologic prednisolone replacement had a small but significant diminution in BMD at all sites.

  1. Renal Replacement Therapy in the Critically Ill Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrope, Claire A; Fleming, Sarah; Kapetanstrataki, Melpo; Parslow, Roger C; Morris, Kevin P

    2018-01-08

    Although renal replacement therapy is widely used in critically ill children, there have been few comprehensive population-based studies of its use. This article describes renal replacement therapy use, and associated outcomes, in critically ill children across the United Kingdom in the largest cohort study of this patient group. A retrospective observational study using prospectively collected data. Data from the Pediatric Intensive Care Audit Network database which collects data on all children admitted to U.K. PICUs. Children (< 16 yr) in PICU who received renal replacement therapy between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, were identified. Individual-level data including age, underlying diagnosis, modality (peritoneal dialysis and continuous extracorporeal techniques [continuous renal replacement therapy]), duration of renal replacement therapy, PICU length of stay, and survival were extracted. Three-thousand eight-hundred twenty-five of 129,809 PICU admissions (2.9%) received renal replacement therapy in 30 of 33 centers. Volumes of renal replacement therapy varied considerably from 0% to 8.6% of PICU admissions per unit, but volume was not associated with patient survival. Overall survival to PICU discharge (73.8%) was higher than previous reports. Mortality risk was related to age, with lower risk in older children compared with neonates (odds ratio, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.5-0.8) although mortality did not increase over the age of 1 year; mode of renal replacement therapy, with lower risk in peritoneal dialysis than continuous renal replacement therapy methodologies (odds ratio, 0.7; 0.5-0.9); duration of renal replacement therapy (odds ratio, 1.02/d; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04); and primary diagnosis, with the lowest survival in liver disease patients (53.9%). This study describes current renal replacement therapy use across the United Kingdom and associated outcomes. We describe a number of factors associated with outcome, including age, underlying diagnosis, and

  2. Testosterone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are forms of testosterone injection used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in ... are low before you begin to use testosterone injection. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are ...

  3. [Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) as well as insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are essential hormones to maintain homeostasis of bone turnover by activating osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Results from GH replacement therapy for primary osteoporosis and adult-onset GH deficiency (AGHD) suggest that one year or more treatment period by this agent is required to gain bone mineral density (BMD) over the basal level after compensating BMD loss caused by dominant increase in bone resorption which was observed at early phase of GH treatment. A recent meta-analysis demonstrates the efficacy of GH replacement therapy on increases in BMD in male patients with AGHD. Additional analyses are needed to draw firm conclusions in female patients with AGHD, because insufficient amounts of GH might be administrated to them without considerations of influence of estrogen replacement therapy on IGF-1 production. Further observational studies are needed to clarify whether GH replacement therapy prevent fracture risk in these patients.

  4. Breast parenchymal change on mammography following postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Sun Jung; Kim, Hee Soo; Na, Jae Beom; Won, Jong Yoon; Won, Jae Whan [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Yong Gi; Cho, Byung Jae; Lee, Kyung Sang [Cheil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    To determine the frequency and distribution of parenchymal changes on mammography before and after hormone replacement therapy. Mammograms of 100 postmenopausal women who underwent hormone replacement therapy without breast disease were evaluated. Mammograms obtained annually after hormone replacement were analysed and compared with that of pretreatment. In addition, mammograms of control group and treatment group were compared. An increase in density of breast parenchyma was seen on the mammogram of 20 women(20%) receiving therapy. The mammograms from the control group showed no change. Mammographic changes were detected at first year in 13 women, 2nd year in 4 women, 3rd year in 2 women, and 4th year in 1 woman (average, 19 months). We conclude that increase in mammographic density following postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy is not uncommon(20%)

  5. QUALITY OF LIFE, COUNSELLING AND HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nena Kopčavar Guček

    2008-12-01

    Quality of life in menopause is a result of many factors and therefore it is very individual.Hormone replacement therapy is one of the possibilities of improvement. Therefore, it isessential that a woman is adequately informed about all the advantages and risks of thehormonal replacement therapy. Only an informed patient can be a partner in shareddecision making about the improvement of quality of life

  6. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Testosterone and cardiovascular disease in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Channer, Kevin S

    2012-01-01

    Despite regional variations in the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD), men are consistently more at risk of developing and dying from CAD than women, and the gender-specific effects of sex hormones are implicated in this inequality. This ‘Perspectives' article reviews the current evidence regarding the cardiovascular effects of testosterone in men including an examination of the age-related decline in testosterone, the relationship between testosterone levels and coronary disease, coronary risk factors and mortality. We also review the vaso-active effects of testosterone, and discuss how these have been used in men with heart failure and angina. We discuss the ‘cause' versus ‘effect' controversy, regarding low testosterone levels in men with coronary heart disease, as well as concerns over the use of testosterone replacement therapy in middle aged and elderly men. The article concludes with a discussion regarding the future direction for work in this interesting area, including the relative merits of screening for, and treating hypogonadism with testosterone replacement therapy in men with heart disease. PMID:22522504

  8. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection following Topical Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Pan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare condition, usually presenting as an acute coronary syndrome, and is often seen in states associated with high systemic estrogen levels such as pregnancy or oral contraceptive use. While topical hormonal replacement therapy may result in increased estrogen levels similar to those documented with oral contraceptive use, there are no reported cases of spontaneous coronary dissection with topical hormonal replacement therapy. We describe a 53-year-old female who developed two spontaneous coronary dissections while on topical hormonal replacement therapy. The patient had no other risk factors for coronary dissection. After withdrawal from topical hormonal therapy, our patient has done well and has not had recurrent coronary artery dissections over a one-year follow-up period. The potential contributory role of topical hormonal therapy as a cause of spontaneous coronary dissection should be recognized.

  9. Testosterone ethosomes for enhanced transdermal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainbinder, Denize; Touitou, Elka

    2005-01-01

    Physiological decrease in testosterone levels in men with age causes various changes with clinical significance. Recent testosterone replacement therapy is based mainly on transdermal nonpatch delivery systems. These products have the drawback of application on extremely large areas to achieve required hormone blood levels. The objective of the present study was to design and test a testosterone nonpatch formulation using ethosomes for enhanced transdermal absorption. The ethosomal formulation was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering for structure and size distribution and by ultracentrifugation for entrapment capacity. To evaluate the feasibility of this delivery system to enhance testosterone permeation through the skin, first the systemic absorption in rats was compared with a currently used gel (AndroGel). Further, theoretical estimation of testosterone blood concentration following ethosomal application in men was made. For this purpose, in vitro permeation experiments through human skin were performed to establish testosterone skin permeation values. In the design of these experiments, testosterone solubility in various solutions was measured and the effect of the receiver medium on the skin barrier function was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Theoretical estimation shows that testosterone human plasma concentration value in the upper part of the physiological range could be achieved by application of the ethosomal formulation on an area of 40 cm(2). This area is about 10 times smaller than required with current nonpatch formulations. Our work shows that the ethosomal formulation could enhance testosterone systemic absorption and also be used for designing new products that could solve the weaknesses of the current testosterone replacement therapies.

  10. Testosterone and the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, Travis; Sadhu, Archana; Petak, Steven; Robbins, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Testosterone (T) has a number of important effects on the cardiovascular system. In men, T levels begin to decrease after age 40, and this decrease has been associated with an increase in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular (CV) risk. Low T levels in men may increase their risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD), metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. Reduced T levels in men with congestive heart failure (CHF) portends a poor prognosis and is associated with increased mortality. Studies have reported a reduced CV risk with higher endogenous T concentration, improvement of known CV risk factors with T therapy, and reduced mortality in T-deficient men who underwent T replacement therapy versus untreated men. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been shown to improve myocardial ischemia in men with CAD, improve exercise capacity in patients with CHF, and improve serum glucose levels, HbA1c, and insulin resistance in men with diabetes and prediabetes. There are no large long-term, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials to provide definitive conclusions about TRT and CV risk. However, there currently is no credible evidence that T therapy increases CV risk and substantial evidence that it does not. In fact, existing data suggests that T therapy may offer CV benefits to men.

  11. Clarifications on Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy and Hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ting Wang

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: CRRT is not only a replacement for organ function, but an important form of hemodynamic therapy. Improved hemodynamic management of critically ill patients can be achieved by establishing specific therapeutic hemodynamic targets and maintaining circulatory stability during CRRT. Over the long term, observation of renal hemodynamics will provide greater opportunities for the progression of CRRT hemodynamic therapy.

  12. Enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease, towards individualized treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fabry disease is a very heterogeneous disorder for which expensive enzyme replacement therapy is available since more than 15 years. Because of the variety of symptoms and disease course, individual choices need to be made to improve the appropriate use of therapy. Supported by ZONWM, we have been

  13. The cost and effectiveness of surfactant replacement therapy at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    therapy ms of. The cost and effectiveness of surfactant replacement therapy at Johannesburg. Hospital, November 1991. December 1992 v. A. Davies, D. E. Ballot, ..... neural d retinopa developm ventilate these, 69 backgro. Main o urban ba developm. Study infants d. Tygerber at 3-mon. Result significa and ges babies w.

  14. Effects of physiologic testosterone therapy on quality of life, self-esteem, and mood in women with primary ovarian insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, Gioia M; Martinez, Pedro E; Klug, Summer P; Haq, Nazli A; Vanderhoof, Vien H; Koziol, Deloris E; Popat, Vaishali B; Kalantaridou, Sophia N; Calis, Karim A; Rubinow, David R; Schmidt, Peter J; Nelson, Lawrence M

    2014-09-01

    Women with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) display low androgen levels, which could contribute to mood and behavioral symptoms observed in this condition. We examined the effects of physiologic testosterone therapy added to standard estrogen/progestin therapy on quality of life, self-esteem, and mood in women with POI. One hundred twenty-eight women with 46,XX spontaneous POI participated in a 12-month randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-design investigation of the efficacy of testosterone augmentation of estrogen/progestin therapy. Quality of life, self-esteem, and mood symptoms were evaluated with standardized rating scales and a structured clinical interview. Differences in outcome measures between the testosterone and placebo treatments were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank sum tests. No differences in baseline characteristics, including serum hormone levels (P > 0.05), were found. Baseline mean (SD) Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale scores were 10.7 (8.6) and 9.2 (7.8) for testosterone and placebo, respectively (P = 0.35). After 12 months of treatment, measures of quality of life, self-esteem, and mood symptoms did not differ between treatment groups. Serum testosterone levels achieved physiologic levels in the testosterone group and were significantly higher compared with placebo (P women with POI. Our findings suggest that augmentation of standard estrogen/progestin therapy with physiologic testosterone therapy in young women with POI neither aggravates nor improves baseline reports of quality of life or self-esteem and had minimal effects on mood. Other mechanisms might play a role in the altered mood accompanying this disorder.

  15. Interaction between testosterone and growth hormone on whole-body protein anabolism occurs in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birzniece, Vita; Meinhardt, Udo J; Umpleby, Margot A; Handelsman, David J; Ho, Ken K Y

    2011-04-01

    GH and testosterone both exert protein-anabolic effects and may act synergistically. Liver and muscle are major sites of protein metabolism. Our objective was to determine whether the site of GH and testosterone interaction on protein metabolism is primarily hepatic or extrahepatic. In this open-label randomized crossover study, the impact on whole-body protein metabolism of oral (solely hepatic testosterone exposure) and transdermal (systemic testosterone exposure) testosterone replacement in the presence or absence of GH was compared. Eleven hypopituitary men with GH and testosterone deficiency were randomized to 2-wk treatments with transdermal testosterone (10 mg) or oral testosterone (40 mg), with or without GH replacement (0.6 mg/d). The dose of testosterone administered orally achieves physiological portal testosterone concentrations without spillover into the systemic circulation. Whole-body leucine turnover was measured, from which leucine rate of appearance (LRa), an index of protein breakdown, and leucine oxidation (Lox), a measure of irreversible protein loss, were estimated at the end of each treatment. In the absence of GH, neither transdermal nor oral testosterone affected LRa or Lox. GH therapy significantly increased LRa, an effect equally reduced by transdermal and oral testosterone administration. GH replacement alone did not significantly change Lox, whereas addition of testosterone treatment reduced Lox, with the effect not significantly different between transdermal and oral testosterone. In the doses used, testosterone stimulates protein anabolism by reducing protein breakdown and oxidation only in the presence of GH. Because the net effect on protein metabolism during GH therapy is not different between systemic and solely hepatic testosterone administration, we conclude that the liver is the primary site of this hormonal interaction.

  16. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of breast cancer: the role of progestins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia Irene; Pederson, Anette Tønnes; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2003-01-01

    . Recent studies originating from both the USA and Europe suggest that the combined treatment regimens with estrogen and progestin increase the risk of breast cancer beyond the risk following the use of unopposed estrogen. At present it is not known if progestins with different androgenicity influence......Epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer associated with the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). This notion is mostly based on studies from the USA. During the last decades unopposed estrogen treatment has been used to a lesser extent, whereas the combined...... estrogen-progestin treatment regime is now prescribed worldwide. In the USA the predominant compounds are conjugated estrogens and medroxyprogesterone-acetate, whereas oestradiol combined with testosterone-like progestins is commonly used in Europe. These differences are largely the result of traditions...

  17. Surfactant Replacement Therapy Beyond Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasani, Bonny; Kabra, Nandkishor; Nanavati, Ruchi

    2016-03-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is an established modality of treatment in preterm neonates with respiratory distress syndrome. In addition, there are various neonatal respiratory disorders which are characterized by surfactant deficiency in which surfactant therapy can be a feasible and safe option. To collate the literature on the use of surfactant replacement therapy in neonates beyond respiratory distress syndrome and examine the evidence and newer developments. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, and EMBASE up to June 2015; and previous reviews, including cross-references, abstracts, and conference proceedings. Evidence supports surfactant administration via bolus route in neonates with meconium aspiration syndrome, but additional robust evidence is required before its adoption in clinical practice. There is limited evidence to support surfactant therapy in neonates with pneumonia, pulmonary hemorrhage and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Large multicenter randomized trials are needed to cement or refute the role of surfactant therapy in these disorders.

  18. Influences of hormone replacement therapy on olfactory and cognitive function in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Richard L; Tourbier, Isabelle; Ng, Victoria; Neff, Jessica; Armstrong, Deborah; Battistini, Michelle; Sammel, Mary D; Gettes, David; Evans, Dwight L; Mirza, Natasha; Moberg, Paul J; Connolly, Tim; Sondheimer, Steven J

    2015-06-01

    Olfactory dysfunction can be an early sign of Alzheimer's disease. Since hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may protect against Alzheimer's disease in postmenopausal women, the question arises as to whether it also protects against olfactory dysfunction in such women. A total of three olfactory and 12 neurocognitive tests were administered to 432 healthy postmenopausal women with varied HRT histories. Serum levels of reproductive hormones were obtained for all subjects; APOE-ε4 haplotype was determined for 77 women. National Adult Reading Test and Odor Memory/Discrimination Test scores were positively influenced by HRT. Odor Identification and Odor Memory/Discrimination Test scores were lower for women who scored poorly on a delayed recall test, a surrogate for mild cognitive impairment. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Revised, as a Neuropsychological Instrument Spatial Span Backwards Test scores were higher in women receiving estrogen and progestin HRT and directly correlated with serum testosterone levels, the latter implying a positive effect of testosterone on spatial memory. APOE-ε4 was associated with poorer odor threshold test scores. These data suggest that HRT positively influences a limited number of olfactory and cognitive measures during menopause. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. INFLUENCES OF HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON OLFACTORY AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN THE MENOPAUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Richard L.; Tourbier, Isabelle; Ng, Victoria; Neff, Jessica; Armstrong, Deborah; Battistini, Michelle; Sammel, Mary D.; Gettes, David; Evans, Dwight L.; Mirza, Natasha; Moberg, Paul J.; Connolly, Tim; Sondheimer, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction can be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may protect against developing AD in postmenopausal women, the question arises as to whether it also protects against olfactory dysfunction in such women. Three olfactory and 12 neurocognitive tests were administered to 432 healthy postmenopausal women with varied HRT histories. Serum levels of reproductive hormones were obtained for all subjects; APOE-ε4 haplotype was determined for 77. National Adult Reading Test and Odor Memory/Discrimination Test (OMT) scores were positively influenced by HRT. Odor identification and OMT test scores were lower for women who scored poorly on a delayed recall test, a surrogate for mild cognitive impairment. WAIS-R NI Spatial Span Backwards Test scores were higher in women receiving estrogen plus progestin HRT and directly correlated with serum testosterone levels, the latter implying a positive effect of testosterone on spatial memory. APOE-ε4 was associated with poorer odor threshold test scores. These data suggest that HRT positively influences a limited number of olfactory and cognitive measures in the menopause. PMID:25850354

  20. Testosterone therapy in men with prostate cancer: literature review, clinical experience, and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Morgentaler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For several decades any diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa has been considered an absolute contraindication to the use of testosterone (T therapy in men. Yet this prohibition against T therapy has undergone recent re-examination with refinement of our understanding of the biology of androgens and PCa, and increased appreciation of the benefits of T therapy. A reassuringly low rate of negative outcomes has been reported with T therapy after radical prostatectomy (RP, radiation treatments, and in men on active surveillance. Although the number of these published reports are few and the total number of treated men is low, these experiences do provide a basis for consideration of T therapy in selected men with PCa. For clinicians considering offering this treatment, we recommend first selecting patients with low grade cancers and undetectable prostate-specific antigen following RP. Further research is required to define the safety of T therapy in men with PCa. However, many patients symptomatic from T deficiency are willing to accept the potential risk of PCa progression or recurrence in return for the opportunity to live a fuller and happier life with T therapy.

  1. Gene replacement therapy for genetic hepatocellular jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Remco; Beuers, Ulrich; Bosma, Piter J

    2015-06-01

    Jaundice results from the systemic accumulation of bilirubin, the final product of the catabolism of haem. Inherited liver disorders of bilirubin metabolism and transport can result in reduced hepatic uptake, conjugation or biliary secretion of bilirubin. In patients with Rotor syndrome, bilirubin (re)uptake is impaired due to the deficiency of two basolateral/sinusoidal hepatocellular membrane proteins, organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) and OATP1B3. Dubin-Johnson syndrome is caused by a defect in the ATP-dependent canalicular transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), which mediates the export of conjugated bilirubin into bile. Both disorders are benign and not progressive and are characterised by elevated serum levels of mainly conjugated bilirubin. Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) is responsible for the glucuronidation of bilirubin; deficiency of this enzyme results in unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia. Gilbert syndrome is the mild and benign form of inherited unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia and is mostly caused by reduced promoter activity of the UGT1A1 gene. Crigler-Najjar syndrome is the severe inherited form of unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia due to mutations in the UGT1A1 gene, which can cause kernicterus early in life and can be even lethal when left untreated. Due to major disadvantages of the current standard treatments for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, phototherapy and liver transplantation, new effective therapeutic strategies are under development. Here, we review the clinical features, pathophysiology and genetic background of these inherited disorders of bilirubin metabolism and transport. We also discuss the upcoming treatment option of viral gene therapy for genetic disorders such as Crigler-Najjar syndrome and the possible immunological consequences of this therapy.

  2. Men's health, low testosterone, and diabetes: individualized treatment and a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Donna; Brannigan, Robert E; Campbell, R Keith; Fine, Shari; Jack, Leonard; Nelson, Joseph B; Regan-Klich, Janet

    2008-01-01

    Testosterone plays a critical role in male reproductive and metabolic functioning. Serum testosterone levels decrease with age, and low testosterone is associated with a variety of comorbidities, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Men with type 2 diabetes have been shown to have significantly lower testosterone levels than men without diabetes. Several forms of testosterone replacement therapy (eg, oral, injectable, buccal, transdermal preparations) are available for use in the United States. The primary goals of testosterone therapy are to restore physiologic testosterone levels and reduce the symptoms of hypogonadism. Testosterone therapy may be a viable option in some men with diabetes and low testosterone; however, clinicians must be aware of contraindications to therapy (eg, prostate cancer and male breast cancer), implement appropriate monitoring procedures, and ensure that patient expectations are realistic regarding treatment outcome. Data suggest that testosterone therapy may have a positive effect on bones, muscles, erythropoiesis and anemia, libido, mood and cognition, penile erection, cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, insulin resistance, visceral adiposity, and quality of life. Sexual health may be a window into men's health; thus, more effective communication strategies are needed between clinicians and men with diabetes to ensure that sexual health topics are adequately addressed. Diabetes educators can play a key role in screening for low testosterone, providing relevant information to patients, and increasing clinician awareness of the need to address men's sexual health and implement appropriate strategies. Multidisciplinary care and individualized treatment are needed to optimize outcome.

  3. Clarifications on Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy and Hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Cui; Zhang, Hong-Min; Liu, Da-Wei

    2017-05-20

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a continuous process of bedside blood purification which is widely used in the treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and for fluid management. However, since AKI and fluid overload are often found to be associated with hemodynamic abnormalities, determining the relationship between CRRT and hemodynamics remains a challenge in the treatment of critically ill patients. The aim of this review was to summarize key points in the relationship between CRRT and hemodynamics and to understand and monitor renal hemodynamics in critically ill patients, especially those with AKI. This review was based on data in articles published in the PubMed databases up to January 30, 2017, with the following keywords: "continuous renal replacement therapy," "Hemodynamics," and "Acute kidney injury." Original articles and critical reviews on CRRT were selected for this review. CRRT might treat AKI by hemodynamic therapy, and it was an important form of hemodynamic therapy. The targets of hemodynamic therapy should be established when using CRRT. Therefore, hemodynamic management and stability were very important during CRRT. Most studies suggested that renal hemodynamics should be clearly identified. CRRT is not only a replacement for organ function, but an important form of hemodynamic therapy. Improved hemodynamic management of critically ill patients can be achieved by establishing specific therapeutic hemodynamic targets and maintaining circulatory stability during CRRT. Over the long term, observation of renal hemodynamics will provide greater opportunities for the progression of CRRT hemodynamic therapy.

  4. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of non-fatal stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A T; Lidegaard, O; Kreiner, S

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the risk of subtypes of stroke is as yet unclear. To investigate the effect of oestrogen and combined oestrogen-progestagen therapy on the risk of non-fatal haemorrhagic and thromboembolic stroke, we carried out a case......-control study. METHODS: From the Danish National Patient Register we identified all Danish women aged 45-64 years who had a non-fatal, first-ever cerebrovascular attack during 1990-92. Two age-matched controls were randomly selected for each case from the Danish National Person Register. Important correlates...... therapy and non-fatal subarachnoid haemorrhage (odds ratio 0.52 [95% CI 0.23-1.22]), intracerebral haemorrhage (0.15 [0.02-1.09]), or thromboembolic infarction (1.16 [0.86-1.58]), respectively, compared with never use. Current use of combined oestrogen-progestagen replacement therapy had no significant...

  5. Testosterone treatment in the aging male: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Nicole; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2012-03-19

    The definition of late onset hypogonadism in the aging male is controversially debated, and according to the latest literature consists of at least three especially sexual symptoms such as loss of morning erection, low sexual desire and erectile dysfunction as well as a total testosterone <8-11 nmol/l. Testosterone replacement therapy in the aging male has been shown to have a beneficial effect on muscle and fat mass as well as on bone mineral density, with more conflicting effects observed on muscle strength, sexual function, mood and quality of life. The prescriptions for testosterone products for the aging male increased by over 170% in the previous five years. Furthermore, there is a lot of epidemiological data showing an inverse relationship between testosterone levels and obesity, insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, only few small randomised placebo-controlled studies have investigated the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on insulin resistance and HbA1c levels, with controversial results. Importantly, so far the long-term safety and efficacy of testosterone replacement therapy has not been established. Although until now no clear evidence has been found that testosterone replacement therapy has a causative role in prostate cancer or indeed in changes of the biology of the prostate, in a recent meta-analysis a 4-fold increased risk of prostate-associated event rates in testosterone treated elderly men sounds a note of caution. Also the risk for cardiovascular events is still not clear and caution is warranted especially in elderly men with cardiovascular disease and limited mobility. In summary, the actual available evidence of long-term risks and outcome of testosterone replacement therapy is still very limited and carefully designed placebo-controlled trials of testosterone administration to assess the risks and benefits of such a therapy are required. Until then, testosterone treatment in elderly men

  6. Effect of dietary fish oil on mouse testosterone level and the distribution of eicosapentaenoic acid-containing phosphatidylcholine in testicular interstitium

    OpenAIRE

    Zaima, Nobuhiro; Kinoshita, Saori; Hieda, Nao; Kugo, Hirona; Narisawa, Kaori; Yamamoto, Ayami; Yanagimoto, Kenichi; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of serum testosterone are characteristically associated with diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, obstructive sleep apnea, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Testosterone replacement therapy is effective against many of these disorders, indicating the importance of maintaining a healthy testosterone level. In this study, we investigated the effects of fish oil on murine testosterone metabolism and analyzed the dynamics of relevant lipids in testes by ma...

  7. Adherence to nicotine replacement patch therapy in cardiovascular patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, Louise C. W.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; Oort, Frans J.; Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Vermeulen, Hester; van Loenen, Lucas B. M.; Peters, Ron J. G.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Legemate, Dink A.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) is the most frequently used pharmacological intervention for smoking cessation. Research on the effect of NRT showed serious nonadherence among users. We investigated adherence to NRT in cardiovascular patients. A number of 174 outpatients (N = 174), who smoked > 5

  8. A Critical Evaluation of Nicotine Replacement Therapy for Teenage Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Christi A.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the appropriateness and feasibility of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in teenage smokers. Available forms of NRT, theoretical rationale and efficacy of NRT, ethical considerations, and the feasibility of NRT in teenage smokers are addressed. Several characteristics similar to adult nicotine dependent smokers have been found in teen…

  9. Renal Replacement Therapy Resources in Africa | Matri | Arab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, there is a general impression that it is at least three to four times more frequent than in more developed countries Methods: a survey on renal replacement therapy in Africa was conducted in the context of the African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) Congress 2007. A questionnaire was sent to leading African ...

  10. Renal replacement therapy in Ukraine: epidemiology and international comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolesnyk, Inna; Noordzij, Marlies; Kolesnyk, Mykola; Kulyzky, Mykola; Jager, Kitty J.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the status of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the post-Soviet countries. We therefore investigated the epidemiology and treatment outcomes of RRT in Ukrainian patients and put the results into an international perspective. Data from the Ukrainian National Renal Registry for

  11. Trends in renal replacement therapy in Turkey, 1996-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Serdengeçti, Kamil; Altiparmak, Mehmet R.; Jager, Kitty; Seyahi, Nurhan; Erek, Ekrem; Altıparmak, Mehmet Rıza; Sifil, Aykut; Bakkaloğlu, Ayşin; Duman, Neval; Güvence, Necmettin; Kiper, Haluk; Öner, Ayşe; Söylemezoğlu, Oğuz; Sindel, Sükrü; Tokgöz, Bülent; Turgan, Çetin; Türk, Süleyman; Utas, Cengiz; Ataman, Rezzan; Denizli, Nazım; Kazancıgil, Rümeyza; Koç, Mehmet; Sever, Mehmet; Trabulus, Sinan; Unsal, Abdülkadir; Dilek, Kamil; Güllülü, Mustafa; Kalender, Betül; Oktay, Nilay; Yurtkuran, Mustafa; Akçiçek, Fehmi; Başçı, Ali; Çamsarı, Taner; Hoşcoşkun, Cüneyt; Mir, Sevgi; Ok, Ercan; Uslu, Adam; Cengiz, Kuddusi; Akpolat, Tekin; Arık, Nurol; Ulusoy, Sükrü; Çeliker, Hüseyin; Erkoç, Reha; Keles, Mustafa; Uyanık, Abdullah; Göymen, Asım; Yılmaz, Emin; Karayaylalı, Ibrahim; Paydaş, Saime; Seyrek, Neslihan; Ersoy, Fevzi; Gürkan, Alihan; Yakupoğlu, Gülşen; Özdemir, Oktay; Kirtis, Murat

    2011-01-01

    National renal registry studies providing data for incidence, prevalence, and characteristics of end-stage renal disease and renal replacement therapy (RRT) serve as a basis to determine national strategies for the prevention and treatment of these diseases and identify new areas for special

  12. Efficacy and safety of testosterone replacement gel for treating hypogonadism in men: Phase III open-label studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkoff, L; Brock, G; Carrara, D; Neijber, A; Ando, M; Mitchel, J

    2018-02-01

    Efficacy and safety of testosterone gel 2% (TG) were evaluated in two phase 3, open-labelled, single-arm, multicentre studies (000023 and extension study 000077). Hypogonadal men having serum testosterone levels testosterone concentration 300-1050 ng/dl on Day 90). Study 000077 evaluated the safety of TG in patients rolling over from study 000023 over a period of 6 months. Of 180 subjects in 000023, 172 completed and 145 rolled over to 000077, with 127 completers. The responder rate was 85.5%. Fewer subjects in 000077 (12.7%) versus 000023 (31.8%) had maximum testosterone concentration (Cmax ) >1500 ng/dl, with no significant safety concerns. Significant improvements in sexual function and quality of life were noted in both studies. Subjects experienced few skin reactions without notable increases in prostate-specific antigen and haematocrit levels. TG was efficacious with an acceptable safety profile. Cmax >1500 ng/dl did not exhibit distinct impact on safety parameters. However, further optimisation of titration schema to reduce Cmax is warranted while maintaining the average steady state total testosterone concentration. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Therapy of Hypoparathyroidism by Replacement with Parathyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rejnmark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT is a state of hypocalcemia due to inappropriate low levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH. HypoPT is normally treated by calcium supplements and activated vitamin D analogues. Although plasma calcium is normalized in response to conventional therapy, quality of life (QoL seems impaired and patients are at increased risk of renal complications. A number of studies have suggested subcutaneous injections with PTH as an alternative therapy. By replacement with the missing hormone, urinary calcium may be lowered and QoL may improve. PTH replacement therapy (PTH-RT possesses, nevertheless, a number of challenges. If PTH is injected only once a day, fluctuations in calcium levels may occur resulting in hypercalcemia in the hours following an injection. Twice-a-day injections seem to cause less fluctuation in plasma calcium but do stimulate bone turnover to above normal. Most recently, continuous delivery of PTH by pump has appeared as a feasible alternative to injections. Plasma calcium levels do not fluctuate, urinary calcium is lowered, and bone turnover is only stimulated modestly (into the normal range. Further studies are needed to assess the long-term effects. If beneficial, it seems likely that standard treatment of HypoPT in the future will change into replacement therapy with the missing hormone.

  14. Polycythaemia Secondary to Hormone Replacement Therapy with Tibolone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Staples

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case report of a patient with severe polycythaemia associated with tibolone. In our 65-year-old postmenopausal patient who initially presented with haemoglobin 203 g/L [115–160] and haematocrit 0.63 [0.32–0.47], the cessation of tibolone, a synthetic hormone replacement therapy, led to a dramatic and sustained resolution of this patient’s polycythaemia to normal haematological values. Tibolone possesses oestrogenic, androgenic, and progestogenic properties. Tibolone therapy may be an infrequently recognized contributor towards polycythaemia in postmenopausal patients presenting to haematology clinics.

  15. Liberation From Renal Replacement Therapy After Cadaveric Liver Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Hilmi, Ibtesam A.; Al-Khafaji, Ali; Damian, Daniela; Rosario-Rivera, Bedda L.; Abdullah, Ali; Kellum, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) is common in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and is associated with worse outcomes following liver transplantation (LT). We investigated the factors associated with liberation from posttransplant RRT and studied the impact of RRT on patient and graft outcomes. Methods A 5-year retrospective study of ESLD patients who received pretransplant RRT was conducted. Variables associated with liberation from RRT at 30 days...

  16. Serum Testosterone Levels and Mortality in Men With CKD Stages 3–4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Kiranpreet K.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse D.; Nally, Joseph V.; Shoskes, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypogonadism in men (total testosterone level testosterone measured for-cause between January 1, 2005 and October 31, 2011 at a tertiary care center in Cleveland, Ohio. Predictors Total testosterone measured using an immunoassay measurement in 3 forms: a) categorized as low or testosterone replacement therapy versus normal, b) continuous log testosterone, and c) quintiles (100–226, 227–305, 306–392, 393–511, 512–3153 ng/dL). Outcomes Factors associated with low total testosterone, and association between low total testosterone and all-cause mortality were evaluated using logistic regression, Cox proportional hazard models, and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Results Hypogonadism was found in 1288/2419 (53%) of men. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, African American ethnicity and higher eGFR were associated with lower odds of having hypogonadism. Diabetes and higher body mass index were associated with higher odds of having hypogonadism. 357/2419 (15%) patients died during a median follow up of 2.3 years. In the multivariate Cox model, testosterone testosterone replacement therapy were not associated with mortality. In a multivariable model also adjusted for testosterone supplementation, higher log testosterone was associated with significantly lower mortality (HR per 1 log unit, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55–0.89). When compared to the highest quintile, the second lowest quintile of testosterone was associated with higher mortality (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.09–2.16). Limitations Single center study, timing of testosterone testing, lack of adjustment for proteinuria, and sampling bias. Conclusions Low total testosterone may be associated with higher mortality in men with CKD stages 3–4 but more studies are needed. PMID:24726629

  17. Enzyme replacement therapy for pancreatic insufficiency: present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fieker A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aaron Fieker1, Jessica Philpott1, Martine Armand21Division of Digestive Diseases, University of Oklahoma, OKC, OK, USA; 2INSERM, U476 "Nutrition Humaine et Lipides", Marseille, F-13385 France; Univ Méditerranée Aix-Marseille 2, Faculté de Médecine, IPHM-IFR 125, Marseille, F-13385 FranceAbstract: Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is currently the mainstay of treatment for nutrient malabsorption secondary to pancreatic insufficiency. This treatment is safe and has few side effects. Data demonstrate efficacy in reducing steatorrhea and fat malabsorption. Effective therapy has been limited by the ability to replicate the physiologic process of enzyme delivery to the appropriate site, in general the duodenum, at the appropriate time. The challenges include enzyme destruction in the stomach, lack of adequate mixing with the chyme in the duodenum, and failing to deliver and activate at the appropriate time. Treatment is begun when clinically significant malabsorption occurs resulting in steatorrhea and weight loss. Treatment failure is addressed in a sequential fashion. Current research is aimed at studying new enzymes and delivery systems to improve the efficiency of action in the duodenum along with developing better means to monitor therapy.Keywords: exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, lipase, lipids

  18. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular events in recently postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierbeck, Louise Lind; Rejnmark, Lars; Tofteng, Charlotte Landbo

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the long term effect of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in recently postmenopausal women.......To investigate the long term effect of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in recently postmenopausal women....

  19. Renal replacement therapy in Canada: a report from the Canadian Organ Replacement Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, S; Desmeules, M; Copleston, P; Arbus, G; Froment, D; Jeffery, J; Kjellstrand, C

    1995-01-01

    We report here the demography and results of renal replacement therapy in Canada from 1981 to 1992. The new case rate for patients entering renal replacement therapy programs in Canada has increased dramatically over the last 12 years, from 49.9 per million to 98.4 per million of the population. The largest increases have been among the elderly, from 146.2 per million in 1981 to 381.9 per million in 1992 for those aged 65 to 74 years. There has been an even more dramatic increase for those over 75 years, from 83.6 per million in 1981 to 261.6 per million in 1992. There has been a similar increase in the prevalence rate, with an increase from 229.1 per million in 1981 to 518.5 per million in 1992. The hemodialysis rate for 1992 was 172.2 per million and that for peritoneal dialysis was 103.1 per million of the population. The renal transplantation rate also increased from 20 per million in 1981 to 34.8 per million in 1988, but unfortunately has decreased to 27.5 per million in 1992. Diabetes is now the most common primary renal diagnosis, having increased from 15% in 1981 to 24% in 1992. The 5-year survival rate of all patients on renal replacement therapy was 55%. For nondiabetic patients, the 5-year survival rate ranged from 85% for the those aged 15 to 44 years to 20% for those over 65 years. Among diabetic patients, the 5-year survival rate declined from 58% for the 15 to 44 year age group to 10% for those over 65 years.

  20. Effects of growth hormone and testosterone therapy on aerobic and anaerobic fitness , body composition and lipoprotein profile in middle-aged men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Zając

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Andropause and aging are associated with neuroendocrine dysfunctions. Growth hormone and testosterone play a significant role in several processes affecting adaptation and thereby also everyday functioning. The aim of this research project was to evaluate the effects of recombinant human growth hormone and testosterone enanthate injections on body mass and body composition, aerobic and anaerobic fitness and lipid profile in middle-aged men. Materials and method. The research group was comprised of 14 men aged 45 – 60 years. Two series of laboratory analyses were performed. Independent tests were carried out at baseline and after 12 weeks of the experiment. The data were analyzed using Statistica 9.1 software. Results. A two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed a statistically significant effect of the intervention programme on fat-free mass (η2=0.34, total body fat (η2=0.79, total cholesterol (η2=0.30, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (η2=0.31, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (η2=0.42, triglyceride (η2=0.28, testosterone (η2=0.52, insulin-like growth factor 1 (η2=0.47 and growth hormone (η2=0.63. Furthermore, ANOVA revealed a statistically significant effect of the rhGH and T treatment on maximal oxygen uptake (η2=0.63, anaerobic threshold (η2=0.61 and maximal work rate (η2=0.53. Conclusion. It should be emphasized that the lipid profile was affected not only by rhGH+T replacement therapy, but also by the prescribed physical activity programme. The strength and endurance fitness programme alone did not cause significant changes in body mass and composition, nor the anaerobic and aerobic capacity. On the other hand, the rhGH=T treatment stimulated these changes significantly.

  1. Neuronal replacement therapy: previous achievements and challenges ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grade, Sofia; Götz, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    Lifelong neurogenesis and incorporation of newborn neurons into mature neuronal circuits operates in specialized niches of the mammalian brain and serves as role model for neuronal replacement strategies. However, to which extent can the remaining brain parenchyma, which never incorporates new neurons during the adulthood, be as plastic and readily accommodate neurons in networks that suffered neuronal loss due to injury or neurological disease? Which microenvironment is permissive for neuronal replacement and synaptic integration and which cells perform best? Can lost function be restored and how adequate is the participation in the pre-existing circuitry? Could aberrant connections cause malfunction especially in networks dominated by excitatory neurons, such as the cerebral cortex? These questions show how important connectivity and circuitry aspects are for regenerative medicine, which is the focus of this review. We will discuss the impressive advances in neuronal replacement strategies and success from exogenous as well as endogenous cell sources. Both have seen key novel technologies, like the groundbreaking discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells and direct neuronal reprogramming, offering alternatives to the transplantation of fetal neurons, and both herald great expectations. For these to become reality, neuronal circuitry analysis is key now. As our understanding of neuronal circuits increases, neuronal replacement therapy should fulfill those prerequisites in network structure and function, in brain-wide input and output. Now is the time to incorporate neural circuitry research into regenerative medicine if we ever want to truly repair brain injury.

  2. A practical guide to prescribing estrogen replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, S L

    1995-01-01

    Discounting vaccinations, menopausal hormone replacement constitutes the most widely practiced form of long-term prophylactic therapy. Long acknowledged as a means of retarding net bone density loss, sufficient data have accumulated to document the cardioprotective aspects of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). Not surprisingly, new questions concerning long-term effects on various tissues and interaction with progestins have arisen. Given that ERT alone increases risk for endometrial cancer to unacceptable levels, addition of progestins can fully obviate that risk. To what extent, however, do various progestins mute the beneficial estrogen effect on cholesterol lipoproteins and locally in the arterial wall? Does long-term ERT increase the risk for breast cancer and who is at greatest risk? Does the route of ERT matter with respect to metabolic changes? Considering that a woman may spend fully one third of her life in the postmenopausal state, it behooves physicians as primary care providers and as consultants to understand the pros and cons of ERT. Modulation of dose, route and agent, as well as the protocol for therapy, all affect long-term patient compliance. In order to sustain motivation, education of the patient is mandatory, and that process starts with the physician.

  3. [Pharmacokinetics of antibiotics in continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, Santo; Pistolesi, Valentina; Maggiore, Umberto; Fiaccadori, Enrico; Pierucci, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    In the critically ill patient, acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently associated with infective complications requiring appropriate antimicrobial treatment. AKI and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome can affect the pharmacokinetic parameters of many drugs. Furthermore, the start of renal replacement therapy (RRT) is an additional variable to be taken into consideration to avoid inappropriate antimicrobial therapy. Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are widely adopted in the intensive care unit (ICU) and antibiotics that are significantly eliminated by the kidney are likely to be removed during RRT. Generally, drug-dosing adjustments are required if the extracorporeal clearance accounts for more than 25-30% of the total body clearance. The molecular weight cutoffs of the more widely used membranes are much higher than the molecular weight of most drugs. Therefore, molecular size will not be a limitation for the removal of the unbound fraction of the antibiotics most commonly used in ICU patients. However, CRRTs are still not standardized and the impact of RRT on plasma drug concentrations can be substantially different depending on the CRRT modality (diffusive, convective or both), membrane characteristics and delivered dialysis dose. In any case, drug-dosing adjustments should be based on the knowledge of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the different classes of antimicrobials, taking into account that high extracorporeal clearances could lead to drug underexposure in clinical conditions where appropriate antibiotic treatment is essential.

  4. [Renal replacement therapy in Intensive Care Units in Catalonia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Bermeo, H; Tomasa, T; Navas, A; Xirgu, J; Catalán-Ibars, R M; Morillas, J; Cuartero, M; Manciño, J M; Roglán, A

    2015-01-01

    To assess the indications, settings and techniques used in renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). A prospective, multicenter observational study was carried out. Intensive Care Units. All patients admitted to ICUs during the two-month study period in 2011 who required RRT. None. Patient demographic characteristics, baseline clinical data, RRT technique and materials used. Thirty-three patients were analyzed. RRT was started within the first 24hours after ICU admission in 17 of the 33 patients (52%). At the start of RRT, 18% of the patients (n=6) presented grade R on the RIFLE acute kidney injury (AKI) scale. The most common disorder associated with AKI was multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (64%; n=21). At the start of RRT, most patients (76%; n=25) presented hemodynamic instability, while the remaining 24% (n=8) were considered hemodynamically stable. The most common RRT technique in hemodynamically stable patients was continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (63%; n=5). CRRT was the technique of choice in all 25 of the hemodynamically unstable patients (100%). Anticoagulation was used in 55% (n=18) of the patients. In most cases (61%, n=20), RRT was administered through the right femoral vein. In 84% (n=28) of the patients, the ultrafiltration effluent flow rate was ≤ 35ml/kg/h. The ICU physicians in this study followed current RRT guidelines. CRRT was preferred over intermittent renal replacement therapy, regardless of patient hemodynamic status. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  5. Citrate anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy in small children

    OpenAIRE

    Soltysiak, Jolanta; Warzywoda, Alfred; Kociński, Bartłomiej; Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Benedyk, Anna; Silska-Dittmar, Magdalena; Zachwieja, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Background Regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) is one of the methods used to prevent clotting in continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The aim of this study was to describe the outcomes and complications of RCA-CRRT in comparison to heparin anticoagulation (HA)-CRRT in critically ill children. Methods This study was a retrospective review of 30 critically ill children (16 on RCA- and 14 on HA-CRRT) who underwent at least 24 h of CRRT. The mean body weight of the children was 8.69 ± ...

  6. [Evidence-based renal replacement therapy--intermittent versus CRRT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörres, Achim

    2013-03-01

    Continuous and intermittent renal replacement procedures are equally adequate therapies for acute kidney injury. The choice of modality should be made individually and on the basis of the specific clinical situation which may include switching between modalities during the course of treatment. In patients with haemodynamic instability or at risk of disequilibrium and cerebral edema CRRT or prolonged intermittent treatment may offer advantages whilst IHD should be preferred for the acute treatment of life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities or metabolic acidosis. Overall, the different modalities should be viewed as complementary. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierbeck, L

    2015-01-01

    contribute to the later onset of cardiovascular disease in women. The effect of estrogens has for decades been understood from observational studies of postmenopausal women treated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Later, treatment with HRT was disregarded due to the fear of side......Many peri- and postmenopausal women suffer from a reduced quality of life due to menopausal symptoms and preventable diseases. The importance of cardiovascular disease in women must be emphasized, as it is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in women. It is well known that female hormones...

  8. Allopathic and complementary alternatives to hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichholz, Amy C; Mahavni, Vikas; Sood, Anil K

    2002-07-01

    Management of the menopause is a rapidly growing concern due to the ageing human population. The overall female lifespan has increased over the last century and up to a third of a woman's life is now spent in menopause. To that end, significant attention has been placed on maximising the quantity and quality of life in the menopausal years. The optimal management strategies are ones that are highly flexible and sensitive to an individual's expectations and concerns. Thus, while traditional oestrogen replacement therapy has been in place for > 20 years, there is now a greater interest in alternatives to this modality for those women who cannot or will not use it. This article reviews some of the alternative therapies that are being incorporated both in the allopathic and complementary medicine arenas.

