WorldWideScience

Sample records for testing spectral models

  1. Construction of Spectral Discoloration Model for Red Lead Pigment by Aging Test and Simulating Degradation Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of spectral discoloration model, based on aging test and simulating degradation experiment, was proposed to detect the aging degree of red lead pigment in ancient murals and to reproduce the spectral data supporting digital restoration of the ancient murals. The degradation process of red lead pigment under the aging test conditions was revealed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and spectrophotometer. The simulating degradation experiment was carried out by proportionally mixing red lead and lead dioxide with referring to the results of aging test. The experimental result indicated that the pure red lead was gradually turned into black lead dioxide, and the amount of tiny particles of the aging sample increased faced with aging process. Both the chroma and lightness of red lead pigment decreased with discoloration, and its hue essentially remains unchanged. In addition, the spectral reflectance curves of the aging samples almost started rising at about 550 nm with the inflection moving slightly from about 570 nm to 550 nm. The spectral reflectance of samples in long- and in short-wavelength regions was fitted well with the logarithmic and linear function. The spectral discoloration model was established, and the real aging red lead pigment in Dunhuang murals was measured and verified the effectiveness of the model.

  2. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  3. Spectral modeling for the identification and quantification of algal blooms: A test of approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malthus, T.J.; Grieve, L. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Harwar, M.D. [Univ. of Wolverhampton (United Kingdom)

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop and test a Monte Carlo modelling approach for the characterization of reflectance for different bloom-forming marine phytoplankton species. The model was tested on optical data for four species (Dunaliella salina, Pavlova pinguis, Emiliania huxleyi and Synechocystes spp.) and simulations performed over a range of chlorophyll concentrations. Discriminant analysis identified 10 key wavelengths which could be used to maximize the separation between the four species. The resulting wavelengths were combined in a neural network to show 100% accuracy in classifying species type. Further simulations were undertaken to investigate the effect of aquatic humus on reflectance characteristics and the change in wavelengths for algal discrimination. The implications for the development of algorithms for the identification of algal bloom species type by remote sensing are briefly discussed.

  4. Evaluating the robustness of models developed from field spectral data in predicting African grass foliar nitrogen concentration using WorldView-2 image as an independent test dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanga, Onisimo; Adam, Elhadi; Adjorlolo, Clement; Abdel-Rahman, Elfatih M.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the extent to which the resampled field spectra compare with the actual image spectra of the new generation multispectral WorldView-2 (WV-2) satellite. This was achieved by developing models from resampled field spectra data and testing them on an actual WV-2 image of the study area. We evaluated the performance of reflectance ratios (RI), normalized difference indices (NDI) and random forest (RF) regression model in predicting foliar nitrogen concentration in a grassland environment. The field measured spectra were used to calibrate the RF model using a randomly selected training (n = 70%) nitrogen data set. The model developed from the field spectra resampled to WV-2 wavebands was validated on an independent field spectral test dataset as well as on the actual WV-2 image of the same area (n = 30%, bootstrapped a 100 times). The results show that the model developed using RI could predict nitrogen with a mean R2 of 0.74 and 0.65 on an independent field spectral test data set and on the actual WV-2 image, respectively. The root mean square error of prediction (RMSE %) was 0.17 and 0.22 for the field test data set and the WV-2 image, respectively. Results provide an insight on the magnitude of errors that are expected when up-scaling field spectral models to airborne or satellite image data. The prediction also indicates the unceasing relevance of field spectroscopy studies to better understand the spectral models critical for vegetation quality assessment.

  5. Testing Constancy of the Error Covariance Matrix in Vector Models against Parametric Alternatives using a Spectral Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yukay

    I consider multivariate (vector) time series models in which the error covariance matrix may be time-varying. I derive a test of constancy of the error covariance matrix against the alternative that the covariance matrix changes over time. I design a new family of Lagrange-multiplier tests against...

  6. Testing a missing spectral link in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kellay, H.; Tran, Tuan; Goldburg, W.; Goldenfeld, N.; Gioia, G.; Chakraborty, P.

    2012-01-01

    Although the cardinal attribute of turbulence is the velocity fluctuations, these fluctuations have been ignored in theories of the frictional drag of turbulent flows. Our goal is to test a new theory that links the frictional drag to the spectral exponent , a property of the velocity fluctuations

  7. Testing a missing spectral link in turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellay, Hamid; Tran, Tuan; Goldburg, Walter; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2012-12-21

    Although the cardinal attribute of turbulence is the velocity fluctuations, these fluctuations have been ignored in theories of the frictional drag of turbulent flows. Our goal is to test a new theory that links the frictional drag to the spectral exponent α, a property of the velocity fluctuations in a flow. We use a soap-film channel wherein for the first time the value of α can be switched between 3 and 5/3, the two theoretically possible values in soap-film flows. To induce turbulence with α = 5/3, we make one of the edges of the soap-film channel serrated. Remarkably, the new theory of the frictional drag holds in both soap-film flows (for either value of the spectral exponent α) and ordinary pipe flows (where α = 5/3), even though these types of flow are governed by different equations.

  8. Spectral Learning for Supervised Topic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yong; Wang, Yining; Zhu, Jun

    2017-03-15

    Supervised topic models simultaneously model the latent topic structure of large collections of documents and a response variable associated with each document. Existing inference methods are based on variational approximation or Monte Carlo sampling, which often suffers from the local minimum defect. Spectral methods have been applied to learn unsupervised topic models, such as latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), with provable guarantees. This paper investigates the possibility of applying spectral methods to recover the parameters of supervised LDA (sLDA). We first present a two-stage spectral method, which recovers the parameters of LDA followed by a power update method to recover the regression model parameters. Then, we further present a single-phase spectral algorithm to jointly recover the topic distribution matrix as well as the regression weights. Our spectral algorithms are provably correct and computationally efficient. We prove a sample complexity bound for each algorithm and subsequently derive a sufficient condition for the identifiability of sLDA. Thorough experiments on synthetic and real-world datasets verify the theory and demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the spectral algorithms. In fact, our results on a large-scale review rating dataset demonstrate that our single-phase spectral algorithm alone gets comparable or even better performance than state-of-the-art methods, while previous work on spectral methods has rarely reported such promising performance.

  9. Practical Models of Extinction for Spectral Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall

    2013-09-01

    Spectral extinction includes both the effects of absorption and scattering, but while multiple absorption models exist, no useful scattering model exists in standard spectral tools. Nonetheless X-ray halos, created by scattering from dust grains, are detected around even moderately absorbed sources and their impact on an observed source spectrum can be equivalent to direct absorption. By convolving the scattering cross section with dust models we will create a spectral model as a function of energy, type of dust, and extraction region that can be used with models of direct absorption (e.g. XSPEC s phabs ). This will ensure the extinction model is consistant and enable direct connections between a source s X-ray spectral fits and its UV/optical extinction.

  10. A modeling cross-spectral analysis technique based on the Prony Spectral Line Estimator (PSLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, G A; Intaglietta, M

    1994-03-01

    The Cross-Prony Spectral Line Estimator (XPSLE) is proposed for spectral comparison of short data records. Basic theory is discussed. The XPSLE method is tested on pairs of synthetic data records and is shown to be sensitive to disparity of spectral content. Application to analysis of arteriolar vasomotion is discussed.

  11. Model-based biological Raman spectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer-Peltier, Karen E; Haka, Abigail S; Motz, Jason T; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2002-01-01

    Raman spectral imaging is a powerful tool for determining chemical information in a biological specimen. The challenge is to condense the large amount of spectral information into an easily visualized form with high information content. Researchers have applied a range of techniques, from peak-height ratios to sophisticated models, to produce interpretable Raman images. The purpose of this article is to review some of the more common imaging approaches, in particular principal components analysis, multivariate curve resolution, and Euclidean distance, as well as to present a new technique, morphological modeling. How to best extract meaningful chemical information using each imaging approach will be discussed and examples of images produced with each will be shown. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Spectral functions of the spinless Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, J [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Hohenadler, M [Institute for Theoretical and Computational Physics, TU Graz (Austria); Fehske, H [Institute for Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-03-01

    An analytical approach to the one-dimensional spinless Holstein model is proposed, which is valid at finite charge-carrier concentrations. Spectral functions of charge carriers are computed on the basis of self-energy calculations. A generalization of the Lang-Firsov canonical transformation method is shown to provide an interpolation scheme between the extreme weak-coupling and strong-coupling cases. The transformation depends on a variationally determined parameter that characterizes the charge distribution across the polaron volume. The relation between the spectral functions of the polaron and electron, the latter corresponding to the photoemission spectrum, is derived. Particular attention is paid to the distinction between the coherent and incoherent parts of the spectra, and their evolution as a function of band filling and model parameters. Results are discussed and compared with recent numerical calculations for the many-polaron problem.

  13. New approach to spectral features modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brug, H. van; Scalia, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of spectral features, speckle effects, is explained, followed by a discussion on many aspects of spectral features generation. The next part gives an overview of means to limit the amplitude of the spectral features. This paper gives a discussion of all means to reduce the spectral

  14. Spectral properties in supersymmetric matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulton, Lyonell, E-mail: L.Boulton@hw.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar, E-mail: garciamormaria@uniovi.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Avda Calvo Sotelo 18, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Restuccia, Alvaro, E-mail: arestu@usb.ve [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Avda Calvo Sotelo 18, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-03-21

    We formulate a general sufficiency criterion for discreteness of the spectrum of both supersymmmetric and non-supersymmetric theories with a fermionic contribution. This criterion allows an analysis of Hamiltonians in complete form rather than just their semiclassical limits. In such a framework we examine spectral properties of various (1+0) matrix models. We consider the BMN model of M-theory compactified on a maximally supersymmetric pp-wave background, different regularizations of the supermembrane with central charges and a non-supersymmetric model comprising a bound state of N D2 with m D0. While the first two examples have a purely discrete spectrum, the latter has a continuous spectrum with a lower end given in terms of the monopole charge.

  15. Unstructured Spectral Element Model for Dispersive and Nonlinear Wave Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Eskilsson, Claes; Bigoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    ). In the present paper we use a single layer of quadratic (in 2D) and prismatic (in 3D) elements. The model has been stabilized through a combination of over-integration of the Galerkin projections and a mild modal filter. We present numerical tests of nonlinear waves serving as a proof-of-concept validation......We introduce a new stabilized high-order and unstructured numerical model for modeling fully nonlinear and dispersive water waves. The model is based on a nodal spectral element method of arbitrary order in space and a -transformed formulation due to Cai, Langtangen, Nielsen and Tveito (1998...

  16. Spectral density method to Anderson-Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chebrolu, Narasimha Raju, E-mail: narasimharaju.phy@gmail.com; Chatterjee, Ashok [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Two-parameter spectral density function of a magnetic impurity electron in a non-magnetic metal is calculated within the framework of the Anderson-Holstein model using the spectral density approximation method. The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the spectral function is investigated.

  17. Spectral density method to Anderson-Holstein model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebrolu, Narasimha Raju; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-06-01

    Two-parameter spectral density function of a magnetic impurity electron in a non-magnetic metal is calculated within the framework of the Anderson-Holstein model using the spectral density approximation method. The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the spectral function is investigated.

  18. Wavelength and alignment tests for confocal spectral imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Robert M; Lerner, Jeremy M

    2005-12-01

    Confocal spectral imaging (CSI) microscope systems now on the market delineate multiple fluorescent proteins, labels, or dyes within biological specimens by performing spectral characterizations. However, we find that some CSI present inconsistent spectral profiles of reference spectra within a particular system as well as between related and unrelated instruments. We also find evidence of instability that, if not diagnosed, could lead to inconsistent data. This variability confirms the need for diagnostic tools to provide a standardized, objective means of characterizing instability, evidence of misalignment, as well as performing calibration and validation functions. Our protocol uses an inexpensive multi-ion discharge lamp (MIDL) that contains Hg+, Ar+, and inorganic fluorophores that emit distinct, stable spectral features, in place of a sample. An MIDL characterization verifies the accuracy and consistency of a CSI system and validates acquisitions of biological samples. We examined a total of 10 CSI systems, all of which displayed spectral inconsistencies, enabling us to identify malfunctioning subsystems. Only one of the 10 instruments met its optimal performance expectations. We have found that using a primary light source that emits an absolute standard "reference spectrum" enabled us to diagnose instrument errors and measure accuracy and reproducibility under normalized conditions. Using this information, a CSI operator can determine whether a CSI system is working optimally and make objective comparisons with the performance of other CSI systems. It is evident that if CSI systems of a similar make and model were standardized to reveal the same spectral profile from a standard light source, then researchers could be confident that real-life experimental findings would be repeatable on any similar system. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. A Spectral Evaluation of Models Performances in Mediterranean Oak Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, R.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Abramowitz, G.; Carrara, A.; Correia, A.; Kobayashi, H.; Papale, D.; Pearson, D.; Pereira, J.; Piao, S.; Rambal, S.; Sonnentag, O.

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystem processes are influenced by climatic trends at multiple temporal scales including diel patterns and other mid-term climatic modes, such as interannual and seasonal variability. Because interactions between biophysical components of ecosystem processes are complex, it is important to test how models perform in frequency (e.g. hours, days, weeks, months, years) and time (i.e. day of the year) domains in addition to traditional tests of annual or monthly sums. Here we present a spectral evaluation using wavelet time series analysis of model performance in seven Mediterranean Oak Woodlands that encompass three deciduous and four evergreen sites. We tested the performance of five models (CABLE, ORCHIDEE, BEPS, Biome-BGC, and JULES) on measured variables of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET). In general, model performance fails at intermediate periods (e.g. weeks to months) likely because these models do not represent the water pulse dynamics that influence GPP and ET at these Mediterranean systems. To improve the performance of a model it is critical to identify first where and when the model fails. Only by identifying where a model fails we can improve the model performance and use them as prognostic tools and to generate further hypotheses that can be tested by new experiments and measurements.

  20. MHz to THz: Spectral Modeling of CMB Foreground Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan

    Measurements of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a critical test of the inflationary paradigm. Gravity waves excited during an inflationary epoch in the early universe interact with the CMB to impart a characteristic signal in linear polarization. The distinctive spatial pattern and frequency dependence of the inflationary signal provide a unique signature to characterize physics at energies approaching Grand Unification, a trillion times beyond the energies accessible to direct experimentation using particle accelerators. Detecting the inflationary signal will be difficult. At predicted amplitudes of 30--100 nK, the signal is faint compared to astrophysical foreground emission from sources within the Galaxy. Measurements of the Galactic synchrotron and dust foregrounds show these sources to be more than an order of magnitude brighter than the inflationary signal. Robust detection and characterization of the gravity-wave signal requires subtracting these polarized foregrounds to accuracy of a few percent or better. Despite the importance of accurate foreground subtraction for both polarized and unpolarized CMB analyses, considerable uncertainty exists in the frequency dependence of the dominant synchrotron and dust foregrounds. Published maps of the synchrotron spectral index differ at levels Delta beta > 0.2, while estimates of the dust spectral index differ by comparable amounts. Foreground uncertainty at this level would prevent detection of the inflationary signal, even when scaled from nearby ``guard'' channels surrounding the foreground minimum near 60 GHz. We propose to use multi-frequency parametric fitting to model the frequency spectrum of diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky. Archival data sets spanning 5 decades in frequency from 22 MHz to 3 THz allow self-consistent determination of the spectral index and curvature for both synchrotron and dust emission. Broad frequency coverage minimizes confusion

  1. Validation of spectral gas radiation models under oxyfuel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, Johann Valentin

    2013-05-15

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels with pure oxygen results in a different flue gas composition than combustion with air. Standard computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) spectral gas radiation models for air combustion are therefore out of their validity range in oxyfuel combustion. This thesis provides a common spectral basis for the validation of new spectral models. A literature review about fundamental gas radiation theory, spectral modeling and experimental methods provides the reader with a basic understanding of the topic. In the first results section, this thesis validates detailed spectral models with high resolution spectral measurements in a gas cell with the aim of recommending one model as the best benchmark model. In the second results section, spectral measurements from a turbulent natural gas flame - as an example for a technical combustion process - are compared to simulated spectra based on measured gas atmospheres. The third results section compares simplified spectral models to the benchmark model recommended in the first results section and gives a ranking of the proposed models based on their accuracy. A concluding section gives recommendations for the selection and further development of simplified spectral radiation models. Gas cell transmissivity spectra in the spectral range of 2.4 - 5.4 {mu}m of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the temperature range from 727 C to 1500 C and at different concentrations were compared in the first results section at a nominal resolution of 32 cm{sup -1} to line-by-line models from different databases, two statistical-narrow-band models and the exponential-wide-band model. The two statistical-narrow-band models EM2C and RADCAL showed good agreement with a maximal band transmissivity deviation of 3 %. The exponential-wide-band model showed a deviation of 6 %. The new line-by-line database HITEMP2010 had the lowest band transmissivity deviation of 2.2% and was therefore recommended as a reference model for the

  2. Spectral statistics in particles-rotor model and cranking model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou Xian Rong; Zhao En Guang; Guo Lu

    2002-01-01

    Spectral statistics for six particles in single-j and two-j model coupled with a deformed core are studied in the frames of particles-rotor model and cranking shell model. The nearest-neighbor-distribution of energy levels and spectral rigidity are studied as a function of the spin or cranking frequency, respectively. The results of single-j shell are compared with those in two-j case. The system becomes more regular when single-j space (i sub 1 sub 3 sub / sub 2) is replaced by two-j shell (g sub 7 sub / sub 2 + d sub 5 sub / sub 2), although the basis size of the configuration space is unchanged. However, the degree of chaoticity of the system changes slightly when configuration space is enlarged by extending single-j shell (i sub 1 sub 3 sub / sub 2) to two-j shell (i sub 1 sub 3 sub / sub 2 + g sub 9 sub / sub 2). Nuclear chaotic behavior is studied when authors take a two-body interaction as delta force and pairing interaction, respectively

  3. MODELING SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL MASKING IN THE HUMAN AUDITORY SYSTEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Torsten; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Ewert, Stephan D.

    2007-01-01

    An auditory signal processing model is presented that simulates psychoacoustical data from a large variety of experimental conditions related to spectral and temporal masking. The model is based on the modulation filterbank model by Dau et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2892-2905 (1997)] but inclu......An auditory signal processing model is presented that simulates psychoacoustical data from a large variety of experimental conditions related to spectral and temporal masking. The model is based on the modulation filterbank model by Dau et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2892-2905 (1997...

  4. Spectral response model for a multibin photon-counting spectral computed tomography detector and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejin; Persson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans; Karlsson, Staffan; Xu, Cheng; Danielsson, Mats; Huber, Ben

    2015-07-01

    Variations among detector channels in computed tomography can lead to ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and biased estimates in projection-based material decomposition. Typically, the ring artifacts are corrected by compensation methods based on flat fielding, where transmission measurements are required for a number of material-thickness combinations. Phantoms used in these methods can be rather complex and require an extensive number of transmission measurements. Moreover, material decomposition needs knowledge of the individual response of each detector channel to account for the detector inhomogeneities. For this purpose, we have developed a spectral response model that binwise predicts the response of a multibin photon-counting detector individually for each detector channel. The spectral response model is performed in two steps. The first step employs a forward model to predict the expected numbers of photon counts, taking into account parameters such as the incident x-ray spectrum, absorption efficiency, and energy response of the detector. The second step utilizes a limited number of transmission measurements with a set of flat slabs of two absorber materials to fine-tune the model predictions, resulting in a good correspondence with the physical measurements. To verify the response model, we apply the model in two cases. First, the model is used in combination with a compensation method which requires an extensive number of transmission measurements to determine the necessary parameters. Our spectral response model successfully replaces these measurements by simulations, saving a significant amount of measurement time. Second, the spectral response model is used as the basis of the maximum likelihood approach for projection-based material decomposition. The reconstructed basis images show a good separation between the calcium-like material and the contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium. The contrast agent concentrations are reconstructed with more

  5. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchenko Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, we characterize both short-term (solar rotation and long-term (solar cycle changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2 and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2 and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S models.

  6. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, Sergey V.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Lean, Judith L.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), we characterize both short-term (solar rotation) and long-term (solar cycle) changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2) and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) models.

  7. Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method for a fluidized bed model

    CERN Document Server

    Sarra, S A

    2003-01-01

    A Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method and operator splitting are used to solve a hyperbolic system of conservation laws with a source term modeling a fluidized bed. The fluidized bed displays a slugging behavior which corresponds to shocks in the solution. A modified Gegenbauer postprocessing procedure is used to obtain a solution which is free of oscillations caused by the Gibbs-Wilbraham phenomenon in the spectral viscosity solution. Conservation is maintained by working with unphysical negative particle concentrations.

  8. Spectral action models of gravity on packed swiss cheese cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Adam; Marcolli, Matilde

    2016-06-01

    We present a model of (modified) gravity on spacetimes with fractal structure based on packing of spheres, which are (Euclidean) variants of the packed swiss cheese cosmology models. As the action functional for gravity we consider the spectral action of noncommutative geometry, and we compute its expansion on a space obtained as an Apollonian packing of three-dimensional spheres inside a four-dimensional ball. Using information from the zeta function of the Dirac operator of the spectral triple, we compute the leading terms in the asymptotic expansion of the spectral action. They consist of a zeta regularization of the divergent sum of the leading terms of the spectral actions of the individual spheres in the packing. This accounts for the contribution of points 1 and 3 in the dimension spectrum (as in the case of a 3-sphere). There is an additional term coming from the residue at the additional point in the real dimension spectrum that corresponds to the packing constant, as well as a series of fluctuations coming from log-periodic oscillations, created by the points of the dimension spectrum that are off the real line. These terms detect the fractality of the residue set of the sphere packing. We show that the presence of fractality influences the shape of the slow-roll potential for inflation, obtained from the spectral action. We also discuss the effect of truncating the fractal structure at a certain scale related to the energy scale in the spectral action.

  9. Spectral evaluation of Earth geopotential models and an experiment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gravity field related datasets have been compiled over local/regional scale (see ICGEM 2010), evalu- ating these models to clarify the differences among them and hence to monitor the improvements. Keywords. Earth geopotential model; spectral evaluation; terrestrial data; CHAMP and GRACE; EGM08; Remove. Compute ...

  10. Data Field Modeling and Spectral-Spatial Feature Fusion for Hyperspectral Data Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da; Li, Jianxun

    2016-12-16

    Classification is a significant subject in hyperspectral remote sensing image processing. This study proposes a spectral-spatial feature fusion algorithm for the classification of hyperspectral images (HSI). Unlike existing spectral-spatial classification methods, the influences and interactions of the surroundings on each measured pixel were taken into consideration in this paper. Data field theory was employed as the mathematical realization of the field theory concept in physics, and both the spectral and spatial domains of HSI were considered as data fields. Therefore, the inherent dependency of interacting pixels was modeled. Using data field modeling, spatial and spectral features were transformed into a unified radiation form and further fused into a new feature by using a linear model. In contrast to the current spectral-spatial classification methods, which usually simply stack spectral and spatial features together, the proposed method builds the inner connection between the spectral and spatial features, and explores the hidden information that contributed to classification. Therefore, new information is included for classification. The final classification result was obtained using a random forest (RF) classifier. The proposed method was tested with the University of Pavia and Indian Pines, two well-known standard hyperspectral datasets. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has higher classification accuracies than those obtained by the traditional approaches.

  11. CAM-SE: A scalable spectral element dynamical core for the Community Atmosphere Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Edwards, Jim [IBM and National Center for Atmospheric Research; Evans, Kate J [ORNL; Guba, O [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Lauritzen, Peter [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Mirin, Art [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); St.-Cyr, Amik [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Taylor, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Worley, Patrick H [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 5 includes a spectral element dynamical core option from NCAR's High-Order Method Modeling Environment. It is a continuous Galerkin spectral finite element method designed for fully unstructured quadrilateral meshes. The current configurations in CAM are based on the cubed-sphere grid. The main motivation for including a spectral element dynamical core is to improve the scalability of CAM by allowing quasi-uniform grids for the sphere that do not require polar filters. In addition, the approach provides other state-of-the-art capabilities such as improved conservation properties. Spectral elements are used for the horizontal discretization, while most other aspects of the dynamical core are a hybrid of well tested techniques from CAM's finite volume and global spectral dynamical core options. Here we first give a overview of the spectral element dynamical core as used in CAM. We then give scalability and performance results from CAM running with three different dynamical core options within the Community Earth System Model, using a pre-industrial time-slice configuration. We focus on high resolution simulations of 1/4 degree, 1/8 degree, and T340 spectral truncation.

  12. Renormalization of aperiodic model lattices: spectral properties

    CERN Document Server

    Kroon, L

    2003-01-01

    Many of the published results for one-dimensional deterministic aperiodic systems treat rather simplified electron models with either a constant site energy or a constant hopping integral. Here we present some rigorous results for more realistic mixed tight-binding systems with both the site energies and the hopping integrals having an aperiodic spatial variation. It is shown that the mixed Thue-Morse, period-doubling and Rudin-Shapiro lattices can be transformed to on-site models on renormalized lattices maintaining the individual order between the site energies. The character of the energy spectra for these mixed models is therefore the same as for the corresponding on-site models. Furthermore, since the study of electrons on a lattice governed by the Schroedinger tight-binding equation maps onto the study of elastic vibrations on a harmonic chain, we have proved that the vibrational spectra of aperiodic harmonic chains with distributions of masses determined by the Thue-Morse sequence and the period-doubli...

  13. The next step in coastal numerical models: spectral/hp element methods?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskilsson, Claes; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we outline the application of spectral/hp element methods for modelling nonlinear and dispersive waves. We present one- and two-dimensional test cases for the shallow water equations and Boussinesqtype equations – including highly dispersive Boussinesq-type equations.......In this paper we outline the application of spectral/hp element methods for modelling nonlinear and dispersive waves. We present one- and two-dimensional test cases for the shallow water equations and Boussinesqtype equations – including highly dispersive Boussinesq-type equations....

  14. Modelling and validation of spectral reflectance for the colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidovic-Rowe, Dzena; Claridge, Ela

    2005-03-01

    The spectral reflectance of the colon is known to be affected by malignant and pre-malignant changes in the tissue. As part of long-term research on the derivation of diagnostically important parameters characterizing colon histology, we have investigated the effects of the normal histological variability on the remitted spectra. This paper presents a detailed optical model of the normal colon comprising mucosa, submucosa and the smooth muscle layer. Each layer is characterized by five variable histological parameters: the volume fraction of blood, the haemoglobin saturation, the size of the scattering particles, including collagen, the volume fraction of the scattering particles and the layer thickness, and three optical parameters: the anisotropy factor, the refractive index of the medium and the refractive index of the scattering particles. The paper specifies the parameter ranges corresponding to normal colon tissue, including some previously unpublished ones. Diffuse reflectance spectra were modelled using the Monte Carlo method. Validation of the model-generated spectra against measured spectra demonstrated that good correspondence was achieved between the two. The analysis of the effect of the individual histological parameters on the behaviour of the spectra has shown that the spectral variability originates mainly from changes in the mucosa. However, the submucosa and the muscle layer must be included in the model as they have a significant constant effect on the spectral reflectance above 600 nm. The nature of variations in the spectra also suggests that it may be possible to carry out model inversion and to recover parameters characterizing the colon from multi-spectral images. A preliminary study, in which the mucosal blood and collagen parameters were modified to reflect histopathological changes associated with colon cancer, has shown that the spectra predicted by our model resemble measured spectral reflectance of adenocarcinomas. This suggests that

  15. A three-dimensional spectral element model for the solution of the hydrostatic primitive equations

    CERN Document Server

    Iskandarani, M; Levin, J C

    2003-01-01

    We present a spectral element model to solve the hydrostatic primitive equations governing large-scale geophysical flows. The highlights of this new model include unstructured grids, dual h-p paths to convergence, and good scalability characteristics on present day parallel computers including Beowulf-class systems. The behavior of the model is assessed on three process-oriented test problems involving wave propagation, gravitational adjustment, and nonlinear flow rectification, respectively. The first of these test problems is a study of the convergence properties of the model when simulating the linear propagation of baroclinic Kelvin waves. The second is an intercomparison of spectral element and finite-difference model solutions to the adjustment of a density front in a straight channel. Finally, the third problem considers the comparison of model results to measurements obtained from a laboratory simulation of flow around a submarine canyon. The aforementioned tests demonstrate the good performance of th...

  16. SINGLE-PARTICLE SPECTRAL DENSITY OF THE HUBBARD-MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEHLIG, B; ESKES, H; HAYN, R; MEINDERS, MBJ

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  17. Single-particle spectral density of the Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehlig, B.; Eskes, H.; Hayn, R.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the single-particle spectral function for the Hubbard model within the framework of a projection technique equivalent to the two-pole approximation. We show that the two-pole approximation can be well understood as an average characterization of the upper and the lower Hubbard bands,

  18. Robust spectral clustering using statistical sub-graph affinity model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin A Eichel

    Full Text Available Spectral clustering methods have been shown to be effective for image segmentation. Unfortunately, the presence of image noise as well as textural characteristics can have a significant negative effect on the segmentation performance. To accommodate for image noise and textural characteristics, this study introduces the concept of sub-graph affinity, where each node in the primary graph is modeled as a sub-graph characterizing the neighborhood surrounding the node. The statistical sub-graph affinity matrix is then constructed based on the statistical relationships between sub-graphs of connected nodes in the primary graph, thus counteracting the uncertainty associated with the image noise and textural characteristics by utilizing more information than traditional spectral clustering methods. Experiments using both synthetic and natural images under various levels of noise contamination demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve improved segmentation performance when compared to existing spectral clustering methods.

  19. Robust spectral clustering using statistical sub-graph affinity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichel, Justin A; Wong, Alexander; Fieguth, Paul; Clausi, David A

    2013-01-01

    Spectral clustering methods have been shown to be effective for image segmentation. Unfortunately, the presence of image noise as well as textural characteristics can have a significant negative effect on the segmentation performance. To accommodate for image noise and textural characteristics, this study introduces the concept of sub-graph affinity, where each node in the primary graph is modeled as a sub-graph characterizing the neighborhood surrounding the node. The statistical sub-graph affinity matrix is then constructed based on the statistical relationships between sub-graphs of connected nodes in the primary graph, thus counteracting the uncertainty associated with the image noise and textural characteristics by utilizing more information than traditional spectral clustering methods. Experiments using both synthetic and natural images under various levels of noise contamination demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve improved segmentation performance when compared to existing spectral clustering methods.

  20. Towards tests of quark-hadron duality with functional analysis and spectral function data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boito, Diogo; Caprini, Irinel

    2017-04-01

    The presence of terms that violate quark-hadron duality in the expansion of QCD Green's functions is a generally accepted fact. Recently, a new approach was proposed for the study of duality violations (DVs), which exploits the existence of a rigorous lower bound on the functional distance, measured in a certain norm, between a "true" correlator and its approximant calculated theoretically along a contour in the complex energy plane. In the present paper, we pursue the investigation of functional-analysis-based tests towards their application to real spectral function data. We derive a closed analytic expression for the minimal functional distance based on the general weighted L2 norm and discuss its relation with the distance measured in the L∞ norm. Using fake data sets obtained from a realistic toy model in which we allow for covariances inspired from the publicly available ALEPH spectral functions, we obtain, by Monte Carlo simulations, the statistical distribution of the strength parameter that measures the magnitude of the DV term added to the usual operator product expansion. The results show that, if the region with large errors near the end point of the spectrum in τ decays is excluded, the functional-analysis-based tests using either L2 or L∞ norms are able to detect, in a statistically significant way, the presence of DVs in realistic spectral function pseudodata.

  1. Spectral amplification models for response spectrum addressing the directivity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Saed; Akkar, Sinan

    2017-04-01

    Ground motions with forward directivity effects are known with their significantly large spectral ordinates in medium-to-long periods. The large spectral ordinates stem from the impulsive characteristics of the forward directivity ground motions. The quantification of these spectral amplifications requires the identification of major seismological parameters that play a role in their generation. After running a suite of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, Moghimi and Akkar (2016) have shown that fault slip rate, fault characteristic magnitude, fault-site geometry as well as mean annual exceedance rate are important parameters that determine the level of spectral amplification due to directivity. These parameters are considered to develop two separate spectral amplification equations in this study. The proposed equations rely on Shahi and Baker (SHB11; 2011) and Chiou and Spudich (CHS13; Spudic et al., 2013) narrow-band forward directivity models. The presented equations only focus on the estimation of maximum spectral amplifications that occur at the ends of the fault segments. This way we eliminate the fault-site parameter in our equations for simplification. The proposed equations show different trends due to differences in the narrow-band directivity models of SHB11 and CHS13. The equations given in this study can form bases for describing forward directivity effects in seismic design codes. REFERENCES Shahi. S., Baker, J.W. (2011), "An Empirically Calibrated Framework for Including the Effects of Near-Fault Directivity in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis", Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 101(2): 742-755. Spudich, P., Watson-Lamprey, J., Somerville, P., Bayless, J., Shahi, S. K., Baker, J. W., Rowshandel, B., and Chiou, B. (2013), "Final Report of the NGA-West2 Directivity Working Group", PEER Report 2013/09. Moghimi. S., Akkar, S. (2016), "Implications of Forward Directivity Effects on Design Ground Motions", Seismological Society of

  2. Spectral Action Models of Gravity on Packed Swiss Cheese Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We present a model of (modified) gravity on spacetimes with fractal structure based on packing of spheres, which are (Euclidean) variants of the Packed Swiss Cheese Cosmology models. As the action functional for gravity we consider the spectral action of noncommutative geometry, and we compute its asymptotic expansion on a space obtained as an Apollonian packing of 3-dimensional spheres inside a 4-dimensional ball. Using information from the zeta function of the Dirac operator of the spectral triple, we show that the leading terms in the asymptotic expansion of the spectral action consist of a zeta regularization of the divergent sum of the leading terms of the spectral actions of the individual spheres in the packing, which accounts for the contribution of the points 1 and 3 in the dimension spectrum (as in the case of a 3-sphere). There is also an additional term coming from the residue at the additional point in the dimension spectrum that corresponds to the packing constant. It detects the fractality of t...

  3. Desktop Modeling Tools for Lidar Remote Sensing and Spectral Optimizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliutau, D.; Prasad, N. S.

    2013-12-01

    We developed a set of cross-platform desktop modeling tools for molecular spectroscopy and atmospheric remote sensing optimization calculations which rely on the HITRAN database in spectral calculations. As part of the simulation framework its components further use the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) for radiative transfer simulations and a number of NASA Earth datasets including the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) in computational routines. Currently the framework includes a spectral optimization program used to identify potential measurement wavelengths exhibiting minimum temperature, pressure and water vapor interferences, and a shell component for easier operation of the LBLRTM. An additional lidar simulation module for weighting functions selection and further lidar optimizations is also being incorporated into the modeling framework. The developed simulation components are applicable to the analysis of various atmospheric species and have been used in performance prediction calculations for the sensing of atmospheric CO2 in the future ASCENDS mission.

  4. Spectral fits with TCAF model : A global understanding of both temporal and spectral properties of black hole sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Dipak; Sarathi Pal, Partha; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Santanu; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit; Molla, Aslam Ali

    2016-07-01

    There are many theoretical and phenomenological models in the literature which explain physics of accretion around black holes (BHs). Some of these models assume ad hoc components to explain different timing and spectral aspects of black hole candidates (BHCs) which no necessarily follow from physical equations. Chakrabarti and his collaborators, on the other hand claim in the last two decades that the spectral and timing properties of BHCs must not be treated separately since variation of these properties happens due to variation of two component (Keplerian and sub-Keplerian) accretion flow rates, and the Compton cloud parameters only. Recently after the inclusion of Two-component advective flow (TCAF) model in to HEASARC's spectral analysis software package XSPEC as an additive local model, we found that TCAF is quite capable to describe the underlying accretion flow dynamics around BHs with spectral fitted physical parameters. Properties of different spectral states and their transitions during an outburst of a transient BHC are more clear. A strong correlation between spectral and timing properties could also be seen in Accretion Rate Ratio Intensity Diagram (ARRID), where transitions between different spectral states are prominent. One can also predict frequency of the dominating quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from TCAF model fitted shock parameters and even predict the most probable mass range of an unknown BHC from TCAF fits. This gives us a confidence that the description of accretion process is more clear than ever before.

  5. Spectral analysis of surface waves method to assess shear wave velocity within centrifuge models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Carol Andrea; Thorel, Luc; Caicedo, Bernardo

    2009-06-01

    The method of the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) is tested out on reduced scale centrifuge models, with a specific device, called the mini Falling Weight, developed for this purpose. Tests are performed on layered materials made of a mixture of sand and clay. The shear wave velocity VS determined within the models using the SASW is compared with the laboratory measurements carried out using the bender element test. The results show that the SASW technique applied to centrifuge testing is a relevant method to characterize VS near the surface.

  6. Prediction of euphotic depths and diffuse attenuation coefficients from absorption profiles: a model based on comparisons between vertical profiles of spectral absorption, spectral irradiance, and P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Pegau, Scott; Barnard, Andrew H.; Mueller, James L.; Maske, Helmut; Valdez, Eduardo; Lara-Lara, Ruben; Alvarez-Borrego, Saul

    1997-02-01

    A model is presented which predicts the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance as a function of depth and the depth of the euphotic zone as based on the one percent level of photosynthetically active radiation from vertical profiles of spectral absorption and attenuation. The model is tested using data obtained in the Gulf of California. The modeled diffuse attenuation coefficients and PAR levels ar shown to have average errors of less than five percent when compared to the measured values.

  7. Unsupervised Segmentation of Spectral Images with a Spatialized Gaussian Mixture Model and Model Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen S.X.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe a novel unsupervised spectral image segmentation algorithm. This algorithm extends the classical Gaussian Mixture Model-based unsupervised classification technique by incorporating a spatial flavor into the model: the spectra are modelized by a mixture of K classes, each with a Gaussian distribution, whose mixing proportions depend on the position. Using a piecewise constant structure for those mixing proportions, we are able to construct a penalized maximum likelihood procedure that estimates the optimal partition as well as all the other parameters, including the number of classes. We provide a theoretical guarantee for this estimation, even when the generating model is not within the tested set, and describe an efficient implementation. Finally, we conduct some numerical experiments of unsupervised segmentation from a real dataset.

  8. Algebraic properties and spectral collapse in nonlinear quantum Rabi models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, V.; Raffa, F. A.; Franzosi, R.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the origin of spectral collapse occurring in nonlinear Rabi Hamiltonians with an su(1,1) coupling scheme, showing how the collapse can be triggered by the competition between the Rabi parameter g and the field frequency W. The collapse already appears in the model Hamiltonian where the atomic-energy term is absent. After showing that su(1,1) is the dynamical algebra of the Hamiltonian, we demonstrate how the occurrence of spectral collapse can be directly related to the three types of equivalence classes characterizing the structure of this algebra. We highlight how the dramatic change of the spectrum significantly affects the structure of eigenstates represented in a suitable momentum–coordinate picture.

  9. The SORCE Solar Spectral Irradiance Data and Degradation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beland, S.; Harder, J. W.; Snow, M. A.; Woods, T. N.; Vanier, B.; Lindholm, C.; Elliott, J. P.; Sandoval, L.

    2016-12-01

    The Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) and the SOlar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) instruments on board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission have been taking daily Solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements since April 2003. It is critical to accurately track the instrument degradation over time to be able to measure the small SSI variations with the solar cycle over the wavelength range covered by SOLSTICE (115-310nm) and by SIM (220-2400nm). The instrument degradation is constantly being updated and the corresponding model has been refined over the years to account for changes and a better understanding of the instrument's behavior over time. We present the improvements made in the latest versions of the SOLSTICE and SIM data, and the work in progress in preparation of the upcoming releases. We compare these new data release with the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measured by the SORCE Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) instrument.

  10. Loglinear Rasch model tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelderman, Hendrikus

    1984-01-01

    Existing statistical tests for the fit of the Rasch model have been criticized, because they are only sensitive to specific violations of its assumptions. Contingency table methods using loglinear models have been used to test various psychometric models. In this paper, the assumptions of the Rasch

  11. Anisotropic spectral modeling for unstably stratified homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briard, Antoine; Iyer, Manasa; Gomez, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a spectral model is derived to investigate numerically unstably stratified homogeneous turbulence (USHT) at large Reynolds numbers. The modeling relies on an earlier work for passive scalar dynamics [Briard et al., J. Fluid Mech. 799, 159 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.362] and can handle both shear and mean scalar gradients. The extension of this model to the case of active scalar dynamics is the main theoretical contribution of this paper. This spectral modeling is then applied at large Reynolds numbers to analyze the scaling of the kinetic energy, scalar variance, and scalar flux spectra and to study as well the temporal evolution of the mixing parameter, the Froude number, and some anisotropy indicators in USHT. A theoretical prediction for the exponential growth rate of the kinetic energy, associated with our model equations, is derived and assessed numerically. Throughout the validation part, results are compared with an analogous approach, restricted to axisymmetric turbulence, which is more accurate in term of anisotropy description, but also much more costly in terms of computational resources [Burlot et al., J. Fluid Mech. 765, 17 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2014.726]. It is notably shown that our model can qualitatively recover all the features of the USHT dynamics, with good quantitative agreement on some specific aspects. In addition, some remarks are proposed to point out the similarities and differences between the physics of USHT, shear flows, and passive scalar dynamics with a mean gradient, the two latter configurations having been addressed previously with the same closure. Moreover, it is shown that the anisotropic part of the pressure spectrum in USHT scales in k-11 /3 in the inertial range, similarly to the one in shear flows. Finally, at large Schmidt numbers, a different spectral range is found for the scalar flux: It first scales in k-3 around the Kolmogorov scale and then further in k-1 in the viscous-convective range.

  12. Validation of buoyancy driven spectral tensor model using HATS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, A.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    We present a homogeneous spectral tensor model for wind velocity and temperature fluctuations, driven by mean vertical shear and mean temperature gradient. Results from the model, including one-dimensional velocity and temperature spectra and the associated co-spectra, are shown in this paper. Th...... is described via five parameters: the dissipation rate (ε), length scale of energy-containing eddies (L), a turbulence anisotropy parameter (Γ), gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing the atmospheric stability and the rate of destruction of temperature variance (ηθ)....

  13. Skill Assessment of a Spectral Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson, W.; Casey, Nancy W.

    2009-01-01

    Ocean phytoplankton, detrital material, and water absorb and scatter light spectrally. The Ocean- Atmosphere Spectral Irradiance Model (OASIM) is intended to provide surface irradiance over the oceans with sufficient spectral resolution to support ocean ecology, biogeochemistry, and heat exchange investigations, and of sufficient duration to support inter-annual and decadal investigations. OASIM total surface irradiance (integrated 200 nm to 4 microns) was compared to in situ data and three publicly available global data products at monthly 1-degree resolution. OASIM spectrally-integrated surface irradiance had root mean square (RMS) difference= 20.1 W/sq m (about 11%), bias=1.6 W/sq m (about 0.8%), regression slope= 1.01 and correlation coefficient= 0.89, when compared to 2322 in situ observations. OASIM had the lowest bias of any of the global data products evaluated (ISCCP-FD, NCEP, and ISLSCP 11), and the best slope (nearest to unity). It had the second best RMS, and the third best correlation coefficient. OASIM total surface irradiance compared well with ISCCP-FD (RMS= 20.7 W/sq m; bias=-11.4 W/sq m, r=0.98) and ISLSCP II (RMS =25.2 W/sq m; bias= -13.8 W/sq m; r=0.97), but less well with NCEP (RMS =43.0 W/sq m ;bias=-22.6 W/sq m; x=0.91). Comparisons of OASIM photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) with PAR derived from SeaWiFS showed low bias (-1.8 mol photons /sq m/d, or about 5%), RMS (4.25 mol photons /sq m/d ' or about 12%), near unity slope (1.03) and high correlation coefficient (0.97). Coupled with previous estimates of clear sky spectral irradiance in OASIM (6.6% RMS at 1 nm resolution), these results suggest that OASIM provides reasonable estimates of surface broadband and spectral irradiance in the oceans, and can support studies on ocean ecosystems, carbon cycling, and heat exchange.

  14. Characterizing multivariate decoding models based on correlated EEG spectral features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J

    2013-07-01

    Multivariate decoding methods are popular techniques for analysis of neurophysiological data. The present study explored potential interpretative problems with these techniques when predictors are correlated. Data from sensorimotor rhythm-based cursor control experiments was analyzed offline with linear univariate and multivariate models. Features were derived from autoregressive (AR) spectral analysis of varying model order which produced predictors that varied in their degree of correlation (i.e., multicollinearity). The use of multivariate regression models resulted in much better prediction of target position as compared to univariate regression models. However, with lower order AR features interpretation of the spectral patterns of the weights was difficult. This is likely to be due to the high degree of multicollinearity present with lower order AR features. Care should be exercised when interpreting the pattern of weights of multivariate models with correlated predictors. Comparison with univariate statistics is advisable. While multivariate decoding algorithms are very useful for prediction their utility for interpretation may be limited when predictors are correlated. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonlinear spectral mixing theory to model multispectral signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borel, C.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Astrophysics and Radiation Measurements Group

    1996-02-01

    Nonlinear spectral mixing occurs due to multiple reflections and transmissions between discrete surfaces, e.g. leaves or facets of a rough surface. The radiosity method is an energy conserving computational method used in thermal engineering and it models nonlinear spectral mixing realistically and accurately. In contrast to the radiative transfer method the radiosity method takes into account the discreteness of the scattering surfaces (e.g. exact location, orientation and shape) such as leaves and includes mutual shading between them. An analytic radiosity-based scattering model for vegetation was developed and used to compute vegetation indices for various configurations. The leaf reflectance and transmittance was modeled using the PROSPECT model for various amounts of water, chlorophyll and variable leaf structure. The soil background was modeled using SOILSPEC with a linear mixture of reflectances of sand, clay and peat. A neural network and a geometry based retrieval scheme were used to retrieve leaf area index and chlorophyll concentration for dense canopies. Only simulated canopy reflectances in the 6 visible through short wave IR Landsat TM channels were used. The authors used an empirical function to compute the signal-to-noise ratio of a retrieved quantity.