  9. Renal replacement therapy in sepsis-induced acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajapakse Senaka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a common complication of sepsis and carries a high mortality. Renal replacement therapy (RRT during the acute stage is the mainstay of therapy. Va-rious modalities of RRT are available. Continuous RRT using convective methods are preferred in sepsis-induced ARF, especially in hemodynamically unstable patients, although clear evidence of benefit over intermittent hemodialysis is still not available. Peritoneal dialysis is clearly inferior, and is not recommended. Early initiation of RRT is probably advantageous, although the optimal timing of dialysis is yet unknown. Higher doses of RRT are more likely to be beneficial. Use of bio-compatible membranes and bicarbonate buffer in the dialysate are preferred. Anticoagulation during dialysis must be carefully adjusted and monitored.

  10. Possible removal of topiramate by continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Linda; Parker, Dennis; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Shah, Aashit; Coplin, William M; Rhoney, Denise H

    2010-01-15

    Topiramate is primarily renally eliminated and requires dosage adjustment based upon renal function. While there is data to suggest drug removal during intermittent hemodialysis (IHD), little is known regarding its clearance and dosing during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). We describe a 59-year-old man with refractory status epilepticus who was started on continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) for acute renal failure while receiving topiramate with a series of serum concentrations to assess for removal during CVVHDF. Our data suggest clinically important amounts of topiramate are removed by CRRT, and higher topiramate dosage may be needed for these patients instead of the current recommended 50% of normal dosage. Unfortunately, there is no antiepileptic drug dosing recommendation when used during CRRT due to the paucity of data. This case highlights a need for research evaluating the effect of CRRT on AED elimination in order to optimize therapy for seizure control.

  11. A retrospective study: osteoporosis and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. June Kuczynski

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this stud y was to determine i f women who undergo hormone replacement therapy postmenopausally, will demonstrate less osteoporosis than women who do not undergo H R T. The osteoporosis subjects were 195 women who volunteered to participate in an NIHsponsored double-blind clinical trial entitled Safely and Efficacy of Fluoride Therapy in Osteoporosis. A convenience sample of 78 controls was obtained by inviting women seeking regular medical attention to join an epidemiological investigation of osteoporosis. The data were analyzed using Chisquare and Student’s t-ratio. The study concludes that future retrospective and prospective analyses appreciate the com plexity of the problem in terms of individual risk for osteoporosis.

  12. Testosterone Deficiency and Nocturia: A Review

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    Kazuyoshi Shigehara

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nocturia causes lack of sleep and excessive daytime somnolence, reducing overall well-being, vitality, productivity, and mental health. Nocturia is significantly associated with testosterone deficiency, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, and sleep disorders. The development of LUTS is commonly associated with testosterone deficiency in elderly men, and recent studies have suggested that testosterone has an ameliorative effect on nocturia. In hypogonadal men with nocturia, a negative feedback cycle can arise, in which testosterone deficiency leads to the development of nocturia, and nocturia contributes to the decline in testosterone levels. Therefore, patients with nocturia should receive appropriate treatment in order to improve their quality of life. Nocturia is generally treated by restricting nighttime water intake, as well as by the administration of medications, such as alpha-1 blockers, anticholinergic drugs, and desmopressin. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT is used worldwide as a treatment for many hypogonadal conditions. TRT represents an alternative treatment option for nocturia in hypogonadal men. However, limited information is currently available regarding the effects of TRT on nocturia in hypogonadal men, and further studies are required to reach more definitive conclusions.

  13. Testosterone Deficiency and Nocturia: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Izumi, Koji; Mizokami, Atsushi; Namiki, Mikio

    2017-04-01

    Nocturia causes lack of sleep and excessive daytime somnolence, reducing overall well-being, vitality, productivity, and mental health. Nocturia is significantly associated with testosterone deficiency, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and sleep disorders. The development of LUTS is commonly associated with testosterone deficiency in elderly men, and recent studies have suggested that testosterone has an ameliorative effect on nocturia. In hypogonadal men with nocturia, a negative feedback cycle can arise, in which testosterone deficiency leads to the development of nocturia, and nocturia contributes to the decline in testosterone levels. Therefore, patients with nocturia should receive appropriate treatment in order to improve their quality of life. Nocturia is generally treated by restricting nighttime water intake, as well as by the administration of medications, such as alpha-1 blockers, anticholinergic drugs, and desmopressin. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is used worldwide as a treatment for many hypogonadal conditions. TRT represents an alternative treatment option for nocturia in hypogonadal men. However, limited information is currently available regarding the effects of TRT on nocturia in hypogonadal men, and further studies are required to reach more definitive conclusions. Copyright © 2017 Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology.

  14. Enzyme replacement therapy for infantile-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Zhang, Lingli; Quan, Shuyan

    2017-11-20

    Infantile-onset Pompe disease is a rare and progressive autosomal-recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Current treatment involves enzyme replacement therapy (with recombinant human alglucosidase alfa) and symptomatic therapies (e.g. to control secretions). Children who are cross-reactive immunological material (CRIM)-negative require immunomodulation prior to commencing enzyme replacement therapy.Enzyme replacement therapy was developed as the most promising therapeutic approach for Pompe disease; however, the evidence is lacking, especially regarding the optimal dose and dose frequency. To assess the effectiveness, safety and appropriate dose regimen of enzyme replacement therapy for treating infantile-onset Pompe disease. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register, which is compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Embase (Ovid), PubMed and LILACS, and CBM, CNKI, VIP, and WANFANG for literature published in Chinese. In addition, we searched three online registers: WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ClinicalTrials.gov, and www.genzymeclinicalresearch.com. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search of the Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register: 24 November 2016. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of enzyme replacement therapy in children with infantile-onset Pompe disease. Two authors independently selected relevant trials, assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted investigators to obtain important missing information. We found no trials comparing the effectiveness and safety of enzyme replacement therapy to another intervention, no intervention or placebo.We found one trial (18 participants

  15. Acute Kidney Injury and Renal Replacement Therapy in Burns

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    Burak Canver

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication in patients with severe burn injury and one of the major causes of death. It has a negative prognostic value and almost always develops in the context of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS induced by sepsis. Over the last 20 years, according to data avaliable, the mortality rate has been reported to reach about 75%. Several definitions of AKI have been used , but nowadays the RIFLE classification is considered the gold standard, enabling a more objective comparison of populations. There are several ways to treat AKI in burn patients, including peritoneal dialysis (PD, intermittent hemodialysis, and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. CRRT is generally used in patients in whom intermittent hemodialysis has failed to control hypovolemia, as well as in patients who cannot tolerate intermittent hemodialysis. Additionally, PD is not suitable for patients with burns within the abdominal area. For these reasons, most patients with unstable hemodynamic conditions receive CRRT. In burn patients with acute renal failure the dialytic treatment with continuous renal replacement therapies permitted us to achieve a survival and dialytic adequacy; however, mortality rate is high and related to septic shock and MODS. Despite the wide variation of the analysed burn populations and definitions of AKI, this review clearly showed that AKI remains prevalent and is associated with increased mortality in patients with severe burn injury. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 46-50

  16. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Applications on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetimakman, Ayse Filiz; Tanyildiz, Murat; Kesici, Selman; Kockuzu, Esra; Bayrakci, Benan

    2017-06-01

    Continuous venovenous hemofiltration or hemodiafiltration is used frequently in pediatric patients, but experience of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) application on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circuit is still limited. Among several methods used for applying CRRT on ECMO patients, we aim to share our experience on inclusion of a CRRT device in the ECMO circuit which we believe is easier and safer to apply. The data were collected on demographics, outcomes, and details of the treatment of ECMO patients who had CRRT. During the study period of 3 years, venous cannula of ECMO circuit before pump was used for CRRT access for both the filter inlet and outlet of CRRT machine to minimize the thromboembolic complications. The common indication for CRRT was fluid overload. CRRT was used in 3.68% of a total number of patients admitted and 43% of patients on ECMO. The patients have undergone renal replacement therapy for periods of time ranging between 24 h and 25 days (260 h mean). The survival rate of this group of patients with multiorgan failure was 33%. Renal recovery occurred in all of the survivors. Complications such as electrolyte imbalance, hypothermia, and bradykinin syndrome were easily managed. Adding a CRRT device on ECMO circuit is a safe and effective technique. The major advantages of this technique are easy to access, applying CRRT without extra anticoagulation process, preventing potential hemodynamic disturbances, and increased clearance of solutes and fluid overload using larger hemofilter.

  17. Femoral Access and Delivery of Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Mårtensson, Johan; Lo, Serigne; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Cass, Alan; Gallagher, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to describe the use of dialysis catheters in critically ill patients treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and to study the impact of femoral versus non-femoral access on CRRT dose. Statistical analysis and predictive modelling of data from the Randomized Evaluation of Normal vs. Augmented Level renal replacement therapy trial. The femoral vein was the first access site in 937 (67%) of 1,399 patients. These patients had higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores (p = 0.009) and lower pH (p < 0.001) but similar mortality to patients with non-femoral access (44 vs. 45%; p = 0.63). Lower body weight was independently associated with femoral access placement (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.96-0.98). Femoral access was associated with a 1.03% lower CRRT dose (p = 0.05), but a 4.20% higher dose was achieved with 13.5 Fr catheters (p = 0.03). Femoral access was preferred in lighter and sicker patients. Catheter gauge had greater impact than catheter site in CRRT dose delivery. Video Journal Club "Cappuccino with Claudio Ronco" at http://www.karger.com/?doi=439581. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Press coverage of hormone replacement therapy and menopause.

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    Colombo, Cinzia; Mosconi, Paola; Buratti, Maria Grazia; Liberati, Alessandro; Donati, Serena; Mele, Alfonso; Satolli, Roberto

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the information reported by Italian press articles about hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and menopause, in terms of completeness, clarity of language and transparency. In the framework of the Consensus Conference Informing women about hormone replacement therapy, 225 articles published from 2000 to 2007 in Italian lay press were evaluated. Health magazines, weekly news magazines, newspapers, women's magazines and medical practitioners' journals were selected. A form covering graphic layout, completeness of information, clarity of language and transparency was applied to each article by a reviewer. The form was tested in a pilot phase. HRT was recommended to treat menopausal symptoms in more than half of articles (56%) and was described as a preventive measure in almost half (48%). Risks related to HRT were under-reported (58% of the articles). Information on conflicts of interest was lacking (88%). Opinions of experts were the main source of information cited in the articles (66%). The information reported by the articles is lacking in several aspects. Many women are likely to receive unbalanced information from the press. Qualified sources of information delivered on the scientific knowledge available are needed, reporting advantages and disadvantages of HRT, pharmacological and non-pharmacological alternative treatments and their effectiveness. Scientific journalism needs to grow through training. The role of researchers and clinicians is discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eComasco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. This review summarizes the findings of thirty-four studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women’s brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  20. Supplemental and complementary alternatives to hormone replacement therapy.

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    Keller, C; Fullerton, J; Mobley, C

    1999-05-01

    Tables 1 and 2 offer a summary of information currently available on the sources, dosages, and proposed health benefits of the supplemental and complementary nutritional therapies that can be suggested as alternatives to hormone replacement therapy. These therapies have the additional benefit of being broadly available to women of all socioeconomic strata, and should be acceptable to women of various ethnicities and cultures. Adequate intakes (AI) of vitamins are recommended based on observational or experimentally determined approximations of the average nutrient intake, by a defined population or group, that appears to sustain a defined nutritional state (Food and Nutrition Boar, Institute of Medicine, 1997). Reviewing the empirical evidence concerning the use of vitamin supplements leads to the conclusion that doses higher than AI or recommended daily requirements is not warranted. For those individuals who choose to supplement, counseling should be provided to caution about tolerable upper limits, those maximum levels of nutrient intake judged unlikely to pose a risk for adverse health effects (Food and Nutrition Boar, Institute of Medicine). Supplemental and complementary therapy directed at ameliorating symptoms or reducing the risk of menopause related illness (osteoporosis and CHD) becomes a decision balance of the woman's preferences, risk and health history, and personal and financial resources. There appears to be some protection of morbidity and mortality from CHD with antioxidant dietary intake. Osteoporosis appears to be delayed with calcium supplementation. Menopausal symptoms, CHD risk, and osteoporosis risk appears to be reduced with phytoestrogen supplementation, although doses have not been established. Research concerning the safety and efficacy of these therapies continues. Findings from current clinical trials, such as the Women's Health Initiative may render these and additional alternative therapies to HRT more precise in the near future.

  1. Timing of renal replacement therapy and patient outcomes in the randomized evaluation of normal versus augmented level of replacement therapy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Min; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cass, Alan; Gallagher, Martin; Lo, Serigne; Lee, Joanne

    2014-08-01

    To explore the relationship between timing of continuous renal replacement therapy commencement and clinical outcomes in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. The primary outcomes were all-cause mortality at 28 and 90 days. Nested observational cohort study using data from the Randomized Evaluation of Normal Versus Augmented Level Replacement Therapy Study. Twenty-three ICUs in Australia and New Zealand. Four hundred thirty-nine critically ill patients with acute kidney injury Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage kidney disease-injury (RIFLE-I) criteria. None. The time between RIFLE-I acute kidney injury and randomization in the Randomized Evaluation of Normal Versus Augmented Level Replacement Therapy Study (proxy for continuous renal replacement therapy commencement) was the variable of interest. All baseline variables in the Randomized Evaluation of Normal Versus Augmented Level Replacement Therapy Study were assessed. Multivariable Cox, logistic, and linear regression models were used to assess the independent relationship of time of onset of RIFLE-I acute kidney injury and randomization and patient outcomes. The median time between RIFLE-I acute kidney injury and continuous renal replacement therapy commencement was 17.6 hours (interquartile range, 7.1-46 hr). Based on four groups of continuous renal replacement therapy commencement ([group 1; reference]: Study, earlier commencement of continuous renal replacement therapy relative to RIFLE-I acute kidney injury was not significantly associated with improved survival. Additional studies with larger sample sizes and broader commencement times are warranted.

  2. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy: the consensus conference statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosconi, Paola; Donati, Serena; Colombo, Cinzia; Mele, Alfonso; Liberati, Alessandro; Satolli, Roberto

    2009-05-29

    The risks/benefits balance of hormone replacement therapy is controversial. Information can influence consumers' knowledge and behavior; research findings about hormone replacement therapy are uncertain and the messages provided by the media are of poor quality and incomplete, preventing a fully informed decision making process. We therefore felt that an explicit, rigorous and structured assessment of the information needs on this issue was urgent and we opted for the organisation of a national consensus conference (CC) to assess the current status of the quality of information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and re-visit recent research findings on its risks/benefits. We chose a structured approach based on the traditional CC method combined with a structured preparatory work supervised by an organising committee (OC) and a scientific board (SB). The OC and SB chose the members of the CC's jury and appointed three multidisciplinary working groups (MWG) which were asked to review clinical issues and different aspects of the quality of information. Before the CC, the three MWGs carried out: a literature review on the risk/benefit profile of HRT and two surveys on the quality of information on lay press and booklets targeted to women. A population survey on women's knowledge, attitude and practice was also carried out. The jury received the documents in advance, listened the presentations during the two-day meeting of the CCs, met immediately after in a closed-door meeting and prepared the final document. Participants were researchers, clinicians, journalists as well as consumers' representatives. Key messages in the CC's deliberation were: a) women need to be fully informed about the transient nature of menopausal symptoms, about HRT risks and benefits and about the availability of non-pharmacological interventions; b) HRT is not recommended to prevent menopausal symptoms; c) the term "HRT" is misleading and "post menopausal hormone therapy" should be the

  3. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy: the consensus conference statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberati Alessandro

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risks/benefits balance of hormone replacement therapy is controversial. Information can influence consumers' knowledge and behavior; research findings about hormone replacement therapy are uncertain and the messages provided by the media are of poor quality and incomplete, preventing a fully informed decision making process. We therefore felt that an explicit, rigorous and structured assessment of the information needs on this issue was urgent and we opted for the organisation of a national consensus conference (CC to assess the current status of the quality of information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT and re-visit recent research findings on its risks/benefits. Methods We chose a structured approach based on the traditional CC method combined with a structured preparatory work supervised by an organising committee (OC and a scientific board (SB. The OC and SB chose the members of the CC's jury and appointed three multidisciplinary working groups (MWG which were asked to review clinical issues and different aspects of the quality of information. Before the CC, the three MWGs carried out: a literature review on the risk/benefit profile of HRT and two surveys on the quality of information on lay press and booklets targeted to women. A population survey on women's knowledge, attitude and practice was also carried out. The jury received the documents in advance, listened the presentations during the two-day meeting of the CCs, met immediately after in a closed-door meeting and prepared the final document. Participants were researchers, clinicians, journalists as well as consumers' representatives. Results Key messages in the CC's deliberation were: a women need to be fully informed about the transient nature of menopausal symptoms, about HRT risks and benefits and about the availability of non-pharmacological interventions; b HRT is not recommended to prevent menopausal symptoms; c the term "HRT" is misleading and "post

  4. [Testosterone therapy improves cardiac function of male rats with right heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zong-Bin; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ju-Xiang; Chen, Xun-Min; Jiang, Shi-Sen

    2009-11-01

    Clinical studies have shown decreased levels of sexual hormones, particularly testosterone deficiency, in men with chronic heart failure (CHF). The authors aimed to investigate the effect of testosterone on cardiac function and the possible mechanism of androgen protecting the heart in male rats. Forty-three male SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: right heart failure (RHF, n = 15), physiologic testosterone treatment (TT, n = 15) and control (n = 13). The RHF group was given intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline at 60 mg/kg to make RHF models; the TT group was injected with testosterone at 5 mg/kg 3 days after monocrotaline administration; and the control group received equal volume of saline. The CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood of each rat were counted by flow cytometry. The levels of serum testosterone and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The hearts, lungs and livers of all the surviving rats were excised at 6 weeks for pathological and immunohistochemical examinations. The level of serum testosterone was gradually decreased, while that of TNF-alpha obviously increased in the RHF group. After testosterone treatment, the TT group showed a remarkable improvement of cardiac performance and a significant decrease in the level of serum TNF-alpha as compared with the RHF group. Statistically significant differences were observed neither in the CD34+ cell count in the peripheral blood nor in the CD34+ expression of the myocardial cells between the TT and RHF groups. Physiological supplementation of testosterone can improve the cardiac function of RHF male rats, probably through its inhibition of TNF-alpha rather than by autologous mobilization of bone marrow stem cells.

  5. Testosterone therapy delays cardiomyocyte aging via an androgen receptor-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Wu, S Z; Ruan, Y J; Hong, L; Xing, X W; Lai, W Y

    2011-11-01

    The testicular feminized (Tfm) mouse carries a nonfunctional androgen receptor (AR) and reduced circulating testosterone levels. We used Tfm and castrated mice to determine whether testosterone modulates markers of aging in cardiomyocytes via its classic AR-dependent pathway or conversion to estradiol. Male littermates and Tfm mice were divided into 6 experimental groups. Castrated littermates (group 1) and sham-operated Tfm mice (group 2, N = 8 each) received testosterone. Sham-operated Tfm mice received testosterone in combination with the aromatase inhibitor anastrazole (group 3, N = 7). Castrated littermates (group 4) and sham-operated untreated Tfm mice (group 5) were used as controls (N = 8 and 7, respectively). An additional control group (group 6) consisted of age-matched non-castrated littermates (N = 8). Cardiomyocytes were isolated from the left ventricle, telomere length was measured by quantitative PCR and expression of p16INK4α, retinoblastoma (Rb) and p53 proteins was detected by Western blot 3 months after treatment. Compared with group 6, telomere length was short (P testosterone deficiency contributes to cardiomyocyte aging. Physiological testosterone can delay cardiomyocyte aging via an AR-independent pathway and in part by conversion to estradiol.

  6. JCL Roundtable: enzyme replacement therapy for lipid storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W Virgil; Desnick, Robert J; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    There are several inherited disorders that involve abnormal storage of lipids in tissues leading to severe compromise of organs. Sadly, these are often accompanied by lifelong morbidity and early mortality. Disorders such as Gaucher, Fabry, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiencies (Wolman and cholesteryl ester storage diseases) have been known for many years, and provide a difficult and frustrating set of problems for patients, their families, and their physicians. With recombinant methods of protein synthesis, it is now possible to literally replace the defective enzymes that underlie the basic pathophysiology of many such disorders. The delivery of these enzymes into the affected cells is possible because of their location in the lysosomes where the natural degradation of their lipid substrates occurs. I have asked 2 well-known investigators to join us for this Roundtable. These are professors who have been involved with the research that has made this type of therapy possible and who have participated in the clinical trials that demonstrated the value of enzyme replacement therapy. They are Dr. Robert Desnick, dean of Genetic and Genomic Medicine and professor and chairman emeritus of the Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, and Dr. Gregory Grabowski, professor of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pediatrics, at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Dr. Grabowski recently retired from that school to become the chief science officer of Synageva, a company involved in producing enzymes for this type of therapy. Copyright © 2014 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hormone Replacement Therapy, Likely Neither Angel Nor Demon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell S Wachtel

    Full Text Available A decline in breast cancer incidence has been attributed to the reduction in hormone replacement therapy (HRT prescriptions since the publication of the landmark WHIT paper in 2003. Concurrently, a relationship between HRT and cerebrovascular disease incidence has also been suggested. No generalized analysis of HRT prescription rates and breast cancer incidence rates that included more than seven years of data. We hypothesized that detailed analysis of SEER data would clarify the relationship between HRT use and breast cancer incidence. Given the large decline in HRT prescription rates uncovered, analyses of potential complications were also conducted, with the understanding that a small effect or one limited to a subpopulation, such as a single race, might not be detected.Incidence rates (per 100,000 women and standard errors for ductal and lobular breast carcinomas, and endometrioid /endometrial carcinomas in women over 50 years were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER database 1992-2012. From the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 1996-2012 weighted counts and standard errors of hormone replacement therapy (HRT prescriptions for women over 50 years were obtained. Using the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS, 1996-2010 weighted counts and standard errors of femoral neck fractures, total hip replacements, acute myocardial infarctions, and cerebral infarctions were obtained for 50+ year men and women. Weighted counts and standard errors were divided by US census figures and multiplied by 100,000. Joinpoint regression was used to analyze rates.Beginning 2001, HRT prescription rates dropped dramatically, 2001-2012 AAPC -14.9 (95% CI -17.4, -12.4. Breast cancer rates, which began to decline in 1999, increased after 2003; 2012 rates were similar to those seen in 2001 for both ductal, AAPC 0.1 (-0.4, 0.6 and lobular, AAPC 0.5 (-0.4, 1.5, carcinoma. Endometrial carcinoma rates increased, 2001-2012 AAPC 3.5 (3.1, 3

  8. Headache and hormone replacement therapy in the postmenopausal woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2009-01-01

    Headache and migraine are common symptoms of the menopause, often associated with irregular periods, hot flashes, and night sweats. Perimenopausal women should routinely be asked about headache and migraine, so that they can be offered appropriate advice. If attacks are infrequent, it may be sufficient to optimize acute treatment strategies. Lifestyle changes, alone or combined with a nonprescription treatment such as isoflavones, may be considered, although evidence of efficacy is limited. In women with migraine and more severe menopause symptoms, continuous hormone replacement therapy should be considered, using a nonoral route and the lowest dose effective in controlling symptoms. For women who have contraindications to estrogen therapy or do not wish to use it, compounds that inhibit serotonin reuptake, such as venlafaxine, fluoxetine, and paroxetine, have all shown efficacy for the control of hot flashes and prevention of migraine. Gabapentin is another nonhormonal option that has clinical trial evidence of effectiveness in treating hot flashes and reducing the frequency and severity of migraine attacks. Although clonidine is licensed in several countries for migraine prophylaxis and treatment of vasomotor symptoms, any benefit from treatment is often offset by adverse events. There is evidence that hysterectomy can increase the frequency of migraine and menopause symptoms, with added morbidity and risk of mortality. Therapy should regularly be evaluated to assess its ongoing need, as hormonal triggers are self-limiting and abate after menopause.

  9. pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics; renal replacement therapy, continuous; antibiotics; antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honore, Patrick M; Jacobs, Rita; De Waele, Elisabeth; Spapen, Herbert D

    2017-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is progressively supplanting intermittent haemodialysis (IHD) in critically ill patients. Although CRRT indeed offers more appropriate haemodynamic, fluid, and metabolic stability, concern is rising about its impact on concomitant drugs and, in particular, antimicrobial treatment. Antimicrobial dose recommendations have been elaborated to avoid drug accumulation and toxicity in patients undergoing IHD. However, these dosing regimens have resulted in significant underdosing in patients undergoing CRRT, thereby increasing the risk of treatment failure and development of resistance. Applying pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) principles may aid one to obtain more adequate antimicrobial therapy during CRRT. Much progress has been made in recent years resulting in relevant changes in particular antimicrobial therapies. In this review, we discuss antimicrobials that are frequently used in an intensive care setting. Drugs are divided according to their PK/PD characteristics and, wherever possible, dose recommendations during CRRT are provided. Of course, while therapeutic drug monitoring remains the best way to cope with PK/PD variability within a critically ill CRRT population, its bedside use is actually limited to some specific antibiotics.

  10. Guilt by association: a historical perspective on Huggins, testosterone therapy, and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgentaler, Abraham

    2008-08-01

    A long-standing belief is that higher testosterone (T) will increase the risk of prostate cancer (PCa), yet recent studies do not support this view. To identify the key historical and scientific events leading to the establishment and persistence of the belief in a T-dependent model of PCa growth, despite evidence to the contrary. Review of key historical scientific articles regarding T and PCa. The T-dependent model of PCa growth arose from the work of Huggins and coworkers, who in 1941 demonstrated dramatic responses to castration among men with advanced PCa. These authors and others also reported a rapid clinical progression with T administration. This led to the concept that T was like "food for a hungry tumor" for men with PCa. Fowler and Whitmore recognized in 1981 that the negative effect of T administration did not occur unless men had been previously castrated. However, this critical observation was either forgotten or dismissed amid major changes in PCa diagnosis and management during the 1980s. More recent studies have failed to provide clinical evidence supporting the belief that higher T represents a risk for PCa. Factors contributing to the persistence of the T-dependent model included dramatic effects of castration, continued use of androgen deprivation for treatment of PCa, an influential spokesperson (Huggins), groupthink (failure to acknowledge evidence inconsistent with the prevalent ideology), and an imprecise formulation of the model ("more T, more cancer growth"), making refutation difficult. The fear that higher T will increase PCa growth stems from a theory of T-dependent PCa growth that originated with observations in a special population (castrated men) that is not particularly relevant to T therapy in hypogonadal men. The negative view of T with regard to PCa should be recognized for what it is--guilt by association.

  11. [Renal replacement therapy by hemodialysis in Constantine (Algeria)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhabel, Abdelouahab; Laib, Zoheir; Hannache, Kamel; Aberkane, Abdelhamid

    2014-02-01

    End-stage renal failure is considered a public heath problem that constitutes a heavy cost on communities worldwide. To be able to plan the treatment of this pathology, we must have reliable and updated information through health network which represents the best mean for planning and reflexion locally and nationwide. The aim of our study was to answer to this need through a local registry of renal replacement therapy and nephrology network that we have for the first time an inventory of this pathology in an Algerian town (Constantine), and in this article we present the first results concerning patients under chronic hemodialysis. Copyright © 2013 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Renouncement of renal replacement therapy: withdrawal and refusal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Andrade Moura Neto

    Full Text Available Abstract Renouncement of renal replacement therapy (RRT is a medical dilemma. This review covers the concept, the magnitude, the prognosis, and discusses strategies and management approaches about this subject in patients with CKD and AKI. Evidence suggests that refusal is more frequent and carries a more guarded prognosis than withdrawal of RRT. When RRT is not expected to be beneficial in terms of survival or quality of life, conservative treatment and palliative care are alternatives. We review the historical evolution of guidelines about renouncement of RRT and palliative care, and highlight the absence of specific recommendations in Brazil. However renouncement of RRT may be ethically and legally accepted in Brazil, as the right to a dignified death. Longer life expectancy, economic pressures, and greater awareness will require a more detailed discussion about indications and sustainable use of RRT, and possibly the elaboration of national guidelines.

  13. Predictors of Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Koziolek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Criteria that may guide early renal replacement therapy (RRT initiation in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI currently do not exist. Methods: In 120 consecutive patients with AKI, clinical and laboratory data were analyzed on admittance. The prognostic power of those parameters which were significantly different between the two groups was analyzed by receiver operator characteristic curves and by leave-1-out cross validation. Results: Six parameters (urine albumin, plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, daily urine output, fluid balance and plasma sodium were combined in a logistic regression model that estimates the probability that a particular patient will need RRT. Additionally, a second model without daily urine output was established. Both models yielded a higher accuracy (89 and 88% correct classification rate, respectively than the best single parameter, cystatin C (correct classification rate 74%. Conclusions: The combined models may help to better predict the necessity of RRT using clinical and routine laboratory data in patients with AKI.

  14. Arterial Stiffness and Renal Replacement Therapy: A Controversial Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Edmundo Cabrera; Zócalo, Yanina; Galli, Cintia; Wray, Sandra; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increase of arterial stiffness has been to have a significant impact on predicting mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a noninvasive, reliable parameter of regional arterial stiffness that integrates the vascular geometry and arterial wall intrinsic elasticity and is capable of predicting cardiovascular mortality in this patient population. Nevertheless, reports on PWV in dialyzed patients are contradictory and sometimes inconsistent: some reports claim the arterial wall stiffness increases (i.e., PWV increase), others claim that it is reduced, and some even state that it augments in the aorta while it simultaneously decreases in the brachial artery pathway. The purpose of this study was to analyze the literature in which longitudinal or transversal studies were performed in hemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis patients, in order to characterize arterial stiffness and the responsiveness to renal replacement therapy.

  15. Arterial Stiffness and Renal Replacement Therapy: A Controversial Topic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Cabrera Fischer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase of arterial stiffness has been to have a significant impact on predicting mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Pulse wave velocity (PWV is a noninvasive, reliable parameter of regional arterial stiffness that integrates the vascular geometry and arterial wall intrinsic elasticity and is capable of predicting cardiovascular mortality in this patient population. Nevertheless, reports on PWV in dialyzed patients are contradictory and sometimes inconsistent: some reports claim the arterial wall stiffness increases (i.e., PWV increase, others claim that it is reduced, and some even state that it augments in the aorta while it simultaneously decreases in the brachial artery pathway. The purpose of this study was to analyze the literature in which longitudinal or transversal studies were performed in hemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis patients, in order to characterize arterial stiffness and the responsiveness to renal replacement therapy.

  16. Demographics of paediatric renal replacement therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chesnaye, Nicholas; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Schaefer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ESPN/ERA-EDTA Registry collects data on European children with end-stage renal disease receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) who are listed on national and regional renal registries in Europe. In this paper we report on the analysis of demographic data collected from 2009...... to 2011. METHODS: Data on primary renal disease, incidence, prevalence, 4-year survival, transplantation rate and causes of death in paediatric patients receiving RRT were extracted from the ESPN/ERA-EDTA Registry for 37 European countries. RESULTS: The incidence of RRT in paediatric patients in Europe...... during the study period was 5.5 cases per million age-related population (pmarp) in patients aged 0-14 years and varied markedly between countries (interquartile range 3.4-7.0 years). The prevalence of RRT was 27.9 pmarp and increased with age, with 67 % of prevalent patients living with a functioning...

  17. Hormone replacement therapy in Denmark, 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Møller, Lisbeth Nørgaard

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the Danish National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (NRM) was opened for research purposes, and therefore, on an individual basis, can merge with other national registers. The aim of this study was to analyse the use of hormones based on the individual data of the entire Danish...... female population, with the focus on a detailed evaluation of specific hormone regimens and factors associated with systemic hormone replacement therapy (HRT).......Recently, the Danish National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (NRM) was opened for research purposes, and therefore, on an individual basis, can merge with other national registers. The aim of this study was to analyse the use of hormones based on the individual data of the entire Danish...

  18. Current status of renal replacement therapy in Cuba 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Oliva, J F

    2009-01-01

    We present the main structural and organizational features, as well as the human resources and the activities of Cuba in nephrology, dialysis, and transplantation. Access to renal replacement therapy is universal (not restricted). There are 47 hemodialysis services. There are 281 renal physicians (216 serving adult patients and 65 pediatric nephrologists). The incidence of renal replacement rose from 71 per million population (pmp) in 2000 to 98 pmp in 2006. The prevalence of patients on dialysis treatment increased from 100 pmp in 2000 to 194 pmp in 2006. Growth rates for dialysis increased by an average of 10.6% annually in this time. The overall prevalence of patients increased from 156 pmp in 1999 to 275 pmp in 2006. The main cause of endstage renal disease was diabetes mellitus. Main causes of death on dialysis were cardiovascular disease (43.7%) and infectious disease (22.8%). Ninety percent of the organs were retrieved from cadavers. The cadaveric donation rate was 10 pmp. Cuba shares economic limitations with its neighbors but is one of the emerging world's least socially stratified countries, with a universal, free public healthcare system emphasizing primary health care and prevention in nephrology.

  19. A Cost Analysis of Kidney Replacement Therapy Options in Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Younis Ph.D.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a cost analysis of kidney replacement therapy options in Palestine. It informs evidence-based resource allocation decisions for government-funded kidney disease services where transplant donors are limited, and some of the common modalities, i.e., peritoneal dialysis (PD and home hemodialysis (HD, are not widely available due to shortages of qualified staff, specialists, and centers to follow the patient cases, provide training, make home visits, or provide educational programs for patients. The average cost of kidney transplant was US$16 277 for the first year; the estimated cost of HD per patient averaged US$16 085 per year—nearly as much as a transplant. Consistent with prior literature and experience, while live, related kidney donors are scarce, we found that kidney transplant was more adequate and less expensive than HD. These results have direct resource allocation implications for government-funded kidney disease services under Palestinian Ministry of Health. Our findings strongly suggest that investing in sufficient qualified staff, equipment, and clinical infrastructure to replace HD services with transplantation whenever medically indicated and suitable kidney donors are available, as well as deploying PD programs and Home HD programs, will result in major overall cost savings. Our results provide a better understanding of the costs of kidney disease and will help to inform Ministry of Health and related policy makers as they develop short- and long-term strategies for the population, in terms of both cost savings and enhanced quality of life.

  20. Renal replacement therapy in acute poisonings--one center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlík, Miroslav; Derzsiová, Katarina; Frank, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    The authors described three groups of patients after acute poisonings. In the first group were 60 patients after carbon tetrachioride poisoning, the second group consisted of 81 patients after mushroom poisoning and 20 patients after ethylene glycol poisoning were in the third group. Besides two patients with rare poisonings after potassium dichromate and after paraquat poisoning were analysed. All groups of patients with the kidney damage were presented from the diagnostic, differential diagnostic, conservative, ntra- and extracorporeal elimination treatment point of view. In the group of patients suffering from acute carbon tetrachloride poisoning and with acute renal failure following therapy was used: conservative treatment, exchange blood transfusion--in 4 patients in hepatic coma, renal replacement therapy (peritoneal dialysis, haemodialysis, plasmapheresis). From the total number of 60 patients 58 survived and 2 patients died in liver coma. Survival of patients after mushroom poisoning depended on amount of oral use of mushroom (Amanita phalloides), on early admission in dialysis centre and on early beginning of renal replacement therapy within 24 hr after acute poisoning. Twenty four patients from 81 patients of this group died. Main clinical signs of ethylene glycol poisoning were various neurological symptoms (cramps, hemiparesis, coma), severe metabolic acidosis (pH = 7.06 +/- 0.14), leucocytosis (26.4 +/- 5.5x 10(9)/L) and the signs of acute toxic hepatitis and of acute renal failure. Calcium oxalic crystals in urine were present in 17 patients and leucocytosis was observed in every patient. In the first 4 patients we administered intravenously ethylalcohol as an antidotum and later in other patients we used ethylalcohol in dialysis solution. The concentration of ethylalcohol in dialysis solution was 100 mg%. Severe metabolic acidosis improved in 17 patients using bicarbonate haemodialysis and 3 patients died before the possibility to use bicarbonate

  1. [Survival in acute renal failure with conventional therapy or continuous replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibáñez-Velázquez, Martín; Sánchez-Montoya, Felipe; Alvirde-Gutiérrez, Luis

    2014-01-01

    To know the survival rate in patients with RIFLE I and II stages on acute renal failure, treated with supportive care or continuous renal replacement therapy with PRISMA machine, at an intensive care unit. There were included patients of both sexes, aged 16 to 69 years, with acute renal failure in RIFLE I and II stages and score of scale APACHE II lower than 36 points. The sample studied was divided in two groups: a group was treated with supportive care, and the other group received continuous renal replacement therapy via PRISMA machine. We compared mortality between both groups and the association with the RIFLE stages with Pearson's chi-squared test. The average score of the scale APACHE I was 14 points, and the probability of death was 15 %. The patients with acute renal failure RIFLE I were 54.5 % and RIFLE II 45.5 %, with mortality of 30.4 % and 38.8 %, respectively. Patients in RIFLE I stage who received supportive care and continuous replacement therapy had non-statistical differences in mortality (p = 0.356). The mortality in patients with acute renal failure in RIFLE II stage treated with continuous replacement therapy was higher (p = 0.000). Because of its accessibility and lower mortality, supportive care should be the initial procedure in patients with acute renal failure in RIFLE I and II stages.

  2. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy for Children ≤10 kg: A Report from the Prospective Pediatric Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenazi, David J.; Goldstein, Stuart L.; Koralkar, Rajesh; Fortenberry, James; Baum, Michelle; Hackbarth, Richard; Blowey, Doug; Bunchman, Timothy E.; Brophy, Patrick D.; Symons, Jordan; Chua, Annabelle; Flores, Francisco; Somers, Michael J. G.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To report circuit characteristics and survival analysis in children weighing ≤10 kg enrolled in the Prospective Pediatric Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy (ppCRRT) Registry. STUDY DESIGN We conducted prospective cohort analysis of the ppCRRT Registry to: (1) evaluate survival differences in children ≤10 kg compared with other children; (2) determine demographic and clinical differences between surviving and non-surviving children #10 kg; and (3) describe continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) circuit characteristics differences in children #5 kg versus 5–10 kg. RESULTS The ppCRRT enrolled 84 children ≤10 kg between January 2001 and August 2005 from 13 US tertiary centers. Children ≤10 kg had lower survival rates than children >10 kg (36/84 [43%] versus 166/260 [64%]; P 10 kg, survivors were more likely to have fewer days in intensive care unit prior to CRRT, lower Pediatric Risk of Mortality 2 scores at intensive care unit admission and lower mean airway pressure (Paw), higher urine output, and lower percent fluid overload (FO) at CRRT initiation. Adjusted regression analysis revealed that Pediatric Risk of Mortality 2 scores, FO, and decreased urine output were associated with mortality. Compared with circuits from children 5–10 kg at CRRT initiation, circuits from children #5 kg more commonly used blood priming for initiation, heparin anticoagulation, and higher blood flows/effluent flows for body weight. CONCLUSION Mortality is more common in children who are ≤10 kg at the time of CRRT initiation. Like other CRRT populations, urine output and FO at CRRT initiation are independently associated with mortality. CRRT prescription differs in small children. PMID:23102589

  3. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Improves Survival in Severely Burned Military Casualties With Acute Kidney Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Kevin K; Juncos, , Luis A; Wolf, Steven E; Mann, Elizabeth E; Renz, Evan M; White, Christopher E; Barillo, David J; Clark, Richard A; Jones, John A; Edgecombe, Harcourt P

    2007-01-01

    .... We wondered whether early use of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) changes outcomes in severely burned military casualties with predetermined criteria for acute kidney injury. Methods...

  4. A cost analysis of kidney replacement therapy options in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Mustafa; Jabr, Samer; Al-Khatib, Abdallah; Forgione, Dana; Hartmann, Michael; Kisa, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    This study provides a cost analysis of kidney replacement therapy options in Palestine. It informs evidence-based resource allocation decisions for government-funded kidney disease services where transplant donors are limited, and some of the common modalities, i.e., peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis (HD), are not widely available due to shortages of qualified staff, specialists, and centers to follow the patient cases, provide training, make home visits, or provide educational programs for patients. The average cost of kidney transplant was US$16,277 for the first year; the estimated cost of HD per patient averaged US$16,085 per year--nearly as much as a transplant. Consistent with prior literature and experience, while live, related kidney donors are scarce, we found that kidney transplant was more adequate and less expensive than HD. These results have direct resource allocation implications for government-funded kidney disease services under Palestinian Ministry of Health. Our findings strongly suggest that investing in sufficient qualified staff, equipment, and clinical infrastructure to replace HD services with transplantation whenever medically indicated and suitable kidney donors are available, as well as deploying PD programs and Home HD programs, will result in major overall cost savings. Our results provide a better understanding of the costs of kidney disease and will help to inform Ministry of Health and related policy makers as they develop short- and long-term strategies for the population, in terms of both cost savings and enhanced quality of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Renal replacement therapy should be tailored to the patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Paul A; Aisling, E Courtney

    2014-02-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) describes loss of kidney function which is both substantial and irreversible. It is associated with acute life-threatening complications such as hyperkalaemia and pulmonary oedema, and chronic metabolic derangements that cannot be sustained in the long-term. Patient education is paramount in ESRD management. The form of renal replacement therapy (RRT) instituted should primarily be based on patient preference subsequent to an individually tailored education programme from specialist staff. This programme needs to take into account the patient's comorbidities and any contraindications to specific modalities of RRT. Transplantation replicates normal renal physiology much more closely than either dialysis modality. Assessment for transplantation requires consideration of the patient's suitability for general anaesthetic and surgery. Patients need to have an adequate blood supply and urinary drainage, and space for a kidney. They must also be suitable candidates for long-term immunosuppression. Ideally patients with ESRD should have a pre-emptive transplant before they require dialysis. Ninety per cent of recipients of a live donor transplant in the UK in 1999-2001 were alive ten years later, compared with 74% of deceased donor recipients. There is no conclusive evidence that either dialysis modality is superior, and unless there are obvious reasons why one therapy is unsuitable, patient preference is usually the deciding factor. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) does not provide the same level of fluid and toxin removal as haemodialysis (HD) and many patients will be forced to transfer to HD within two to three years as PD gradually loses effectiveness. For those who will be suitable for transplantation, optimum management of diabetes, smoking cessation, weight loss, and general fitness is crucial in facilitating this.

  6. Timing of renal replacement therapy initiation by AKIN classification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies using Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN)/RIFLE criteria to classify early initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT) have defined it as the therapy started in less severe AKIN/RIFLE stages. Generally, these studies failed in demonstrating measurable benefits. Methods We compared RRT initiation in critically ill patients and defined early or late RRT in reference to timing after stage 3 AKIN was met: patients beginning RRT within 24 hours after acute kidney injury (AKI) stage 3 were considered early starters. AKIN criteria were evaluated by both urine output (UO) and serum creatinine (sCr) and patients with acute-on-chronic kidney disease were excluded. A propensity score methodology was used to control variables. Results A total of 358 critically ill patients were submitted to RRT. Only 150 patients with pure AKI at stage 3 were analyzed. Mortality was lower in the early RRT group (51.5 vs. 77.9%, P = 0.001). After achieving balance between the groups using a propensity score, there was a significant 30.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.4 to 45.2%, P = 0.002) relative decrease of mortality in the early RRT group. Moreover, patients on the early RRT group had lower duration of mechanical ventilation, time on RRT and a trend to lower intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay. Conclusions For the first time, AKIN was used with UO criterion to evaluate early and late RRT. Using a time-based approach could be a better parameter to access the association between RRT initiation and outcomes in patients with AKI. PMID:23548002

  7. Testosterone deficiency in dialysis patients: Difference between dialysis techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigarrán, Secundino; Coronel, Francisco; Florit, Enrique; Calviño, Jesús; Villa, Juan; Gonzalez Tabares, Lourdes; Herrero, José Antonio; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    Testosterone deficiency is a prevalent condition in male patients with chronic kidney disease. However, it is not known whether the type of renal replacement therapy has an impact on testosterone deficiency that accompanies loss of renal function. The cross-sectional study enrolled 79 prevalent male patients on dialysis; 43 on haemodialysis (HD) and 36 on peritoneal dialysis (PD). The median age was 69 years and 31.6% were diabetics. Endogenous testosterone levels were measured by immunoluminescence assay (normal range 3-10.5ng/ml), while nutritional/inflammatory markers, bone and mineral metabolism markers, anaemia, type of dialysis technique and time on dialysis were also assessed. Body composition was evaluated by bioimpedance vector analysis and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Testosterone deficiency was defined as levels below 3ng/ml. Mean testosterone levels were 8.81±6.61ng/ml. Testosterone deficiency affected 39.5% of HD patients and only 5.6% of PD patients. In the univariate analysis, testosterone levels were directly correlated with type of dialysis technique (HD) (Rho Spearman 0.366; P<.001) and time on dialysis (Rho -0.412; P=.036) and only with the HD technique in the multivariate analysis. No other significant correlations were found. Circulating testosterone levels in men on dialysis were independently associated with HD technique. It can be concluded that a new factor -namely the dialysis technique- may be associated with falling testosterone levels and the associated loss of muscle mass and inflammation. Further studies are needed to establish whether the dialysis technique itself triggers testosterone elimination. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy in older men Riscos e benefícios da terapia de reposição hormonal em homens idosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Firmbach Pasqualotto

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of testosterone in older men, known as male hormonal replacement therapy or androgen replacement therapy, has become of increasing interest to both the medical and lay communities over the past decade. Even though the knowledge of the potential benefits and risks of male Androgen Replacement Therapy has increased dramatically, there is still much that needs to be determined. Although there are a number of potential benefits of male Androgen Replacement Therapy and data concerning clinical effects of such replacement have accumulated, as yet there have not been any large multicenter randomized controlled trials of this therapy. It is the purpose of this article to review what is currently known about the possible risks and benefits of male Androgen Replacement Therapy by discussing the clinical trials to date.O uso da testosterona em homens idosos, conhecido como Terapia de Reposição Hormonal no homem ou Terapia de Reposição com Androgênios, têm aumentado o interesse para as comunidades médica e leiga na última década. Muito embora o conhecimento a respeito dos potenciais benefícios e riscos da Terapia de Reposição Hormonal nos homens tem aumentado dramaticamente, ainda existe muito que precisa ser determinado. Embora existam vários benefícios potenciais da Terapia de Reposição com Androgênios e dados clínicos relacionados com o uso de tal terapia, não existem ainda nenhum estudo controlado, randomizado e multicêntrico avaliando o uso de tal terapia. O objetivo deste artigo é revisar os aspectos atuais sobre os possíveis riscos e benefícios da Terapia de Reposição com Androgênios discutindo os estudos clínicos publicados sobre o assunto.