  16. Spectral modeling, analysis, and synthesis of musical sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Sylvain; Desainte-Catherine, Myriam

    2002-11-01

    Spectral models provide general representations for sound well-suited for expressive musical transformations. These models allow us to extract and modify perceptually-relevant parameters such as amplitude, frequency, and spectrum. Thus, they are of great interest for the classification of musical sounds. A new analysis method was proposed to accurately extract the spectral parameters for the model from existing sounds. This method extends the classic short-time Fourier analysis by also considering the derivatives of the sound signal, and it can work with very short analysis windows. Although originally designed for stationary sounds with no noise, this method shows excellent results in the presence of noise and it is currently being extended in order to handle nonstationary sounds as well. A very efficient synthesis algorithm, based on a recursive description of the sine function, is able to reproduce sound in real time from the model parameters. This algorithm allows an extremely fine control of the partials of the sounds while avoiding signal discontinuities as well as numerical imprecision, and with a nearly optimal number of operations per partial. Psychoacoustic phenomena such as masking are considered in order to reduce on the fly the number of partials to be synthesized.

  17. Performance of parallel computers for spectral atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, I.T.; Toonen, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Worley, P.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Massively parallel processing (MPP) computer systems use high-speed interconnection networks to link hundreds or thousands of RISC microprocessors. With each microprocessor having a peak performance of 100 Mflops/sec or more, there is at least the possibility of achieving very high performance. However, the question of exactly how to achieve this performance remains unanswered. MPP systems and vector multiprocessors require very different coding styles. Different MPP systems have widely varying architectures and performance characteristics. For most problems, a range of different parallel algorithms is possible, again with varying performance characteristics. In this paper, we provide a detailed, fair evaluation of MPP performance for a weather and climate modeling application. Using a specially designed spectral transform code, we study performance on three different MPP systems: Intel Paragon, IBM SP2, and Cray T3D. We take great care to control for performance differences due to varying algorithmic characteristics. The results yield insights into MPP performance characteristics, parallel spectral transform algorithms, and coding style for MPP systems. We conclude that it is possible to construct parallel models that achieve multi-Gflop/sec performance on a range of MPPs if the models are constructed to allow run-time selection of appropriate algorithms.

  18. Remote sensing of oceanic primary production: Computations using a spectral model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathyendranath, S.; Platt, T.; Caverhill, C.M.; Warnock, R.E.; Lewis, M.R.

    A spectral model of underwater irradiance is coupled with a spectral version of the photosynthesis-light relationship to compute oceanic primary production. The results are shown to be significantly different from those obtained using...

  19. Spectral action for Bianchi type-IX cosmological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Wentao; Fathizadeh, Farzad; Marcolli, Matilde [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology,1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-13

    A rationality result previously proved for Robertson-Walker metrics is extended to a homogeneous anisotropic cosmological model, namely the Bianchi type-IX minisuperspace. It is shown that the Seeley-de Witt coefficients appearing in the expansion of the spectral action for the Bianchi type-IX geometry are expressed in terms of polynomials with rational coefficients in the cosmic evolution factors w{sub 1}(t),w{sub 2}(t),w{sub 3}(t), and their higher derivates with respect to time. We begin with the computation of the Dirac operator of this geometry and calculate the coefficients a{sub 0},a{sub 2},a{sub 4} of the spectral action by using heat kernel methods and parametric pseudodifferential calculus. An efficient method is devised for computing the Seeley-de Witt coefficients of a geometry by making use of Wodzicki’s noncommutative residue, and it is confirmed that the method checks out for the cosmological model studied in this article. The advantages of the new method are discussed, which combined with symmetries of the Bianchi type-IX metric, yield an elegant proof of the rationality result.

  20. Extreme Wind Calculation Applying Spectral Correction Method – Test and Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathmann, Ole Steen; Hansen, Brian Ohrbeck; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    2016-01-01

    We present a test and validation of extreme wind calculation applying the Spectral Correction (SC) method as implemented in a DTU Wind Condition Software. This method can do with a short-term(~1 year) local measured wind data series in combination with a long-term (10-20 years) reference modelled...... wind data series like CFSR and CFDDA reanalysis data for the site in question. The validation of the accuracy was performed by comparing with estimates by the traditional Annual Maxim a (AM) method and the Peak Over Threshold (POT) method, applied to measurements, for six sites: four sites located...... in Denmark, one site located in the Netherlands and one site located in the USA, comprising both on-shore and off-shore sites. The SC method was applied to 1-year measured wind data while the AM and POT methods were applied to long-term measured wind data. Further, the consistency of the SC method...

  1. Acoustic Model Testing Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesman, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Scale models have been used for decades to replicate liftoff environments and in particular acoustics for launch vehicles. It is assumed, and analyses supports, that the key characteristics of noise generation, propagation, and measurement can be scaled. Over time significant insight was gained not just towards understanding the effects of thruster details, pad geometry, and sound mitigation but also to the physical processes involved. An overview of a selected set of scale model tests are compiled here to illustrate the variety of configurations that have been tested and the fundamental knowledge gained. The selected scale model tests are presented chronologically.

  2. Measurements and Modeling of Heliospheric EUV Spectral Irradiance and Luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, L. E.; McMullin, D. R.; Auchere, F.

    2012-12-01

    For more than 15 years, The EIT and the later EUVI instruments aboard SoHO and STEREO, respectively, have provided a time series of images of the solar radiance in the HeII 30.4 nm transition region and three coronal emission lines (FeIX/X, FeXII, and FeXV) of differing temperatures. While the EIT measurements were gathered from a position very near to the Earth-Sun axis, the EUVI measurements were gathered at angles ranging up to and in excess of ±90 degrees in solar longitude from the Earth-Sun axis. Using a Differential Emission Measure (DEM) model, these measurements provide the basis for estimates of the spectral irradiance for the entire solar spectrum up to about 50 nm at any position in the heliosphere. These spectra are utilized in this work for two purposes. First, the photoionization rate of neutral He at each position is calculated. Neutral He is of interest because it traverses the heliopause relatively undisturbed and therefore provides a measure of isotopic parameters beyond the heliosphere. Second, we use these generate a time series of estimates of the solar EUV spectral luminosity extending from the recent post Solar Cycle 23 minimum into the current unusually weak rise of Solar Cycle 24. Because this EUV spectral luminosity is the sum of all solar radiation at each wavelength in every direction, their time series should not contain any systematic 27-day solar rotation periodicities as do typical solar activity indices and its presence would be an indication of time series reliability. This EUV luminosity time series is compared with other solar indices such as SSN and the F10.7 radio flux.

  3. SPECTRAL COLOR INDICES BASED GEOSPATIAL MODELING OF SOIL ORGANIC MATTER IN CHITWAN DISTRICT, NEPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. K. Mandal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Space Technology provides a resourceful-cost effective means to assess soil nutrients essential for soil management plan. Soil organic matter (SOM is one of valuable controlling productivity of crops by providing nutrient in farming systems. Geospatial modeling of soil organic matter is essential if there is unavailability of soil test laboratories and its strong spatial correlation. In the present analysis, soil organic matter is modeled from satellite image derived spectral color indices. Brightness Index (BI, Coloration Index (CI, Hue Index (HI, Redness Index (RI and Saturation Index (SI were calculated by converting DN value to radiance and radiance to reflectance from Thematic Mapper image. Geospatial model was developed by regressing SOM with color indices and producing multiple regression model using stepwise regression technique. The multiple regression equation between SOM and spectral indices was significant with R = 0. 56 at 95% confidence level. The resulting MLR equation was then used for the spatial prediction for the entire study area. Redness Index was found higher significance in estimating the SOM. It was used to predict SOM as auxiliary variables using cokringing spatial interpolation technique. It was tested in seven VDCs of Chitwan district of Nepal using Thematic Mapper remotely sensed data. SOM was found to be measured ranging from 0.15% to 4.75 %, with a mean of 2.24 %. Remotely sensed data derived spectral color indices have the potential as useful auxiliary variables for estimating SOM content to generate soil fertility management plans.

  4. A continuous spectral aerosol-droplet microphysics model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Lebo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional (2-D continuous spectral aerosol-droplet microphysics model is presented and implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model for large-eddy simulations (LES of warm clouds. Activation and regeneration of aerosols are treated explicitly in the calculation of condensation/evaporation. The model includes a 2-D spectrum that encompasses wet aerosol particles (i.e., haze droplets, cloud droplets, and drizzle droplets in a continuous and consistent manner and allows for the explicit tracking of aerosol size within cloud droplets due to collision-coalescence. The system of differential equations describing condensation/evaporation (i.e., mass conservation and energy conservation is solved simultaneously within each grid cell. The model is demonstrated by simulating a marine stratocumulus deck for two different aerosol loadings (100 and 500 cm−3, and comparison with the more traditional microphysics modeling approaches (both 1-D bin and bulk schemes is evaluated. The simulations suggest that in a 1-D bin microphysics scheme, without regeneration, too few particles are produced and hence the mode of the droplet size spectrum occurs at a larger size relative to the 2-D bin model results. Moreover, with regeneration, the 1-D scheme produces too many small droplets and thus shifts the mode toward smaller sizes. These large shifts in the droplet size distribution can potentially have significant effects on the efficiency of the collision-coalescence process, fall speeds, and ultimately precipitation.

  5. Let your fingers do the walking: A simple spectral signature model for "remote" fossil prospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Glenn C; Emerson, Charles W; Anemone, Robert L; Townsend, K E Beth

    2012-07-01

    Even with the most meticulous planning, and utilizing the most experienced fossil-hunters, fossil prospecting in remote and/or extensive areas can be time-consuming, expensive, logistically challenging, and often hit or miss. While nothing can predict or guarantee with 100% assurance that fossils will be found in any particular location, any procedures or techniques that might increase the odds of success would be a major benefit to the field. Here we describe, and test, one such technique that we feel has great potential for increasing the probability of finding fossiliferous sediments - a relatively simple spectral signature model using the spatial analysis and image classification functions of ArcGIS(®)10 that creates interactive thematic land cover maps that can be used for "remote" fossil prospecting. Our test case is the extensive Eocene sediments of the Uinta Basin, Utah - a fossil prospecting area encompassing ∼1200 square kilometers. Using Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite imagery, we "trained" the spatial analysis and image classification algorithms using the spectral signatures of known fossil localities discovered in the Uinta Basin prior to 2005 and then created interactive probability models highlighting other regions in the Basin having a high probability of containing fossiliferous sediments based on their spectral signatures. A fortuitous "post-hoc" validation of our model presented itself. Our model identified several paleontological "hotspots", regions that, while not producing any fossil localities prior to 2005, had high probabilities of being fossiliferous based on the similarities of their spectral signatures to those of previously known fossil localities. Subsequent fieldwork found fossils in all the regions predicted by the model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Martian Radiative Transfer Modeling Using the Optimal Spectral Sampling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Uymin, G.; Moncet, J.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The large volume of existing and planned infrared observations of Mars have prompted the development of a new martian radiative transfer model that could be used in the retrievals of atmospheric and surface properties. The model is based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) method [1]. The method is a fast and accurate monochromatic technique applicable to a wide range of remote sensing platforms (from microwave to UV) and was originally developed for the real-time processing of infrared and microwave data acquired by instruments aboard the satellites forming part of the next-generation global weather satellite system NPOESS (National Polarorbiting Operational Satellite System) [2]. As part of our on-going research related to the radiative properties of the martian polar caps, we have begun the development of a martian OSS model with the goal of using it to perform self-consistent atmospheric corrections necessary to retrieve caps emissivity from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra. While the caps will provide the initial focus area for applying the new model, it is hoped that the model will be of interest to the wider Mars remote sensing community.

  7. Spectral decomposition of internal gravity wave sea surface height in global models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Anna C.; Arbic, Brian K.; Alford, Matthew H.; Ansong, Joseph K.; Farrar, J. Thomas; Menemenlis, Dimitris; O'Rourke, Amanda K.; Richman, James G.; Shriver, Jay F.; Voet, Gunnar; Wallcraft, Alan J.; Zamudio, Luis

    2017-10-01

    Two global ocean models ranging in horizontal resolution from 1/12° to 1/48° are used to study the space and time scales of sea surface height (SSH) signals associated with internal gravity waves (IGWs). Frequency-horizontal wavenumber SSH spectral densities are computed over seven regions of the world ocean from two simulations of the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) and three simulations of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm). High wavenumber, high-frequency SSH variance follows the predicted IGW linear dispersion curves. The realism of high-frequency motions (>0.87 cpd) in the models is tested through comparison of the frequency spectral density of dynamic height variance computed from the highest-resolution runs of each model (1/25° HYCOM and 1/48° MITgcm) with dynamic height variance frequency spectral density computed from nine in situ profiling instruments. These high-frequency motions are of particular interest because of their contributions to the small-scale SSH variability that will be observed on a global scale in the upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite altimetry mission. The variance at supertidal frequencies can be comparable to the tidal and low-frequency variance for high wavenumbers (length scales smaller than ˜50 km), especially in the higher-resolution simulations. In the highest-resolution simulations, the high-frequency variance can be greater than the low-frequency variance at these scales.

  8. iSEDfit: Bayesian spectral energy distribution modeling of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, John

    2017-08-01

    iSEDfit uses Bayesian inference to extract the physical properties of galaxies from their observed broadband photometric spectral energy distribution (SED). In its default mode, the inputs to iSEDfit are the measured photometry (fluxes and corresponding inverse variances) and a measurement of the galaxy redshift. Alternatively, iSEDfit can be used to estimate photometric redshifts from the input photometry alone. After the priors have been specified, iSEDfit calculates the marginalized posterior probability distributions for the physical parameters of interest, including the stellar mass, star-formation rate, dust content, star formation history, and stellar metallicity. iSEDfit also optionally computes K-corrections and produces multiple "quality assurance" (QA) plots at each stage of the modeling procedure to aid in the interpretation of the prior parameter choices and subsequent fitting results. The software is distributed as part of the impro IDL suite.

  9. Spectral composition of light sources and insect phototaxis, with an evaluation of existing spectral response models. Journal of Insect Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunsven, van R.H.A.; Donners, M.; Boekee, K.; Tichelaar, I.; Geffen, van K.G.; Groenendijk, D.; Berendse, F.; Veenendaal, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Artificial illumination attracts insects, but to what extent light attracts insects, depends on the spectral composition of the light. Response models have been developed to predict the attractiveness of artificial light sources. In this study we compared attraction of insects by existing light

  10. Model-Based Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, Mark; Brinksma, Hendrik; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; Broy, M.; Leuxner, C.; Hoare, C.A.R.

    This paper provides a comprehensive introduction to a framework for formal testing using labelled transition systems, based on an extension and reformulation of the ioco theory introduced by Tretmans. We introduce the underlying models needed to specify the requirements, and formalise the notion of

  11. Wave Reflection Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Larsen, Brian Juul

    The investigation concerns the design of a new internal breakwater in the main port of Ibiza. The objective of the model tests was in the first hand to optimize the cross section to make the wave reflection low enough to ensure that unacceptable wave agitation will not occur in the port. Secondly...... wave overtopping was studied as well....

  12. Spectral optimization and uncertainty quantification in combustion modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, David Allan

    Reliable simulations of reacting flow systems require a well-characterized, detailed chemical model as a foundation. Accuracy of such a model can be assured, in principle, by a multi-parameter optimization against a set of experimental data. However, the inherent uncertainties in the rate evaluations and experimental data leave a model still characterized by some finite kinetic rate parameter space. Without a careful analysis of how this uncertainty space propagates into the model's predictions, those predictions can at best be trusted only qualitatively. In this work, the Method of Uncertainty Minimization using Polynomial Chaos Expansions is proposed to quantify these uncertainties. In this method, the uncertainty in the rate parameters of the as-compiled model is quantified. Then, the model is subjected to a rigorous multi-parameter optimization, as well as a consistency-screening process. Lastly, the uncertainty of the optimized model is calculated using an inverse spectral optimization technique, and then propagated into a range of simulation conditions. An as-compiled, detailed H2/CO/C1-C4 kinetic model is combined with a set of ethylene combustion data to serve as an example. The idea that the hydrocarbon oxidation model should be understood and developed in a hierarchical fashion has been a major driving force in kinetics research for decades. How this hierarchical strategy works at a quantitative level, however, has never been addressed. In this work, we use ethylene and propane combustion as examples and explore the question of hierarchical model development quantitatively. The Method of Uncertainty Minimization using Polynomial Chaos Expansions is utilized to quantify the amount of information that a particular combustion experiment, and thereby each data set, contributes to the model. This knowledge is applied to explore the relationships among the combustion chemistry of hydrogen/carbon monoxide, ethylene, and larger alkanes. Frequently, new data will

  13. Data depth and rank-based tests for covariance and spectral density matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Chau, Joris

    2017-06-26

    In multivariate time series analysis, objects of primary interest to study cross-dependences in the time series are the autocovariance or spectral density matrices. Non-degenerate covariance and spectral density matrices are necessarily Hermitian and positive definite, and our primary goal is to develop new methods to analyze samples of such matrices. The main contribution of this paper is the generalization of the concept of statistical data depth for collections of covariance or spectral density matrices by exploiting the geometric properties of the space of Hermitian positive definite matrices as a Riemannian manifold. This allows one to naturally characterize most central or outlying matrices, but also provides a practical framework for rank-based hypothesis testing in the context of samples of covariance or spectral density matrices. First, the desired properties of a data depth function acting on the space of Hermitian positive definite matrices are presented. Second, we propose two computationally efficient pointwise and integrated data depth functions that satisfy each of these requirements. Several applications of the developed methodology are illustrated by the analysis of collections of spectral matrices in multivariate brain signal time series datasets.

  14. Solar Spectral Proxy Irradiance from GOES (SSPRING): a model for solar EUV irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Katherine; Snow, Martin; Viereck, Rodney; Machol, Janet

    2016-02-01

    Several currently operating instruments are able to measure the full EUV spectrum at sufficient wavelength resolution for use in upper-atmosphere modeling, the effects of space weather, and modeling satellite drag. However, no missions are planned at present to succeed the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) missions, which currently provide these data sources. To develop a suitable replacement for these measurements, we use two broadband EUV channels on the NOAA GOES satellites, the magnesium core-to-wing ratio (Mg II index) from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) as well as EUV and Mg II time averages to model the EUV spectrum from 0.1 to 105 nm at 5-nm spectral resolution and daily time resolution. A Levenberg-Marquardt least squares fitting algorithm is used to determine a coefficient matrix that best reproduces a reference data set when multiplied by input data. The coefficient matrix is then applied to model data outside of the fitting interval. Three different fitting intervals are tested, with a variable fitting interval utilizing all days of data before the prediction date producing the best results. The correlation between the model results and the observed spectrum is found to be above 95% for the 0.1-50 nm range, and between 74% and 95% for the 50-105 nm range. We also find a favorable comparison between our results and the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). These results provide a promising potential source for an empirical EUV spectral model after direct EUV measurements are no longer available, and utilize a similar EUV modeling technique as the upcoming GOES-R satellites.

  15. Solar Spectral Proxy Irradiance from GOES (SSPRING: a model for solar EUV irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suess Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several currently operating instruments are able to measure the full EUV spectrum at sufficient wavelength resolution for use in upper-atmosphere modeling, the effects of space weather, and modeling satellite drag. However, no missions are planned at present to succeed the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO missions, which currently provide these data sources. To develop a suitable replacement for these measurements, we use two broadband EUV channels on the NOAA GOES satellites, the magnesium core-to-wing ratio (Mg II index from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE as well as EUV and Mg II time averages to model the EUV spectrum from 0.1 to 105 nm at 5-nm spectral resolution and daily time resolution. A Levenberg-Marquardt least squares fitting algorithm is used to determine a coefficient matrix that best reproduces a reference data set when multiplied by input data. The coefficient matrix is then applied to model data outside of the fitting interval. Three different fitting intervals are tested, with a variable fitting interval utilizing all days of data before the prediction date producing the best results. The correlation between the model results and the observed spectrum is found to be above 95% for the 0.1–50 nm range, and between 74% and 95% for the 50–105 nm range. We also find a favorable comparison between our results and the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM. These results provide a promising potential source for an empirical EUV spectral model after direct EUV measurements are no longer available, and utilize a similar EUV modeling technique as the upcoming GOES-R satellites.

  16. Spectral modulation effect in teleseismic P-waves from DPRK nuclear tests recorded at different azimuths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Yefim; Kim, So Gu; Hofstetter, Abraham

    2014-05-01

    Two underground nuclear explosions conducted by North Korea in 2009 and 2013 were recorded by the Israel Seismic Network. Pronounced coherent minima (spectral nulls) at 1.2-1.3 Hz were revealed in the spectra of teleseismic P-waves. For a ground-truth explosion with a shallow source depth (relatively to an earthquake), this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of the interference between the down-going P-wave and the pP phase reflected from the Earth's surface. A similar effect was observed at ISN stations for the Pakistan nuclear explosion at a different frequency 1.7 Hz indicating a source and not site-effect. Similar spectral minima with about the same frequency were observed in teleseismic P-waves of all three North Korea explosions (including the 2006 test) recorded at network stations and arrays in Kazakhstan (KURK), Norway (NORESS, ARCESS), Australia (Alice Springs, Warramunga) and Canada (Yellowknife), covering a broad azimuthal range. Data of the 2013 test at Warramunga array showed harmonic spectral modulation with several minima, evidencing a clear interference effect. These observations support the above-mentioned interpretation. Based on the null frequency dependency on the near-surface acoustic velocity and the source depth, the depth of the North Korea tests was estimated as ~2 km (different from the value ~1 km reported by USGS for the third test). This unusual depth estimation needs an additional validation based on more stations and verification by other methods.

  17. Comparison of Grid Nudging and Spectral Nudging Techniques for Dynamical Climate Downscaling within the WRF Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X.; Chen, L.; Ma, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Climate downscaling has been an active research and application area in the past several decades focusing on regional climate studies. Dynamical downscaling, in addition to statistical methods, has been widely used in downscaling as the advanced modern numerical weather and regional climate models emerge. The utilization of numerical models enables that a full set of climate variables are generated in the process of downscaling, which are dynamically consistent due to the constraints of physical laws. While we are generating high resolution regional climate, the large scale climate patterns should be retained. To serve this purpose, nudging techniques, including grid analysis nudging and spectral nudging, have been used in different models. There are studies demonstrating the benefit and advantages of each nudging technique; however, the results are sensitive to many factors such as nudging coefficients and the amount of information to nudge to, and thus the conclusions are controversy. While in a companion work of developing approaches for quantitative assessment of the downscaled climate, in this study, the two nudging techniques are under extensive experiments in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Using the same model provides fair comparability. Applying the quantitative assessments provides objectiveness of comparison. Three types of downscaling experiments were performed for one month of choice. The first type is serving as a base whereas the large scale information is communicated through lateral boundary conditions only; the second is using the grid analysis nudging; and the third is using spectral nudging. Emphases are given to the experiments of different nudging coefficients and nudging to different variables in the grid analysis nudging; while in spectral nudging, we focus on testing the nudging coefficients, different wave numbers on different model levels to nudge.

  18. Model Atmospheres and Spectral Irradiance Library of the Exoplanet Host Stars Observed in the MUSCLES Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, Jeffrey

    2017-08-01

    We propose to compute state-of-the-art model atmospheres (photospheres, chromospheres, transition regions and coronae) of the 4 K and 7 M exoplanet host stars observed by HST in the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, the nearest host star Proxima Centauri, and TRAPPIST-1. Our semi-empirical models will fit theunique high-resolution panchromatic (X-ray to infrared) spectra of these stars in the MAST High-Level Science Products archive consisting of COS and STIS UV spectra and near-simultaneous Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ground-based observations. We will compute models with the fully tested SSRPM computer software incorporating 52 atoms and ions in full non-LTE (435,986 spectral lines) and the 20 most-abundant diatomic molecules (about 2 million lines). This code has successfully fit the panchromatic spectrum of the M1.5 V exoplanet host star GJ 832 (Fontenla et al. 2016), the first M star with such a detailed model, and solar spectra. Our models will (1) predict the unobservable extreme-UV spectra, (2) determine radiative energy losses and balancing heating rates throughout these atmospheres, (3) compute a stellar irradiance library needed to describe the radiation environment of potentially habitable exoplanets to be studied by TESS and JWST, and (4) in the long post-HST era when UV observations will not be possible, the stellar irradiance library will be a powerful tool for predicting the panchromatic spectra of host stars that have only limited spectral coverage, in particular no UV spectra. The stellar models and spectral irradiance library will be placed quickly in MAST.

  19. Spectral Energy Budget of High Resolution General Circulation Models: Simulation of the Direct Energy Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augier, P.; Lindborg, E.

    2012-12-01

    Nastrom and Gage (1985) showed that the atmospheric kinetic energy and potential temperature spectra measured in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere present two inertial ranges. At the mesoscales, the spectra have a kh-5/3 power law dependence. At larger scales, there is a narrow range where the spectra show a kh-3 dependence. Recently, there has been considerable progress in simulating the observed spectra with some high resolution General Circulation Models (GCMs) (see e.g.~Hamilton et al., 2008). Our aim is to understand fundamental mechanisms of energy transfer between different scales and how well these mechanisms are described by different GCMs. In particular, we wish to test the hypothesis recently proposed by Vallgren, Deusebio & Lindborg (2011), that the atmospheric kinetic and potential energy spectra can be explained by assuming that there are two cascade processes emanating from the same large-scale energy source at scales of thousands of kilometers. In order to do this, we calculate the spectral budgets of energy using data from different GCMs, including data from the T639L24 AFES model and the T1279L91 ECMWF Integrated Forecast System. The concept of available potential energy (APE, Lorenz, 1955) has been used to formulate the spectral budgets of the so-called ``primitive equations'' in pressure coordinates, with spherical harmonics as the base functions, and taking into account the topography. The ratio of the total APE over the total kinetic energy (KE) is large, of the order of 3. This is due to a larger magnitude of the APE spectrum at the very large scales of the atmosphere (total wavenumber l ≤slant 3). At the other scales, APE and KE spectra are of the same order of magnitude. For the ECMWF model and at the synoptic scales, the APE spectrum is half the KE spectrum as predicted by Charney (1971). The main terms of the spectral energy budget are computed, which allows us to present a spectral representation of the Lorenz energy cycle

  20. The spectral cell method in nonlinear earthquake modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Daniel; Restrepo, Doriam

    2017-12-01

    This study examines the applicability of the spectral cell method (SCM) to compute the nonlinear earthquake response of complex basins. SCM combines fictitious-domain concepts with the spectral-version of the finite element method to solve the wave equations in heterogeneous geophysical domains. Nonlinear behavior is considered by implementing the Mohr-Coulomb and Drucker-Prager yielding criteria. We illustrate the performance of SCM with numerical examples of nonlinear basins exhibiting physically and computationally challenging conditions. The numerical experiments are benchmarked with results from overkill solutions, and using MIDAS GTS NX, a finite element software for geotechnical applications. Our findings show good agreement between the two sets of results. Traditional spectral elements implementations allow points per wavelength as low as PPW = 4.5 for high-order polynomials. Our findings show that in the presence of nonlinearity, high-order polynomials (p ≥ 3) require mesh resolutions above of PPW ≥ 10 to ensure displacement errors below 10%.

  1. The spectral cell method in nonlinear earthquake modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Daniel; Restrepo, Doriam

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the applicability of the spectral cell method (SCM) to compute the nonlinear earthquake response of complex basins. SCM combines fictitious-domain concepts with the spectral-version of the finite element method to solve the wave equations in heterogeneous geophysical domains. Nonlinear behavior is considered by implementing the Mohr-Coulomb and Drucker-Prager yielding criteria. We illustrate the performance of SCM with numerical examples of nonlinear basins exhibiting physically and computationally challenging conditions. The numerical experiments are benchmarked with results from overkill solutions, and using MIDAS GTS NX, a finite element software for geotechnical applications. Our findings show good agreement between the two sets of results. Traditional spectral elements implementations allow points per wavelength as low as PPW = 4.5 for high-order polynomials. Our findings show that in the presence of nonlinearity, high-order polynomials (p ≥ 3 ) require mesh resolutions above of PPW ≥ 10 to ensure displacement errors below 10%.

  2. Modelling of Carbon Monoxide Air Pollution in Larg Cities by Evaluetion of Spectral LANDSAT8 Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzelo, M.; Gharagozlou, A.; Sadeghian, S.; Baikpour, S. H.; Rajabi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Air pollution in large cities is one of the major problems that resolve and reduce it need multiple applications and environmental management. Of The main sources of this pollution is industrial activities, urban and transport that enter large amounts of contaminants into the air and reduces its quality. With Variety of pollutants and high volume manufacturing, local distribution of manufacturing centers, Testing and measuring emissions is difficult. Substances such as carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons and lead compounds are substances that cause air pollution and carbon monoxide is most important. Today, data exchange systems, processing, analysis and modeling is of important pillars of management system and air quality control. In this study, using the spectral signature of carbon monoxide gas as the most efficient gas pollution LANDSAT8 images in order that have better spatial resolution than appropriate spectral bands and weather meters،SAM classification algorithm and Geographic Information System (GIS ), spatial distribution of carbon monoxide gas in Tehran over a period of one year from the beginning of 2014 until the beginning of 2015 at 11 map have modeled and then to the model valuation ،created maps were compared with the map provided by the Tehran quality comparison air company. Compare involved plans did with the error matrix and results in 4 types of care; overall, producer, user and kappa coefficient was investigated. Results of average accuracy were about than 80%, which indicates the fit method and data used for modeling.

  3. MODELLING OF CARBON MONOXIDE AIR POLLUTION IN LARG CITIES BY EVALUETION OF SPECTRAL LANDSAT8 IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamzelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution in large cities is one of the major problems that resolve and reduce it need multiple applications and environmental management. Of The main sources of this pollution is industrial activities, urban and transport that enter large amounts of contaminants into the air and reduces its quality. With Variety of pollutants and high volume manufacturing, local distribution of manufacturing centers, Testing and measuring emissions is difficult. Substances such as carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons and lead compounds are substances that cause air pollution and carbon monoxide is most important. Today, data exchange systems, processing, analysis and modeling is of important pillars of management system and air quality control. In this study, using the spectral signature of carbon monoxide gas as the most efficient gas pollution LANDSAT8 images in order that have better spatial resolution than appropriate spectral bands and weather meters،SAM classification algorithm and Geographic Information System (GIS , spatial distribution of carbon monoxide gas in Tehran over a period of one year from the beginning of 2014 until the beginning of 2015 at 11 map have modeled and then to the model valuation ،created maps were compared with the map provided by the Tehran quality comparison air company. Compare involved plans did with the error matrix and results in 4 types of care; overall, producer, user and kappa coefficient was investigated. Results of average accuracy were about than 80%, which indicates the fit method and data used for modeling.

  4. Standard Test Method for Normal Spectral Emittance at Elevated Temperatures of Nonconducting Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1971-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes an accurate technique for measuring the normal spectral emittance of electrically nonconducting materials in the temperature range from 1000 to 1800 K, and at wavelengths from 1 to 35 μm. It is particularly suitable for measuring the normal spectral emittance of materials such as ceramic oxides, which have relatively low thermal conductivity and are translucent to appreciable depths (several millimetres) below the surface, but which become essentially opaque at thicknesses of 10 mm or less. 1.2 This test method requires expensive equipment and rather elaborate precautions, but produces data that are accurate to within a few percent. It is particularly suitable for research laboratories, where the highest precision and accuracy are desired, and is not recommended for routine production or acceptance testing. Because of its high accuracy, this test method may be used as a reference method to be applied to production and acceptance testing in case of dispute. 1.3 This test metho...

  5. AMARSI: Aerosol modeling and retrieval from multi-spectral imagers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Curier, R.L.; Staroverova, A.; Kokhanovsky, A.; Hoyningen-Huene, W. van; Rozanov, V.V.; Burrows, J.P.; Hesselmans, G.; Gale, L.; Bouvet, M.

    2008-01-01

    The AMARSI project aims at the development and validation of aerosol retrieval algorithms over ocean. One algorithm will be developed for application with data from the Multi Spectral Imager (MSI) on EarthCARE. A second algorithm will be developed using the combined information from AATSR and MERIS,

  6. Polarisation Spectral Synthesis For Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Mattia

    2017-02-01

    Despite their relevance across a broad range of astrophysical research topics, Type Ia supernova explosions are still poorly understood and answers to the questions of when, why and how these events are triggered remain unclear. In this respect, polarisation offers a unique opportunity to discriminate between the variety of possible scenarios. The observational evidence that Type Ia supernovae are associated with rather low polarisation signals (smaller than a few per cent) places strong constraints for models and calls for modest asphericities in the progenitor system and/or explosion mechanism.The goal of this thesis is to assess the validity of contemporary Type Ia supernova explosion models by testing whether their predicted polarisation signatures can account for the small signals usually observed. To this end, we have implemented and tested an innovative Monte Carlo scheme in the radiative transfer code artis. Compared to previous Monte Carlo approaches, this technique produces synthetic observables (light curves, flux and polarisation spectra) with a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise and therefore in the required computing time. This improvement is particularly crucial for our study as we aim to extract very weak polarisation signals, comparable to those detected in Type Ia supernovae. We have also demonstrated the applicability of this method to other classes of supernovae via a preliminary study of the first spectropolarimetry observations of superluminous supernovae.Using this scheme, we have calculated synthetic spectropolarimetry for three multi-dimensional explosion models recently proposed as promising candidates to explain Type Ia supernovae. Our findings highlight the power of spectropolarimetry in testing and discriminating between different scenarios. While all the three models predict light curves and flux spectra that are similar to each others and reproduce those observed in Type Ia supernovae comparably well, polarisation does

  7. Validation of spectral gas radiation models under oxyfuel conditions. Part A: Gas cell experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becher, Valentin; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    for the validation of new developed models. In part A of the series gas cell transmissivity spectra in the spectral range of 2.4–5.4μm of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the temperature range from 727 to 1500° C and at different concentrations were compared at a nominal resolution of 32cm−1 to line-by-line models......AbstractCombustion of hydrocarbon fuels with pure oxygen results in a different flue gas composition as combustion with air. Standard CFD spectral gas radiation models for air combustion are out of their validity range. The series of three articles provides a common spectral basis...

  8. Spectral models of additive and modulation noise in speech and phonatory excitation signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoentgen, Jean

    2003-01-01

    The article presents spectral models of additive and modulation noise in speech. The purpose is to learn about the causes of noise in the spectra of normal and disordered voices and to gauge whether the spectral properties of the perturbations of the phonatory excitation signal can be inferred from the spectral properties of the speech signal. The approach to modeling consists of deducing the Fourier series of the perturbed speech, assuming that the Fourier series of the noise and of the clean monocycle-periodic excitation are known. The models explain published data, take into account the effects of supraglottal tremor, demonstrate the modulation distortion owing to vocal tract filtering, establish conditions under which noise cues of different speech signals may be compared, and predict the impossibility of inferring the spectral properties of the frequency modulating noise from the spectral properties of the frequency modulation noise (e.g., phonatory jitter and frequency tremor). The general conclusion is that only phonatory frequency modulation noise is spectrally relevant. Other types of noise in speech are either epiphenomenal, or their spectral effects are masked by the spectral effects of frequency modulation noise.

  9. A Perceptual Model for Sinusoidal Audio Coding Based on Spectral Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Søren Holdt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychoacoustical models have been used extensively within audio coding applications over the past decades. Recently, parametric coding techniques have been applied to general audio and this has created the need for a psychoacoustical model that is specifically suited for sinusoidal modelling of audio signals. In this paper, we present a new perceptual model that predicts masked thresholds for sinusoidal distortions. The model relies on signal detection theory and incorporates more recent insights about spectral and temporal integration in auditory masking. As a consequence, the model is able to predict the distortion detectability. In fact, the distortion detectability defines a (perceptually relevant norm on the underlying signal space which is beneficial for optimisation algorithms such as rate-distortion optimisation or linear predictive coding. We evaluate the merits of the model by combining it with a sinusoidal extraction method and compare the results with those obtained with the ISO MPEG-1 Layer I-II recommended model. Listening tests show a clear preference for the new model. More specifically, the model presented here leads to a reduction of more than 20% in terms of number of sinusoids needed to represent signals at a given quality level.

  10. Spectral-spatial classification combined with diffusion theory based inverse modeling of hyperspectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Nordgaard, Hâvard B.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2016-02-01

    Hyperspectral imagery opens a new perspective for biomedical diagnostics and tissue characterization. High spectral resolution can give insight into optical properties of the skin tissue. However, at the same time the amount of collected data represents a challenge when it comes to decomposition into clusters and extraction of useful diagnostic information. In this study spectral-spatial classification and inverse diffusion modeling were employed to hyperspectral images obtained from a porcine burn model using a hyperspectral push-broom camera. The implemented method takes advantage of spatial and spectral information simultaneously, and provides information about the average optical properties within each cluster. The implemented algorithm allows mapping spectral and spatial heterogeneity of the burn injury as well as dynamic changes of spectral properties within the burn area. The combination of statistical and physics informed tools allowed for initial separation of different burn wounds and further detailed characterization of the injuries in short post-injury time.

  11. Spectral-Based Volume Sensor Testbed Algorithm Development, Test Series VS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-12

    Spectral-Based Volume Sensor SFA Smoke and Fire Alert, a VIDS product of Fastcom Technology, S.A. SigniFire a VIDS product of axonX, LLC SP Shortpass...189 through -253 VS3 Volume Sensor Test Series 3 VSD-8 Visual Smoke Detection System, a VIDS product of Fire Sentry Corp. Manuscript approved... subsitute for VS2-223), Smoldering Cables, FOV, !Trans PC1 PC2 PC3 PC4 PC5 PC6 PC7 PC8 _5900A

  12. Radiation Transfer of Models of Massive Star Formation. IV. The Model Grid and Spectral Energy Distribution Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2018-01-01

    We present a continuum radiative transfer model grid for fitting observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of massive protostars. The model grid is based on the paradigm of core accretion theory for massive star formation with pre-assembled gravitationally bound cores as initial conditions. In particular, following the turbulent core model, initial core properties are set primarily by their mass and the pressure of their ambient clump. We then model the evolution of the protostar and its surround structures in a self-consistent way. The model grid contains about 9000 SEDs with four free parameters: initial core mass, the mean surface density of the environment, the protostellar mass, and the inclination. The model grid is used to fit observed SEDs via {χ }2 minimization, with the foreground extinction additionally estimated. We demonstrate the fitting process and results using the example of massive protostar G35.20-0.74. Compared with other SED model grids currently used for massive star formation studies, the properties of the protostar and its surrounding structures are more physically connected in our model grid, which reduces the dimensionality of the parameter spaces and the total number of models. This excludes possible fitting of models that are physically unrealistic or are not internally self-consistent in the context of the turbulent core model. Thus, this model grid serves not only as a fitting tool to estimate properties of massive protostars, but also as a test of core accretion theory. The SED model grid is publicly released with this paper.

  13. The Cross radiometric calibration test of KOMPSAT-2 multi-spectral images over Desert area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, J.; Kim, H.

    2012-12-01

    The KOrea MultiPurpose SAtellite-2 (KOMPSAT-2) satellite was launched on July 28, 2006 and has been operated to support multi-purpose monitoring of earth surface with high spatial resolution. The KOMPSAT-2 has 1m panchromatic image and 4-m multi spectral bands such as blue (450-520nm), green (520-600nm), red (630-690nm), NIR (760-900nm). Since the performance of sensor onboard satellites is usually degraded in orbit after launch, it is necessary to calibrate spectral radiance for getting accurate TOP radiance values by performing cross radiometric methods. In this study, Cross Calibration method is adopted for the estimation of TOA (Top of Atmosphere) radiance to KOMPSAT-2 multi spectral images with ancillary data such as LandSat TOA radiance, MODIS products, and atmospheric measurements. For the calibration desert areas are served as reference target objects because its relative high surface reflectance is not very sensitive to the presence of low aerosol load, which is main probleggm of inferring TOA radiance by using Radiative Transfer model. Although desert areas have low aerosol effect when comparing with other reference targets such like deep Ocean, surface bidirectional effects predominant in desert should be considered to estimate TOA radiance. In this study, MODIS 16-day Level 3 BRDF/albedo model parameters product (MCD43A1) is used to correct surface bidirectional effects by inputting 6S parameters. The surface reflectance over target area is simulated from LandSat recalibrated TOA radiance with AERONET measurement, and MODIS BRDF product. After then, KOMPSAT-2 TOA radiance is simulated from LandSat-based surface target reflectance from 6S radiative transfer model. Finally, the estimated TOA radiance from KOMPSAT-2 is compared with the KOMPSAT-2's DN values in order to produce DN to Radiance coefficients.

  14. Study of the spectral and the temporal properties of few black hole candidates with TCAF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    We study spectral and temporal properties of outbursting black hole candidates (BHCs) using Two Component Advective Flow (TCAF) model in XSPEC as a local additive table model. Evolution of spectral and temporal properties of BHCs can easily be explained with spectral analysis using TCAF. From TCAF model fit of black hole spectra one can extract two types of flow rates (Keplerian and sub-Keplerian rates) and shock parameters (location and strength), which give new insight into the problem of accretion dynamics. Depending upon accretion rate ratio (ARR) and nature of QPOs (if present) we can classify total outburst phases of transient BHCs in different spectral states. This classification qualitatively match with the classifications based on spectral properties alone. However, in our process, use the physical quantities, such as accretion rates gave a complete, meaning of what exactly happens in a state transition. We also compare TCAF model fitted spectral results with combined disk black body and power-law model fitted results, which almost matches. In our study, evolution of quasi periodic oscillations (QPOs) also explained from the movement of shock location. It is also clear from the analysis that the rising and declining phases may not retrace the same path always and form a hysteresis loop.

  15. Testing and validating environmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J.W.; Hooper, R.P.; Kendall, C.; Neal, C.; Leavesley, G.

    1996-01-01

    Generally accepted standards for testing and validating ecosystem models would benefit both modellers and model users. Universally applicable test procedures are difficult to prescribe, given the diversity of modelling approaches and the many uses for models. However, the generally accepted scientific principles of documentation and disclosure provide a useful framework for devising general standards for model evaluation. Adequately documenting model tests requires explicit performance criteria, and explicit benchmarks against which model performance is compared. A model's validity, reliability, and accuracy can be most meaningfully judged by explicit comparison against the available alternatives. In contrast, current practice is often characterized by vague, subjective claims that model predictions show 'acceptable' agreement with data; such claims provide little basis for choosing among alternative models. Strict model tests (those that invalid models are unlikely to pass) are the only ones capable of convincing rational skeptics that a model is probably valid. However, 'false positive' rates as low as 10% can substantially erode the power of validation tests, making them insufficiently strict to convince rational skeptics. Validation tests are often undermined by excessive parameter calibration and overuse of ad hoc model features. Tests are often also divorced from the conditions under which a model will be used, particularly when it is designed to forecast beyond the range of historical experience. In such situations, data from laboratory and field manipulation experiments can provide particularly effective tests, because one can create experimental conditions quite different from historical data, and because experimental data can provide a more precisely defined 'target' for the model to hit. We present a simple demonstration showing that the two most common methods for comparing model predictions to environmental time series (plotting model time series

  16. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability in Cycle 24: Model Predictions and OMI Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, S.; DeLand, M.; Lean, J.

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), we characterize both short-term (solar rotation) and long-term (solar cycle) changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) between 265-500 nanometers during the ongoing Cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment - 2) and SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) instruments and find fair-to-excellent agreement between the observations and predictions of the NRLSSI2 (Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance - post SORCE) and SATIRE-S (the Naval Research Laboratory's Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era) models.