  9. [Alternatives to hormone replacement therapy for menopause: an epidemiological evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringa, V

    2004-05-01

    Recent results put into question the risks/benefits ratio of hormone replacement therapy and emphasize the importance of precise knowledge of the effects of other treatments that exist for postmenopausal symptoms or diseases. Our aim is to analyze their effect. A review of randomized trials or epidemiological studies was undertaken. Bisphophonates, calcitonin, parathormone, strontium ranelate, calcium and vitamin D have specific effects on bone. The efficacy of bisphophonates for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis has been proven and parathormone and strontium ranelate seem promising. These treatments are useful for women at high risk of osteoporosis who do not suffer from menopausal symptoms. Tibolone, SERMs and phytoestrogens exert effects on various tissues. SERMs are very promising, but they do not improve climacteric symptoms and their long term effects are still unknown. Tibolone has beneficial effects on climacteric symptoms and on bone loss, but recent results concerning its effects on the risk of breast cancer call into question its interest. The beneficial effects of phytoestrogens on bone and on vasomotor symptoms need to be confirmed. At this time, none of the existing treatments for postmenopausal symptoms or diseases is ideal. The existence of several options for treatments of symptoms or diseases of the postmenopause is helpful as it affords several choices for physicians and for women who sometimes need to be treated for many years. However several questions remain unanswered concerning the long term effects of these treatments.

  10. Continuing education: preparing patients to choose a renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goovaerts, Tony; Bagnis Isnard, Corinne; Crepaldi, Carlo; Dean, Jessica; Melander, Stefan; Mooney, Andrew; Prieto-Velasco, Mario; Trujillo, Carmen; Zambon, Roberto; Nilsson, Eva-Lena

    2015-03-01

    Patients with progressive chronic kidney disease face a series of treatment decisions that will impact the quality of life of themselves and their family. Renal replacement therapy option education (RRTOE), generally provided by nurses, is recommended by international guidelines To provide nurses with advice and guidance on running RRTOE. A consensus conference. Four nurses, 5 nephrologists and 1 clinical psychologist (9 renal units; 6 European countries) from units that had extensive experience in RRTOE or were performing research in this field. Experts brainstormed and discussed quality standards for the education team, processes, content/topics, media/material/funding and quality measurements for RRTOE. Conclusions and recommendations from these discussions that are particularly pertinent to nurses are presented in this paper. Through careful planning and smooth interdisciplinary cooperation, it is possible to implement an education and support programme that helps patients choose a form of RRT that is most suited to their needs. This may result in benefits in quality of life and clinical outcomes. There are large differences between renal units in terms of resources available and the demographics of the catchment area. Therefore, nurses should carefully consider how best to adapt the advice offered here to their own situation. Throughout this process, it is crucial to keep in mind the ultimate goal - providing patients with the knowledge and skill to make a modality choice that will enhance their quality of life to the greatest degree. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  11. History of nephrology and renal replacement therapy in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hi Bahl

    2011-01-01

    Korea has a long tradition of Eastern (Korean) medicine. Modern nephrology in Korea began in the 20th century after the Second World War. The first nephrology report was presented in 1949 at the third annual meeting of the Korean Society of Internal Medicine. The first hemodialysis was performed in 1952 during the Korean War, the first acute peritoneal dialysis in 1957, the first kidney biopsy in 1959, the first kidney transplantation in 1969 and the first continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in 1981. National Health Insurance was launched in 1976 with a limited coverage, which was gradually expanded to cover all Korean nationals in 1989. The Korean Society of Nephrology (KSN) was inaugurated in 1980. The KSN End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Registry was started in 1985. Brain death legislation was enacted, and the Korean network for organ sharing launched in 2000. During 2009, a total of 8,906 patients or 175.9 patients per million population (PMP) began renal replacement therapy (RRT), and at the end of the year a total of 56,396 patients or 1,113.6 patients PMP were on RRT in Korea. The prevalence of ESRD continues to grow in Korea while its incidence is stable or declining as compared with the previous year.

  12. Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis in patients on renal replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis is an unusual and potentially fatal condition characterised by small-vessel calcification and ischaemic skin necrosis. It mainly affects patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD on haemodialysis, but may rarely occur in the absence of ESRD in conditions such as primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, alcoholic liver disease and connective tissue disease. Methods. We reviewed the records of all patients diagnosed with calciphylaxis while on renal replacement therapy at Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa, between 1990 and 2014, to describe its presentation, course and final outcome. Results. Nineteen patients developed calciphylaxis over this period. Their median age was 34 years and 13 (68.4% were female. Fifteen (78.9% had received a kidney transplant. All patients had painful skin lesions that rapidly progressed to infarction. Small-vessel calcification was seen on skin biopsy in 13 patients. Twelve patients had hyperparathyroidism. Several of the transplanted patients had been treated for graft rejection in the year preceding the diagnosis. Treatment consisted of good wound care and efforts to normalise serum calcium and phosphate levels. Five patients received an urgent parathyroidectomy. The outcome was fatal in 17 patients, with sepsis being the main cause of death. Conclusions. In our patients, calciphylaxis carried a worse prognosis than previously reported internationally. It should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of painful skin lesions in the dialysis or transplant patient.

  13. Intensity of continuous renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Alicia I; Buamscha, Daniel G; Ciapponi, Agustín

    2016-10-04

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition among patients in intensive care units (ICU), and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a blood purification technique used to treat the most severe forms of AKI but its effectiveness remains unclear. To assess the effects of different intensities (intensive and less intensive) of CRRT on mortality and recovery of kidney function in critically ill AKI patients. We searched Cochrane Kidney and Transplant's Specialised Register to 9 February 2016 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies contained in the Specialised Register are identified through search strategies specifically designed for CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE; handsearching conference proceedings; and searching the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also searched LILACS to 9 February 2016. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We included all patients with AKI in ICU regardless of age, comparing intensive (usually a prescribed dose ≥35 mL/kg/h) versus less intensive CRRT (usually a prescribed dose post-surgical AKI. Based on the current low quality of evidence identified, more intensive CRRT did not demonstrate beneficial effects on mortality or recovery of kidney function in critically ill patients with AKI. There was an increased risk of hypophosphataemia with more intense CRRT. Intensive CRRT reduced the risk of mortality in patients with post-surgical AKI.

  14. Renal replacement therapy for rare diseases affecting the kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wühl, Elke; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Wanner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    -stage renal disease (ESRD) population is limited. The aims of this study were (i) to identify those rare diseases within the ERA-EDTA Registry for which renal replacement therapy (RRT) is being provided and (ii) to determine the prevalence and incidence of RRT for ESRD due to rare diseases, both overall....... RESULTS: From 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2011, 7194 patients started RRT for a rare disease (10.6% children). While some diseases were exclusively found in adults (e.g. Fabry disease), primary oxalosis, cystinosis, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and medullary cystic kidney...... disease affected young patients in up to 46%. On 31 December 2011, 20 595 patients (12.4% of the total RRT population) were on RRT for ESRD caused by a rare disease. The point prevalence was 32.5 per million age-related population in children and 152.0 in adults. Only 5.8% of these patients were younger...

  15. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richelin V. Dye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, there has been a significant amount of research investigating the risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with regards to neurodegenerative disease. Here, we review basic science studies, randomized clinical trials, and epidemiological studies, and discuss the putative neuroprotective effects of HRT in the context of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Findings to date suggest a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease and improved cognitive functioning of postmenopausal women who use 17β-estradiol. With regards to Parkinson’s disease, there is consistent evidence from basic science studies for a neuroprotective effect of 17β-estradiol; however, results of clinical and epidemiological studies are inconclusive at this time, and there is a paucity of research examining the association between HRT and Parkinson’s-related neurocognitive impairment. Even less understood are the effects of HRT on risk for frontotemporal dementia and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Limits to the existing research are discussed, along with proposed future directions for the investigation of HRT and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Hormone replacement therapy and the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gambacciani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fracture prevention is one of the public health priorities worldwide. Estrogen deficiency is the major factor in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the most common metabolic bone disease. Different effective treatments for osteoporosis are available. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT at different doses rapidly normalizes turnover, preserves bone mineral density (BMD at all skeletal sites, leading to a significant, reduction in vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Tibolone, a selective tissue estrogenic activity regulator (STEAR, is effective in the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, vaginal atrophy and prevention/treatment of osteoporosis with a clinical efficacy similar to that of conventional HRT. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs such as raloxifene and bazedoxifene reduce turnover and maintain or increase vertebral and femoral BMD and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. The combination of bazedoxifene and conjugated estrogens, defined as tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC, is able to reduce climacteric symptoms, reduce bone turnover and preserve BMD. In conclusion, osteoporosis prevention can actually be considered as a major additional benefit in climacteric women who use HRT for treatment of climacteric symptoms. The use of a standard dose of HRT for osteoporosis prevention is based on biology, epidemiology, animal and preclinical data, observational studies and randomized, clinical trials. The antifracture effect of a lower dose HRT or TSEC is supported by the data on BMD and turnover, with compelling scientific evidence.

  17. Testosterone therapy delays cardiomyocyte aging via an androgen receptor-independent pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The testicular feminized (Tfm mouse carries a nonfunctional androgen receptor (AR and reduced circulating testosterone levels. We used Tfm and castrated mice to determine whether testosterone modulates markers of aging in cardiomyocytes via its classic AR-dependent pathway or conversion to estradiol. Male littermates and Tfm mice were divided into 6 experimental groups. Castrated littermates (group 1 and sham-operated Tfm mice (group 2, N = 8 each received testosterone. Sham-operated Tfm mice received testosterone in combination with the aromatase inhibitor anastrazole (group 3, N = 7. Castrated littermates (group 4 and sham-operated untreated Tfm mice (group 5 were used as controls (N = 8 and 7, respectively. An additional control group (group 6 consisted of age-matched non-castrated littermates (N = 8. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from the left ventricle, telomere length was measured by quantitative PCR and expression of p16INK4α, retinoblastoma (Rb and p53 proteins was detected by Western blot 3 months after treatment. Compared with group 6, telomere length was short (P < 0.01 and expression of p16INK4α, Rb and p53 proteins was significantly (P < 0.05 up-regulated in groups 4 and 5. These changes were improved to nearly normal levels in groups 1 and 2 (telomere length = 0.78 ± 0.05 and 0.80 ± 0.08; p16INK4α = 0.13 ± 0.03 and 0.15 ± 0.04; Rb = 0.45 ± 0.05 and 0.39 ± 0.06; p53 = 0.16 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03, but did not differ between these two groups. These improvements were partly inhibited in group 3 compared with group 2 (telomere length = 0.65 ± 0.08 vs 0.80 ± 0.08, P = 0.021; p16INK4α = 0.28 ± 0.05 vs 0.15 ± 0.04, P = 0.047; Rb = 0.60 ± 0.06 vs 0.39 ± 0.06, P < 0.01; p53 = 0.34 ± 0.06 vs 0.13 ± 0.03, P = 0.004. In conclusion, testosterone deficiency contributes to cardiomyocyte aging. Physiological testosterone can delay cardiomyocyte aging via an AR-independent pathway and in part by conversion to estradiol.

  18. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Fernando S.; Carvalho, Maria Helena C.; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed. PMID:26538238

  19. β-lactam antibiotic concentrations during continuous renal replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of standard doses of β-lactam antibiotics during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) may result in inadequate serum concentrations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of unadjusted drug regimens (i.e., similar to those used in patients with normal renal function) in patients treated with CRRT and the influence of CRRT intensity on drug clearance. Methods We reviewed data from 50 consecutive adult patients admitted to our Department of Intensive Care in whom routine therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of broad-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics (ceftazidime or cefepime, CEF; piperacillin/tazobactam; TZP; meropenem, MEM) was performed using unadjusted β-lactam antibiotics regimens (CEF = 2 g q8h; TZP = 4 g q6h; MEM = 1 g q8h). Serum drug concentrations were measured twice during the elimination phase by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV). We considered therapy was adequate when serum drug concentrations were between 4 and 8 times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during optimal periods of time for each drug (≥70% for CEF; ≥ 50% for TZP; ≥ 40% for MEM). Therapy was considered as early (ET) or late (LT) phase if TDM was performed within 48 hours of antibiotic initiation or later on, respectively. Results We collected 73 serum samples from 50 patients (age 58 ± 13 years; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score on admission 21 (17–25)), 35 during ET and 38 during LT. Drug concentrations were above 4 times the MIC in 63 (90%), but above 8 times the MIC in 39 (53%) samples. The proportions of patients with adequate drug concentrations during ET and LT were quite similar. We found a weak but significant correlation between β-lactam antibiotics clearance and CRRT intensity. Conclusions In septic patients undergoing CRRT, doses of β-lactam antibiotics similar to those given to patients with normal renal function achieved drug

  20. Testosterone and weight loss: the evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this article is to examine the contemporary data linking testosterone therapy in overweight and obese men with testosterone deficiency to increased lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvement in overall body composition and sustained weight loss. This is of paramount importance because testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency represents a novel and a timely therapeutic strategy for managing obesity in men with testosterone deficiency. Recent findings Long-term testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency produces significant and sustained weight loss, marked reduction in waist circumference and BMI and improvement in body composition. Further, testosterone therapy ameliorates components of the metabolic syndrome. The aforementioned improvements are attributed to improved mitochondrial function, increased energy utilization, increased motivation and vigor resulting in improved cardio-metabolic function and enhanced physical activity. Summary The implication of testosterone therapy in management of obesity in men with testosterone deficiency is of paramount clinical significance, as it produces sustained weight loss without recidivism. On the contrary, alternative therapeutic approaches other than bariatric surgery failed to produce significant and sustained outcome and exhibit a high rate of recidivism. These findings represent strong foundations for testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency and should spur clinical research for better understanding of usefulness of testosterone therapy in treatment of underlying pathophysiological conditions of obesity. PMID:25105998

  1. Testosterone Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone topical works by ... clean and completely dry. Open your testosterone topical container. If you are using a packet, fold the ...

  2. Hormone replacement therapy leads to increased plasma levels of platelet derived microparticles in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rank, Andreas; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nikolajek, Katharina; Rösner, Sabine; Wallwiener, Lisa-Maria; Hiller, Erhard; Toth, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Whereas prevention of cardiovascular diseases by hormonal replacement therapy is still part of an ongoing debate, well-defined data are available relating hormonal replacement therapy to an elevated risk of venous thrombosis and embolism. Although it seems that venous thrombosis in patients treated

  3. Discontinuation of hormone replacement therapy after myocardial infarction and short term risk of adverse cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretler, Ditte-Marie; Hansen, Peter Riis; Sørensen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    To assess the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in women who discontinue hormone replacement therapy after myocardial infarction compared with those who continue.......To assess the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in women who discontinue hormone replacement therapy after myocardial infarction compared with those who continue....

  4. Relation between hormone replacement therapy and ischaemic heart disease in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Pedersen, A T; Heitmann, B L

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the risk of ischaemic heart disease and myocardial infarction among women using hormone replacement therapy, especially the potential modifying effect of cardiovascular risk factors.......To investigate the risk of ischaemic heart disease and myocardial infarction among women using hormone replacement therapy, especially the potential modifying effect of cardiovascular risk factors....

  5. [A tentative research of testosterone supplement therapy on male senile dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Jun; Zhou, Bao-Lin; Bai, Li-Li; Liu, Jun-Sheng; Huang, Yu-Feng

    2003-06-01

    To understand the hormone levels in male senile dementia patients and the effects of testosterone supplement theraphy (TST) on male senile dementia. The general health condition, mental health condition, hormone levels, and some other aspects were evaluated in 9 patients with male senile dementia without significant contradiction for TST. 9 patients were treated with oral testosterone undecanoate 120 mg per day for six weeks, and relative changes were observed, detected and recorded. In 9 cases of male senile dementia, the average score was 5.33 in mini-mental state examination (MMSE), 14.56 in Hamilton depression scale (HAMD), 5.0 in geriatric depression scale (GDS), 32.56 in partial androgen deficiency of the aging male (PADAM) measuring form. The volume of testis was small (8.33 ml on average). After 1 week of having finished TST, the levels of serum testosterone (T) dropped significantly (dropped from average 2.88 ng/ml to 2.47 ng/ml, P Physical strength and psychological status improved significantly, but vasomotor symptoms and sexual function failed response to the treatment. The levels of androgen is low, and the symptoms of androgen deficiency are readily seen in male senile dementia. TST can improve life quality of most patients to some extent.

  6. Effect of long-term Hormone Replacement Therapy on Plasma Homocysteine in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonna S; Kristensen, Søren R; Klitgaard, Niels A

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of hormone replacement therapy on total homocysteine and to study whether there was any difference in effect between opposed and unopposed hormone replacement therapy or whether the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677......T polymorphism was associated with the effect of hormone replacement therapy on total homocysteine. STUDY DESIGN: Two hundred nine healthy postmenopausal women were randomized to hormone replacement therapy (n = 103) or no substitution (n = 106) 5 to 7 years earlier. RESULTS: Women who received...... hormone replacement therapy had significantly lower total homocysteine concentrations than women in the control group; median total homocysteine values were 8.6 micromol/L and 9.7 micromol/L, respectively, in a per-protocol analysis (P =.02). The effect was comparable in all methylenetetrahydrofolate...

  7. [Infants of drug-addicted mothers: pitfalls of replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vert, Paul; Hamon, Isabelle; Hubert, Claire; Legagneur, Michel; Hascoet, Jean-Michel

    2008-05-01

    Maternal drug addiction can cause problems for the fetus and the newborn, and hamper long-term development. The prevalence of drug addiction during pregnancy varies from 1 % to more than 10 % depending on the country and the maternity unit. Management of these mothers can be further complicated by medical, social and psychological problems. Compared to methadone, heroin replacement therapy with buprenorphine provides better stabilization of the mother and causes fewer withdrawal symptoms in the newborn. Despite numerous publications on the effects of this partly preventive medication, data on buprenorphine pharmacology at birth are scarce. In this study, 20 newborns of mothers using oral buprenorphine were observed until the end of the withdrawal syndrome, when present. Buprenorphine plasma levels were determined with HPLC and mass spectrometry in the mother at delivery and in the newborn at birth (cord blood), 24 and 48 hours. Fifteen newborns were born at term (mean +/- SD birth weight 3029 +/- 273 g), and the other five between 32 and 36 weeks. All Apgar scores were > or =7. Withdrawal symptoms were observed in 8 of the 15 infants born to mothers taking buprenorphine alone, and lasted between 5 and 35 days. The newborns were classified in three groups. Groups I (N8) and II (N7) comprised newborns with and without withdrawal symptoms, respectively. In group III (N5), the mothers were polyintoxicated (as shown by urinary drug or neurotropic substance screening) and the newborns were symptomatic for 1 to 69 days. Buprenorphine plasma levels in the mothers ranged from 0 to 2.9 microg/L, suggesting large differences in adherence. At birth there was no significant difference in the mean plasma buprenorphine level between newborns with and without withdrawal symptoms; the respective values were 0.7 (0.4-1.3) and 0.5 (0-0.6) microg/L. In asymptomatic newborns (group II), buprenorphine was no longer detectable at 48 h, whereas in symptomatic newborns (group I), the mean

  8. Factors associated with poor outcomes of continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chin Kao

    Full Text Available Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT is one of the dialysis modalities for critically ill patients. Despite intensive dialysis care, a high mortality rate is found in these patients. Our objective was to investigate the factors associated with poor outcomes in these patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the National Health Insurance Research Database. Records of critically ill patients who received CRRT between 2007 and 2011 were retrieved, and the patients were categorized into two groups: those with acute kidney injury (AKI and those with history of end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Our primary and secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and long-term survival and non-renal recovery (long-term dialysis dependence, respectively, in the AKI group. We enrolled 15,453 patients, with 13,204 and 2249 in the AKI and ESRD groups, respectively. Overall, 66.5% patients died during hospitalization. In-hospital mortality did not differ significantly between groups (adjusted odds ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.84-1.02. Age, chronic liver disease, and cancer history were identified as independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality in both groups. Hypertension was associated with higher risk of in-hospital mortality in patients with AKI. Age, coronary artery disease, and admission to the medical intensive care unit (MICU were risk factors for long-term dialysis dependence in patients with AKI. Patients with AKI and ESRD have similarly poor outcomes after CRRT. Older age and presence of chronic liver disease and cancer were associated with higher mortality. Older age, presence of coronary artery disease, and admission to MICU were associated with lower renal recovery rate in patients with AKI.

  9. Principles of antibacterial dosing in continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gordon; Gomersall, Charles D; Tian, Qi; Joynt, Gavin M; Freebairn, Ross; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2009-07-01

    To outline the concepts involved in optimizing antibacterial dosing in critically ill patients with acute renal failure undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), provide a strategy for optimizing dosing, and summarize the data required to implement the strategy. MEDLINE search from February 1986 to 2008. Optimal dosing of antibacterials is dependent on achieving pharmacokinetic targets associated with maximal killing of bacteria and improved outcomes. The initial dose is dependent on the volume of distribution. Maintenance doses are dependent on clearance. Both should be adjusted according to the pharmacokinetic target associated with optimal bacterial killing, when known. The volume of distribution of some antibacterials is altered by critical illness or acute renal failure or both. Clearance by CRRT is dependent on the dose and mode of CRRT and the sieving or saturation coefficient of the drug. Both sieving and saturation coefficient are related to the plasma protein binding and thus may be altered in renal failure. Appropriate dose calculation requires knowledge of the pharmacokinetic target and the usual minimum inhibitory concentration of the suspected organism in the patient's locality (or if unavailable, the break point for the organism), published pharmacokinetic data (volume of distribution, non-CRRT clearance) on critically ill patients receiving CRRT (which may differ substantially from noncritically ill patients or those without renal failure), the sieving or saturation coefficient of the relevant drug in critically ill patients, the dose and mode of CRRT being used, and the actual dose of CRRT that is delivered. This large number of variables results in considerable inter- and intrapatient heterogeneity in dose requirements. This article provides basic principles and relevant data to guide the clinician in prescribing individualized dosing regimes.

  10. Improvements in Renal Replacement Therapy Practice Patterns in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Külli Kõlvald

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical performance indicators (CPI are important tools to assess and improve the quality of renal replacement therapy (RRT. The aim of the current study was to compare the results of a longitudinal set of CPI in RRT patients and to determine the extent to which the guidelines for anaemia, calcium phosphate management and other CPI are met in Estonian renal centres. Methods: A long-term retrospective, observational, cross-sectional CPI analysis was undertaken in RRT patients from 2007 to 2011. The following CPI set of well-designed measures based on good evidence was analysed: anaemia management variables, laboratory analyses of mineral metabolism, nutritional status variables and dialysis adequacy variables. Results: Relatively small changes in the analysed mean CPI values were noticed during the study period. In the course of the study, we noticed an improvement in anaemia control, but not all centres achieved the standard of >80% of the dialysis patients with a haemoglobin (Hb level >100 g/l. There was a trend of decreasing Hb concentrations below 125 g/l in both haemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. In 2011, hyperphosphataemia was present in 58% of the HD and 47% of the PD patients, whereas centre differences varied between 50 and 60% of both the HD and PD patients. HD adequacy was achieved in 77% of the HD patients. Conclusion: An improvement in the data collection was noticed, and the analysis of CPI allows renal centres to assess and compare their practices with others. The collection and evaluation of CPI of RRT patients is an important improvement and significantly increases the awareness of nephrologists.

  11. Three-dimensional model of surfactant replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoche, Marcel; Tai, Cheng-Feng; Grotberg, James B

    2015-07-28

    Surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) involves instillation of a liquid-surfactant mixture directly into the lung airway tree. It is widely successful for treating surfactant deficiency in premature neonates who develop neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS). However, when applied to adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), early successes were followed by failures. This unexpected and puzzling situation is a vexing issue in the pulmonary community. A pressing question is whether the instilled surfactant mixture actually reaches the adult alveoli/acinus in therapeutic amounts. In this study, to our knowledge, we present the first mathematical model of SRT in a 3D lung structure to provide insight into answering this and other questions. The delivery is computed from fluid mechanical principals for 3D models of the lung airway tree for neonates and adults. A liquid plug propagates through the tree from forced inspiration. In two separate modeling steps, the plug deposits a coating film on the airway wall and then splits unevenly at the bifurcation due to gravity. The model generates 3D images of the resulting acinar distribution and calculates two global indexes, efficiency and homogeneity. Simulating published procedural methods, we show the neonatal lung is a well-mixed compartment, whereas the adult lung is not. The earlier, successful adult SRT studies show comparatively good index values implying adequate delivery. The later, failed studies used different protocols resulting in very low values of both indexes, consistent with inadequate acinar delivery. Reasons for these differences and the evolution of failure from success are outlined and potential remedies discussed.

  12. Relationship between body mass index and serum testosterone concentration in patients receiving luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy for prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Tim M.; van Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A.; Meuleman, Eric J. H.; ter Haar, Ronald W.; Bui, Hong N.; Heijboer, Annemieke C.; Vis, André N.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the body mass index (BMI) and serum testosterone concentrations in men receiving luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist therapy for prostate cancer. A total of 66 white men were included in the present study. All subjects had received LHRH agonist

  13. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone works by replacing ... Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat ...

  14. Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fishmeal replaced with Spirulina platensis, Chlorella vulgaris and Azolla pinnata and the formulated diet fed to Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae to assess the enhancement ability of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and lipid peroxidation (LPx were analysed. In the present study, the S. platensis, C. vulgaris and A. pinnata inclusion diet fed groups had significant (P < 0.05 improvement in the levels of vitamins C and E in the hepatopancreas and muscle tissue. Among all the diets, the replacement materials in 50% incorporated feed fed groups showed better performance when compared with the control group in non-enzymatic antioxidant activity. The 50% fishmeal replacement (best performance diet fed groups taken for enzymatic antioxidant study, in SOD, CAT and LPx showed no significant increases when compared with the control group. Hence, the present results revealed that the formulated feed enhanced the vitamins C and E, the result of decreased level of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and LPx revealed that these feeds are non-toxic and do not produce any stress to postlarvae. These ingredients can be used as an alternative protein source for sustainable Macrobrachium culture.

  15. Carnitine deficiency in children receiving continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgambat, Kristen; Moudgil, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is known to occur in chronic hemodialysis; however, the effect of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on carnitine homeostasis has not been studied. We hypothesized that children receiving CRRT are at risk for deficiency because of continuous removal, absent intake, decreased production, and comorbidities related to critical illness. Records of patients with acute kidney injury receiving CRRT at Children's National Health System between 2011 and 2014 were reviewed for total carnitine (TC), free carnitine (FC), feeding modality, severity of illness, and survival outcome. The proportion of carnitine-deficient patients at baseline, 1, 2, and ≥3 weeks on CRRT were compared by chi-square, and relationships with other variables assessed by Pearson's correlation and logistic regression. The study group included 42 CRRT patients, age 7.9 + 1.1 years. At baseline, 30.7% and 35.7% of patients were TC and FC deficient. Within 1 week, 64.5% (P = 0.03) and 70% (P = 0.03) were TC and FC deficient, and prevalence of deficiency increased to 80% (P = 0.01) and 90% (P = 0.008) by 2 weeks; 100% of patients were TC and FC deficient after being on CRRT for ≥3 weeks (P = 0.005 and P = 0.01, respectively, vs. baseline). TC and FC levels negatively correlated with days on CRRT (r = -0.39, P = 0.001 and r = -0.35, P = 0.005). Patients with TC and FC deficiency had 5.9 and 4.9 greater odds of death than those with normal levels (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03). Carnitine is significantly and rapidly depleted with longer time on CRRT, and carnitine deficiency is associated with increased mortality. Consequences of deficiency and benefits of supplementation in the pediatric CRRT population should be investigated. © 2015 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  16. Effects of hormone replacement therapy on postmenopausal uterine myoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colacurci, N; De Franciscis, P; Cobellis, L; Nazzaro, G; De Placido, G

    2000-05-29

    To evaluate the effects of sequential continuous hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on myoma size and on pulsatility index (PI) of uterine arteries and to verify the correlation between uterine artery flow impedance and the growth rate of myoma in women receiving HRT. In a prospective 1-year study 60 postmenopausal women were enrolled into three study-groups to receive continuous transdermal 17beta-oestradiol 0.05 mg/day plus nomegestrolo acetate 5 mg/day sequentially added: 20 patients (group A) unaffected by uterine myomas, 20 patients (group B) with single asymptomatic myoma 3 cm/14 cm3. The changes in myoma volume and in PI were assessed by means of transvaginal ultrasonographic scan every 3 months. The patients with myoma were divided into two subgroups: quiescent myoma (B1, C1) and growing myoma (B2, C2). No significant increase of uterine fibroids volume was found after 1-year HRT (24.14+/-20.02-->28.81+/-30.02 cm3). Six out of eight myomas growing during HRT belonged to group C. The uterine artery basal PI value of group A was significantly higher (P1.88+/-0.16) and C (1.59+/-0.28-->1.92+/-0.21). The baseline PI values in group B1 and C1 were significantly higher than the baseline values observed in group B2 and C2 (1.76+/-0.17 vs. 1.32+/-0.02, 1.76+/-0.16 vs. 1.24+/-0.08) and significantly lower than those observed in group A (2.39+/-0.47). After 3 months of HRT, the PI values were not significantly higher than the baseline values in groups B1 and C2 (1.76+/-0.17-->1.90+/-0.17; 1.24+/-0.08-->1.74+/-0.16), while they were significantly higher in group C1 (1.76+/-0.16-->2.01+/-0.17). Sequential continuous HRT does not increase the volume of the uterine myoma. The findings of very low resistance index in the uterine arteries of women with growing myoma may indicate the risk of growth of the neoplasia during HRT. The assessment of PI in the uterine arteries could be helpful in predicting the growth rate of the myomas before starting HRT.

  17. Renal Replacement Therapy in Support of Combat Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    was used to create viable sets; pediatric chest tubes were used as PD catheters and dialysate was made using either intravenous saline solution with...important logistic factor in performing RRT is the volume of fluid required for dialysate (for hemodi- alysis and peritoneal dialysis) or replace- ment...treatment may range on the order of 100 to 1000 L per day per patient. Both the dialysate and replacement fluid must be sterile, and no approach for

  18. Feasibility and Safety of Physical Therapy during Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonstra, Amy L; Zanni, Jennifer M; Sperati, C John; Nelliot, Archana; Mantheiy, Earl; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Needham, Dale M

    2016-05-01

    Early rehabilitation in an intensive care unit is associated with improved physical functioning and patient outcomes. However, relatively few data have been reported on physical therapy interventions during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for patients in intensive care units. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of physical therapy interventions, delivered as part of routine clinical care, for patients undergoing CRRT in an intensive care unit. Consecutive patients in the adult medical intensive care unit of one large tertiary care hospital who received physical therapy sessions while on CRRT were prospectively evaluated over 13 months. Physical therapy sessions were individualized on the basis of patients' physical impairments and activity tolerance, with patients' highest level of mobility recorded. Data on 15 different physiological abnormalities and potential safety events, including bleeding, dislodgement, or dysfunction of the CRRT catheter or circuit, were prospectively collected. Eleven physical therapists delivered 268 rehabilitation sessions to 57 patients while they were receiving CRRT, with the following highest levels of mobility achieved during individual sessions: 78 (29%) bed exercises, 72 (27%) supine cycle ergometry, 80 (30%) sitting at edge of bed, 13 (5%) transfer to chair, and 25 (9%) standing or marching in place. No CRRT-specific safety events occurred (0%; 95% upper confidence interval, 6.3%). There were six non-CRRT-related potential safety events (2.2% of all physical therapy sessions; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-8.2%), all of which were transient changes in blood pressure. In this prospective observational study at one adult medical intensive care unit, we found that provision of bedside physical therapy while patients underwent CRRT is feasible, and appears safe.

  19. Retrospective study of long-term outcomes of enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease: Analysis of prognostic factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, Maarten; Biegstraaten, Marieke; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Mehta, Atul; Elliott, Perry M.; Oder, Daniel; Watkinson, Oliver T.; Vaz, Frédéric M.; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; Wanner, Christoph; Hollak, Carla E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite enzyme replacement therapy, disease progression is observed in patients with Fabry disease. Identification of factors that predict disease progression is needed to refine guidelines on initiation and cessation of enzyme replacement therapy. To study the association of potential biochemical

  20. A clinical update on female androgen insufficiency--testosterone testing and treatment in women presenting with low sexual desire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Henry G; Papalia, Mary-Anne

    2006-05-01

    The diagnosis of female androgen deficiency syndrome is suggested by complaints of a diminished sense of well being, persistent unexplained fatigue and decreased sexual desire, sexual receptivity and pleasure in a woman who is oestrogen-replete and in whom no other significant contributing factors can be identified. The diagnosis is supported by the finding of low circulating concentrations of free testosterone. Barriers to its recognition include the non-specificity of the symptoms and methodological problems due to insensitive testosterone assays. Barriers to its treatment include the unavailability of satisfactory forms of testosterone for administration to women and lack of data regarding long-term safety. Although several conditions lead to clear-cut androgen deficiency, such as hypopituitarism, adrenal and ovarian insufficiency, glucocorticoid therapy and use of oral contraceptives and oral oestrogens, it is important for clinicians to recognise that in normal women, androgen levels decline by 50% from the early 20s to the mid 40s, and hence age-related androgen insufficiency may occur in women in their late 30s and 40s, as well as postmenopausally. Satisfactory measurements of free testosterone requires a sensitive and reliable assay for total testosterone, and quantitation of sex hormone binding globulin, from which free testosterone is readily calculated. Adverse effects of testosterone treatment are few if replacement is monitored to achieve physiological circulating testosterone concentrations. Currently, available methods include testosterone implants and testosterone creams, and transdermal patches and sprays are in development.

  1. Testosterone Deficiency Causes Endothelial Dysfunction via Elevation of Asymmetric Dimethylarginine and Oxidative Stress in Castrated Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Tomoya; Hotta, Yuji; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Kazunori

    2017-12-01

    Testosterone is believed to mediate the penile erectile response by producing adequate nitric oxide; therefore, testosterone deficiency results in erectile dysfunction through decreased nitric oxide bioavailability. However, the mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction in testosterone deficiency remain unclear. To investigate the mechanism of endothelial dysfunction in a rat model of testosterone deficiency. Rats were distributed into 3 groups: castrated (Cast), castrated and supplemented with testosterone (Cast + T), and sham (Sham). In the Cast + T group, castrated rats were treated daily with subcutaneous testosterone (3 mg/kg daily) for 4 weeks; Sham and Cast rats received only the vehicle. Erectile function using intracavernosal pressure and mean arterial pressure measurements after electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve, endothelial function using isometric tension, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels using ultra-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry, and inflammatory biomarker expression were performed 4 weeks after the operation. In the Cast group, the ratio of intracavernosal pressure to mean arterial pressure significantly decreased, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was lower, and serum ADMA, oxidative stress, and inflammation biomarker levels were significantly increased (P Testosterone injection significantly improved each of these parameters (P testosterone deficiency on erectile function and the effect of testosterone replacement therapy. This study provides evidence of the influence of testosterone deficiency on endothelial function by investigating ADMA and oxidative stress. A major limitation of this study is the lack of a direct link of increased ADMA by oxidative stress to inflammation. Testosterone deficiency increased not only ADMA levels but also oxidative stress and inflammation in castrated rats, which can cause damage to the corpus cavernosum, resulting in erectile dysfunction. Kataoka T, Hotta Y

  2. Therapy of Severe Heatshock in Combination With Multiple Organ Dysfunction With Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Ming; Chen, Yang-Hong; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Yi; Chen, Jin-Hua; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to compare the clinical effects of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and routine therapy in heatshock (HS) patients. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical information of 33 severe exertional HS patients who were treated from February 1998 to October 2013. On the basis of whether or not CRRT therapy was used in addition to conventional therapy, patients were divided into a CRRT group (n = 15) and a control group (n = 18). Body temperature, blood gas analysis, routine blood tests, blood eletrolytes, enzymes and kidney function data, and APACHE II scores were obtained and compared between the 2 groups on admission and 3, 5, and 7 days after admission. Mortality was also compared between the 2 groups. CRRT treatment combined with conventional treatment resulted in a higher hospital-discharge rate, a faster return to normal of body temperature, greater increase in platelets, a greater decrease in WBC, neutrophils, and serum markers for liver and kidney dysfunction, greater improvement of organ dysfunction, and lower APACHE II scores than conventional treatment used alone. The addition of CRRT to conventional treatment for HS improves survival and causes a faster return to normal of serum markers and organ function. PMID:26252279

  3. Drug dosing during intermittent hemodialysis and continuous renal replacement therapy : special considerations in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Michael A; Neu, Alicia M; Fivush, Barbara A; Parekh, Rulan S; Furth, Susan L

    2004-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is, fortunately, an unusual occurrence in children; however, many children with various underlying illnesses develop acute renal failure, and transiently require renal replacement therapy - peritoneal dialysis, intermittent hemodialysis (IHD), or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). As children with acute and chronic renal failure often have multiple comorbid conditions requiring drug therapy, generalists, intensivists, nephrologists, and pharmacists need to be aware of the issues surrounding the management of drug therapy in pediatric patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. This article summarizes the pharmacokinetics and dosing of many drugs commonly prescribed for pediatric patients, and focuses on the management of drug therapy in pediatric patients undergoing IHD and CRRT in the intensive care unit setting. Peritoneal dialysis is not considered in this review. Finally, a summary table with recommended initial dosages for drugs commonly encountered in pediatric patients requiring IHD or CRRT is presented.

  4. Utilisation and outcome of renal replacement therapy in an Asian tertiary intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gordon Y S; Joynt, Gavin M; Gomersall, Charles D; So, H Y

    2011-12-01

    To determine the period prevalence, demographic characteristics, cost of treatment, and outcomes of patients admitted to the intensive care unit for continuous renal replacement therapy. Descriptive case series. Intensive Care Unit in a Hong Kong tertiary referral, teaching hospital. All patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit from January to December 2007 who underwent continuous renal replacement therapy. Period prevalence of continuous renal replacement therapy, patient demographic data, referral sources by specialty and hospital location, diagnosis, daily cost of disposable items, duration of renal replacement therapy, intensive care unit length of stay, and hospital mortality. Of 1652 patients admitted to the intensive care unit over a 12-month period, 131 (8%) underwent continuous renal replacement therapy, of whom 56% were admitted from general wards (the department of medicine being the source of 59% of referrals). The median age of these continuous renal replacement therapy patients was 67 (interquartile range, 55-76) years, with a slight male predominance (66%). The mean APACHE II score of the patients was 29 (standard deviation, 7). Chronic renal failure requiring either haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis was present in 20/131 (15%) patients. Sepsis was the diagnosis most commonly associated with renal failure deemed to warrant continuous renal replacement therapy (43%). The median duration of such continuous therapy was 55 (interquartile range, 25-93) hours and the median intensive care unit length of stay was 120 (interquartile range, 51-289) hours. The mean daily cost of disposables for the provision of continuous renal replacement therapy was HK$3510. The overall intensive care unit mortality of patients having continuous renal replacement therapy was 38% and the hospital mortality was 53%. The corresponding rates for patients with acute renal failure were 45% and 56%, respectively. Patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy had

  5. Comparative effects of conventional hormone replacement therapy and tibolone on climacteric symptoms and sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, S; Moghasemi, M; Faghihzadeh, S

    2010-04-01

    To compare the effects of tibolone with those of conventional hormone replacement therapy on climacteric symptoms and sexual function in postmenopausal women. In a randomized, controlled trial, 140 postmenopausal women were allocated into three groups. Of the subjects included, 47 women received 2.5 mg tibolone + one Cal+D tablet (500 mg calcium and 200 IU vitamin D) daily; 46 women received 0.625 mg conjugated equine estrogen + 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone (CEE/MPA) + one Cal+D tablet daily; and 47 women received only one Cal+D tablet as the control group. The Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) questionnaire was used to detect the efficacy of treatment on climacteric symptoms. Rosen's Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used for sexual function evaluation. Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free estradiol index (FEI) and free testosterone index (FTI) were measured before and after treatment. The women were followed up for 6 months After treatment, all subscores in the GCS improved in the tibolone and CEE/MPA groups (p < 0.01), except the sexual subscore in the CEE/MPA group, compared with baseline. There were significant differences in the FSFI in the tibolone and CEE/MPA groups in comparison to the control group after treatment. Tibolone, in comparison to CEE/MPA, significantly lowered SHBG levels and increased the FTI and FEI and improved the desire, arousal and orgasm sexual domains of the FSFI (p < 0.001). Tibolone may be an alternative to conventional hormone replacement therapy in the treatment of climacteric symptoms and sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women.

  6. The presence and role of progesterone receptor in the ovaries of postmenopausal women who have not applied hormone replacement therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Piasecka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, not much is known about progesterone receptor (PR expression and localization in postmenopausal women ovaries. In the ovaries of reproductive age women, PR is localized in internal theca and granulosa cells, corpus luteum, ovary surface epithelium (OSE and in stroma. PR expression depends on the serum concentration of progesterone, estrogen, gonadotropin and androgen. The goal of the conducted studies was to examine PR localization and expression in the ovaries of postmenopausal women who have not applied hormone replacement therapy so far. Also, the correlation was examined between PR expression and localization in the ovaries, steroid and gonadotropin hormone serum concentrations, and influence of the time from the last menstruation. The material came from 50 postmenopausal women who had their ovaries removed due to non-neoplastic diseases. The women were divided into 3 groups (A, B, C depending on the time from the last menstruation. The follitropin (FSH, luteotropin (LH, estradiol (E2, testosterone (T, androstendione (A and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS concentrations in blood plasma were measured. Monoclonal mouse anti-human PR antibody was used for immunohistochemical detection (examination involved 50 postmenopausal ovaries. Between particular groups, E2 serum concentrations did not differ, but FSH, LH, T, A, DHEAS serum concentrations were significantly different. Immunohistochemical nuclear localization of PR in postmenopausal women ovaries was observed. PR expression was similar in all three groups (A, B, C. PR expression was observed in OSE nuclei and invaginations cysts deriving from the isolation of invaginated epithelium and metaplastic columnar epithelium and in stroma. In the ovaries of postmenopausal women who have not applied hormone replacement therapy so far, PR was detected in all three groups. Its expression did not depend on the time from menopause and was similar in all examined groups. FSH, LH, T, A

  7. Salivary cortisol day curves in assessing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in Addison's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smans, L.; Lentjes, E.G.W.M.; Hermus, A.R.; Zelissen, P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Addison's disease require lifelong treatment with glucocorticoids. At present, no glucocorticoid replacement therapy (GRT) can exactly mimic normal physiology. As a consequence, under- and especially overtreatment can occur. Suboptimal GRT may lead to various side effects.

  8. Anticoagulation strategies in continuous renal replacement therapy: can the choice be evidence based?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudemans-van Straaten, H. M.; Wester, J. P. J.; de Pont, A. C. J. M.; Schetz, M. R. C.

    2006-01-01

    Critical illness increases the tendency to both coagulation and bleeding, complicating anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). We analyzed strategies for anticoagulation in CRRT concerning implementation, efficacy and safety to provide evidence-based recommendations for

  9. The validity of self-reported use of hormone replacement therapy among Danish nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Johnsen, Søren Påske; Heitmann, Berit Lillienthal

    2004-01-01

    Recent findings from randomized clinical trials on the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) among postmenopausal women contradict findings from observational studies indicating a protective effect on the development of cardiovascular disease. Most observational studies on HRT are based on...