  17. Spectral imaging toolbox: segmentation, hyperstack reconstruction, and batch processing of spectral images for the determination of cell and model membrane lipid order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Miles; Browning, Richard; Carugo, Dario; Sezgin, Erdinc; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Eggeling, Christian; Stride, Eleanor

    2017-05-12

    Spectral imaging with polarity-sensitive fluorescent probes enables the quantification of cell and model membrane physical properties, including local hydration, fluidity, and lateral lipid packing, usually characterized by the generalized polarization (GP) parameter. With the development of commercial microscopes equipped with spectral detectors, spectral imaging has become a convenient and powerful technique for measuring GP and other membrane properties. The existing tools for spectral image processing, however, are insufficient for processing the large data sets afforded by this technological advancement, and are unsuitable for processing images acquired with rapidly internalized fluorescent probes. Here we present a MATLAB spectral imaging toolbox with the aim of overcoming these limitations. In addition to common operations, such as the calculation of distributions of GP values, generation of pseudo-colored GP maps, and spectral analysis, a key highlight of this tool is reliable membrane segmentation for probes that are rapidly internalized. Furthermore, handling for hyperstacks, 3D reconstruction and batch processing facilitates analysis of data sets generated by time series, z-stack, and area scan microscope operations. Finally, the object size distribution is determined, which can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying changes in membrane properties and is desirable for e.g. studies involving model membranes and surfactant coated particles. Analysis is demonstrated for cell membranes, cell-derived vesicles, model membranes, and microbubbles with environmentally-sensitive probes Laurdan, carboxyl-modified Laurdan (C-Laurdan), Di-4-ANEPPDHQ, and Di-4-AN(F)EPPTEA (FE), for quantification of the local lateral density of lipids or lipid packing. The Spectral Imaging Toolbox is a powerful tool for the segmentation and processing of large spectral imaging datasets with a reliable method for membrane segmentation and no ability in programming required. The

  18. On the modeling of spectral map of glass-metal nanocomposite optical nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovskii, A A; Shustova, O V; Zhurikhina, V V; Svirko, Yu

    2012-05-21

    The spectral map of the nonlinear absorption coefficient of glass-copper nanocomposite in the pump-probe scheme constructed with the use of a simple anharmonic oscillator model reproduced well the spectral map obtained in the experiment. It is shown that spectral features in nonlinear response of glass-metal nanocomposites (GMN) can be engineered by varying the size of nanoparticles. The pronounced dependence of the magnitude of the third-order nonlinearity on the particles size explains the diversity of experimental data related to nonlinear optical response of GMNs in different experiments. Performed modeling proves that silver GMN demonstrate much sharper spectral dependence than copper ones due to strong frequency dependence of local field enhancement factor for silver nanoparticles.

  19. An assessment of wind forcing impact on a spectral wave model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The focus of the present study is the assessment of the impact of wind forcing on the spectral wave model. MIKE 21 SW in the Indian Ocean region. Three different wind fields, namely the ECMWF analyzed winds, the ECMWF blended winds, and the NCEP blended winds have been used to drive the model. The wave model ...

  20. An assessment of wind forcing impact on a spectral wave model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The focus of the present study is the assessment of the impact of wind forcing on the spectral wave model MIKE 21 SW in the Indian Ocean region. Three different wind fields, namely the ECMWF analyzed winds, the ECMWF blended winds, and the NCEP blended winds have been used to drive the model. The wave model ...

  1. Statistical iterative material image reconstruction for spectral CT using a semi-empirical forward model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechlem, Korbinian; Ehn, Sebastian; Sellerer, Thorsten; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter B.

    2017-03-01

    In spectral computed tomography (spectral CT), the additional information about the energy dependence of attenuation coefficients can be exploited to generate material selective images. These images have found applications in various areas such as artifact reduction, quantitative imaging or clinical diagnosis. However, significant noise amplification on material decomposed images remains a fundamental problem of spectral CT. Most spectral CT algorithms separate the process of material decomposition and image reconstruction. Separating these steps is suboptimal because the full statistical information contained in the spectral tomographic measurements cannot be exploited. Statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) techniques provide an alternative, mathematically elegant approach to obtaining material selective images with improved tradeoffs between noise and resolution. Furthermore, image reconstruction and material decomposition can be performed jointly. This is accomplished by a forward model which directly connects the (expected) spectral projection measurements and the material selective images. To obtain this forward model, detailed knowledge of the different photon energy spectra and the detector response was assumed in previous work. However, accurately determining the spectrum is often difficult in practice. In this work, a new algorithm for statistical iterative material decomposition is presented. It uses a semi-empirical forward model which relies on simple calibration measurements. Furthermore, an efficient optimization algorithm based on separable surrogate functions is employed. This partially negates one of the major shortcomings of SIR, namely high computational cost and long reconstruction times. Numerical simulations and real experiments show strongly improved image quality and reduced statistical bias compared to projection-based material decomposition.

  2. Modeling Fire Severity in Black Spruce Stands in the Alaskan Boreal Forest Using Spectral and Non-Spectral Geospatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, K.; Kasischke, E. S.; McGuire, A. D.; Turetsky, M. R.; Kane, E. S.

    2010-01-01

    Biomass burning in the Alaskan interior is already a major disturbance and source of carbon emissions, and is likely to increase in response to the warming and drying predicted for the future climate. In addition to quantifying changes to the spatial and temporal patterns of burned areas, observing variations in severity is the key to studying the impact of changes to the fire regime on carbon cycling, energy budgets, and post-fire succession. Remote sensing indices of fire severity have not consistently been well-correlated with in situ observations of important severity characteristics in Alaskan black spruce stands, including depth of burning of the surface organic layer. The incorporation of ancillary data such as in situ observations and GIS layers with spectral data from Landsat TM/ETM+ greatly improved efforts to map the reduction of the organic layer in burned black spruce stands. Using a regression tree approach, the R2 of the organic layer depth reduction models was 0.60 and 0.55 (pb0.01) for relative and absolute depth reduction, respectively. All of the independent variables used by the regression tree to estimate burn depth can be obtained independently of field observations. Implementation of a gradient boosting algorithm improved the R2 to 0.80 and 0.79 (pb0.01) for absolute and relative organic layer depth reduction, respectively. Independent variables used in the regression tree model of burn depth included topographic position, remote sensing indices related to soil and vegetation characteristics, timing of the fire event, and meteorological data. Post-fire organic layer depth characteristics are determined for a large (N200,000 ha) fire to identify areas that are potentially vulnerable to a shift in post-fire succession. This application showed that 12% of this fire event experienced fire severe enough to support a change in post-fire succession. We conclude that non-parametric models and ancillary data are useful in the modeling of the surface

  3. Modeling fire severity in black spruce stands in the Alaskan boreal forest using spectral and non-spectral geospatial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kirsten M.; Kasischke, E.S.; McGuire, A.D.; Turetsky, M.R.; Kane, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Biomass burning in the Alaskan interior is already a major disturbance and source of carbon emissions, and is likely to increase in response to the warming and drying predicted for the future climate. In addition to quantifying changes to the spatial and temporal patterns of burned areas, observing variations in severity is the key to studying the impact of changes to the fire regime on carbon cycling, energy budgets, and post-fire succession. Remote sensing indices of fire severity have not consistently been well-correlated with in situ observations of important severity characteristics in Alaskan black spruce stands, including depth of burning of the surface organic layer. The incorporation of ancillary data such as in situ observations and GIS layers with spectral data from Landsat TM/ETM+ greatly improved efforts to map the reduction of the organic layer in burned black spruce stands. Using a regression tree approach, the R2 of the organic layer depth reduction models was 0.60 and 0.55 (pb0.01) for relative and absolute depth reduction, respectively. All of the independent variables used by the regression tree to estimate burn depth can be obtained independently of field observations. Implementation of a gradient boosting algorithm improved the R2 to 0.80 and 0.79 (pb0.01) for absolute and relative organic layer depth reduction, respectively. Independent variables used in the regression tree model of burn depth included topographic position, remote sensing indices related to soil and vegetation characteristics, timing of the fire event, and meteorological data. Post-fire organic layer depth characteristics are determined for a large (N200,000 ha) fire to identify areas that are potentially vulnerable to a shift in post-fire succession. This application showed that 12% of this fire event experienced fire severe enough to support a change in post-fire succession. We conclude that non-parametric models and ancillary data are useful in the modeling of the surface

  4. Dispersion model for optical thin films applicable in wide spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Nečas, David; Ohlídal, Ivan; Giglia, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    In the optics industry thin film systems are used to construct various interference devices such as antireflective coatings, high-reflectance mirrors, beam splitters and filters. The optical characterization of complex optical systems can not be performed by measurements only in the short spectral range in which the interference devices will be employed because the measured data do not contain sufficient information about all relevant parameters of these systems. The characterization of film materials requires the extension of the spectral range of the measurements to the IR region containing phonon absorption and to the UV region containing the electronic excitations. However, this leads to necessity of a dispersion model suitable for the description of the dielectric response in the wide spectral range. Such model must respect the physical conditions following from theory of dispersion, particularly Kramers-Kronig relations and integrability imposed by sum rules. This work presents the construction of a universal dispersion model composed from individual contributions representing both electronic and phonon excitations. The efficiency of presented model is given by the fact that all the contributions are described by analytical expressions. It is shown that the model is suitable for precise modeling of spectral dependencies of optical constants of a broad class of materials used in the optical industry for thin film systems such as MgF2, SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2, Ta2O5 and TiO2 in the spectral range from far IR to vacuum UV.

  5. Directional and Spectral Irradiance in Ocean Models: Effects on Simulated Global Phytoplankton, Nutrients, and Primary Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of including directional and spectral light in simulations of ocean radiative transfer was investigated using a coupled biogeochemical-circulation-radiative model of the global oceans. The effort focused on phytoplankton abundances, nutrient concentrations and vertically-integrated net primary production. The importance was approached by sequentially removing directional (i.e., direct vs. diffuse) and spectral irradiance and comparing results of the above variables to a fully directionally and spectrally-resolved model. In each case the total irradiance was kept constant; it was only the pathways and spectral nature that were changed. Assuming all irradiance was diffuse had negligible effect on global ocean primary production. Global nitrate and total chlorophyll concentrations declined by about 20% each. The largest changes occurred in the tropics and sub-tropics rather than the high latitudes, where most of the irradiance is already diffuse. Disregarding spectral irradiance had effects that depended upon the choice of attenuation wavelength. The wavelength closest to the spectrally-resolved model, 500 nm, produced lower nitrate (19%) and chlorophyll (8%) and higher primary production (2%) than the spectral model. Phytoplankton relative abundances were very sensitive to the choice of non-spectral wavelength transmittance. The combined effects of neglecting both directional and spectral irradiance exacerbated the differences, despite using attenuation at 500 nm. Global nitrate decreased 33% and chlorophyll decreased 24%. Changes in phytoplankton community structure were considerable, representing a change from chlorophytes to cyanobacteria and coccolithophores. This suggested a shift in community function, from light-limitation to nutrient limitation: lower demands for nutrients from cyanobacteria and coccolithophores favored them over the more nutrient-demanding chlorophytes. Although diatoms have the highest nutrient demands in the model, their

  6. Composite spectral functions for solving Volterra's population model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramezani, M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razzaghi, M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)]. E-mail: razzaghi@math.msstate.edu; Dehghan, M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    An approximate method for solving Volterra's population model for population growth of a species in a closed system is proposed. Volterra's model is a nonlinear integro-differential equation, where the integral term represents the effect of toxin. The approach is based upon composite spectral functions approximations. The properties of composite spectral functions consisting of few terms of orthogonal functions are presented and are utilized to reduce the solution of the Volterra's model to the solution of a system of algebraic equations. The method is easy to implement and yields very accurate result.

  7. Model-Based Security Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Schieferdecker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Security testing aims at validating software system requirements related to security properties like confidentiality, integrity, authentication, authorization, availability, and non-repudiation. Although security testing techniques are available for many years, there has been little approaches that allow for specification of test cases at a higher level of abstraction, for enabling guidance on test identification and specification as well as for automated test generation. Model-based security testing (MBST is a relatively new field and especially dedicated to the systematic and efficient specification and documentation of security test objectives, security test cases and test suites, as well as to their automated or semi-automated generation. In particular, the combination of security modelling and test generation approaches is still a challenge in research and of high interest for industrial applications. MBST includes e.g. security functional testing, model-based fuzzing, risk- and threat-oriented testing, and the usage of security test patterns. This paper provides a survey on MBST techniques and the related models as well as samples of new methods and tools that are under development in the European ITEA2-project DIAMONDS.

  8. Spectral coherence model for power fluctuations in a wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigueras-Rodriguez, A.; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Viedma, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a model for the coherence between wind speeds located in a horizontal plane corresponding to hub height of wind turbines in a large wind farm. The model has been developed using wind speed and power measurements from the 72 Wind Turbines and two of the meteorological masts from...... Nysted offshore wind farm during 9 months. The coherence model developed in this paper is intended for use of power fluctuations in large offshore wind farms. In this way, analysing the current coherence models it is shown the needing of a new one, adapted to the characteristic distances and the related...

  9. Spectral evaluation of Earth geopotential models and an experiment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As the number of Earth geopotential models (EGM) grows with the increasing number of data collected by dedicated satellite gravity missions, CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE, measuring the differences among the models and monitoring the improvements in gravity field recovery are required. This study assesses the ...

  10. A spectral directional reflectance model of row crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, F.J.; Gu, X.F.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, Q.; Yu, T.; Liu, Q.; Huang, H.A.; Qin, W.; Chen, Liangfu; Zhao, H.

    2010-01-01

    A computationally efficient reflectance model for row planted canopies is developed in this paper through separating the contributions of incident direct and diffuse radiation scattered by row canopies. The row model allows calculating the reflectance spectrum in any given direction for the optical

  11. The influence of spectral nudging on typhoon formation in regional climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feser, Frauke; Barcikowska, Monika

    2012-03-01

    Regional climate models can successfully simulate tropical cyclones and typhoons. This has been shown and was evaluated for hindcast studies of the past few decades. But often global and regional weather phenomena are not simulated at the observed location, or occur too often or seldom even though the regional model is driven by global reanalysis data which constitute a near-realistic state of the global atmosphere. Therefore, several techniques have been developed in order to make the regional model follow the global state more closely. One is spectral nudging, which is applied for horizontal wind components with increasing strength for higher model levels in this study. The aim of this study is to show the influence that this method has on the formation of tropical cyclones (TC) in regional climate models. Two ensemble simulations (each with five simulations) were computed for Southeast Asia and the Northwestern Pacific for the typhoon season 2004, one with spectral nudging and one without. First of all, spectral nudging reduced the overall TC number by about a factor of 2. But the number of tracks which are similar to observed best track data (BTD) was greatly increased. Also, spatial track density patterns were found to be more similar when using spectral nudging. The tracks merge after a short time for the spectral nudging simulations and then follow the BTD closely; for the no nudge cases the similarity is greatly reduced. A comparison of seasonal precipitation, geopotential height, and temperature fields at several height levels with observations and reanalysis data showed overall a smaller ensemble spread, higher pattern correlations and reduced root mean square errors and biases for the spectral nudged simulations. Vertical temperature profiles for selected TCs indicate that spectral nudging is not inhibiting TC development at higher levels. Both the Madden-Julian Oscillation and monsoonal precipitation are reproduced realistically by the regional model

  12. Inference of dense spectral reflectance images from sparse reflectance measurement using non-linear regression modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Jason; Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2015-09-01

    One method to acquire multispectral images is to sequentially capture a series of images where each image contains information from a different bandwidth of light. Another method is to use a series of beamsplitters and dichroic filters to guide different bandwidths of light onto different cameras. However, these methods are very time consuming and expensive and perform poorly in dynamic scenes or when observing transient phenomena. An alternative strategy to capturing multispectral data is to infer this data using sparse spectral reflectance measurements captured using an imaging device with overlapping bandpass filters, such as a consumer digital camera using a Bayer filter pattern. Currently the only method of inferring dense reflectance spectra is the Wiener adaptive filter, which makes Gaussian assumptions about the data. However, these assumptions may not always hold true for all data. We propose a new technique to infer dense reflectance spectra from sparse spectral measurements through the use of a non-linear regression model. The non-linear regression model used in this technique is the random forest model, which is an ensemble of decision trees and trained via the spectral characterization of the optical imaging system and spectral data pair generation. This model is then evaluated by spectrally characterizing different patches on the Macbeth color chart, as well as by reconstructing inferred multispectral images. Results show that the proposed technique can produce inferred dense reflectance spectra that correlate well with the true dense reflectance spectra, which illustrates the merits of the technique.

  13. Modeling Atmospheric Turbulence via Rapid Distortion Theory: Spectral Tensor of Velocity and Buoyancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    the eddy lifetime parameterization of Mann to make the model stationary. The buoyant spectral tensor model is driven via five parameters: the viscous dissipation rate epsilon, length scale of energy-containing eddies L, a turbulence anisotropy parameter Gamma, gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing...

  14. Higher-order triangular spectral element method with optimized cubature points for seismic wavefield modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Youshan; Teng, Jiwen; Xu, Tao; Badal, José

    2017-05-01

    The mass-lumped method avoids the cost of inverting the mass matrix and simultaneously maintains spatial accuracy by adopting additional interior integration points, known as cubature points. To date, such points are only known analytically in tensor domains, such as quadrilateral or hexahedral elements. Thus, the diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method (SEM) in non-tensor domains always relies on numerically computed interpolation points or quadrature points. However, only the cubature points for degrees 1 to 6 are known, which is the reason that we have developed a p-norm-based optimization algorithm to obtain higher-order cubature points. In this way, we obtain and tabulate new cubature points with all positive integration weights for degrees 7 to 9. The dispersion analysis illustrates that the dispersion relation determined from the new optimized cubature points is comparable to that of the mass and stiffness matrices obtained by exact integration. Simultaneously, the Lebesgue constant for the new optimized cubature points indicates its surprisingly good interpolation properties. As a result, such points provide both good interpolation properties and integration accuracy. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) numbers are tabulated for the conventional Fekete-based triangular spectral element (TSEM), the TSEM with exact integration, and the optimized cubature-based TSEM (OTSEM). A complementary study demonstrates the spectral convergence of the OTSEM. A numerical example conducted on a half-space model demonstrates that the OTSEM improves the accuracy by approximately one order of magnitude compared to the conventional Fekete-based TSEM. In particular, the accuracy of the 7th-order OTSEM is even higher than that of the 14th-order Fekete-based TSEM. Furthermore, the OTSEM produces a result that can compete in accuracy with the quadrilateral SEM (QSEM). The high accuracy of the OTSEM is also tested with a non-flat topography model. In terms of computational

  15. Higher-order triangular spectral element method with optimized cubature points for seismic wavefield modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Youshan, E-mail: ysliu@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100029 (China); Teng, Jiwen, E-mail: jwteng@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100029 (China); Xu, Tao, E-mail: xutao@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100029 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Beijing, 100101 (China); Badal, José, E-mail: badal@unizar.es [Physics of the Earth, Sciences B, University of Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    The mass-lumped method avoids the cost of inverting the mass matrix and simultaneously maintains spatial accuracy by adopting additional interior integration points, known as cubature points. To date, such points are only known analytically in tensor domains, such as quadrilateral or hexahedral elements. Thus, the diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method (SEM) in non-tensor domains always relies on numerically computed interpolation points or quadrature points. However, only the cubature points for degrees 1 to 6 are known, which is the reason that we have developed a p-norm-based optimization algorithm to obtain higher-order cubature points. In this way, we obtain and tabulate new cubature points with all positive integration weights for degrees 7 to 9. The dispersion analysis illustrates that the dispersion relation determined from the new optimized cubature points is comparable to that of the mass and stiffness matrices obtained by exact integration. Simultaneously, the Lebesgue constant for the new optimized cubature points indicates its surprisingly good interpolation properties. As a result, such points provide both good interpolation properties and integration accuracy. The Courant–Friedrichs–Lewy (CFL) numbers are tabulated for the conventional Fekete-based triangular spectral element (TSEM), the TSEM with exact integration, and the optimized cubature-based TSEM (OTSEM). A complementary study demonstrates the spectral convergence of the OTSEM. A numerical example conducted on a half-space model demonstrates that the OTSEM improves the accuracy by approximately one order of magnitude compared to the conventional Fekete-based TSEM. In particular, the accuracy of the 7th-order OTSEM is even higher than that of the 14th-order Fekete-based TSEM. Furthermore, the OTSEM produces a result that can compete in accuracy with the quadrilateral SEM (QSEM). The high accuracy of the OTSEM is also tested with a non-flat topography model. In terms of computational

  16. Theory of ferrimagnetism in the Hubbard model on bipartite lattices with spectral symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yang; He, Jing; Zhang, Xing-Hai; Kou, Su-Peng

    2015-09-09

    The Hubbard model is one of the most important models in condensed matter physics. In this paper, we developed a theory of ferrimagnetism in the Hubbard model on bipartite lattices with spectral symmetry. By taking three models as examples, we studied the ferrimagnetic orders that emerge from three typical fermionic systems--metal, semi-metal and (Chern) insulator. In particular, we found that there may exist various ferrimagnetic orders and explored the universal features.

  17. CMB spectral distortions in generic two-field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Leskinen, Juuso; Nurmi, Sami; Takahashi, Tomo

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the CMB μ distortion in models where two uncorrelated sources contribute to primordial perturbations. We parameterise each source by an amplitude, tilt, running and running of the running. We perform a detailed analysis of the distribution signal as function of the model parameters, highlighting the differences compared to single-source models. As a specific example, we also investigate the mixed inflaton-curvaton scenario. We find that the μ distortion could efficiently break degeneracies of curvaton parameters especially when combined with future sensitivity of probing the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. For example, assuming bounds μ < 0.5 × 10‑8 and r<0.01, the curvaton contribution should either vanish or the curvaton should dominate primordial perturbations and its slow-roll parameter ηχ is constrained to the interval ‑0.007 < ηχ< 0.045.

  18. Spectrally-consistent regularization modeling of turbulent natural convection flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trias, F. Xavier; Verstappen, Roel; Gorobets, Andrey; Oliva, Assensi

    2012-01-01

    The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations constitute an excellent mathematical modelization of turbulence. Unfortunately, attempts at performing direct simulations are limited to relatively low-Reynolds numbers because of the almost numberless small scales produced by the non-linear convective

  19. Allophane on Mars: Evidence from IR spectroscopy and TES spectral models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Christensen, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Allophane is an alteration product of volcanic glass and a clay mineral precursor that is commonly found in basaltic soils on Earth. It is a poorly-crystalline or amorphous, hydrous aluminosilicate with Si/Al ratios ranging from ~0.5-1 [Wada, 1989]. Analyses of thermal infrared (TIR) spectra of the Martian surface from TES show high-silica phases at mid-to-high latitudes that have been proposed to be primary volcanic glass [Bandfield et al., 2000; Bandfield, 2002; Rogers and Christensen, 2007] or poorly-crystalline secondary silicates such as allophane or aluminous amorphous silica [Kraft et al., 2003; Michalski et al., 2006; Rogers and Christensen, 2007; Kraft, 2009]. Phase modeling of chemical data from the APXS on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit suggest the presence of allophane in chemically weathered rocks [Ming et al., 2006]. The presence of allophane on Mars has not been previously tested with IR spectroscopy because allophane spectra have not been available. We synthesized allophanes and allophanic gels with a range of Si/Al ratios to measure TIR emission and VNIR reflectance spectra and to test for the presence of allophane in Martian soils. VNIR reflectance spectra of the synthetic allophane samples have broad absorptions near 1.4 µm from OH stretching overtones and 1.9 µm from a combination of stretching and bending vibrations in H2O. Samples have a broad absorption centered near 2.25 µm, from AlAlOH combination bending and stretching vibrations, that shifts position with Si/Al ratio. Amorphous silica (opaline silica or primary volcanic glass) has been identified in CRISM spectra of southern highland terrains based on the presence of 1.4, 1.9, and broad 2.25 µm absorptions [Mustard et al., 2008]; however, these absorptions are also consistent with the presence of allophane. TIR emission spectra of the synthetic allophanes show two spectrally distinct types: Si-rich and Al-rich. Si-rich allophanes have two broad absorptions centered near 1080 and

  20. Allophane on Mars: Evidence from IR Spectroscopy and TES Spectral Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp. T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Christensen, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    Allophane is an alteration product of volcanic glass and a clay mineral precursor that is commonly found in basaltic soils on Earth. It is a poorly-crystalline or amorphous, hydrous aluminosilicate with Si/Al ratios ranging from approx.0.5-1 [Wada, 1989]. Analyses of thermal infrared (TIR) spectra of the Martian surface from TES show high-silica phases at mid-to-high latitudes that have been proposed to be primary volcanic glass [Bandfield et al., 2000; Bandfield, 2002; Rogers and Christensen, 2007] or poorly-crystalline secondary silicates such as allophane or aluminous amorphous silica [Kraft et al., 2003; Michalski et al., 2006; Rogers and Christensen, 2007; Kraft, 2009]. Phase modeling of chemical data from the APXS on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit suggest the presence of allophane in chemically weathered rocks [Ming et al., 2006]. The presence of allophane on Mars has not been previously tested with IR spectroscopy because allophane spectra have not been available. We synthesized allophanes and allophanic gels with a range of Si/Al ratios to measure TIR emission and VNIR reflectance spectra and to test for the presence of allophane in Martian soils. VNIR reflectance spectra of the synthetic allophane samples have broad absorptions near 1.4 m from OH stretching overtones and 1.9 m from a combination of stretching and bending vibrations in H2O. Samples have a broad absorption centered near 2.25 microns, from AlAlOH combination bending and stretching vibrations, that shifts position with Si/Al ratio. Amorphous silica (opaline silica or primary volcanic glass) has been identified in CRISM spectra of southern highland terrains based on the presence of 1.4, 1.9, and broad 2.25 m absorptions [Mustard et al., 2008]; however, these absorptions are also consistent with the presence of allophane. TIR emission spectra of the synthetic allophanes show two spectrally distinct types: Si-rich and Al-rich. Si-rich allophanes have two broad absorptions centered near 1080

  1. Spectral model for long-term computation of thermodynamics and potential evaporation in shallow wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Alberto; Meruane, Carolina

    2017-09-01

    Altiplanic wetlands are unique ecosystems located in the elevated plateaus of Chile, Argentina, Peru, and Bolivia. These ecosystems are under threat due to changes in land use, groundwater extractions, and climate change that will modify the water balance through changes in precipitation and evaporation rates. Long-term prediction of the fate of aquatic ecosystems imposes computational constraints that make finding a solution impossible in some cases. In this article, we present a spectral model for long-term simulations of the thermodynamics of shallow wetlands in the limit case when the water depth tends to zero. This spectral model solves for water and sediment temperature, as well as heat, momentum, and mass exchanged with the atmosphere. The parameters of the model (water depth, thermal properties of the sediments, and surface albedo) and the atmospheric downscaling were calibrated using the MODIS product of the land surface temperature. Moreover, the performance of the daily evaporation rates predicted by the model was evaluated against daily pan evaporation data measured between 1964 and 2012. The spectral model was able to correctly represent both seasonal fluctuation and climatic trends observed in daily evaporation rates. It is concluded that the spectral model presented in this article is a suitable tool for assessing the global climate change effects on shallow wetlands whose thermodynamics is forced by heat exchanges with the atmosphere and modulated by the heat-reservoir role of the sediments.

  2. Illuminating the origins of spectral properties of green fluorescent proteins via proteochemometric and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantasenamat, Chanin; Simeon, Saw; Owasirikul, Wiwat; Songtawee, Napat; Lapins, Maris; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2014-10-15

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has immense utility in biomedical imaging owing to its autofluorescent nature. In efforts to broaden the spectral diversity of GFP, there have been several reports of engineered mutants via rational design and random mutagenesis. Understanding the origins of spectral properties of GFP could be achieved by means of investigating its structure-activity relationship. The first quantitative structure-property relationship study for modeling the spectral properties, particularly the excitation and emission maximas, of GFP was previously proposed by us some years ago in which quantum chemical descriptors were used for model development. However, such simplified model does not consider possible effects that neighboring amino acids have on the conjugated π-system of GFP chromophore. This study describes the development of a unified proteochemometric model in which the GFP chromophore and amino acids in its vicinity are both considered in the same model. The predictive performance of the model was verified by internal and external validation as well as Y-scrambling. Our strategy provides a general solution for elucidating the contribution that specific ligand and protein descriptors have on the investigated spectral property, which may be useful in engineering novel GFP variants with desired characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. NSMAXG: A new magnetic neutron star spectral model in XSPEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2014-08-01

    The excellent sensitivity of X-ray telescopes, such as Chandra and XMM-Newton, is ideal for the study of cooling neutron stars, which can emit at these energies. In order to exploit the wealth of information contained in the high quality data, a thorough knowledge of the radiative properties of neutron star atmospheres is necessary. A key factor affecting photon emission is magnetic fields, and neutron stars are known to have strong surface magnetic fields. Here I briefly describe our latest work on constructing magnetic (B >= 1010 G) atmosphere models of neutron stars and the NSMAXG implementation of these models in XSPEC. Our results allow for more robust extractions of neutron star parameters from observations.

  4. Subaru spectroscopy and spectral modeling of Cygnus A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, Matthew J.; Perlman, Eric S. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Nikutta, Robert [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Packham, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, 1 UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Elitzur, Moshe [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Av. República 252, Santiago (Chile); Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Levenson, N. A. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Radomski, James T. [SOFIA/USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Aretxaga, Itziar [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Calle Luis Erro 1, Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2014-06-10

    We present high angular resolution (∼0.''5) MIR spectra of the powerful radio galaxy, Cygnus A (Cyg A), obtained with the Subaru telescope. The overall shape of the spectra agree with previous high angular resolution MIR observations, as well as previous Spitzer spectra. Our spectra, both on and off nucleus, show a deep silicate absorption feature. The absorption feature can be modeled with a blackbody obscured by cold dust or a clumpy torus. The deep silicate feature is best fit by a simple model of a screened blackbody, suggesting that foreground absorption plays a significant, if not dominant, role in shaping the spectrum of Cyg A. This foreground absorption prevents a clear view of the central engine and surrounding torus, making it difficult to quantify the extent the torus attributes to the obscuration of the central engine, but does not eliminate the need for a torus in Cyg A.

  5. Spectral response curve models applied to forest cover-type discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, W. D.; Lusch, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of remote sensing systems to provide a cost-effective inventory tool in the case of forest resources is currently of interest to a variety of natural resources management agencies. A number of studies have been performed regarding the use of Landsat data for mapping forest resources in Michigan. The present paper is concerned with current research, which has been directed toward the development and evaluation of computer-implemented classifications for the identification and characterization of coniferous forest types in Michigan's northern Lower Peninsula. Attention is given to the characteristic response curves from Landsat MSS data, spectral response curve models, and forest cover-type discrimination. It is found that spectral response curve models can be used to evaluate and explain the characteristic spectral responses of coniferous forest types on a snow-covered, winter Landsat scene.

  6. Open Systems with Error Bounds: Spin-Boson Model with Spectral Density Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascherpa, F; Smirne, A; Huelga, S F; Plenio, M B

    2017-03-10

    In the study of open quantum systems, one of the most common ways to describe environmental effects on the reduced dynamics is through the spectral density. However, in many models this object cannot be computed from first principles and needs to be inferred on phenomenological grounds or fitted to experimental data. Consequently, some uncertainty regarding its form and parameters is unavoidable; this in turn calls into question the accuracy of any theoretical predictions based on a given spectral density. Here, we focus on the spin-boson model as a prototypical open quantum system, find two error bounds on predicted expectation values in terms of the spectral density variation considered, and state a sufficient condition for the strongest one to apply. We further demonstrate an application of our result, by bounding the error brought about by the approximations involved in the hierarchical equations of motion resolution method for spin-boson dynamics.

  7. Clues to Coral Reef Ecosystem Health: Spectral Analysis Coupled with Radiative Transfer Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, L.; Ganapol, B.; Kramer, P.; Armstrong, R.; Gleason, A.; Torres, J.; Johnson, L.; Garfield, N.

    2003-12-01

    Coral reefs are among the world's most productive and biologically rich ecosystems and are some of the oldest ecosystems on Earth. Coralline structures protect coastlines from storms, maintain high diversity of marine life, and provide nurseries for marine species. Coral reefs play a role in carbon cycling through high rates of organic carbon metabolism and calcification. Coral reefs provide fisheries habitat that are the sole protein source for humans on remote islands. Reefs respond immediately to environmental change and therefore are considered "canaries" of the oceans. However, the world's reefs are in peril: they have shrunk 10-50% from their historical extent due to climate change and anthropogenic activity. An important contribution to coral reef research is improved spectral distinction of reef species' health where anthropogenic activity and climate change impacts are high. Relatively little is known concerning the spectral properties of coral or how coral structures reflect and transmit light. New insights into optical processes of corals under stressed conditions can lead to improved interpretation of airborne and satellite data and forecasting of immediate or long-term impacts of events such as bleaching and disease in coral. We are investigating the spatial and spectral resolution required to detect remotely changes in reef health by coupling spectral analysis of in situ spectra and airborne spectral data with a new radiative transfer model called CorMOD2. Challenges include light attenuation by the water column, atmospheric scattering, and scattering caused by the coral themselves that confound the spectral signal. In CorMOD2, input coral reflectance measurements produce modeled absorption through an inversion at each visible wavelength. The first model development phase of CorMOD2 imposes a scattering baseline that is constant regardless of coral condition, and further specifies that coral is optically thick. Evolution of CorMOD2 is towards a coral

  8. Measuring and modeling the effect of surface moisture on the spectral reflectance of coastal beach sand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corjan Nolet

    Full Text Available Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet sand appears darker than dry sand: it is less reflective. The goals of this study are (1 to measure and model reflectance under controlled laboratory conditions as function of wavelength (λ and surface moisture (θ over the optical domain of 350-2500 nm, and (2 to explore the implications of our laboratory findings for accurately mapping the distribution of surface moisture under natural conditions. A laboratory spectroscopy experiment was conducted to measure spectral reflectance (1 nm interval under different surface moisture conditions using beach sand. A non-linear increase of reflectance upon drying was observed over the full range of wavelengths. Two models were developed and tested. The first model is grounded in optics and describes the proportional contribution of scattering and absorption of light by pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix. The second model is grounded in soil physics and links the hydraulic behaviour of pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix to its optical properties. The optical model performed well for volumetric moisture content θ 0.97, but underestimated reflectance for θ between 24-30% (R2 > 0.92, most notable around the 1940 nm water absorption peak. The soil-physical model performed very well (R2 > 0.99 but is limited to 4% > θ < 24%. Results from a field experiment show that a short-wave infrared terrestrial laser scanner (λ = 1550 nm can accurately relate surface moisture to reflectance (standard error 2.6%, demonstrating its potential to derive spatially extensive surface moisture maps of a natural coastal beach.

  9. Measuring and Modeling the Effect of Surface Moisture on the Spectral Reflectance of Coastal Beach Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Corjan; Poortinga, Ate; Roosjen, Peter; Bartholomeus, Harm; Ruessink, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet sand appears darker than dry sand: it is less reflective. The goals of this study are (1) to measure and model reflectance under controlled laboratory conditions as function of wavelength () and surface moisture () over the optical domain of 350–2500 nm, and (2) to explore the implications of our laboratory findings for accurately mapping the distribution of surface moisture under natural conditions. A laboratory spectroscopy experiment was conducted to measure spectral reflectance (1 nm interval) under different surface moisture conditions using beach sand. A non-linear increase of reflectance upon drying was observed over the full range of wavelengths. Two models were developed and tested. The first model is grounded in optics and describes the proportional contribution of scattering and absorption of light by pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix. The second model is grounded in soil physics and links the hydraulic behaviour of pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix to its optical properties. The optical model performed well for volumetric moisture content 24% ( 0.97), but underestimated reflectance for between 24–30% ( 0.92), most notable around the 1940 nm water absorption peak. The soil-physical model performed very well ( 0.99) but is limited to 4% 24%. Results from a field experiment show that a short-wave infrared terrestrial laser scanner ( = 1550 nm) can accurately relate surface moisture to reflectance (standard error 2.6%), demonstrating its potential to derive spatially extensive surface moisture maps of a natural coastal beach. PMID:25383709

  10. Spectral element modelling of floating bodies in a Boussinesq framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Eskilsson, Claes; Ricchiuto, Mario

    -RANS simulations of point-absorbers close to resonance have indicated that there might be significant differences between the power production using linear hydrodynamics and VOF-RANS. At present VOF-RANS simulations are too computational expensive to be used in the design cycle. In shallow and intermediate waters......The wave energy sector relies heavily on the use of linear hydrodynamic models for the assessment of motions, loads and power production. The linear codes are computationally efficient and produce good results if applied within their application window. However, recent studies using two-phase VOF...

  11. The Impact of Accurate Extinction Measurements for X-Ray Spectral Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall K.; Valencic, Lynne A.; Corrales, Lia

    2016-02-01

    Interstellar extinction includes both absorption and scattering of photons from interstellar gas and dust grains, and it has the effect of altering a source's spectrum and its total observed intensity. However, while multiple absorption models exist, there are no useful scattering models in standard X-ray spectrum fitting tools, such as XSPEC. Nonetheless, X-ray halos, created by scattering from dust grains, are detected around even moderately absorbed sources, and the impact on an observed source spectrum can be significant, if modest, compared to direct absorption. By convolving the scattering cross section with dust models, we have created a spectral model as a function of energy, type of dust, and extraction region that can be used with models of direct absorption. This will ensure that the extinction model is consistent and enable direct connections to be made between a source's X-ray spectral fits and its UV/optical extinction.

  12. THE IMPACT OF ACCURATE EXTINCTION MEASUREMENTS FOR X-RAY SPECTRAL MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Randall K. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Valencic, Lynne A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Corrales, Lia, E-mail: lynne.a.valencic@nasa.gov [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 37-241, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Interstellar extinction includes both absorption and scattering of photons from interstellar gas and dust grains, and it has the effect of altering a source's spectrum and its total observed intensity. However, while multiple absorption models exist, there are no useful scattering models in standard X-ray spectrum fitting tools, such as XSPEC. Nonetheless, X-ray halos, created by scattering from dust grains, are detected around even moderately absorbed sources, and the impact on an observed source spectrum can be significant, if modest, compared to direct absorption. By convolving the scattering cross section with dust models, we have created a spectral model as a function of energy, type of dust, and extraction region that can be used with models of direct absorption. This will ensure that the extinction model is consistent and enable direct connections to be made between a source's X-ray spectral fits and its UV/optical extinction.

  13. Toward Improved Modeling of Spectral Solar Irradiance for Solar Energy Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This study introduces the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) recent efforts to extend the capability of the Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) by computing spectral solar irradiances over both horizontal and inclined surfaces. A new model is developed by computing the optical thickness of the atmosphere using a spectral irradiance model for clear-sky conditions, SMARTS2. A comprehensive lookup table (LUT) of cloud bidirectional transmittance distribution functions (BTDFs) is precomputed for 2002 wavelength bands using an atmospheric radiative transfer model, libRadtran. The solar radiation transmitted through the atmosphere is given by considering all possible paths of photon transmission and the relevent scattering and absorption attenuation. Our results indicate that this new model has an accuracy that is similar to that of state-of-the-art radiative transfer models, but it is significantly more efficient.

  14. A framework for efficient irregular wave simulations using Higher Order Spectral method coupled with viscous two phase model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inno Gatin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a framework for efficient irregular wave simulations using Higher Order Spectral method coupled with fully nonlinear viscous, two-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD model is presented. CFD model is based on solution decomposition via Spectral Wave Explicit Navier–Stokes Equation method, allowing efficient coupling with arbitrary potential flow solutions. Higher Order Spectrum is a pseudo-spectral, potential flow method for solving nonlinear free surface boundary conditions up to an arbitrary order of nonlinearity. It is capable of efficient long time nonlinear propagation of arbitrary input wave spectra, which can be used to obtain realistic extreme waves. To facilitate the coupling strategy, Higher Order Spectrum method is implemented in foam-extend alongside the CFD model. Validation of the Higher Order Spectrum method is performed on three test cases including monochromatic and irregular wave fields. Additionally, the coupling between Higher Order Spectrum and CFD is validated on three hour irregular wave propagation. Finally, a simulation of a 3D extreme wave encountering a full scale container ship is shown.

  15. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...

  16. Verification of spectral stabilization and numerically modeled external vacuum in NIMROD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovinec, C. R.; Bunkers, K. J.

    2013-10-01

    Revisions to the NIMROD algorithm (JCP 195, 355) aim to improve its utility for tokamak computations. The standard spectral-element expansion of all physical fields in continuous bases leads to convergence on MHD interchange from the unstable side in conditions of weak dissipation. This is a numerical impediment in nonlinear computations (Lutjens, CPC 95, 47). Adapting 1D numerical results (Sovinec, BAPS 57, No. 12) to NIMROD's elements, we consider incomplete modal expansions for auxiliary flow-divergence and parallel-vorticity fields. Their bases are just the highest order Legendre polynomial of each element. We show that convergence from the stable side is achieved when the auxiliary fields are used for either hyperbolic or parabolic correction terms, as verified in cylindrical interchange and toroidal ballooning computations. Separate development on applying distinct physical models to different regions of a domain allows coupling to external vacuum regions, suitable for modeling vertical displacement events and resistive wall modes. Results from initial tests are reported. Work supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  17. A polychromatic adaption of the Beer-Lambert model for spectral decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellerer, Thorsten; Ehn, Sebastian; Mechlem, Korbinian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Noël, Peter B.

    2017-03-01

    We present a semi-empirical forward-model for spectral photon-counting CT which is fully compatible with state-of-the-art maximum-likelihood estimators (MLE) for basis material line integrals. The model relies on a minimum calibration effort to make the method applicable in routine clinical set-ups with the need for periodic re-calibration. In this work we present an experimental verifcation of our proposed method. The proposed method uses an adapted Beer-Lambert model, describing the energy dependent attenuation of a polychromatic x-ray spectrum using additional exponential terms. In an experimental dual-energy photon-counting CT setup based on a CdTe detector, the model demonstrates an accurate prediction of the registered counts for an attenuated polychromatic spectrum. Thereby deviations between model and measurement data lie within the Poisson statistical limit of the performed acquisitions, providing an effectively unbiased forward-model. The experimental data also shows that the model is capable of handling possible spectral distortions introduced by the photon-counting detector and CdTe sensor. The simplicity and high accuracy of the proposed model provides a viable forward-model for MLE-based spectral decomposition methods without the need of costly and time-consuming characterization of the system response.

  18. Regional Spectral Model Workshop in memory of John Roads and Masao Kanamitsu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann-Ming Henry Juang; Shyh-Chin Chen; Songyou Hong; Hideki Kanamaru; Thomas Reichler; Takeshi Enomoto; Dian Putrasahan; Bruce T. Anderson; Sasha Gershunov; Haiqin Li; Kei Yoshimura; Nikolaus Buenning; Diane Boomer

    2014-01-01

    The committee for the 12th International Regional Spectral Model (RSM) Workshop drew its members from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), the U.S. Forest Service, Yonsei University, the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, the University of Tokyo, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Hokkaido University,...

  19. Spectral theory of extended Harper's model and a question by Erdős and Szekeres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, A.; Jitomirskaya, S.; Marx, C. A.

    2017-10-01

    The extended Harper's model, proposed by D.J. Thouless in 1983, generalizes the famous almost Mathieu operator, allowing for a wider range of lattice geometries (parametrized by three coupling parameters) by permitting 2D electrons to hop to both nearest and next nearest neighboring (NNN) lattice sites, while still exhibiting its characteristic symmetry (Aubry duality). Previous understanding of the spectral theory of this model was restricted to two dual regions of the parameter space, one of which is characterized by the positivity of the Lyapunov exponent. In this paper, we complete the picture with a description of the spectral measures over the entire remaining (self-dual) region, for all irrational values of the frequency parameter (the magnetic flux in the model). Most notably, we prove that in the entire interior of this regime, the model exhibits a collapse from purely ac spectrum to purely sc spectrum when the NNN interaction becomes symmetric. In physics literature, extensive numerical analysis had indicated such "spectral collapse," however so far not even a heuristic argument for this phenomenon could be provided. On the other hand, in the remaining part of the self-dual region, the spectral measures are singular continuous irrespective of such symmetry. The analysis requires some rather delicate number theoretic estimates, which ultimately depend on the solution of a problem posed by Erd\\H{o}s and Szekeres.

  20. Different atmospheric parameters influence on spectral UV radiation (measurements and modelling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarova, N.Y. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Meteorological Observatory; Krotkov, N.A. [Maryland Univ., MD (United States). JCESS/Meteorology Dept.; Geogdzhaev, I.V.; Bushnev, S.V.; Kondranin, T.V. [SUMGF/MIPT, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Khattatov, V.U. [Central Aerological Observatory, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The ultraviolet (UV) radiation plays a vital role in the biophysical processes despite its small portion in the total solar flux. UV radiation is subject to large variations at the Earth surface depending greatly on solar elevation, ozone and cloud amount, aerosols and surface albedo. The analysis of atmospheric parameters influence is based on the spectral archive data of three spectral instruments: NSF spectroradiometer (Barrow network) (NSF Polar Programs UV Spectroradiometer Network 1991-1992,1992), spectrophotometer (SUVS-M) of Central Aerological Observatory CAO, spectroradiometer of Meteorological Observatory of the Moscow State University (MO MSU) and model simulations based on delta-Eddington approximation

  1. Stability indicating analysis of bisacodyl by partial least squares regression, spectral residual augmented classical least squares and support vector regression chemometric models: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A. Naguib

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Partial least squares regression (PLSR, spectral residual augmented classical least squares (SRACLS and support vector regression (SVR are three different chemometric models. These models are subjected to a comparative study that highlights their inherent characteristics via applying them to analysis of bisacodyl in the presence of its reported degradation products monoacetyl bisacodyl (I and desacetyl bisacodyl (II, in raw material. For proper analysis, a 3 factor 3 level experimental design was established resulting in a training set of 9 mixtures containing different ratios of the interfering species. A linear test set consisting of 6 mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. To test the generalisation ability of the models, some extra mixtures were prepared that are outside the concentration space of the training set. To test the ability of models to handle nonlinearity in spectral response, another set of nonlinear samples was prepared. The paper highlights model transfer to other labs under other conditions as well. This paper aims to manifest the advantages of SRACLS and SVR over PLSR model, where SRACLS can tackle future changes without the need for tedious recalibration, while SVR is a more robust and general model, with high ability to model nonlinearity in spectral response, though like PLSR is needing recalibration. The results presented indicate the ability of the three models to analyse bisacodyl in the presence of its degradation products in raw material with high accuracy and precision; where SVR gives the best results at all tested conditions compared to other models.