  10. Hormone replacement therapy and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery: the Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.C.D. Westendorp (Iris); B.A. in 't Veld; M.L. Bots (Michiel); J.M. Akkerhuis (Jurgen); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Observational data suggest that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in healthy postmenopausal women. The mechanisms underlying this protection are not entirely clear but may

  11. Oral contraceptive use and hormone replacement therapy are associated with microalbuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monster, TBM; Janssen, WMT; de Jong, PE; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2001-01-01

    Background: Controversy exists regarding the adverse and beneficial effects of oral contraceptive use and hormone replacement therapy. Microalbuminuria is associated with increased risk of renal and cardiovascular disease. Objective: To examine the association between oral contraceptive use or

  12. TLR-4 mediated brain inflammation halts neurogenesis: Impact of hormonal replacement therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdeslam eMouihate

    2014-01-01

    ...-estradiol is also endowed with proinflammatory properties. The aim of the present study is to assess the effect of hormonal replacement therapies on LPS-induced brain inflammation and its consequent effect on newly born...

  13. Calculating evidence-based renal replacement therapy - Introducing an excel-based calculator to improve prescribing and delivery in renal replacement therapy - A before and after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Daniel; Mousdale, Stephen; Waqar-Uddin, Haroon; Tully, Redmond; Taylor, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Transferring the theoretical aspect of continuous renal replacement therapy to the bedside and delivering a given "dose" can be difficult. In research, the "dose" of renal replacement therapy is given as effluent flow rate in ml kg -1  h -1 . Unfortunately, most machines require other information when they are initiating therapy, including blood flow rate, pre-blood pump flow rate, dialysate flow rate, etc. This can lead to confusion, resulting in patients receiving inappropriate doses of renal replacement therapy. Our aim was to design an excel calculator which would personalise patient's treatment, deliver an effective, evidence-based dose of renal replacement therapy without large variations in practice and prolong filter life. Our calculator prescribes a haemodialfiltration dose of 25 ml kg -1  h -1 whilst limiting the filtration fraction to 15%. We compared the episodes of renal replacement therapy received by a historical group of patients, by retrieving their data stored on the haemofiltration machines, to a group where the calculator was used. In the second group, the data were gathered prospectively. The median delivered dose reduced from 41.0 ml kg -1  h -1 to 26.8 ml kg -1  h -1 with reduced variability that was significantly closer to the aim of 25 ml kg -1 .h -1 ( p  < 0.0001). The median treatment time increased from 8.5 h to 22.2 h ( p  = 0.00001). Our calculator significantly reduces variation in prescriptions of continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration and provides an evidence-based dose. It is easy to use and provides personal care for patients whilst optimizing continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration delivery and treatment times.

  14. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comasco, Erika; Frøkjær, Vibe; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in several cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized...

  15. Effect of Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy on Outcome in Pediatric Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Akash; Stewart, Claire E; Dhawan, Anil; Douiri, Abdel

    2016-10-01

    To establish the effect of continuous renal replacement therapy on outcome in pediatric acute liver failure. Retrospective cohort study. Sixteen-bed PICU in a university-affiliated tertiary care hospital and specialist liver centre. All children (0-18 yr) admitted to PICU with pediatric acute liver failure between January 2003 and December 2013. Children with pediatric acute liver failure were managed according to a set protocol. The guidelines for continuous renal replacement therapy in pediatric acute liver failure were changed in 2011 following preliminary results to indicate the earlier use of continuous renal replacement therapy for both renal dysfunction and detoxification. Of 165 children admitted with pediatric acute liver failure, 136 met the inclusion criteria and 45 of these received continuous renal replacement therapy prior to transplantation or recovery. Of the children managed with continuous renal replacement therapy, 26 (58%) survived: 19 were successfully bridged to liver transplantation and 7 spontaneously recovered. Cox proportional hazards regression model clearly showed reducing hyperammonemia by 48 hours after initiating continuous renal replacement therapy significantly improved survival (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.013-1.073; p = 0.004). On average, for every 10% decrease in ammonia from baseline at 48 hours, the likelihood of survival increased by 50%. Time to initiate continuous renal replacement therapy from PICU admission was lower in survivors compared to nonsurvivors (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.916-1.007; p = 0.095). Change in practice to initiate early and high-dose continuous renal replacement therapy led to increased survival with maximum effect being visible in the first 14 days (HR, 3; 95% CI, 1.0-10.3; p = 0.063). Among children with pediatric acute liver failure who did not receive a liver transplant, use of continuous renal replacement therapy significantly improved survival (HR, 4; 95% CI, 1.5-11.6; p = 0.006). Continuous renal replacement

  16. Quantitative liver functions in Turner syndrome with and without hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Ott, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes.......Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes....

  17. Selective estrogen receptor alpha agonist GTx-758 decreases testosterone with reduced side effects of androgen deprivation therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Evan Y; Getzenberg, Robert H; Coss, Christopher C; Gittelman, Marc M; Keane, Thomas; Tutrone, Ronald; Belkoff, Laurence; Given, Robert; Bass, Joel; Chu, Franklin; Gambla, Michael; Gaylis, Franklin; Bailen, James; Hancock, Michael L; Smith, Jordan; Dalton, James T; Steiner, Mitchell S

    2015-02-01

    A need remains for new therapeutic approaches for men with advanced prostate cancer, particularly earlier in the disease course. To assess the ability of an oral selective estrogen receptor α agonist (GTx-758) to lower testosterone concentrations compared with leuprolide while minimizing estrogen deficiency-related side effects of androgen-deprivation therapy. Hormone-naive advanced prostate cancer patients were randomized to oral GTx-758 1000 mg/d, 2000 mg/d, or leuprolide depot. GTx-758 and leuprolide. The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving total testosterone ≤ 50 ng/dl by day 60. Secondary end points included serum free testosterone, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), sex hormone-binding globulin, hot flashes, bone turnover markers, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 levels. Of 159 randomized patients, leuprolide reduced total testosterone to ≤ 50 ng/dl in a greater proportion of patients than GTx-758 by day 60 (43.4%, 63.6%, and 88.2% of subjects receiving GTx-758 1000 mg [pfree testosterone and PSA earlier and to a greater degree than leuprolide. GTx-758 led to fewer hot flashes, decreases in bone turnover markers, and alterations in IGF-1 compared with leuprolide. A higher incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) was seen with GTx-758 (4.1%) compared with leuprolide (0.0%). Although leuprolide reduced total testosterone to ≤ 50 ng/dl in a greater proportion of patients compared with GTx-758, GTx-758 was superior in lowering free testosterone and PSA. GTx-758 reduced estrogen deficiency side effects of hot flashes, bone loss, and insulin resistance but with a higher incidence of VTEs. This paper reports findings that leuprolide lowered total testosterone more than GTx-758 but that GTx-758 lowered free testosterone and prostate-specific antigen more than leuprolide. GTx-758 also reduced estrogen deficiency side effects, albeit at a higher rate of vascular events. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01615120. Copyright

  18. 78 FR 277 - Food and Drug Administration Actions Related to Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Smoking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... Therapies and Smoking-Cessation Products; Report to Congress on Innovative Products and Treatments for... replacement therapies (NRTs), and input on a report to Congress examining the regulation and development of... marketed for smoking cessation. Section 918(b) requires that the Secretary of HHS, after consultation with...

  19. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Cardias Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kolesnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the combined use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy with switching into the ECMO circuit in cardiac surgical patients over 18 years of age and to reveal predictors of a fatal outcome in this combination of auxiliary organ support techniques. Materials and methods. The retrospective cohort study postoperatively used a combination of ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy in 27 cardiac surgical patients aged over 18 years with severe cardiopulmonary insufficiency concurrent with acute kidney lesion. In all cases, the continuous renal replacement therapy circuit was switched into the line after an ECMO pump. The end points of the study were the duration of dialysis-dependent acute renal failure, the frequency of complications, and hospital mortality. Results. In all cases with a favorable outcome, the duration of continuous renal replacement therapy was 3 days longer than that of ECMO. There were no cases of recovery if the duration of continuous renal replacement therapy was shorter than that of ECMO and the duration of the latter was more than 10 days. The duration of sympathomimetic support (>3.5 days was shown to be an independent and significant predictor of death (AUC 0.99; CI 99.9%, 0.96—1.0 in the patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy and ECMO. It was established that the number of inotrophic drugs (>2 and the highest lactate level (>1.99 mmol/l could be used to predict hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury and severe cardiopulmonary insufficiency (AUC 0.85 and 0.86; sensitivity/specificity 0.83/0.67 and 0.86/0.67, respectively.Conclusion. The concurrent use of ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy in severe cardiac surgical patients with potentially reversible cardiopulmonary insufficiency and acute kidney injury is a sound and complementary combination of auxiliary organ support techniques.  

  20. The selection of infants for surfactant replacement therapy under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surfactant, which is now regarded as standard therapy for. HMD in developed countries,'" is expensive. Regimens involving multiple dosing or prophylactic administration may add to the cost. In our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), owing to financial constraints, infants below i 000 g birth weight are not routinely ventilated ...

  1. Renal replacement therapy choices for pre-dialysis renal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweed, Alison E; Ceaser, Karen

    With the numbers of patients developing end-stage renal failure predicted to increase over the coming years, more patients than ever will be expected to choose their future form of renal replacement treatment. This study explored the decision-making processes of pre-dialysis patients to elucidate how these choices were made. Nine pre-dialysis patients were interviewed, transcripts of which were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four main themes relating to the decision-making process emerged: maintaining one's integrity, forced adaptation, utilizing information, and support and experiencing illness. While making a decision was an individualized process, contextualized within participants' illness experiences, these core themes emerged for the whole group, irrespective of the chosen treatment modality. For renal services, there is a need to tailor information provided to pre-dialysis patients and to become cognizant of the contexts in which they live and operate.

  2. Hormone replacement therapy and the risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjögren, Lea L; Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    , estrogen plus progestin or tibolone for a minimum of one year. Risk of endometrial cancer was compared to placebo or never users and measured as relative risk, hazard or odds ratio. RESULTS: 28 studies were included. The observational literature found an increased risk among users of estrogen alone......BACKGROUND: In 1975, estrogen only was found to be associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. In November 2015, NICE guidelines on hormone therapy were published that did not take this risk into account. AIM: This systematic literature review assesses the safety of estrogen plus...... progestin therapy according to the risk of endometrial cancer, while considering both regimen and type of progestin. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched, resulting in the identification of 527 published articles on menopausal women with intact uteri treated with estrogen only...

  3. Peritoneal Dialysis in Renal Replacement Therapy for Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Ansari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal dialysis (PD was the first modality used for renal replacement therapy (RRT of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI because of its inherent advantages as compared to Hemodialysis. It provides the nephrologist with nonvascular alternative for renal replacement therapy. It is an inexpensive modality in developing countries and does not require highly trained staff or a complex apparatus. Systemic anticoagulation is not needed, and it can be easily initiated. It can be used as continuous or intermittent procedure and, due to slow fluid and solute removal, helps maintain hemodynamic stability especially in patients admitted to the intensive care unit. PD has been successfully used in AKI involving patients with hemodynamic instability, those at risk of bleeding, and infants and children with AKI or circulatory failure. Newer continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRTs are being increasingly used in renal replacement therapy of AKI with less use of PD. Results of studies comparing newer modalities of CRRT versus acute peritoneal dialysis have been conflicting. PD is the modality of choice in renal replacement therapy in pediatric patients and in patients with AKI in developing countries.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of nicotine dependence with emphasis on nicotine replacement therapy. A status report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, D; Benowitz, N; Fagerström, K; Kunze, M; Keil, U

    2000-03-01

    Tobacco use is a global health care problem. Repetitive exposure to nicotine produces neuroadaptation resulting in nicotine dependence. Cigarette smoking is particularly addictive due to the repeated delivery of bolus doses of nicotine to the bloodstream. Although compulsive tobacco use is sustained by nicotine addiction, it is the toxic combustion products in tobacco smoke such as carbon monoxide and oxidant gases that adversely affect the cardiovascular system. Smoking cessation produces significant health benefits and is a very cost-effective intervention. Evidence that nicotine is the addictive component of tobacco provides the rationale for using nicotine replacement therapy to aid cessation. Nicotine replacement therapy doubles successful smoking cessation rates and evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of tobacco addiction recommend routine use of nicotine replacement therapy, particularly in heavily dependent smokers. Success rates of up to 40% can be achieved in specialist clinics. Despite early concerns regarding the safety of nicotine replacement therapy in smokers with heart disease, it is now clear that the health risks of using nicotine replacement therapy to assist such patients to stop, or significantly reduce, smoking far outweigh any treatment-related risks. Copyright 2000 The European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of hip fracture: population based case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaëlsson, Karl; Baron, John A; Farahmand, Bahman Y; Johnell, Olof; Magnusson, Cecilia; Persson, Per-Gunnar; Persson, Ingemar; Ljunghall, Sverker

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative risk of hip fracture associated with postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy including the effect of duration and recency of treatment, the addition of progestins, route of administration, and dose. Design: Population based case-control study. Setting: Six counties in Sweden. Subjects: 1327 women aged 50-81 years with hip fracture and 3262 randomly selected controls. Main outcome measure: Use of hormone replacement therapy. Results: Compared with women who had never used hormone replacement therapy, current users had an odds ratio of 0.35 (95 % confidence interval 0.24 to 0.53) for hip fracture and former users had an odds ratio of 0.76 (0.57 to 1.01). For every year of therapy, the overall risk decreased by 6% (3% to 9%): 4% (1% to 8%) for regimens without progestin and 11% (6% to 16%) for those with progestin. Last use between one and five years previously, with a duration of use more than five years, was associated with an odds ratio of 0.27 (0.08 to 0.94). After five years without hormone replacement therapy the protective effect was substantially diminished (−7% to 48%). With current use, an initiation of therapy nine or more years after the menopause gave equally strong reduction in risk for hip fracture as an earlier start. Oestrogen treatment with skin patches gave similar risk estimates as oral regimens. Conclusions: Recent use of hormone replacement therapy is required for optimum fracture protection, but therapy can be started several years after the menopause. The protective effect increases with duration of use, and an oestrogen-sparing effect is achieved when progestins are included in the regimen. Key messages Hormone replacement therapy should be continued for long periods for optimal protection of hip fracture No overall substantial hip fracture protection remains after five years without hormone replacement therapy Therapy can be initiated several years after menopause without loss of fracture protection

  6. Effect of testosterone deficiency on cholesterol metabolism in pigs fed a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhaowei; Xi, Haitao; Pan, Yongming; Jiang, Xiaoling; Chen, Liang; Cai, Yueqin; Zhu, Keyan; Chen, Cheng; Xu, Xiaoping; Chen, Minli

    2015-03-07

    effects could be reversed by testosterone replacement therapy. Altered hepatic PCSK9 and LDLR expression, resulting in reduced LDL-cholesterol clearance, may contribute to the increased serum cholesterol levels induced by testosterone deficiency and an HFC diet. These results deepen our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of testosterone deficiency on cholesterol metabolism.

  7. Effects of hormone replacement therapy on depressive and anxiety symptoms after oophorectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela D. Ðoković

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To assess the effect of hormone replacement therapy on postoperative depression and anxiety symptoms. Methods In observational prospective study 80 women divided into two groups were evaluated: women who received estrogen and androgen replacement therapy after hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy before onset of menopause (35-45 years old and a control group that consisted of perimenipausal women (45-55 years old. Hormone replacement therapy began one week after surgery. The severity of depression and anxiety was evaluated through the use of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. Subjects from the study group were interviewed right after the surgical treatment, one, two and three months later. Subjects from the control group were interviewed only once. Results The women who underwent surgery had a statistically significantly higher score in Hamilton Depression Scale (p<0.001 and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (p=0.002 compared to the control perimenopausal women. There was a significant reduction of depressive and anxiety symptoms during hormone replacement therapy. Statistically significant difference in depressive score was found immediately after one month of hormone replacement therapy (first week/one month later: p=0.0057. Statistically significant difference in anxiety score appeared three months after the introduction of hormone therapy (first week/one month later: p=0.309; first week/two months later: p=0.046; first week/three months later: p<0.001. Level of serum luteinizing hormone was in correlation with depressive and anxiety score. Conclusion Estrogen-androgen replacement therapy may reduce the risk of psychiatric disorders developing in women with bilateral oophorectomy (indication for hysterectomy with oophorectomy was leiomyomata uteri.

  8. Estrogen replacement therapy for depression in perimenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Asma; Arain, Tariq Mahmud; Shahid, Amna; Irfan, Shahid; Farrukh, Soufia

    2005-10-01

    To determine the effect of a four-week course of oral estrogen therapy on depression in aging women. Quasi experimental. The OPD, Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from September 2000 to January 2004. Forty-two depressed women (aged 42-57) who were either perimenopausal (n = 20) or postmenopausal (n = 22) received open label treatment with oral estrogen tablets (1.25 mg/day) for 4 weeks. The Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess depressive symptoms, the Greene Climacteric Scale was used to assess menopause-related symptoms, and the Clinical Global Impression(CGI) was used to assess global clinical improvement in these women at baseline and after treatment. Remission of depression was defined as a score < 10 on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and a score < or = 2 on the CGI at week 4. The women who completed the study had a median Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score of 20 (range = 15-32) at study entry and 11.50 (range = 10-31.0) at week 4 (z = -3.43, p < 0.01). This improvement was consistent with that reported by the women themselves on the Beck Depression Inventory (rs = 0.86, n = 20, p < 0.01). The improvement measured by CGI scores was also significant (p < 0.01). Remission of depression was noted in 5 of the 40 women (after 1 year) who completed the study. Anti-depressant response was not associated with severity or subtypes of depression at study entry or with concomitant improvement in menopause-related symptoms. Perimenopausal and postmenopausal women benefit from short-term use of estrogen therapy. Antidepressant effect of estrogen therapy is independent of improvement in menopause-related symptoms.

  9. Safety and efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy in the nephropathy of Fabry disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C Fervenza

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Fernando C Fervenza1, Roser Torra2, David G Warnock31Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Nephrology, Fundació Puigvert, Barcelona, Spain; 3Division of Nephrology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Kidney involvement with progressive loss of kidney function (Fabry nephropathy is an important complication of Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder arising from deficiency of α-galactosidase activity. Clinical trials have shown that enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with recombinant human α-galactosidase clears globotriaosylceramide from kidney cells, and can stabilize kidney function in patients with mild to moderate Fabry nephropathy. Recent trials show that patients with more advanced Fabry nephropathy and overt proteinuria do not respond as well to ERT alone, but can benefit from anti-proteinuric therapy given in conjunction with ERT. This review focuses on the use of enzyme replacement therapy with agalsidase-alfa and agalsidase-beta in adults with Fabry nephropathy. The current results are reviewed and evaluated. The issues of dosing of enzyme replacement therapy, the use of adjunctive agents to control urinary protein excretion, and the individual factors that affect disease severity are reviewed.Keywords: agalsidase, enzyme replacement therapy, Fabry nephropathy, anti-proteinuric therapy

  10. Androgen replacement therapy contributes to improving lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with hypogonadism and benign prostate hypertrophy: a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Konaka, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Masashi; Fukushima, Masato; Maeda, Yuji; Mizokami, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Origasa, Hideki; Iwamoto, Teruaki; Namiki, Mikio

    2011-03-01

    We performed a randomised controlled study regarding the effects of androgen replacement therapy (ART) on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in hypogonadal men with benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH). Fifty-two patients with hypogonadism and BPH were randomly assigned to receive testosterone (ART group) as 250 mg of testosterone enanthate every 4 weeks or to the untreated control group. We compared International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), uroflowmetry data, post-voiding residual volume (PVR) and systemic muscle volume at baseline and 12 months after treatment. Forty-six patients (ART group, n=23; control, n=23) were included in the analysis. At the 12-month visit, IPSS showed a significant decrease compared with baseline in the ART group (15.7 +/- 8.7 vs. 12.5 +/- 9.5; p<0.05). No significant changes were observed in the control group. The ART group also showed improvement in maximum flow rate and voided volume (p<0.05), whereas no significant improvements were observed in the controls. PVR showed no significant changes in either group. In addition, the ART group showed significant enhancement of mean muscle volume (p<0.05), whereas no significant changes were seen in the controls. ART improved LUTS in hypogonadal men with mild BPH.

  11. New Product Marketing Blurs the Line Between Nicotine Replacement Therapy and Smokeless Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostygina, Ganna; England, Lucinda; Ling, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    Tobacco companies have begun to acquire pharmaceutical subsidiaries and recently started to market nicotine replacement therapies, such as Zonnic nicotine gum, in convenience stores. Conversely, tobacco companies are producing tobacco products such as tobacco chewing gum and lozenges that resemble pharmaceutical nicotine replacement products, including a nicotine pouch product that resembles snus pouches. This convergence of nicotine and tobacco product marketing has implications for regulation and tobacco cessation.

  12. Risk of fracture in adults on renal replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ditte; Olesen, Jonas B; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients on dialysis treatment or living with a transplanted kidney have several risk factors for bone fracture, especially disturbances in mineral metabolism and immunosuppressive therapy. We describe the incidence of fracture in this retrospective national Danish cohort study...... and explore the influence of age, gender, comorbidity and prescribed medication. METHODS: By individual-level linkage between nationwide administrative registries, the risk of fracture was compared between the group of patients receiving chronic dialysis treatment and patients receiving their first renal...... transplant in the study period, using the Danish background population as reference group. All three groups were followed up until first fracture, emigration, death or end of study. Cox proportional hazard models with fracture as outcome were fitted to the data. RESULTS: The hazard ratio (HR) for any...

  13. Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on IGF-related parameters and on the pituitary-gonadal axis in GH-deficient males. A double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Andersson, A M; Pedersen, S A

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that growth hormone (GH) may play a regulatory role in male reproductive function. To express full anabolic effect in immature boys testosterone apparently requires the presence of GH. In GH-deficient adults, GH replacement therapy exerts a variety of anabolic actions, some...... of which are similar to the effects of gonadal steroids. However, little is known about the potential effects of GH on gonadal steroids and on dynamic tests of pituitary-gonadal function in adults with GH deficiency. We evaluated the pituitary-gonadal axis in a 4-month double-blind, placebo-controlled GH...

  14. Use and discontinuation of hormone replacement therapy in women with myocardial infarction: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretler, Ditte-Marie; Hansen, Peter Riis; Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell

    2011-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: General use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) dropped drastically after 2002 when pivotal randomized trials showed increased risk of coronary artery disease and other complications with HRT. HRT is not recommended for primary or secondary prevention of...... of coronary heart disease and guidelines recommend discontinuation of HRT after myocardial infarction (MI). It is unknown whether women actually discontinue HRT after MI.......WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: General use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) dropped drastically after 2002 when pivotal randomized trials showed increased risk of coronary artery disease and other complications with HRT. HRT is not recommended for primary or secondary prevention...

  15. Surfactant replacement therapy for preterm and term neonates with respiratory distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polin, Richard A; Carlo, Waldemar A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory failure secondary to surfactant deficiency is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Surfactant therapy substantially reduces mortality and respiratory morbidity for this population. Secondary surfactant deficiency also contributes to acute respiratory morbidity in late-preterm and term neonates with meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia/sepsis, and perhaps pulmonary hemorrhage; surfactant replacement may be beneficial for these infants. This statement summarizes the evidence regarding indications, administration, formulations, and outcomes for surfactant-replacement therapy. The clinical strategy of intubation, surfactant administration, and extubation to continuous positive airway pressure and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure on outcomes and surfactant use in preterm infants are also reviewed.

  16. [Few alternatives to estrogen replacement therapy for vegetative symptoms after menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar, Mats; Nedstrand, Elizabeth; Wyon, Yvonne

    2004-04-29

    Vasomotor symptoms with hot flushes and sweating are reported by about 75 percent of women around menopause. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is the treatment of choice but some women have medical contraindications or side effects. There is, therefore, a need of alternative therapies. Progestagens may decrease hot flushes, as will clonidin and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Phytoestrogens, which exist in some dietary products and complementary and alternative medicines have estrogen-like effects and may decrease hot flushes, although there are contradictory scientific reports. Acupuncture, exercise and behavioral therapy may also decrease vasomotor symptoms. No alternative therapy is as effective as HRT.

  17. Adrenal insufficiency and adrenal replacement therapy. Current status in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulinas, Anna; Casanueva, Felipe; Goñi, Fernando; Monereo, Susana; Moreno, Basilio; Picó, Antonio; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Salvador, Javier; Tinahones, Francisco J; Webb, Susan M

    2013-03-01

    Adrenal insufficiency (AI) is a rare endocrine disease, associated to increased mortality if left untreated. It can be due to a primary failure of the adrenal glands (primary AI) or malfunctioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) (secondary AI). The lack of data on incidence/prevalence of adrenal insufficiency in Spain complicates any evaluation of the magnitude of the problem in our country. Initial symptoms are non-specific, so often there is a delay in diagnosis. Current therapy with available glucocorticoids is associated with decreased quality of life in patients with treated AI, as well as with increased mortality and morbidity, probably related to both over-treatment and lack of hydrocortisone, associated with non-physiological peaks and troughs of the drug over the 24 hours. The availability of a new drug with a modified dual release (immediate and retarded), that requires one only daily dose, improves and simplifies the treatment, increases compliance as well as quality of life, morbidity and possibly mortality. This revision deals with the knowledge on the situation both globally and in Spain, prior to the availability of this new drug. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. [Hot rods in the ICU : What is the antibiotic mileage of your renal replacement therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielstein, J T; Kruse, A K; Anderson, N; Vaitiekunas, H; Scherneck, S

    2017-05-08

    We would neither be disappointed nor upset if the gas mileage on the sticker of a car didn't match our personal, real-life fuel consumption. Depending on our daily route to work, our style of accelerating and the number of passengers in our carpool, the gas mileage will vary. As soon as the falcon wing door of our car is closed and entrance to the ICU is granted, we tend to forget all of this, even though another hot rod is waiting there for us. Renal replacement therapy is like a car; it fulfills goals, such as the removal of uremic toxins and accumulated fluids, but it also "consumes" (removes) antibiotics. Unlike catecholamines, where we have the mean arterial pressure on our ICU dashboard, we do not have a gauge to measure antibiotic "consumption", i.e. elimination by renal replacement therapy. This manuscript describes the principles and basic knowledge to improve dosing of antibiotics in critically ill patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. As in modern cars, we briefly touch on hybrid therapies combining renal replacement therapy with extracorporeal lung support or adsorbent technologies that remove cytokines or bacteria. Further, the importance of considering body size and body composition is addressed, especially for choosing the right initial dose of antibiotics. Lastly we point out the dire need to increase the availability of timely and affordable therapeutic drug monitoring on the most commonly used antiinfectives, ideally using point-of-care devices at the bedside.

  19. Electronic cigarettes: health impact, nicotine replacement therapy, regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Zdrojewicz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available While the adverse effects of conventional cigarettes on human health have been thoroughly examined, in the last 15 years we have witnessed the birth of electronic cigarettes. There are many types of these devices available on the market. Studies are still underway to determine their negative impact on the human body. Electronic cigarettes comprise of power supply and a vaporising system. The user inhales the aerosol produced by heating up the liquid containing nicotine. In contrast with conventional cigarettes, the tobacco is not combusted, thus the compositions of the aerosol and cigarette smoke are considerably different. Out of 93 chemical substances present in the e-cigarette smoke, the aerosol contains only acetaldehyde, acetone, acrolein, formaldehyde and nicotine. More toxic substances, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals, are not present. The amount of evidence suggesting electronic cigarettes’ harmful effects on the human body is constantly increasing. Some reports imply that the electronic cigarettes negatively influence pregnancy, human psyche, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. They might also be involved in oncogenesis. With electronic cigarettes constantly gaining popularity, the question about the adverse effects of passive smoking becomes increasingly more relevant. Although various methods of helping people cease smoking or delivering nicotine to their bodies without burning toxic substances are being explored, electronic cigarettes are not recommended in nicotine substitution therapy. Legal regulations regarding electronic cigarettes are still being worked on. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects electronic cigarettes have on the human’s health.

  20. The treatment of hemophilia A: from protein replacement to AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youjin, Shen; Jun, Yin

    2009-03-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is an essential component in blood coagulation, a deficiency of which causes the serious bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Recently, with the development of purification level and recombinant techniques, protein replacement treatment to hemophiliacs is relatively safe and can prolong their life expectancy. However, because of the possibility of unknown contaminants in plasma-derived FVIII and recombinant FVIII, and high cost for hemophiliacs to use these products, gene therapy for hemophilia A is an attractive alternative to protein replacement therapy. Thus far, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy. Further improvement of the virus for clinical application depends on better understanding of the molecular structure and fate of the vector genome. It is likely that hemophilia will be the first genetic disease to be cured by somatic cell gene therapy.

  1. Ductal carcinoma In-Situ in turner syndrome patient undergoing hormone replacement therapy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Bawa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Turner’s syndrome is a rare congenital disease which affects about 1 in every 2500-3000 live-born females. This happens due to chromosomal abnormalities in a phenotypic female, causing increased gonadotropin concentrations and low concentrations of estrogens from infancy. As a result, hormone replacement therapy is started in most adolescent Turner syndrome patients to initiate and sustain sexual maturation. Accordingly, most Turner’s syndrome patients undergo several decades of estrogen replacement therapy, from puberty to post-menopausal age. The highly publicized findings of the Women’s Health Initiative have called into question the appropriateness of hormone replacement therapy in adolescents with Turner’s syndrome. Those concerns were mostly theoretical extrapolations, as few prospective studies of cancer occurrence in women with Turner syndrome have been reported. Consequently, several recent publications have challenged those extrapolations, based on the assertion that the levels of hormone replacement in Turner syndrome patients are well below the physiologic levels observed in normal menstruating women, as well as the fact that these women are significantly younger than those studied by the Women’s Health Initiative. In discord to those reports, we present a case of ductal carcinoma in-situ in a 40-year-old Turner patient, who had undergone over two decades of combined hormone replacement therapy. The patient underwent an elective excisional biopsy for a palpable mass, with histopathology revealing a complex fibroadenoma with a nidus of ductal carcinoma in-situ. The lesion was noted to be estrogen receptor positive and progesterone receptor negative, with heavy staining for HER-2/Neu receptor. The patient was treated with tamoxifen. While a rare case, it is imperative for the astute clinician to keep in mind the consequences of long-term hormone replacement therapy in Turner’s syndrome patients in order to avoid missed

  2. Use of Physical Therapy Following Total Knee Replacement Surgery: Implications of Orthopedic Surgeons' Ownership of Physical Therapy Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jean M; Reschovsky, James D; Reicherter, Elizabeth Anne

    2016-10-01

    To examine whether the course of physical therapy treatments received by patients who undergo total knee replacement (TKR) surgery differs depending on whether the orthopedic surgeon has a financial stake in physical therapy services. Sample of Medicare beneficiaries who underwent TKR surgery during the years 2007-2009. We used regression analysis to evaluate the effect of physician self-referral on the following outcomes: (1) time from discharge to first physical therapy visit; (2) episode length; (3) number of physical therapy visits per episode; (4) number of physical therapy service units per episode; and (5) number of physical therapy services per episode expressed in relative value units. TKR patients who underwent physical therapy treatment at a physician-owned clinic received on average twice as many physical therapy visits (8.3 more) than patients whose TKR surgery was performed by a orthopedic surgeon who did not self-refer physical therapy services (p physical therapy service units during an episode compared with patients treated by nonself-referring providers (p physical therapy services rendered to the patient look virtually identical to episodes where the TKR surgery was performed by a surgeon nonowner. Physical therapists not involved with physician-owned clinics saw patients for fewer visits, but the composition of physical therapy services rendered during each visit included more individualized therapeutic exercises. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Clinical evolution of chronic renal patients with HIV infection in replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ramón Saracho; Eduardo Martín Escobar; Jordi Comas Farnés; Emma Arcos; Auxiliadora Mazuecos Blanca; Miguel Ángel Gentil Govantes; Pablo Castro de la Nuez; Óscar Zurriaga; Manuel Ferrer Alamar; Encarnación Bouzas Caamaño; Teresa García Falcón; José Portolés Pérez; José A. Herrero Calvo; Carlos Chamorro Jambrina; Íñigo Moina Eguren

    2015-01-01

    Patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT) infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a special group with growing interest. In order to study the epidemiological data of HIV+ patients on RRT in Spain, we collected individual information from 2004 to 2011 (period of use of highly active antiretroviral therapy [HAART]) in the Autonomous Communities of Andalusia, Aragon, Asturias, Catalonia, Valencia, Castilla la Mancha, Castilla León, Galicia, Madrid, La Rioja and the Basque Cou...

  4. Beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and continuous renal replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ulldemolins, Marta; Vaquer, Sergi; Llaurad?-Serra, Mireia; Pontes, Caridad; Calvo, Gonzalo; Soy, Dolors; Mart?n-Loeches, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Although early and appropriate antibiotic therapy remains the most important intervention for successful treatment of septic shock, data guiding optimization of beta-lactam prescription in critically ill patients prescribed with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) are still limited. Being small hydrophilic molecules, beta-lactams are likely to be cleared by CRRT to a significant extent. As a result, additional variability may be introduced to the per se variable antibiotic concentrati...

  5. The efficacy of surfactant replacement therapy in the growth restricted preterm infant: what is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul eMalhotra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surfactant replacement therapy (SRT is an integral part of management of preterm surfactant deficiency (respiratory distress syndrome, RDS. Its role in the management of RDS has been extensively studied. However its efficacy in the management of lung disease in preterm infants born with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR has not been systematically studied.Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of exogenous surfactant replacement therapy in the management of preterm IUGR lung disease. Methods: A systematic search of all available randomised clinical trials (RCT of surfactant replacement therapy in preterm IUGR infants was done according to the standard Cochrane collaboration search strategy. Neonatal respiratory outcomes were compared between the preterm IUGR and appropriately-grown for gestational age (AGA preterm infant populations in eligible studies. Results: No study was identified which evaluated the efficacy or responsiveness of exogenous surfactant replacement therapy in preterm IUGR infants as compared to preterm AGA infants. The only study identified through the search strategy used small for gestational age (SGA; defined as less than 10th centile for birth weight as a proxy for IUGR. The RCT evaluated the efficacy or responsiveness of SRT in preterm SGA group as compared to AGA infants. The rate of intubation, severity of RDS, rate of surfactant administration, pulmonary air leaks and days on the ventilator did not differ between both groups. However, the requirement for prolonged nasal CPAP (p< 0.001, supplemental oxygen therapy (p <0.01 and the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia at 28 days and 36 weeks (both p<0.01 was greater in SGA infants. Discussion: There is currently insufficient data available to evaluate the efficacy of SRT in preterm IUGR lung disease. A variety of research strategies will be needed to enhance our understanding of the role and rationale for use of surfactant replacement therapy in preterm

  6. Cardiometabolic complications after androgen deprivation therapy in a man with prostate cancer: effects of three years intermittent testosterone supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eAversa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for prostate carcinoma (PCa may cause cardiometabolic complications unless intermittent androgen blockade (IAB is instituted. An 80-year-old man was diagnosed intermediate grade (Gleason 4+3 PCa and was treated with continuous ADT with triptorelin plus bicalutamide. After 6 months of treatment, he experienced an acute myocardial infarction and one month after hospitalization he came to our outpatient clinic for fatigue, weight gain and hyperglycemia. Due to iatrogenic hypogonadism, we decided to proceed with IAB, but after three months ADT withdrawal his serum testosterone (T was still 0.5 ng/mL. Due to very low concomitant PSA levels (0.1 ng/mL he was then proposed intermittent T-gel supplementation (Tostrex® which was initiated according to the following scheme: 6 months on and three months off. T-gel dose was titrated tri-weekly in order to achieve T plasma levels below 3.49 ng/mL. After six months on, his serum T raised to a mean value of 2.0 ng/mL without increments in PSA. After overall twelve months on, his serum T peaked to a mean value of 3.0 ng/mL while a delay in PSA rise was seen after 24 mo (0.6 ng/mL but remained stable until the last observation carried forward (LOCF, at 45 months. No clinical and biochemical PCa progression were observed at LOCF. Reversion of iatrogenic metabolic syndrome started after six mo of T supplementation without using any add-on treatment. This case provides support that once regression of PCa growth is attained, T supplementation may be administered in well differentiated PCa, especially if IAB is not successful in reverting iatrogenic hypogonadism and its associated cardiac and metabolic complications.

  7. Should we start and continue growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in adults with GH deficiency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC

    2000-01-01

    During the last decade, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults has been described as a clinical syndrome. Central features of this entity include increased fat mass, reduced muscle and bone mass, as well as impaired exercise capacity and quality of life. GH replacement therapy has been initiated

  8. Changes in the profile of lipoprotein subfractions associated with hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira José Luiz da Costa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report the effects of 2 regimens of hormone replacement therapy during the postmenopausal period on the profile of the major lipoprotein subfractions (HDL, LDL, and VLDL. METHODS: We carried out a cohort study in 38 postmenopausal patients who were starting their hormone replacement therapy due to gynecological indications, for a period of 12 weeks. Analysis of lipoprotein subclasses was performed through nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS: Hormone replacement therapy cause an increase in the proportion of larger subfractions of VLDL and HDL (p=0.008 and 0.03, respectively and in the proportion of larger particles of VLDL due to a 36% increase in the levels of larger particles (p=0.004, concomitantly with a 15% reduction in the levels of smaller particles (p=0.04. In regard to HDL, the increase occurred only a 17% increase in the levels of larger particles (p=0.002. No significant change occurred in the distribution pattern of LDL subfractions. CONCLUSION: The proportion of larger subfractions of VLDL and HDL increases after hormone replacement therapy. The increase in the proportion of larger particles of VLDL occurs due to an increase in the levels of the larger subclasses concomitantly with a reduction in the smaller particles. However, an increase in the proportion of larger particles of HDL occurs only due to an increase in the levels of the larger subfractions.

  9. Citrate versus heparin anticoagulation in continuous renal replacement therapy in small children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymakers-Janssen, Paulien A M; Lilien, Marc; van Kessel, Ingrid A.; Veldhoen, Esther S.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; van Gestel, Josephus P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Citrate is preferred over heparin as an anticoagulant in adult continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). However, its potential adverse effects and data on use in CRRT in infants and toddlers is limited. We conducted a prospective study on using citrate in CRRT in critically ill small

  10. Comparative effects of adjuvant cimetidine and omeprazole during pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruno, M. J.; Rauws, E. A.; Hoek, F. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    In a double-blind, randomized crossover study, the hypotheses were tested that more powerful inhibition of gastric acid secretion by adjuvant omeprazole further improves the efficacy of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy compared to adjuvant cimetidine and that excluding the influence of

  11. Renal replacement therapy in Europe: a summary of the 2011 ERA-EDTA Registry Annual Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, Marlies; Kramer, Anneke; Abad Diez, José M.; Alonso de la Torre, Ramón; Arcos Fuster, Emma; Bikbov, Boris T.; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Bouzas Caamaño, Encarnación; Čala, Svetlana; Caskey, Fergus J.; Castro de la Nuez, Pablo; Cernevskis, Harijs; Collart, Frederic; Díaz Tejeiro, Rafael; Djukanovic, Ljubica; Ferrer-Alamar, Manuel; Finne, Patrik; García Bazaga, María de Los Angelos; Garneata, Liliana; Golan, Eliezer; Gonzalez Fernández, Raquel; Heaf, James G.; Hoitsma, Andries; Ioannidis, George A.; Kolesnyk, Mykola; Kramar, Reinhard; Lasalle, Mathilde; Leivestad, Torbjørn; Lopot, Frantisek; van de Luijtgaarden, Moniek W. M.; Macário, Fernando; Magaz, Ángela; Martín Escobar, Eduardo; de Meester, Johan; Metcalfe, Wendy; Ots-Rosenberg, Mai; Palsson, Runolfur; Piñera, Celestino; Pippias, Maria; Prütz, Karl G.; Ratkovic, Marina; Resić, Halima; Rodríguez Hernández, Aurelio; Rutkowski, Boleslaw; Spustová, Viera; Stel, Vianda S.; Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Wanner, Christoph; Jager, Kitty J.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a summary of the 2011 ERA-EDTA Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org). Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from national and regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the Mediterranean Sea were

  12. Adolescents' use of nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation : predictors of compliance trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherphof, Charlotte S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341769797; van den Eijnden, Regina J. J. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/17399394X; Lugtig, Peter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824658; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/090632893

    Previous research has shown limited efficacy of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) among adolescents and generally low compliance rates. As higher compliance rates are associated with improved abstinence rates, the present study examined predictors of NRT compliance. This study aims to test whether

  13. Cue-Provoked Craving and Nicotine Replacement Therapy in Smoking Cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Andrew J.; Shiffman, Saul; Sayette, Michael A.; Paty, Jean A.; Gwaltney, Chad J.; Balabanis, Mark H.

    2004-01-01

    Cue exposure paradigms have been used to examine reactivity to smoking cues. However, it is not known whether cue-provoked craving is associated with smoking cessation outcomes or whether cue reactivity can be attenuated by nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in clinical samples. Cue-provoked craving ratings and reaction time responses were…

  14. Acute renal insufficiency and renal replacement therapy after pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kist-van Holthe tot Echten, J. E.; Goedvolk, C. A.; Doornaar, M. B.; van der Vorst, M. M.; Bosman-Vermeeren, J. M.; Brand, R.; van der Heijden, A. J.; Schoof, P. H.; Hazekamp, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate renal function and renal replacement therapy after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery in children. Patient characteristics (sex, age, diagnosis), operation type, and death were listed. The study was performed retrospectively using serum creatinine level before,

  15. Renal replacement therapy registries--time for a structured data quality evaluation programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couchoud, Cécile; Lassalle, Mathilde; Cornet, Ronald; Jager, Kitty J.

    2013-01-01

    Registries in the area of renal replacement therapy (RRT) are intended to be a tool for epidemiological research, health care planning and improvement of quality of care. In this perspective, the value of a population-based RRT registry and its ability to achieve its goals rely heavily on the

  16. Construction and characterization of an effector strain of streptococcus mutans for replacement therapy of dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillman, J.D.; Brooks, T.A.; Michalek, S.M.; Harmon, C.C.; van der Weijden, C.C.; Snoep, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    An effector strain has been constructed for use in the replacement therapy of dental caries. Recombinant DNA methods were used to make the Streptococcus mutans supercolonizing strain, JH1140, lactate dehydrogenase deficient by deleting virtually all of the ldh open reading frame (ORF). To compensate

  17. Breast cancer with different prognostic characteristics developing in Danish women using hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia; Pedersen, A T; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the risk of developing prognostic different types of breast cancer in women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A total of 10 874 postmenopausal Danish Nurses were followed since 1993. Incident breast cancer cases and histopathological information were...

  18. Association between renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with severe acute kidney injury and mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagshaw, Sean M.; Uchino, Shigehiko; Kellum, John A.; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Morgera, Stanislao; Schetz, Miet; Tan, Ian; Bouman, Catherine; Macedo, Etienne; Gibney, Noel; Tolwani, Ashita; Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M.; Ronco, Claudio; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of critically ill patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) treated and not treated with renal replacement therapy (RRT). Secondary analysis of a multi-centre cohort study. Primary exposure was RRT. Primary outcome was propensity and multi-variable

  19. Renal replacement therapy for children throughout the world: the need for a global registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploos van Amstel, Sophie; Noordzij, Marlies; Warady, Bradley A.; Cano, Francisco; Craig, Jonathan C.; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Ishikura, Kenji; Neu, Alicia; Safouh, Hesham; Xu, Hong; Jager, Kitty J.; Schaefer, Franz

    2017-01-01

    To describe the factors affecting the incidence of renal replacement therapy (RRT) among children, information from RRT registries is required. We aimed to give an overview of existing pediatric RRT registries worldwide, identify regions with a need to commence or increase data collection on

  20. Incidence of renal replacement therapy for diabetic nephropathy in the Netherlands : Dutch diabetes estimates (DUDE)-3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Peter R.; Kramer, Anneke; Logtenberg, Susan J. J.; Hoitsma, Andries J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Jager, Kitty J.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of patients needing renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to diabetes mellitus (DM)-related glomerulosclerosis or nephropathy (diabetic nephropathy, DN) in the Netherlands. Design: Using the national

  1. Incidence of renal replacement therapy for diabetic nephropathy in the Netherlands: Dutch diabetes estimates (DUDE)-3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Peter R.; Kramer, Anneke; Logtenberg, Susan J. J.; Hoitsma, Andries J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Jager, Kitty J.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of patients needing renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to diabetes mellitus (DM)-related glomerulosclerosis or nephropathy (diabetic nephropathy, DN) in the Netherlands. Using the national registry for RRT

  2. Characteristics and survival of young adults who started renal replacement therapy during childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Anneke; Stel, Vianda S.; Tizard, Jane; Verrina, Enrico; Rönnholm, Kai; Pálsson, Runólfur; Maxwell, Heather; Jager, Kitty J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the group of children on renal replacement therapy (RRT) who reach the age of 18 years and are transferred from paediatric to adult nephrology services. The aim of this study was to describe patient demographics, primary renal diseases, treatment history and

  3. Outcomes of male patients with Alport syndrome undergoing renal replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Temme, Johanna; Kramer, Anneke; Jager, Kitty J

    2012-01-01

    Patients with the hereditary disease Alport syndrome commonly require renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the second or third decade of life. This study compared age at onset of RRT, renal allograft, and patient survival in men with Alport syndrome receiving various forms of RRT (peritoneal dialysis...

  4. Incidence of renal replacement therapy for diabetic nephropathy in the Netherlands: Dutch diabetes estimates (DUDE)-3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, P.R. van; Kramer, A.; Logtenberg, S.J.; Hoitsma, A.J.; Kleefstra, N.; Jager, K.J.; Bilo, H.J.G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of patients needing renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to diabetes mellitus (DM)-related glomerulosclerosis or nephropathy (diabetic nephropathy, DN) in the Netherlands. DESIGN: Using the national

  5. Raloxifene and hormone replacement therapy increase arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic levels in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giltay, E.J.; Duschek, E.J.J.; Katan, M.B.; Neele, S.J.; Netelenbos, J.C.; Zock, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    Estrogens may affect the essential n-6 and n-3 fatty acids arachidonic acid (AA; C20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3). Therefore, we investigated the long-term effects of hormone replacement therapy and raloxifene, a selective estrogen-receptor modulator, in two randomized,

  6. Children with Pompe disease: clinical characteristics, peculiar features and effects of enzyme replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.I. van Capelle (Carine)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Pompe disease is a metabolic myopathy. Since the first description of the disease in 1932 by J.C. Pompe,1 tremendous progress has been made from discovering the biochemical and genetic basis of the disease to developing enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). With this

  7. Survival and clinical outcomes of children starting renal replacement therapy in the neonatal period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stralen, Kariljn J.; Borzych-Dużalka, Dagmara; Hataya, Hiroshi; Kennedy, Sean E.; Jager, Kitty J.; Verrina, Enrico; Inward, Carol; Rönnholm, Kai; Vondrak, Karel; Warady, Bradley A.; Zurowska, Aleksandra M.; Schaefer, Franz; Cochat, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    End-stage renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) during the neonatal period is a very rare condition, and little information is available regarding long-term RRT and outcomes. To gain more information, we performed a collaborative study on patient characteristics and treatment

  8. Agreements and disagreements in exercise therapy prescriptions after hip replacement among rehabilitation professionals: a multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eulenburg, Christine; Rahlf, Anna-Lina; Kutasow, Andrej; Zech, Astrid

    2015-08-05

    Exercise therapy following total hip replacement (THR) is considered to be important during the initial postoperative care, but till date only a few evidence-based recommendations exist. The aim of this survey was to identify prescription standards among different rehabilitation professionals, for the exercise therapy management after THR in Germany. The study was a cross-sectional survey. Standardized questionnaires were sent to 38 eligible rehabilitation facilities in Germany. Participating surgeons, orthopaedic physicians, physiotherapists and exercise therapists rated the optimal early weight-bearing, resistance training, key components and dose of exercise therapy, and the hip loading during exercising. The returned questionnaires were then analyzed for level of agreement (≥80%) among respondents. 313 rehabilitation professionals from 28 clinics returned completed questionnaires and were considered eligible for analysis. Out of total respondents, 53.9% (cemented THR) and 18.2% (uncemented THR) recommended full weight-bearing within five days after surgery. Commencement of resistance training later than three weeks after surgery is recommended by 20.6% (36%) for cemented (uncemented) prosthesis. Feedback varied significantly amongst the professions. Regarding the overall objectives of rehabilitation after hip replacement, respondents agree in six out of eight requested items. Agreement concerning priorities of specific exercises was achieved in three out of twelve items. The recommended exercise therapy dose varied significantly with working experience (p = 0.02). Rehabilitation professionals mainly disagreed with the exercise therapy prescriptions following the total hip replacement during the initial postoperative care in Germany.

  9. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on lipids and coagulation factors in postmenopausal women smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatović-Babić Danijela

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopause and smoking impair lipid profile, induce hypercoagulability and reduce fibrinolytic capacity [1, 2]. Postmenopause induced lipid changes can be reversed by oestrogen replacement [3]. Oestrogens also reduce fibrino-gen level [4] and have beneficial effects on endothelium [5]. Although several studies showed that hormone replacement therapy may increase the risk of thromboembolic diseases, procoagulant oestrogen activity has not clearly been demonstrated. It is well known that smoking accelerates oestrogen metabolism [6, 7], which may attenuate its beneficial effects. The present study was undertaken to determine if there is difference in beneficial effects of oestrogens between smokers and non-smokers in terms of coagulation process and lipids. The examination was a longitudinal one-year, before/after therapeutic study, which included healthy postmenopausal women (FSH levels at least 40 U/l, 30 smokers and 32 non-smokers who were under 55 years of age and postmenopausal period shorter than 5 years. Women with surgically induced menopause received unopposed oral oestrogens, while those with spontaneous menopause were treated with combined oral oestrogen/progestogen therapy. Before entering the study and in three-months intervals total LDL, HDL cholesterol, triglycérides and VLDL were determined, as well School of Medicine, Belgrade as plasma fibrinogen prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time. Neither beneficial nor adverse effects of oestrogens on lipids and coagulation were observed during one-year follow-up in smokers, although subjects with longer smoking history had higher triglycérides levels after 12 months of therapy. On the contrary, oestrogen replacement reduced total and LDL cholesterol and increased HDL cholesterol in non-smokers, with no change in triglycérides and VLDL level. A decrease in fibrinogen levels and coagulation activity, expressed by protrombin time and partial thromboplastin time, were

  10. Testosterone delays vascular smooth muscle cell senescence and inhibits collagen synthesis via the Gas6/Axl signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-qing; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Cheng-wei; Li, Yi-hui; Tang, Meng-xiong; Wang, Zhi-hao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yun; Li, Li; Zhong, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases in men. However, its effect on cell senescence, which plays a causal role in vascular aging, remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone alleviated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) senescence and collagen synthesis via growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6)/Axl- and Akt/FoxO1a-dependent pathways. Testosterone significantly ameliorated angiotensin II-induced VSMC senescence and collagen overexpression. In addition, testosterone inhibited angiotensin II-induced matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity, which played a pivotal role in facilitating age-related collagen deposition. Testosterone increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 but decreased the expression of MMP-2 and membrane type-1 metalloproteinase which contributed to increase MMP-2 activity. The effects on VSMCs senescence and collagen synthesis were mediated by restoration of angiotensin II-induced downregulation of Gas6 and Axl expression and a subsequent reduction of Akt and FoxO1a phosphorylation. The effects of testosterone were reversed by a Gas6 blocker, Axl-Fc, and a specific inhibitor of Axl, R428. Treatment of VSMCs with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 abrogated the downregulating effect of testosterone on MMP-2 activity. Furthermore, when FoxO1a expression was silenced by using a specific siRNA, the inhibitory effect of testosterone on MMP-2 activity was revered as well, that indicated this process was Akt/FoxO1a dependence. Taken together, Gas6/Axl and Akt/FoxO1a were involved in protective effects of testosterone on VSMCs senescence and collagen synthesis. Our results provide a novel mechanism underlying the protective effect of testosterone on vascular aging and may serve as a theoretical basis for testosterone replacement therapy.

  11. Association between mortality and replacement solution bicarbonate concentration in continuous renal replacement therapy: A propensity-matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Kianoush; Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Iacovella, Gina M; Akhoundi, Abbasali; Albright, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    Given the known deleterious effects seen with bicarbonate supplementation for acidemia, we hypothesized that utilizing high bicarbonate concentration replacement solution in continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) would be independently associated with higher mortality. In a propensity score-matched historical cohort study conducted at a single tertiary care center from December 9, 2006, through December 31, 2009, a total of 287consecutive adult critically ill patients with Stage III acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring CVVH were enrolled. We excluded patients on maintenance dialysis, those who received other modalities of continuous renal replacement therapies, and patients that received a mixed of 22 and 32 mEq/L bicarbonate solution pre- and post-filter. The primary outcome was in-hospital and 90-day mortality rates. Among enrollees, 68 were used 32 mEq/L bicarbonate solution, and 219 received 22mEq/L bicarbonate solution for CVVH. Patients on 32 mEq/L bicarbonate solution were more often non-surgical, had lower pH and bicarbonate level but had higher blood potassium and phosphorus levels in comparison with those on 22 mEq/L bicarbonate solution. After adjustment for the baseline characteristics, the use of 32 bicarbonate solution was significantly associated with increased in-hospital (HR = 1.94; 95% CI 1.02-3.79) and 90-day mortality (HR = 1.50; 95% CI 1.03-2.14). There was a significant increase in the hospital (p = .03) and 90-day (p = .04) mortality between the 22 vs. 32 mEq/L bicarbonate solution groups following propensity matching. Our data showed there is a strong association between using high bicarbonate solution and mortality independent of severity of illness and comorbid conditions. These findings need to be evaluated further in prospective studies.

  12. Association between mortality and replacement solution bicarbonate concentration in continuous renal replacement therapy: A propensity-matched cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianoush Kashani

    Full Text Available Given the known deleterious effects seen with bicarbonate supplementation for acidemia, we hypothesized that utilizing high bicarbonate concentration replacement solution in continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH would be independently associated with higher mortality.In a propensity score-matched historical cohort study conducted at a single tertiary care center from December 9, 2006, through December 31, 2009, a total of 287consecutive adult critically ill patients with Stage III acute kidney injury (AKI requiring CVVH were enrolled. We excluded patients on maintenance dialysis, those who received other modalities of continuous renal replacement therapies, and patients that received a mixed of 22 and 32 mEq/L bicarbonate solution pre- and post-filter. The primary outcome was in-hospital and 90-day mortality rates.Among enrollees, 68 were used 32 mEq/L bicarbonate solution, and 219 received 22mEq/L bicarbonate solution for CVVH. Patients on 32 mEq/L bicarbonate solution were more often non-surgical, had lower pH and bicarbonate level but had higher blood potassium and phosphorus levels in comparison with those on 22 mEq/L bicarbonate solution. After adjustment for the baseline characteristics, the use of 32 bicarbonate solution was significantly associated with increased in-hospital (HR = 1.94; 95% CI 1.02-3.79 and 90-day mortality (HR = 1.50; 95% CI 1.03-2.14. There was a significant increase in the hospital (p = .03 and 90-day (p = .04 mortality between the 22 vs. 32 mEq/L bicarbonate solution groups following propensity matching.Our data showed there is a strong association between using high bicarbonate solution and mortality independent of severity of illness and comorbid conditions. These findings need to be evaluated further in prospective studies.

  13. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome: The link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranabir Salam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS or "Syndrome X" which is a constellation of insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hypertension, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and increased very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL and triglyceride (TG levels. It is one of the main threats for public health in the 21st century with its associated risk of cardiovascular disease. This condition affects a major chunk of mankind. International Diabetes Federation (IDF estimated that around 20-25% of the adult population of the world has MetS. Several definitions have been put forward by different expert bodies leading to confusion. To overcome this, joint new statement of many expert group have been issued. Serum testosterone (T has been shown to be associated with MetS. Several studies have shown a higher prevalence of MetS in subjects with low testosterone. There are also several studies showing a significant difference in serum T between those with MetS and those without. Serum T has also been shown to be associated with components of MetS and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT improves various metabolic and anthropometric parameters in MetS. Patients with androgen deprivation for treatment of various cancers have also been reported to have higher prevalence of MetS. But the evidence of association is not sufficient evidence for the causation of MetS by low testosterone and long-term studies are needed to confirm whether T deficiency is the cause or is a feature of MetS.

  14. Does hormone replacement therapy and use of oral contraceptives increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch-Johansen, Fatima; Jensen, Allan; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women.......We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women....

  15. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation after myocardial infarction - a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretler, Ditte-Marie; Hansen, Peter Riis; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the association between use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) after myocardial infarction.......Our aim was to assess the association between use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) after myocardial infarction....

  16. The effect of hormone replacement therapy on serum homocysteine levels in perimenopausal women : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, AE; Bak, AAA; Lindemans, J; Planellas, J; Bennink, HJTC; Hofman, A; Grobbee, DE; Witteman, JCM

    2001-01-01

    Serum homocysteine levels may be lowered by hormone replacement therapy, but randomized controlled trial data are scarce. We performed a single center randomized placebo-controlled trial to assess the 6 months effect of hormone replacement therapy compared with placebo on fasting serum homocysteine

  17. Effects of testosterone on skeletal muscle architecture in intermediate-frail and frail elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Ross A; Srinivas-Shankar, U; Roberts, Stephen A; Connolly, Martin J; Adams, Judith E; Oldham, Jackie A; Wu, Frederick C W; Seynnes, Olivier R; Stewart, Claire E H; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Narici, Marco V

    2010-11-01

    Testosterone increases lean mass and may help to counter the changes in muscle architecture associated with sarcopenia. This study was designed to investigate the effects of testosterone replacement therapy on skeletal muscle architecture in intermediate-frail and frail elderly men. A subgroup of 30 intermediate-frail and frail elderly men (65-89 years) with low to borderline-low testosterone levels were enrolled from a single-center randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Participants received either a transdermal testosterone (50 mg) or placebo gel daily for 6 months. Architecture (muscle thickness, fascicle length, and pennation angle) of the gastrocnemius medialis muscle was assessed by ultrasound imaging at baseline and after 6 months of treatment. Serum testosterone increased from 11.6 ± 3.5 to 18.0 ± 8.1 nmol/L by 10 days after randomization in the active group (but not the placebo group) and was maintained throughout the treatment period. Testosterone treatment resulted in a preservation of muscle thickness at 6 months while it decreased in the placebo group (effect size 1.4 [95% confidence interval = 0.3-2.5; p = .015]). There was no significant effect of treatment on fascicle length (effect size 1.9 mm [95% confidence interval = -1.2 to 5.0 mm; p = .22]) or pennation angle (effect size 1.2° [95% confidence interval = -1.3 to 3.7°; p = .32]). Testosterone replacement in intermediate-frail and frail elderly men is associated with preservation of muscle thickness. The results suggest that testosterone mitigates sarcopenia by improving muscle tissue to maintain a state of normality in aging men.

  18. A case report of spontaneous pregnancy during hormonal replacement therapy for premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbod Ebrahimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premature ovarian failure (POF is a common condition; its incidence is estimated to be as great as 1 in 100 by the age of 40 years. Physiologic replacement of ovarian steroid hormones seems rational until the age of normal menopause. Temporary return of ovarian function and pregnancy may occur rarely in women with POF. We report a case of POF who conceived during hormone replacement therapy.Case: A 30 years-old woman with confirmed POF after pelvic surgery and sever emotional stress conceived spontaneously.Conclusion: Return of ovarian function and achievement of pregnancy is possible in women with POF.

  19. Kinetics of removal of intravenous testosterone pulses in normal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Johannes D; Keenan, Daniel M; Liu, Peter Y; Takahashi, Paul Y

    2010-04-01

    Testosterone is secreted into the bloodstream episodically, putatively distributing into total, bioavailable (bio) nonsex hormone-binding globulin (nonSHBG-bound), and free testosterone moieties. The kinetics of total, bio, and free testosterone pulses are unknown. Design Adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis was blocked pharmacologically, glucocorticoid was replaced, and testosterone was infused in pulses in four distinct doses in 14 healthy men under two different paradigms (a total of 220 testosterone pulses). Testosterone kinetics were assessed by deconvolution analysis of total, free, bioavailable, SHBG-bound, and albumin-bound testosterone concentration-time profiles. Independently of testosterone dose or paradigm, rapid-phase half-lives (min) of total, free, bioavailable, SHBG-bound, and albumin-bound testosterone were comparable at 1.4+/-0.22 min (grand mean+/-S.E.M. of geometric means). Slow-phase testosterone half-lives were highest for SHBG-bound testosterone (32 min) and total testosterone (27 min) with the former exceeding that of free testosterone (18 min), bioavailable testosterone (14 min), and albumin-bound testosterone (18 min; Pmimicry of physiological pulses, and deconvolution analysis may have utility in estimating the in vivo kinetics of other hormones, substrates, and metabolites.

  20. Regaining lost youth: the controversial and colorful beginnings of hormone replacement therapy in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Arnold

    2005-02-01

    The quest for regaining lost youth seems to have existed since the beginning of recorded history and has taken many forms. One strategy that began in earnest in the latter part of the 19th century and continues to have enormous momentum today is based on the notion that by replacing internally secreted substances, that is, hormones, that decline with age, the vitality and physical attributes associated with youth can be regained. Although the approach remains highly controversial as, for example, in "anti-aging medicine," it is no more controversial than it was many years ago when the work of three high profile investigators, Charles Eduoard Brown-Séquard, Eugen Steinach, and Serge Voronoff set the basis for using this strategy. In the case of all three individuals, the therapies they developed received widespread attention (including ridicule) in the popular press, were spread rapidly by practitioners of questionable training and ethical motivation, and finally and relatively quickly disappeared from common use. However, and ultimately more importantly, in the process of developing and promoting their therapies, these individuals made important contributions to the origins of endocrinology, the biology of sex, and establishment of hormone replacement therapy. It remains to be seen whether contemporary efforts using hormone replacement therapy to blunt and reverse aging have the same fate as their predecessors and make comparable important contributions to biology and medicine.

  1. Use of Renal Replacement Therapy in a Neonatal Foal with Postresuscitation Acute Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D M; Ruby, R E; Eatroff, A; Yaeger, M J

    2017-03-01

    A newborn foal was presented because it was unresponsive and in cardiopulmonary arrest. Aggressive cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation was administered to the foal, which revived the foal; however, acute renal failure developed. Fluid retention and azotemia occurred although the foal was alert and able to suckle. A 6-hour renal replacement therapy session using hemodiafiltration and a continuous renal replacement therapy machine was administered to the foal at 3 days of age which lowered the foal's azotemia and facilitated removal of some of the excess body fluid. Despite therapy, the foal developed pulmonary edema and was euthanized. Although the foal in this case did not survive, this report highlights the possibility of developing postresuscitation complications such as acute renal failure and describes the use of renal replacement therapy using hemodiafiltration as a viable option in neonatal foals with acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Transcriptomic analysis of hepatic responses to testosterone deficiency in miniature pigs fed a high-cholesterol diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhaowei; Jiang, Xiaoling; Pan, Yongming; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Lifan; Zhu, Keyan; Cai, Yueqin; Ling, Yun; Chen, Fangming; Xu, Xiaoping; Chen, Minli

    2015-02-06

    hypercholesterolemia and hepatic steatosis in pigs fed an HFC diet and that these effects could be reversed by testosterone replacement therapy. Impaired metabolic processes, enhanced immune and inflammatory responses, oxidative stress, and apoptosis may contribute to the increased hepatic steatosis induced by testosterone deficiency and an HFC diet. These results deepened our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of testosterone deficiency-induced hepatic steatosis and provided a foundation for future investigations.

  3. Biometry of the hypospadic penis after hormone therapy (testosterone and estrogen): A randomized, double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Kelly Christina de Castro; Bastos, André Netto; Miana, Laura Pimenta; Barros, Eveline de Souza; Ramos, Plínio Santos; Miranda, Lara Meneguelli; Faria, Natália Maia; Avarese de Figueiredo, André; de Bessa, José; Netto, José Murillo B

    2016-08-01

    The use of preoperative hormonal stimulation before hypospadias surgery aims to increase penile size and achieve better surgical results; however, the rules are not clear in the literature. We evaluated the effects of topical testosterone and estrogen in the hypospadic penis regarding biometric measures, side effects, and serum hormonal levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study using estradiol prior to hypospadias surgery. Sixty-nine children with hypospadias were randomly divided into three study groups: a control group (CG) of 17 children given placebo cream; a testosterone group (TG) of 28 children who used 1% testosterone propionate; and an estradiol group (EG) of 24 children using 0.01% estradiol. All subjects applied the topical ointment on the entire penis, twice daily for 30 days before surgical correction. Biometric evaluation of the penis included penile length and diameter, glans diameter, distance from the urethral meatus to the tip, and the width of the urethral plate. These measurements as well as serum hormone level, and side effects were evaluated prior to hormone use, and 30 and 90 days after. After 30 days an increase in penile diameter and length and diameter of the glans were observed in TG (p penis had a tendency to increase also in TG. Estradiol did not change biometric measure of the penis. Few side effects occurred after both hormones, and any that did improved after 90 days follow-up and did not change hormone serum levels. Preoperative use of topical testosterone increases penile size, diameter of the penis and glans. The use of estradiol does not change penile biometry. Side effects occur mainly with the use of testosterone and are transient. No significant and persistent hormonal changes were observed. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sexual Health: Testosterone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fat distribution Muscle strength and mass Facial and body hair Red blood cell production Sex drive Sperm production ... bone density. Swollen or tender breasts (gynecomastia) and body hair loss are possible. You may have less energy ...

  5. Pharmacokinetics and antimicrobial dosing adjustment in critically ill patients during continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, D; Verbine, A; Ronco, C

    2007-05-01

    Appropriate antimicrobial therapy poses one of the greatest challenges during the management of a septic patient in the intensive care unit (ICU). Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common complication of sepsis and often occurs as a component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is increasingly used as an effective extracorporeal blood purification therapy in this critically ill patient population. Available data demonstrate that sepsis, ARF and different modalities of CRRT may have profound effects on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of various antimicrobial agents used in the ICU. Guidelines for antimicrobial prescription which will fit the individual patient undergoing a particular method of treatment are still unavailable. Understanding the principles of drug removal by CRRT and pharmacokinetics of various agents can help to modify the drug dosage and dosing intervals for individualized therapy. Meanwhile, monitoring the drug serum concentration is still mandatory whenever clinically feasible.

  6. PECULIARITIES OF REPLACEMENT ENZYME THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS: BENEFITS OF HIGH-TECH ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Simonova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years we have gained enormous success not only in the field of understanding of pathologic basis and genetics of cystic fibrosis, but we have also developed new therapeutic approach to this disease. Enzyme therapy is one of the main parts of a complex treatment of cystic fibrosis. Correct therapeutic decision upon medication and treatment regimen allows to reach dramatic amelioration o patient’s condition, and significantly decrease the risk of complications of the disease itself and side-effects of the treatment given. This article contains guidelines of enzyme therapy in cystic fibrosis and clinical mistakes analysis that occur while deciding upon therapy. Key words: chronic pancreatic failure, replacement enzyme therapy, kreon, cystic fibrosis, children. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (5: 152–156.

  7. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Halachic Considerations for Enrolling in an Experimental Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbi Moshe D. Tendler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The transition of new biotechnologies into clinical trials is a critical step in approving a new drug or therapy in health care. Ethically recruiting appropriate volunteers for these clinical trials can be a challenging task for both the pharmaceutical companies and the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper we analyze the Jewish halachic perspectives of volunteering for clinical trials by focusing on an innovative technology in reproductive medicine, mitochondrial replacement therapy. The halachic perspective encourages individuals to volunteer for such clinical trials under the ethical principles of beneficence and social responsibility, when animal studies have shown that health risks are minimal.

  8. Functional salivary gland regeneration as the next generation of organ replacement regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Miho; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Oral health is maintained by the coordinated function of many organs including the teeth and salivary glands. Dysfunction of these organs causes many problems, such as dental caries, swallowing dysfunction and periodontal disease. Regenerative therapy for salivary gland tissue repair and whole-salivary gland replacement is currently considered a novel therapeutic concept that may have potential for the full recovery of salivary gland function. Salivary gland tissue stem cells are thought to be candidate cell sources for salivary gland tissue repair therapies. In addition, whole-salivary gland replacement therapy may become a novel next-generation organ regenerative therapy. Almost all organs arise from reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions of the germ layers. We developed a novel bioengineering method, an organ germ method that can reproduce organogenesis through the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. A bioengineered salivary gland germ can regenerate a structurally correct salivary gland in vitro, and bioengineered salivary glands successfully secrete saliva into the oral cavity from ducts in the recipient through the reestablishment of the afferent-efferent neural network. The bioengineered salivary gland can also improve the symptoms of xerostomia, such as bacterial infection and swallowing dysfunction. In this review, we describe recent findings and technological developments of salivary gland regenerative therapy.

  9. Epidemiologic trends in chronic renal replacement therapy over forty years: A Swiss dialysis experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann Petra; Ambühl Manon; Corleto Domenica; Klaghofer Richard; Ambühl Patrice M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Long term longitudinal data are scarce on epidemiological characteristics and patient outcomes in patients on maintenance dialysis, especially in Switzerland. We examined changes in epidemiology of patients undergoing renal replacement therapy by either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis over four decades. Methods Single center retrospective study including all patients which initiated dialysis treatment for ESRD between 1970 and 2008. Analyses were performed for subgroup...

  10. Renal replacement therapy in Europe: a summary of the 2011 ERA?EDTA Registry Annual Report

    OpenAIRE

    Noordzij, Marlies; Kramer, Anneke; Abad Diez, Jos? M.; Alonso de la Torre, Ram?n; Arcos Fuster, Emma; Bikbov, Boris T.; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Bouzas Caama?o, Encarnaci?n; ?ala, Svetlana; Caskey, Fergus J.; Castro de la Nuez, Pablo; Cernevskis, Harijs; Collart, Frederic; D?az Tejeiro, Rafael; Djukanovic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Background This article provides a summary of the 2011 ERA?EDTA Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org). Methods Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from national and regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the Mediterranean Sea were used. From 27 registries, individual patient data were received, whereas 17 registries contributed data in aggregated form. We present the incidence and prevalence of RRT, and ren...

  11. CRRTnet: a prospective, multi-national, observational study of continuous renal replacement therapy practices

    OpenAIRE

    Heung, Michael; Bagshaw, Sean M.; House, Andrew A.; Juncos, Luis A.; Piazza, Robin; Goldstein, Stuart L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is the recommended modality of dialysis for critically ill patients with hemodynamic instability. Yet there remains significant variability in how CRRT is prescribed and delivered, and limited evidence-basis to guide practice. Methods This is a prospective, multi-center observational study of patients undergoing CRRT. Initial enrollment phase will occur at 4 academic medical centers in North America over 5?years, with a target enrollment ...

  12. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prior to chronic renal replacement therapy initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Fosbøl, Emil L; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with severe renal complications, including acute renal failure, reduced glomerular filtration rate and interstitial nephritis. Caution against NSAIDs is therefore recommended in advanced chronic kidney disease. In this study......, we examined NSAID use, aetiology and comorbidity among a national cohort of patients before the initiation of chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT). METHODS: Patients initiated on chronic RRT in the period 1997-2006 were identified in the Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis...

  13. Antimicrobial Doses in Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Comparison of Dosing Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Kempke, Anna P.; Leino, Abbie S.; Daneshvar, Farzad; Lee, John Andrew; Mueller, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Drug dose recommendations are not well defined in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) due to limited published data. Several guidelines and pharmacokinetic equations have been proposed as tools for CRRT drug dosing. Dose recommendations derived from these methods have yet to be compared or prospectively evaluated. Methods. A literature search of PubMed, Micromedex, and Embase was conducted for 40 drugs commonly used in the ICU to gather pharmacokinetic dat...

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of daptomycin in adult patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiaoying; Khadzhynov, Dmytro; Peters, Harm; Chaves, Ricardo L.; Hamed, Kamal; Levi, Micha; Corti, Natascia

    2016-01-01

    Aim The objective of this population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis was to provide guidance for the dosing interval of daptomycin in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Methods A previously published population PK model for daptomycin was updated with data from patients undergoing continuous veno?venous haemodialysis (CVVHD; n?=?9) and continuous veno?venous haemodiafiltration (CVVHDF; n?=?8). Model?based simulations were performed to compare the 24?h AUC, C max an...

  15. Pharmacokinetics of Procainamide and N-acetylprocainamide during Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Ahmed N.; Abdelhady, Ahmed M.; Spencer, Dustin; Sowinski, Kevin M.; Tisdale, James E.; Overholser, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Procainamide and its major metabolite, N-acetyl procainamide (NAPA), prolong the QTc interval and can promote potentially fatal ventricular arrhythmias. Excretion of procainamide and NAPA is reduced in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) resulting in drug accumulation and toxicity. The elimination of procainamide or NAPA in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has not been evaluated increasing the risk for subtherapeutic or toxic dosing regimens. This case re...

  16. NICOTINE REPLACEMENT THERAPY OF THE TOBACCO ADDICTION IN PREVENTION OF CARDIORESPIRATORY DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    M. G. Gambaryan

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious public health issue in Russia and one of the major risk factors of cardiorespiratory diseases. Smoking cessation is the most cost-effective measure for prevention of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and for reduction in risk of death from these diseases. Helping the patients to quit smoking is difficult because of the nicotine addiction that most of them face. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is used to reduce the tobacco dependence and withdrawal symptom...

  17. Prevalence of hormone replacement therapy in a sample of middle-aged women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S H; Jeune, B

    1988-01-01

    A survey based on a postal questionnaire sent to a random sample of Danish women aged 40-59 yr living on the island of Fünen (n = 401, response rate = 79%) revealed that the overall prevalence of the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was 16%, the highest rate being in the 50-54 age group (21......, approximately one third reporting a positive and one-third a negative attitude....

  18. TREND OF BALKAN ENDEMIC NEPHROPATHY PATIENTS ON RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN BOSNIA FROM 2003 THROUGH 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Imamović, Goran; Zerem, Enver; Omerović, Safet

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate epidemiological status of Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Bosnia from 2003 through 2005. Incidence and prevalence rates of BEN, diabetes mellitus (DM) and RRT population and proportion of BEN RRT population in total RRT population were tracked in renal units covering the entire BEN endemic region in Bosnia. BEN incidence and prevalence rates were 52; 34;48 and 262; 265, 292, respectively. DM incidence and pre...

  19. Doubling in the use of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in Denmark: association to iodization of salt?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerqueira, Charlotte; Knudsen, Nils; Ovesen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    of salt was initiated in 1998 because of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the raised iodine intake on the nationwide incident use of thyroid hormone replacement therapy (levothyroxine) to treat hypothyroidism. Data on all use of levothyroxine...... for caution when initiating iodine fortification programs to keep the intake within the optimal range, and the need for continuous monitoring....

  20. Short QTc Interval in Males with Klinefelter Syndrome-Influence of CAG Repeat Length, Body Composition, and Testosterone Replacement Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Inger Norlyk; Skakkebaek, Anne; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundKlinefelter syndrome (KS) is a sex chromosomal aneuploidy (47,XXY) affecting 1/660 males. Based on findings in Turner syndrome, we hypothesized that electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities would be present in males with KS. ObjectiveTo investigate ECGs in males with KS and compare with co...

  1. Epidemiologic trends in chronic renal replacement therapy over forty years: A Swiss dialysis experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehmann Petra

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long term longitudinal data are scarce on epidemiological characteristics and patient outcomes in patients on maintenance dialysis, especially in Switzerland. We examined changes in epidemiology of patients undergoing renal replacement therapy by either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis over four decades. Methods Single center retrospective study including all patients which initiated dialysis treatment for ESRD between 1970 and 2008. Analyses were performed for subgroups according to dialysis vintage, based on stratification into quartiles of date of first treatment. A multivariate model predicting death and survival time, using time-dependent Cox regression, was developed. Results 964 patients were investigated. Incident mean age progressively increased from 48 ± 14 to 64 ± 15 years from 1st to 4th quartile (p  Discussion We document an increase of a predominantly elderly incident and prevalent dialysis population, with progressively shortened survival after initiation of renal replacement over four decades, and, nevertheless, a prolonged lifespan. Analysis of the data is limited by lack of information on comorbidity in the study population. Conclusions Survival in patients on renal replacement therapy seems to be affected not only by medical and technical advances in dialysis therapy, but may mostly reflect progressively lower mortality of individuals with cardiovascular and metabolic complications, as well as a policy of accepting older and polymorbid patients for dialysis in more recent times. This is relevant to make demographic predictions in face of the ESRD epidemic nephrologists and policy makers are facing in industrialized countries.

  2. Caffeine drinking, cigarette smoking, and dopaminergic replacement therapy dose in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-López, Carmen; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Corona, Teresa

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effect of smoking and caffeine intake in the dosage of dopaminergic replacement therapy. Patients were recruited from the movement disorders clinic of the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City. An interviewer-administered structured questionnaire was given to all subjects regarding their smoking and caffeine drinking habits. Dopaminergic replacement therapy information was collected and levodopa, dopamine agonists, and levodopa equivalent daily doses were calculated. 146 Parkinson's disease patients (50 % female) were included. All patients were on antiparkinsonian treatment, with a mean levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD) of 550.2 ± 408. Patients were stratified according to smoking and caffeine drinking status. 104 (71.2 %) of the patients were "never smokers", 33 (22.6 %) were "former smokers" and 9 (6.2 %) were "current smokers". 40 (27.4 %) patients reported no history of caffeine intake, 36 (24.7 %) were former consumers and 70 (47.9 %) were current caffeine drinkers. No association between LEDD and smoking or caffeine intake was found. A weak positive correlation (r = 0.22, p < 0.04) was found between the daily dose of pramipexole and the daily intake of caffeine. LEDD, levodopa daily dose and dopamine agonist daily dose were not related to smoking or caffeine intake status. We found a weak correlation between caffeine daily intake and pramipexole dose. Further prospective exploration is needed to address the interaction of concomitant A2A antagonism induced by caffeine intake and dopaminergic replacement therapy.

  3. Fenoldopam to prevent renal replacement therapy after cardiac surgery. Design of the FENO-HSR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, G; Bove, T; Pasero, D; Comis, M; Orando, S; Pinelli, F; Guarracino, F; Corcione, A; Galdieri, N; Zucchetti, M; Maglioni, E; Biagioli, B; Pala, G; Frontini, M; Caramelli, F; Persi, B; Renzini, M; Paoletti, F; Lorini, L; Morelli, A; Alvaro, G; Bianco, R; Pittarello, D; Manzato, A; Pedersini, G; Mizzi, A; Lojacono, N; Leoncini, P; Iovino, T; Cariello, C; Baldassarri, R; Camata, A M; Padua, G; Frascaroli, G; Leonardi, S; Bignami, E; Zangrillo, A

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy is a serious complication following cardiac surgery associated with poor clinical outcomes. Until now no drug showed nephroprotective effects. Fenoldopam is a dopamine-1 receptor agonist which seems to be effective in improving postoperative renal function. The aim of this paper is to describe the design of the FENO-HSR study, planned to assess the effect of a continuous infusion of fenoldopam in reducing the need for renal replacement therapy in patients with acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery. We're performing a double blind, placebo-controlled multicentre randomized trial in over 20 Italian hospitals. Patients who develop acute renal failure defined as R of RIFLE score following cardiac surgery are randomized to receive a 96-hours continuous infusion of either fenoldopam (0.025-0.3 µg/kg/min) or placebo. The primary endpoint will be the rate of renal replacement therapy. Secondary endpoints will be: mortality, time on mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, peak serum creatinine and the rate of acute renal failure (following the RIFLE score). This trial is planned to assess if fenoldopam could improve relevant outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who develop acute renal dysfunction. Results of this double-blind randomized trial could provide important insights to improve the management strategy of patients at high risk for postoperative acute kidney injury.

  4. Marketing and Testosterone Treatment in the USA: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandari, Jathin; Ayyash, Omar M; Emery, Sherry L; Wessel, Charles B; Davies, Benjamin J

    2017-10-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration only for classic hypogonadism, although off-label indications have resulted in a dramatic expansion in prescriptions in the USA. Marketing may significantly affect prescriber behavior. To systematically review all available evidence on marketing and TRT in the USA. PubMed, Embase, and Scopus were searched up to July 2017 for all relevant publications reporting on assessments of the TRT market size, economic costs associated with hypogonadism, trends in TRT prescriptions, drug discontinuation rates, and advertising and sales efforts in the USA. Twenty retrospective studies were included in the final analysis. The market size for hypogonadism constitutes 5.6-76.8% of men in the USA, with the lower end of the range representing the strictest criteria for diagnosis. Men with a diagnosis of hypogonadism consume $14 118 in direct and indirect costs to the payer. Over the last 2 decades, TRT prescriptions have increased between 1.8- and 4-fold. After 1 yr, 80-85% of men discontinue TRT. There is an association between direct-to-consumer advertising and testosterone testing, TRT prescriptions, and TRT without testosterone testing. There is a high prevalence of misinformation on Internet advertising. Off-label indications have driven the dramatic expansion of TRT prescriptions over the last 2 decades. Direct-to-consumer advertising poses a unique challenge in the USA. Overtreatment can be avoided by applying strict diagnostic criteria for hypogonadism, which limits the addressable market for TRT. In this report, we reviewed the relationship between marketing and testosterone therapy in the USA. We found that many patients are prescribed testosterone without an appropriate diagnosis of hypogonadism, which may be related to the marketing efforts for off-label prescribing. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional tooth regenerative therapy: tooth tissue regeneration and whole-tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Tsuji, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Oral and general health is compromised by irreversible dental problems, including dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury. Regenerative therapy for tooth tissue repair and whole-tooth replacement is currently considered a novel therapeutic concept with the potential for the full recovery of tooth function. Several types of stem cells and cell-activating cytokines have been identified in oral tissues. These cells are thought to be candidate cell sources for tooth tissue regenerative therapies because they have the ability to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole-tooth replacement therapy is regarded as an important model for the development of an organ regenerative concept. A novel three-dimensional cell-manipulation method, designated the organ germ method, has been developed to recapitulate organogenesis. This method involves compartmentalisation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells at a high cell density to mimic multicellular assembly conditions and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. A bioengineered tooth germ can generate a structurally correct tooth in vitro and erupt successfully with the correct tooth structure when transplanted into the oral cavity. We have ectopically generated a bioengineered tooth unit composed of a mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and that tooth unit was successfully engrafted into an adult jawbone through bone integration. Such bioengineered teeth were able to perform normal physiological tooth functions, such as developing a masticatory potential in response to mechanical stress and a perceptive potential for noxious stimuli. In this review, we describe recent findings and technologies underpinning tooth regenerative therapy.

  6. Rosa Damascena oil improved sexual function and testosterone in male patients with opium use disorder under methadone maintenance therapy-results from a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnia, Vahid; Tatari, Faeze; Alikhani, Mostafa; Shakeri, Jalal; Taghizadeh, Moshen; Karbasizadeh, Hassan; Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2017-07-01

    Some patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) are treated with methadone maintenance therapy (MMT). However, as with opioids, methadone has major side-effects; sexual dysfunction is a particularly distressing such effect. Rosa Damascena oil has been shown to reduce subjective sexual dysfunction in patients with major depressive disorders, but its influence on testosterone has not so far been tested. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of Rosa Damascena oil on sexual dysfunction and testosterone levels among male patients with OUD and undergoing MMT. A total of 50 male patients (mean age: 40 years) diagnosed with OUD and receiving MMT were randomly assigned either to the Rosa Damascena oil (drops) or a placebo condition. At baseline, and four and eight weeks later, patients completed questionnaires covering sexual and erectile function. Blood samples to assess testosterone levels were taken at baseline and eight weeks later on completion of the study. Over time sexual dysfunction decreased, and testosterone increased in the Rosa Damascena oil, but not in the placebo condition. Sexual dysfunction scores and testosterone levels were not consistently related. Results from this double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical trial showed that Rosa Damascena oil improved sexual function and testosterone levels among males with OUD and undergoing MMT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy. The 2017 recommendations of the Italian Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambacciani, Marco; Biglia, Nicoletta; Cagnacci, Angelo; DI Carlo, Costantino; Caruso, Salvatore; Cicinelli, Ettore; DE Leo, Vincenzo; Farris, Manuela; Gambera, Alessandro; Guaschino, Secondo; Lanzone, Antonio; Paoletti, Anna M; Russo, Novella; Vicariotto, Franco; Villa, Paola; Volpe, Annibale

    2017-10-03

    In the last decade the risk benefits ratio of HRT has been reevaluated mainly in tens of cardiovascular risk. Present Consensus Statement is largely inspired by the Global Consensus on Menopausel Hormone Therapy in 2013 and 2016 by leading global menopause societies (The American Society for Reproductive Medicine, The Asia Pacific Menopause Federation, The Endocrine Society, The European Menopause and Andropause Society, The International Menopause Society, The International Osteoporosis Foundation and The North American Menopause Society). The aim of these Recommendations is to provide a simple and updated reference on postmenopausal HRT. The term HRT typically includes estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) and estrogen- progestogen therapy (EPT). EPT can be sequential (Seq) when progestogen is added to ERT for 10-14 days a month, or continuous combined (CC) when progestogen is administered continuously every day along with a fixed amount of estrogen, In the everyday language, HRT includes also Tibolone and the Tissue Selective Estrogen Complex (TSEC).

  8. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Update: An Emphasis on Safe and High-Quality Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell-Chaple, Hildy

    2017-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was introduced more than 40 years ago as a renal support option for critically ill patients who had contraindications to intermittent hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Despite being the most common renal support therapy used in intensive care units today, the tremendous variability in CRRT management challenges the interpretation of findings from CRRT outcome studies. The lack of standardization in practice and training of clinicians along with the high risk of CRRT-related adverse events has been the impetus for the recent expert consensus work on identifying quality indicators for CRRT programs. This article summarizes the potential complications that establish CRRT as a high-risk therapy and also the recently published best-practice recommendations for providing high-quality CRRT. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  9. Randomized controlled trials – mechanistic studies of testosterone and the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Hugh Jones

    2018-01-01

    expression of the insulin receptor, glucose transporters, and expression on regulatory enzymes of key metabolic pathways. The effect on high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C differs between studies in that it has been found to fall, rise, or have no change in levels. Testosterone replacement can suppress the levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and stimulate the production of interleukin-10 (IL-10 which has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic actions in men with CVD. No effect on C-reactive protein has been detected. No adverse effects on clotting factors have been detected. RCTs have not clearly demonstrated any significant evidence that testosterone improves or adversely affects the surrogate markers of atherosclerosis such as reduction in carotid intima thickness or coronary calcium deposition. Any effect of testosterone on prevention or amelioration of atherosclerosis is likely to occur over years as shown in statin therapy trials and not months as used in testosterone RCTs. The weight of evidence from long-term epidemiological studies supports a protective effect as evidenced by a reduction in major adverse CV events (MACEs and mortality in studies which have treated men with testosterone deficiency. No RCT where testosterone has been replaced to the normal healthy range has reported a significant benefit or adverse effect on MACE nor has any recent meta-analysis.

  10. Randomized controlled trials - mechanistic studies of testosterone and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T Hugh; Kelly, Daniel M

    2018-02-09

    the insulin receptor, glucose transporters, and expression on regulatory enzymes of key metabolic pathways. The effect on high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) differs between studies in that it has been found to fall, rise, or have no change in levels. Testosterone replacement can suppress the levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and stimulate the production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) which has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic actions in men with CVD. No effect on C-reactive protein has been detected. No adverse effects on clotting factors have been detected. RCTs have not clearly demonstrated any significant evidence that testosterone improves or adversely affects the surrogate markers of atherosclerosis such as reduction in carotid intima thickness or coronary calcium deposition. Any effect of testosterone on prevention or amelioration of atherosclerosis is likely to occur over years as shown in statin therapy trials and not months as used in testosterone RCTs. The weight of evidence from long-term epidemiological studies supports a protective effect as evidenced by a reduction in major adverse CV events (MACEs) and mortality in studies which have treated men with testosterone deficiency. No RCT where testosterone has been replaced to the normal healthy range has reported a significant benefit or adverse effect on MACE nor has any recent meta-analysis.

  11. Analysis of Survival After Initiation of Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, James M; Barmparas, Galinos; Ko, Ara; Dhillon, Navpreet; Smith, Eric; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2017-10-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) benefits patients with renal failure who are too hemodynamically unstable for intermittent hemodialysis. The duration of therapy beyond which continued use is futile, particularly in a population of patients admitted to and primarily cared for by a surgical service (hereinafter referred to as surgical patients), is unclear. To analyze proportions of and independent risk factors for survival to discharge after initiation of CRRT among patients in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU). This retrospective cohort study included all patients undergoing CRRT from July 1, 2012, through January 31, 2016, in an SICU of an urban tertiary medical center. The population included patients treated before or after general surgery and patients admitted to a surgical service during inpatient evaluation and care before liver transplant. The pretransplant population was censored from further survival analysis on receipt of a transplant. Continuous renal replacement therapy. Hospital mortality among patients in an SICU after initiation of CRRT. Of 108 patients (64 men [59.3%] and 44 women [40.7%]; mean [SD] age, 62.0 [12.7] years) admitted to the SICU, 53 were in the general surgical group and 55 in the pretransplant group. Thirteen of the 22 patients in the pretransplant group who required 7 or more days of CRRT died (in-hospital mortality, 59.1%); among the 12 patients in the general surgery group who required 7 or more days of CRRT, 12 died (in-hospital mortality, 100%). In the general surgical group, each day of CRRT was associated with an increased adjusted odds ratio of death of 1.39 (95% CI, 1.01-1.90; P = .04). Continuous renal replacement therapy is valuable for surgical patients with an acute and correctable indication; however, survival decreases significantly with increasing duration of CRRT. Duration of CRRT does not correlate with survival among patients awaiting liver transplant.