  2. Electronic spectral properties of the two-dimensional infinite-U Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Hansen, Daniel; Perepelitsky, Edward; Rigol, Marcos; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2013-04-01

    A strong-coupling series expansion for the Green's function and the extremely correlated Fermi liquid (ECFL) theory are used to calculate the moments of the electronic spectral functions of the infinite-U Hubbard model. Results from these two complementary methods agree very well at both low densities, where the ECFL solution is the most accurate, and at high to intermediate temperatures, where the series converge. We find that a modified first moment, which underestimates the contributions from the occupied states and is accessible in the series through the time-dependent Green's function, best describes the peak location of the spectral function in the strongly correlated regime. This is examined by the ECFL results at low temperatures, where it is shown that the spectral function is largely skewed towards the occupied states.

  3. Implementation and testing of WELD and automatic spectral rule-based classifications for Landsat ETM+ in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wessels, Konrad J

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, Beijing, China, 22 - 26 April 2013 Implementation and testing of WELD and automatic spectral rule-based classifications for Landsat ETM+ in South Africa KJ Wessels1, BP Salmon1, F van den Bergh1...

  4. Analytical spectral density of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model at finite N

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Antonio M.; Verbaarschot, Jacobus J. M.

    2017-09-01

    We derive an approximate analytical formula for the spectral density of the q -body Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model obtained by summing a class of diagrams representing leading intersecting contractions. This expression agrees with that of Q -Hermite polynomials, with Q a nontrivial function of q ≥2 and the number of Majorana fermions N . Numerical results, obtained by exact diagonalization, are in excellent agreement with this approximate analytical spectral density even for relatively small N ˜8 . For N ≫1 and not close to the edge of the spectrum, we find that the approximate analytical spectral density simplifies to ρasym(E )=exp [2 arcsin2(E /E0)/log η ] , where η (N ,q ) is the suppression factor of the contribution of intersecting Wick contractions relative to nested contractions and E0 is the ground-state energy per particle. This spectral density reproduces the known result for the free energy in the large-q and large-N limit at arbitrary values of the temperature. In the infrared region, where the SYK model is believed to have a gravity dual, the analytical spectral density is given by ρ (E )˜sinh [2 π √{2 }√{(1 -E /E0)/(-log η ) }] . It therefore has a square-root edge, as in random matrix ensembles, followed by an exponential growth, a distinctive feature of black holes and also of low-energy nuclear excitations. Results for level statistics in this region confirm the agreement with random matrix theory. Physically this is a signature that, for sufficiently long times, the SYK model and its gravity dual evolve to a fully ergodic state whose dynamics only depends on the global symmetry of the system. Our results strongly suggest that random matrix correlations are a universal feature of quantum black holes and that the SYK model, combined with holography, may be relevant to modeling certain aspects of the nuclear dynamics.

  5. Synthetic Multivariate Models to Accommodate Unmodeled Interfering Components During Quantitative Spectral Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaland, David M.

    1999-07-14

    The analysis precision of any multivariate calibration method will be severely degraded if unmodeled sources of spectral variation are present in the unknown sample spectra. This paper describes a synthetic method for correcting for the errors generated by the presence of unmodeled components or other sources of unmodeled spectral variation. If the spectral shape of the unmodeled component can be obtained and mathematically added to the original calibration spectra, then a new synthetic multivariate calibration model can be generated to accommodate the presence of the unmodeled source of spectral variation. This new method is demonstrated for the presence of unmodeled temperature variations in the unknown sample spectra of dilute aqueous solutions of urea, creatinine, and NaCl. When constant-temperature PLS models are applied to spectra of samples of variable temperature, the standard errors of prediction (SEP) are approximately an order of magnitude higher than that of the original cross-validated SEPs of the constant-temperature partial least squares models. Synthetic models using the classical least squares estimates of temperature from pure water or variable-temperature mixture sample spectra reduce the errors significantly for the variable temperature samples. Spectrometer drift adds additional error to the analyte determinations, but a method is demonstrated that can minimize the effect of drift on prediction errors through the measurement of the spectra of a small subset of samples during both calibration and prediction. In addition, sample temperature can be predicted with high precision with this new synthetic model without the need to recalibrate using actual variable-temperature sample data. The synthetic methods eliminate the need for expensive generation of new calibration samples and collection of their spectra. The methods are quite general and can be applied using any known source of spectral variation and can be used with any multivariate

  6. Development of a Fast and Accurate PCRTM Radiative Transfer Model in the Solar Spectral Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Yang, Qiguang; Li, Hui; Jin, Zhonghai; Wu, Wan; Kizer, Susan; Zhou, Daniel K.; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A fast and accurate principal component-based radiative transfer model in the solar spectral region (PCRTMSOLAR) has been developed. The algorithm is capable of simulating reflected solar spectra in both clear sky and cloudy atmospheric conditions. Multiple scattering of the solar beam by the multilayer clouds and aerosols are calculated using a discrete ordinate radiative transfer scheme. The PCRTM-SOLAR model can be trained to simulate top-of-atmosphere radiance or reflectance spectra with spectral resolution ranging from 1 cm(exp -1) resolution to a few nanometers. Broadband radiances or reflectance can also be calculated if desired. The current version of the PCRTM-SOLAR covers a spectral range from 300 to 2500 nm. The model is valid for solar zenith angles ranging from 0 to 80 deg, the instrument view zenith angles ranging from 0 to 70 deg, and the relative azimuthal angles ranging from 0 to 360 deg. Depending on the number of spectral channels, the speed of the current version of PCRTM-SOLAR is a few hundred to over one thousand times faster than the medium speed correlated-k option MODTRAN5. The absolute RMS error in channel radiance is smaller than 10(exp -3) mW/cm)exp 2)/sr/cm(exp -1) and the relative error is typically less than 0.2%.

  7. Wind turbine fatigue damage evaluation based on a linear model and a spectral method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaldi, Carlo; Henriksen, Lars Christian; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2015-01-01

    presents a method to estimate wind turbine fatigue damage suited for optimization design applications. The method utilizes a high-order linear wind turbine model. The model comprehends a detailed description of the wind turbine and the controller. The fatigue is computed with a spectral method applied......Wind turbine multidisciplinary design optimization is currently the focus of several investigations because it has showed potential in reducing the cost of energy. This design approach requires fast methods to evaluate wind turbine loads with a sufficiently high level of fidelity. This paper...... to power spectral densities of wind turbine sensor responses to turbulent wind. In this paper, the model is validated both in time domain and frequency domain with a nonlinear aeroservoelastic model. The approach is compared quantitatively against fatigue damage obtained from the power spectra of time...

  8. A simple spectral model for the modification of turbulence in flow over gentle hills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, H.P.

    1996-01-01

    A model is presented which calculates the changes of the velocity variances and stress in flow over gentle isolated hills. At intermediate frequencies spectra of the velocity components are modified according to rapid distortion theory. At low frequencies spectral densities change...... with measurements of turbulent flow over various hills and an escarpment. The model is able to simulate the structure of the modified variance and covariance fields although larger differences occur at individual positions. The calculated modified spectra compare well with observed spectra....

  9. Spectral Inverse Quantum (Spectral-IQ Method for Modeling Mesoporous Systems: Application on Silica Films by FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work advances the inverse quantum (IQ structural criterion for ordering and characterizing the porosity of the mesosystems based on the recently advanced ratio of the particle-to-wave nature of quantum objects within the extended Heisenberg uncertainty relationship through employing the quantum fluctuation, both for free and observed quantum scattering information, as computed upon spectral identification of the wave-numbers specific to the maximum of absorption intensity record, and to left-, right- and full-width at the half maximum (FWHM of the concerned bands of a given compound. It furnishes the hierarchy for classifying the mesoporous systems from more particle-related (porous, tight or ionic bindings to more wave behavior (free or covalent bindings. This so-called spectral inverse quantum (Spectral-IQ particle-to-wave assignment was illustrated on spectral measurement of FT-IR (bonding bands’ assignment for samples synthesized within different basic environment and different thermal treatment on mesoporous materials obtained by sol-gel technique with n-dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB and of their combination as cosolvents. The results were analyzed in the light of the so-called residual inverse quantum information, accounting for the free binding potency of analyzed samples at drying temperature, and were checked by cross-validation with thermal decomposition techniques by endo-exo thermo correlations at a higher temperature.

  10. Modelling Perception of Structure and Affect in Music: Spectral Centroid and Wishart's Red Bird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger T. Dean

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pearce (2011 provides a positive and interesting response to our article on time series analysis of the influences of acoustic properties on real-time perception of structure and affect in a section of Trevor Wishart’s Red Bird (Dean & Bailes, 2010. We address the following topics raised in the response and our paper. First, we analyse in depth the possible influence of spectral centroid, a timbral feature of the acoustic stream distinct from the high level general parameter we used initially, spectral flatness. We find that spectral centroid, like spectral flatness, is not a powerful predictor of real-time responses, though it does show some features that encourage its continued consideration. Second, we discuss further the issue of studying both individual responses, and as in our paper, group averaged responses. We show that a multivariate Vector Autoregression model handles the grand average series quite similarly to those of individual members of our participant groups, and we analyse this in greater detail with a wide range of approaches in work which is in press and continuing. Lastly, we discuss the nature and intent of computational modelling of cognition using acoustic and music- or information theoretic data streams as predictors, and how the music- or information theoretic approaches may be applied to electroacoustic music, which is ‘sound-based’ rather than note-centred like Western classical music.

  11. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  12. Artificial cloud test confirms volcanic ash detection using infrared spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, A. J.; Dezitter, F.; Davies, I.; Weber, K.; Birnfeld, M.; Moriano, D.; Bernardo, C.; Vogel, A.; Prata, G. S.; Mather, T. A.; Thomas, H. E.; Cammas, J.; Weber, M.

    2016-05-01

    Airborne volcanic ash particles are a known hazard to aviation. Currently, there are no means available to detect ash in flight as the particles are too fine (radii ash clouds are difficult or impossible to detect by eye. The economic cost and societal impact of the April/May 2010 Icelandic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull generated renewed interest in finding ways to identify airborne volcanic ash in order to keep airspace open and avoid aircraft groundings. We have designed and built a bi-spectral, fast-sampling, uncooled infrared camera device (AVOID) to examine its ability to detect volcanic ash from commercial jet aircraft at distances of more than 50 km ahead. Here we report results of an experiment conducted over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of France, confirming the ability of the device to detect and quantify volcanic ash in an artificial ash cloud created by dispersal of volcanic ash from a second aircraft. A third aircraft was used to measure the ash in situ using optical particle counters. The cloud was composed of very fine ash (mean radii ~10 μm) collected from Iceland immediately after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption and had a vertical thickness of ~200 m, a width of ~2 km and length of between 2 and 12 km. Concentrations of ~200 μg m-3 were identified by AVOID at distances from ~20 km to ~70 km. For the first time, airborne remote detection of volcanic ash has been successfully demonstrated from a long-range flight test aircraft.

  13. Artificial cloud test confirms volcanic ash detection using infrared spectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, A J; Dezitter, F; Davies, I; Weber, K; Birnfeld, M; Moriano, D; Bernardo, C; Vogel, A; Prata, G S; Mather, T A; Thomas, H E; Cammas, J; Weber, M

    2016-05-09

    Airborne volcanic ash particles are a known hazard to aviation. Currently, there are no means available to detect ash in flight as the particles are too fine (radii ash clouds are difficult or impossible to detect by eye. The economic cost and societal impact of the April/May 2010 Icelandic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull generated renewed interest in finding ways to identify airborne volcanic ash in order to keep airspace open and avoid aircraft groundings. We have designed and built a bi-spectral, fast-sampling, uncooled infrared camera device (AVOID) to examine its ability to detect volcanic ash from commercial jet aircraft at distances of more than 50 km ahead. Here we report results of an experiment conducted over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of France, confirming the ability of the device to detect and quantify volcanic ash in an artificial ash cloud created by dispersal of volcanic ash from a second aircraft. A third aircraft was used to measure the ash in situ using optical particle counters. The cloud was composed of very fine ash (mean radii ~10 μm) collected from Iceland immediately after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption and had a vertical thickness of ~200 m, a width of ~2 km and length of between 2 and 12 km. Concentrations of ~200 μg m(-3) were identified by AVOID at distances from ~20 km to ~70 km. For the first time, airborne remote detection of volcanic ash has been successfully demonstrated from a long-range flight test aircraft.

  14. Novel Spectral Representations and Sparsity-Driven Algorithms for Shape Modeling and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming

    In this dissertation, we focus on extending classical spectral shape analysis by incorporating spectral graph wavelets and sparsity-seeking algorithms. Defined with the graph Laplacian eigenbasis, the spectral graph wavelets are localized both in the vertex domain and graph spectral domain, and thus are very effective in describing local geometry. With a rich dictionary of elementary vectors and forcing certain sparsity constraints, a real life signal can often be well approximated by a very sparse coefficient representation. The many successful applications of sparse signal representation in computer vision and image processing inspire us to explore the idea of employing sparse modeling techniques with dictionary of spectral basis to solve various shape modeling problems. Conventional spectral mesh compression uses the eigenfunctions of mesh Laplacian as shape bases, which are highly inefficient in representing local geometry. To ameliorate, we advocate an innovative approach to 3D mesh compression using spectral graph wavelets as dictionary to encode mesh geometry. The spectral graph wavelets are locally defined at individual vertices and can better capture local shape information than Laplacian eigenbasis. The multi-scale SGWs form a redundant dictionary as shape basis, so we formulate the compression of 3D shape as a sparse approximation problem that can be readily handled by greedy pursuit algorithms. Surface inpainting refers to the completion or recovery of missing shape geometry based on the shape information that is currently available. We devise a new surface inpainting algorithm founded upon the theory and techniques of sparse signal recovery. Instead of estimating the missing geometry directly, our novel method is to find this low-dimensional representation which describes the entire original shape. More specifically, we find that, for many shapes, the vertex coordinate function can be well approximated by a very sparse coefficient representation with

  15. Improvement of the simulated precipitation by applying a Semi-Lagrangian advection scheme in the ECPC Regional Spectral Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E. C.; Yoshimura, K.

    2016-12-01

    The non-iteration dimensional-split semi-Lagrangian (NDSL) advection scheme is applied to the Experimental Climate Prediction Center (ECPC) regional spectral model (RSM) in order to alleviate the Gibbs phenomenon. The Gibbs problem is solved by replacing the spectral prognostic vapor and radioactive tracer calculations with the NDSL method, which considers advection of tracers on grid system without spectral space transformations. The NDSL scheme in the RSM successfully solved the Gibbs problem of the radioactive tracers for the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident case. In this study, analyses are focused on the improvement of the simulated precipitation from the RSM by applying the NDSL scheme for hydrometeors. It is shown that the NDSL improves location and intensity of the precipitation for the case of the Changma front over Korea. Furthermore, a mass-conserving NDSL scheme is also tested with the monotonic NDSL scheme for the Changma case. The mass-conserving scheme shows advantages in the simulated humidity fields and rainfall intensity.

  16. 2D spectral element modeling of GPR wave propagation in inhomogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Sajad; Oskooi, Behrooz; Amini, Navid; Dalkhani, Amin Rahimi

    2016-10-01

    We present a spectral element method, for simulation of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) in two dimensions. The technique is based upon a weak formulation of the equations of Maxwell and combines the flexibility of the elemental-based methods with the accuracy of the spectral based methods. The wave field on the elements is discretized using high-degree Lagrange interpolation and integration over an element is accomplished based upon the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre integration rule. As a result, the mass matrix and the damping matrix are always diagonal, which drastically reduces the computational cost. We first develop the formulation of 2D spectral element method (SEM) in the time-domain based on Maxwell's equations. The presented formulation is with matrix notation that simplifies the implementation of the relations in computer programs, especially in MATLAB application. We discuss the differences between spectral element method and finite-element method in the time-domain. Also, we show that the SEM numerical dispersion is much lower than FEM. To absorb waves at the edges of the modeling domain, we implement first order Clayton and Engquist absorbing boundary conditions (CE-ABC) introduced in numerical finite-difference modeling of seismic wave propagation. We used the SEM to simulate a complex model to show its abilities and limitations. As well as, one distinct advantage of SEM is that we can easily define our model features in nodal points, because the integration points and the interpolation points are similar that makes it very flexible in simulation of complex models.

  17. Consistent spectral predictors for dynamic causal models of steady-state responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Rosalyn J; Stephan, Klaas E; Dolan, Raymond J; Friston, Karl J

    2011-04-15

    Dynamic causal modelling (DCM) for steady-state responses (SSR) is a framework for inferring the mechanisms that underlie observed electrophysiological spectra, using biologically plausible generative models of neuronal dynamics. In this paper, we examine the dynamic repertoires of nonlinear conductance-based neural population models and propose a generative model of their power spectra. Our model comprises an ensemble of interconnected excitatory and inhibitory cells, where synaptic currents are mediated by fast, glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors and slower voltage-gated NMDA receptors. We explore two formulations of how hidden neuronal states (depolarisation and conductances) interact: through their mean and variance (mean-field model) or through their mean alone (neural-mass model). Both rest on a nonlinear Fokker-Planck description of population dynamics, which can exhibit bifurcations (phase transitions). We first characterise these phase transitions numerically: by varying critical model parameters, we elicit both fixed points and quasiperiodic dynamics that reproduce the spectral characteristics (~2-100 Hz) of real electrophysiological data. We then introduce a predictor of spectral activity using centre manifold theory and linear stability analysis. This predictor is based on sampling the system's Jacobian over the orbits of hidden neuronal states. This predictor behaves consistently and smoothly in the region of phase transitions, which permits the use of gradient descent methods for model inversion. We demonstrate this by inverting generative models (DCMs) of SSRs, using simulated data that entails phase transitions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-spherical surface wave amplitude radiation patterns identified from spectral ratios of the 2016 and 2013 DPRK nuclear tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, G. A.; Ford, S. R.; Myers, S.; Pasyanos, M.; Walter, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    The 6 January 2016, 12 February 2013 and 25 May 2009 declared nuclear explosions at the Punggye-ri test site in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) were all closely located providing an opportunity to perform differential analysis. We used spectral ratios of surface waves between 50 and 10 sec period between the co-located events to isolate relative explosion amplitude radiation patterns by the cancelation of propagation and site effects. We calculated the spectral ratios using a dense array of 72 NIED F-NET stations across Japan and all available IMS, IC and IU network stations. Analyses of Rayleigh waves indicated non-spherical radiation for the 2016 and 2013 tests relative to 2009. The 2016/2009 and 2013/2009 event pairs had ellipsoidal radiation patterns. The 2016/2009 pair had an ellipse major axis oriented 123 degrees from north and the 2013/2009 pair was oriented 33 degrees from north. This suggests that both 2016 and 2013 explosions have non-spherical radiation and also that the radiation between 2016 and 2013 were rotated by 90 degrees. This radiation pattern was strongest in the 20 and 33 sec period band but was also observed in the 10 and 50 sec band with higher scatter. We did not discern any Love wave radiation patterns but there is high scatter possibly due to a lower long-period signal to noise ratio on the horizontal relative to the vertical components. There are several possible source models that can theoretically cause non-spherical radiation, for example topography, spall damage, or tectonic release. One implication we have identified is that the radiation pattern makes it problematic for the use of surface waves in relative relocations, typically more robust for earthquakes. The amount of departure from purely spherical radiation is consistent with the 20-30% CLVD and 60-70% isotropic components estimated from regional long-period moment tensor solutions for the two explosions. This work performed under the auspices of the US

  19. [A novel technology for water quality testing based on UV spectral analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, You-quan; Li, Yu-chun; Guo, Yi; Gu, Bai-jun; Yang, Zhen

    2012-05-01

    Water pollution control and prevention require that the water quality testing is of real time, online and portability. The presejt paper provides a water detecting system based on UV-visible spectra. The R2 of the linear regression is greater than 0.99 between absorbance and COD of the samples. Single measurement is within 1 s. At the same time, two methods were presented for direct comparison and normalization of the spectra and their corresponding indicator parameters. By a large number of experiments with standard solution of the potassium hydrogen phthalate and water samples, we found that these methods can be used to classify samples, find suitable mathematical model of the test water from the database, to improve the universal ability of the UV water testing technology, and get other water quality indices.

  20. UNCERTAINTIES IN ATOMIC DATA AND THEIR PROPAGATION THROUGH SPECTRAL MODELS. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bautista, M. A.; Fivet, V. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Quinet, P. [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons-UMONS, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Dunn, J. [Physical Science Department, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA 30338 (United States); Gull, T. R. [Code 667, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kallman, T. R. [Code 662, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mendoza, C., E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu [Centro de Fisica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC), P.O. Box 20632, Caracas 1020A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2013-06-10

    We present a method for computing uncertainties in spectral models, i.e., level populations, line emissivities, and emission line ratios, based upon the propagation of uncertainties originating from atomic data. We provide analytic expressions, in the form of linear sets of algebraic equations, for the coupled uncertainties among all levels. These equations can be solved efficiently for any set of physical conditions and uncertainties in the atomic data. We illustrate our method applied to spectral models of O III and Fe II and discuss the impact of the uncertainties on atomic systems under different physical conditions. As to intrinsic uncertainties in theoretical atomic data, we propose that these uncertainties can be estimated from the dispersion in the results from various independent calculations. This technique provides excellent results for the uncertainties in A-values of forbidden transitions in [Fe II].

  1. Uncertainties in Atomic Data and Their Propagation Through Spectral Models. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, M. A.; Fivet, V.; Quinet, P.; Dunn, J.; Gull, T. R.; Kallman, T. R.; Mendoza, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for computing uncertainties in spectral models, i.e., level populations, line emissivities, and emission line ratios, based upon the propagation of uncertainties originating from atomic data.We provide analytic expressions, in the form of linear sets of algebraic equations, for the coupled uncertainties among all levels. These equations can be solved efficiently for any set of physical conditions and uncertainties in the atomic data. We illustrate our method applied to spectral models of Oiii and Fe ii and discuss the impact of the uncertainties on atomic systems under different physical conditions. As to intrinsic uncertainties in theoretical atomic data, we propose that these uncertainties can be estimated from the dispersion in the results from various independent calculations. This technique provides excellent results for the uncertainties in A-values of forbidden transitions in [Fe ii]. Key words: atomic data - atomic processes - line: formation - methods: data analysis - molecular data - molecular processes - techniques: spectroscopic

  2. Spectral Quantitative Analysis Model with Combining Wavelength Selection and Topology Structure Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopy is an efficient and widely used quantitative analysis method. In this paper, a spectral quantitative analysis model with combining wavelength selection and topology structure optimization is proposed. For the proposed method, backpropagation neural network is adopted for building the component prediction model, and the simultaneousness optimization of the wavelength selection and the topology structure of neural network is realized by nonlinear adaptive evolutionary programming (NAEP. The hybrid chromosome in binary scheme of NAEP has three parts. The first part represents the topology structure of neural network, the second part represents the selection of wavelengths in the spectral data, and the third part represents the parameters of mutation of NAEP. Two real flue gas datasets are used in the experiments. In order to present the effectiveness of the methods, the partial least squares with full spectrum, the partial least squares combined with genetic algorithm, the uninformative variable elimination method, the backpropagation neural network with full spectrum, the backpropagation neural network combined with genetic algorithm, and the proposed method are performed for building the component prediction model. Experimental results verify that the proposed method has the ability to predict more accurately and robustly as a practical spectral analysis tool.

  3. Sparse modeling of EELS and EDX spectral imaging data by nonnegative matrix factorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiga, Motoki, E-mail: shiga_m@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Gifu University, 1-1, Yanagido, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Muto, Shunsuke [Advanced Measurement Technology Center, Institute of Materials and Systems for Sustainability, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tsuda, Koji [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Center for Materials Research by Information Integration, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Biotechnology Research Institute for Drug Discovery, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 2-4-7 Aomi Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Yamamoto, Yuta [High-Voltage Electron Microscope Laboratory, Institute of Materials and Systems for Sustainability, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Mori, Toshiyuki [Environment and Energy Materials Division, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Tanji, Takayoshi [Division of Materials Research, Institute of Materials and Systems for Sustainability, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques have enabled us to automatically obtain electron energy-loss (EELS)/energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectral datasets from a specified region of interest (ROI) at an arbitrary step width, called spectral imaging (SI). Instead of manually identifying the potential constituent chemical components from the ROI and determining the chemical state of each spectral component from the SI data stored in a huge three-dimensional matrix, it is more effective and efficient to use a statistical approach for the automatic resolution and extraction of the underlying chemical components. Among many different statistical approaches, we adopt a non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) technique, mainly because of the natural assumption of non-negative values in the spectra and cardinalities of chemical components, which are always positive in actual data. This paper proposes a new NMF model with two penalty terms: (i) an automatic relevance determination (ARD) prior, which optimizes the number of components, and (ii) a soft orthogonal constraint, which clearly resolves each spectrum component. For the factorization, we further propose a fast optimization algorithm based on hierarchical alternating least-squares. Numerical experiments using both phantom and real STEM-EDX/EELS SI datasets demonstrate that the ARD prior successfully identifies the correct number of physically meaningful components. The soft orthogonal constraint is also shown to be effective, particularly for STEM-EELS SI data, where neither the spatial nor spectral entries in the matrices are sparse. - Highlights: • Automatic resolution of chemical components from spectral imaging is considered. • We propose a new non-negative matrix factorization with two new penalties. • The first penalty is sparseness to choose the number of components from data. • Experimental results with real data demonstrate effectiveness of our method.

  4. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests E Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods and Class I and Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 or PM10â2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. E, Table E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for...

  5. Prediction of traffic convective instability with spectral analysis of the Aw–Rascle–Zhang model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belletti, Francois, E-mail: francois.belletti@berkeley.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Huo, Mandy, E-mail: mhuo@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Litrico, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.litrico@lyonnaise-des-eaux.fr [LyRE, R& D center of SUEZ environnement, Bordeaux (France); Bayen, Alexandre M., E-mail: bayen@berkeley.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2015-10-09

    Highlights: • We linearize and diagonalize the ARZ model. We give a Froude number for traffic. • Spectral domain transfer functions are derived and decompose the model. • The linearized system is convectively unstable in the free-flow regime. • We conduct experiments with the linearized model on the NGSIM dataset. • We show that the linearization does not destroy the accuracy of the model. - Abstract: This article starts from the classical Aw–Rascle–Zhang (ARZ) model for freeway traffic and develops a spectral analysis of its linearized version. A counterpart to the Froude number in hydrodynamics is defined that enables a classification of the nature of vehicle traffic flow using the explicit solution resulting from the analysis. We prove that our linearization about an equilibrium is stable for congested regimes and unstable otherwise. NGSIM data for congested traffic trajectories is used so as to confront the linearized model's predictions to actual macroscopic behavior of traffic. The model is shown to achieve good accuracy for speed and flow. In particular, it accounts for the advection of oscillations on boundaries into the interior domain where the PDE under study is solved.

  6. Estimating solar ultraviolet irradiance (290-385 nm by means of the spectral parametric models: SPCTRAL2 and SMARTS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Foyo-Moreno

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of the ozone depletion in Antarctic and the globally declining trend of stratospheric ozone concentration, public and scientific concern has been raised in the last decades. A very important consequence of this fact is the increased broadband and spectral UV radiation in the environment and the biological effects and heath risks that may take place in the near future. The absence of widespread measurements of this radiometric flux has lead to the development and use of alternative estimation procedures such as the parametric approaches. Parametric models compute the radiant energy using available atmospheric parameters. Some parametric models compute the global solar irradiance at surface level by addition of its direct beam and diffuse components. In the present work, we have developed a comparison between two cloudless sky parametrization schemes. Both methods provide an estimation of the solar spectral irradiance that can be integrated spectrally within the limits of interest. For this test we have used data recorded in a radiometric station located at Granada (37.180°N, 3.580°W, 660 m a.m.s.l., an inland location. The database includes hourly values of the relevant variables covering the years 1994-95. The performance of the models has been tested in relation to their predictive capability of global solar irradiance in the UV range (290–385 nm. After our study, it appears that information concerning the aerosol radiative effects is fundamental in order to obtain a good estimation. The original version of SPCTRAL2 provides estimates of the experimental values with negligible mean bias deviation. This suggests not only the appropriateness of the model but also the convenience of the aerosol features fixed in it to Granada conditions. SMARTS2 model offers increased flexibility concerning the selection of different aerosol models included in the code and provides the best results when the selected models are those

  7. Average spectral power changes at the hippocampal electroencephalogram in schizophrenia model induced by ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Luis Rafael L; Borges, Lucas T N; Silva, Joyse M F; de Andrade, Francisca Roselin O; Barbosa, Talita M; Oliveira, Tatiana Q; Macedo, Danielle; Lima, Ricardo F; Dantas, Leonardo P; Patrocinio, Manoel Cláudio A; do Vale, Otoni C; Vasconcelos, Silvânia M M

    2017-08-29

    The use of ketamine (Ket) as a pharmacological model of schizophrenia is an important tool for understanding the main mechanisms of glutamatergic regulated neural oscillations. Thus, the aim of the current study was to evaluate Ket-induced changes in the average spectral power using the hippocampal quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG). To this end, male Wistar rats were submitted to a stereotactic surgery for the implantation of an electrode in the right hippocampus. After three days, the animals were divided into four groups that were treated for 10 consecutive days with Ket (10, 50, or 100 mg/kg). Brainwaves were captured on the 1st or 10th day, respectively, to acute or repeated treatments. The administration of Ket (10, 50, or 100 mg/kg), compared with controls, induced changes in the hippocampal average spectral power of delta, theta, alpha, gamma low or high waves, after acute or repeated treatments. Therefore, based on the alterations in the average spectral power of hippocampal waves induced by Ket, our findings might provide a basis for the use of hippocampal QEEG in animal models of schizophrenia. © 2017 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  8. Optimum strategies for mapping vegetation using multiple-endmember spectral mixture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Gardner, Margaret E.; Church, Rick; Ustin, Susan L.; Green, Robert O.

    1997-10-01

    Improved vegetation maps are required for fire management and biodiversity assessment, from critical inputs for hydrological and biogeochemical models and represent a means for scaling-up point measurements. At scales greater than 10 meters, vegetation communities are typically mixed consisting of leaves, branches, exposed soil and shadows. To map mixed vegetation, many researchers employ spectral mixture analysis (SMA). In most SMA applications, a single set of spectra consisting of green vegetation, soil, non- photosynthetic vegetation and shade are used to 'unmix' images. However, because most scenes contain more than four components, this simple approach leads to fraction errors and may fail to differentiate many vegetation types. In this work, we apply a new approach called multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis, in which the number and types of endmembers vary per-pixel. Using this approach, hundreds of unique models are generated that account for community specific differences in plant chemistry, physical attributes and phenology. Additionally, we describe a new strategy for developing and organizing regionally specific spectral libraries. We present result from a study in the Santa Monica Mountains using AVIRIS data, in which we map grassland and chaparral communities, mapping species dominance in some cases to a high degree of accuracy.

  9. Imaging acoustic vibrations in an ear model using spectrally encoded interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechin, Sveta; Yelin, Dvir

    2018-01-01

    Imaging vibrational patterns of the tympanic membrane would allow an accurate measurement of its mechanical properties and provide early diagnosis of various hearing disorders. Various optical technologies have been suggested to address this challenge and demonstrated in vitro using point scanning and full-field interferometry. Spectrally encoded imaging has been previously demonstrated capable of imaging tissue acoustic vibrations with high spatial resolution, including two-dimensional phase and amplitude mapping. In this work, we demonstrate a compact optical apparatus for imaging acoustic vibrations that could be incorporated into a commercially available digital otoscope. By transmitting harmonic sound waves through the otoscope insufflation port and analyzing the spectral interferograms using custom-built software, we demonstrate high-resolution vibration imaging of a circular rubber membrane within an ear model.

  10. Continental Spatio-Temporal Data Analysis with Linear Spectral Mixture Model Using FOSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Uttam; Nemani, Ramakrishna; Ganguly, Sangram; Milesi, Cristina; Raja, Kumar; Wang, Weile; Votava, Petr; Michaelis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates the development and implementation of a Fully Constrained Least Squares (FCLS) unmixing model developed in C++ programming language with OpenCV package and boost C++ libraries in the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX). Visualization of the results is supported by GRASS GIS and statistical analysis is carried in R in a Linux system environment. FCLS was first tested on computer simulated data with Gaussian noise of various signal-to-noise ratio, and Landsat data of an agricultural scenario and an urban environment using a set of global end members of substrate (soils, sediments, rocks, and non-photosynthetic vegetation), vegetation that includes green photosynthetic plants and dark objects which encompasses absorptive substrate materials, clear water, deep shadows, etc. For the agricultural scenario, a spectrally diverse collection of 11 scenes of Level 1 terrain corrected, cloud free Landsat-5 TM data of Fresno, California, USA were unmixed and the results were validated with the corresponding ground data. To study an urbanized landscape, a clear sky Landsat-5 TM data were unmixed and validated with coincident World View-2 abundance maps (of 2 m spatial resolution) for an area of San Francisco, California, USA. The results were evaluated using descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient, RMSE, probability of success, boxplot and bivariate distribution function. Finally, FCLS was used for sub-pixel land cover analysis of the monthly WELD (Wen-enabled Landsat data) repository from 2008 to 2011 of North America. The abundance maps in conjunction with DMSP-OLS nighttime lights data were used to extract the urban land cover features and analyze their spatial-temporal growth.

  11. Seismic waves modeling with the Fourier pseudo-spectral method on massively parallel machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klin, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The Fourier pseudo-spectral method (FPSM) is an approach for the 3D numerical modeling of the wave propagation, which is based on the discretization of the spatial domain in a structured grid and relies on global spatial differential operators for the solution of the wave equation. This last peculiarity is advantageous from the accuracy point of view but poses difficulties for an efficient implementation of the method to be run on parallel computers with distributed memory architecture. The 1D spatial domain decomposition approach has been so far commonly adopted in the parallel implementations of the FPSM, but it implies an intensive data exchange among all the processors involved in the computation, which can degrade the performance because of communication latencies. Moreover, the scalability of the 1D domain decomposition is limited, since the number of processors can not exceed the number of grid points along the directions in which the domain is partitioned. This limitation inhibits an efficient exploitation of the computational environments with a very large number of processors. In order to overcome the limitations of the 1D domain decomposition we implemented a parallel version of the FPSM based on a 2D domain decomposition, which allows to achieve a higher degree of parallelism and scalability on massively parallel machines with several thousands of processing elements. The parallel programming is essentially achieved using the MPI protocol but OpenMP parts are also included in order to exploit the single processor multi - threading capabilities, when available. The developed tool is aimed at the numerical simulation of the seismic waves propagation and in particular is intended for earthquake ground motion research. We show the scalability tests performed up to 16k processing elements on the IBM Blue Gene/Q computer at CINECA (Italy), as well as the application to the simulation of the earthquake ground motion in the alluvial plain of the Po river (Italy).

  12. Continental Spatio-temporal Data Analysis with Linear Spectral Mixture Model using FOSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, U.; Nemani, R. R.; Ganguly, S.; Milesi, C.; Raja, K. S.; Wang, W.; Votava, P.; Michaelis, A.

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates the development and implementation of a Fully Constrained Least Squares (FCLS) unmixing model developed in C++ programming language with OpenCV package and boost C++ libraries in the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX). Visualization of the results is supported by GRASS GIS and statistical analysis is carried in R in a Linux system environment. FCLS was first tested on computer simulated data with Gaussian noise of various signal-to-noise ratio, and Landsat data of an agricultural scenario and an urban environment using a set of global endmembers of substrate (soils, sediments, rocks, and non-photosynthetic vegetation), vegetation that includes green photosynthetic plants and dark objects which encompasses absorptive substrate materials, clear water, deep shadows, etc. For the agricultural scenario, a spectrally diverse collection of 11 scenes of Level 1 terrain corrected, cloud free Landsat-5 TM data of Fresno, California, USA were unmixed and the results were validated with the corresponding ground data. To study an urbanized landscape, a clear sky Landsat-5 TM data were unmixed and validated with coincident World View-2 abundance maps (of 2 m spatial resolution) for an area of San Francisco, California, USA. The results were evaluated using descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient, RMSE, probability of success, boxplot and bivariate distribution function. Finally, FCLS was used for sub-pixel land cover analysis of the monthly WELD (Wen-enabled Landsat data) repository from 2008 to 2011 of North America. The abundance maps in conjunction with DMSP-OLS nighttime lights data were used to extract the urban land cover features and analyze their spatial-temporal growth.

  13. THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: SPECTRAL VARIATION ON KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Wesley C. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Brown, Michael E. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Glass, Florian, E-mail: wesley.fraser@nrc.ca [Observatoire de Genve, Universit de Genve, 51 chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    Here, we present additional photometry of targets observed as part of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. Twelve targets were re-observed with the WFC3 in the optical and NIR wavebands designed to complement those used during the first visit. Additionally, all of the observations originally presented by Fraser and Brown were reanalyzed through the same updated photometry pipeline. A re-analysis of the optical and NIR color distribution reveals a bifurcated optical color distribution and only two identifiable spectral classes, each of which occupies a broad range of colors and has correlated optical and NIR colors, in agreement with our previous findings. We report the detection of significant spectral variations on five targets which cannot be attributed to photometry errors, cosmic rays, point-spread function or sensitivity variations, or other image artifacts capable of explaining the magnitude of the variation. The spectrally variable objects are found to have a broad range of dynamical classes and absolute magnitudes, exhibit a broad range of apparent magnitude variations, and are found in both compositional classes. The spectrally variable objects with sufficiently accurate colors for spectral classification maintain their membership, belonging to the same class at both epochs. 2005 TV189 exhibits a sufficiently broad difference in color at the two epochs that span the full range of colors of the neutral class. This strongly argues that the neutral class is one single class with a broad range of colors, rather than the combination of multiple overlapping classes.

  14. A Spectral Geometrical Model for Compton Scatter Tomography Based on the SSS Approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazantsev, Ivan G.; Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2016-01-01

    The forward model of single scatter in the Positron Emission Tomography for a detector system possessing an excellent spectral resolution under idealized geometrical assumptions is investigated. This model has the form of integral equations describing a flux of photons emanating from the same...... annihilation event and undergoing a single scattering at a certain angle. The equations for single scatter calculation are derived using the Single Scatter Simulation approximation. We show that the three-dimensional slice-by-slice filtered backprojection algorithm is applicable for scatter data inversion...

  15. A generalization of the double-corner-frequency source spectral model and its use in the SCEC BBP validation exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boore, David M.; Di Alessandro, Carola; Abrahamson, Norman A.

    2014-01-01

    The stochastic method of simulating ground motions requires the specification of the shape and scaling with magnitude of the source spectrum. The spectral models commonly used are either single-corner-frequency or double-corner-frequency models, but the latter have no flexibility to vary the high-frequency spectral levels for a specified seismic moment. Two generalized double-corner-frequency ω2 source spectral models are introduced, one in which two spectra are multiplied together, and another where they are added. Both models have a low-frequency dependence controlled by the seismic moment, and a high-frequency spectral level controlled by the seismic moment and a stress parameter. A wide range of spectral shapes can be obtained from these generalized spectral models, which makes them suitable for inversions of data to obtain spectral models that can be used in ground-motion simulations in situations where adequate data are not available for purely empirical determinations of ground motions, as in stable continental regions. As an example of the use of the generalized source spectral models, data from up to 40 stations from seven events, plus response spectra at two distances and two magnitudes from recent ground-motion prediction equations, were inverted to obtain the parameters controlling the spectral shapes, as well as a finite-fault factor that is used in point-source, stochastic-method simulations of ground motion. The fits to the data are comparable to or even better than those from finite-fault simulations, even for sites close to large earthquakes.

  16. [Spectral reflectance characteristics and modeling of typical Takyr Solonetzs water content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-hua; Jia, Ke-li

    2015-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the spectral reflectance of the typical Takyr Solonetzs soil in Ningxia, the relationship of soil water content and spectral reflectance was determined, and a quantitative model for the prediction of soil water content was constructed. The results showed that soil spectral reflectance decreased with the increasing soil water content when it was below the water holding capacity but increased with the increasing soil water content when it was higher than the water holding capacity. Soil water content presented significantly negative correlation with original reflectance (r), smooth reflectance (R), logarithm of reflectance (IgR), and positive correlation with the reciprocal of R and logarithm of reciprocal [lg (1/R)]. The correlation coefficient of soil water content and R in the whole wavelength was 0.0013, 0.0397 higher than r and lgR, respectively. Average correlation coefficient of soil water content with 1/R and [lg (1/R)] at the wavelength of 950-1000 nm was 0.2350 higher than that of 400-950 nm. The relationships of soil water content with the first derivate differential (R') , the first derivate differential of logarithm (lgR)' and the first derivate differential of logarithm of reciprocal [lg(1/R)]' were unstable. Base on the coefficients of r, lg(1/R), R' and (lgR)', different regression models were established to predict soil water content, and the coefficients of determination were 0.7610, 0.8184, 0.8524 and 0.8255, respectively. The determination coefficient for power function model of R'. reached 0.9447, while the fitting degree between the predicted value based on this model and on-site measured value was 0.8279. The model of R' had the highest fitted accuracy, while that of r had the lowest one. The results could provide a scientific basis for soil water content prediction and field irrigation in the Takyr Solonetzs region.

  17. Using H/V spectral ratios to constrain 1-D subsurface models for seismic hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, A.; Zaslavsky, Y.

    2003-04-01

    In recent years, considerable research has been focused on establishing reliable methods to predict earthquake ground motions for seismic hazard assessment. The seismic motions are significantly affected by the soil layers at the site and by the impedance ratio between surficial and underlying deposits. These yield frequency selective amplification effects that are important parameters in the process of earthquake resistance design of buildings and in the process of preparing earthquake damage scenarios. Numerical methods for estimating site effects require modeling of the subsurface, primarily shear-wave velocities of the sedimentary layers and underlying rock and thickness of each layer. In many cases, it is difficult to construct such models by only using conventional geophysical methods and borehole information, especially with regard to the deeper sediments. We have encountered such difficulties at several sites for bridge design in Israel, located along or near the seismically active Dead Sea transform. There, and in many other places we found it very useful to constrain the subsurface models by considering site response functions evaluated by using the H/V spectral ratio techniques. A number of bridge construction sites where instrumented with three-component seismometers. We evaluated the empirical site response function from H/V spectral rations of weak motions from local and regional earthquakes and measurements of ambient noise. The average spectral ratio estimated for soil sites showed amplification factor up to 5 in the frequency range of 0.4 to 0.8 Hz. Regional geology data, S-wave refraction surveys in different areas for similar geological units and borehole information were used to construct 1D subsurface model for each site from which an analytical site response function is calculated. The uncertainty associated with the proposed subsurface model models yield a too high variability between the analytical site response functions. Hence, we found it

  18. Soot and Spectral Radiation Modeling for a High-Pressure Turbulent Spray Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreryo-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Roy, Somesh P [Marquette University (United States); Modest, Michael F [University of California Merced (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Simulations are performed of a transient high-pressure turbulent n-dodecane spray flame under engine-relevant conditions. An unsteady RANS formulation is used, with detailed chemistry, a semi-empirical two-equation soot model, and a particle-based transported composition probability density function (PDF) method to account for unresolved turbulent fluctuations in composition and temperature. Results from the PDF model are compared with those from a locally well-stirred reactor (WSR) model to quantify the effects of turbulence-chemistry-soot interactions. Computed liquid and vapor penetration versus time, ignition delay, and flame lift-off height are in good agreement with experiment, and relatively small differences are seen between the WSR and PDF models for these global quantities. Computed soot levels and spatial soot distributions from the WSR and PDF models show large differences, with PDF results being in better agreement with experimental measurements. An uncoupled photon Monte Carlo method with line-by-line spectral resolution is used to compute the spectral intensity distribution of the radiation leaving the flame. This provides new insight into the relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation, and the importance of turbulent fluctuations on radiative heat transfer.