  12. Effects of leptin replacement therapy on pancreatic β-cell function in patients with lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyappa, Ranganath; Brown, Rebecca J; Mari, Andrea; Joseph, Jalaja; Warren, Mary A; Cochran, Elaine K; Skarulis, Monica C; Gorden, Phillip

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Leptin administration is known to directly modulate pancreatic β-cell function in leptin-deficient rodent models. However, human studies examining the effects of leptin administration on β-cell function are lacking. In this study, we examined the effects (16-20 weeks) of leptin replacement on β-cell function in patients with lipodystrophy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a prospective, open-label, currently ongoing study, we studied the effects of leptin replacement on β-cell function in 13 patients with congenital or acquired lipodystrophy. Insulin secretory rate (ISR) was calculated by C-peptide deconvolution from plasma glucose and C-peptide levels measured during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) performed at baseline and after 16-20 weeks of leptin replacement. β-Cell glucose sensitivity and rate sensitivity were assessed by mathematical modeling of OGTT. RESULTS There was a significant decrease in triglycerides, free fatty acids, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels (A1C) after leptin therapy. Patients with lipodystrophy have high fasting and glucose-stimulated ISR. However, leptin therapy had no significant effect on fasting ISR, total insulin secretion during OGTT, β-cell glucose sensitivity, rate sensitivity, or insulin clearance. CONCLUSIONS In contrast to the suppressive effects of leptin on β-cell function in rodents, 16-20-week treatment with leptin in lipodystrophy patients did not significantly affect insulin secretion or β-cell function in leptin-deficient individuals with lipodystrophy.

  13. Functional tooth regeneration using a bioengineered tooth unit as a mature organ replacement regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Mizuno, Mitsumasa; Imamura, Aya; Ogawa, Miho; Yasukawa, Masato; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Morita, Ritsuko; Ikeda, Etsuko; Nakao, Kazuhisa; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kasugai, Shohei; Saito, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Donor organ transplantation is currently an essential therapeutic approach to the replacement of a dysfunctional organ as a result of disease, injury or aging in vivo. Recent progress in the area of regenerative therapy has the potential to lead to bioengineered mature organ replacement in the future. In this proof of concept study, we here report a further development in this regard in which a bioengineered tooth unit comprising mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, was successfully transplanted into a properly-sized bony hole in the alveolar bone through bone integration by recipient bone remodeling in a murine transplantation model system. The bioengineered tooth unit restored enough the alveolar bone in a vertical direction into an extensive bone defect of murine lower jaw. Engrafted bioengineered tooth displayed physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function for bone remodeling and responsiveness to noxious stimulations. This study thus represents a substantial advance and demonstrates the real potential for bioengineered mature organ replacement as a next generation regenerative therapy.

  14. Hair cortisol content in patients with adrenal insufficiency on hydrocortisone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Rachel; Koren, Gideon; Rieder, Michael; Van Uum, Stan

    2011-06-01

    Patients with adrenal insufficiency (AI) require life-long replacement therapy with exogenous glucocorticoids. Several studies have shown impaired subjective health status in these patients as well as increased morbidity and mortality risk, which may be caused by glucocorticoid over-replacement. As a measure of long-term cortisol exposure, the usefulness of hair cortisol analysis in patients receiving glucocorticoid replacement therapy was investigated. Hair samples, demographics, medical history and perceived stress scale questionnaires were collected from 93 patients across North America diagnosed with primary or secondary AI. Sixty-two household partners served as a control group. Cortisol was measured in the proximal 2 cm of hair, representing the most recent 2 months of exposure. A modified enzyme immunoassay was used for the measurement of cortisol. The male patients had significantly higher hair cortisol levels than the male controls (P cortisol content correlated significantly with glucocorticoid dose (r = 0·3, P cortisol content correlates with hydrocortisone (HC) dose in patients with AI. Our results suggest that some AI patients may be over-treated and hence may be at risk for the adverse effects of cortisol. Measurement of HC in hair may become a useful monitoring tool for long-term cortisol exposure in patients treated with glucocorticoids. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Influence of Renal Replacement Modalities on Amikacin Population Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Patients on Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Claire; Wallis, Steven C; Muller, Laurent; Saissi, Gilbert; Lipman, Jeffrey; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe amikacin pharmacokinetics (PK) in critically ill patients receiving equal doses (30 ml/kg of body weight/h) of continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF). Patients receiving amikacin and undergoing CVVH or CVVHDF were eligible. Population pharmacokinetic analysis and Monte Carlo simulation were undertaken using the Pmetrics software package for R. Sixteen patients (9 undergoing CVVH, 11 undergoing CVVHDF) and 20 sampling intervals were analyzed. A two-compartment linear model best described the data. Patient weight was the only covariate that was associated with drug clearance. The mean ± standard deviation parameter estimates were 25.2 ± 17.3 liters for the central volume, 0.89 ± 1.17 h(-1) for the rate constant for the drug distribution from the central to the peripheral compartment, 2.38 ± 6.60 h(-1) for the rate constant for the drug distribution from the peripheral to the central compartment, 4.45 ± 2.35 liters/h for hemodiafiltration clearance, and 4.69 ± 2.42 liters/h for hemofiltration clearance. Dosing simulations for amikacin supported the use of high dosing regimens (≥25 mg/kg) and extended intervals (36 to 48 h) for most patients when considering PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) targets of a maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax)/MIC ratio of ≥8 and a minimal concentration of ≤2.5 mg/liter at the end of the dosing interval. The mean clearance of amikacin was 1.8 ± 1.3 liters/h by CVVHDF and 1.3 ± 1 liters/h by CVVH. On the basis of simulations, a strategy of an extended-interval high loading dose of amikacin (25 mg/kg every 48 h) associated with therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) should be the preferred approach for aminoglycoside treatment in critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). (This study is a substudy of a trial registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under number NCT01403220.). Copyright © 2016, American Society

  16. Stem cell therapy. Use of differentiated pluripotent stem cells as replacement therapy for treating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Ira J; Daley, George Q; Goldman, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) directed to various cell fates holds promise as source material for treating numerous disorders. The availability of precisely differentiated PSC-derived cells will dramatically affect blood component and hematopoietic stem cell therapies and should facilitate...... treatment of diabetes, some forms of liver disease and neurologic disorders, retinal diseases, and possibly heart disease. Although an unlimited supply of specific cell types is needed, other barriers must be overcome. This review of the state of cell therapies highlights important challenges. Successful...

  17. Managing the menopause - British Menopause Society Council consensus statement on hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, Joan; Rees, Margaret C P; Gray, Sarah; Lumsden, Mary Ann; Stevenson, John; Williamson, Jennifer

    2003-09-01

    The British Menopause Society Council aims to aid health professionals to inform and advise women about the menopause. The oestrogen plus progestogen arm of the Women's Health Initiative was stopped in July 2002. This guidance regarding hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use responds to the results and analysis that have been published since then. Because there are few effective alternatives to HRT for vasomotor and urogenital symptoms, oestrogen-based treatments still have a major role. HRT is also most effective for prevention of osteoporosis. Unopposed oestrogens are contraindicated in women with an intact uterus, and hence a range of oestrogen and progestogen combinations, with differing routes of delivery, now exists under the title of "HRT". Treatment choice should be based on up to date information and targeted to individual women's needs. Hormone replacement still offers the potential for benefit to outweigh harm, providing the appropriate regimen has been instigated in terms of dose, route and combination.

  18. [Pituitary functional recovery and hormone replacement therapy of patients with pituitary adenoma surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-Hong; Xue, Xin-Cheng; Zhou, Pei-Zhi; Yin, Sen-Lin; Jiang, Shu

    2013-05-01

    To study the pituitary functional recovery of patients with pituitary adenoma surgery and to identify appropriate dosages of hormone replacement for those patients. Serum hormone levels of 187 patients with pituitary adenoma were detected before and after surgery. The lowest serum hormone levels were detected on the 3rd day after surgery (P pituitary adenoma experienced hypopituitarism shortly after surgery, especially for the elderly who recovered more slowly. Low dosage of hormone replacement therapy based on their symptoms can help the patients reach a stable level of hormone within three months. As a result, the 90th day after surgery can be regarded as a cut-off time for measuring functional recovery of glandula pituitaria.

  19. The impact of hormone replacement therapy on menopausal symptoms in younger high-risk women after prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madalinska, Joanna B.; van Beurden, Marc; Bleiker, Eveline M. A.; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B.; Hollenstein, Judith; Massuger, Leon F.; Gaarenstroom, Katja N.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Verheijen, Rene H. M.; van Dorst, Eleonora B. L.; van der Putten, Hans; van der Velden, Ko; Boonstra, Henk; Aaronson, Neil K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Preventive health strategies for women at increased hereditary risk of ovarian cancer include gynecologic screening (GS) and/or prophylactic oophorectomy (PBSO). Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is often prescribed to compensate for postsurgical endocrine deficiencies. This study examined

  20. The impact of hormone replacement therapy on menopausal symptoms in younger high-risk women after prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madalinska, J.B.; Beurden, M. van; Bleiker, E.M.A.; Valdimarsdottir, H.B.; Hollenstein, J.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Gaarenstroom, K.N.; Mourits, M.J.E.; Verheijen, R.H.; Dorst, E.B.L. van; Putten, H. van der; Velden, K. van der; Boonstra, H.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Preventive health strategies for women at increased hereditary risk of ovarian cancer include gynecologic screening (GS) and/or prophylactic oophorectomy (PBSO). Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is often prescribed to compensate for postsurgical endocrine deficiencies. This study examined

  1. Modelling Gaucher disease progression: long-term enzyme replacement therapy reduces the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dussen, Laura; Biegstraaten, Marieke; Dijkgraaf, Marcel Gw; Hollak, Carla Em

    2014-01-01

    Long-term complications and associated conditions of type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD) can include splenectomy, bone complications, pulmonary hypertension, Parkinson disease and malignancies. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) reverses cytopenia and reduces organomegaly. To study the effects of ERT on

  2. Infantile Pompe disease: clinical and genetic characteristics with an experience of enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Anna; Kim, Su Jin; Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Park, June Dong; Kim, Gi Beom; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Jeehun; Ki, Chang Seok; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Chae, Jong-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by lysosomal acid α-glucosidase deficiency. Infantile-onset Pompe disease presents with cardiomyopathy and hypotonia, leading to premature death. This article describes 7 infantile Pompe disease cases and provides their molecular bases and clinical outcomes after enzyme replacement therapy for the first time in Korea. Molecular genetic analyses revealed the presence of 9 different mutations, including 5 novel mutations (c.2171C>A, c.2774C>T, c.1582_3de12, c.1261_1263Tms, and c.1322_1326+9de114). The most common mutation in these 7 patients was c.1316T>A (28%). Four patients received intravenous recombinant human acid α-glucosidase therapy for 2 years, on average, without significant side effects during the treatment course. They all exhibited increased muscle power, with considerable improvement in cardiac function. Pompe disease is heterogeneous regarding both clinical features and molecular characteristics. Early identification of Pompe disease is very important, considering that enzyme replacement therapy is a safe and effective treatment for early-onset patients.

  3. Modulating Wnt signaling to improve cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Clare L; Thompson, Lachlan H

    2014-02-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated the capacity for dopamine neurons, transplanted ectopically into the striatum, to structurally integrate, restore dopamine transmission, and induce long-term functional benefits for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Despite this proof of principle, a number of limitations have hindered the development of cell replacement therapy over the past 20 years, particularly tissue availability, graft survival, and adequate reinnervation of the host brain. With a greater understanding of failure in prior clinical trials, increased knowledge of midbrain dopamine development (now including Wnts), and the development of pluripotent stem cell technologies, we are better equipped than ever to re-address a number of these challenges. This review summarizes the trials, tribulations, and progress in cell replacement therapy for PD. We discuss the prospects of modulating canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling to improve cell therapy based upon their roles in dopamine neural development and the adult brain. This will include the potential of Wnts to (i) expand fetally derived tissue in vitro and following transplantation, (ii) promote the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, (iii) increase graft integration and restoration of neural circuitry, and finally (iv) enhance graft survival.

  4. Serum estrogen and SHBG levels and breast cancer incidence among users and never users of hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Anne Mette Lund; Tjønneland, Anne; Christensen, Jane Hvarregaard

    2012-01-01

    Levels of endogenous estrogen and SHBG are associated with risk of breast cancer among women who have never used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We investigated these associations in both never and baseline users of HRT.......Levels of endogenous estrogen and SHBG are associated with risk of breast cancer among women who have never used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We investigated these associations in both never and baseline users of HRT....

  5. Ascending aortic remodelling in Fabry disease after long-term enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monney, Pierre; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Hajdu, Steven; Tran, Christel; Schwitter, Juerg; Dormond, Olivier; Barbey, Frédéric

    2017-11-09

    Previous cross-sectional studies reported a high prevalence of ascending aorta dilations/aneurysms in male adults with Fabry disease, independently of cardiovascular risk factors. To characterise the remodelling of the ascending aorta in classic Fabry disease under long-term enzyme replacement therapy. Diameter of the ascending aorta was measured with magnetic resonance imaging at the sino-tubular junction (STJ), and proximal (pAsAo), and distal ascending aorta (dAsAo) at baseline, and after 5 and 10 years of enzyme replacement therapy in 15 adult Fabry patients (10 males; 5 females). Over a mean follow-up of 9.5 years, the annual expansion rates measured in 10 males with Fabry disease were 0.41 ± 0.16, 0.36 ± 0.25 and 0.41 ± 0.26 mm/y at the STJ, pAsAo and dAsAo, respectively. Expansion rate at the pAsAo level in male patients was significantly higher than the expected expansion projected from theoretical normal values: 0.36 ± 0.25 vs 0.13 ± 0.05, p = 0.017. In 5 females, the annual expansion rates at the STJ, pAsAo and dAsAo were 0.14 ± 0.11, 0.21 ± 0.18 and 0.26 ± 0.24 mm/y, respectively. There was no significant difference from the projected normal expansion rate at the level of the pAsAo: 0.21 ± 0.18 vs 0.13 ± 0.04, p = 0.39. Our data suggest that the remodelling of the ascending aorta is more pronounced in male patients with Fabry disease under long-term enzyme replacement therapy compared with the progression observed in a large population study.

  6. Testosterone effect on brain metabolism in elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease: comparing two cases at different disease stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, R S

    2013-06-01

    To describe the effect of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) on the brain activity of two demented, hypogonadal male patients with early and late-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD), respectively. We describe the clinical and positron emission tomography (PET) findings for two individuals, one with early stage and the other with late-stage Alzheimer's disease, before and after treatment with a topical testosterone gel. Both patients were hypogonadal at baseline. We assessed cerebral glucose metabolism (CGM) via (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET). We investigated whether there are testosterone-susceptible areas within cerebral structures in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Under testosterone replacement therapy, changes in cerebral glucose metabolism were observed in both patients. Improvement in glucose uptake was observed most consistently in the parietal lobe and brainstem; decreased glucose metabolism was observed in the temporal lobe, the limbic system and the insula for these two subjects. These case reports demonstrate the potential for PET scanning to detect changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in hypogonadal men with Alzheimer's disease who are treated with testosterone. Further study will be needed to investigate the consistency and significance of these changes in terms of magnitude and brain region, and the correlation with functional changes.

  7. Methadone Replacement Therapy and Sexual Disorders among Opium Dependent Iranian Men: A Meta-Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakhanian, Masoudeh; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Afshari, Mahdi; Taghizadeh, Fatemeh; Moosazadeh, Mahmood

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of sexual disorders among persons receiving methadone replacement therapy is of great importance, because these problems may lead to non-compliance and relapse. This study aimed to estimate the effect of methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) on sexual function among addicted Iranian men using met-analysis. Investigating the available data banks, relevant studies were identified. After exclusion of duplicates, irrelevant papers and low quality articles, eligible papers were entered into the meta-analysis. Prevalence and standardized mean difference of sexual function scores were illustrated by forest plots based on sexual desire, orgasm and erectile function. During the primary search, 5341 evidences were identified. After application of the inclusion/exclusion criteria and quality assessment, nine papers were detected eligible for final meta-analysis. Total prevalence [95% confidence intervals (CI)] of sexual disorders and erectile dysfunction among Iranian men under methadone therapy were estimated as 66.3% (27.1-105.5) and 77.5% (61.9-93.1), respectively. The standardized mean differences (95% CI) of Sexual desire, orgasm and erection before and after methadone therapy were estimated as 0.16 (-0.68, 0.99), -0.01 (-0.75, 0.74) and 0.11 (-0.41, 0.64), respectively. This meta-analysis showed that methadone therapy did not significantly influence the sexual desire, erectile function and orgasm among opium dependent men.

  8. Spontaneous Lumbar Artery Bleeding and Retroperitoneal Hematoma in a Patient Treated with Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Kyung Park

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the lumbar artery is usually associated with trauma but rarely has been reported in association with anticoagulation. We present a 71-year-old man who developed spontaneous rupture of the lumbar artery leading to a retroperitoneal hematoma while receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. The bleeding was confirmed by computed tomography and angiography and was controlled successfully using selective angiographic embolization. We suggest that spontaneous retroperitoneal bleeding should be considered in a case of sudden decrease in hemoglobin in a CRRT patient.

  9. Oral Rehydration Therapy and Feeding Replaces Total Parenteral Nutrition: A Clinical Vignette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Scott Mitchell; Noon, Muhammad Jawad; Greenough, William Bates

    2016-02-01

    A 27-year-old patient with spina bifida and a high output loss of water and electrolytes from her ileostomy was successfully liberated from dependency on total parenteral nutrition and intravenous fluid and electrolyte replacement by the use of a rice-based oral rehydration therapy (ORT). This allowed her to return home to the care of her mother. We suggest that ORT can be effective in the context of modern high-technology settings, as well as in resource-poor situations.

  10. Obesity, type 2 diabetes and hormone replacement therapy vs. colorectal tumors in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Szamocka, Małgorzata; Ameryk, Monika; Meder, Agnieszka; Sokup, Alina; Świątkowski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Szamocka Małgorzata, Ameryk Monika, Meder Agnieszka, Sokup Alina, Świątkowski Maciej. Obesity, type 2 diabetes and hormone replacement therapy vs. colorectal tumors in the elderly. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2017;7(6):230-243. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.804629 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/4530         The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evaluation. Part B item 1...

  11. A randomized trial evaluating a block-replacement regimen during radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Grupe, Peter; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Eur J Clin Invest 2010 ABSTRACT: Background  Lack of consensus regarding the antithyroid drug regimen in relation to radioiodine ((131) I) therapy of hyperthyroidism prompted this randomized trial comparing two strategies. Design  Patients with Graves' disease (GD, n = 51) or toxic nodular goitre...... (TNG, n = 49) were randomized to (131) I either 8 days following discontinuation of methimazole (-BRT, n = 52, median dose: 5 mg) or while on a continuous block-replacement regimen (+BRT, n = 48, median dose 15 mg methimazole and 100 μg levothyroxine). Results  Patients in the +BRT group required more...

  12. Obesity and sarcopenia after menopause are reversed by sex hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Rosenfalck, A M; Højgaard, L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Menopause is linked to an increase in fat mass and a decrease in lean mass exceeding age-related changes, possibly related to reduced output of ovarian steroids. In this study we examined the effect of combined postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the total and regional.......04) and abdominal fat decreased (-185 g vs. +253 g, p = 0.04) during HRT compared with placebo. DISCUSSION: HRT is linked to the reversal of both menopause-related obesity and loss of lean mass, without overall change in body weight. The increase in lean body mass during HRT is likely explained by muscle anabolism...

  13. Mortality from infections and malignancies in patients treated with renal replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelzang, Judith L; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Noordzij, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infections and malignancies are the most common non-cardiovascular causes of death in patients on chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT). Here, we aimed to quantify the mortality risk attributed to infections and malignancies in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients when...... compared with the general population by age group and sex. METHODS: We followed 168 156 patients included in the ERA-EDTA registry who started RRT in 1993-2007 until 1 January 2012. Age- and cause-specific mortality rates per 1000 person-years (py) and mortality rate ratios (MRRs) compared...

  14. Testosterone deficiency: a historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard Nieschlag

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of the testes and testosterone are known since antiquity. Aristotle knew the effects of castration and his hypothesis on fertilization is one of the first scientific encounters in reproductive biology. Over centuries, castration has been performed as punishment and to produce obedient slaves, but also to preserve the soprano voices of prepubertal boys. The Chinese imperial (and other oriental courts employed castrates as overseers in harems who often obtained high-ranking political positions. The era of testis transplantation and organotherapy was initiated by John Hunter in London who transplanted testes into capons in 1786. The intention of his experiments was to prove the 'vital principle' as the basis for modern transplantation medicine, but Hunter did not consider endocrine aspects. Arnold Adolph Berthold postulated internal secretion from his testicular transplantation experiments in 1849 in Göttingen and is thus considered the father of endocrinology. Following his observations, testicular preparations were used for therapy, popularized by self-experiments by Charles-Edouard Brown-Séquard in Paris (1889, which can at best have placebo effects. In the 1920s Sergio Voronoff transplanted testes from animals to men, but their effectiveness was disproved. Today testicular transplantation is being refined by stem cell research and germ cell transplantation. Modern androgen therapy started in 1935 when Enrest Lacquer isolated testosterone from bull testes in Amsterdam. In the same year testosterone was chemically synthesized independently by Adolf Butenandt in Göttingen and Leopold Ruzicka in Basel. Since testosterone was ineffective orally it was either compressed into subcutaneous pellets or was used orally as 17α-methyl testosterone, now obsolete because of liver toxicity. The early phases of testosterone treatment coincide with the first description of the most prominent syndromes of hypogonadism by Klinefelter, by

  15. Mammographic changes in postmenopausal women : comparative effects between continuous combined hormone and single estrogen replacement therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sug; Choi, Jong Tae; Jung, Kyoon Soon; Jung, Seung Hye [Jeil Women' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    As the use of hormone replacement therapy for the menopausal women increases, some caution is advised, since there is an increased risk of breast cancer. Accordingly, the importance of regular mammography has been addressed. This cross-setional study analyzed the effects of different hormone therapies on mammographic density. Sixty-seven postemenopausal women who had completed one year of hormone therapy and had undergone follow-up mammography, were divided into two groups : Group I : continuous conjugated equine estrogen, 0.625mg, plus continuous medroxyprogesterone acetate, 2.5mg (n=48), Group II : continuous conjugated equine estrogen 0.625mg (n=19). The mammograms were read by two radiologists. With regard to the radiologists involved, interobserver reliabillity (kappa) was 0.70 and intraobserver reliability (kappa) was 0.51 and 0.67. Before hormone therapy, factors related to decreased mammographic density were age and number of full term pregnancies (p<0.05). After one year of hormone therapy, body fat showed a significant increase (p<0.05), but in spite of this, increased mammographic density induced by hormone therapy remained significantly high (p<0.05). Compared with Group II, Group I showed a significant increase in mammographic density (p<0.05). In Group I, mammographic density increased from P2 to DY pattern in two cases, but there was no such change in Group II. The increase of mammographic density seen in Group II was much more significant statistically than that seen in Group I. The mammograms of women who have undergone continuous combined hormone therapy should therefore be interpreted very cautiously.

  16. Considerations for Medication Management and Anticoagulation During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ashley; Li, Fanny; Gross, A Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Providing safe and high-quality care to critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) includes adequate drug dosing and evaluation of patients' response to medications during therapy. Pharmacokinetic drug studies in acute kidney injury and CRRT are limited, considering the number of medications used in critical care. Therefore, it is important to understand the basic principles of drug clearance during CRRT by evaluating drug properties, CRRT modalities, and how they affect medication clearance. Few published studies have addressed drug disposition and clinical response during CRRT. Additionally, clotting in the CRRT circuit is a concern, so a few options for anticoagulation strategies are presented. This article reviews (1) the CRRT system and drug property factors that affect medication management, (2) the evidence available to guide drug dosing, and (3) anticoagulation strategies for critically ill patients receiving CRRT. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  17. Percutaneous 17ß-estradiol replacement therapy in hypertensive postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Osório-Wender

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the short-term effects of percutaneous 17ß-estradiol on blood pressure, metabolic profile and hormonal levels in postmenopausal women with systemic arterial hypertension. After a wash-out period of 15 days, 10 hypertensive patients were treated with guanabenz acetate to control blood pressure, followed by 17ß-estradiol in the form of hydroalcoholic gel administered for 21 of 28 days of each cycle, for 3 cycles. Patients were evaluated before, during and 2 months after estrogen administration. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure or heart rate did not present any significant change in any patient when compared to those periods with the antihypertensive drug only (pretreatment period and 60 days after estrogen therapy was discontinued. Plasma biological markers of hepatic estrogenic action (plasma renin activity, antithrombin III, triglycerides, total cholesterol and lipoproteins also remained unchanged during the study. Hormone treatment was effective, as indicated by the relief of menopausal symptoms, a decrease in FSH levels (73.48 ± 27.21 to 35.09 ± 20.44 IU/l, P<0.05, and an increase in estradiol levels (15.06 ± 8.76 to 78.7 ± 44.6 pg/ml, P<0.05. There was no effect on LH (18.0 ± 9.5 to 14.05 ± 8.28 IU/l. Hormone levels returned to previous values after estrogen treatment was discontinued. The data indicate that short-term percutaneous 17ß-estradiol replacement therapy, at the dose used, seems to be a safe hormone therapy for hypertensive menopausal women. Nevertheless, a controlled, prospective, randomized clinical assay with a larger number of subjects is needed to definitely establish both the beneficial and harmful effects of hormone replacement therapy in hypertensive women

  18. Modification of aspartoacylase for potential use in enzyme replacement therapy for the treatment of Canavan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zano, Stephen; Malik, Radhika; Szucs, Sylvia; Matalon, Reuben; Viola, Ronald E

    2011-02-01

    Canavan disease is a fatal neurological disease without any effective treatments to slow the relentless progress of this disorder. Enzyme replacement therapy has been used effectively to treat a number of metabolic disorders, but the presence of the blood-brain-barrier presents an additional challenge in the treatment of neurological disorders. Studies have begun with the aim of establishing a treatment protocol that can effectively replace the defective enzyme in Canavan disease patients. The human enzyme, aspartoacylase, has been cloned, expressed and purified, and the surface lysyl groups modified through PEGylation. Fully active modified enzymes were administered to mice that are defective in this enzyme and that show many of the symptoms of Canavan disease. Statistically significant increases in brain enzyme activity levels have been achieved in this animal model, as well as decreases in the elevated substrate levels that mimic those found in Canavan disease patients. These results demonstrate that the modified enzyme is gaining access to the brain and functions to correct this metabolic defect. The stage is now set for a long term study to optimize this enzyme replacement approach for the development of a treatment protocol. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Management of Cyanide Intoxication with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Park

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide intoxication results in severe metabolic acidosis and catastrophic prognosis with conventional treatment. Indications of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT are expanding to poisoning cases. A 50-year-old male patient arrived in the emergency room due to mental change after ingestion of cyanide as a suicide attempt 30 minutes prior. He was comatose, and brain stem reflexes were absent. Initial laboratory analysis demonstrated severe metabolic acidosis with increased lactic acid of 25 mM/L. Shock and acidosis were not corrected despite a large amount of fluid resuscitation with high-dose norepinephrine and continuous renal replacement therapy. We decided to apply ECMO and CRRT to allow time for stabilization of hemodynamic status. After administration of antidote infusion, although the patient had the potential to progress to brain death status, vital signs were improved with correction of acidosis. We considered the evaluation for organ donation. We report a male patient who showed typical cyanide intoxication as lethal metabolic acidosis and cardiac impairment, and the patient recovered after antidote administration during vital organ support through ECMO and CRRT.

  20. Enzyme replacement therapy induces T-cell responses in late-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banati, Miklos; Hosszu, Zsolt; Trauninger, Anita; Szereday, Laszlo; Illes, Zsolt

    2011-11-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in ultra-orphan Pompe disease generates anti-rhGAA antibodies, which may interfere with efficacy. rhGAA-specific T-cell responses were examined at different time-points in 6 Hungarian patients treated with rhGAA and compared with 1 untreated patient and 5 healthy controls. The ex vivo percentage of activated T cells was increased in treated patients. rhGAA stimulation in vitro generated a dose-dependent increase in intracellular interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) expression in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Isolated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells produced increased amounts of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in half of the patients after in vitro stimulation with rhGAA, whereas interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, and IL-17 levels were not elevated. Expression of cytotoxic FasL and perforin molecules by natural killer (NK), NKT-like, and CD8(+) T cells were not increased ex vivo. We found that enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) induces pro-inflammatory T-cell responses in addition to the antibody response in Pompe disease. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A new gcrR-deficient Streptococcus mutans mutant for replacement therapy of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenting; Mao, Tiantian; Xu, Qing-an; Shao, Jin; Liu, Chang; Fan, Mingwen

    2013-01-01

    gcrR gene acts as a negative regulator related to sucrose-dependent adherence in S. mutans. It is constructive to test the potential capacity of mutans with gcrR gene deficient in bacteria replacement therapy. In this study, we constructed the mutant by homologous recombination. The morphological characteristics of biofilms were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. S. mutans UA159 and the mutant MS-gcrR-def were inoculated, respectively, or together for competitive testing in vitro and in rat model. Adhesion assay showed that the adhesion ability of the mutant increased relative to the wild type, especially in the early stage. MS-gcrR-def out-competed S. mutans UA159 in vitro biofilm, and correspondingly coinfection displayed significantly fewer caries in vivo. The former possessed both a lower level of acid production and a stronger colonization potential than S. mutans UA159. These findings demonstrate that MS-gcrR-def appears to be a good candidate for replacement therapy.

  2. A New gcrR-Deficient Streptococcus mutans Mutant for Replacement Therapy of Dental Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Pan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. gcrR gene acts as a negative regulator related to sucrose-dependent adherence in S. mutans. It is constructive to test the potential capacity of mutans with gcrR gene deficient in bacteria replacement therapy. Methods. In this study, we constructed the mutant by homologous recombination. The morphological characteristics of biofilms were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. S. mutans UA159 and the mutant MS-gcrR-def were inoculated, respectively, or together for competitive testing in vitro and in rat model. Results. Adhesion assay showed that the adhesion ability of the mutant increased relative to the wild type, especially in the early stage. MS-gcrR-def out-competed S. mutans UA159 in vitro biofilm, and correspondingly coinfection displayed significantly fewer caries in vivo. The former possessed both a lower level of acid production and a stronger colonization potential than S. mutans UA159. Conclusion. These findings demonstrate that MS-gcrR-def appears to be a good candidate for replacement therapy.

  3. [Peritoneal dialysis for acute renal failure: Rediscovery of an old modality of renal replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issad, Belkacem; Rostoker, Guy; Bagnis, Corinne; Deray, Gilbert

    2016-07-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in adults in the intensive care unit (ICU) often evolves in a context of multiple organ failure, which explains the high mortality rate and increase treatment needs. Among, two modalities of renal replacement therapy, peritoneal dialysis (PD) was the first modality used for the treatment of ARF in the 1950s. Today, while PD is generalized for chronic renal failure treatment, its use in the ICU is limited, particularly, due to the advent of new hemodialysis techniques and the development of continuous replacement therapy. Recently, a renewed interest in the use of PD in patients with ARF has manifested in several emerging countries (Brazil, Vietnam). A systematic review in 2013 showed a similar mortality in ARF patients having PD (58%) and those treated by hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration/hemofiltration (56.1%). In the International society of peritoneal dialysis (ISPD)'s guideline (2013), PD may be used in adult ARF as the other blood extracorporeal epuration technics (recommendation with grade 1B). PD is the preferred method in cardiorenal syndromes, in frailty patients with hemodynamic instability and those lacking vascular access; finally PD is also an option in elderly and patients with bleeding tendency. In industrial countries, high volume automated PD with a flexible catheter (usually Tenckhoff) is advocated. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin replacement therapy in the treatment of patients with primary immunodeficiency disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Skoda-Smith

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Suzanne Skoda-Smith, Troy R Torgerson, Hans D OchsSeattle Children’s Research Institute and Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WashingtonAbstract: Antibody deficiency is the most frequently encountered primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD and patients who lack the ability to make functional immunoglobulin require life-long replacement therapy to prevent serious bacterial infections. Human serum immunoglobulin manufactured from pools of donated plasma can be administered intramuscularly, intravenously or subcutaneously. With the advent of well-tolerated preparations of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg in the 1980s, the suboptimal painful intramuscular route of administration is no longer used. However, some patients continued to experience unacceptable adverse reactions to the intravenous preparations, and for others, vascular access remained problematic. Subcutaneously administered immunoglobulin (SCIg provided an alternative delivery method to patients experiencing difficulties with IVIg. By 2006, immunoglobulin preparations designed exclusively for subcutaneous administration became available. They are therapeutically equivalent to intravenous preparations and offer patients the additional flexibility for the self-administration of their product at home. SCIg as replacement therapy for patients with primary antibody deficiencies is a safe and efficacious method to prevent serious bacterial infections, while maximizing patient satisfaction and improving quality of life.Keywords: subcutaneous immunoglobulin, primary immunodeficiency disease, antibody deficiency, X-linked agammaglobulinemia, common variable immune deficiency

  5. Sleep architecture in Sheehan's syndrome before and 6 months after growth hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismailogullari, Sevda; Tanriverdi, Fatih; Kelestimur, Fahrettin; Aksu, Murat

    2009-02-01

    To characterize the sleep parameters in patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency in Sheehan's syndrome adults and to assess the effects of 6-month GH replacement therapy (GHRT). Twenty-two women with Sheehan's syndrome, (mean age; 49.1+/-2.2 years), and 12 women with similar age (mean age; 51.3+/-3.8 years) and body mass index as control subjects were included in the study. Under baseline conditions, women received adequate hormone replacement therapy for all hormonal deficiencies other than GH. Twelve patients received recombinant GH (Genotropin; Pfizer Stockholm, Sweden) (treatment group) and eight patients received placebo (placebo group) for 6 months. Two patients had only baseline evaluation and were not followed up prospectively. Two polysomnography (PSG) recordings were performed on the patients group, one in the baseline period and the other at the sixth month of treatment (either GH or placebo). Control group had only baseline PSG. GH deficient females with Sheehan's syndrome have more NREM (95.9+/-1.5% and 88.6+/-0.9%, respectively; psyndrome patients under baseline conditions.

  6. [Pharmacokinetic principles and drug-dosing adjustments during continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, S; Guzzo, I; Vitaliano, E; Muzi, L; Solazzo, A; Pistolesi, V; Pierucci, A

    2006-01-01

    In the critically ill, acute renal failure (ARF) and "Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome" (MODS) can be associated with significant modifications of many pharmacokinetic parameters, such as protein binding, volume of distribution and total body clearance. The start of renal replacement therapy (RRT) represents an additional variable to take in consideration for drug-dosing adjustments. Drugs significantly eliminated by the kidney are likely to be removed during RRT and a supplemental dose or further dosing adjustments are required if extracorporeal clearance is more than 25-30% of total body clearance. The impact of RRT on plasma drug concentrations can be substantially different in relation to the type of treatment (diffusive, convective or both), membrane characteristics (low-flux or high-flux), filter surface area and prescribed dialysis dose. The molecular weight cut-offs of high-flux membrane are much higher than the molecular weight of most drugs. Therefore, molecular size will not be a limitation for the removal of the unbound fraction of the drugs most commonly used in the critically ill undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). However, diffusive clearance could be significantly lower than convective clearance for drugs in the middle molecular weight range. In any case, the extracorporeal clearances report-ed with the use of high-volume CRRT (>50-60 L/2 h) are often surprisingly elevated and can lead to drug underdosing in clinical conditions where adequate antibiotic treatment is essential.

  7. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan, E-mail: marcobotelho@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Nanotecnologia; Fechine, Pierre [Universidade Federal do Ceara (GQMAT/UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica. Grupo Avancado de Biomateriais em Quimica; Queiroz, Danilo Caldas de [Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFCT), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Ruela, Ronaldo [Instituto de Biotecnologia Aplicada (INBIOS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Almeida, Jackson Guedes [Universidade Federal do Vale de Sao Francisco (UNIVALE), Petrolina, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Quintans Junior, Lucindo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia

    2014-06-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  8. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Botelho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10% combined with estriol (0.1% + estradiol (0.25% for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. METHODS: A total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. RESULTS: An improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05 after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04±4.9 to 57.12±4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. CONCLUSION: The nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women.

  9. Enzyme replacement therapy with alglucosidase alfa in Pompe disease: Clinical experience with rate escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ankit K; Walters, Crista K; Cope, Heidi L; Kazi, Zoheb B; DeArmey, Stephanie M; Kishnani, Priya S

    2017-12-23

    Patients with Pompe disease have realized significant medical benefits due to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) infusions with alglucosidase alfa. However, regular infusions are time-consuming. Utilizing recommended infusion rates, infusion duration is 3h 45min for a patient receiving the standard dose of 20mg/kg, not including additional time needed for preparation of ERT, assessment of vital signs, intravenous access, and post-infusion monitoring. Recent studies have demonstrated increased effectiveness of higher dose of ERT (40mg/kg) in infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD), which increases the infusion duration to 6h 36min. Increased infusion durations compound the psychosocial burden on patients and families and potentially further disrupt family activities and obligations. We developed a stepwise infusion rate escalation protocol to administer higher dose ERT safely while decreasing infusion duration, which has been implemented in 15 patients to date. Reported here in detail are five patients with IOPD on 40mg/kg/weekly ERT in whom infusion duration was decreased with individualized, stepwise rate escalation. All patients tolerated rate escalations above the recommended rates without experiencing any infusion associated reactions and experienced a reduction in infusion duration by 1h and 24min with a corresponding increase in reported satisfaction. Our experience with ERT rate escalation is presented. A careful stepwise method of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) rate escalation can safely reduce infusion duration in patients with Pompe disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Menopause: A Review of Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chueh Chang

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is frequently prescribed to healthy women to ameliorate menopausal symptoms. HRT is used long term (≥ 1 year to prevent chronic disease in older women. The objective of this study was to review the benefits and risks of HRT and studies of menopause or HRT in Taiwan via a MEDLINE search. Recommendations are provided for future HRT research in Taiwan. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are considered the gold standard of scientific evidence. A MEDLINE literature search (January 1966-July 2002 identified 23 papers on trials (≥ 1 year that met the inclusion criteria. The results showed that various HRT regimens used for more than 1 year caused more harm than good in healthy menopausal women and that there was no benefit for women with coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease, hysterectomy, hysterosalpingooophorectomy, and ischemic stroke. None of this research was conducted in Taiwan. A MEDLINE search using the key words “estrogen replacement therapy and menopause in Taiwan” identified 16 studies. There was only one, short-term, HRT trial. No evidence suggested benefits from long-term HRT in menopausal women in Taiwan.

  11. Efficacy of Drospirenone-Containing Hormone Replacement Therapy to Reduce Vasomotor Symptoms of Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A. Brown

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy has been proven efficacious for controlling vasomotor symptoms such as hot flushes associated with menopause. Drospirenone is a progestin with antiandrogenic and antimineralocorticoid activity that may be used in combination with estrogen to control hot flushes and offers the potential benefit of minimizing breast tenderness, blood pressure elevations and weight gain. Six clinical trials were reviewed. Of these, four trials explicitly listed hot flushes as a primary outcome. Efficacy with regards to hot flushes was found to range from modest to large (i.e., 37.5% to 94.6%, and four of the studies utilized diary cards to assess hot flushes. Results from these studies must be interpreted cautiously as quite a few limitations existed such as small population sizes involving specific ethnic groups, lack of p values with regards to baseline characteristics lending question to homogeneity, and inclusion of mostly healthy participants. Additionally, while the studies were long enough to see an effect, the long term effects of drospirenone-containing hormone replacement therapy (HRT is unknown. The available data supports the use of drospirenone-containing HRT for the treatment of hot flushes associated with menopause.

  12. Hormone replacement therapy may reduce the return of endogenous lead from bone to the circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, C.E.; Beaumont, L.F.; Gordon, C.L. [McMaaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women suppress the increase in bone resorption expected as circulating levels of endogenous estrogen decline. We tested the hypothesis that bone lead content might remain elevated in women on HRT. Fifty-six women who at recruitment were on average 3.5 years postmenopausal were placed on calcium supplementations. Six months later, 33 of these women were prescribed either low dose or moderate dose hormone replacement in addition to the calcium supplementation. After approximately 4 years of hormone replacement, lead content was measured at the tibia and calcaneus by in vivo fluorescence excitation, and lead concentrations were measured in serum, whole blood, and urine. Women not taking hormones had significantly lower lead concentrations in cortical bone compared to all women on HRT (p=0.007). Tibia lead content (mean {plus_minus} SD) for women on calcium only was 11.13 {plus_minus}6.22 {mu}g/g bone mineral. For women on HRT, tibia bone lead was 19.37 {plus_minus}8.62 {mu}g/g bone mineral on low-dose HRT and 16.87 {plus_minus} 11.68 {mu}g/g bone mineral on moderate-dose HRT. There were no differences between groups for lead concentrations measured in trabecular bone, whole blood, serum, or urine. Hormone replacement maintains cortical bone lead content. In women not on HRT, there will be a perimenopausal release of lead from bone. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Pancreatic Enzyme Therapy and Coefficient of Fat Absorption in Children and AdolReplacement escents With Cystic Fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenenk, Janna W; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Houwen, Roderick H J; van der Ent, CK

    Objectives: Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is the proven therapy to substantially reduce fat malabsorption in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Few details of the daily practice regarding PERT and the resulting coefficient of fat absorption (CFA) are known. We therefore recorded the

  14. Epidemiologic trends in chronic renal replacement therapy over forty years: a Swiss dialysis experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Petra Rhyn; Ambühl, Manon; Corleto, Domenica; Klaghofer, Richard; Ambühl, Patrice M

    2012-07-02

    Long term longitudinal data are scarce on epidemiological characteristics and patient outcomes in patients on maintenance dialysis, especially in Switzerland. We examined changes in epidemiology of patients undergoing renal replacement therapy by either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis over four decades. Single center retrospective study including all patients which initiated dialysis treatment for ESRD between 1970 and 2008. Analyses were performed for subgroups according to dialysis vintage, based on stratification into quartiles of date of first treatment. A multivariate model predicting death and survival time, using time-dependent Cox regression, was developed. 964 patients were investigated. Incident mean age progressively increased from 48 ± 14 to 64 ± 15 years from 1st to 4th quartile (p live span continuously increased from 57 ± 13 to 74 ± 11 years (p dialysis initiation, with significantly better survival, however, shortened live span vs. individuals remaining on dialysis. Among age at time of initiating dialysis therapy, sex, dialysis modality and transplant status, only transplant status is a significant independent covariate predicting death (HR: 0.10 for transplanted vs. non-transplanted patients, p = 0.001). Dialysis vintage was associated with better survival during the second vs. the first quartile (p = 0.026). We document an increase of a predominantly elderly incident and prevalent dialysis population, with progressively shortened survival after initiation of renal replacement over four decades, and, nevertheless, a prolonged lifespan. Analysis of the data is limited by lack of information on comorbidity in the study population. Survival in patients on renal replacement therapy seems to be affected not only by medical and technical advances in dialysis therapy, but may mostly reflect progressively lower mortality of individuals with cardiovascular and metabolic complications, as well as a policy of accepting

  15. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, Charles J; Lee, Kevin; Prince, Marloe; Jetty, Vybhav; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    When exogenous testosterone or treatments to elevate testosterone (human chorionic gonadotropin [HCG] or Clomid) are prescribed for men who have antecedent thrombophilia, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism often occur and may recur despite adequate anticoagulation if testosterone therapy is continued. A 55-year-old white male was referred to us because of 4 thrombotic events, 3 despite adequate anticoagulation over a 5-year period. We assessed interactions between thrombophilia, exogenous testosterone therapy, and recurrent thrombosis. In 2009, despite low-normal serum testosterone 334 ng/dL (lower normal limit [LNL] 300 ng/dL), he was given testosterone (TT) cypionate (50 mg/week) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG; 500 units/week) for presumed hypogonadism. Ten months later, with supranormal serum T (1385 ng/dL, upper normal limit [UNL] 827 ng/dL) and estradiol (E2) 45 pg/mL (UNL 41 pg/mL), he had a pulmonary embolus (PE) and was then anticoagulated for 2 years (enoxaparin, then warfarin). Four years later, on TT-HCG, he had his first deep venous thrombosis (DVT). TT was stopped and HCG continued; he was anticoagulated (enoxaparin, then warfarin, then apixaban, then fondaparinux). One year after his first DVT, on HCG, still on fondaparinux, he had a second DVT (5/315), was anticoagulated (enoxaparin + warfarin), with a Greenfield filter placed, but 8 days later had a second PE. Thrombophilia testing revealed the lupus anticoagulant. After stopping HCG, and maintained on warfarin, he has been free of further DVT-PE for 9 months. When DVT-PE occur on TT or HCG, in the presence of thrombophilia, TT-HCG should be stopped, lest DVT-PE reoccur despite concurrent anticoagulation.

  16. Anti-TNF-alpha therapy enhances the effects of enzyme replacement therapy in rats with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Eliyahu

    Full Text Available Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT is available for several lysosomal storage disorders, the benefit of this treatment to the skeletal system is very limited. Our previous work has shown the importance of the Toll-like receptor 4/TNF-alpha inflammatory pathway in the skeletal pathology of the mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS, and we therefore undertook a study to examine the additive benefit of combining anti-TNF-alpha therapy with ERT in a rat model of MPS type VI.MPS VI rats were treated for 8 months with Naglazyme® (recombinant human N-acetyl-galactosamine-4-sulfatase, or by a combined protocol using Naglazyme® and the rat-specific anti-TNF-alpha drug, CNTO1081. Both protocols led to markedly reduced serum levels of TNF-alpha and RANKL, although only the combined treatment reduced TNF-alpha in the articular cartilage. Analysis of cultured articular chondrocytes showed that the combination therapy also restored collagen IIA1 expression, and reduced expression of the apoptotic marker, PARP. Motor activity and mobility were improved by ERT, and these were significantly enhanced by combination treatment. Tracheal deformities in the MPS VI animals were only improved by combination therapy, and there was a modest improvement in bone length. Ceramide levels in the trachea also were markedly reduced. MicroCT analysis did not demonstrate any significant positive effects on bone microarchitecture from either treatment, nor was there histological improvement in the bone growth plates.The results demonstrate that combining ERT with anti-TNF-alpha therapy improved the treatment outcome and led to significant clinical benefit. They also further validate the usefulness of TNF-alpha, RANKL and other inflammatory molecules as biomarkers for the MPS disorders. Further evaluation of this combination approach in other MPS animal models and patients is warranted.

  17. An open-label clinical trial of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in children with Fabry disease who are naïve to enzyme replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goker-Alpan O

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ozlem Goker-Alpan,1 Nicola Longo,2 Marie McDonald,3 Suma P Shankar,4,5 Raphael Schiffmann,6 Peter Chang,7 Yinghua Shen,7 Arian Pano7 1Lysosomal Disorders Unit, Fairfax, VA, 2University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 3Department of Pediatrics, Duke University, Durham, NC, 4Department of Ophthalmology, 5Department of Human Genetics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 6Institute of Metabolic Disease, Baylor Research Institute, Dallas, TX, 7Shire, Lexington, MA, USA Background: Following a drug manufacturing process change, safety/efficacy of agalsidase alfa were evaluated in enzyme replacement therapy (ERT-naïve children with Fabry disease. Methods: In an open-label, multicenter, Phase II study (HGT-REP-084; Shire, 14 children aged ≥7 years received 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase alfa every other week for 55 weeks. Primary endpoints: safety, changes in autonomic function (2-hour Holter monitoring. Secondary endpoints: estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index (LVMI, midwall fractional shortening, pharmacodynamic parameters, and patient-reported quality-of-life. Results: Among five boys (median 10.2 [range 6.7, 14.4] years and nine girls (14.8 [10.1, 15.9] years, eight patients experienced infusion-related adverse events (vomiting, n=4; nausea, n=3; dyspnea, n=3; chest discomfort, n=2; chills, n=2; dizziness, n=2; headache, n=2. One of these had several hypersensitivity episodes. However, no patient discontinued for safety reasons and no serious adverse events occurred. One boy developed immunoglobulin G (IgG and neutralizing antidrug antibodies. Overall, no deterioration in cardiac function was observed in seven patients with low/abnormal SDNN (standard deviation of all filtered RR intervals; <100 ms and no left ventricular hypertrophy: mean (SD baseline SDNN, 81.6 (20.9 ms; mean (95% confidence interval [CI] change from baseline to week 55, 17.4 (2.9, 31.9 ms. Changes in SDNN correlated with changes in LVMI (r=-0

  18. [Safety and efficacy of the MARS therapy applied by continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) monitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E; Seller-Pérez, G; Lebrón-Gallardo, M; Jiménez-Pérez, M; Moreno-López, J M; Muñoz-López, A

    2007-10-01

    Analyze the utility and safety of MARS therapy applied with the CRRT monitor. Prospective study of cohorts. Polyvalent ICU in tertiary university hospital with hepatic transplantation program. Thirty one patients: 9 (22.6%) with acute liver failure (ALF) (1 hepatic surgery, 1 primary graft failure, 7 other causes) and 22 (71%) with acute-on-chronic failure (AoCLF). For the treatment, the patients with ALF are maintained in the ICU but those with AoCLF are admitted for the performance of the different sessions, that are programmed for a duration of at least 15 hours in AoCLF and in ALF are maintained continuously, changing the circuit every 24 hours. Metabolic control and complications registered in 75 sessions on 31 patients. Urea decrease was 33.5 (29-38%), creatinine 36 (31-41%), total bilirubin 29 (25-33%) and direct bilirubin 34 (30-38%). Clearance was slower, but sustained, after the first 4 hours of each session both for urea (pCRRT monitors provide adequate bilirubin clearance percentages and is safe, even in serious patients. Prolongation of the duration of the sessions was not accompanied by an increase in the risk of infection secondary to the albumin contamination.

  19. GH replacement therapy and second neoplasms in adult survivors of childhood cancer: a retrospective study from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignardello, E; Felicetti, F; Castiglione, A; Fortunati, N; Matarazzo, P; Biasin, E; Sacerdote, C; Ricardi, U; Fagioli, F; Corrias, A; Arvat, E

    2015-02-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is the most common endocrine late effect observed in childhood cancer survivors (CCS) previously submitted to cranial irradiation. Radiation therapy can also increase the risk of second neoplasms (SNs). Since in previous studies GH replacement therapy was associated with increased incidence of neoplasia, we explored the association between SNs and GH replacement therapy in a cohort of CCS with GHD. Within the clinical cohort of CCS referred to the Transition Unit for Childhood Cancer Survivors of Turin between November 2001 and December 2012, we considered all patients who developed GHD as a consequence of cancer therapies. GHD was always diagnosed in childhood. To evaluate the quality of data, our cohort was linked to the Childhood Cancer Registry of Piedmont. GHD was diagnosed in 49 out of 310 CCS included in our clinical cohort. At least one SN was diagnosed in 14 patients, meningioma and basal cell carcinoma being the most common SNs. The cumulative incidence of SNs was similar in GH-treated and -untreated patients (8 SNs out of 26 GH-treated and 6 out of 23 GH-untreated patients; p = 0.331). Age, sex and paediatric cancer type had no impact on SNs development. In our CCS, GH replacement therapy does not seem to increase the risk of SNs. Anyway, independently from replacement therapy, in these patients we observed an elevated risk of SNs, possibly related to previous radiation therapy, which suggests the need of a close long-term follow-up.

  20. Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Injury: Which Method to Use in the Intensive Care Unit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades the treatment options for patients with acute kidney injury (AKI requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT have expanded from basic acute peritoneal dialysis and intermittent hemodialysis (IHD, to now include a variety of continuous modalities (CRRT, ranging from hemofiltration, dialysis and/or hemodiafiltration, and a variety of hybrid therapies, variously described as extended daily dialysis and/or hemodiafiltration, with the possibility of additional adjunct therapies encompassing plasma separation and adsorption techniques. Current evidence does not support that one modality is superior to any other in terms of patients′ survival in the intensive care unit, or at discharge. There have been two prospective audits, which have reported improved renal recovery in the survivors who were treated by CRRT rather than IHD, but this has not been confirmed in randomized controlled trials. Thus the choice of RRT modality should be guided by the individual patients′ clinical status, the medical and nursing expertise in the local intensive care unit, and the availability of RRT modality.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Procainamide and N-acetylprocainamide during Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ahmed N.; Abdelhady, Ahmed M.; Spencer, Dustin; Sowinski, Kevin M.; Tisdale, James E.; Overholser, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Procainamide and its major metabolite, N-acetyl procainamide (NAPA), prolong the QTc interval and can promote potentially fatal ventricular arrhythmias. Excretion of procainamide and NAPA is reduced in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) resulting in drug accumulation and toxicity. The elimination of procainamide or NAPA in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has not been evaluated increasing the risk for subtherapeutic or toxic dosing regimens. This case report describes a patient undergoing CRRT who was administered procainamide for recurring ventricular tachycardia (VT) over approximately a 36 hour period. The patient required increased vasopressor therapy and developed QTc prolongation during procainamide administration. The VT resided following pacemaker adjustments, procainamide administration, and multiple direct current cardioversion attempts. Procainamide and NAPA concentrations were determined over a 120 hour period as part of routine clinical care and a pharmacokinetic (PK) model was developed using NONMEM. The developed PK model was used to simulate several procainamide dosing regimens to optimize therapy during CRRT. Based on the model-based simulations, a 50% reduction in the procainamide maintenance dose (2 mg/min) in CKD patients on CRRT can achieve therapeutic plasma procainamide and combined procainamide/NAPA concentrations. PMID:23562328

  2. Satisfaction with Renal Replacement Therapy and Education: The American Association of Kidney Patients Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadem, Stephen Z.; Walker, David R.; Friedman, Amy L.; Goldman, Richard; Sexton, Sue; Buettner, Kim; Robinson, Kris; Peters, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives This study was undertaken by the American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP) to better understand ESRD patients' satisfaction with their current renal replacement therapy (RRT) and the education they received before initiating therapy. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In addition to an open invitation on the AAKP website, nearly 9000 ESRD patients received invitations to complete the survey, which consisted of 46 questions. Satisfaction was measured on a 1 (extremely dissatisfied) to 7 (extremely satisfied) scale. Results Survey respondents were younger, more highly educated, and more likely to be white as well as employed as compared with the U.S. dialysis population. A total of 977 patients responded. Overall patient satisfaction with current RRT treatment varied from a low of 4.5 for in-center hemodialysis (ICHD) to a high of 6.1 in transplant (TX) patients. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis (HHD) mean scores were 5.2 and 5.5, respectively. PD, HHD, and TX patients' satisfaction scores were significantly higher than those of ICHD patients (P patients are not uniformly advised about all possible treatment methods and hence were only moderately satisfied with their pretreatment education. Once on RRT, those on a home therapy or with a kidney TX are more satisfied than those with ICHD. PMID:21330485

  3. Pharmaceutical intervention in menopausal patients with hormone replacement therapy in a community pharmacy from Antofagasta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandrina Alucema

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is the most widely used treatment for controlling the effects of menopause. This type of therapy causes some drug-related problems (DRP, which requires monitoring to control the negative effects and ensure patient adherence to therapy. Aims: Perform a pharmacotherapeutic monitoring and educate to menopausal patients in HRT of a community pharmacy from the city of Antofagasta. Methods: A 98-menopausal patients underwent a pharmaceutical intervention to identify the PRM and its resolution. It was applied to them a survey before and after educational activities about this disease and HRT to determine the knowledge on the subject. Results: During the pharmacotherapeutic monitoring was determined that 55% of patients using combined HRT. 62 DRPs were detected, of which 43 were resolved (69%; the most were Patient-Pharmacist (73%. The better resolution DRP were DRP 4(b “frequency of inadequate administration” and DRP 2(a “no medical indication”. At baseline, 90% had an inadequate level of knowledge about the disease and THR, 8% intermediate, and only 2% adequate. After the implementation of the education strategy, the level of knowledge increased, achieving at the end of the study only intermediate (10% and adequate (90% levels. Conclusions: The results confirm the importance of pharmaceutical intervention for the identification and resolution of DRP and the requirement to establish educational strategies to increase the knowledge about menopause and HRT in menopausal patients.

  4. Effectiveness of Compounded Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy: An Observational Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniels Kelly R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT is believed it to be a safer and equally effective alternative to Conventional Hormone Therapy for the relief of menopausal symptoms; however, data are needed to support these claims. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of compounded BHRT provided in six community pharmacies. Methods This was an observational cohort study of women between the ages of 18-89 who received a compounded BHRT product from January 1, 2003 to April 30, 2010 in six community pharmacies. Data included patient demographics, comorbidities, therapeutic outcomes, and hormone therapies. Women self-rated menopausal symptoms as absent, mild, moderate, or severe. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the patient population, BHRT use, and adverse events. Patient symptom severity was compared at baseline and 3 to 6 months follow-up using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results Women (n = 296 receiving BHRT at Oakdell Pharmacy had a mean (standard deviation age of 52 (9 years. The most common BHRT dosage forms utilized were topical (71% and oral (43%. Compounded BHRT regimens were generally initiated at low doses regardless of route. Women experienced a 25% decrease in emotional lability (p Conclusions This study demonstrates that compounded BHRT improves mood symptoms. Larger studies are needed to examine the impact on vasomotor symptoms, myocardial infarction and breast cancer.

  5. Recovery of renal function and survival after continuous renal replacement therapy during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, Matthew L; Warshaw, Barry L; Heard, Micheal L; Fortenberry, James D

    2011-03-01

    To assess the outcome of pediatric patients supported by concomitant extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Acute kidney injury is associated with mortality in ECMO patients. CRRT in patients on ECMO provides an efficient and potentially beneficial method of acute kidney injury management. Concern that concomitant CRRT use increases the risk of developing anuria and chronic renal failure limits its use in some centers. We hypothesized that development of chronic renal failure is rare with concurrent ECMO and CRRT. We evaluated the outcomes of 154 ECMO/CRRT patients cared for over 10 yrs at a referral pediatric medical center. None. Among 68 (44%) ECMO/CRRT survivors, 45 were assigned a pediatric risk, injury, failure, loss and end-stage (referred to as "pRIFLE") score at CRRT initiation. Seventeen (38%) patients met the criteria for Risk, 15 (33%) for Injury, and 10 (22%) for Failure. Two Failure patients later met End stage criteria. Of all survivors, 18 (26%) required ongoing renal replacement therapy (15 required continuous veno-venous hemofiltration, two required peritoneal dialysis, and one patient required intermittent hemodialysis) post ECMO discontinuation. Renal recovery occurred in 65 (96%) of 68 patients before discharge. One neonatal patient had sepsis-induced renal injury on transfer, but had normal creatinine 1 month later. Two pediatric patients with vasculitis and primary renal disease at presentation (both meeting Failure criteria) developed end-stage renal disease. One received peritoneal dialysis and subsequent renal transplant. The other has diminished function without need for renal replacement therapy. In the absence of primary renal disease, chronic renal failure did not occur after concurrent use of CRRT with ECMO. Concern for precipitating chronic renal failure by using CRRT during ECMO is not substantiated by this large single-center experience. Consistent with previous reports

  6. Replacement therapy with levothyroxine modulates platelet activation in recent-onset post-thyroidectomy subclinical hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desideri, G; Bocale, R; D'Amore, A; Necozione, S; Boscherini, M; Carnassale, G; Barini, A; Barini, A; Bellantone, R; Lombardi, C P

    2017-10-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism has been linked to increased risk of atherosclerotic disease. Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), mainly derived from activated platelets, and the lipid peroxidation product 8-iso-prostaglandin F 2α (8-iso-PGF 2α ) are known to play a relevant pathophysiological role in atherogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between thyroid hormones and circulating levels of sCD40L and 8-iso-PGF 2α in patient with recent-onset post-thyroidectomy subclinical hypothyroidism under replacement therapy. Circulating levels of thyroid hormones, sCD40L, and 8-iso-PGF 2α were assessed in 40 recently thyroidectomized patients (33 females, mean age 52.0 ± 11.7 years) at baseline (5-7 day after surgery) and after 2 months under replacement therapy with levothyroxine (LT-4). At baseline, circulating levels of thyroid hormones were indicative of a subclinical hypothyroidism (TSH 7.7 ± 3.9 μU/mL, FT3 1.8 ± 0.6 pg/mL, and FT3 8.9 ± 3.0 pg/mL). Circulating levels of sCD40L and 8-iso-PGF 2α were directly correlated with each other (r = 0.360, p = 0.023) and with TSH levels (r = 0.322, p = 0.043 and r = 0.329 p = 0.038, respectively). After 2 months under the replacement therapy with LT-4 circulating levels of TSH (from 7.7 ± 3.9 to 2.7 ± 2.8 μU/mL, p hypothyroidism to develop atherosclerotic disease. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Long-Term Testosterone Therapy on Patients with “Diabesity”: Results of Observational Studies of Pooled Analyses in Obese Hypogonadal Men with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Haider

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate effects of long-term testosterone (T therapy in obese men with T deficiency (TD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, data were collected from two observational, prospective, and cumulative registry studies of 561 men with TD receiving T therapy for up to 6 years. A subgroup of obese hypogonadal men with T2DM was analyzed. Weight, height, waist circumference (WC, fasting blood glucose (FBG, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c blood pressure, lipid profile, C-reactive protein (CRP, and liver enzymes were measured. A total of 156 obese, diabetic men with T deficiency, aged 61.17 ± 6.18 years, fulfilled selection criteria. Subsequent to T therapy, WC decreased by 11.56 cm and weight declined by 17.49 kg (15.04%. Fasting glucose declined from 7.06 ± 1.74 to 5.59 ± 0.94 mmol/L (P<0.0001 for all. HbA1c decreased from 8.08 to 6.14%, with a mean change of 1.93%. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, lipid profiles including total cholesterol: HDL ratio, CRP, and liver enzymes all improved (P<0.0001. Long-term T therapy for up to 6 years resulted in significant and sustained improvements in weight, T2DM, and other cardiometabolic risk factors in obese, diabetic men with TD and this therapy may play an important role in the management of obesity and diabetes (diabesity in men with T deficiency.

  8. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: Reviewing Current Best Practice to Provide High-Quality Extracorporeal Therapy to Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michael J; Karakala, Nithin

    2017-07-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) use continues to expand globally. Despite improving technology, CRRT remains a complex intervention. Delivery of high-quality CRRT requires close collaboration of a multidisciplinary team including members of the critical care medicine, nephrology, nursing, pharmacy, and nutrition support teams. While significant gaps in medical evidence regarding CRRT persist, the growing evidence base supports evolving best practice and consensus to define high-quality CRRT. Unfortunately, there is wide variability in CRRT operating characteristics and limited uptake of these best practices. This article will briefly review the current best practice on important aspects of CRRT delivery including CRRT dose, anticoagulation, dialysis vascular access, fluid management, and drug dosing in CRRT. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of pharmacologic therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia on prostate volume and free testosterone and consequently on urinary parameters and sexual desire in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Nebojša

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Pharmacologic therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH relieves disease progression and affects the androgen hormone status. A decrease in the level of free testosterone (freeT within total testosterone (totalT leads to symptoms of sexual dysfunction. The aim of this study was to show the impact of pharmacological treatment for BPH on prostate volume (PV and levels of freeT and, consequently, on urinary parameters and sexual desire in men during 6 months of administration. Methods. This clinical prospective study included 156 BPH patients with moderate urinary symptoms – International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS 30 mL and prostate specific antigen (PSA value < 4 ng/mL. The average age of patients was 61.16 ± 2.97 years. The performed tests included determination of tumor markers (PSA, free PSA, hormones (totalT, freeT, freeT/totalT ratio, trans abdominal ultrasonography and uroflowmetry. Urinary symptoms were measured by IPSS and the Quality of Life (QoL questionnaire while the changes in sexual desire were measured using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF questionnaire. Four groups were formed, 39 patients each. The group 1 received alpha1- blocker (AB tamsulosin, the group 2, 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor (5-ARI finasteride, the group 3, combined therapy of both drugs (tamsulosin and finasteride, while the group 4 (control group had no therapy. Follow-ups were performed every three and six months during therapy administration. Results. Prostate volume significantly decreased in the patients on combined therapy (-6.95 ± 2.00; p < 0.001 and finasteride (-6.67 ± 3.35. In the finasteride group, the levels of freeT (-4.23 ± 5.2; p < 0.001 and freeT/totalT ratio (-0.12 0.08; p < 0.001 significantly decreased as did the freeT (-2.64 ± 7.81 and freeT/totalT ratio (-0.09 ± 0.13 in the combined therapy group. Uroflowmetry showed a significant improvement in all parameters and all the therapy groups. Combined

  10. Testosterone increases the muscle protein synthesis rate but does not affect very-low-density lipoprotein metabolism in obese premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Smith, Gordon I; Patterson, Bruce W; Reeds, Dominic N; Kampelman, Janine; Magkos, Faidon; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2012-03-15

    Men and women with hyperandrogenemia have a more proatherogenic plasma lipid profile [e.g., greater triglyceride (TG) and total and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations] than healthy premenopausal women. Furthermore, castration of male rats markedly reduces testosterone availability below normal and decreases plasma TG concentration, and testosterone replacement reverses this effect. Testosterone is, therefore, thought to be an important regulator of plasma lipid homeostasis. However, little is known about the effect of testosterone on plasma TG concentration and kinetics. Furthermore, testosterone is a potent skeletal muscle protein anabolic agent in men, but its effect on muscle protein turnover in women is unknown. We measured plasma lipid concentrations, hepatic very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG and VLDL-apolipoprotein B-100 secretion rates, and the muscle protein fractional synthesis rate in 10 obese women before and after trandermal testosterone (1.25 g of 1% AndroGel daily) treatment for 3 wk. Serum total and free testosterone concentrations increased (P testosterone treatment, reaching concentrations that are comparable to those in women with hyperandrogenemia, but lower than the normal range for eugonadal men. Except for a small (∼10%) decrease in plasma high-density lipoprotein particle and cholesterol concentrations (P testosterone therapy had no effect on plasma lipid concentrations, lipoprotein particle sizes, and hepatic VLDL-TG and VLDL-apolipoprotein B-100 secretion rates (all P > 0.05); the muscle protein fractional synthesis rate, however, increased by ∼45% (P testosterone is a potent skeletal muscle protein anabolic agent, but not an important regulator of plasma lipid homeostasis in obese women.

  11. Subgroup analysis of continuous renal replacement therapy in severely burned patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaechul Yoon

    Full Text Available Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT is administered to critically ill patients with renal injuries as renal replacement or renal support. We aimed to identify predictors of mortality among burn patients receiving CRRT, and to investigate clinical differences according to acute kidney injury (AKI status. This retrospective observational study evaluated 216 Korean burn patients who received CRRT at a burn intensive care unit. Patients were categorized by AKI status. Data were collected regarding arterial pH, laboratory results, ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen (PF ratio, and urine production. Among surviving patients, CRRT duration and the sequential organ failure assessment score were 6.5 days and 4.7 in the non-AKI group and 23.4 days and 7.4 in the AKI group, respectively (p = 0.003 and p = 0.008. On logistic regression analyses, mortality was significantly associated with a pH of 5.0 mEg/L (p = 0.045, creatinine levels of >2.0 mg/dL (p = 0.011, lactate levels of >2 mmol/L (p2 mmol/L, and a platelet count of 2 mg/dL. In the non-AKI group, poor outcomes were associated with lactate levels of >1.5 mmol/L, a PF ratio of 1.2 mg/dL. Duration of the CRRT application and the requirement for either renal replacement or renal support at the initiation of CRRT application are important considerations depending on its application.

  12. Subgroup analysis of continuous renal replacement therapy in severely burned patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jaechul; Kim, Youngmin; Yim, Haejun; Cho, Yong-Suk; Chun, Wook

    2017-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is administered to critically ill patients with renal injuries as renal replacement or renal support. We aimed to identify predictors of mortality among burn patients receiving CRRT, and to investigate clinical differences according to acute kidney injury (AKI) status. This retrospective observational study evaluated 216 Korean burn patients who received CRRT at a burn intensive care unit. Patients were categorized by AKI status. Data were collected regarding arterial pH, laboratory results, ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen (PF ratio), and urine production. Among surviving patients, CRRT duration and the sequential organ failure assessment score were 6.5 days and 4.7 in the non-AKI group and 23.4 days and 7.4 in the AKI group, respectively (p = 0.003 and p = 0.008). On logistic regression analyses, mortality was significantly associated with a pH of 5.0 mEg/L (p = 0.045), creatinine levels of >2.0 mg/dL (p = 0.011), lactate levels of >2 mmol/L (p2 mmol/L, and a platelet count of 2 mg/dL. In the non-AKI group, poor outcomes were associated with lactate levels of >1.5 mmol/L, a PF ratio of 1.2 mg/dL. Duration of the CRRT application and the requirement for either renal replacement or renal support at the initiation of CRRT application are important considerations depending on its application. PMID:29190735

  13. Effect of the interleukin-1 genotype on outcomes of regenerative periodontal therapy with bone replacement grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Oren I; Caton, Jack; Blieden, Timothy; Fisher, Susan G; Trafton, Sarah; Hart, Thomas C

    2004-10-01

    Previous studies have shown an association between a specific genotype for the inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1 and the severity of periodontal disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the IL-1 genotype on the outcomes of periodontal surgical regenerative treatment with bone replacement grafts. Forty-four patients with interproximal intrabony defects were treated with bone replacement grafts. Probing depths (PD) and clinical attachment levels (CAL) were measured before treatment and at least 9 months post-treatment. Whole-mouth plaque index (WMPI) and bleeding index (WMBI) were recorded as well. All patients were tested for the IL-1 genotype. Thirteen (29.55%) of the patients were IL-1 genotype positive. There was no statistically significant difference between the genotype-positive and genotype-negative groups regarding age, smoking status, gender, WMPI, and WMBI. There was no significant difference in PD or CAL between the genotype-positive and genotype-negative groups at baseline. Genotype-positive patients had a smaller reduction in probing depth (1.86 mm versus 2.13 mm) and a greater gain of clinical attachment (1.20 mm versus 0.65 mm). These differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.70, P = 0.40). Multivariate regression analysis showed that presurgical PD significantly influenced post-surgical PD and CAL, and only WMPI significantly influenced CAL. In this study, there was no evidence that the IL-1 genotype influences the clinical treatment outcomes of regenerative periodontal therapy with bone replacement grafts.

  14. Alternatives to hormone replacement therapy: a multi-method study of women's experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathen, C Nadine

    2006-09-01

    To explore women's decision-making regarding use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) during menopause. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 women who were currently or had previously used hormone replacement therapy (HRT), including questions about their experiences with alternatives to HRT. This was followed by a non-random questionnaire survey of 285 demographically representative Canadian women aged 45-65 who were current or former HRT users. Fifty-seven percent (57%, n = 162) of women reported either having used or considered a CAM approach for menopause. Women who had tried or considered CAM were significantly younger (mean age = 54.9 years versus 56.8 years; t(280) = 3.4, p menopause-specific symptoms than those who had not, and these women also reported a worse experience of menopause overall. : A majority of menopausal women in the current study considered or tried CAM alternatives to HRT.

  15. Estrogen replacement therapy after endometrial cancer: a survey of physicians' prescribing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancke, K; Foeldi, M; Zahradnik, H P; Gitsch, G; Gilbert, L; Denschlag, D

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether the prescribing practice of physicians with regard to estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) in symptomatic women with previous endometrial cancer is consistent with the available evidence. A descriptive survey was conducted among physicians in Germany, using a questionnaire containing two hypothetical cases of endometrial cancer patients ('low-risk' and 'high-risk' disease) and menopausal symptoms. Physicians were asked about their prescribing practice concerning moderate to severe menopausal symptoms. Four hundred and twenty questionnaires were sent out, with an overall response rate of 39.8%; 45.6% in the 'low-risk' case and 75.4% in the 'high-risk' case (p alternatives (44.8% phytoestrogens, 29.0% selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). Despite the evidence that ERT does not increase the risk of recurrence of endometrial cancer, many physicians are reluctant to prescribe ERT in women suffering from moderate to severe menopausal symptoms.

  16. Pros and Cons of Long-Term use of Nicotine Replacement Therapies: A Qualitative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Gitte; Kaae, Susanne; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, harm reduction has been increasingly suggested as a method to reduce the harm caused by smoking in smokers who are unable or unwilling to quit all nicotine products. One of these methods includes long-term substitution of tobacco with nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs......, including perceived pros and cons of using NRTs, the risk of relapse to smoking and their motivation to quit using NRTs. The results identified five major themes that entailed pros and cons of the long-term use of NRTs. These were the non-nicotinic factors of NRTs, health risks of NRTs vs. smoking......, intrapersonal processes, the social environment of smoking vs. NRTs and finances. None of the ex-smokers feared to relapse to smoking, and few were motivated to quit NRTs. Non-nicotinic factors were found to have an important role in developing an addiction to NRTs. The use of NRTs yields some of the expected...

  17. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in patients with liver disease: is circuit life different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Banwari; Shaw, Steve; Shankar Hari, Manu; Burroughs, Andrew K; Davenport, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    Clotting of haemofiltration circuits is a major complication of continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT), yet systemic anticoagulation risks haemorrhage. Traditionally, patients with liver failure are managed with no or minimal anticoagulation, because of abnormal clotting tests and the perceived, increased bleeding risk. We retrospectively reviewed CRRT circuit life in 50 patients; 3 groups of liver failure patients treated with CRRT (acute liver failure (ALF), acute on chronic liver disease (ACLD) and post-elective liver transplantation (LTx)), with two control groups; systemic sepsis (SS) and haematological malignancy (Haem). CCRT circuit life was significantly greater in the Haem group, compared to the others; 24.3+/-23.9h, vs. 11+/-10.5 ALF, 11.6+/-6.6 ACLF, 7.4+/-5.1 LTx and 9.2+/-6.5 SS, pCRRT circuit survival without an obvious increase in bleeding or blood transfusion requirement. Thus anticoagulation should be considered in these patients with repeated circuit clotting.

  18. A beta-blocker, propranolol, decreases the efficacy from enzyme replacement therapy in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Oh; Pope, Rand; Li, Songtao; Kishnani, Priya S; Steet, Richard; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2016-02-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) fails to completely reverse muscle weakness in Pompe disease. β2-agonists enhanced ERT by increasing receptor-mediated uptake of rhGAA in skeletal muscles. To test the hypothesis that a β-blocker might reduce the efficacy of ERT, because the action of β-blockers opposes those of β2-agonists. Mice with Pompe disease were treated with propranolol (a β-blocker) or clenbuterol in combination with ERT, or with ERT alone. Propranolol-treated mice had decreased weight gain (pblocker, reduced weight, increased left ventricular mass and decreased glycogen clearance in skeletal muscle following ERT. β-Blockers might therefore decrease the efficacy from ERT in patients with Pompe disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term hormone replacement therapy preserves bone mineral density in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Line; Hjerrild, Britta E; Lauridsen, Anna L

    2009-01-01

    at baseline and follow-up (5.9+/-0.7 years). SETTING: Tertiary hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-four women with TS (43.0+/-9.95 years). Interventions Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Main outcome measures BMD (g/cm(2)) measured at lumbar spine, hip, and the non......-dominant forearm. Bone formation and resorption markers, sex hormones, IGF1, and maximal oxygen uptake. RESULTS: At follow-up, forearm BMD, radius ultradistal BMD, and hip BMD remained unchanged, radius 1/3 BMD declined (0.601+/-0.059 vs 0.592+/-0.059, P=0.03), while spine BMD increased (0.972+/-0.139 vs 1.......010+/-0.144, Poxygen uptake was significantly reduced in TS. CONCLUSION: Longitudinal changes in BMD in TS were slight. BMD can be maintained at most sites in well...

  20. Association between nicotine replacement therapy use in pregnancy and smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brose, Leonie S; McEwen, Andy; West, Robert

    2013-10-01

    There is an urgent need to find better ways of helping pregnant smokers to stop. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have not detected an effect of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) for smoking cessation in pregnancy. This may be because of inadequate dosing because of faster nicotine metabolism in this group. In England, many pregnant smokers use single form and combination NRT (patch plus a faster acting form). This correlational study examined whether the latter is associated with higher quit rates. Routinely collected data from 3880 pregnant smokers attempting to stop in one of 44 Stop Smoking Services in England. The outcome measure was 4-week quit rates, verified by expired-air carbon monoxide levelsmoking cessation during pregnancy. While this conclusion is based on correlational data, it lends support to continuing this treatment option pending confirmation by an RCT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nursing for renal replacement therapies in the Intensive Care Unit: historical, educational, and protocol review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ian; Fealy, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Nurses have made a significant contribution to the development and application of dialysis in the 1950s and continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) setting from the 1980s. Any treatment requires patient and machine-circuit preparation, connection of the extracorporeal circuit (EC) to the patient vascular access catheter and regular tasks to maintain a treatment in progress. During treatment, nurses prepare fluids, adjust fluid settings to provide fluid balance, prepare electrolyte additives, monitor acid base and electrolyte levels, monitor patient and machine 'vital signs', and then when necessary diagnose circuit clotting and perform a disconnection of the EC from the patient. All of these aspects of CRRT nursing are essential to a suitable nursing policy or protocol. This paper provides a clinical review for this every day sequence when using CRRT in the ICU setting.

  2. Initiation of renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit in Vicenza (IRRIV) score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Jose J; Villa, Gianluca; Garzotto, Francesco; Sharma, Aashish; Lorenzin, Anna; Ribeiro, Leonardo; Lu, Renhua; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    One of the top research priorities in acute kidney injury is related to the timing of renal replacement therapy (RRT) initiation. The purpose was to develop an index that might serve as a standardized concept of timing of initiation of RRT. A previously described database was used. We applied a multivariable Cox regression model with backward selection to characterize parameters present in those patients who received RRT compared with those who did not receive RRT. We studied 590 patients. We identified independent risk factors for RRT and a risk score was devised. The Area Under the Curve of the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.81 (95% CI 0.74-0.86) for predicting the need for RRT. We have developed a simple Score (IRRIV Score) to identify patients at high risk of requiring RRT. This score may serve as a standardized definition of the timing of initiation of RRT. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Increased risk of breast cancer following different regimens of hormone replacement therapy frequently used in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer following hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The aim of this study was to investigate whether different treatment regimens or the androgenecity of progestins influence the risk of breast cancer differently. The Danish Nurse Cohort...... was established in 1993, where all female nurses aged 45 years and above received a mailed questionnaire (n = 23,178). A total of 19,898 women returned the questionnaire (86%). The questionnaire included information on HRT types and regimens, reproductive history and lifestyle-related factors. Breast cancer cases...... performed using Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 244 women developed breast cancer during follow-up. After adjustment for confounding factors, an increased risk of breast cancer was found for the current use of estrogen only (RR = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.16-3.35), for the combined use of estrogen...

  4. Review of graft rejection in age-related macular degeneration replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Ying Mao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis the leading cause of blindness among the elderly worldwide. AMD is classified as either neovascular(wetor non-neovascular(dry. The dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelial(RPEcells is regarded as the main pathological changes of AMD. The recent development of regenerative medicine has witnessed RPE cell-replacement therapy as a new approach to treat AMD, resulting in obvious visual improvement in various studies. However, there are still many problems and challenges that remain unsolved, including graft rejection. This review introduces subretinal immune environment under both normal and AMD condition, putting emphasis on immune response to allogeneic RPE. Lastly, strategies to prevent graft rejection are discussed.

  5. Hormonal replacement therapy reduces forearm fracture incidence in recent postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Leif; Beck-Nielsen, H.; Sørensen, O.H.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the fracture reducing potential of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) in recent postmenopausal women in a primary preventive scenario. METHODS: Prospective controlled comprehensive cohort trial: 2016 healthy women aged 45-58 years, from three to 24 months past last menstrual...... bleeding were recruited from a random sample of the background population. Mean age was 50. 8+/-2.8 years, and the number of person years followed was 9335.3. There were two main study arms: a randomised arm (randomised to HRT; n=502, or not; n=504) and a non-randomised arm (on HRT; n=221, or not; n=789...... by own choice). First line HRT was oral sequential oestradiol/norethisterone in women with intact uterus and oral continuous oestradiol in hysterectomised women. RESULTS: After five years, a total of 156 fractures were sustained by 140 women. There were 51 forearm fractures in 51 women. By intention...

  6. European consensus for starting and stopping enzyme replacement therapy in adult patients with Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Kruijshaar, Michelle E.; Toscano, A.

    2017-01-01

    synthesis is presented. RESULTS: Consensus was reached on how the diagnosis of Pompe disease should be confirmed, when treatment should be started, reasons for stopping treatment and the use of ERT during pregnancy. This was based on expert opinion and supported by the literature. One clinical trial and 43......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pompe disease is a rare inheritable muscle disorder for which enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been available since 2006. Uniform criteria for starting and stopping ERT in adult patients were developed and reported here. METHODS: Three consensus meetings were organized...... through the European Pompe Consortium, a network of experts from 11 European countries in the field of Pompe disease. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of ERT in adult patients on a range of clinical outcome measures and quality of life. A narrative...

  7. A population approach to renal replacement therapy epidemiology: lessons from the EVEREST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Fergus J; Jager, Kitty J

    2014-08-01

    The marked variation that exists in renal replacement therapy (RRT) epidemiology between countries and within countries requires careful systematic examination if the root causes are to be understood. While individual patient-level studies are undoubtedly important, there is a complementary role for more population-level, area-based studies--an aetiological approach. The EVEREST Study adopted such an approach, bringing RRT incidence rates, survival and modality mix together with macroeconomic factors, general population factors and renal service organizational factors for up to 46 countries. This review considers the background to EVEREST, its key results and then the main methodological lessons and their potential application to ongoing work. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  8. Human β-glucuronidase: structure, function, and application in enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Huma; Islam, Asimul; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William S; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Imtaiyaz

    2013-10-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases occur due to incomplete metabolic degradation of macromolecules by various hydrolytic enzymes in the lysosome. Despite structural differences, most of the lysosomal enzymes share many common features including a lysosomal targeting motif and phosphotransferase recognition sites. β-Glucuronidase (GUSB) is an important lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glucuronate-containing glycosaminoglycan. The deficiency of GUSB causes mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPSVII), leading to lysosomal storage in the brain. GUSB is a well-studied protein for its expression, sequence, structure, and function. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of sequence, structure, function, and evolution of GUSB and its lysosomal enzyme targeting. Enzyme replacement therapy reported for this protein is also discussed.

  9. Oral pharmacological chaperone migalastat compared with enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Nicholls, Kathleen; Shankar, Suma P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by GLA mutations, resulting in α-galactosidase (α-Gal) deficiency and accumulation of lysosomal substrates. Migalastat, an oral pharmacological chaperone being developed as an alternative to intravenous enzyme replacement...... therapy (ERT), stabilises specific mutant (amenable) forms of α-Gal to facilitate normal lysosomal trafficking. METHODS: The main objective of the 18-month, randomised, active-controlled ATTRACT study was to assess the effects of migalastat on renal function in patients with Fabry disease previously...... treated with ERT. Effects on heart, disease substrate, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and safety were also assessed. RESULTS: Fifty-seven adults (56% female) receiving ERT (88% had multiorgan disease) were randomised (1.5:1), based on a preliminary cell-based assay of responsiveness to migalastat...

  10. Trends in Renal Replacement Therapy in Bosnia and Herzegovina 2002-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halima Resić

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal Registry (RR of Bosnia and Herzegovina was established in 2002, with aim to follow up the trends of Renal Replacement Therapy in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The prevalence of Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT in Bosnia and Herzegovina is rising steadily. One reason for this is an increasing number of patients starting RRT. The aim is to present the epidemiology and treatment of all aspects of RRT in Bosnia and Herzegovina in period 2002-2008. Centre-related and patient-related questionnaires were sent to all 25 dialysis centres in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The demographic data, prevalence and incidence, type of renal replacement therapy, cause of ESRD, erythropoietin administration, cause of death, and type of vascular access were obtained from the questionnaires. Collected data were analysed using SPSS statistics. The number of patients treated by Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT increased steadily from 1,531 patients in 2002 to the 2,206 at the 2008 (43%. The prevalence has increased from 399 pmp in 2002 to 696 pmp. in 2008. Incidence (new patients in 2002 was 110 pmp and incidence rate in 2008 was 163, and there were 249 new patients (day 1. The mean age for new patients increased from 60 years in 2002 to 63.5 years in 2008 and the population over 75 years rate from 8.79% to 11.3%. Most ESRD patients in Bosnia and Herzegovina are undergoing intermittent hemodialysis (92%, while some patients (8% are treated by peritoneal dialysis and transplantation. The most significant cause of ESRD in 2008 was chronic glomerulonephritis (421 patients, 19.2%, followed by pyelonephritis (414 patients, 18.9%, BEN (14.7% and Diabetes mellitus (12.2%. Hepatitis B and C virus infections had 397 (16.3% patients, out of them 22 had both type of infections and 98 patients had B type infection. Only 10.5% of patients were tested on MRSA and 3 patients were positive on MRSA. There were no HIV-positive patients on RRT. The most common type of vascular access was AV fistula

  11. Renal replacement therapy for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spithoven, Edwin M; Kramer, Anneke; Meijer, Esther

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the fourth most common renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). Still, there are few epidemiological data on the prevalence of, and survival on RRT for ADPKD. METHODS: This study used data from the ERA-EDTA Registry...... on RRT prevalence and survival on RRT in 12 European countries with 208 million inhabitants. We studied four 5-year periods (1991-2010). Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and by Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: From the first to the last study period, the prevalence...... of RRT for ADPKD increased from 56.8 to 91.1 per million population (pmp). The percentage of prevalent RRT patients with ADPKD remained fairly stable at 9.8%. Two-year survival of ADPKD patients on RRT (adjusted for age, sex and country) increased significantly from 89.0 to 92.8%, and was higher than...

  12. Stabilized incidence of diabetic patients referred for renal replacement therapy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V R; Hansen, P M; Heaf, J

    2006-01-01

    Despite an improvement in diabetes care during the last 20 years, the number of diabetic patients starting renal replacement therapy (RRT) has continued to increase in the Western world. The aim was to study the incidence of patients starting RRT in Denmark from 1990 to 2004. Data were obtained......). The number of diabetic patients starting RRT increased steadily from: 52 (number of patients) in 1990, 113 in 1995, 150 in 2000, 168 in 2001, and 183 in 2002. However, during the years 2003 and 2004 this number was significantly reduced by 15% to 156 and 155, respectively. This was mainly due to a 22......% reduction in the number of non-insulin- treated (type II) diabetic patients (number of patients): 98, 82, and 76 in 2002, 2003, and 2004, respectively. The mean age in the background population, the mean age in diabetic patients starting RRT and the incidence of type I and type II diabetes increased during...

  13. Predictive value of NGAL for use of renal replacement therapy in patients with severe sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortrup, P B; Haase, N; Treschow, F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The predictive value of plasma and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) for use of renal replacement therapy (RRT) and acute kidney injury (AKI) is not established in patients with severe sepsis. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study in three general...... intensive care units (ICUs) in adult ICU patients with severe sepsis needing fluid resuscitation and a sub-study of the 6S trial. Plasma and urine were sampled at baseline and NGAL was measured using particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (The NGAL Test). Outcome measures were use of RRT in ICU......%) had RRT in the ICU, 91 patients had AKI at enrollment; of the remaining 131 patients 24% developed AKI during the first 48 h, and 55% had died at 90 days. Areas under receiver-operating characteristics curve (AuROC) for predicting use of RRT in ICU were 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.61-0.78) and 0...

  14. Regional and social inequalities in chronic renal replacement therapy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hommel, Kristine; Rasmussen, Soren; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2010-01-01

    Background. The incidence of chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT) varies markedly between Danish nephrology centres. The aim of the present study was to establish if there is regional and social variation in the incidence of chronic RRT in Denmark when analysed according to patient residence....... The importance of diabetic nephropathy and patients aged 70 years or older was also studied. Methods. Incident patients on chronic RRT in the period 1995-2006 were identified in the Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis and Transplantation. Information on residence, income, educational status and ethnic...... origin was obtained from Statistics Denmark. Rates of incident RRT patients were standardized for regional differences of sex and age as well as income, educational status and ethnic origin. Poisson regression was used when comparing rates. Results. Age- and sex-standardized incident chronic RRT rates...

  15. Temporal Progression of Retinal Progenitor Cell Identity: Implications in Cell Replacement Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awais Javed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Retinal degenerative diseases, which lead to the death of rod and cone photoreceptor cells, are the leading cause of inherited vision loss worldwide. Induced pluripotent or embryonic stem cells (iPSCs/ESCs have been proposed as a possible source of new photoreceptors to restore vision in these conditions. The proof of concept studies carried out in mouse models of retinal degeneration over the past decade have highlighted several limitations for cell replacement in the retina, such as the low efficiency of cone photoreceptor production from stem cell cultures and the poor integration of grafted cells in the host retina. Current protocols to generate photoreceptors from stem cells are largely based on the use of extracellular factors. Although these factors are essential to induce the retinal progenitor cell (RPC fate from iPSCs/ESCs, developmental studies have shown that RPCs alter fate output as a function of time (i.e., their temporal identity to generate the seven major classes of retinal cell types, rather than spatial position. Surprisingly, current stem cell differentiation protocols largely ignore the intrinsic temporal identity of dividing RPCs, which we argue likely explains the low efficiency of cone production in such cultures. In this article, we briefly review the mechanisms regulating temporal identity in RPCs and discuss how they could be exploited to improve cone photoreceptor production for cell replacement therapies.

  16. Progestational effects of combinations of gestodene on the postmenopausal endometrium during hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrjalsen, I; Bjarnason, N H; Christiansen, C

    1999-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the dose-response effects on the postmenopausal endometrium of 3 sequential combined hormone replacement regimens and 1 continuous combined hormone replacement regimen of estradiol and gestodene. In this 2-year double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 278 healthy postmenopausal women received either 2 mg estradiol sequentially combined with 50 microg or 25 microg gestodene, 1 mg estradiol sequentially or continuously combined with 25 microg gestodene, or placebo. All 4 hormone treatment regimens produced a safe endometrial histologic appearance. The regimens that were based on the lower dose of 1 mg estradiol was associated with less uterine bleeding than were those that were based on 2 mg estradiol. For sequentially opposing the 2 mg dose of estradiol, the dose of 25 microg gestodene was less efficient in producing secretory activity than was the dose of 50 microg gestodene. The measurement of placental protein 14 in serum reflected the secretory transformation of the endometrial buildup. The reduction in bleeding episodes associated with regimens with lower estradiol doses may lead to improved long-term therapy compliance by menopausal women. The potency of progestogens can be assessed by measuring the serum concentration of placental protein 14.