  19. Image Retrieval Based on Multiview Constrained Nonnegative Matrix Factorization and Gaussian Mixture Model Spectral Clustering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunyi Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Content-based image retrieval has recently become an important research topic and has been widely used for managing images from repertories. In this article, we address an efficient technique, called MNGS, which integrates multiview constrained nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF and Gaussian mixture model- (GMM- based spectral clustering for image retrieval. In the proposed methodology, the multiview NMF scheme provides competitive sparse representations of underlying images through decomposition of a similarity-preserving matrix that is formed by fusing multiple features from different visual aspects. In particular, the proposed method merges manifold constraints into the standard NMF objective function to impose an orthogonality constraint on the basis matrix and satisfy the structure preservation requirement of the coefficient matrix. To manipulate the clustering method on sparse representations, this paper has developed a GMM-based spectral clustering method in which the Gaussian components are regrouped in spectral space, which significantly improves the retrieval effectiveness. In this way, image retrieval of the whole database translates to a nearest-neighbour search in the cluster containing the query image. Simultaneously, this study investigates the proof of convergence of the objective function and the analysis of the computational complexity. Experimental results on three standard image datasets reveal the advantages that can be achieved with the proposed retrieval scheme.

  20. Toward a New Spectral Modeling Capability for Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, P. A.; Marcu, D.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wilms, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2013-04-01

    Spectral modeling of accreting X-ray pulsars can tell us a great deal about the physical conditions in and near the neutron star compact objects in high mass X-ray binary systems. In such systems the accreting plasma is initially channeled from an accretion disk by the strong neutron star magnetic field into a funneled supersonic flow onto the magnetic polar cap of the neutron star. Many of these accreting X-ray pulsars have X-ray spectra that consist of broadband Comptonized power-law X-ray continua with superposed cyclotron resonant scattering features indicating magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. We are undertaking a new program to develop a spectral analysis tool based on the analytical work of Becker & Wolff (2007) for accreting X-ray pulsar spectra inside the XSPEC spectral analysis framework. We will apply this new analysis tool to the large amount of data on numerous bright accreting X-ray pulsars currently residing in the HEASARC archive. In this presentation we discuss the physical processes that are likely to occur in such a flow and how one might self-consistently model the broadband pulsar X-ray spectrum. A previous attempt at developing such a modeling capability made significant contributions to the understanding of one source in particular, namely, 4U0115+634 (Ferrigno et al. 2010) and we expect to build on that success. Our models will incorporate bremsstrahlung emission, black body emission, and cyclotron emission, all in a strongly Comptonizing environment inside the shock-heated accreting plasma. We will discuss how we will include these physical processes in the calculations as well as the algorithm such a tool will use to converge to a solution. This program is both feasible and timely in light of the expected launch of the LOFT X-ray timing mission. This research is supported by the NASA Astrophysical Data Analysis Program and the Office of Naval Research.

  1. Synthetic spectral analysis of a kinetic model for slow-magnetosonic waves in solar corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, Wenzhi; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China, E-mail: jshept@gmail.com (China); Zhang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Vocks, Christian [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, 14482, Potsdam (Germany); Marsch, Eckart [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Peter, Hardi [Max Plank Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-03-25

    We propose a kinetic model of slow-magnetosonic waves to explain various observational features associated with the propagating intensity disturbances (PIDs) occurring in the solar corona. The characteristics of slow mode waves, e.g, inphase oscillations of density, velocity, and thermal speed, are reproduced in this kinetic model. Moreover, the red-blue (R-B) asymmetry of the velocity distribution as self-consistently generated in the model is found to be contributed from the beam component, as a result of the competition between Landau resonance and Coulomb collisions. Furthermore, we synthesize the spectral lines and make the spectral analysis, based on the kinetic simulation data of the flux tube plasmas and the hypothesis of the surrounding background plasmas. It is found that the fluctuations of parameters of the synthetic spectral lines are basically consistent with the observations: (1) the line intensity, Doppler shift, and line width are fluctuating in phase; (2) the R-B asymmetry usually oscillate out of phase with the former three parameters; (3) the blueward asymmetry is more evident than the redward asymmetry in the R-B fluctuations. The oscillations of line parameters become weakened for the case with denser surrounding background plasmas. Similar to the observations, there is no doubled-frequency oscillation of the line width for the case with flux-tube plasmas flowing bulkly upward among the static background plasmas. Therefore, we suggest that the “wave + beam flow” kinetic model may be a viable interpretation for the PIDs observed in the solar corona.

  2. Spectral selectivity model for light transmission by the intermediate filaments in Müller cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Golubeva, Tatiana; Korneeva, Elena; Inyushin, Mikhail; Zueva, Lidia; Makarov, Vladimir

    2017-08-01

    Presently we continue our studies of the quantum mechanism of light energy transmission in the form of excitons by axisymmetric nanostructures with electrically conductive walls. Using our theoretical model, we analyzed the light energy transmission by biopolymers forming optical channels within retinal Müller cells. There are specialized intermediate filaments (IF) 10-18nm in diameter, built of electrically conductive polypeptides. Presently, we analyzed the spectral selectivity of these nanostructures. We found that their transmission spectrum depends on their diameter and wall thickness. We also considered the classical approach, comparing the results with those predicted by the quantum mechanism. We performed experimental measurements on model quantum waveguides, made of rectangular nanometer-thick chromium (Cr) tracks. The optical spectrum of such waveguides varied with their thickness. We compared the experimental absorption/transmission spectra with those predicted by our model, with good agreement between the two. We report that the observed spectra may be explained by the same mechanisms as operating in metal nanolayers. Both the models and the experiment show that Cr nanotracks have high light transmission efficiency in a narrow spectral range, with the spectral maximum dependent on the layer thickness. Therefore, a set of intermediate filaments with different geometries may provide light transmission over the entire visible spectrum with a very high (~90%) efficiency. Thus, we believe that high contrast and visual resolution in daylight are provided by the quantum mechanism of energy transfer in the form of excitons, whereas the ultimate retinal sensitivity of the night vision is provided by the classical mechanism of photons transmitted by the Müller cell light-guides. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Representer-based variational data assimilation in a spectral element shallow water model on the cubed-sphere grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Joo Jung

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A representer-based variational data assimilation system is newly developed for the spectral element shallow water model in the High Order Method Modeling Environment. This study includes the development of tangent linear and adjoint codes and a background error covariance model. The correctness of the developed codes were checked by various ways such as linearity tests for tangent linear codes, adjoint tests for adjoint codes and symmetric tests for representer functions, which are four-dimensional covariance functions in observation-space. Then, direct and indirect representer-based data assimilation systems were constructed and evaluated by performing a series of identical twin experiments, where synthetic data were obtained from a reference run (nature run and assimilated to correct initial conditions. The characteristics of the covariance model according to the different horizontal scales were evaluated by a suite of single-observation experiments. The results show satisfactory behaviours for both direct and indirect representer-based variational data assimilation methods, which indicates that they are ready to be further developed as a full-fledged four-dimensional variational data assimilation system as next step.

  4. Spectral modeling of Ceres VIR data from Dawn: Method and Result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raponi, Andrea; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ciarniello, M.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Frigeri, A.; Fonte, S.; Giardino, M.; Longobardo, A.; Magni, G.; Marchi, S.; Palomba, E.; Pieters, C. M.; Tosi, F.; Turrini, D.; Zambon, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    The Dawn spacecraft [1] is at Ceres, the closest of the IAU-defined dwarf planets to the Sun. This work focuses on the interpretation of Ceres’ surface composition based on the data from the VIR instrument [2] onboard Dawn. The Visible InfraRed (VIR) mapping spectrometer combines high spectral and spatial resolution in the VIS (0.25-1mm) and IR (1-5mm) spectral ranges. VIR will provide a very good coverage of the surface during its orbital mission at Ceres.In order to model the measured spectra, we have utilized Hapke's radiative transfer model [3], which allows estimation of the mineral composition, the relative abundances of the spectral end-members, and the grain size. Optical constants of the spectral end-members are approximated by applying the methodology described in [4] to IR spectra reflectance obtained from the RELAB database.The observed spectra of Ceres surface are affected by a thermal emission component that prevents direct comparison with laboratory data at longer wavelengths. Thus to model the whole wavelength range measured by VIR, the thermal emission is modeled together with the reflectance. Calibrated spectra are first cleaned by removing artefacts. A best fit is obtained with a least square optimization algorithm. For further details on the method, see reference [5].The range 2.5 - 2.9 μm is severely hindered by Earth's atmosphere, but it contains a strong absorption band that dominates the IR Ceres’ spectrum. Thanks to the VIR instrument we can obtain a compositional model for the whole IR range [6]. We used several different combinations of materials hypothesized to be representative of the Ceres’ surface including phyllosilicates, ices, carbonaceous chondrites and salts. The results will be discussed.Acknowledgements This work is supported by the Italian Space Agencies and NASA. Enabling contributions from the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams are gratefully acknowledged.Reference[1] Russell et al., Space Sci. Rev., 163

  5. Inferring the Growth of Massive Galaxies Using Bayesian Spectral Synthesis Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Coley Michael; Poremba, Megan R.; Moustakas, John

    2018-01-01

    The most massive galaxies in the universe are typically found at the centers of massive galaxy clusters. Studying these galaxies can provide valuable insight into the hierarchical growth of massive dark matter halos. One of the key challenges of measuring the stellar mass growth of massive galaxies is converting the measured light profiles into stellar mass. We use Prospector, a state-of-the-art Bayesian spectral synthesis modeling code, to infer the total stellar masses of a pilot sample of massive central galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We compare our stellar mass estimates to previous measurements, and present some of the quantitative diagnostics provided by Prospector.

  6. First-order goniospectrophotometric spectral modeling of isotropic and anisotropic colorant mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruschwitz, Jennifer D T; Berns, Roy S

    2014-02-01

    Color modeling of translucent and opaque media commonly uses two-constant Kubelka-Munk (KM) turbid media theory. KM theory is designed for isotropic color systems that rely on absorption and scatter to produce an overall reflected color. KM theory has previously been considered inadequate to use with interference pigments (IPs) due to their specular reflected, angle-dependent color and anisotropic behavior. If, however, an IP's reflected color is considered to contribute to the background reflectance and not as a colorant in a mixture with a conventional colorant, KM theory can be used. KM theory was successfully implemented to predict the goniospectrophotometric, normalized spectral reflectance of conventional colorants and IP mixtures.

  7. Modeling Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Forcing on Centennial and Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R.; Rind, D.; Jonas, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a series of experiments to explore clima responses to two types of solar spectral forcing on decadal and centennial time scales - one based on prior reconstructions, and another implied by recent observations from the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral 1rradiance Monitor). We apply these forcings to the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Global/Middle Atmosphere Model (GCMAM). that couples atmosphere with ocean, and has a model top near the mesopause, allowing us to examine the full response to the two solar forcing scenarios. We show different climate responses to the two solar forCing scenarios on decadal time scales and also trends on centennial time scales. Differences between solar maximum and solar minimum conditions are highlighted, including impacts of the time lagged reSponse of the lower atmosphere and ocean. This contrasts with studies that assume separate equilibrium conditions at solar maximum and minimum. We discuss model feedback mechanisms involved in the solar forced climate variations.

  8. An X-ray spectral model for clumpy tori in active galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo, E-mail: liuyuan@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: lixb@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918-3, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-05-20

    We construct an X-ray spectral model for the clumpy torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) using Geant4, which includes the physical processes of the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering, γ conversion, fluorescence line, and Auger process. Since the electrons in the torus are expected to be bounded instead of free, the deviation of the scattering cross section from the Klein-Nishina cross section has also been included, which changes the X-ray spectra by up to 25% below 10 keV. We have investigated the effect of the clumpiness parameters on the reflection spectra and the strength of the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The volume filling factor of the clouds in the clumpy torus only slightly influences the reflection spectra, however, the total column density and the number of clouds along the line of sight significantly change the shapes and amplitudes of the reflection spectra. The effect of column density is similar to the case of a smooth torus, while a small number of clouds along the line of sight will smooth out the anisotropy of the reflection spectra and the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The smoothing effect is mild in the low column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}), whereas it is much more evident in the high column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 25} cm{sup –2}). Our model provides a quantitative tool for the spectral analysis of the clumpy torus. We suggest that the joint fits of the broad band spectral energy distributions of AGNs (from X-ray to infrared) should better constrain the structure of the torus.

  9. Can the Time-Spectral Method GWRM Advance Fusion Transport Modelling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall, Kristoffer; Scheffel, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Transport phenomena in fusion plasma pose a daunting task for both real-time experiments and numerical modelling. The transport is driven by micro-instabilities caused by a host of unstable modes, for example ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes. These modes can be modelled using fluid or gyrokinetic equations. However, the equations are characterised by high degrees of freedom and high temporal and spatial numerical requirements. Thus, a time-spectral method GWRM has been developed in order to efficiently solve these multiple time scale equations. The GWRM assumes a multivariate Chebyshev expansion ansatz in time, space, and parameter domain. Advantages are that time constraining CFL criteria no longer apply and that the solution accurately averages over small time-scale dynamics. For benchmarking, a two-fluid 2D drift wave turbulence model has been solved in order to study toroidal ion temperature gradient growth rates and nonlinear behaviour.

  10. Spectral tensor parameters for wind turbine load modeling from forested and agricultural landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Segalini, A.

    2015-01-01

    A velocity spectral tensor model was evaluated from the single-point measurements of wind speed. The model contains three parameters representing the dissipation rate of specific turbulent kinetic energy, a turbulence length scale and the turbulence anisotropy. Sonic anemometer measurements taken...... over a forested and an agricultural landscape were used to calculate the model parameters for neutral, slightly stable and slightly unstable atmospheric conditions for a selected wind speed interval. The dissipation rate above the forest was nine times that at the agricultural site. No significant...... differences were observed in the turbulence length scales between the forested and agricultural areas. Only a small difference was observed in the turbulence anisotropy at the two sites, except near the surface, where the forest turbulence was more isotropic. The turbulence anisotropy remained more or less...

  11. Middle Atmosphere Dynamics with Gravity Wave Interactions in the Numerical Spectral Model: Tides and Planetary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Huang, F. T.

    2010-01-01

    As Lindzen (1981) had shown, small-scale gravity waves (GW) produce the observed reversals of the zonal-mean circulation and temperature variations in the upper mesosphere. The waves also play a major role in modulating and amplifying the diurnal tides (DT) (e.g., Waltersheid, 1981; Fritts and Vincent, 1987; Fritts, 1995a). We summarize here the modeling studies with the mechanistic numerical spectral model (NSM) with Doppler spread parameterization for GW (Hines, 1997a, b), which describes in the middle atmosphere: (a) migrating and non-migrating DT, (b) planetary waves (PW), and (c) global-scale inertio gravity waves. Numerical experiments are discussed that illuminate the influence of GW filtering and nonlinear interactions between DT, PW, and zonal mean variations. Keywords: Theoretical modeling, Middle atmosphere dynamics, Gravity wave interactions, Migrating and non-migrating tides, Planetary waves, Global-scale inertio gravity waves.

  12. Structure of Eigenstates and Local Spectral Density of States A Three-Orbital Schematic Shell Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, W; Casati, G; Wang, Wen-ge

    1998-01-01

    The average shape of the Spectral Local Density of States (LDOS) and eigenfunctions (EFs) has been studied numerically for a conservative dynamical model (three-orbital Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model) which can exhibit strong chaos in the classical limit. The attention is paid to the comparison of the shape of LDOS with that known for random matrix models, as well as to the shape of the EFs, for different values of the perturbation strength. The classical counterparts of the LDOS has also been studied and found in a remarkable agreement with the quantum calculations. Finally, by making use of a generalization of Brillouin- Wigner perturbation expansion, the form of long tails of LDOS and EFs is given analytically and confirmed numerically.

  13. Model-Based Testing of Probabilistic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerhold, Marcus; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; Stevens, Perdita; Wasowski, Andzej

    This paper presents a model-based testing framework for probabilistic systems. We provide algorithms to generate, execute and evaluate test cases from a probabilistic requirements model. In doing so, we connect ioco-theory for model-based testing and statistical hypothesis testing: our ioco-style

  14. Impacts of using spectral nudging on regional climate model RCA4 simulations of the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the Rossby Centre regional climate model RCA4 is investigated for the Arctic CORDEX (COordinated Regional climate Downscaling EXperiment region, with an emphasis on its suitability to be coupled to a regional ocean and sea ice model. Large biases in mean sea level pressure (MSLP are identified, with pronounced too-high pressure centred over the North Pole in summer of over 5 hPa, and too-low pressure in winter of a similar magnitude. These lead to biases in the surface winds, which will potentially lead to strong sea ice biases in a future coupled system. The large-scale circulation is believed to be the major reason for the biases, and an implementation of spectral nudging is applied to remedy the problems by constraining the large-scale components of the driving fields within the interior domain. It is found that the spectral nudging generally corrects for the MSLP and wind biases, while not significantly affecting other variables, such as surface radiative components, two-metre temperature and precipitation.

  15. Improving the representation of clouds, radiation, and precipitation using spectral nudging in the Weather Research and Forecasting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spero, Tanya L.; Otte, Martin J.; Bowden, Jared H.; Nolte, Christopher G.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral nudging—a scale-selective interior constraint technique—is commonly used in regional climate models to maintain consistency with large-scale forcing while permitting mesoscale features to develop in the downscaled simulations. Several studies have demonstrated that spectral nudging improves the representation of regional climate in reanalysis-forced simulations compared with not using nudging in the interior of the domain. However, in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, spectral nudging tends to produce degraded precipitation simulations when compared to analysis nudging—an interior constraint technique that is scale indiscriminate but also operates on moisture fields which until now could not be altered directly by spectral nudging. Since analysis nudging is less desirable for regional climate modeling because it dampens fine-scale variability, changes are proposed to the spectral nudging methodology to capitalize on differences between the nudging techniques and aim to improve the representation of clouds, radiation, and precipitation without compromising other fields. These changes include adding spectral nudging toward moisture, limiting nudging to below the tropopause, and increasing the nudging time scale for potential temperature, all of which collectively improve the representation of mean and extreme precipitation, 2 m temperature, clouds, and radiation, as demonstrated using a model-simulated 20 year historical period. Such improvements to WRF may increase the fidelity of regional climate data used to assess the potential impacts of climate change on human health and the environment and aid in climate change mitigation and adaptation studies.

  16. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Spectral Energy Distributions and Fits Using a Grid of Protostellar Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, E.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Stutz, A. M.; Stanke, T.; Tobin, J. J.; Megeath, S. T.; Osorio, M.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Poteet, C. A.; Booker, J.; Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Allen, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present key results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and model fits of 330 young stellar objects, predominantly protostars, in the Orion molecular clouds. This is the largest sample of protostars studied in a single, nearby star formation complex. With near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and submillimeter photometry from APEX, our SEDs cover 1.2-870 μm and sample the peak of the protostellar envelope emission at ˜100 μm. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, we classify our sample into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II pre-main-sequence stars. We implement a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30,400 model SEDs and use it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar. We argue that far-IR data are essential for accurate constraints on protostellar envelope properties. We find that most protostars, and in particular the flat-spectrum sources, are well fit. The median envelope density and median inclination angle decrease from Class 0 to Class I to flat-spectrum protostars, despite the broad range in best-fit parameters in each of the three categories. We also discuss degeneracies in our model parameters. Our results confirm that the different protostellar classes generally correspond to an evolutionary sequence with a decreasing envelope infall rate, but the inclination angle also plays a role in the appearance, and thus interpretation, of the SEDs.

  17. An Independent Filter for Gene Set Testing Based on Spectral Enrichment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frost, H Robert; Li, Zhigang; Asselbergs, Folkert W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; Moore, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Gene set testing has become an indispensable tool for the analysis of high-dimensional genomic data. An important motivation for testing gene sets, rather than individual genomic variables, is to improve statistical power by reducing the number of tested hypotheses. Given the dramatic growth in

  18. Modeling the Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    We apply two scenarios of external forcing, namely the SIM-based out-of-phase variations and the proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM, to compute climate responses to solar variation on decadal time scale. We find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, while temperature response decreases downward to the surface for both scenarios, and both models. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are 0.6 K in RCM and 0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of 5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing are similar to the HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment) observed 11-year temperature variations. Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to the stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two sce-narios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., the one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other one from flux transport that has much less background component [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide potential range of variations of TSI on centennial time scale. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive the as-sociated historical SSI. The historical SSI is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean will provide the first order estimate of temperature response to SSI variation on centennial time scales. We anticipate the stratosphere, troposphere, and

  19. Using electroretinograms and multi-model inference to identify spectral classes of photoreceptors and relative opsin expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessios, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how individual photoreceptor cells factor in the spectral sensitivity of a visual system is essential to explain how they contribute to the visual ecology of the animal in question. Existing methods that model the absorption of visual pigments use templates which correspond closely to data from thin cross-sections of photoreceptor cells. However, few modeling approaches use a single framework to incorporate physical parameters of real photoreceptors, which can be fused, and can form vertical tiers. Akaike's information criterion (AICc) was used here to select absorptance models of multiple classes of photoreceptor cells that maximize information, given visual system spectral sensitivity data obtained using extracellular electroretinograms and structural parameters obtained by histological methods. This framework was first used to select among alternative hypotheses of photoreceptor number. It identified spectral classes from a range of dark-adapted visual systems which have between one and four spectral photoreceptor classes. These were the velvet worm, Principapillatus hitoyensis, the branchiopod water flea, Daphnia magna, normal humans, and humans with enhanced S-cone syndrome, a condition in which S-cone frequency is increased due to mutations in a transcription factor that controls photoreceptor expression. Data from the Asian swallowtail, Papilio xuthus, which has at least five main spectral photoreceptor classes in its compound eyes, were included to illustrate potential effects of model over-simplification on multi-model inference. The multi-model framework was then used with parameters of spectral photoreceptor classes and the structural photoreceptor array kept constant. The goal was to map relative opsin expression to visual pigment concentration. It identified relative opsin expression differences for two populations of the bluefin killifish, Lucania goodei. The modeling approach presented here will be useful in selecting the most likely

  20. On Spectral Laws of 2D-Turbulence in Shell Models

    CERN Document Server

    Frick, P; Frick, Peter; Aurell, Erik

    1993-01-01

    We consider a class of shell models of 2D-turbulence. They conserve inertially the analogues of energy and enstrophy, two quadratic forms in the shell amplitudes. Inertially conserving two quadratic integrals leads to two spectral ranges. We study in detail the one characterized by a forward cascade of enstrophy and spectrum close to Kraichnan's $k^{-3}$--law. In an inertial range over more than 15 octaves, the spectrum falls off as $k^{-3.05\\pm 0.01}$, with the same slope in all models. We identify a ``spurious'' intermittency effect, in that the energy spectrum over a rather wide interval adjoing the viscous cut-off, is well approximated by a power-law with fall-off significantly steeper than $k^{-3}$.

  1. Spectral Properties of Composite Excitations in the t-J Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Takashi; Yahagi, Yuta; Matsueda, Hiroaki

    2017-08-01

    In quantum many-body systems, the equation of motion for a simple fermionic operator does not close, and higher-order processes induce composite operators dressed with several types of nonlocal quantum fluctuation. We systematically examine the spectral properties of these composite excitations in the t-J model in one spatial dimension by both numerical and theoretical approaches. Of particular interest, with the help of the Bethe ansatz for the large-U Hubbard model, is the classification of which composite excitations are due to the string excitation, which is usually hidden in the single-particle spectrum, as well as the spinon and holon branches. We examine how the mixing between the spinon and string excitations is prohibited in terms of the composite operator method. Owing to the dimensionality independent nature of the present approach, we discuss the implications of the mixing in close connection with the pseudogap in high-Tc cuprates.

  2. One-electron singular spectral features of the 1D Hubbard model at finite magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M.P. Carmelo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The momentum, electronic density, spin density, and interaction dependences of the exponents that control the (k,ω-plane singular features of the σ=↑,↓ one-electron spectral functions of the 1D Hubbard model at finite magnetic field are studied. The usual half-filling concepts of one-electron lower Hubbard band and upper Hubbard band are defined in terms of the rotated electrons associated with the model Bethe-ansatz solution for all electronic density and spin density values and the whole finite repulsion range. Such rotated electrons are the link of the non-perturbative relation between the electrons and the pseudofermions. Our results further clarify the microscopic processes through which the pseudofermion dynamical theory accounts for the one-electron matrix elements between the ground state and excited energy eigenstates.

  3. Unsupervised mitochondria segmentation using recursive spectral clustering and adaptive similarity models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietlmeier, Julia; Ghita, Ovidiu; Duessmann, Heiko; Prehn, Jochen H M; Whelan, Paul F

    2013-12-01

    The unsupervised segmentation method proposed in the current study follows the evolutional ability of human vision to extrapolate significant structures in an image. In this work we adopt the perceptual grouping strategy by selecting the spectral clustering framework, which is known to capture perceptual organization features, as well as by developing similarity models according to Gestaltic laws of visual segregation. Our proposed framework applies but is not limited to the detection of cells and organelles in microscopic images and attempts to provide an effective alternative to presently dominating manual segmentation and tissue classification practice. The main theoretical contribution of our work resides in the formulation of robust similarity models which automatically adapt to the statistical structure of the biological domain and return optimal performance in pixel classification tasks under the wide variety of distributional assumptions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Model-independent sum rule analysis based on limited-range spectral data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenko, A B; Marel, D van der; Carbone, F; Marsiglio, F [Departement de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    Partial sum rules are widely used in physics to separate low- and high-energy degrees of freedom of complex dynamical systems. Their application, though, is challenged in practice by the always finite spectrometer bandwidth and is often performed using risky model-dependent extrapolations. We show that, given spectra of the real and imaginary parts of any causal frequency-dependent response function (for example, optical conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, acoustical impedance etc) in a limited range, the sum-rule integral from zero to a certain cutoff frequency inside this range can be safely derived using only the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations without any extra model assumptions. This implies that experimental techniques providing both active and reactive response components independently, such as spectroscopic ellipsometry in optics, allow an extrapolation-independent determination of spectral weight 'hidden' below the lowest accessible frequency.

  5. Multi-spectral light interaction modeling and imaging of skin lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Sachin Vidyanand

    Nevoscope as a diagnostic tool for melanoma was evaluated using a white light source with promising results. Information about the lesion depth and its structure will further improve the sensitivity and specificity of melanoma diagnosis. Wavelength-dependent variable penetration power of monochromatic light in the trans-illumination imaging using the Nevoscope can be used to obtain this information. Optimal selection of wavelengths for multi-spectral imaging requires light-tissue interaction modeling. For this, three-dimensional wavelength dependent voxel-based models of skin lesions with different depths are proposed. A Monte Carlo simulation algorithm (MCSVL) is developed in MATLAB and the tissue models are simulated using the Nevoscope optical geometry. 350--700nm optical wavelengths with an interval of 5nm are used in the study. A correlation analysis between the lesion depth and the diffuse reflectance is then used to obtain wavelengths that will produce diffuse reflectance suitable for imaging and give information related to the nevus depth and structure. Using the selected wavelengths, multi-spectral trans-illumination images of the skin lesions are collected and analyzed. An adaptive wavelet transform based tree-structure classification method (ADWAT) is proposed to classify epi-illuminance images of the skin lesions obtained using a white light source into melanoma and dysplastic nevus images classes. In this method, tree-structure models of melanoma and dysplastic nevus are developed and semantically compared with the tree-structure of the unknown image for classification. Development of the tree-structure is dependent on threshold selections obtained from a statistical analysis of the feature set. This makes the classification method adaptive. The true positive value obtained for this classifier is 90% with a false positive of 10%. The Extended ADWAT method and Fuzzy Membership Functions method using combined features from the epi-illuminance and multi-spectral

  6. 46 CFR 154.431 - Model test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...(c). (b) Analyzed data of a model test for the primary and secondary barrier of the membrane tank... Model test. (a) The primary and secondary barrier of a membrane tank, including the corners and joints...

  7. A spectral nudging method for the ACCESS1.3 atmospheric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Uhe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A convolution-based method of spectral nudging of atmospheric fields is developed in the Australian Community Climate and Earth Systems Simulator (ACCESS version 1.3 which uses the UK Met Office Unified Model version 7.3 as its atmospheric component. The use of convolutions allow for flexibility in application to different atmospheric grids. An approximation using one-dimensional convolutions is applied, improving the time taken by the nudging scheme by 10–30 times compared with a version using a two-dimensional convolution, without measurably degrading its performance. Care needs to be taken in the order of the convolutions and the frequency of nudging to obtain the best outcome. The spectral nudging scheme is benchmarked against a Newtonian relaxation method, nudging winds and air temperature towards ERA-Interim reanalyses. We find that the convolution approach can produce results that are competitive with Newtonian relaxation in both the effectiveness and efficiency of the scheme, while giving the added flexibility of choosing which length scales to nudge.

  8. Flare Comparisons of the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) to Preliminary SDO EVE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlon, Phillip C.

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) launched February 11, 2010 from Kennedy Space Center and started normal science operations in April 2010. One of the instruments onboard SDO, the EUV Variability- Experiment (EVE), will measure the solar EUV irradiance from 0.1-105 nm with 0.1 nm spectral resolution as well as a measure of the broad-band Lyman-Alpha emission (121.0 rim), all with less than 10 percent uncertainties. One of the biggest improvements of EVE over its predecessors is its ability to continuously measure the complete spectrum ever y 10 seconds, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This temporal coverage and cadence will greatly enhance the knowledge of the solar EUV variations during solar flares. This paper will present a comparison of the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM), which can produce an estimated EUV spectrum at 10 seconds temporal resolution, to the preliminary flare observation results from SDO EVE. The discussion will focus on the short-term EUV flare variations and evolution.

  9. Comparisons of the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) to Preliminary SDO EVE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) launched February 11,2010 from Kennedy Space Center and started normal science operations in April 2010. One of the instruments onboard SDO, the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE), will measure the solar EUV irradiance from 0.1-105 nm with 0.1 nm spectral resolution as well as a measure of the broad-band Lyman-Alpha emission (121.6 nm), all with less than 10 percent uncertainties. One of the biggest improvements of EVE over its predecessors is its ability to continuously measure the complete spectrum every 10 seconds, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This temporal coverage and cadence will greatly enhance the knowledge of the solar EUV variations during solar flares. This paper will present a comparison of the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM), which can produce an estimated EUV spectrum at 10 seconds temporal resolution, to the preliminary results from SDO EVE. The discussion will focus on the short-term EUV flare variations and evolution.

  10. A spectral nudging method for the ACCESS1.3 atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhe, P.; Thatcher, M.

    2015-06-01

    A convolution-based method of spectral nudging of atmospheric fields is developed in the Australian Community Climate and Earth Systems Simulator (ACCESS) version 1.3 which uses the UK Met Office Unified Model version 7.3 as its atmospheric component. The use of convolutions allow for flexibility in application to different atmospheric grids. An approximation using one-dimensional convolutions is applied, improving the time taken by the nudging scheme by 10-30 times compared with a version using a two-dimensional convolution, without measurably degrading its performance. Care needs to be taken in the order of the convolutions and the frequency of nudging to obtain the best outcome. The spectral nudging scheme is benchmarked against a Newtonian relaxation method, nudging winds and air temperature towards ERA-Interim reanalyses. We find that the convolution approach can produce results that are competitive with Newtonian relaxation in both the effectiveness and efficiency of the scheme, while giving the added flexibility of choosing which length scales to nudge.

  11. Oxygen spectral line synthesis: 3D non-LTE with CO5BOLD hydrodynamical model atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakapavičius, D.; Steffen, M.; Kučinskas, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Freytag, B.; Caffau, E.; Cayrel, R.

    In this work we present first results of our current project aimed at combining the 3D hydrodynamical stellar atmosphere approach with non-LTE (NLTE) spectral line synthesis for a number of key chemical species. We carried out a full 3D-NLTE spectrum synthesis of the oxygen IR 777 nm triplet, using a modified and improved version of our NLTE3D package to calculate departure coefficients for the atomic levels of oxygen in a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical solar model atmosphere. Spectral line synthesis was subsequently performed with the Linfor3D code. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the lines of the oxygen triplet produce deeper cores under NLTE conditions, due to the diminished line source function in the line forming region. This means that the solar oxygen IR 777 nm lines should be stronger in NLTE, leading to negative 3D NLTE-LTE abundance corrections. Qualitatively this result would support previous claims for a relatively low solar oxygen abundance. Finally, we outline several further steps that need to be taken in order to improve the physical realism and numerical accuracy of our current 3D-NLTE calculations.

  12. Testing linear models for ability parameters in item response models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, Cornelis A.W.; Hendrawan, I.

    2005-01-01

    Methods for testing hypotheses concerning the regression parameters in linear models for the latent person parameters in item response models are presented. Three tests are outlined: A likelihood ratio test, a Lagrange multiplier test and a Wald test. The tests are derived in a marginal maximum

  13. PICASSO VISION instrument design, engineering model test results, and flight model development status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näsilä, Antti; Holmlund, Christer; Mannila, Rami; Näkki, Ismo; Ojanen, Harri J.; Akujärvi, Altti; Saari, Heikki; Fussen, Didier; Pieroux, Didier; Demoulin, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    PICASSO - A PICo-satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations is an ESA project led by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, in collaboration with VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Clyde Space Ltd. (UK) and Centre Spatial de Liège (BE). The test campaign for the engineering model of the PICASSO VISION instrument, a miniaturized nanosatellite spectral imager, has been successfully completed. The test results look very promising. The proto-flight model of VISION has also been successfully integrated and it is waiting for the final integration to the satellite platform.

  14. Efficient 3D frequency response modeling with spectral accuracy by the rapid expansion method

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-07-01

    Frequency responses of seismic wave propagation can be obtained either by directly solving the frequency domain wave equations or by transforming the time domain wavefields using the Fourier transform. The former approach requires solving systems of linear equations, which becomes progressively difficult to tackle for larger scale models and for higher frequency components. On the contrary, the latter approach can be efficiently implemented using explicit time integration methods in conjunction with running summations as the computation progresses. Commonly used explicit time integration methods correspond to the truncated Taylor series approximations that can cause significant errors for large time steps. The rapid expansion method (REM) uses the Chebyshev expansion and offers an optimal solution to the second-order-in-time wave equations. When applying the Fourier transform to the time domain wavefield solution computed by the REM, we can derive a frequency response modeling formula that has the same form as the original time domain REM equation but with different summation coefficients. In particular, the summation coefficients for the frequency response modeling formula corresponds to the Fourier transform of those for the time domain modeling equation. As a result, we can directly compute frequency responses from the Chebyshev expansion polynomials rather than the time domain wavefield snapshots as do other time domain frequency response modeling methods. When combined with the pseudospectral method in space, this new frequency response modeling method can produce spectrally accurate results with high efficiency. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  15. Element-by-element parallel spectral-element methods for 3-D teleseismic wave modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Shaolin

    2017-09-28

    The development of an efficient algorithm for teleseismic wave field modeling is valuable for calculating the gradients of the misfit function (termed misfit gradients) or Fréchet derivatives when the teleseismic waveform is used for adjoint tomography. Here, we introduce an element-by-element parallel spectral-element method (EBE-SEM) for the efficient modeling of teleseismic wave field propagation in a reduced geology model. Under the plane-wave assumption, the frequency-wavenumber (FK) technique is implemented to compute the boundary wave field used to construct the boundary condition of the teleseismic wave incidence. To reduce the memory required for the storage of the boundary wave field for the incidence boundary condition, a strategy is introduced to efficiently store the boundary wave field on the model boundary. The perfectly matched layers absorbing boundary condition (PML ABC) is formulated using the EBE-SEM to absorb the scattered wave field from the model interior. The misfit gradient can easily be constructed in each time step during the calculation of the adjoint wave field. Three synthetic examples demonstrate the validity of the EBE-SEM for use in teleseismic wave field modeling and the misfit gradient calculation.

  16. Spectral scaling of the Leray-{alpha} model for two-dimensional turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunasin, Evelyn [Department of Mathematics, University of California, San Diego (UCSD), La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Kurien, Susan [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Titi, Edriss S [Department of Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Irvine (UCI), Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)], E-mail: elunasin@math.ucsd.edu, E-mail: skurien@lanl.gov, E-mail: etiti@math.uci.edu

    2008-08-29

    We present data from high-resolution numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes-{alpha} and the Leray-{alpha} models for two-dimensional turbulence. It was shown previously (Lunasin et al 2007 J. Turbul. 8 30) that for wavenumbers k such that k{alpha} >> 1, the energy spectrum of the smoothed velocity field for the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes-{alpha} (NS-{alpha}) model scales as k{sup -7}. This result is in agreement with the scaling deduced by dimensional analysis of the flux of the conserved enstrophy using its characteristic time scale. We therefore hypothesize that the spectral scaling of any {alpha}-model in the sub-{alpha} spatial scales must depend only on the characteristic time scale and dynamics of the dominant cascading quantity in that regime of scales. The data presented here, from simulations of the two-dimensional Leray-{alpha} model, confirm our hypothesis. We show that for k{alpha} >> 1, the energy spectrum for the two-dimensional Leray-{alpha} scales as k{sup -5}, as expected by the characteristic time scale for the flux of the conserved enstrophy of the Leray-{alpha} model. These results lead to our conclusion that the dominant directly cascading quantity of the model equations must determine the scaling of the energy spectrum.

  17. Force Limited Random Vibration Test of TESS Camera Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlicek, Alexandra; Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Rey, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a spaceborne instrument consisting of four wide field-of-view-CCD cameras dedicated to the discovery of exoplanets around the brightest stars. As part of the environmental testing campaign, force limiting was used to simulate a realistic random vibration launch environment. While the force limit vibration test method is a standard approach used at multiple institutions including Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), it is still difficult to find an actual implementation process in the literature. This paper describes the step-by-step process on how the force limit method was developed and applied on the TESS camera mass model. The process description includes the design of special fixtures to mount the test article for properly installing force transducers, development of the force spectral density using the semi-empirical method, estimation of the fuzzy factor (C2) based on the mass ratio between the supporting structure and the test article, subsequent validating of the C2 factor during the vibration test, and calculation of the C.G. accelerations using the Root Mean Square (RMS) reaction force in the spectral domain and the peak reaction force in the time domain.

  18. Coupling spectral analysis and hidden Markov models for the segmentation of behavioural patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerah, Karine; Woillez, Mathieu; Fablet, Ronan; Garren, François; Martin, Stéphane; De Pontual, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    Movement pattern variations are reflective of behavioural switches, likely associated with different life history traits in response to the animals' abiotic and biotic environment. Detecting these can provide rich information on the underlying processes driving animal movement patterns. However, extracting these signals from movement time series, requires tools that objectively extract, describe and quantify these behaviours. The inference of behavioural modes from movement patterns has been mainly addressed through hidden Markov models. Until now, the metrics implemented in these models did not allow to characterize cyclic patterns directly from the raw time series. To address these challenges, we developed an approach to i) extract new metrics of cyclic behaviours and activity levels from a time-frequency analysis of movement time series, ii) implement the spectral signatures of these cyclic patterns and activity levels into a HMM framework to identify and classify latent behavioural states. To illustrate our approach, we applied it to 40 high-resolution European sea bass depth time series. Our results showed that the fish had different activity regimes, which were also associated (or not) with the spectral signature of different environmental cycles. Tidal rhythms were observed when animals tended to be less active and dived shallower. Conversely, animals exhibited a diurnal behaviour when more active and deeper in the water column. The different behaviours were well defined and occurred at similar periods throughout the annual cycle amongst individuals, suggesting these behaviours are likely related to seasonal functional behaviours (e.g. feeding, migrating and spawning). The innovative aspects of our method lie within the combined use of powerful, but generic, mathematical tools (spectral analysis and hidden Markov Models) to extract complex behaviours from 1-D movement time series. It is fully automated which makes it suitable for analyzing large datasets

  19. Model-based testing for software safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurbuz, Havva Gulay; Tekinerdogan, Bedir

    2017-01-01

    Testing safety-critical systems is crucial since a failure or malfunction may result in death or serious injuries to people, equipment, or environment. An important challenge in testing is the derivation of test cases that can identify the potential faults. Model-based testing adopts models of a

  20. Improvement of and Parameter Identification for the Bimodal Time-Varying Modified Kanai-Tajimi Power Spectral Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiguo Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Kanai-Tajimi power spectrum filtering method proposed by Du Xiuli et al., a genetic algorithm and a quadratic optimization identification technique are employed to improve the bimodal time-varying modified Kanai-Tajimi power spectral model and the parameter identification method proposed by Vlachos et al. Additionally, a method for modeling time-varying power spectrum parameters for ground motion is proposed. The 8244 Orion and Chi-Chi earthquake accelerograms are selected as examples for time-varying power spectral model parameter identification and ground motion simulations to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the improved bimodal time-varying modified Kanai-Tajimi power spectral model. The results of this study provide important references for designing ground motion inputs for seismic analyses of major engineering structures.

  1. Modelling the cosmic spectral energy distribution and extragalactic background light over all time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S. K.; Driver, S. P.; Davies, L. J. M.; Lagos, C. d. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.

    2018-02-01

    We present a phenomological model of the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) and the integrated galactic light (IGL) over all cosmic time. This model, based on an earlier model by Driver et al., attributes the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) to two processes - first, chaotic clump accretion and major mergers, resulting in the early-time formation of bulges and secondly, cold gas accretion, resulting in late-time disc formation. Under the assumption of a Universal Chabrier initial mass function, we combine the Bruzual & Charlot stellar libraries, the Charlot & Fall dust attenuation prescription and template spectra for emission by dust and active galactic nuclei to predict the CSED - pre- and post-dust attenuation - and the IGL throughout cosmic time. The phenomological model, as constructed, adopts a number of basic axioms and empirical results and has minimal free parameters. We compare the model output, as well as predictions from the semi-analytic model GALFORM to recent estimates of the CSED out to z = 1. By construction, our empirical model reproduces the full energy output of the Universe from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared extremely well. We use the model to derive predictions of the stellar and dust mass densities, again finding good agreement. We find that GALFORM predicts the CSED for z < 0.3 in good agreement with the observations. This agreement becomes increasingly poor towards z = 1, when the model CSED is ˜50 per cent fainter. The latter is consistent with the model underpredicting the CSFH. As a consequence, GALFORM predicts a ˜30 per cent fainter IGL.

  2. The Effects of Chemical Weathering on Thermal-Infrared Spectral Data and Models: Implications for Aqueous Processes on the Martian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, Elizabeth Barger

    2011-12-01

    Chemical and mineralogical data from Mars shows that the surface has been chemically weathered on local to regional scales. Chemical trends and the types of chemical weathering products present on the surface and their abundances can elucidate information about past aqueous processes. Thermal-infrared (TIR) data and their respective models are essential for interpreting Martian mineralogy and geologic history. However, previous studies have shown that chemical weathering and the precipitation of fine-grained secondary silicates can adversely affect the accuracy of TIR spectral models. Furthermore, spectral libraries used to identify minerals on the Martian surface lack some important weathering products, including poorly-crystalline aluminosilicates like allophane, thus eliminating their identification in TIR spectral models. It is essential to accurately interpret TIR spectral data from chemically weathered surfaces to understand the evolution of aqueous processes on Mars. Laboratory experiments were performed to improve interpretations of TIR data from weathered surfaces. To test the accuracy of deriving chemistry of weathered rocks from TIR spectroscopy, chemistry was derived from TIR models of weathered basalts from Baynton, Australia and compared to actual weathering rind chemistry. To determine how specific secondary silicates affect the TIR spectroscopy of weathered basalts, mixtures of basaltic minerals and small amounts of secondary silicates were modeled. Poorly-crystalline aluminosilicates were synthesized and their TIR spectra were added to spectral libraries. Regional Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data were modeled using libraries containing these poorly-crystalline aluminosilicates to test for their presence on the Mars. Chemistry derived from models of weathered Baynton basalts is not accurate, but broad chemical weathering trends can be interpreted from the data. TIR models of mineral mixtures show that small amounts of crystalline and

  3. Shifted Jacobi spectral collocation method for solving two-sided fractional water wave models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkawy, M. A.; Alqahtani, Rubayyi T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the spectral collocation technique to solve the two-sided fractional water wave models (TSF-WWMs). The shifted Jacobi-Gauss-Lobatto collocation (SJ-GL-C) and shifted Jacobi-Gauss-Radau collocation (SJ-GR-C) methods are developed to approximate the TSF-WWMs. The main idea in the novel algorithm is to reduce the TSF-WWM to a systems of algebraic equations. The applicability and accuracy of the present technique have been examined by the given numerical examples in this paper. By means of these numerical examples, we ensure that the present technique is a simple and very accurate numerical scheme for solving TSF-WWMs.

  4. Physics of Solar Prominences: I-Spectral Diagnostics and Non-LTE Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrosse, N.; Heinzel, P.; Vial, J.-C,; Kucera, T.; Parenti, S.; Gunar, S.; Schmieder, B.; Kilper, G.

    2010-01-01

    This review paper outlines background information and covers recent advances made via the analysis of spectra and images of prominence plasma and the increased sophistication of non-LTE (i.e. when there is a departure from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) radiative transfer models. We first describe the spectral inversion techniques that have been used to infer the plasma parameters important for the general properties of the prominence plasma in both its cool core and the hotter prominence-corona transition region. We also review studies devoted to the observation of bulk motions of the prominence plasma and to the determination of prominence mass. However, a simple inversion of spectroscopic data usually fails when the lines become optically thick at certain wavelengths. Therefore, complex

  5. Effective Volumetric Feature Modeling and Coarse Correspondence via Improved 3DSIFT and Spectral Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a nonrigid coarse correspondence computation algorithm for volumetric images. Our matching algorithm first extracts then correlates image features based on a revised and improved 3DSIFT (I3DSIFT algorithm. With a scale-related keypoint reorientation and descriptor construction, this feature correlation is less sensitive to image rotation and scaling. Then, we present an improved spectral matching (ISM algorithm on correlated features to obtain a one-to-one mapping between corresponded features. One can effectively extend this feature correspondence to dense correspondence between volume images. Our algorithm can benefit nonrigid volumetric image registration in many tasks such as motion modeling in medical image analysis and processing.

  6. Inclusion complexation of sulfapyridine with α- and β-cyclodextrins: Spectral and molecular modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, N.; Siva, S.; Saravanan, J.

    2013-12-01

    The inclusion complexes of sulfapyridine (SFP) with α-CD and β-CD were investigated by absorption, fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, FTIR, DSC, XRD, 1H NMR, SEM, TEM and molecular modeling methods. The normal fluorescence takes place from locally excited (LE) state while twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) is responsible for highly Stokes shifted fluorescence. The enhancement of TICT emission in both CDs suggesting that the inclusion process plays the major role in this emission. The spectral shifts revealed that part of pyridine ring of SFP is entrapped in the CDs cavities. TEM images confirmed round shaped nanoparticles with the average size about 20-50 nm were observed in SFP with α-CD and β-CD inclusion complexes. PM3 calculations have suggested that the large stabilization of excited singlet state of SFP with twisted conformation occurring at the amide SN bond between the electron donor group (aniline ring) and the electron acceptor group (pyridine ring).

  7. A Further Test of Lorentz Violation from the Rest-frame Spectral Lags of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2017-12-01

    Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) can manifest itself by an energy-dependent vacuum dispersion of light, which leads to arrival time differences of photons with different energies originating from the same astronomical source. The spectral lags of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been widely used to investigate the possible LIV effect. However, all current investigations used lags extracted in the observer frame only. In this work, we present, for the first time, an analysis of the LIV effect and its redshift dependence in the cosmological rest frame. Using a sample of 56 GRBs with known redshifts, we obtain a robust limit on LIV by fitting their rest-frame spectral lag data using both a maximization of the likelihood function and a minimum χ 2 statistic. Our analysis indicates that there is no evidence of LIV. Additionally, we test the LIV in different redshift ranges by dividing the full sample into four redshift bins. We also find no evidence for the redshift variation of the LIV effect.

  8. Vehicle rollover sensor test modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCoy, R.W.; Chou, C.C.; Velde, R. van de; Twisk, D.; Schie, C. van

    2007-01-01

    A computational model of a mid-size sport utility vehicle was developed using MADYMO. The model includes a detailed description of the suspension system and tire characteristics that incorporated the Delft-Tyre magic formula description. The model was correlated by simulating a vehicle suspension

  9. Enhanced Modified Bark Spectral Distortion (EMBSD): An objective speech quality measure based on audible distortion and cognition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wonho

    The Speech Processing Lab at Temple University developed an objective speech quality measure called the Modified Bark Spectral Distortion (MBSD). The MBSD uses auditory perception models derived from psychoacoustic studies. The MBSD measure extends the Bark Spectral Distortion (BSD) method by incorporating noise making threshold to differentiate audible/inaudible distortions. The performance of the MBSD was comparable to that of the ITU-T Recommendation P.861 for various coding distortions. Based on the experiments with Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) data that contains distortions encountered in real network applications, modifications have been made to the MBSD algorithm. These are: use of the first 15 loudness components, normalization of loudness vectors, deletion of the spreading function in the noise masking threshold calculation, and use of a new cognition model based on postmasking effects. The Enhanced MBSD (EMBSD) shows significant improvement over the MBSD for TDMA data. Also, the performance of the EMBSD is better than that of the ITU-T Recommendation P.861 and Measuring Normalizing Blocks (MNB) measures for TDMA data. The performance of the EMBSD was compared to various other objective speech quality measures with the speech data including a wide range of distortion conditions. The EMBSD showed clear improvement over the MBSD and had the correlation coefficient of 0.89 for the conditions of MNRUs, codecs, tandem cases, bit errors, and frame erasures. Mean Opinion Score (MOS) has been used to evaluate objective speech quality measures. Recognizing the procedural difference between the MOS test and current objective speech quality measures, it is proposed that current objective speech quality measures should be evaluated with Degradation Mean Opinion Score (DMOS). The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient has been the main performance parameter for evaluation of objective speech quality measures. The Standard Error of the Estimates (SEE

  10. Development and Validation of A 3d Staggered Fourier Pseudo-spectral Method For Wave Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seriani, G.; Vuan, A.; Priolo, E.; Carcione, J.

    We have developed and implemented an algorithm for the 3D forward modeling of seismic wave-fields in complex geological structures. The algorithm is based on the solution of the elastic full wave equation in heterogeneous media using the Fourier pseudo-spectral method. Numerical accuracy and computational efficiency have been improved using a staggered scheme and parallel implementation, respectively. The parallel code can handle both SHMEM and MPI libraries which allow to perform the computations whether using a single massive parallel computer or distributed PC- clusters. The wave equation is written in a displacement-velocity-stress formulation using the equation of conservation of momentum, and the stress-strain relations for an isotropic elastic medium undergoing infinitesimal deformation. In the time domain, the system of partial differential equations is integrated through a leap-frog finite dif- ference discrete scheme. Spatial derivatives are computed globally by using the FFT. Attenuation is accommodated at each time step by multiplying the stress and velocity field by the attenuation factor. The presence of a free surface is obtained by FFT zero- padding. Wave reflections from the model edges are removed by applying absorbing strips. A generalized moment-tensor source formulation is used to represent source mechanisms. The 3-D staggered Fourier pseudo-spectral method is validated with both analytical and numerical solutions. In particular, we have used as reference solutions the full wave-field in homogeneous and layered media computed by the Cagniard-de Hoop technique and the wave-number integration method, respectively. The compari- son showed that the time histories are in good agreement with the reference solutions. Moreover, because of the staggered approach, the three components of the wave-field are defined on dual meshes displaced by a half grid-step. Therefore three components records are recovered by a fast interpolation.

  11. A test-bed modeling study for wave resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Neary, V. S.; Wang, T.; Gunawan, B.; Dallman, A.

    2016-02-01

    Hindcasts from phase-averaged wave models are commonly used to estimate standard statistics used in wave energy resource assessments. However, the research community and wave energy converter industry is lacking a well-documented and consistent modeling approach for conducting these resource assessments at different phases of WEC project development, and at different spatial scales, e.g., from small-scale pilot study to large-scale commercial deployment. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate current wave model codes, as well as limitations and knowledge gaps for predicting sea states, in order to establish best wave modeling practices, and to identify future research needs to improve wave prediction for resource assessment. This paper presents the first phase of an on-going modeling study to address these concerns. The modeling study is being conducted at a test-bed site off the Central Oregon Coast using two of the most widely-used third-generation wave models - WaveWatchIII and SWAN. A nested-grid modeling approach, with domain dimension ranging from global to regional scales, was used to provide wave spectral boundary condition to a local scale model domain, which has a spatial dimension around 60km by 60km and a grid resolution of 250m - 300m. Model results simulated by WaveWatchIII and SWAN in a structured-grid framework are compared to NOAA wave buoy data for the six wave parameters, including omnidirectional wave power, significant wave height, energy period, spectral width, direction of maximum directionally resolved wave power, and directionality coefficient. Model performance and computational efficiency are evaluated, and the best practices for wave resource assessments are discussed, based on a set of standard error statistics and model run times.

  12. Spectral Modeling of the 0.4-2.5 μm Phobos CRISM dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, Maurizio; Roush, Ted; Dalle Ore, Cristina; Marzo, Giuseppe A.; Simioni, Emanuele

    2017-04-01

    We present the spectral modeling of the 0.4-2.5 μm MRO/CRISM Phobos dataset. After applying a statistical clustering technique, based on a K-means partitioning algorithm, we identified eight separate clusters in the Phobos CRISM data, extending the surface coverage beyond the previous analyses of Fraeman et al. (2012, 2014). Each resulting cluster is characterized by an average and its associated variability. We modeled these different spectra using a radiative transfer code based on the approach of Shkuratov et al. (1999). We used the optical constants of the model proposed by Pajola et al. (2013) in our effort, i.e. the Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and the Mg-rich pyroxene glass (PM80). The Shkuratov model is used in an algorithm that iteratively, and simultaneously changes the relative abundance and grain sizes of the selected components to minimize the differences between the model and observations using a chi-squared criterion. The best-fitting models were achieved with a simple intimate mixture showing that the relative percentages of TL and PM80 vary between 80-20% and 95-5%, respectively, and grain sizes for TL are 12-14 μm and 20-22 μm for PM80. This work aims to return a detailed picture of the surface properties of Phobos identifying specific areas that may be of interest for future planetary exploration, as the proposed Japanese Mars Moon eXploration (MMX) sample return mission. Acknowledgements: We make use of the public NASA-Planetary Data System MRO-CRISM spectral data of Phobos. M.P. was supported for this research by an appointment to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Post-doctoral Program at the Ames Research Center administered by Universities Space Research Association (USRA) through a contract with NASA. References: Fraeman et al. 2012, J. Geophy. Res, E00J15, 10.1029/2012JE004137; Fraeman et al., 2014, Icarus, 229, 196-205, 10.1016/icarus.2013.11.021; Shkuratov, Y. et al. (1999), Icarus, 137, 235. Pajola et al., 2013

  13. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of the radio galaxy IC310

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraija, N.; Marinelli, A.; Galván-Gámez, A.; Aguilar-Ruiz, E.

    2017-03-01

    The radio galaxy IC310 located in the Perseus Cluster is one of the brightest objects in the radio and X-ray bands, and one of the closest active galactic nuclei observed in very-high energies. In GeV - TeV γ-rays, IC310 was detected in low and high flux states by the MAGIC telescopes from October 2009 to February 2010. Taking into account that the spectral energy distribution (SED) up to a few GeV seems to exhibit a double-peak feature and that a single-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model can explain all of the multiwavelength emission except for the non-simultaneous MAGIC emission, we interpret, in this work, the multifrequency data set of the radio galaxy IC310 in the context of homogeneous hadronic and leptonic models. In the leptonic framework, we present a multi-zone SSC model with two electron populations to explain the whole SED whereas for the hadronic model, we propose that a single-zone SSC model describes the SED up to a few GeVs and neutral pion decay products resulting from pγ interactions could describe the TeV - GeV γ-ray spectra. These interactions occur when Fermi-accelerated protons interact with the seed photons around the SSC peaks. We show that, in the leptonic model the minimum Lorentz factor of second electron population is exceedingly high γe ∼ 105 disfavoring this model, and in the hadronic model the required proton luminosity is not extremely high ∼1044 erg/s, provided that charge neutrality between the number of electrons and protons is given. Correlating the TeV γ-ray and neutrino spectra through photo-hadronic interactions, we find that the contribution of the emitting region of IC310 to the observed neutrino and ultra-high-energy cosmic ray fluxes are negligible.

  14. Spectral Energy Distribution Models for Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei in LINERs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Eracleous, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) represent the bulk of the AGN population in the present-day universe and they trace the low-level accreting supermassive black holes. In order to probe the accretion and jet physical properties in LLAGNs as a class, we model the broadband radio to X-rays spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 21 LLAGNs in low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) with a coupled accretion-jet model. The accretion flow is modeled as an inner ADAF outside of which there is a truncated standard thin disk. We find that the radio emission is severely underpredicted by ADAF models and is explained by the relativistic jet. The origin of the X-ray radiation in most sources can be explained by three distinct scenarios: the X-rays can be dominated by emission from the ADAF, or the jet, or the X-rays can arise from a jet-ADAF combination in which both components contribute to the emission with similar importance. For 3 objects both the jet and ADAF fit equally well the X-ray spectrum and can be the dominant source of X-rays whereas for 11 LLAGNs a jet-dominated model accounts better than the ADAF-dominated model for the data. The individual and average SED models that we computed can be useful for different studies of the nuclear emission of LLAGNs. From the model fits, we estimate important parameters of the central engine powering LLAGNs in LINERs, such as the mass accretion rate and the mass-loss rate in the jet and the jet power - relevant for studies of the kinetic feedback from jets.

  15. Twisted Spectral Triple for the Standard Model and Spontaneous Breaking of the Grand Symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devastato, Agostino, E-mail: agostino.devastato@na.infn.it; Martinetti, Pierre, E-mail: martinetti@dima.unige.it [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    Grand symmetry models in noncommutative geometry, characterized by a non-trivial action of functions on spinors, have been introduced to generate minimally (i.e. without adding new fermions) and in agreement with the first order condition an extra scalar field beyond the standard model, which both stabilizes the electroweak vacuum and makes the computation of the mass of the Higgs compatible with its experimental value. In this paper, we use a twist in the sense of Connes-Moscovici to cure a technical problem due to the non-trivial action on spinors, that is the appearance together with the extra scalar field of unbounded vectorial terms. The twist makes these terms bounded and - thanks to a twisted version of the first-order condition that we introduce here - also permits to understand the breaking to the standard model as a dynamical process induced by the spectral action, as conjectured in [24]. This is a spontaneous breaking from a pre-geometric Pati-Salam model to the almost-commutativegeometryofthestandardmodel,withtwoHiggs-likefields: scalar and vector.

  16. Application of Spectral Decomposition Techniques in the Assessment and Intercomparison of Models and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, B. E.; Li, J.; Lacis, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the assessment of models using observations, or the intercomparison between different observational datasets, it is necessary to examine the coherency in the spatial and temporal variability present in different datasets. Meanwhile, global datasets are always high dimensional, therefore efficient comparison is not an easy task. In this study, we apply several spectral decomposition techniques, namely Combined Principal Component Analysis (CPCA) and Combined Maximum Covariance Analysis (CMCA), as effective means to reduce data dimension and extract the dominant variability. More importantly, these methods find the common modes of variability in different datasets, therefore allowing parallel comparison and evaluation. These methods were applied to the AOD fields from fifteen CMIP5 models and three observational datasets: MODIS, MISR and AERONET. We focus on large-scale features including the spatial distribution, seasonality and long term trends. Results show that while models qualitatively agree with observations, significant regional differences still exist, especially in regions with mixed aerosol types such as the Sahel, North India and East Asia. Compared with observations, models in general lack interannual variability. Moreover, all models indicate consistent AOD trends with increases over East Asia and decreases over East US and Europe. However, the AOD trends over these regions are not very significant in the observations Instead, a significant increase in dust concentrations over the Arabian Peninsula and a significant decrease over the biomass burning regions of South America are found in MODIS and MISR. The aerosol composition for the regions with largest disagreement is also examined. Figure caption: The dominant mode of CMCA analysis using fifteen CMIP5 models and MODIS, MISR and AERONET. The color of the circles indicate the signal of AERONET. This mode is associated with a summer-winter seasonal cycle and models agree qualitatively with

  17. A Different View of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations: Modeling Total Energy over Six-Month Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N; Snow, Martin; Harder, Jerald; Chapman, Gary; Cookson, Angela

    A different approach to studying solar spectral irradiance (SSI) variations, without the need for long-term (multi-year) instrument degradation corrections, is examining the total energy of the irradiance variation during 6-month periods. This duration is selected because a solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes 5 to 7 months to decay and disperse back into the quiet-Sun network. The solar outburst energy, which is defined as the irradiance integrated over the 6-month period and thus includes the energy from all phases of active region evolution, could be considered the primary cause for the irradiance variations. Because solar cycle variation is the consequence of multiple active region outbursts, understanding the energy spectral variation may provide a reasonable estimate of the variations for the 11-year solar activity cycle. The moderate-term (6-month) variations from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments can be decomposed into positive (in-phase with solar cycle) and negative (out-of-phase) contributions by modeling the variations using the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) facular excess and sunspot deficit proxies, respectively. These excess and deficit variations are fit over 6-month intervals every 2 months over the mission, and these fitted variations are then integrated over time for the 6-month energy. The dominant component indicates which wavelengths are in-phase and which are out-of-phase with solar activity. The results from this study indicate out-of-phase variations for the 1400 - 1600 nm range, with all other wavelengths having in-phase variations.

  18. Phononic dispersion of graphene using atomistic-continuum model and spectrally formulated finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sushovan; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2017-04-01

    Grapahene is a two dimensional allotrope of carbon. Since the onset of current century, particularly, upon successful exfoliation of single layer graphene, it has received significant research attention because of some of the extreme mechanical, thermal, electromagnetic and optical properties it exhibits. As various applications of graphene have been envisioned and their realizations attempted, dynamic characteristics of graphene also became an extremely important field of study. Based on solid state physics and first principle analysis, dispersion relationship of graphene has been computed using various methods. Some of these methods rely on various inter atomic potentials and force-fields. An approximate technique of mechanical characterization involves atomisticcontinuum modeling of carbon carbon bonds in graphene and its rolled 1D form carbon nanotube. In this technique, the carbon-carbon bonds are modeled as 1D frame elements. The equivalence of energies in various modes of the actual structure and the equivalent mechanical system has led to specification of various model parameters. Here, based on atomistic continuum method, we attempt to compute the dispersion relationship accounting for the bonded interactions and the next nearest non-bonded interactions. For that purpose we use frequency domain spectral finite element method with pointed inertial components. It has been shown that it is possible to obtain the dispersion relationship close to the one computed using ab-initio method.

  19. Maintenance of quasi-stationary waves in a two-level quasi-geostrophic spectral model with topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, M.-S.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the maintenance of the quasistationary waves forced by topography using a truncated two-level quasigeostrophic spectral model in a zonal channel on a beta-plane is presented. The model's motion contains wavenumbers 0, n, and 2n in the zonal direction, where n is the lowest eddy wavenumber and also the wavenumber of the topography. The study covered the two cases defined by n=2 and n=3; the spectral mode was integrated by initially perturbing the stationary solution of the equations governing the spectral coefficients, and a detailed energetics study was made of the quasiequilibrium state to study the maintenance of the quasistationary waves. The energy conversions required for maintaining these waves when n=3 imply that they are generated mainly by baroclinic stability of the forced waves; this type of baroclinic wave tends to become stationary to draw efficiently on the available energy of the forced wave.

  20. Green's functions from real-time bold-line Monte Carlo calculations: spectral properties of the nonequilibrium Anderson impurity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Guy; Gull, Emanuel; Reichman, David R; Millis, Andrew J

    2014-04-11

    The nonequilibrium spectral properties of the Anderson impurity model with a chemical potential bias are investigated within a numerically exact real-time quantum Monte Carlo formalism. The two-time correlation function is computed in a form suitable for nonequilibrium dynamical mean field calculations. Additionally, the evolution of the model's spectral properties are simulated in an alternative representation, defined by a hypothetical but experimentally realizable weakly coupled auxiliary lead. The voltage splitting of the Kondo peak is confirmed and the dynamics of its formation after a coupling or gate quench are studied. This representation is shown to contain additional information about the dot's population dynamics. Further, we show that the voltage-dependent differential conductance gives a reasonable qualitative estimate of the equilibrium spectral function, but significant qualitative differences are found including incorrect trends and spurious temperature dependent effects.

  1. Model-Based Testing: The New Revolution in Software Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh KUMAR SHARMA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The efforts spent on testing are enormous due to the continuing quest for better software quality, and the ever growing complexity of software systems. The situation is aggravated by the fact that the complexity of testing tends to grow faster than the complexity of the systems being tested, in the worst case even exponentially. Whereas development and construction methods for software allow the building of ever larger and more complex systems, there is a real danger that testing methods cannot keep pace with construction, hence these new systems cannot be sufficiently fast and thoroughly be tested. This may seriously hamper the development of future generations of software systems. One of the new technologies to meet the challenges imposed on software testing is model-based testing. Models can be utilized in many ways throughout the product life-cycle, including: improved quality of specifications, code generation, reliability analysis, and test generation. This paper will focus on the testing benefits from MBT methods and review some of the historical challenges that prevented model based testing and we also try to present the solutions that can overcome these challenges.

  2. Comprehensive isolation of natural organic matter from water for spectral characterizations and reactivity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, J.A.; Croue, J.-P.; Benjamin, M.; Korshin, G.V.; Hwang, C.J.; Bruchet, A.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of approaches were tested to comprehensively isolate natural organic matter (NOM) from water. For waters with high NOM concentrations such as the Suwannee River, Georgia, approaches that used combinations of membrane concentrations, evaporative concentrations, and adsorption on nonionic XAD resins, ion exchange resins and iron oxide coated sand isolated over 90% of the NOM. However, for waters with low NOM concentrations, losses of half of the NOM were common and desalting of NOM isolates was a problem. A new comprehensive approach was devised and tested on the Seine River, France in which 100 L of filtered water was sodium softened by ion exchange and vacuum evaporated to 100 mL. Colloids (32% of the NOM) were isolated using a 3,500 Dalton membrane by dialysis against 0.1 M HCl and 0.2 M HF to remove salts and silica. On the membrane permeate, hydrophobic NOM (42%) was isolated using XAD-8 resin and hydrophilic NOM (26%) was isolated using a variety of selective desalting precipitations. The colloid fraction was characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy as N-acetylamino sugars. ?? 2000 American Chemical Society.

  3. GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

    2010-03-09

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  4. A model for optimal constrained adaptive testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.; Reese, Lynda M.

    2001-01-01

    A model for constrained computerized adaptive testing is proposed in which the information on the test at the ability estimate is maximized subject to a large variety of possible constraints on the contents of the test. At each item-selection step, a full test is first assembled to have maximum

  5. Atomic Action Refinement in Model Based Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bijl, H.M.; Rensink, Arend; Tretmans, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    In model based testing (MBT) test cases are derived from a specification of the system that we want to test. In general the specification is more abstract than the implementation. This may result in 1) test cases that are not executable, because their actions are too abstract (the implementation

  6. Traceability in Model-Based Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew George

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing complexities of software and the demand for shorter time to market are two important challenges that face today’s IT industry. These challenges demand the increase of both productivity and quality of software. Model-based testing is a promising technique for meeting these challenges. Traceability modeling is a key issue and challenge in model-based testing. Relationships between the different models will help to navigate from one model to another, and trace back to the respective requirements and the design model when the test fails. In this paper, we present an approach for bridging the gaps between the different models in model-based testing. We propose relation definition markup language (RDML for defining the relationships between models.

  7. Spectral model selection in the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Kevin J; Qu, Jifeng

    2017-04-01

    In the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant based on Johnson noise thermometry, the ratio of the power spectral densities of thermal noise across a resistor at the triple point of water, and pseudo-random noise synthetically generated by a quantum-accurate voltage-noise source is constant to within 1 part in a billion for frequencies up to 1 GHz. Given knowledge of this ratio, and the values of other parameters that are known or measured, one can determine the Boltzmann constant. Due, in part, to mismatch between transmission lines, the experimental ratio spectrum varies with frequency. We model this spectrum as an even polynomial function of frequency where the constant term in the polynomial determines the Boltzmann constant. When determining this constant (offset) from experimental data, the assumed complexity of the ratio spectrum model and the maximum frequency analyzed (fitting bandwidth) dramatically affects results. Here, we select the complexity of the model by cross-validation - a data-driven statistical learning method. For each of many fitting bandwidths, we determine the component of uncertainty of the offset term that accounts for random and systematic effects associated with imperfect knowledge of model complexity. We select the fitting bandwidth that minimizes this uncertainty. In the most recent measurement of the Boltzmann constant, results were determined, in part, by application of an earlier version of the method described here. Here, we extend the earlier analysis by considering a broader range of fitting bandwidths and quantify an additional component of uncertainty that accounts for imperfect performance of our fitting bandwidth selection method. For idealized simulated data with additive noise similar to experimental data, our method correctly selects the true complexity of the ratio spectrum model for all cases considered. A new analysis of data from the recent experiment yields evidence for a temporal trend in the offset

  8. Efficient Hybrid-Spectral Model for Fully Nonlinear Numerical Wave Tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben; Bingham, Harry B.; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2013-01-01

    method in the vertical for the discretization of the Laplace equation in the fluid domain, which yields a sparse and spectrally accurate Dirichletto-Neumann operator. The Laplace problem is solved with an efficient Defect Correction method preconditioned with a spectral discretization of the linearised...

  9. Joint test for structural model specification

    OpenAIRE

    Serkan YÜKSEL

    2006-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. Aim of this thesis is to propose a test statistic that can test for true structural model in time series. Main concern of the thesis is to suggest a test statistic, which has joint null of unit root and no structural break (difference stationary model). When joint null hypothesis is rejected, source of deviation from the null model may be structural break or (and) stationarity. Sources of the deviation correspond to different structural...

  10. Phonon spectral function of the one-dimensional Holstein-Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Manuel; Assaad, Fakher F.; Hohenadler, Martin

    2015-06-01

    We use the continuous-time interaction expansion (CT-INT) quantum Monte Carlo method to calculate the phonon spectral function of the one-dimensional Holstein-Hubbard model at half-filling. Our results are consistent with a soft-mode Peierls transition in the adiabatic regime, and the existence of a central peak related to long-range order in the Peierls phase. We explain a previously observed feature at small momenta in terms of a hybridization of charge and phonon excitations. Tuning the system from a Peierls to a metallic phase with a nonzero Hubbard interaction suppresses the central peak, but a significant renormalization of the phonon dispersion remains. In contrast, the dispersion is only weakly modified in the Mott phase. We discuss finite-size effects, the relation to the dynamic charge structure factor, as well as additional sum rules and their implications. Finally, we reveal the existence of a discrete symmetry in a continuum field theory of the Holstein model, which is spontaneously broken in the Peierls phase.

  11. A Spectral-SAR Model for the Anionic-Cationic Interaction in Ionic Liquids: Application to Vibrio fischeri Ecotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Ostafe

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the recently launched the spectral-structure activity relationship (S-SARanalysis, the vectorial anionic-cationic model of a generic ionic liquid is proposed, alongwith the associated algebraic correlation factor in terms of the measured and predictedactivity norms. The reliability of the present scheme is tested by assessing the Hanschfactors, i.e. lipophylicity, polarizability and total energy, to predict the ecotoxicityendpoints of wide types of ionic liquids with ammonium, pyridinium, phosphonium,choline and imidazolium cations on the aquatic bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The results, whileconfirming the cationic dominant influence when only lipophylicity is considered,demonstrate that the anionic effect dominates all other more specific interactions. It wasalso proved that the S-SAR vectorial model predicts considerably higher activity for theionic liquids than for its anionic and cationic subsystems separately, in all consideredcases. Moreover, through applying the least norm-correlation path principle, the completetoxicological hierarchies are presented, unfolding the ecological rules of combined cationicand anionic influences in ionic liquid toxicity.

  12. Finding relevant spectral regions between spectroscopic techniques by use of cross model validation and partial least squares regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westad, Frank; Afseth, Nils Kristian; Bro, Rasmus

    2007-07-09

    In this paper, we extend the concept of cross model validation (CMV) to multiple X and Y variables where different spectroscopic techniques serve as X and Y data in a regression context. For the first dataset on marzipan samples the main objective was to find significant regions in the spectral data, and to discuss the issue of false discovery, i.e. combinations of variables that erroneously are found to be significant. A permutation test within the framework of CMV showed that no regression coefficients in the partial least squares regression (PLSR) model between FT-IR and VIS/NIR spectra show significance at the 5% level. We believe the reason is that the CMV acts as strong filter towards spurious correlations. Corresponding CH- and OH-bands between FT-IR and NIR spectra gave significant regions. For the second dataset, the results from CMV are interpreted more in detail with chemical background knowledge in mind. Most of the significant regions found between the Raman and NIR spectra could be interpreted from the chemical composition of the oil mixtures. Some regions were more difficult to interpret, which could be due to systematic baseline effects in the NIR data.

  13. Used Fuel Testing Transportation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Best, Ralph E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Maheras, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); England, Jeffery L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); LeDuc, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-25

    This report identifies shipping packages/casks that might be used by the Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign Program (UFDC) to ship fuel rods and pieces of fuel rods taken from high-burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies to and between research facilities for purposes of evaluation and testing. Also identified are the actions that would need to be taken, if any, to obtain U.S. Nuclear Regulatory (NRC) or other regulatory authority approval to use each of the packages and/or shipping casks for this purpose.

  14. Soil moisture prediction of bare soil profiles using diffuse spectral reflectance information and vadose zone flow modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaeian, E.; Homaee, M.; Montzka, C.; Vereecken, H.; Norouzi, A.A.; van Genuchten, M.Th.

    2016-01-01

    Soil hydraulic property information of the vadose zone is key to quantifying the temporal and spatial variability of soil moisture, and for modeling water flow and contaminant transport processes in the near surface. This study deals with exploring the feasibility of using diffuse soil spectral

  15. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary discs - III. Impact of inner rims on spectral energy distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thi, W. -F.; Woitke, P.; Kamp, I.

    We study the hydrostatic density structure of the inner disc rim around Herbig Ae stars using the thermo-chemical hydrostatic code prodimo. We compare the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and images from our hydrostatic disc models to that from prescribed density structure discs. The 2D

  16. Creating Orthographically Rectified Satellite Multi-Spectral Imagery with High Resolution Digital Elevation Model from LiDAR: A Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-15

    GSFC and NIMA Joint Geopotential Model, Greenbelt MD: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Longbotham, N. et al., 2012. Very High Resolution Multiangle...Detection and Ranging LLC Limited Liability Company MSI Multi-Spectral Imagery NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NIMA National

  17. On the errors of spectral shallow-water limited-area model simulations using an extension technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmel, M.; Harlander, U. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie (LIM)

    1999-08-01

    Although the spectral technique is frequently used for the horizontal discretization in global atmospheric models, it is not common in limited area models (LAMs) because of the nonperiodic boundary conditions. We apply the Haugen-Machenhauer extension technique to a regional three-layer shallow-water model based on double Fourier series. The method extends the time-dependent boundary fields into a zone outside the integration area in a way that periodic fields are obtained. The boundary fields necessary for the regional model simulations are calculated in advance by a global simulation performed. In contrast to other studies, we use exactly the same numerical model for the global and the regional simulation, respectively. The only difference between these simulations is the model domain. Therefore, a relatively objective measure for errors associated with the extension technique can be obtained. First, we compare an analytic stationary nonlinear and nonperiodic solution of the governing model equations with the spectral LAM solution. Secondly, we compare the time evolution of pressure and flow structures during a westerly flow across an asymmetric large-scale topography in the global and regional model domains. Both simulations show a good agreement between the regional and the global solutions. The rms-errors amount to about 2 m for the layer heights and 0.2 m s{sup -1} for the velocity components in the mountain flow case after a 48 h integration period. Finally, we repeat this simulation with models based on 2nd and 4th order finite differences, respectively, and compare the errors of the spectral model version with the errors of the grid point versions. We demonstrate that the high accuracy of global spectral methods can also be realized in the regional model by using the Haugen-Machenhauer extension technique. (orig.) 21 refs.

  18. lmerTest Package: Tests in Linear Mixed Effects Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Brockhoff, Per B.; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen

    2017-01-01

    One of the frequent questions by users of the mixed model function lmer of the lme4 package has been: How can I get p values for the F and t tests for objects returned by lmer? The lmerTest package extends the 'lmerMod' class of the lme4 package, by overloading the anova and summary functions...... by providing p values for tests for fixed effects. We have implemented the Satterthwaite's method for approximating degrees of freedom for the t and F tests. We have also implemented the construction of Type I - III ANOVA tables. Furthermore, one may also obtain the summary as well as the anova table using...

  19. Linear Logistic Test Modeling with R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Purya; Kubinger, Klaus D.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper gives a general introduction to the linear logistic test model (Fischer, 1973), an extension of the Rasch model with linear constraints on item parameters, along with eRm (an R package to estimate different types of Rasch models; Mair, Hatzinger, & Mair, 2014) functions to estimate the model and interpret its parameters. The…

  20. Testing predictive performance of binary choice models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.D. Donkers (Bas); B. Melenberg (Bertrand)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBinary choice models occur frequently in economic modeling. A measure of the predictive performance of binary choice models that is often reported is the hit rate of a model. This paper develops a test for the outperformance of a predictor for binary outcomes over a naive prediction

  1. Multi-channel MRI segmentation with graph cuts using spectral gradient and multidimensional Gaussian mixture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoeur, Jérémy; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Collins, D. Louis; Morrisey, Sean P.; Barillot, Christian

    2009-02-01

    A new segmentation framework is presented taking advantage of multimodal image signature of the different brain tissues (healthy and/or pathological). This is achieved by merging three different modalities of gray-level MRI sequences into a single RGB-like MRI, hence creating a unique 3-dimensional signature for each tissue by utilising the complementary information of each MRI sequence. Using the scale-space spectral gradient operator, we can obtain a spatial gradient robust to intensity inhomogeneity. Even though it is based on psycho-visual color theory, it can be very efficiently applied to the RGB colored images. More over, it is not influenced by the channel assigment of each MRI. Its optimisation by the graph cuts paradigm provides a powerful and accurate tool to segment either healthy or pathological tissues in a short time (average time about ninety seconds for a brain-tissues classification). As it is a semi-automatic method, we run experiments to quantify the amount of seeds needed to perform a correct segmentation (dice similarity score above 0.85). Depending on the different sets of MRI sequences used, this amount of seeds (expressed as a relative number in pourcentage of the number of voxels of the ground truth) is between 6 to 16%. We tested this algorithm on brainweb for validation purpose (healthy tissue classification and MS lesions segmentation) and also on clinical data for tumours and MS lesions dectection and tissues classification.

  2. Non-invasive, Contrast-enhanced Spectral Imaging of Breast Cancer Signatures in Preclinical Animal Models In vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Ren, Songyang; Park, Sangyong; Farkas, Daniel L

    2010-10-02

    We report here a non-invasive multispectral imaging platform for monitoring spectral reflectance and fluorescence images from primary breast carcinoma and metastatic lymph nodes in preclinical rat model in vivo. The system is built around a monochromator light source and an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for spectral selection. Quantitative analysis of the measured reflectance profiles in the presence of a widely-used lymphazurin dye clearly demonstrates the capability of the proposed imaging platform to detect tumor-associated spectral signatures in the primary tumors as well as metastatic lymphatics. Tumor-associated changes in vascular oxygenation and interstitial fluid pressure are reasoned to be the physiological sources of the measured reflectance profiles. We also discuss the translational potential of our imaging platform in intra-operative clinical setting.

  3. Multi-Spectral Satellite Imagery and Land Surface Modeling Supporting Dust Detection and Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, A.; Case, J.; Zavodsky, B.; Naeger, A. R.; LaFontaine, F.; Smith, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Current and future multi-spectral satellite sensors provide numerous means and methods for identifying hazards associated with polluting aerosols and dust. For over a decade, the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville has focused on developing new applications from near real-time data sources in support of the operational weather forecasting community. The SPoRT Center achieves these goals by matching appropriate analysis tools, modeling outputs, and other products to forecast challenges, along with appropriate training and end-user feedback to ensure a successful transition. As a spinoff of these capabilities, the SPoRT Center has recently focused on developing collaborations to address challenges with the public health community, specifically focused on the identification of hazards associated with dust and pollution aerosols. Using multispectral satellite data from the SEVIRI instrument on the Meteosat series, the SPoRT team has leveraged EUMETSAT techniques for identifying dust through false color (RGB) composites, which have been used by the National Hurricane Center and other meteorological centers to identify, monitor, and predict the movement of dust aloft. Similar products have also been developed from the MODIS and VIIRS instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua, and Suomi-NPP satellites, respectively, and transitioned for operational forecasting use by offices within NOAA's National Weather Service. In addition, the SPoRT Center incorporates satellite-derived vegetation information and land surface modeling to create high-resolution analyses of soil moisture and other land surface conditions relevant to the lofting of wind-blown dust and identification of other, possible public-health vectors. Examples of land surface modeling and relevant predictions are shown in the context of operational decision making by forecast centers with potential future applications to public health arenas.

  4. Spectral signatures of the tropical Pacific dynamics from model and altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionel, Tchilibou Michel; Gourdeau, Lionel; Morrow, Rosemary; Djath, Bugshin; Jouanno, Julien; Marin, Frederic

    2017-04-01

    The tropics are distinguishable from mid latitudes by their small Coriolis parameter vanishing at the equator, large Rossby radius, and strong anisotropic circulation. These peculiarities are at the origin of dynamics that strongly respond to the wind forcing through zonally propagating tropical waves, and of a large range of wavenumbers covering meso and submesoscale interactions. The main tropical meso and submesoscales features are associated with Tropical Instability Waves (Marchesiello et al., 2011), but coherent vorticity structures span the tropical band as described by Ubelmann and Fu (2011). This study aims to infer the dynamics of the tropical Pacific through spectral EKE and SSH analyses by looking at their latitudinal dependence. Also, a question of interest is the observability of such dynamics using along track altimetric wavenumber spectra since the tracks are mainly oriented meridionally in the tropics. This study is based on the 1.12° resolution DRAKKAR global model. Frequency-zonal wavenumber EKE spectra, and their corresponding 1D frequency and zonal wavenumber are analyzed in different latitudinal bands in the tropics illustrating the contrast between the dynamics in the equatorial belt and in the off -equatorial belt. Zonal and meridional wavenumber EKE spectra, and 2D (horizontal wavenumber) spectra of zonal and meridional velocities are used to illustrate the degree of anisotropy in the tropics depending on latitude. These EKE spectra and the relationship between EKE and SSH spectra helps us to discuss the validity of QG turbulence theories in the tropics. These model results combined with those from a 1/36° resolution regional model with explicit tides point out the actual limitation of along track altimetric SSH to infer small scale dynamics in the tropics due the high energy level of high frequency ageostrophic motions.

  5. Improved spectral comparisons of paleoclimate models and observations via proxy system modeling: Implications for multi-decadal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, S. G.; Parsons, L. A.; Loope, G. R.; Overpeck, J. T.; Ault, T. R.; Emile-Geay, J.

    2017-10-01

    The spectral characteristics of paleoclimate observations spanning the last millennium suggest the presence of significant low-frequency (multi-decadal to centennial scale) variability in the climate system. Since this low-frequency climate variability is critical for climate predictions on societally-relevant scales, it is essential to establish whether General Circulation models (GCMs) are able to simulate it faithfully. Recent studies find large discrepancies between models and paleoclimate data at low frequencies, prompting concerns surrounding the ability of GCMs to predict long-term, high-magnitude variability under greenhouse forcing (Laepple and Huybers, 2014a, 2014b). However, efforts to ground climate model simulations directly in paleoclimate observations are impeded by fundamental differences between models and the proxy data: proxy systems often record a multivariate and/or nonlinear response to climate, precluding a direct comparison to GCM output. In this paper we bridge this gap via a forward proxy modeling approach, coupled to an isotope-enabled GCM. This allows us to disentangle the various contributions to signals embedded in ice cores, speleothem calcite, coral aragonite, tree-ring width, and tree-ring cellulose. The paper addresses the following questions: (1) do forward-modeled ;pseudoproxies; exhibit variability comparable to proxy data? (2) if not, which processes alter the shape of the spectrum of simulated climate variability, and are these processes broadly distinguishable from climate? We apply our method to representative case studies, and broaden these insights with an analysis of the PAGES2k database (PAGES2K Consortium, 2013). We find that current proxy system models (PSMs) can help resolve model-data discrepancies on interannual to decadal timescales, but cannot account for the mismatch in variance on multi-decadal to centennial timescales. We conclude that, specific to this set of PSMs and isotope-enabled model, the paleoclimate

  6. Spectral properties of natural and oil polluted Baltic seawater — results of measurements and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowska, V.; Freda, W.; Baszanowska, E.; Rudź, K.; Darecki, M.; Heldt, J. R.; Toczek, H.

    2013-10-01

    Seawater in addition to natural components such as living and non-living organic matter contains also components artificially introduced into the marine environment, such as oil substances. These components, present in the surface layer of the sea, can significantly affect radiative transfer processes. Therefore, taking into account these processes in remote sensing measurements can improve assessment of the environment. To improve local seawater optical models, it is necessary to measure the luminescence properties of all components of seawater as well as the water leaving radiance values. Additionally, substances which form the surface microlayer (surfactants — surface active agents) can affect both the dynamic characteristics of the fluxes (in particular the gas exchange and marine aerosol production) as well as inherent optical properties of surface seawater. This paper contains both the results of research focused on introducing of an efficient method for identifying oils by their fluorescence spectra as well as a marine experiment on the identification of luminescent properties of surfactants — sampled in different regions of the Baltic Sea. Moreover, the aim of the presented study is to assess the impact of the oil emulsion to spectral water leaving signal. Those results are obtained both from running Monte Carlo radiative transfer code and from approximated formulas.

  7. Application of agrometeorological spectral model in rice area in southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leivas, Janice F.; de C. Teixeira, Antonio Heriberto; Andrade, Ricardo G.; de C. Victoria, Daniel; Bayma-Silva, Gustavo; Bolfe, Edson L.

    2015-10-01

    The southern region is responsible for 70% of rice production in Brazil. In this study, rice areas of Rio Grande do Sul were selected, using the land use classification, scale 1: 100,000, provided by Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE). MODIS Images were used and meteorological data, available by National Institute of Meteorology (INMET). The period of analysis was crop season 2011/2012, October to March. To obtain evapotranspiration was applied agrometeorological-spectral model SAFER (Simple Algorithm For Retrieving Evapotranspiration). From the analysis of the results, on planting and cultivation period , the average evapotranspiration (ET) daily was 1.93 +/- 0.96 mm.day-1. In the vegetative development period of rice, the daily ET has achieved 4.94 mm.day-1, with average value 2,31+/- 0.97 mm.day-1. In the period of harvest, evapotranspiration daily average was 1.84 +/- 0.80 mm.day-1. From results obtained, the estimation of evapotranspiration from satellite images may assist in monitoring the culture during the cycle, assisting in estimates of water productivity and crop yield.

  8. Autoregressive spectral analysis of cortical electroencephalographic signals in a rat model of post-traumatic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yupeng; Jiao, Baohua; Wu, Zhendong; Zhen, Junli; Jia, Qingzhong; Zhang, Hailin; Guan, Bingcai; Wang, Shuai

    2015-11-01

    Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a common consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and significant predictor of poor prognosis in TBI patients. To develop clinical interventions for PTE risk reduction, there is a need to elucidate the epileptogenic mechanisms induced by brain injury. The iron-induced rat model of epilepsy used here mimics many aspects of human PTE. Intracortical injection of iron results in local neuronal damage and the establishment of an epileptic focus, leading to chronic spontaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) signals and motor seizures, with progressively increasing frequency over many months. Identifying unique aspects of PTE seizure semiology for prognosis and treatment may be aided by novel methods of EEG analysis. Here, autoregressive (AR) methods were compared to the conventional fast Fourier transform (FFT) for processing EEG signals in iron-induced epilepsy. Power spectra obtained using AR showed higher frequency resolution over a given epoch than the spectra obtained using FFT. Moreover, changes in total AR spectral power and frequency distribution over brief successive periods provided convenient indexes for long-term monitoring of seizures. Autoregression analysis may prove complementary to FFT for EEG analysis in PTE patients.

  9. Testing models for structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, N.

    The author reviews a number of tests of theories for structure formation. Large-scale flows and IRAS galaxies indicate a high density parameter Ω ≅ 1, in accord with inflationary predictions, but it is not clear how this meshes with the uniformly low values obtained from virial analysis on scales ≡1 Mpc. Gravitational distortion of faint galaxies behind clusters allows one to construct maps of the mass surface density, and this should shed some light on the large vs. small-scale Ω discrepancy. Power spectrum analysis reveals too red a spectrum on scales λ ≡ 10 - 100 h-1Mpc, but the gaussian fluctuation hypothesis appears to be in good shape. These results suggest that the problem for CDM lies not in the very early universe but in the assumed matter content. The power spectrum problem can be solved by invoking a cocktail of mixed dark matter. However, if gravitational lensing fails to reveal extended dark mass around clusters then we may be forced to explore more radical possibilities for the dark matter.

  10. Biglan Model Test Based on Institutional Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskens, Ronald W.; Creswell, John W.

    The Biglan model, a theoretical framework for empirically examining the differences among subject areas, classifies according to three dimensions: adherence to common set of paradigms (hard or soft), application orientation (pure or applied), and emphasis on living systems (life or nonlife). Tests of the model are reviewed, and a further test is…

  11. Multivariate Model for Test Response Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnan, Shaji; Krishnan, Shaji; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic approach to construct an effective multivariate test response model for capturing manufacturing defects in electronic products is described. The effectiveness of the model is demonstrated by its capability in reducing the number of test-points, while achieving the maximal coverage

  12. Testing the potential of multi-spectral remote sensing for retrospectively estimating fire severity in African savannahs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alistair M.S. Smith; Martin J. Wooster; Nick A. Drake; Frederick M. Dipotso; Michael J. Falkowski; Andrew T. Hudak

    2005-01-01

    The remote sensing of fire severity is a noted goal in studies of forest and grassland wildfires. Experiments were conducted to discover and evaluate potential relationships between the characteristics of African savannah fires and post-fire surface spectral reflectance in the visible to shortwave infrared spectral region. Nine instrumented experimental fires were...