  17. Clinical analysis of single filtration plasmapheresis using continuous renal replacement therapy machines in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eunsoo; Kim, Yujeong; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Park, Inwhee; Kim, Heungsoo; Lee, Su Hyung; Oh, Chang-Kwon; Shin, Gyu-Tae

    2017-06-01

    Plasmapheresis has become an essential element of kidney transplantation (KT). In the present study, we report clinical outcomes of filtration plasmapheresis using continuous renal replacement therapy machines with a single filter for the first time in Korea. We retrospectively analyzed six patients who underwent filtration plasmapheresis for KT in our center; plasmapheresis was performed using the Plasmaflex (Baxter®) with a TPE 2000 filter set (Baxter®) in our hemodialysis unit. Five percent albumin was used as the replacement fluid, and intravenous immunoglobulin G was administered after each plasmapheresis session. The target preoperative ABO isoagglutinin titer was less than 1:8. Filtration plasmapheresis was performed in four patients for ABO-incompatible KT, one for antibody-mediated rejection after KT, and the last one for positive T cell crossmatch. Altogether, 46 sessions of plasmapheresis were performed. ABO isoagglutinin titers successfully declined to or below the target level in all patients, and all patients successfully received KT with no significant antibody titer rebound. Acute antibody-mediated rejection and positive T cell crossmatch were well treated with filtration plasmapheresis, and no patient required fresh frozen plasma infusion for coagulopathy. There were one episode of hypotension and three of hypocalcemia. No patients experienced bleeding, infection, or allergic reaction. Filtration plasmapheresis was effective and safe. Although our result is from a single center, our protocol appears to be promising.

  18. Clinical analysis of single filtration plasmapheresis using continuous renal replacement therapy machines in kidney transplantation

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    Eunsoo Lim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plasmapheresis has become an essential element of kidney transplantation (KT. In the present study, we report clinical outcomes of filtration plasmapheresis using continuous renal replacement therapy machines with a single filter for the first time in Korea. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed six patients who underwent filtration plasmapheresis for KT in our center; plasmapheresis was performed using the Plasmaflex (Baxter® with a TPE 2000 filter set (Baxter® in our hemodialysis unit. Five percent albumin was used as the replacement fluid, and intravenous immunoglobulin G was administered after each plasmapheresis session. The target preoperative ABO isoagglutinin titer was less than 1:8. Results: Filtration plasmapheresis was performed in four patients for ABO-incompatible KT, one for antibody-mediated rejection after KT, and the last one for positive T cell crossmatch. Altogether, 46 sessions of plasmapheresis were performed. ABO isoagglutinin titers successfully declined to or below the target level in all patients, and all patients successfully received KT with no significant antibody titer rebound. Acute antibody-mediated rejection and positive T cell crossmatch were well treated with filtration plasmapheresis, and no patient required fresh frozen plasma infusion for coagulopathy. There were one episode of hypotension and three of hypocalcemia. No patients experienced bleeding, infection, or allergic reaction. Conclusion: Filtration plasmapheresis was effective and safe. Although our result is from a single center, our protocol appears to be promising.

  19. Controversies in IgG replacement therapy in patients with antibody deficiency diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Erwin W; Ochs, Hans D; Shearer, William T

    2013-04-01

    This Current perspectives article will review and highlight the importance of accurate diagnosis of patients who have failed to produce specific antibodies to naturally encountered foreign proteins or polysaccharides or after vaccination and the appropriate institution of immunoglobulin replacement therapy. The field of primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) has expanded remarkably since the early descriptions 6 decades ago. With greater recognition and advanced cellular and molecular diagnostic technology, new entities and single-gene defects in patients with PIDD are rapidly being defined. This, combined with treatment advances and newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency, has resulted in improved outcomes and survival and even permanent cures. Awareness of PIDD has also increased, but the guidelines for recognition remain to be validated. The zeal for registering and enrolling patients has potentially created a large body of "patients" treated with immunoglobulin replacement unnecessarily. The complexity, diversity, and availability of laboratory testing have brought awareness of PIDD to the forefront, but because of an absence of standardization of certain assays, concerns about the correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment have increased. We hope to refocus the discussion on identifying clear laboratory and clinical guidelines for the establishment of an accurate diagnosis of antibody deficiency, its rationale, and, where indicated, institution of safe treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Combination of continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for advanced cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Hon-Jek; Chen, Yung-Chang; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2003-03-01

    The critically ill patients may require mechanical ventilation, cardiac mechanical support, and other types of critical support. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a supportive therapy, which provides good cardiopulmonary and end-organ support. Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) exhibit important advantages in terms of clinical tolerance and blood purification. This investigation aims to evaluate the acute renal failure in cardiac patients under ECMO, and assess the effect of combining these two technologies, ECMO and CRRT. Between December 1998 and June 2001, 10 adult cardiac patients were treated on ECMO. Five of them were treated with both ECMO and CRRT. The clinical outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 10 patients studied, five were men and five were women. The mean age of survivors and non-survivors was 37.00 +/- 14.54 years and 46.17 +/- 7.41 years, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 60%. Survivors did not differ significantly from non-survivors in age or gender. The APACHE II scores on the first day of ECMO support between survival and non-survival were 19.00 +/- 9.38 and 24.67 +/- 3.50 (P value = 0.392) (Table 2), which demonstrates no significant differences too. The cause of death in most patients was related to organ system failure during the 24 h immediately before ECMO started. Five patients with acute renal failure treated by CRRT were eventually died. The median and mean survival in this group on CRRT was 40.50 +/- 18.07 h and 92.60 +/- 60.50 h. We conclude that mortality rate for acute renal failure in cardiac patients under ECMO continues to be high. Our data suggest that acute renal failure is generally a part of multiorgan failure. This unique form of acute renal failure, causes generalized edema and fluid overload despite still low serum creatinine and azotemia, and deteriorates rapidly to death. From this study shows, advanced cardiac failure may need more aggressive and early initiation of ECMO support

  1. Using continuous renal replacement therapy to manage patients of shock and acute renal failure

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    Soni Sachin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of acute renal failure (ARF in the hospital setting is increasing. It portends excessive morbidity and mortality and a considerable burden on hospital resources. Extracorporeal therapies show promise in the management of patients with shock and ARF. It is said that the potential of such therapy goes beyond just providing renal support. The aim of our study was to analyze the clinical setting and outcomes of critically ill ARF patients managed with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. Patients and Methods: Ours was a retrospective study of 50 patients treated between January 2004 and November 2005. These 50 patients were in clinical shock and had concomitant ARF. All of these patients underwent CVVHDF (continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration in the intensive care unit. For the purpose of this study, shock was defined as systolic BP < 100 mm Hg in spite of administration of one or more inotropic agents. SOFA (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score before initiation of dialysis support was recorded in all cases. CVVHDF was performed using the Diapact ® (Braun CRRT machine. The vascular access used was as follows: femoral in 32, internal jugular in 8, arteriovenous fistula (AVF in 4, and subclavian in 6 patients. We used 0.9% or 0.45% (half-normal saline as a prefilter replacement, with addition of 10% calcium gluconate, magnesium sulphate, sodium bicarbonate, and potassium chloride in separate units, while maintaining careful monitoring of electrolytes. Anticoagulation of the extracorporeal circuit was achieved with systemic heparin in 26 patients; frequent saline flushes were used in the other 24 patients. Results: Of the 50 patients studied, 29 were males and 21 females (1.4:1. The average age was 52.88 years (range: 20-75 years. Causes of ARF included sepsis in 24 (48%, hemodynamically mediated renal failure (HMRF in 18 (36%, and acute over chronic kidney disease in 8 (16% patients. The overall mortality was

  2. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular outcomes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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    Dicheng Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is widely used to controlling menopausal symptoms and prevent adverse cardiovascular events. However, the benefit and risk of HRT on cardiovascular outcomes remains controversial. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically searched the PubMed, EmBase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for obtaining relevant literature. All eligible trials reported on the effects of HRT on cardiovascular outcomes. We did a random effects meta-analysis to obtain summary effect estimates for the clinical outcomes with use of relative risks calculated from the raw data of included trials. Of 1903 identified studies, we included 10 trials reporting data on 38908 postmenopausal women. Overall, we noted that estrogen combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate therapy as compared to placebo had no effect on coronary events (RR, 1.07; 95%CI: 0.91-1.26; P = 0.41, myocardial infarction (RR, 1.09; 95%CI: 0.85-1.41; P = 0.48, stroke (RR, 1.21; 95%CI: 1.00-1.46; P = 0.06, cardiac death (RR, 1.19; 95%CI: 0.91-1.56; P = 0.21, total death (RR, 1.06; 95%CI: 0.81-1.39; P = 0.66, and revascularization (RR, 0.95; 95%CI: 0.83-1.08; P = 0.43. In addition, estrogen therapy alone had no effect on coronary events (RR, 0.93; 95%CI: 0.80-1.08; P = 0.33, myocardial infarction (RR, 0.95; 95%CI: 0.78-1.15; P = 0.57, cardiac death (RR, 0.86; 95%CI: 0.65-1.13; P = 0.27, total mortality (RR, 1.02; 95%CI: 0.89-1.18; P = 0.73, and revascularization (RR, 0.77; 95%CI: 0.45-1.31; P = 0.34, but associated with a 27% increased risk for incident stroke (RR, 1.27; 95%CI: 1.06-1.53; P = 0.01. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Hormone replacement therapy does not effect on the incidence of coronary events, myocardial infarction, cardiac death, total mortality or revascularization. However, it might contributed an important role on the risk of incident stroke.

  3. Cardiomyopathy and response to enzyme replacement therapy in a male mouse model for Fabry disease.

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    Aurelie Nguyen Dinh Cat

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism that results in progressive accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids, (predominately globotriaosylceramide; GL-3 in lysosomes, as well as other cellular compartments and the extracellular space. Our aim was to characterize the cardiac phenotype of male knock-out mice that are deficient in alpha-galactosidase A activity, as a model for Fabry disease and test the efficacy of Enzyme Replacement Therapy with agalsidase-beta. Male mice (3-4 months of age were characterized with awake blood pressure and heart rate measurements, cardiac echocardiography and electrocardiography measurements under light anesthesia, histological studies and molecular studies with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The Fabry knock-out mouse has bradycardia and lower blood pressure than control wild type (CB7BL/6J mice. In Fabry knock-out mice, the cardiomyopathy associated mild hypertrophy at echography with normal systolic LV function and mild diastolic dysfunction. Premature atrial contractions were more frequent in without conduction defect. Heart weight normalized to tibial length was increased in Fabry knock-out mice. Ascending aorta dilatation was observed. Molecular studies were consistent with early stages of cardiac remodeling. A single dose of agalsidase-beta (3 mg/kg did not affect the LV hypertrophy, function or heart rate, but did improve the mRNA signals of early cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mice at 3 to 4 months of age have cardiac and vascular alterations similar to that described in early clinical stage of Fabry disease in children and adolescents. Enzyme replacement therapy affects cardiac molecular remodeling after a single dose.

  4. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy (CRRT) practices in Canadian hospitals: Where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbonnais, Frances Fothergill; Slivar, Sharon; Tucker, Sue Malone

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in critically ill patients. Renal replacement therapy is prescribed for as many as 70% of critically ill patients in AKI and may be provided in the form of intermittent or continuous dialysis including intermittent hemodialysis, sustained low-efficiency dialysis, and continuous renal replacement therapy (CR RT). CRRT is commonly used for unstable critically ill patients, as it involves a slow continuous process. The nursing work involved with CR RT is highly complex and the learning requirements are challenging; therefore, it is important to identify nursing practices. A national survey was conducted to gain insight into CRRT nursing practices. T he design for this study was descriptive using a survey The target population for this survey was ICU nurse educators at Canadian teaching and community hospitals. Topics in the survey included staff education, CRRT ordering and initiation practices, vascular access, filters and filter life, fluids used, anticoagulation methods, adverse events, and greatest concerns. One hundred and twenty-nine surveys were sent out and 73 were returned for a response rate of 57%. Thirty-six hospitals used CRRT and of these, 73% had used CR RT for more than eight years. The findings revealed that educators identified achieving and maintaining competence as their greatest concern related to CRRT practices. The fndings of this research revealed that consistent training programs were not the norm. The complexity of caring for patients on CRRT requires consideration of when to introduce to staff the technology and care of patients on CRRT and how to sustain their competence.

  5. Ultrafiltration rate is an important determinant of microcirculatory alterations during chronic renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Gerke; Pranskunas, Andrius; Skarupskiene, Inga; Pilvinis, Vidas; Hemmelder, Marc H; Ince, Can; Boerma, E Christiaan

    2017-02-20

    Hemodialysis (HD) with ultrafiltration (UF) in chronic renal replacement therapy is associated with hemodynamic instability, morbidity and mortality. Sublingual Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging during HD revealed reductions in microcirculatory blood flow (MFI). This study aims to determine underlying mechanisms. The study was performed in the Medical Centre Leeuwarden and the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Patients underwent 4-h HD session with linear UF. Nine patients were subject to combinations of HD and UF: 4 h of HD followed by 1 h isolated UF and 4 h HD with blood-volume-monitoring based UF. Primary endpoint: difference in MFI before and after intervention. During all sessions monitoring included blood pressure, heartrate and SDF-imaging. NCT01396980. Baseline characteristics were not different between the two centres as within the HD/UF modalities. MFI was not different before and after HD with UF. Total UF did not differ between modalities. Median MFI decreased significantly during isolated UF [2.8 (2.5-2.9) to 2.5 (2.2-2.8), p = 0.03]. Baseline MFI of each UF session was correlated with MFI after the intervention (r s = 0.52, p = 0.006). During HD with UF or isolated HD we observed no changes in MFI. This indicates that non-flow mediated mechanisms are of unimportance. During isolated UF we observed a reduction in MFI in conjunction with a negative intravascular fluid balance. The correlation between MFI before and after intervention suggests that volume status at baseline is a factor in microvascular alterations. In conclusion we observed a significant decrease of sublingual MFI, related to UF rate during chronic renal replacement therapy.

  6. Fabry disease: characterisation of the plasma proteome pre- and post-enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Sun Hee; Kang, Eungu; Kim, Yoon-Myung; Go, Heounjeong; Kim, Kyung Yong; Jung, Jae Yong; Kang, Minji; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Min; Choi, In-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Jung, Sung-Chul; Desnick, Robert J; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Beom Hee

    2017-11-01

    Fabry disease is characterised by the progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and related glycosphingolipids in vascular endothelial cells. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) clears this accumulation. We analysed plasma proteome profiles before and after ERT to characterise its molecular pathology. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) were done using plasma samples before and after ERT in eight patients with classical Fabry disease RESULTS: After short-term ERT (4-12 months), the levels of 15 plasma proteins involved in inflammation, oxidative and ischaemic injury, or complement activation were reduced significantly. Among them, β-actin (ACTB), inactivated complement C3b (iC3b), and C4B were elevated significantly in pre-ERT Fabry disease plasma compared with control plasma. After longer-term ERT (46-96 months), iC3b levels gradually decreased, whereas the levels of other proteins varied. The gradual reduction of iC3b was comparable to that of Gb3 levels. In addition, iC3b increased significantly in pre-ERT Fabry disease mouse plasma, and C3 deposits were notable in renal tissues of pre-enzyme replacement therapy patients. These results indicated that C3-mediated complement activation might be altered in Fabry disease and ERT might promote its stabilisation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Quality of pharmacokinetic studies in critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaara, S; Pettila, V; Kaukonen, K-M

    2012-02-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is the preferred renal replacement therapy modality in the critically ill. We aimed to reveal the literature on the pharmacokinetic studies in critically ill patients receiving CRRT with special reference to quality assessment of these studies and the CRRT dose. We conducted a systematic review by searching the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane databases to December 2009 and bibliographies of relevant review articles. We included original studies reporting from critically ill adult subjects receiving CRRT because of acute kidney injury with a special emphasis on drug pharmacokinetics. We used the minimum reporting criteria for CRRT studies by Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) and, second, the Downs and Black checklist to assess the quality of the studies. We calculated the CRRT dose per study. We included pharmacokinetic parameters, residual renal function, and recommendations on drug dosing. Of 182 publications, 95 were considered relevant and 49 met the inclusion criteria. The median [interquartile range (IQR)] number of reported criteria by ADQI was 7.0 (5.0-8.0) of 12. The median (IQR) Downs and Black quality score was 15 (14-16) of 32. None of the publications reported CRRT dose directly. The median (IQR) weighted CRRT dose was 23.7 (18.8-27.9) ml/kg/h. More attention should be paid both to standardizing the CRRT dose and reporting of the CRRT parameters in pharmacokinetic studies. The general quality of the studies during CRRT in the critically ill was only moderate and would be greatly improved by reports in concordant with the ADQI recommendations. © 2011 The Authors Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2011 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  8. Elevated hair cortisol concentrations in children with adrenal insufficiency on hydrocortisone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noppe, G; van Rossum, E F C; Vliegenthart, J; Koper, J W; van den Akker, E L T

    2014-12-01

    Glucocorticoid replacement therapy in patients with adrenal insufficiency needs to be tailored to the individual patient based on body composition and clinical signs and symptoms as no objective method for assessment of treatment adequacy is available. Current treatment regimens are often not satisfactory, which is shown by the adverse metabolic profile and doubled mortality rates in treated adrenal insufficiency patients. Measurement of cortisol concentrations in hair reflect the long-term systemic cortisol exposure and may be of use in refinement of hydrocortisone treatment. We aimed to study whether long-term cortisol (hydrocortisone) levels, as measured in scalp hair, are similar in children with adrenal insufficiency and healthy children. We set up a case control study, measuring anthropometric characteristics and hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) in 54 hydrocortisone substituted children with adrenal insufficiency (AI patients) in the age of 4-18 years and 54 healthy children matched for gender and age. Mean HCC were significantly higher in AI patients compared with healthy controls (mean 13·3 vs 8·2 pg/mg, P = 0·02). AI patients also had a higher BMI (P < 0·001) and waist circumference (WC) (P = 0·02). HCC was significantly associated with BMI (P = 0·002) and WC (P = 0·002). HCC explained 13% of the difference in BMI and 29% of the difference in WC between AI patients and controls. Hydrocortisone-treated AI patients have increased HCC and adverse anthropometric characteristics compared with healthy controls. HCC measurement may be of value in identifying overtreatment and thereby improve hydrocortisone replacement therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Does perioperative furosemide usage reduce the need for renal replacement therapy in cardiac surgery patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Ajay; Husain, Mubassher; Salhiyyah, Kareem; Raja, Shahzad G.

    2012-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was ‘Does perioperative furosemide usage reduce the need for renal replacement therapy in cardiac surgery patients?’ Forty-seven papers were found using the reported search, of which 10 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Current best available evidence to resolve the issue includes a systematic review and nine randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The systematic review of seven RCTs and one observational study has demonstrated that in patients who have undergone cardiac surgery, a more consistent and sustained diuresis is produced by a continuous infusion of furosemide compared with intermittent bolus doses of furosemide. However, there does not appear to be a significant difference in the total urine output or a change in serum electrolyte levels when furosemide is administered as a continuous infusion compared with intermittent bolus doses. Three RCTs recruiting neonatal and paediatric patients after open heart surgery also validated the safety and efficacy of furosemide infusion as well as intermittent bolus doses. Two of the five RCTS in adult cardiac surgery patients showed that furosemide infusion was associated with a reduced need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), while two RCTs failed to show any benefit and one reported an increased incidence of renal impairment. We conclude that continuous furosemide infusion in the perioperative period promotes a gentle and sustained diuresis in cardiac surgery patients. The evidence supporting the benefit of this strategy in terms of reducing the need for RRT is weak. At the same time, current best available evidence, albeit from small RCTs, suggests that the timely introduction of continuous furosemide infusion does not increase the incidence

  10. A Chaperone Enhances Blood α-Glucosidase Activity in Pompe Disease Patients Treated With Enzyme Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Fecarotta, Simona; la Marca, Giancarlo; Rossi, Barbara; Ascione, Serena; Donati, Maria Alice; Morandi, Lucia Ovidia; Ravaglia, Sabrina; Pichiecchio, Anna; Ombrone, Daniela; Sacchini, Michele; Pasanisi, Maria Barbara; De Filippi, Paola; Danesino, Cesare; Della Casa, Roberto; Romano, Alfonso; Mollica, Carmine; Rosa, Margherita; Agovino, Teresa; Nusco, Edoardo; Porto, Caterina; Andria, Generoso

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is currently the only approved treatment for Pompe disease, due to acid α-glucosidase deficiency. Clinical efficacy of this approach is variable, and more effective therapies are needed. We showed in preclinical studies that chaperones stabilize the recombinant enzyme used for enzyme replacement therapy. Here, we evaluated the effects of a combination of enzyme therapy and a chaperone on α-glucosidase activity in Pompe disease patients. α-Glucosidase activity was analyzed by tandem-mass spectrometry in dried blood spots from patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy, either alone or in combination with the chaperone N-butyldeoxynojirimycin given at the time of the enzyme infusion. Thirteen patients with different presentations (3 infantile-onset, 10 late-onset) were enrolled. In 11 patients, the combination treatment resulted in α-glucosidase activities greater than 1.85-fold the activities with enzyme replacement therapy alone. In the whole patient population, α-glucosidase activity was significantly increased at 12 hours (2.19-fold, P = 0.002), 24 hours (6.07-fold, P = 0.001), and 36 hours (3.95-fold, P = 0.003). The areas under the curve were also significantly increased (6.78-fold, P = 0.002). These results suggest improved stability of recombinant α-glucosidase in blood in the presence of the chaperone. PMID:25052852

  11. Effects of replacement therapy on sleep architecture in children with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrillo, Elisabetta; Bizzarri, Carla; Bruni, Oliviero; Ferri, Raffaele; Pavone, Martino; Cappa, Marco; Cutrera, Renato

    2012-05-01

    Children with GH deficiency (GHD) show a general decrease in electroencephalographic (EEG) arousability represented by a significant global decrease in Cyclic Alternating Pattern (CAP). The aim of the present study was to evaluate if sleep structure is influenced by GH substitutive therapy by analyzing the classical sleep architecture parameters and sleep microstructure by means of CAP. Laboratory polysomnographic sleep recordings were obtained from five children affected by GHD (two girls and three boys; mean age: 4.6 ± 3.1 years), at baseline and after GH therapy, and from 10 normal healthy children (four girls and six boys, mean age: 5.6 ± 2.2 years). Compared to controls, GHD subjects showed a reduced total sleep time with increased wakefulness and a consequent decrease in sleep efficiency; GH therapy was associated with an increase of the awakenings/hour and a large effect size was evident for sleep latency, sleep efficiency, and stage N3, which were decreased, and for stage W, which was increased. CAP appeared to be globally reduced and all phase A subtypes and CAP cycle showed a longer duration in GHD children vs. controls. GH substitutive treatment was followed by an increase in CAP rate (total, in N2, and in N3); additionally, A1 index was also significantly increased, especially during stage N3, with a very large effect size. On the other hand, A2 and A3 index and CAP cycle mean duration were reduced. Sleep stage architecture seems to be influenced by the GH status, but the analysis of sleep microstructure by means of CAP reveals an enhancement of EEG slow oscillations in GHD patients (demonstrated by an increase in CAP rate and A1 index during N3) after the start of GH replacement therapy. These findings deserve to be verified in a larger trial. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sources of information influencing the state-of-the-science gap in hormone replacement therapy usage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Chew

    Full Text Available Medical reviews and research comprise a key information source for news media stories on medical therapies and innovations as well as for physicians in updating their practice. The present study examined medical review journal articles, physician surveys and news media coverage of hormone replacement therapy (HT to assess the relationship between the three information sources and whether/if they contributed to a state-of-the-science gap (a condition when the evaluation of a medical condition or therapy ascertained by the highest standards of investigation is incongruent with the science-in-practice such as physician recommendations and patient actions.We content-analyzed 177 randomly sampled HT medical reviews between 2002 and 2014, and HT news valence in three major TV networks, newspapers and magazines/internet sites in 2002-2003, 2008-2009 and 2012-14. The focus in both analyses was whether HT benefits outweighed risks, risks outweighed benefits or both risks and benefits were presented. We also qualitatively content-analyzed all 19 surveys of US physicians' HT recommendations from 2002 to 2009, and 2012 to 2014.Medical reviews yielded a mixed picture about HT (40.1% benefits, 26.0% risks, and 33.9% both benefits and risks. While a majority of physician surveys were pro-HT 10/19, eight showed varied attitudes and one was negative. Newspaper and television coverage reflected a pro and con balance while magazine stories were more positive in the later reporting period.Medical journal review articles, physicians, and media reports all provide varying view points towards hormone therapy use thus leading to limited knowledge about the actual risks and benefits of HT among peri- and menopausal women and a state-of-the-science gap.

  13. Sources of information influencing the state-of-the-science gap in hormone replacement therapy usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Fiona; Wu, Xianwei

    2017-01-01

    Medical reviews and research comprise a key information source for news media stories on medical therapies and innovations as well as for physicians in updating their practice. The present study examined medical review journal articles, physician surveys and news media coverage of hormone replacement therapy (HT) to assess the relationship between the three information sources and whether/if they contributed to a state-of-the-science gap (a condition when the evaluation of a medical condition or therapy ascertained by the highest standards of investigation is incongruent with the science-in-practice such as physician recommendations and patient actions). We content-analyzed 177 randomly sampled HT medical reviews between 2002 and 2014, and HT news valence in three major TV networks, newspapers and magazines/internet sites in 2002-2003, 2008-2009 and 2012-14. The focus in both analyses was whether HT benefits outweighed risks, risks outweighed benefits or both risks and benefits were presented. We also qualitatively content-analyzed all 19 surveys of US physicians' HT recommendations from 2002 to 2009, and 2012 to 2014. Medical reviews yielded a mixed picture about HT (40.1% benefits, 26.0% risks, and 33.9% both benefits and risks). While a majority of physician surveys were pro-HT 10/19), eight showed varied attitudes and one was negative. Newspaper and television coverage reflected a pro and con balance while magazine stories were more positive in the later reporting period. Medical journal review articles, physicians, and media reports all provide varying view points towards hormone therapy use thus leading to limited knowledge about the actual risks and benefits of HT among peri- and menopausal women and a state-of-the-science gap.

  14. Letrozole versus testosterone. a single-center pilot study of HIV-infected men who have sex with men on highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) with hypoactive sexual desire disorder and raised estradiol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Daniel; Goldmeier, David; Frize, Graham; Lamba, Harpal; De Souza, Carl; Kocsis, Agnes; Scullard, George

    2007-03-01

    Since the advent of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART), men with HIV experience good quality of life and expect to have normal sexual function. However, it appears that men infected with HIV commonly complain of sexual problems. There is evidence that men on HAART develop low sexual desire that is associated with raised estradiol levels. It has been postulated that abnormal metabolism seen in this group of men increases the aromatization of testosterone to estradiol. We hypothesized that letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor that inhibits the conversion of testosterone to estradiol, would be beneficial in these men. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of testosterone vs. an aromatase inhibitor, letrazole, in HIV-infected men with raised estradiol and low sexual desire. Thirteen men who have sex with men on HAART with low sexual desire as well as raised estradiol levels (>120 pmol/L) were randomly allocated to receive either parenteral testosterone (Sustanon 250 intramuscular injection) (N = 6) or letrozole 2.5 mg orally daily (N = 7) for 6 weeks. Sex steroid hormone assays, sex hormone-binding globulin, virological, hematological, and biochemical parameters were measured before and after treatment. Each subject was given the Spector Sexual Desire Inventory and the Depression/Anxiety Stress Scale before and immediately after treatment. Subjects were also asked to estimate the number of actual sexual acts before and after treatment. Results. Inventory data showed a rise in dyadic desire in both treatment arms. Mean actual sexual acts rose from 0.33 to 1.5 in the testosterone group and from 0.43 to 1.29 for the letrozole group. Luteinizing hormone increased in seven of seven men on letrozole. Serum testosterone increased in seven of seven men on letrozole. There were no adverse events from either medication. Letrozole may be useful in the management of men on HAART who have low sexual desire.

  15. PSYCHOSEXUAL FUNCTIONING IN WOMEN WITH COMPLETE TESTICULAR FEMINIZATION - IS ANDROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY PREFERABLE TO ESTROGEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLOB, AK; TENBOSCH, JJ; VANHALL, EV; DEJONG, FH; SCHULTZ, WCMW; EIKELBOOM, FA

    1993-01-01

    Effects of oral testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) on blood hormone levels, moods, sociosexual functioning and self-image of the body were studied in four gonadectomized patients with complete testicular feminization. In a double-blind cross-over experiment, patients were treated with oral

  16. Delay in onset of metabolic alkalosis during regional citrate anti-coagulation in continous renal replacement therapy with calcium-free replacement solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    See Kay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional citrate anti-coagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy chelates calcium to produce the anti- coagulation effect. We hypothesise that a calcium-free replacement solution will require less citrate and produce fewer metabolic side effects. Fifty patients, in a Medical Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary teaching hospital (25 in each group, received continuous venovenous hemofiltration using either calcium-containing or calcium-free replacement solutions. Both groups had no significant differences in filter life, metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypercalcemia. However, patients using calcium-containing solution developed metabolic alkalosis earlier, compared to patients using calcium-free solution (mean 24.6 hours,CI 0.8-48.4 vs. 37.2 hours, CI 9.4-65, P = 0.020. When calcium-containing replacement solution was used, more citrate was required (mean 280ml/h, CI 227.2-332.8 vs. 265ml/h, CI 203.4-326.6, P = 0.069, but less calcium was infused (mean 21.2 ml/h, CI 1.2-21.2 vs 51.6ml/h, CI 26.8-76.4, P ≤ 0.0001.

  17. Preliminary study on the effect of castration and testosterone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To study the effect of castration and testosterone replacement on the testosterone level of the New Zealand rabbit, 16 apparently healthy adult male rabbits were used. The animals were divided into four groups with each group having four rabbits. The first group served as the control group. The rabbits in the second group ...

  18. The Effect of Castration and Testosterone Administration on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SOS

    2012-04-18

    Apr 18, 2012 ... To study the effect of castration and testosterone replacement on the testosterone level of the New. Zealand rabbit, 16 apparently ... After two weeks, the rabbits were castrated and the effect of castration and ... infiltration of the local anesthetic around the neck of scrotum (Hall,. 1979). Each testicle was then ...

  19. Management of metformin-associated lactic acidosis by continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffray Keller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA is a severe metabolic failure with high related mortality. Although its use is controversial, intermittent hemodialysis is reported to be the most frequently used treatment in conjunction with nonspecific supportive measures. Our aim was to report the evolution and outcome of cases managed by continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Over a 3-year period, we retrospectively identified patients admitted to the intensive care unit for severe lactic acidosis caused by metformin. We included patients in our study who were treated with CRRT because of shock. We describe their clinical and biological features at admission and during renal support, as well as their evolution. We enrolled six patients with severe lactic acidosis; the mean pH and mean lactate was 6.92±0.20 and 14.4±5.1 mmol/l, respectively. Patients had high illness severity scores, including the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II (average score 63±12 points. Early CRRT comprised either venovenous hemofiltration (n = 3 or hemodiafiltration (n = 3 with a mean effluent flow rate of 34±6 ml/kg/h. Metabolic acidosis control and metformin elimination was rapid and there was no rebound. Outcome was favorable in all cases. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Standard use of CRRT efficiently treated MALA in association with symptomatic organ supportive therapies.

  20. [Echinocandins: searching for differences. The example of their use in patients requiring continuous renal replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Llama-Celis, Natalia; Huarte-Lacunza, Rafael; Gómez-Baraza, Cristina; Cañamares-Orbis, Iciar; Sebastián-Aldeanueva, Manuel; Arrieta-Navarro, Raquel

    2012-12-01

    The echinocandins have a growing role in the treatment of fungal infections because of their novel mechanism of action. This is reflected in recently published management guidelines, but available in vitro data, animal studies, and clinical studies do not clearly differentiate the three agents in class. Comparative clinical efficacy among agents within the class, pharmacokinetic profiles in special populations, pharmacoeconomics justifications, and place in therapy have been largely unanswered. They share many common properties but marketing strategies of drug manufacturers are engaged in product differentiation. Although exist similarities in the pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of the echinocandins, limited data have been published regarding their pharmacokinetics in continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) patients. The pharmacokinetics of drug removal in critically ill patients receiving CRRT is very complex, with multiple variables affecting clearance. This review outlines the basic principles that determine whether a dose adjustment is required. Two studies with data on PK parameters of micafungin and anidulafungin in CRRT patients have been published and are compared following that basic principles in the review.

  1. Nicotine replacement therapy decision based on fuzzy multi-criteria analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarmudi, Zamali; Matmali, Norfazillah; Abdullah, Mohd Lazim

    2017-08-01

    It has been observed that Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) is one of the alternatives to control and reduce smoking addiction among smokers. Since the decision to choose the best NRT alternative involves uncertainty, ambiguity factors and diverse input datasets, thus, this paper proposes a fuzzy multi-criteria analysis (FMA) to overcome these issues. It focuses on how the fuzzy approach can unify the diversity of datasets based on NRT's decision-making problem. The analysis done employed the advantage of the cost-benefit criterion to unify the mixture of dataset input. The performance matrix was utilised to derive the performance scores. An empirical example regarding the NRT's decision-making problem was employed to illustrate the proposed approach. Based on the calculations, this analytical approach was found to be highly beneficial in terms of usability. It was also very applicable and efficient in dealing with the mixture of input datasets. Hence, the decision-making process can easily be used by experts and patients who are interested to join the therapy/cessation program.

  2. Antiepileptic Drug Removal by Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Sherif Hanafy

    2017-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is used for managing acute kidney injury in critically ill patients. Removal of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) by CRRT could be significant and may complicate patients' intensive care unit stay. The objective of the current review was to summarize the available evidence for AED removal by CRRT. An electronic literature search of PubMed (1946 to May 2016), Medline (1946 to May 2016), and Embase (1974 to May 2016) databases for studies discussing AED removal by CRRT was conducted. A total of 31 case reports discussing 32 patients were found. AEDs reported were levetiracetam (n = 3), valproic acid (n = 9), carbamazepine (n = 10), phenytoin (n = 3), phenobarbital (n = 4), lacosamide (n = 1), gabapentin (n = 1), and topiramate (n = 1). Two-thirds of the reports were about using CRRT in drug overdose and one-third was about AED removal by CRRT during therapy. Based on the current limited evidence and pharmacokinetic characteristics of AEDs, renally eliminated AEDs and/or AEDs with limited protein binding such as levetiracetam are more likely to be removed by CRRT than AEDs that are mainly metabolized and extensively protein bound such as carbamazepine. In conclusion, there is not enough evidence to provide robust dosing recommendations for AEDs in patients undergoing CRRT. Further studies are needed.

  3. [Drugs dosing in intensive care unit during continuous renal replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourquin, Vincent; Ponte, Belén; Saudan, Patrick; Martin, Pierre-Yves

    2009-11-01

    Drug dosing in the intensive care unit can be challenging. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of sepsis and a part of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is increasingly used as dialysis therapy in this critically ill population. Available data demonstrate that sepsis, AKI and different modalities of CRRT can profoundly change drugs pharmacokinetic. The severity of these changes depends on molecules characteristics (volume of distribution, plasma protein binding, molecular weight, plasma half-life, plasma clearance), patient itself (volemia, residual renal function, tissue perfusion, hepatic dysfunction) and modality of CRRT (diffusion, convection, adsorption). There are no available recommendations to adapt drug dosing in a given critically ill patient with a given modality of CRRT. It is necessary to fully understand the different methods of CRRT and drug pharmacokinetic to prescribe the appropriate dose and to avoid under or potentially toxic overdosing. Monitoring the plasma level of drug - when available - can establish a relation between the blood concentration and its effect; thus, facilitating drug dosing.

  4. Quantification of apoptotic phenomenon on endometrial biopsies in postmenopausal patients under hormonal replacement therapy (HRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzea, Dana; Iosif, Cristina; Vasilescu, Florina; Andrei, F; Dobrea, Camelia; Nicolae, Alina; Georgescu, Alina; Mircea, F; Ceauşu, M; Vişan, Ariana; Mihai, Mihaela; Ardeleanu, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    To quantify the apoptotic phenomenon on endometrial biopsies in postmenopausal patients under hormonal replacement therapy (HRT). The study lot consisted of 30 endometrial biopsies on which we studied the apoptotic phenomenon through morphological and molecular biology techniques (TUNEL reaction). Examination of endometrial biopsies before and post-therapeutically has been made. From morphological point of view, pre-therapeutically, endometrial biopsies presented apoptotic changes in about 1-3% of cells and under TSH there have been observed apoptotic changes in about 1-2% of cells. In female reproductive system, we found out a raised rate of cellular proliferation and concurrently a raised rate of apoptosis. Apoptotic phenomenon can be observed in endometrium at every menstrual cycle. In proliferative endometrium apoptosis rate is low, but in endometrial carcinoma apoptosis rate grow up. Bcl2 and Bax are expressing in normal and hyperplastic endometrium, but in endometrial carcinoma Bcl2/Bax ratio decline. Quantification of apoptosis, using morphological and TUNEL reaction methods, on endometrial biopsies in postmenopausal patients before and after therapy indicate a low rate of apoptotic phenomenon.

  5. Modification of blood pressure in postmenopausal women: role of hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannoletta M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Marianna Cannoletta, Angelo Cagnacci Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences of the Mother, Child and Adult, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena and Reggio Emilia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy Abstract: The rate of hypertension increases after menopause. Whether estrogen and progesterone deficiency associated with menopause play a role in determining a worst blood pressure (BP control is still controversial. Also, studies dealing with the administration of estrogens or hormone therapy (HT have reported conflicting evidence. In general it seems that, despite some negative data on subgroups of later postmenopausal women obtained with oral estrogens, in particular conjugated equine estrogens (CEE, most of the data indicate neutral or beneficial effects of estrogen or HT administration on BP control of both normotensive and hypertensive women. Data obtained with ambulatory BP monitoring and with transdermal estrogens are more convincing and concordant in defining positive effect on BP control of both normotensive and hypertensive postmenopausal women. Overall progestin adjunct does not hamper the effect of estrogens. Among progestins, drospirenone, a spironolactone-derived molecule, appears to be the molecule with the best antihypertensive properties. Keywords: hormone replacement therapy, estrogen, progestin, blood pressure, menopause, hypertension 

  6. PERİODONTAL TREATMENT OUTCOMES IN POST MENOPAUSAL WOMEN RECEIVING HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali ÇEKİCİ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of hormone replacement therapy(HRT on periodontal treatment outcomes in a group of postmenopausal women with periodontitis. Materials and Methods: 23 post-menopausal chronic periodontitis patients were included in this study. The test group(n=11 consisted of women who started HRT with this study and received conjugated estrogen and medroxyprogesteron. The control group(n=12 was women not taking any HRT or supplement therapy. Study groups received the same periodontal treatment. All subjects examiend by recording the following: plaque index (PI, sulcus bleeding index (SBI, periodontal pocket depth (PD and relative attachment level (RAL from 6 sites in each tooth. Measurements were recorded at the baseline, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months following periodontal treatment. Serum estrogene level and bone mineral density was recorded at baseline and 6 months following periodontal treatment. Results: The GI change was greater in the control group. There wasn’t significant difference by means of PD, the attachment gain was significantly greater in the HRT receiving group. Conclusion: HRT seems to have a positive effect on periodontal treatment outcomes.

  7. Early mortality on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT): the prairie CRRT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bhanu; Urbanski, Michelle; Ferguson, Thomas W; Karreman, Erwin; Tangri, Nav

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) have an increased short-term and long-term risk of mortality. In most North American intensive care units (ICUs), these patients receive continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). We aim to identify clinical and demographic factors associated with mortality within 24 h of initiating CRRT. This paper is a prospective cohort study. The setting involves three ICUs (12-bed surgical ICU, 10-bed medical ICU, and a 7-bed combined ICU for both medical and surgical patients) of the Regina Qu'Appelle Health Region (RQHR) Saskatchewan, Canada. The patients were 106 individuals with AKI who were admitted to the ICUs and received CRRT from April 2013 to September 2014. Date and time of admission, transfer to, and initiation of CRRT were documented. Demographic data, use of vasoactive medications, ventilator settings, pH, urine output, and chronic disease comorbidities were measured. The methods involved a stepwise multiple variable logistic regression model using death within 24 h of starting CRRT as the dependent variable, with significant variables derived from univariate analysis as covariates. Of the 2634 patients admitted to the ICUs in the study period (April 2013 to September 2014), 83.6 % (2201/2634) had no AKI. Two hundred and sixty-nine or 10.2 % of the patients had stage 3 AKI. One hundred six of the 269 patients (40%) were started on CRRT. Of those on CRRT, 66/106 died in the ICU while on CRRT. Seventeen of the 66 patients (26%) died within 24 h of initiating therapy. In univariate logistic regression models, factors associated with early mortality included fraction of inspired oxygen (per 0.1 unit) (OR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.09-1.77); epinephrine dose >10 μg/min (OR 5.81, 95 % CI 1.86-18.16); vasopressin >0.02 μg/min (OR 3.99, 95 % CI 1.07-14.84); and norepinephrine dose >20 μg/min (OR 11.04, 95 % CI 2.38-51.24) which were associated with early mortality. When included in

  8. Economics of dialysis dependence following renal replacement therapy for critically ill acute kidney injury patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethgen, Olivier; Schneider, Antoine G.; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The obective of this study was to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing intermittent with continuous renal replacement therapy (IRRT versus CRRT) as initial therapy for acute kidney injury (AKI) in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods Assuming some patients would potentially be eligible for either modality, we modeled life year gained, the quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and healthcare costs for a cohort of 1000 IRRT patients and a cohort of 1000 CRRT patients. We used a 1-year, 5-year and a lifetime horizon. A Markov model with two health states for AKI survivors was designed: dialysis dependence and dialysis independence. We applied Weibull regression from published estimates to fit survival curves for CRRT and IRRT patients and to fit the proportion of dialysis dependence among CRRT and IRRT survivors. We then applied a risk ratio reported in a large retrospective cohort study to the fitted CRRT estimates in order to determine the proportion of dialysis dependence for IRRT survivors. We conducted sensitivity analyses based on a range of differences for daily implementation cost between CRRT and IRRT (base case: CRRT day $632 more expensive than IRRT day; range from $200 to $1000) and a range of risk ratios for dialysis dependence for CRRT as compared with IRRT (from 0.65 to 0.95; base case: 0.80). Results Continuous renal replacement therapy was associated with a marginally greater gain in QALY as compared with IRRT (1.093 versus 1.078). Despite higher upfront costs for CRRT in the ICU ($4046 for CRRT versus $1423 for IRRT in average), the 5-year total cost including the cost of dialysis dependence was lower for CRRT ($37 780 for CRRT versus $39 448 for IRRT on average). The base case incremental cost-effectiveness analysis showed that CRRT dominated IRRT. This dominance was confirmed by extensive sensitivity analysis. Conclusions Initial CRRT is cost-effective compared with initial IRRT by reducing the rate of long-term dialysis

  9. Knowledge and Perceptions about Nicotine, Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Electronic Cigarettes among Healthcare Professionals in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Moysidou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions of Greek healthcare professionals about nicotine, nicotine replacement therapies and electronic cigarettes. Methods. An online survey was performed, in which physicians and nurses working in private and public healthcare sectors in Athens-Greece were asked to participate through email invitations. A knowledge score was calculated by scoring the correct answers to specific questions with 1 point. Results. A total of 262 healthcare professionals were included to the analysis. Most had daily contact with smokers in their working environment. About half of them considered that nicotine has an extremely or very important contribution to smoking-related disease. More than 30% considered nicotine replacement therapies equally or more addictive than smoking, 76.7% overestimated their smoking cessation efficacy and only 21.0% would recommend them as long-term smoking substitutes. For electronic cigarettes, 45.0% considered them equally or more addictive than smoking and 24.4% equally or more harmful than tobacco cigarettes. Additionally, 35.5% thought they involve combustion while the majority responded that nicotine in electronic cigarettes is synthetically produced. Only 14.5% knew about the pending European regulation, but 33.2% have recommended them to smokers in the past. Still, more than 40% would not recommend electronic cigarettes to smokers unwilling or unable to quit smoking with currently approved medications. Cardiologists and respiratory physicians, who are responsible for smoking cessation therapy in Greece, were even more reluctant to recommend electronic cigarettes to this subpopulation of smokers compared to all other participants. The knowledge score of the whole study sample was 7.7 (SD: 2.4 out of a maximum score of 16. Higher score was associated with specific physician specialties. Conclusions. Greek healthcare professionals appear to overestimate

  10. Economics of dialysis dependence following renal replacement therapy for critically ill acute kidney injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethgen, Olivier; Schneider, Antoine G; Bagshaw, Sean M; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Kellum, John A

    2015-01-01

    The obective of this study was to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing intermittent with continuous renal replacement therapy (IRRT versus CRRT) as initial therapy for acute kidney in