  13. Combined Spectral and Spatial Modeling of Corn Yield Based on Aerial Images and Crop Surface Models Acquired with an Unmanned Aircraft System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Geipel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Precision Farming (PF management strategies are commonly based on estimations of within-field yield potential, often derived from remotely-sensed products, e.g., Vegetation Index (VI maps. These well-established means, however, lack important information, like crop height. Combinations of VI-maps and detailed 3D Crop Surface Models (CSMs enable advanced methods for crop yield prediction. This work utilizes an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS to capture standard RGB imagery datasets for corn grain yield prediction at three early- to mid-season growth stages. The imagery is processed into simple VI-orthoimages for crop/non-crop classification and 3D CSMs for crop height determination at different spatial resolutions. Three linear regression models are tested on their prediction ability using site-specific (i unclassified mean heights, (ii crop-classified mean heights and (iii a combination of crop-classified mean heights with according crop coverages. The models show determination coefficients \\({R}^{2}\\ of up to 0.74, whereas model (iii performs best with imagery captured at the end of stem elongation and intermediate spatial resolution (0.04m\\(\\cdot\\px\\(^{-1}\\.Following these results, combined spectral and spatial modeling, based on aerial images and CSMs, proves to be a suitable method for mid-season corn yield prediction.

  14. Linear spectral modeling of ground-based observations of Europa (ESO/VLT/SINFONI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligier, Nicolas; Poulet, François; Carter, John; Langevin, Yves; Dumas, Christophe; Gourgeot, Florian

    2015-11-01

    Jupiter’s moon Europa may harbor a global salty subsurface liquid water ocean (Kivelson et al. 2000), and its surface should contain important clues about its composition. However, debate still persists about the nature of the surface chemistry and the relative roles of exogenous versus endogenous processing. Recently, Roth et al. (2014) reported the presence of activity by the detection of plumes reinforcing Europa as a major target of interests of upcoming space missions such as the ESA L-class mission JUICE.To continue the investigation of the composition of the surface of Europa, a global mapping campaign of the satellite was performed between October 2011 and January 2012 with the integral field spectrograph SINFONI on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. The high spectral binning of this instrument (0.5 nm) is suitable to detect any narrow signature in the wavelength range 1.45-2.45 μm. The spatially resolved spectra we obtained over five epochs nearly cover the entire surface of Europa with a pixel scale of 12.5 by 25 m.a.s (~35 by 70 km on Europa’s surface).We perform linear spectral modeling using 4 types of species : water-ice (both crystalline and amorphous), sulfuric acid hydrate, sulfate salts and Cl-rich salts. At first order, spectra on the leading side are, as expected, dominated by water-ice distorted and asymmetric absorption features, whereas sulfuric acid hydrate thought to originate from Iogenic sulfur ion bombardment is clearly predominant on the trailing side (Carlson et al. 2005).Salts are also required to fit any SINFONI spectrum with the following notable result: when Na/K-bearing chlorines instead of Mg-sulfates are used, the fits are improved whatever the region. The feature centered at ~2.07 µm previously associated to the magnesium sulfates (Brown et al. 2013) is also observed in the SINFONI spectra and can be reproduced by some chlorine salts. Global abundance maps will be presented, regional variations of abundances will be

  15. TESTING GARCH-X TYPE MODELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Søndergaard; Rahbek, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We present novel theory for testing for reduction of GARCH-X type models with an exogenous (X) covariate to standard GARCH type models. To deal with the problems of potential nuisance parameters on the boundary of the parameter space as well as lack of identification under the null, we exploit...... a noticeable property of specific zero-entries in the inverse information of the GARCH-X type models. Specifically, we consider sequential testing based on two likelihood ratio tests and as demonstrated the structure of the inverse information implies that the proposed test neither depends on whether...

  16. Hydraulic Model Tests on Modified Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue; Lynggaard, Jakob

    are found in Hald and Lynggaard (2001). Model tests and reconstruction are carried out during the phase 3 project: ”Wave Dragon. Reconstruction of an existing model in scale 1:50 and sequentiel tests of changes to the model geometry and mass distribution parameters” sponsored by the Danish Energy Agency...... (DEA) wave energy programme. The tests will establish a well documented basis for the development of a 1:4.5 scale prototype planned for testing Nissum Bredning, a sea inlet on the Danish West Coast....

  17. Testing Expected Shortfall Models for Derivative Positions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, F.L.J.; Melenberg, B.; Schumacher, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we test several risk management models for computing expected shortfall for one-period hedge errors of hedged derivatives positions.Contrary to value-at-risk, expected shortfall cannot be tested using the standard binomial test, since we need information of the distribution in the

  18. On modelling three-dimensional piezoelectric smart structures with boundary spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Fangxin; Aliabadi, M. H.

    2017-05-01

    The computational efficiency of the boundary element method in elastodynamic analysis can be significantly improved by employing high-order spectral elements for boundary discretisation. In this work, for the first time, the so-called boundary spectral element method is utilised to formulate the piezoelectric smart structures that are widely used in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The resultant boundary spectral element formulation has been validated by the finite element method (FEM) and physical experiments. The new formulation has demonstrated a lower demand on computational resources and a higher numerical stability than commercial FEM packages. Comparing to the conventional boundary element formulation, a significant reduction in computational expenses has been achieved. In summary, the boundary spectral element formulation presented in this paper provides a highly efficient and stable mathematical tool for the development of SHM applications.

  19. ``Statistical treatment of the spectral properties of plasmas in local thermodynamical equilibrium using a screened hydrogenic model``; ``Traitement statistique des proprietes spectrales des plasmas a l`equilibre thermodynamique local dans le cadre du modele hydrogenique ecrante``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faussurier, G.

    1996-12-31

    A new screened hydrogenic model is presented. The screening constants depend both on the principal n and orbital l quantum numbers. They have been obtained from numerical fits over a large data base containing ionization potentials and one-electron excitation energies of ions. A rapid and original method to compute the bound-bound and bound-free oscillator strengths is proposed. The discrete spectrum and the series continuum are connected by continuity, and the sum rules are respected. The screened hydrogenic average atom is well-adapted to describe multicharged ion plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Using the key principle of statistical mechanics, it is shown first that this model is properly defined and thermodynamically coherent. Secondly, a new method of detailed ionization stage accounting of a LTE plasma is explained. It can be used to reconstruct the distribution of integer charge states in such a plasma from any average atom model. The l -splitting allows one-electron transitions between two subshells with the same principal quantum number n. They may be of great importance when the Rosseland opacity is computed. Though, methods of classical statistical mechanics are required to calculate the distribution of the configurations around the average atom one and so to improve the spectral opacities. The splitting in integer ionic stages can be easily included. The formalism is tested by comparisons with theoretical and experimental results published in the literature. From the photoabsorption spectra encountered, the main results are the correct estimations of both the Rosseland opacity and the detailed charge degrees accounting. (author).

  20. The Couplex test cases: models and lessons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeat, A. [Lyon-1 Univ., MCS, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Kern, M. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), 78 - Le Chesnay (France); Schumacher, S.; Talandier, J. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2003-07-01

    The Couplex test cases are a set of numerical test models for nuclear waste deep geological disposal simulation. They are centered around the numerical issues arising in the near and far field transport simulation. They were used in an international contest, and are now becoming a reference in the field. We present the models used in these test cases, and show sample results from the award winning teams. (authors)

  1. Simulation of Acoustics for Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Gabriel; Strutzenberg, Louise L.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity acoustic measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in both held down and elevated configurations, as well as with and without water suppression have been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure.

  2. Model Calculations of Solar Spectral Irradiance in the 3.7 Micron Band for Earth Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven; Fontenla, Juan M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the launch of the first Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument aboard TIROS-N, measurements in the 3.7 micron atmospheric window have been exploited for use in cloud detection and screening, cloud thermodynamic phase and surface snow/ice discrimination, and quantitative cloud particle size retrievals. The utility of the band has led to the incorporation of similar channels on a number of existing satellite imagers and future operational imagers. Daytime observations in the band include both reflected solar and thermal emission energy. Since 3.7 micron channels are calibrated to a radiance scale (via onboard blackbodies), knowledge of the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance in the spectral region is required to infer reflectance. Despite the ubiquity of 3.7 micron channels, absolute solar spectral irradiance data comes from either a single measurement campaign (Thekaekara et al. 1969) or synthetic spectra. In this study, we compare historical 3.7 micron band spectral irradiance data sets with the recent semi-empirical solar model of the quiet-Sun by Fontenla et al. (2006). The model has expected uncertainties of about 2 % in the 3.7 pm spectral region. We find that channel-averaged spectral irradiances using the observations reported by Thekaekara et al. are 3.2-4.1% greater than those derived from the Fontenla et al. model for MODIS and AVHRR instrument bandpasses; the Kurucz spectrum (1995) as included in the MODTRAN4 distribution, gives channel-averaged irradiances 1.2-1.5 % smaller than the Fontenla model. For the MODIS instrument, these solar irradiance uncertainties result in cloud microphysical retrievals uncertainties comparable with other fundamental reflectance error sources.

  3. A comparison between weighted sum of gray and spectral CK radiation models for heat transfer calculations in furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ammouri, F.; Plessier, R.; Till, M.; Marie, B.; Djavdan, E. [Air Liquide Centre de Recherche Claude Delorme, 78 - Jouy-en-Josas (France)

    1996-12-31

    Coupled reactive fluid dynamics and radiation calculations are performed in air and oxy-fuel furnaces using two gas radiative property models. The first one is the weighted sum of gray gases model (WSGG) and the second one is the correlated-k (CK) method which is a spectral model based on the cumulative distribution function of the absorption coefficient inside a narrow band. The WSGG model, generally used in industrial configurations, is less time consuming than the CK model. However it is found that it over-predicts radiative fluxes by about 12 % in industrial furnaces. (authors) 27 refs.

  4. Imaging of acute superior mesenteric artery embolus using spectral CT in a canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhen; Xiao, Xigang; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Zhiwen; Zhang, Jin ling; Tang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of single-source dual-energy spectral CT (sDECT) imaging in an acute superior mesenteric artery embolus (SMAE) canine model. Methods: Pre-contrast and double-phase contrast-enhanced sDECT were performed before and after embolization in eight SMAE dog models. Monochromatic images of embolized intestine with the best contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were obtained and compared with the polychromatic images. CT parameters including attenuation value, iodine content, water content and thickness of the embolized intestinal segments were obtained, and normalized difference in iodine concentration (NDIC) was calculated. Results: The CNR in pre-contrast, arterial phase and portal venous phase at 4 h after embolization was 1.11 ± 1.23, 13.50 ± 1.54 and 10.63 ± 3.75, respectively, significantly higher than those of the polychromatic images (p clearly revealed the embolized intestinal segments, which were highly consistent with the gross findings. The difference in attenuation values between the embolization area and non-embolization area in the monochromatic images was 105.06 ± 35.35 HU, higher than that in the polychromatic images (p provide the optimal monochromatic images and allow increased detection rates of lesions. sDECT is a very promising tool for quantitative diagnosis of SMAE. Advances in knowledge: Our research provides more quantitative parameters for the assessment of SMAE by sDECT. PMID:26185922

  5. Bayesian regression models outperform partial least squares methods for predicting milk components and technological properties using infrared spectral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragina, A; de los Campos, G; Vazquez, A I; Cecchinato, A; Bittante, G

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of Bayesian models commonly used for genomic selection to predict "difficult-to-predict" dairy traits, such as milk fatty acid (FA) expressed as percentage of total fatty acids, and technological properties, such as fresh cheese yield and protein recovery, using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral data. Our main hypothesis was that Bayesian models that can estimate shrinkage and perform variable selection may improve our ability to predict FA traits and technological traits above and beyond what can be achieved using the current calibration models (e.g., partial least squares, PLS). To this end, we assessed a series of Bayesian methods and compared their prediction performance with that of PLS. The comparison between models was done using the same sets of data (i.e., same samples, same variability, same spectral treatment) for each trait. Data consisted of 1,264 individual milk samples collected from Brown Swiss cows for which gas chromatographic FA composition, milk coagulation properties, and cheese-yield traits were available. For each sample, 2 spectra in the infrared region from 5,011 to 925 cm(-1) were available and averaged before data analysis. Three Bayesian models: Bayesian ridge regression (Bayes RR), Bayes A, and Bayes B, and 2 reference models: PLS and modified PLS (MPLS) procedures, were used to calibrate equations for each of the traits. The Bayesian models used were implemented in the R package BGLR (http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/BGLR/index.html), whereas the PLS and MPLS were those implemented in the WinISI II software (Infrasoft International LLC, State College, PA). Prediction accuracy was estimated for each trait and model using 25 replicates of a training-testing validation procedure. Compared with PLS, which is currently the most widely used calibration method, MPLS and the 3 Bayesian methods showed significantly greater prediction accuracy. Accuracy increased in moving from

  6. Bayesian regression models outperform partial least squares methods for predicting milk components and technological properties using infrared spectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragina, A.; de los Campos, G.; Vazquez, A. I.; Cecchinato, A.; Bittante, G.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of Bayesian models commonly used for genomic selection to predict “difficult-to-predict” dairy traits, such as milk fatty acid (FA) expressed as percentage of total fatty acids, and technological properties, such as fresh cheese yield and protein recovery, using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral data. Our main hypothesis was that Bayesian models that can estimate shrinkage and perform variable selection may improve our ability to predict FA traits and technological traits above and beyond what can be achieved using the current calibration models (e.g., partial least squares, PLS). To this end, we assessed a series of Bayesian methods and compared their prediction performance with that of PLS. The comparison between models was done using the same sets of data (i.e., same samples, same variability, same spectral treatment) for each trait. Data consisted of 1,264 individual milk samples collected from Brown Swiss cows for which gas chromatographic FA composition, milk coagulation properties, and cheese-yield traits were available. For each sample, 2 spectra in the infrared region from 5,011 to 925 cm−1 were available and averaged before data analysis. Three Bayesian models: Bayesian ridge regression (Bayes RR), Bayes A, and Bayes B, and 2 reference models: PLS and modified PLS (MPLS) procedures, were used to calibrate equations for each of the traits. The Bayesian models used were implemented in the R package BGLR (http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/BGLR/index.html), whereas the PLS and MPLS were those implemented in the WinISI II software (Infrasoft International LLC, State College, PA). Prediction accuracy was estimated for each trait and model using 25 replicates of a training-testing validation procedure. Compared with PLS, which is currently the most widely used calibration method, MPLS and the 3 Bayesian methods showed significantly greater prediction accuracy. Accuracy increased in moving

  7. Test-driven modeling of embedded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Allan; Madsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To benefit maximally from model-based systems engineering (MBSE) trustworthy high quality models are required. From the software disciplines it is known that test-driven development (TDD) can significantly increase the quality of the products. Using a test-driven approach with MBSE may have...... a similar positive effect on the quality of the system models and the resulting products and may therefore be desirable. To define a test-driven model-based systems engineering (TD-MBSE) approach, we must define this approach for numerous sub disciplines such as modeling of requirements, use cases......, scenarios, behavior, architecture, etc. In this paper we present a method that utilizes the formalism of timed automatons with formal and statistical model checking techniques to apply TD-MBSE to the modeling of system architecture and behavior. The results obtained from applying it to an industrial case...

  8. Collider Tests of the Little Higgs Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Aaron T

    2002-12-16

    The little Higgs model provides an alternative to traditional candidates for new physics at the TeV scale. The new heavy gauge bosons predicted by this model should be observable at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We discuss how the LHC experiments could test the little Higgs model by studying the production and decay of these particles.

  9. Simulation of Coastal Circulation in the Eastern Mediterranean Using a Spectral Microphysics Cloud Ensemble Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khain, Alexander P.; Sednev, Igor; Khvorostyanov, V.

    1996-12-01

    The interaction of the cold season land breeze with the background flow in the Eastern Mediterranean and its influence on the climatic distribution of convective precipitation is studied using a 2D nonhydrostatic cloud ensemble model with the spectral approach in the description of cloud microphysics. The model microphysics is based on solving two kinetic equations for the size distribution functions for water droplets and ice particles. Each function is described using 33 mass categories. The model takes into account the following microphysical processes: nucleation of cloud condensation nuclei; nucleation of ice nuclei., condensational growth/evaporation of drops; growth/sublimation of ice due to accretion; freezing of droplets; melting of ice particles; and coalescence of drops, drops and ice, and ice particles themselves. The computational domain (200 km by 12 km) is covered by a finite-difference grid consisting of 129 × 31 grid points. It is shown that the model is able to reproduce wind velocity and the distribution and intensity of precipitation. Results indicate that the interaction of the winter land breeze and the background flow determine to a great extent the climatic distribution of convective-type precipitation in the Eastern Mediterranean. The background wind substantially influences both the amount and distribution of precipitation. It determines the width of the zone of convective activity and its location relative to the seashore. It is also shown that latent heat release greatly increases both the intensity of thermally induced circulation and its vertical and horizontal spreading. It is indicated that deep convection triggered by the boundary layer circulation not only increases the intensity of breeze circulation but changes the thermodynamic structure through an increase of the temperature gradients between the areas of intense convection and surrounding areas. These gradients seem to maintain the breeze front location over the sea in case

  10. Spectral Remittance and Transmittance of Visible and Infrared-A Radiation in Human Skin-Comparison Between in vivo Measurements and Model Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazena, Helmut; Meffert, Hans; Uebelhack, Ralf

    2017-05-04

    The aim of the study was to assess the interindividual variability of spectral remittance and spectral transmittance of visible and infrared-A radiations interacting with human skin and subcutaneous tissue, and direct measurements were taken in vivo using healthy persons of different skin color types. Up to wavelengths of about 900 nm, both spectral remittance and spectral transmittance depended significantly on the individual contents of melanin and hemoglobin in the skin, whereas the contents of water and lipids mainly determined spectral slopes of both characteristics of interaction for wavelengths above about 900 nm. In vivo measured data of spectral transmittance showed approximately similar decreases with tissue thickness between about 900 nm and 1100 nm as compared with model data which were calculated using spectral absorption and scattering coefficients of skin samples in vitro published by different authors. In addition, in vivo measured data and in vitro-based model calculations of spectral remittance were approximately comparable in this wavelength range. In contrast, systematic but individually varying differences between both methods were found for both spectral remittance and spectral transmittance at wavelengths below about 900 nm, where interaction of radiation was significantly affected by both melanin and hemoglobin. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Model-based testing for embedded systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zander, Justyna; Mosterman, Pieter J

    2011-01-01

    What the experts have to say about Model-Based Testing for Embedded Systems: "This book is exactly what is needed at the exact right time in this fast-growing area. From its beginnings over 10 years ago of deriving tests from UML statecharts, model-based testing has matured into a topic with both breadth and depth. Testing embedded systems is a natural application of MBT, and this book hits the nail exactly on the head. Numerous topics are presented clearly, thoroughly, and concisely in this cutting-edge book. The authors are world-class leading experts in this area and teach us well-used

  12. Mass estimation of MAXI J1659-152 during spectral and temporal analsyis with TCAF and POS models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Aslam Ali; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Santanu; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit

    2016-07-01

    The Galactic transient black hole candidate (BHC) MAXI J1659-152 showed its first X-ray outburst on 25th Spet. 2010. We make a detailed spectral and temporal study of this outburst with RXTE/PCA data. The spectral analysis was made with Two Component Advective Flow (TCAF) model fits file as an additive table model in XSPEC. While fitting spectra with TCAF, we note that model fitted normalization (N) remains almost constant (129.7 - 146.3) which lead us to calculate mass of the black hole (BH). We then refitted all the spectra with fixed normalization value of 139 (calculated from weighted averaging of the N values), and found that mass of the BH comes in the range of 4.69-7.75 M_Sun. It is to be noted that in TCAF model fits file, mass is an input parameter. We also calculted mass of the BH, with our study of the QPO frequency evolution during declining phase of the outburst with the Propagating Oscillatory Shock (POS) model. We observe that in the declining phase of the outburst the shock moves away from the black hole as the QPO frequency decreases. We obtain our best fit of QPO evolution by using mass of the BH at 6 M_Sun and acceptable fit (reduced chisq value < 1.5) for the mass range of 5.08-7.38 M_Sun, which lie within the range of mass obtained from our spectral fit. So, from the study of spectral and temporal variability of this source we conclude the probable mass range of the black hole to be 4.69 - 7.75 M_Sun.

  13. The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) and its Contributions to Space Weather Research, the Flare Energy Budget, and Instrument Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) is an empirical model of the solar irradiance spectrum from 0.1 to 190 nm at 1 nm spectral resolution and on a 1-minute time cadence. The goal of FISM is to provide accurate solar spectral irradiances over the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV: 0-200 nm) range as input for ionospheric and thermospheric models. The seminar will begin with a brief overview of the FISM model, and also how the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) will contribute to improving FISM. Some current studies will then be presented that use FISM estimations of the solar VUV irradiance to quantify the contributions of the increased irradiance from flares to Earth's increased thermospheric and ionospheric densites. Initial results will also be presented from a study looking at the electron density increases in the Martian atmosphere during a solar flare. Results will also be shown quantifying the VUV contributions to the total flare energy budget for both the impulsive and gradual phases of solar flares. Lastly, an example of how FISM can be used to simplify the design of future solar VUV irradiance instruments will be discussed, using the future NOAA GOES-R Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray Sensors (EXIS) space weather instrument.

  14. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  15. Do Test Design and Uses Influence Test Preparation? Testing a Model of Washback with Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qin; Andrews, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces Expectancy-value motivation theory to explain the paths of influences from perceptions of test design and uses to test preparation as a special case of washback on learning. Based on this theory, two conceptual models were proposed and tested via Structural Equation Modeling. Data collection involved over 870 test takers of…

  16. Modeling Reliability Growth in Accelerated Stress Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    and E. Elsayed, "A general accelerated life model for step stress testing," IIE Transactions , vol. 37, no. 11, pp. 1059-1069, 2005. [57] D. Nicholls...W. Nelson, "Accelerated Life Testing - step-stress models and data analyses," IEEE Transactions on Reliability, vol. 29, pp. 103-108, 1980. [19] G...34 IEEE Transactions on Reliability, Vols. R-26, no. 5, pp. 348-351, 1977. [35] D. E. Olsen, "Estimating reliability growth," IEEE Transactions on

  17. Modelling ties in the sign test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, J C; Best, D J

    1999-06-01

    If ties occur in the sign test, the procedure recommended by Coakley and Heise (1996, Biometrics 52, 1242-1251) is the asymptotic uniformly most powerful nonrandomised test due to Putter (1955, Annals of Mathematical Statistics 26, 368-386). It may be shown that this is a consequence of how the probability of a tie is modelled. Other models with different optimal procedures can be constructed.

  18. Analytical modeling of polarization transformation of laser radiation of various spectral ranges by birefringent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motrich, A. V.; Ushenko, O. G.

    2018-01-01

    The results of statistical dependence and correlation structures of two-dimensional Mueller matrix elements in various spectral regions of laser radiation by changes in the distribution of orientations of optical axes and birefringence of protein crystals. Namely, a two-wave ("red-blue") approach - layer of biological tissues irradiated by He-Ne laser (λ1 = 0,63μm ) and He-Cd laser (λ1 = 0,41μm )was used Conducted analysis of polarimetric sensitivity was made, a state of polarization points that contain volumetric structures of biological objects to spectral region of laser radiation was detected.

  19. Universal dispersion model for characterization of optical thin films over wide spectral range: Application to magnesium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Nečas, David; Giglia, Angelo; Franta, Pavel; Ohlídal, Ivan

    2017-11-01

    Optical characterization of magnesium fluoride thin films is performed in a wide spectral range from far infrared to extreme ultraviolet (0.01-45 eV) utilizing the universal dispersion model. Two film defects, i.e. random roughness of the upper boundaries and defect transition layer at lower boundary are taken into account. An extension of universal dispersion model consisting in expressing the excitonic contributions as linear combinations of Gaussian and truncated Lorentzian terms is introduced. The spectral dependencies of the optical constants are presented in a graphical form and by the complete set of dispersion parameters that allows generating tabulated optical constants with required range and step using a simple utility in the newAD2 software package.

  20. The quantum-chemical modeling of structure and spectral characteristics for molecular complexes in system «penton-terlon»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Tokar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The structure and spectral properties for molecular complexes, which formed by added monomer form of pentaplast as well as N-phenylbenzamide with some species of intermolecular interaction in system «penton-terlon» have been investigated at ab initio level of theory. It is shown, that the main contribution in total energy of molecules have included by dispersion forces, which realized between Chlorine atom of CH2Cl-group and Hydrogen atoms of benzene rings with amide fragment. The proposed theoretical models are validated in reflection of spectral and energetic characteristics of investigating system. Finally, the results of calculations are in good agreement with that data, which have been obtained for such type modeling previously.

  1. Torsion vehicle model test for automotive vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, M. K. Mohd; Ho, C. S.; Ma'at, N.

    2017-04-01

    Torsion vehicle model test of Simple Structural Surfaces (SSS) model for automotive vehicle sedan is proposed in this paper to demonstrate the importance of providing continuous load path within the vehicle structures. The proposed approach is relatively easy to understand as compared to Finite Element Method (FEM). The results prove that the proposed vehicle model test is capable to show that a satisfactory load paths can five a sufficient structural stiffness within the vehicle structure. It is clearly observed that the global torsion stiffness reduces significantly when only one panel is removed from the complete SSS model. The results also five a food agreement with respect to the theoretical hypothesis as the structure is less stiff in torsion in an open section condition. The SSS model and the corresponding torsion test is obviously useful to give an overview of vehicle structural integrity. It can be potentially integrated with FEM to speed up the design process of automotive vehicle.

  2. Sample Size Determination for Rasch Model Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with supplementing statistical tests for the Rasch model so that additionally to the probability of the error of the first kind (Type I probability) the probability of the error of the second kind (Type II probability) can be controlled at a predetermined level by basing the test on the appropriate number of observations.…

  3. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, Erik A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set (~ 105 galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy Hα equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M is Γ = 1.5 ± 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around Mr,0.1 = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has Mr,0.1 ~ -21) are well fit by a universal Γ ~ 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These

  4. Maintenance of quasi-stationary waves in a 2-level quasi-geostrophic spectral model with topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    The maintenance of the quasi-stationary waves obtained through numerically integrating a 2-level quasi-geostrophic spectral model on a beta-plane is investigated. An idealized topography which has only wavenumber n in the zonal direction and the first mode in the meridional direction is used to force the quasi-stationary waves. It is shown that the topographical forcing is not necessarily the mechanism for maintaining the quasi-stationary waves.

  5. A high-order 3-D spectral-element method for the forward modelling and inversion of gravimetric data—Application to the western Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roland; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Seoane, Lucia; Spangenberg, Hannah; Wang, Yi; Dufréchou, Grégory; Bonvalot, Sylvain; Bruinsma, Sean

    2017-04-01

    We image the internal density structure of the Pyrenees by inverting gravity data using an a priori density model derived by scaling a Vp model obtained by full waveform inversion of teleseismic P-waves. Gravity anomalies are computed via a 3-D high-order finite-element integration in the same high-order spectral-element grid as the one used to solve the wave equation and thus to obtain the velocity model. The curvature of the Earth and surface topography are taken into account in order to obtain a density model as accurate as possible. The method is validated through comparisons with exact semi-analytical solutions. We show that the spectral-element method drastically accelerates the computations when compared to other more classical methods. Different scaling relations between compressional velocity and density are tested, and the Nafe-Drake relation is the one that leads to the best agreement between computed and observed gravity anomalies. Gravity data inversion is then performed and the results allow us to put more constraints on the density structure of the shallow crust and on the deep architecture of the mountain range.

  6. Removing an intersubject variance component in a general linear model improves multiway factoring of event-related spectral perturbations in group EEG studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Jeffrey S; Brier, Matthew R; Hart, John; Ferree, Thomas C

    2013-03-01

    Linear statistical models are used very effectively to assess task-related differences in EEG power spectral analyses. Mixed models, in particular, accommodate more than one variance component in a multisubject study, where many trials of each condition of interest are measured on each subject. Generally, intra- and intersubject variances are both important to determine correct standard errors for inference on functions of model parameters, but it is often assumed that intersubject variance is the most important consideration in a group study. In this article, we show that, under common assumptions, estimates of some functions of model parameters, including estimates of task-related differences, are properly tested relative to the intrasubject variance component only. A substantial gain in statistical power can arise from the proper separation of variance components when there is more than one source of variability. We first develop this result analytically, then show how it benefits a multiway factoring of spectral, spatial, and temporal components from EEG data acquired in a group of healthy subjects performing a well-studied response inhibition task. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Modeling answer changes on test items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.

    2012-01-01

    The probability of test takers changing answers upon review of their initial choices is modeled. The primary purpose of the model is to check erasures on answer sheets recorded by an optical scanner for numbers and patterns that may be indicative of irregular behavior, such as teachers or school

  8. Modelling and Testing of Friction in Forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge about friction is still limited in forging. The theoretical models applied presently for process analysis are not satisfactory compared to the advanced and detailed studies possible to carry out by plastic FEM analyses and more refined models have to be based on experimental testing...

  9. Solitons of shallow-water models from energy-dependent spectral problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlin, Jack; Lyons, Tony

    2018-01-01

    The current work investigates the soliton solutions of the Kaup-Boussinesq equation using the inverse scattering transform method. We outline the construction of the Riemann-Hilbert problem for a pair of energy-dependent spectral problems for the system, which we then use to construct the solution of this hydrodynamic system.

  10. A high-order spatial filter for a cubed-sphere spectral element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Gyu; Cheong, Hyeong-Bin

    2017-04-01

    A high-order spatial filter is developed for the spectral-element-method dynamical core on the cubed-sphere grid which employs the Gauss-Lobatto Lagrange interpolating polynomials (GLLIP) as orthogonal basis functions. The filter equation is the high-order Helmholtz equation which corresponds to the implicit time-differencing of a diffusion equation employing the high-order Laplacian. The Laplacian operator is discretized within a cell which is a building block of the cubed sphere grid and consists of the Gauss-Lobatto grid. When discretizing a high-order Laplacian, due to the requirement of C0 continuity along the cell boundaries the grid-points in neighboring cells should be used for the target cell: The number of neighboring cells is nearly quadratically proportional to the filter order. Discrete Helmholtz equation yields a huge-sized and highly sparse matrix equation whose size is N*N with N the number of total grid points on the globe. The number of nonzero entries is also almost in quadratic proportion to the filter order. Filtering is accomplished by solving the huge-matrix equation. While requiring a significant computing time, the solution of global matrix provides the filtered field free of discontinuity along the cell boundaries. To achieve the computational efficiency and the accuracy at the same time, the solution of the matrix equation was obtained by only accounting for the finite number of adjacent cells. This is called as a local-domain filter. It was shown that to remove the numerical noise near the grid-scale, inclusion of 5*5 cells for the local-domain filter was found sufficient, giving the same accuracy as that obtained by global domain solution while reducing the computing time to a considerably lower level. The high-order filter was evaluated using the standard test cases including the baroclinic instability of the zonal flow. Results indicated that the filter performs better on the removal of grid-scale numerical noises than the explicit

  11. Modeling and Testing Legacy Data Consistency Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nytun, J. P.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    . This paper addresses the need for new techniques that enable the modeling and consistency checking for legacy data sources. Specifically, the paper contributes to the development of a framework that enables consistency testing of data coming from different types of data sources. The vehicle is UML and its...... accompanying XMI. The paper presents techniques for modeling consistency requirements using OCL and other UML modeling elements: it studies how models that describe the required consistencies among instances of legacy models can be designed in standard UML tools that support XMI. The paper also considers...

  12. A wave model test bed study for wave energy resource characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Neary, Vincent S.; Wang, Taiping; Gunawan, Budi; Dallman, Annie R.; Wu, Wei-Cheng

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a test bed study conducted to evaluate best practices in wave modeling to characterize energy resources. The model test bed off the central Oregon Coast was selected because of the high wave energy and available measured data at the site. Two third-generation spectral wave models, SWAN and WWIII, were evaluated. A four-level nested-grid approach—from global to test bed scale—was employed. Model skills were assessed using a set of model performance metrics based on comparing six simulated wave resource parameters to observations from a wave buoy inside the test bed. Both WWIII and SWAN performed well at the test bed site and exhibited similar modeling skills. The ST4 package with WWIII, which represents better physics for wave growth and dissipation, out-performed ST2 physics and improved wave power density and significant wave height predictions. However, ST4 physics tended to overpredict the wave energy period. The newly developed ST6 physics did not improve the overall model skill for predicting the six wave resource parameters. Sensitivity analysis using different wave frequencies and direction resolutions indicated the model results were not sensitive to spectral resolutions at the test bed site, likely due to the absence of complex bathymetric and geometric features.

  13. The spatial sensitivity of the spectral diversity-biodiversity relationship: an experimental test in a prairie grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Gamon, John A; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Townsend, Philip A; Zygielbaum, Arthur I

    2017-12-21

    Remote sensing has been used to detect plant biodiversity in a range of ecosystems based on the varying spectral properties of different species or functional groups. However, the most appropriate spatial resolution necessary to detect diversity remains unclear. At coarse resolution, differences among spectral patterns may be too weak to detect. In contrast, at fine resolution, redundant information may be introduced. To explore the effect of spatial resolution, we studied the scale dependence of spectral diversity in a prairie ecosystem experiment at Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve, Minnesota, USA. Our study involved a scaling exercise comparing synthetic pixels resampled from high-resolution images within manipulated diversity treatments. Hyperspectral data were collected using several instruments on both ground and airborne platforms. We used the coefficient of variation (CV) of spectral reflectance in space as the indicator of spectral diversity and then compared CV at different scales ranging from 1 mm 2 to 1 m 2 to conventional biodiversity metrics, including species richness, Shannon's index, Simpson's index, phylogenetic species variation, and phylogenetic species evenness. In this study, higher species richness plots generally had higher CV. CV showed higher correlations with Shannon's index and Simpson's index than did species richness alone, indicating evenness contributed to the spectral diversity. Correlations with species richness and Simpson's index were generally higher than with phylogenetic species variation and evenness measured at comparable spatial scales, indicating weaker relationships between spectral diversity and phylogenetic diversity metrics than with species diversity metrics. High resolution imaging spectrometer data (1 mm 2 pixels) showed the highest sensitivity to diversity level. With decreasing spatial resolution, the difference in CV between diversity levels decreased and greatly reduced the optical detectability of

  14. Spectral-Lagrangian methods for collisional models of non-equilibrium statistical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Irene M.; Tharkabhushanam, Sri Harsha

    2009-04-01

    We propose a new spectral Lagrangian based deterministic solver for the non-linear Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) in d-dimensions for variable hard sphere (VHS) collision kernels with conservative or non-conservative binary interactions. The method is based on symmetries of the Fourier transform of the collision integral, where the complexity in its computation is reduced to a separate integral over the unit sphere S. The conservation of moments is enforced by Lagrangian constraints. The resulting scheme, implemented in free space, is very versatile and adjusts in a very simple manner to several cases that involve energy dissipation due to local micro-reversibility (inelastic interactions) or elastic models of slowing down process. Our simulations are benchmarked with available exact self-similar solutions, exact moment equations and analytical estimates for the homogeneous Boltzmann equation, both for elastic and inelastic VHS interactions. Benchmarking of the simulations involves the selection of a time self-similar rescaling of the numerical distribution function which is performed using the continuous spectrum of the equation for Maxwell molecules as studied first in Bobylev et al. [A.V. Bobylev, C. Cercignani, G. Toscani, Proof of an asymptotic property of self-similar solutions of the Boltzmann equation for granular materials, Journal of Statistical Physics 111 (2003) 403-417] and generalized to a wide range of related models in Bobylev et al. [A.V. Bobylev, C. Cercignani, I.M. Gamba, On the self-similar asymptotics for generalized non-linear kinetic Maxwell models, Communication in Mathematical Physics, in press. URL: ]. The method also produces accurate results in the case of inelastic diffusive Boltzmann equations for hard spheres (inelastic collisions under thermal bath), where overpopulated non-Gaussian exponential tails have been conjectured in computations by stochastic methods [T.V. Noije, M. Ernst, Velocity distributions in homogeneously cooling

  15. Specific heat of a localized magnetic impurity in a non-magnetic host: A spectral density method for the Anderson–Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, Ch. Narasimha; Chatterjee, Ashok, E-mail: acsp@uohyd.ernet.in

    2015-10-01

    The effect of electron–phonon interaction on the spectral function of a magnetic impurity in a non-magnetic host metal is studied within the framework of the Anderson–Holstein model using a spectral density method. The impurity contribution to the specific heat of the host metal is also calculated.

  16. Specific heat of a localized magnetic impurity in a non-magnetic host: A spectral density method for the Anderson-Holstein model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ch. Narasimha; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-10-01

    The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the spectral function of a magnetic impurity in a non-magnetic host metal is studied within the framework of the Anderson-Holstein model using a spectral density method. The impurity contribution to the specific heat of the host metal is also calculated.

  17. Coupling of WRF meteorological model to WAM spectral wave model through sea surface roughness at the Balearic Sea: impact on wind and wave forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosana-Delgado, R.; Soret, A.; Jorba, O.; Baldasano, J. M.; Sánchez-Arcilla, A.

    2012-04-01

    Meteorological models, like WRF, usually describe the earth surface characteristics by tables that are function of land-use. The roughness length (z0) is an example of such approach. However, over sea z0 is modeled by the Charnock (1955) relation, linking the surface friction velocity u*2 with the roughness length z0 of turbulent air flow, z0 = α-u2* g The Charnock coefficient α may be considered a measure of roughness. For the sea surface, WRF considers a constant roughness α = 0.0185. However, there is evidence that sea surface roughness should depend on wave energy (Donelan, 1982). Spectral wave models like WAM, model the evolution and propagation of wave energy as a function of wind, and include a richer sea surface roughness description. Coupling WRF and WAM is thus a common way to improve the sea surface roughness description of WRF. WAM is a third generation wave model, solving the equation of advection of wave energy subject to input/output terms of: wind growth, energy dissipation and resonant non-linear wave-wave interactions. Third generation models work on the spectral domain. WAM considers the Charnock coefficient α a complex yet known function of the total wind input term, which depends on the wind velocity and on the Charnock coefficient again. This is solved iteratively (Janssen et al., 1990). Coupling of meteorological and wave models through a common Charnock coefficient is operationally done in medium-range met forecasting systems (e.g., at ECMWF) though the impact of coupling for smaller domains is not yet clearly assessed (Warner et al, 2010). It is unclear to which extent the additional effort of coupling improves the local wind and wave fields, in comparison to the effects of other factors, like e.g. a better bathymetry and relief resolution, or a better circulation information which might have its influence on local-scale meteorological processes (local wind jets, local convection, daily marine wind regimes, etc.). This work, within the

  18. ANÁLISIS ESPECTRAL DE OLAS MARINAS: MODELOS UNIVARIADOS // SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF WAVE SEA: UNIVARIATE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor Escudero Mora

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available El análisis espectral, es el proceso técnico de la descomposición de una señal compleja en partes más simples. Muchos procesos físicos se describen mejor como una suma de muchas componentes de frecuencias individuales, alternativamente una señal puede dividirse en segmentos cortos y el análisis del espectro puede aplicarse a estos segmentos individuales. Desde el punto de vista del estudio de olas marinas, el espectro juega un rol fundamental y es interpretado como la energía presente en la serie de tiempo durante el periodo. Este estudio se basa en el análisis del espectro asociado a datos del mar del Norte en el ano de 1999 en la plataforma North Alwyn almacenados en la Universidad Heriot-Watt de Edimburgo, separados en periodos de 20 minutos, el total a estudiar son 244 periodos. Para ello, se determinó que existe información que no aporta al problema, representa ruido y es el 3% de la energía, la cual no fue tomada para el estudio. Se dividió el espectro en 12 subintervalos y se ajustaron modelos autorregresivos bajo el esquema de Box-Jenskin and Reinsel, estudiados estos hasta encontrar la mejor aproximación posible para cada subintervalo mediante las propiedades estadísticas obtenidas por cada modelo, junto con los pronósticos respectivos. // ABSTRACT: Spectral analysis is the technical process of a complex signal decomposition into simpler parts. Many physical processes are better described as a sum of many individual frequency components; alternatively a signal can be divided into short segments and the spectrum analysis can be applied to these individual segments. From the point of view of the study of Waves Sea, the spectrum plays a vital role and it is interpreted as the energy in the time series during the period. This study is based on analysis of the spectrum associated to data from the North Sea in the year of 1999, taken in North Alwyn platform, stored in the Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, separated in

  19. Observation-Based Modeling for Model-Based Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanstrén, T.; Piel, E.; Gross, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    One of the single most important reasons that modeling and modelbased testing are not yet common practice in industry is the perceived difficulty of making the models up to the level of detail and quality required for their automated processing. Models unleash their full potential only through

  20. A unified spectral variation model for Seyfert 1 Galaxies observed with NuSTAR and XMM/Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisawa, K.; Kusunoki, E.; Mizumoto, M.; Sameshima, H.

    2017-10-01

    NuSTAR satellite was launched in 2012 and high-quality energy spectra of Seyfert 1 galaxies above ˜ 10 keV have been made available for the first time. In this paper, we analyze archival data of the NuSTAR and XMM/Suzaku simultaneous observations of particularly variable Seyfert 1 galaxies, MCG-6-30-15, NGC 4593, NGC 1365, Swift J2127.4+5654 and MCG-5-23-16. Our aim is to construct a unified spectral model that explains spectral variations in 0.2-78 keV with minimum free parameters. Consequently, we were successful to explain observed spectral variations of all the five sources at timescales below ˜ 1 day with only two independently variable parameters; partial covering fraction and normalization of the power-law component. In this model, the continuum is composed of disk-black body component, cut-off power-law component, and thin-thermal plasma component, if any. The central X-ray source is fully or partially absorbed by ionized absorbers, and the partial covering fraction is significantly variable. Variations of the partial covering fraction and the power-law normalization mostly explain the soft X-ray variation below ˜ 10 keV and the hard X-ray variations above ˜ 10 keV, respectively. The variable partial absorbers are composed of two layers with different ionization states/column densities.

  1. Spectral multi-energy CT texture analysis with machine learning for tissue classification: an investigation using classification of benign parotid tumours as a testing paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ajmi, Eiman; Forghani, Behzad; Reinhold, Caroline; Bayat, Maryam; Forghani, Reza

    2018-01-02

    There is a rich amount of quantitative information in spectral datasets generated from dual-energy CT (DECT). In this study, we compare the performance of texture analysis performed on multi-energy datasets to that of virtual monochromatic images (VMIs) at 65 keV only, using classification of the two most common benign parotid neoplasms as a testing paradigm. Forty-two patients with pathologically proven Warthin tumour (n = 25) or pleomorphic adenoma (n = 17) were evaluated. Texture analysis was performed on VMIs ranging from 40 to 140 keV in 5-keV increments (multi-energy analysis) or 65-keV VMIs only, which is typically considered equivalent to single-energy CT. Random forest (RF) models were constructed for outcome prediction using separate randomly selected training and testing sets or the entire patient set. Using multi-energy texture analysis, tumour classification in the independent testing set had accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 92%, 86%, 100%, 100%, and 83%, compared to 75%, 57%, 100%, 100%, and 63%, respectively, for single-energy analysis. Multi-energy texture analysis demonstrates superior performance compared to single-energy texture analysis of VMIs at 65 keV for classification of benign parotid tumours. • We present and validate a paradigm for texture analysis of DECT scans. • Multi-energy dataset texture analysis is superior to single-energy dataset texture analysis. • DECT texture analysis has high accura\\cy for diagnosis of benign parotid tumours. • DECT texture analysis with machine learning can enhance non-invasive diagnostic tumour evaluation.

  2. Understanding the interplay between charge, spin and phonons in the spectral properties of the 1D Hubbard-Holstein model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanieh-Ha, Mohammad; Nocera, Alberto; Feiguin, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    We present an analytical construction to calculate the spectral functions of the Hubbard-Holstein model in the limit of strong electron-phonon coupling, and in the limit of U --> ∞ . We argue that in this limit, the phonons only couple to the charge, and not the spin. The resulting spectral function can be understood as a convolution of three contributions, originating from the charge, the spin, and the phonons, in a similar fashion as the large U limit of the Hubbard chain. We support the analytical results with extensive Density Matrix Renormalization Group simulations. We recognize and interpret the signatures of the three contributions in the final spectrum and we discuss their experimental implications.

  3. Molecular Sieve Bench Testing and Computer Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; DaLee, Robert C.; Blackmon, James B.

    1995-01-01

    The design of an efficient four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) CO2 removal system for the International Space Station depends on many mission parameters, such as duration, crew size, cost of power, volume, fluid interface properties, etc. A need for space vehicle CO2 removal system models capable of accurately performing extrapolated hardware predictions is inevitable due to the change of the parameters which influences the CO2 removal system capacity. The purpose is to investigate the mathematical techniques required for a model capable of accurate extrapolated performance predictions and to obtain test data required to estimate mass transfer coefficients and verify the computer model. Models have been developed to demonstrate that the finite difference technique can be successfully applied to sorbents and conditions used in spacecraft CO2 removal systems. The nonisothermal, axially dispersed, plug flow model with linear driving force for 5X sorbent and pore diffusion for silica gel are then applied to test data. A more complex model, a non-darcian model (two dimensional), has also been developed for simulation of the test data. This model takes into account the channeling effect on column breakthrough. Four FORTRAN computer programs are presented: a two-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a one-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a model of thermal vacuum desorption; and a model of a tri-sectional packed bed with two different sorbent materials. The programs are capable of simulating up to four gas constituents for each process, which can be increased with a few minor changes.

  4. Radiation from an equilibrium CO{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasma in the [250-850 nm] spectral region: II. Spectral modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M Lino da [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Vacher, D; Andre, P; Faure, G [Laboratoire Arc Electrique et Plasmas Thermiques, CNRS, UMR 6069, 24 Avenue des Landais, F63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Dudeck, M [Laboratoire d' Aerothermique, CNRS, 1C Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)], E-mail: mlinodasilva@mail.ist.utl.pt

    2008-08-01

    In the first part of this work, described in a previous paper, the thermodynamic conditions in an atmospheric pressure inductively coupled CO{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasma have been determined, and the radiation emission spectrum has been measured and calibrated in the [250-850 nm] spectral region. In the second part of this work, a synthetic radiation spectrum is obtained taking into account (a) the geometry of the plasma torch and (b) the local thermodynamic conditions of the plasma. This synthetic spectrum has then been compared against the measured spectrum. The good agreement between the two spectra allows validating the spectral database of the line-by-line code SPARTAN for the simulation of the radiative emission of CO{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasmas from the near-UV to the near-IR spectral region.

  5. A 'Turing' Test for Landscape Evolution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, A. J.; Wise, S. M.; Wainwright, J.; Swift, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Resolving the interactions among tectonics, climate and surface processes at long timescales has benefited from the development of computer models of landscape evolution. However, testing these Landscape Evolution Models (LEMs) has been piecemeal and partial. We argue that a more systematic approach is required. What is needed is a test that will establish how 'realistic' an LEM is and thus the extent to which its predictions may be trusted. We propose a test based upon the Turing Test of artificial intelligence as a way forward. In 1950 Alan Turing posed the question of whether a machine could think. Rather than attempt to address the question directly he proposed a test in which an interrogator asked questions of a person and a machine, with no means of telling which was which. If the machine's answer could not be distinguished from those of the human, the machine could be said to demonstrate artificial intelligence. By analogy, if an LEM cannot be distinguished from a real landscape it can be deemed to be realistic. The Turing test of intelligence is a test of the way in which a computer behaves. The analogy in the case of an LEM is that it should show realistic behaviour in terms of form and process, both at a given moment in time (punctual) and in the way both form and process evolve over time (dynamic). For some of these behaviours, tests already exist. For example there are numerous morphometric tests of punctual form and measurements of punctual process. The test discussed in this paper provides new ways of assessing dynamic behaviour of an LEM over realistically long timescales. However challenges remain in developing an appropriate suite of challenging tests, in applying these tests to current LEMs and in developing LEMs that pass them.

  6. SPECIES-SPECIFIC FOREST VARIABLE ESTIMATION USING NON-PARAMETRIC MODELING OF MULTI-SPECTRAL PHOTOGRAMMETRIC POINT CLOUD DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bohlin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent development in software for automatic photogrammetric processing of multispectral aerial imagery, and the growing nation-wide availability of Digital Elevation Model (DEM data, are about to revolutionize data capture for forest management planning in Scandinavia. Using only already available aerial imagery and ALS-assessed DEM data, raster estimates of the forest variables mean tree height, basal area, total stem volume, and species-specific stem volumes were produced and evaluated. The study was conducted at a coniferous hemi-boreal test site in southern Sweden (lat. 58° N, long. 13° E. Digital aerial images from the Zeiss/Intergraph Digital Mapping Camera system were used to produce 3D point-cloud data with spectral information. Metrics were calculated for 696 field plots (10 m radius from point-cloud data and used in k-MSN to estimate forest variables. For these stands, the tree height ranged from 1.4 to 33.0 m (18.1 m mean, stem volume from 0 to 829 m3 ha-1 (249 m3 ha-1 mean and basal area from 0 to 62.2 m2 ha-1 (26.1 m2 ha-1 mean, with mean stand size of 2.8 ha. Estimates made using digital aerial images corresponding to the standard acquisition of the Swedish National Land Survey (Lantmäteriet showed RMSEs (in percent of the surveyed stand mean of 7.5% for tree height, 11.4% for basal area, 13.2% for total stem volume, 90.6% for pine stem volume, 26.4 for spruce stem volume, and 72.6% for deciduous stem volume. The results imply that photogrammetric matching of digital aerial images has significant potential for operational use in forestry.

  7. Drug progression model: a social control test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, A C; Bahr, S J

    1995-09-01

    A social control drug progression model was delineated and tested using a sample of 2,626 high school students from the southwestern United States. Along with the social control constructs of parental attachment, educational attachment, religious attachment, and conventional values, we incorporated alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use into the model as intervening variables. The model explains 39% of the variation in the self-reported amphetamine use and 24% of the variation in "hard drug" use (cocaine, heroin, LSD, and PCP). The findings suggest that the integration of social control theory and drug progression improves the predictive power of the model of adolescent drug use.

  8. Soot and Spectral Radiation Modeling in ECN Spray A and in Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Roy, Somesh P [Marquette University (United States); Modest, Michael F [University of California Merced (United States); Ge, Wenjun [University of California Merced (United States)

    2017-04-03

    The amount of soot formed in a turbulent combustion system is determined by a complex system of coupled nonlinear chemical and physical processes. Different physical subprocesses can dominate, depending on the hydrodynamic and thermochemical environments. Similarly, the relative importance of reabsorption, spectral radiation properties, and molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation varies with thermochemical conditions, and in ways that are difficult to predict for the highly nonhomogeneous in-cylinder mixtures in engines. Here it is shown that transport and mixing play relatively more important roles as rate-determining processes in soot formation at engine-relevant conditions. It is also shown that molecular gas radiation and spectral radiation properties are important for engine-relevant conditions.

  9. Modeling and adapting production environmental stress testing

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Simon

    2009-01-01

    PUBLISHED This study describes the production sampling environmental stress test (PSEST) process and the offline analysis conducted. Some of the key characteristics and parameters of the test are outlined. The analytical process is based on two types of regression model, each of which links a dependent variable (the log of time to failure in each dwell, or the log of the number failed in each dwell) to independent variables such as temperature and age. These two types of regres...

  10. Experimental Concepts for Testing Seismic Hazard Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, W.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic hazard analysis is the primary interface through which useful information about earthquake rupture and wave propagation is delivered to society. To account for the randomness (aleatory variability) and limited knowledge (epistemic uncertainty) of these natural processes, seismologists must formulate and test hazard models using the concepts of probability. In this presentation, we will address the scientific objections that have been raised over the years against probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Owing to the paucity of observations, we must rely on expert opinion to quantify the epistemic uncertainties of PSHA models (e.g., in the weighting of individual models from logic-tree ensembles of plausible models). The main theoretical issue is a frequentist critique: subjectivity is immeasurable; ergo, PSHA models cannot be objectively tested against data; ergo, they are fundamentally unscientific. We have argued (PNAS, 111, 11973-11978) that the Bayesian subjectivity required for casting epistemic uncertainties can be bridged with the frequentist objectivity needed for pure significance testing through "experimental concepts." An experimental concept specifies collections of data, observed and not yet observed, that are judged to be exchangeable (i.e., with a joint distribution independent of the data ordering) when conditioned on a set of explanatory variables. We illustrate, through concrete examples, experimental concepts useful in the testing of PSHA models for ontological errors in the presence of aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty. In particular, we describe experimental concepts that lead to exchangeable binary sequences that are statistically independent but not identically distributed, showing how the Bayesian concept of exchangeability generalizes the frequentist concept of experimental repeatability. We also address the issue of testing PSHA models using spatially correlated data.

  11. Design, modeling and testing of data converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kiaei, Sayfe; Xu, Fang

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the a scientific discussion of the state-of-the-art techniques and designs for modeling, testing and for the performance analysis of data converters. The focus is put on sustainable data conversion. Sustainability has become a public issue that industries and users can not ignore. Devising environmentally friendly solutions for data conversion designing, modeling and testing is nowadays a requirement that researchers and practitioners must consider in their activities. This book presents the outcome of the IWADC workshop 2011, held in Orvieto, Italy.

  12. Damage modeling in Small Punch Test specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Cuesta, I.I.; Peñuelas, I.

    2016-01-01

    Ductile damage modeling within the Small Punch Test (SPT) is extensively investigated. The capabilities ofthe SPT to reliably estimate fracture and damage properties are thoroughly discussed and emphasis isplaced on the use of notched specimens. First, different notch profiles are analyzed....... Furthermore,Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model predictions from a top-down approach are employed to gain insightinto the mechanisms governing crack initiation and subsequent propagation in small punch experiments.An accurate assessment of micromechanical toughness parameters from the SPT...

  13. Application of a Spectral Wave Model to Assess Breakwater Configurations at a Small Craft Harbour on Lake Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia H. Cooper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A surface wave model using three nested grids is applied to the eastern end of Lake Ontario to investigate wave propagation from an open lake environment to a small craft harbour protected by a breakwater. The Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN spectral wave model, coupled with the Delft3D hydrodynamic model, is applied to simulate a series of storms in November, 2013. The model results are compared to observations from two pressure sensors, and used to quantify wave properties around existing and future breakwaters to evaluate the bulk changes to the harbour configuration. Overall, the results indicate that the rubblemound breakwater reduces wave heights in the existing harbour by 63% compared to no breakwater, and that the addition of a surface breakwater extension could reduce wave heights by an additional 54%. Wave height attenuation was found to be highly dependent on the incident wave direction relative to breakwater orientation. The spectral wave model is useful for simulating wave transformation for broad directional spectra in wind-sea conditions over large scales to semi-protected areas such as small craft harbours.

  14. Uncertain viscoelastic models with fractional order: A new spectral tau method to study the numerical simulations of the solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, A.; Ismail, F.; Salahshour, S.; Baleanu, D.; Ghaemi, F.

    2017-12-01

    The analysis of the behaviors of physical phenomena is important to discover significant features of the character and the structure of mathematical models. Frequently the unknown parameters involve in the models are assumed to be unvarying over time. In reality, some of them are uncertain and implicitly depend on several factors. In this study, to consider such uncertainty in variables of the models, they are characterized based on the fuzzy notion. We propose here a new model based on fractional calculus to deal with the Kelvin-Voigt (KV) equation and non-Newtonian fluid behavior model with fuzzy parameters. A new and accurate numerical algorithm using a spectral tau technique based on the generalized fractional Legendre polynomials (GFLPs) is developed to solve those problems under uncertainty. Numerical simulations are carried out and the analysis of the results highlights the significant features of the new technique in comparison with the previous findings. A detailed error analysis is also carried out and discussed.

  15. Spectral signature verification using statistical analysis and text mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoster, Mallory E.; Firpi, Alexe H.; Jacobs, Samantha K.; Cone, Shelli R.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the spectral science community, numerous spectral signatures are stored in databases representative of many sample materials collected from a variety of spectrometers and spectroscopists. Due to the variety and variability of the spectra that comprise many spectral databases, it is necessary to establish a metric for validating the quality of spectral signatures. This has been an area of great discussion and debate in the spectral science community. This paper discusses a method that independently validates two different aspects of a spectral signature to arrive at a final qualitative assessment; the textual meta-data and numerical spectral data. Results associated with the spectral data stored in the Signature Database1 (SigDB) are proposed. The numerical data comprising a sample material's spectrum is validated based on statistical properties derived from an ideal population set. The quality of the test spectrum is ranked based on a spectral angle mapper (SAM) comparison to the mean spectrum derived from the population set. Additionally, the contextual data of a test spectrum is qualitatively analyzed using lexical analysis text mining. This technique analyzes to understand the syntax of the meta-data to provide local learning patterns and trends within the spectral data, indicative of the test spectrum's quality. Text mining applications have successfully been implemented for security2 (text encryption/decryption), biomedical3 , and marketing4 applications. The text mining lexical analysis algorithm is trained on the meta-data patterns of a subset of high and low quality spectra, in order to have a model to apply to the entire SigDB data set. The statistical and textual methods combine to assess the quality of a test spectrum existing in a database without the need of an expert user. This method has been compared to other validation methods accepted by the spectral science community, and has provided promising results when a baseline spectral signature is

  16. Spectral Unmixing Modeling of the Aristarchus Pyroclastic Deposit: Assessing Eruptive History and Exploration Potential of Glass-Rich Regional Lunar Pyroclastic Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawin, E. R.; Head, J. W.; Cannon, K. M.

    2017-10-01

    Spectral modeling of the Aristarchus pyroclastic deposit shows that the Moon's largest explosive volcanic deposit is rich in high-titanium volcanic glass. This lunar pyroclastic deposit is of importance for both scientific and exploration purposes.

  17. Testing spatial heterogeneity with stock assessment models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jardim, Ernesto; Eero, Margit; Silva, Alexandra

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that combines meta-population theory and stock assessment models to gain insights about spatial heterogeneity of the meta-population in an operational time frame. The methodology was tested with stochastic simulations for different degrees of connectivity betwee...

  18. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R

    2015-11-22

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg(-1)) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maino, James L.; Kearney, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg−1) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes. PMID:26609084

  20. The spectral shift function and spectral flow

    OpenAIRE

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A.L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends Krein's spectral shift function theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples. We define the spectral shift function under these hypotheses via Birman-Solomyak spectral averaging formula and show that it computes spectral flow.

  1. Energy Harvest Predictions for a Spectrally Tuned Multiple Quantum Well Device Utilising Measured and Modelled Solar Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, Alison; Norton, Matthew; Georghiou, George E.; Lumb, Matthew; Tibbits, Tom N. D.

    2011-12-01

    We present a comparison between modelled and measured solar spectra in Nicosia, Cyprus. The modelled spectra were generated using the SMARTS model, driven by various sources of measured atmospheric data, updated every 30 minutes or less. A comparison with measured spectra reveals the most reliable source of data for that location and period. The spectral simulations demonstrate that both aerosol optical depth and precipitable water content must be accurately known at the location of interest in order to realistically recreate the shape and power of measured spectra accurately. Energy harvest calculations of four triple junction (3J) solar cell designs were performed using the simulated spectra. The model predicts a 5.7% increase in energy harvest when multiple quantum wells are included in a standard 3J device. Simple modifications made to the quantum well device to `tune' the cell to the incident spectra result in a 6.3% increase in predicted energy production over the standard 3J device.

  2. Increasing the Accuracy of Mapping Urban Forest Carbon Density by Combining Spatial Modeling and Spectral Unmixing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Sun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurately mapping urban vegetation carbon density is challenging because of complex landscapes and mixed pixels. In this study, a novel methodology was proposed that combines a linear spectral unmixing analysis (LSUA with a linear stepwise regression (LSR, a logistic model-based stepwise regression (LMSR and k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN, to map the forest carbon density of Shenzhen City of China, using Landsat 8 imagery and sample plot data collected in 2014. The independent variables that contributed to statistically significantly improving the fit of a model to data and reducing the sum of squared errors were first selected from a total of 284 spectral variables derived from the image bands. The vegetation fraction from LSUA was then added as an independent variable. The results obtained using cross-validation showed that: (1 Compared to the methods without the vegetation information, adding the vegetation fraction increased the accuracy of mapping carbon density by 1%–9.3%; (2 As the observed values increased, the LSR and kNN residuals showed overestimates and underestimates for the smaller and larger observations, respectively, while LMSR improved the systematical over and underestimations; (3 LSR resulted in illogically negative and unreasonably large estimates, while KNN produced the greatest values of root mean square error (RMSE. The results indicate that combining the spatial modeling method LMSR and the spectral unmixing analysis LUSA, coupled with Landsat imagery, is most promising for increasing the accuracy of urban forest carbon density maps. In addition, this method has considerable potential for accurate, rapid and nondestructive prediction of urban and peri-urban forest carbon stocks with an acceptable level of error and low cost.

  3. BEYOND THE STANDARD MODEL OF THE DISC–LINE SPECTRAL PROFILES FROM BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjaceslav Sochora

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The strong gravitational field of a black hole has distinct effects on the observed profile of a spectral line from an accretion disc near a black hole. The observed profile of the spectral line is broadened and skewed by a fast orbital motion and redshifted by a gravitational field. These effects can help us to constrain the parameters of a system with a black hole, both in active galactic nuclei and in a stellar-mass black hole. Here we explore the fact that an accretion disc emission can be mathematically imagined as a superposition of radiating accretion rings that extend from the inner edge to the outer rim of the disc, with some radially varying emissivity. In our work, we show that a characteristic double-horn profile of several radially confined (relatively narrow accretion rings or belts could be recognized by the planned instruments onboard future satellites (such as the proposed ESA Large Observatory for X-ray Timing.

  4. Parametric Testing of Launch Vehicle FDDR Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Johann; Bajwa, Anupa; Berg, Peter; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2011-01-01

    For the safe operation of a complex system like a (manned) launch vehicle, real-time information about the state of the system and potential faults is extremely important. The on-board FDDR (Failure Detection, Diagnostics, and Response) system is a software system to detect and identify failures, provide real-time diagnostics, and to initiate fault recovery and mitigation. The ERIS (Evaluation of Rocket Integrated Subsystems) failure simulation is a unified Matlab/Simulink model of the Ares I Launch Vehicle with modular, hierarchical subsystems and components. With this model, the nominal flight performance characteristics can be studied. Additionally, failures can be injected to see their effects on vehicle state and on vehicle behavior. A comprehensive test and analysis of such a complicated model is virtually impossible. In this paper, we will describe, how parametric testing (PT) can be used to support testing and analysis of the ERIS failure simulation. PT uses a combination of Monte Carlo techniques with n-factor combinatorial exploration to generate a small, yet comprehensive set of parameters for the test runs. For the analysis of the high-dimensional simulation data, we are using multivariate clustering to automatically find structure in this high-dimensional data space. Our tools can generate detailed HTML reports that facilitate the analysis.

  5. Effect of random surface inhomogeneities on spectral properties of dielectric-disk microresonators: theory and modeling at millimeter wave range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapolskii, E M; Eremenko, Z E; Tarasov, Yu V

    2009-04-01

    The influence of random axially homogeneous surface roughness on spectral properties of dielectric resonators of circular disk form is studied both theoretically and experimentally. To solve the equations governing the dynamics of electromagnetic fields, the method of eigenmode separation is applied previously developed with reference to inhomogeneous systems subject to arbitrary external static potential. We prove theoretically that it is the gradient mechanism of wave-surface scattering that is highly responsible for nondissipative loss in the resonator. The influence of side-boundary inhomogeneities on the resonator spectrum is shown to be described in terms of effective renormalization of mode wave numbers jointly with azimuth indices in the characteristic equation. To study experimentally the effect of inhomogeneities on the resonator spectrum, the method of modeling in the millimeter wave range is applied. As a model object, we use a dielectric disk resonator (DDR) fitted with external inhomogeneities randomly arranged at its side boundary. Experimental results show good agreement with theoretical predictions as regards the predominance of the gradient scattering mechanism. It is shown theoretically and confirmed in the experiment that TM oscillations in the DDR are less affected by surface inhomogeneities than TE oscillations with the same azimuth indices. The DDR model chosen for our study as well as characteristic equations obtained thereupon enable one to calculate both the eigenfrequencies and the Q factors of resonance spectral lines to fairly good accuracy. The results of calculations agree well with obtained experimental data.

  6. Temperature Buffer Test. Final THM modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Malmberg, Daniel; Boergesson, Lennart; Hernelind, Jan [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Ledesma, Alberto; Jacinto, Abel [UPC, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the final THM modelling which was resumed subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main part of this work has been numerical modelling of the field test. Three different modelling teams have presented several model cases for different geometries and different degree of process complexity. Two different numerical codes, Code{sub B}right and Abaqus, have been used. The modelling performed by UPC-Cimne using Code{sub B}right, has been divided in three subtasks: i) analysis of the response observed in the lower part of the test, by inclusion of a number of considerations: (a) the use of the Barcelona Expansive Model for MX-80 bentonite; (b) updated parameters in the vapour diffusive flow term; (c) the use of a non-conventional water retention curve for MX-80 at high temperature; ii) assessment of a possible relation between the cracks observed in the bentonite blocks in the upper part of TBT, and the cycles of suction and stresses registered in that zone at the start of the experiment; and iii) analysis of the performance, observations and interpretation of the entire test. It was however not possible to carry out a full THM analysis until the end of the test due to

  7. Improving the Accuracy of Mapping Urban Vegetation Carbon Density by Combining Shadow Remove, Spectral Unmixing Analysis and Spatial Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, M.

    2016-12-01

    Mixed pixels and shadows due to buildings in urban areas impede accurate estimation and mapping of city vegetation carbon density. In most of previous studies, these factors are often ignored, which thus result in underestimation of city vegetation carbon density. In this study we presented an integrated methodology to improve the accuracy of mapping city vegetation carbon density. Firstly, we applied a linear shadow remove analysis (LSRA) on remotely sensed Landsat 8 images to reduce the shadow effects on carbon estimation. Secondly, we integrated a linear spectral unmixing analysis (LSUA) with a linear stepwise regression (LSR), a logistic model-based stepwise regression (LMSR) and k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN), and utilized and compared the integrated models on shadow-removed images to map vegetation carbon density. This methodology was examined in Shenzhen City of Southeast China. A data set from a total of 175 sample plots measured in 2013 and 2014 was used to train the models. The independent variables statistically significantly contributing to improving the fit of the models to the data and reducing the sum of squared errors were selected from a total of 608 variables derived from different image band combinations and transformations. The vegetation fraction from LSUA was then added into the models as an important independent variable. The estimates obtained were evaluated using a cross-validation method. Our results showed that higher accuracies were obtained from the integrated models compared with the ones using traditional methods which ignore the effects of mixed pixels and shadows. This study indicates that the integrated method has great potential on improving the accuracy of urban vegetation carbon density estimation. Key words: Urban vegetation carbon, shadow, spectral unmixing, spatial modeling, Landsat 8 images

  8. Estimating Crop Albedo in the Application of a Physical Model Based on the Law of Energy Conservation and Spectral Invariants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Peng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Albedo characterizes the radiometric interface of land surfaces, especially vegetation, and the atmosphere. Albedo is a critical input to many models, such as crop growth models, hydrological models and climate models. For the extensive attention to crop monitoring, a physical albedo model for crops is developed based on the law of energy conservation and spectral invariants, which is derived from a prior forest albedo model. The model inputs have been efficiently and physically parameterized, including the dependency of albedo on the solar zenith/azimuth angle, the fraction of diffuse skylight in the incident radiance, the canopy structure, the leaf reflectance/transmittance and the soil reflectance characteristics. Both the anisotropy of soil reflectance and the clumping effect of crop leaves at the canopy scale are considered, which contribute to the improvement of the model accuracy. The comparison between the model results and Monte Carlo simulation results indicates that the canopy albedo has high accuracy with an RMSE < 0.005. The validation using ground measurements has also demonstrated the reliability of the model and that it can reflect the interaction mechanism between radiation and the canopy-soil system.

  9. Business model stress testing : A practical approach to test the robustness of a business model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaker, T.I.; Bouwman, W.A.G.A.; Janssen, W; de Reuver, G.A.

    Business models and business model innovation are increasingly gaining attention in practice as well as in academic literature. However, the robustness of business models (BM) is seldom tested vis-à-vis the fast and unpredictable changes in digital technologies, regulation and markets. The

  10. Fibrillation power, an alternative method of ECG spectral analysis for prediction of countershock success in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamprecht, F A; Achleitner, U; Krismer, A C; Lindner, K H; Wenzel, V; Strohmenger, H U; Thiel, W; van Gunsteren, W F; Amann, A

    2001-09-01

    Noninvasive prediction of defibrillation success after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may help in determining the optimal time for a countershock, and thus increase the chance for survival. In a porcine model (n=25) of prolonged cardiac arrest, advanced cardiac life support was provided by administration of two or three doses of either vasopressin or epinephrine after 3 or 8 min of basic life support. After 4 min of ventricular fibrillation and 18 min of life support, defibrillation was attempted. The denoised power spectral density of 10 s intervals of the ventricular fibrillation electrocardiogram (ECG) was estimated from averaged and smoothed Fourier transforms. We have eliminated the spectral contribution of artifacts from manual chest compressions and provide a definition for the contribution of ventricular fibrillation to the power spectral density. This contribution is quantified and termed "fibrillation power". We tested fibrillation power and two established methods in their discrimination of survivors (n=16) vs. non-survivors (n=9) in the last minute before the countershock. A fibrillation power > or =79 dB predicted successful defibrillation with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 98%, 98%, 99% and 97% while a mean fibrillation frequency > or =7.7 Hz was predictive with 85%, 83%, 90% and 77% and a mean amplitude > or =0.49 mV was predictive with 95%, 90%, 94% and 91%. We suggest that fibrillation power is an alternative source of information on the status of a fibrillating heart and that it may match the established mean frequency and amplitude analysis of ECG in predicting successful countershock during CPR.

  11. Overload prevention in model supports for wind tunnel model testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton IVANOVICI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Preventing overloads in wind tunnel model supports is crucial to the integrity of the tested system. Results can only be interpreted as valid if the model support, conventionally called a sting remains sufficiently rigid during testing. Modeling and preliminary calculation can only give an estimate of the sting’s behavior under known forces and moments but sometimes unpredictable, aerodynamically caused model behavior can cause large transient overloads that cannot be taken into account at the sting design phase. To ensure model integrity and data validity an analog fast protection circuit was designed and tested. A post-factum analysis was carried out to optimize the overload detection and a short discussion on aeroelastic phenomena is included to show why such a detector has to be very fast. The last refinement of the concept consists in a fast detector coupled with a slightly slower one to differentiate between transient overloads that decay in time and those that are the result of aeroelastic unwanted phenomena. The decision to stop or continue the test is therefore conservatively taken preserving data and model integrity while allowing normal startup loads and transients to manifest.

  12. Mass Appraisal Modelling in Minsk: Testing different Models Location sensitive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio D’Amato

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mass Appraisal is the valuation of large quantity of properties. This automatic valuation procedure gave the opportunity to reach a single point estimate (The Appraisal of Real Estate, 13th Edition. The work test different location sensitive methodologies on a sample of 600 residential properties in the city of Minsk in Belarus. This is the first application of mass appraisal modelling in Belarus. Empirical application compares a location blind model with two Location Value Response Surface models (O Connor, 1982, the former based on the detection of value influence centers the latter based on error surface modelling.

  13. Designing healthy communities: Testing the walkability model

    OpenAIRE

    Zuniga-Teran, Adriana; Orr, Barron; Gimblett, Randy; Chalfoun, Nader; Marsh, Stuart; Guertin, David; Going, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Research from multiple domains has provided insights into how neighborhood design can be improved to have a more favorable effect on physical activity, a concept known as walkability. The relevant research findings/hypotheses have been integrated into a Walkability Framework, which organizes the design elements into nine walkability categories. The purpose of this study was to test whether this conceptual framework can be used as a model to measure the interactions between the built environme...

  14. Thurstonian models for sensory discrimination tests as generalized linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhoff, Per B.; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen

    2010-01-01

    Sensory discrimination tests such as the triangle, duo-trio, 2-AFC and 3-AFC tests produce binary data and the Thurstonian decision rule links the underlying sensory difference 6 to the observed number of correct responses. In this paper it is shown how each of these four situations can be viewed...... as a so-called generalized linear model. The underlying sensory difference 6 becomes directly a parameter of the statistical model and the estimate d' and it's standard error becomes the "usual" output of the statistical analysis. The d' for the monadic A-NOT A method is shown to appear as a standard...... linear contrast in a generalized linear model using the probit link function. All methods developed in the paper are implemented in our free R-package sensR (http://www.cran.r-project.org/package=sensR/). This includes the basic power and sample size calculations for these four discrimination tests...

  15. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2008-10-10

    Aqueous extract test is a laboratory technique commonly used to measure the amount of soluble salts of a soil sample after adding a known mass of distilled water. Measured aqueous extract data have to be re-interpreted in order to infer porewater chemical composition of the sample because porewater chemistry changes significantly due to dilution and chemical reactions which take place during extraction. Here we present an inverse hydrochemical model to estimate porewater chemical composition from measured water content, aqueous extract, and mineralogical data. The model accounts for acid-base, redox, aqueous complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/ex-solution, cation exchange and surface complexation reactions, of which are assumed to take place at local equilibrium. It has been solved with INVERSE-CORE{sup 2D} and been tested with bentonite samples taken from FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test. The inverse model reproduces most of the measured aqueous data except bicarbonate and provides an effective, flexible and comprehensive method to estimate porewater chemical composition of clays. Main uncertainties are related to kinetic calcite dissolution and variations in CO2(g) pressure.

  16. Effect of simulated precompression, compression pressure and tableting speed on an offline diffuse transmittance and reflectance near-infrared spectral information of model intact caffeine tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Branko Z; Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used in the pharmaceutical industry for monitoring drug content during the tablet manufacturing process. It is of critical importance to understand the effect of process factors on NIRS performance. Design of Experiments (DoE) methodology was applied in this work for the systematic study of the effects of compression pressure, precompression pressure and tableting speed on an average Euclidean distance (AED), which reflects spectral features of the tablets, and root mean-squared error of prediction (RMSEP) as key performance indicator of NIRS calibration models. Caffeine tablets were manufactured in 17 experimental runs in accordance with D-optimal design. Developed diffuse transmittance (DT) and diffuse reflectance (DR) calibration models were tested on five independent test sets to confirm the conclusions of the DoE. Compression pressure and tableting speed have shown significant effect on the studied responses in DT mode, whereas all three studied factors have shown a significant effect in DR mode. Significant factors were considered in the development of the global calibration models. The authors suggest further study of RMSEP and AED responses to draw reliable conclusions on the effects of tableting process factors. The global calibration model in DT mode has shown superior performance compared to DR mode.

  17. Basis material decomposition in spectral CT using a semi-empirical, polychromatic adaption of the Beer-Lambert model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, S.; Sellerer, T.; Mechlem, K.; Fehringer, A.; Epple, M.; Herzen, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Noël, P. B.

    2017-01-01

    Following the development of energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors using high-Z sensor materials, application of spectral x-ray imaging methods to clinical practice comes into reach. However, these detectors require extensive calibration efforts in order to perform spectral imaging tasks like basis material decomposition. In this paper, we report a novel approach to basis material decomposition that utilizes a semi-empirical estimator for the number of photons registered in distinct energy bins in the presence of beam-hardening effects which can be termed as a polychromatic Beer-Lambert model. A maximum-likelihood estimator is applied to the model in order to obtain estimates of the underlying sample composition. Using a Monte-Carlo simulation of a typical clinical CT acquisition, the performance of the proposed estimator was evaluated. The estimator is shown to be unbiased and efficient according to the Cramér-Rao lower bound. In particular, the estimator is capable of operating with a minimum number of calibration measurements. Good results were obtained after calibration using less than 10 samples of known composition in a two-material attenuation basis. This opens up the possibility for fast re-calibration in the clinical routine which is considered an advantage of the proposed method over other implementations reported in the literature.

  18. Movable scour protection. Model test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, R.

    2002-07-01

    This report presents the results of a series of model tests with scour protection of marine structures. The objective of the model tests is to investigate the integrity of the scour protection during a general lowering of the surrounding seabed, for instance in connection with movement of a sand bank or with general subsidence. The scour protection in the tests is made out of stone material. Two different fractions have been used: 4 mm and 40 mm. Tests with current, with waves and with combined current and waves were carried out. The scour protection material was placed after an initial scour hole has evolved in the seabed around the structure. This design philosophy has been selected because the situation often is that the scour hole starts to generate immediately after the structure has been placed. It is therefore difficult to establish a scour protection at the undisturbed seabed if the scour material is placed after the main structure. Further, placing the scour material in the scour hole increases the stability of the material. Two types of structure have been used for the test, a Monopile and a Tripod foundation. Test with protection mats around the Monopile model was also carried out. The following main conclusions have emerged form the model tests with flat bed (i.e. no general seabed lowering): 1. The maximum scour depth found in steady current on sand bed was 1.6 times the cylinder diameter, 2. The minimum horizontal extension of the scour hole (upstream direction) was 2.8 times the cylinder diameter, corresponding to a slope of 30 degrees, 3. Concrete protection mats do not meet the criteria for a strongly erodible seabed. In the present test virtually no reduction in the scour depth was obtained. The main problem is the interface to the cylinder. If there is a void between the mats and the cylinder, scour will develop. Even with the protection mats that are tightly connected to the cylinder, scour is expected to develop as long as the mats allow for

  19. Statistical tests of simple earthquake cycle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Phoebe M. R.; Evans, Eileen L.

    2016-12-01

    A central goal of observing and modeling the earthquake cycle is to forecast when a particular fault may generate an earthquake: a fault late in its earthquake cycle may be more likely to generate an earthquake than a fault early in its earthquake cycle. Models that can explain geodetic observations throughout the entire earthquake cycle may be required to gain a more complete understanding of relevant physics and phenomenology. Previous efforts to develop unified earthquake models for strike-slip faults have largely focused on explaining both preseismic and postseismic geodetic observations available across a few faults in California, Turkey, and Tibet. An alternative approach leverages the global distribution of geodetic and geologic slip rate estimates on strike-slip faults worldwide. Here we use the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for similarity of distributions to infer, in a statistically rigorous manner, viscoelastic earthquake cycle models that are inconsistent with 15 sets of observations across major strike-slip faults. We reject a large subset of two-layer models incorporating Burgers rheologies at a significance level of α = 0.05 (those with long-term Maxwell viscosities ηM 4.6 × 1020 Pa s) but cannot reject models on the basis of transient Kelvin viscosity ηK. Finally, we examine the implications of these results for the predicted earthquake cycle timing of the 15 faults considered and compare these predictions to the geologic and historical record.

  20. Does the radial-tangential macroturbulence model adequately describe the spectral line broadening of solar-type stars?*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Yoichi; UeNo, Satoru

    2017-06-01

    In incorporating the effect of atmospheric turbulence in the broadening of spectral lines, the so-called radial-tangential macroturbulence (RTM) model has been widely used in the field of solar-type stars, which was devised from intuitive appearance of the granular velocity field of the Sun. Since this model assumes that turbulent motions are restricted to only radial and tangential directions, it has a special broadening function with notably narrow width due to the projection effect, the validity of which has not yet been confirmed in practice. With the aim of checking whether this RTM model adequately represents the actual solar photospheric velocity field, we carried out an extensive study on the non-thermal velocity dispersion along the line of sight (Vlos) by analyzing spectral lines at various points of the solar disk based on locally averaged as well as high-spatial-resolution spectra, and found the following results. First, the center-to-limb run of Vlos derived from ground-based low-resolution spectra is simply monotonic with a slightly increasing tendency, which contradicts the specific trend (an appreciable peak at θ ≃ 45°) predicted from RTM. Second, the Vlos values derived from a large number of spectra based on high-resolution space observation were revealed to follow a nearly normal distribution, without any sign of the peculiar distribution expected for the RTM case. These two observational facts indicate that the actual solar velocity field is not simply dichotomous as assumed in RTM, but directionally more chaotic. We thus conclude that RTM is not an adequate model, at least for solar-type stars, as it would significantly overestimate the turbulent velocity dispersion by a factor of ˜2. The classical Gaussian macroturbulence model should be more reasonable in this respect.

  1. Spectral stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to stratigraphic analysis is described which uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. The new stratigraphic procedure is illustrated by examples in the literature. The published results demonstrate the potential of spectral stratigraphy for mapping strata, determining dip and strike, measuring and correlating stratigraphic sequences, defining lithofacies, mapping biofacies, and interpreting geological structures.

  2. An efficient implementation of a high-order filter for a cubed-sphere spectral element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Gyu; Cheong, Hyeong-Bin

    2017-03-01

    A parallel-scalable, isotropic, scale-selective spatial filter was developed for the cubed-sphere spectral element model on the sphere. The filter equation is a high-order elliptic (Helmholtz) equation based on the spherical Laplacian operator, which is transformed into cubed-sphere local coordinates. The Laplacian operator is discretized on the computational domain, i.e., on each cell, by the spectral element method with Gauss-Lobatto Lagrange interpolating polynomials (GLLIPs) as the orthogonal basis functions. On the global domain, the discrete filter equation yielded a linear system represented by a highly sparse matrix. The density of this matrix increases quadratically (linearly) with the order of GLLIP (order of the filter), and the linear system is solved in only O (Ng) operations, where Ng is the total number of grid points. The solution, obtained by a row reduction method, demonstrated the typical accuracy and convergence rate of the cubed-sphere spectral element method. To achieve computational efficiency on parallel computers, the linear system was treated by an inverse matrix method (a sparse matrix-vector multiplication). The density of the inverse matrix was lowered to only a few times of the original sparse matrix without degrading the accuracy of the solution. For better computational efficiency, a local-domain high-order filter was introduced: The filter equation is applied to multiple cells, and then the central cell was only used to reconstruct the filtered field. The parallel efficiency of applying the inverse matrix method to the global- and local-domain filter was evaluated by the scalability on a distributed-memory parallel computer. The scale-selective performance of the filter was demonstrated on Earth topography. The usefulness of the filter as a hyper-viscosity for the vorticity equation was also demonstrated.

  3. RESOLVING THE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS AND HOST EMISSION IN THE MID-INFRARED USING A MODEL-INDEPENDENT SPECTRAL DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena [Instituto de Física de Cantabria, CSIC-UC, Avenida de los Castros s/n, E-39005, Santander (Spain); Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Spoon, Henrik W. W. [Cornell University, CRSR, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Almeida, Cristina Ramos [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Santos, Tanio Díaz [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Hönig, Sebastian F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO18 1BJ (United Kingdom); González-Martín, Omaira [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica (CRyA-UNAM), 3-72 (Xangari), 8701, Morelia (Mexico); Esquej, Pilar, E-mail: ahernan@ifca.unican.es [Departamento de Astrofísica, Facultad de CC. Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-04-20

    We present results on the spectral decomposition of 118 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra from local active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using a large set of Spitzer/IRS spectra as templates. The templates are themselves IRS spectra from extreme cases where a single physical component (stellar, interstellar, or AGN) completely dominates the integrated mid-infrared emission. We show that a linear combination of one template for each physical component reproduces the observed IRS spectra of AGN hosts with unprecedented fidelity for a template fitting method with no need to model extinction separately. We use full probability distribution functions to estimate expectation values and uncertainties for observables, and find that the decomposition results are robust against degeneracies. Furthermore, we compare the AGN spectra derived from the spectral decomposition with sub-arcsecond resolution nuclear photometry and spectroscopy from ground-based observations. We find that the AGN component derived from the decomposition closely matches the nuclear spectrum with a 1σ dispersion of 0.12 dex in luminosity and typical uncertainties of ∼0.19 in the spectral index and ∼0.1 in the silicate strength. We conclude that the emission from the host galaxy can be reliably removed from the IRS spectra of AGNs. This allows for unbiased studies of the AGN emission in intermediate- and high-redshift galaxies—currently inaccesible to ground-based observations—with archival Spitzer/IRS data and in the future with the Mid-InfraRed Instrument of the James Webb Space Telescope. The decomposition code and templates are available at http://denebola.org/ahc/deblendIRS.

  4. Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-17

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM is developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA (see upcoming REV 02 of CRWMS M&O 2000 [153314]), which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model (see BSC 2003 [161530]). The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross Drift to obtain the permeability structure for the seepage model; (3) to use inverse modeling to calibrate the SCM and to estimate seepage-relevant, model-related parameters on the drift scale; (4) to estimate the epistemic uncertainty of the derived parameters, based on the goodness-of-fit to the observed data and the sensitivity of calculated seepage with respect to the parameters of interest; (5) to characterize the aleatory uncertainty of

  5. Electron spectral functions of two-dimensional high-T sub c superconductors in the model of fermion condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Khodel, V A

    2001-01-01

    Spectral functions of strongly correlated two-dimensional electron systems in solids are studied on the assumption that these systems undergo as phase transition, called fermion condensation, whose characteristic feature is flattening of the electron spectrum epsilon (p). Unlike the previous models in the present study, the decay of single-particle states is properly taken into account. Results of calculations are shown to be in qualitative agreement with ARPES data. The universal behavior of the ration Im EPSILON(p, epsilon, T)/T as a function of x = epsilon/T are found to be reproduced reasonably well. However, in the present model this behavior is destroyed in vicinities of the van Hove points where the fermion condensate resides

  6. Frequency analysis of tick quotes on the foreign exchange market and agent-based modeling: A spectral distance approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2007-08-01

    High-frequency financial data of the foreign exchange market (EUR/CHF, EUR/GBP, EUR/JPY, EUR/NOK, EUR/SEK, EUR/USD, NZD/USD, USD/CAD, USD/CHF, USD/JPY, USD/NOK, and USD/SEK) are analyzed by utilizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between two normalized spectrograms of the tick frequency and the generalized Jensen-Shannon divergence among them. The temporal structure variations of the similarity between currency pairs is detected and characterized. A simple agent-based model in which N market participants exchange M currency pairs is proposed. The equation for the tick frequency is approximately derived theoretically. Based on the analysis of this model, the spectral distance of the tick frequency is associated with the similarity of the behavior (perception and decision) of the market participants in exchanging these currency pairs.

  7. Modeling of Laser wakefield acceleration in Lorentz boosted frame using EM-PIC code with spectral solver

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Peicheng; Decyk, Viktor K; An, Weiming; Vieira, Jorge; Tsung, Frank S; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O; Mori, Warren B

    2013-01-01

    Simulating laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a Lorentz boosted frame in which the plasma drifts towards the laser with $v_b$ can speedup the simulation by factors of $\\gamma^2_b=(1-v^2_b/c^2)^{-1}$. In these simulations the relativistic drifting plasma inevitably induces a high frequency numerical instability that contaminates the interested physics. Various approaches have been proposed to mitigate this instability. One approach is to solve Maxwell equations in Fourier space (a spectral solver) as this has been shown to suppress the fastest growing modes of this instability in simple test problems using a simple low pass, ring (in two dimensions), or shell (in three dimensions) filter in Fourier space. We describe the development of a fully parallelized, multi-dimensional, particle-in-cell code that uses a spectral solver to solve Maxwell's equations and that includes the ability to launch a laser using a moving antenna. This new EM-PIC code is called UPIC-EMMA and it is based on the components of the U...

  8. Application of the spectral analysis for the mathematical modelling of the rigid Earth rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkevich, V. V.; Eroshkin, G. I.

    The new semi-analytical series - S9000 - describing the high-precision rigid Earth rotation, dynamically adequate to the ephemerides DE404/LE404 over 2000 year time interval, are constructed. The series S9000 are obtained by processing the discrepancies of the comparison between the quadruple precision numerical solutions of the problem and the semi-analytical ones - SMART97 solutions - (Bretagnon et al., 1998), (Brumberg and Bretagnon, 2000) by means of the spectral analysis methods. The comparison between the quadruple precision numerical solutions of the problem and S9000 series reveals the discrepancies less than 10μas over 2000 year time interval. The residuals of the comparison between S9000 series and the high-precision numerical integration are processed for the determination of the diurnal and sub-diurnal harmonics. The addition of the short-period terms to S9000 are constructed over 200 year time interval for the Kinematical case. The comparison between the quadruple precision numerical solutions of the problem and S9000 series with short-periodical part reveals the discrepancies less than 1.2μas over 200 year time interval.

  9. An integrated model of soil-canopy spectral radiances, photosynthesis, fluorescence, temperature and energy balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, van der C.; Verhoef, W.; Timmermans, J.; Verhoef, A.; Su, Z.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the model SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes), which is a vertical (1-D) integrated radiative transfer and energy balance model. The model links visible to thermal infrared radiance spectra (0.4 to 50 µm) as observed above the canopy to the fluxes of

  10. Spectral and scattering theory for translation invariant models in quantum field theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Grud

    This thesis is concerned with a large class of massive translation invariant models in quantum field theory, including the Nelson model and the Fröhlich polaron. The models in the class describe a matter particle, e.g. a nucleon or an electron, linearly coupled to a second quantised massive scalar...

  11. 2-D Model Test of Dolosse Breakwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Liu, Zhou

    1994-01-01

    ). To extend the design diagram to cover Dolos breakwaters with superstructure, 2-D model tests of Dolos breakwater with wave wall is included in the project Rubble Mound Breakwater Failure Modes sponsored by the Directorate General XII of the Commission of the European Communities under Contract MAS-CT92...... of the method of placing and packing the blocks on the hydraulic stability. The Dolosse were more carefully put on the slope and the hydraulic stability of such slope was compared with that of the more randomly packed slope. The whole experiment was carried out in the period of August - November 1993...

  12. Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Finsterle

    2004-09-02

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM was developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). This Model Report has been revised in response to a comprehensive, regulatory-focused evaluation performed by the Regulatory Integration Team [''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Evaluation of Analysis and Model Reports Supporting the TSPA-LA'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169653])]. The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross-Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA [''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167652])], which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model [see ''Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170338])]. The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross-Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross

  13. Model-independent tests of cosmic gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Eric V

    2011-12-28

    Gravitation governs the expansion and fate of the universe, and the growth of large-scale structure within it, but has not been tested in detail on these cosmic scales. The observed acceleration of the expansion may provide signs of gravitational laws beyond general relativity (GR). Since the form of any such extension is not clear, from either theory or data, we adopt a model-independent approach to parametrizing deviations to the Einstein framework. We explore the phase space dynamics of two key post-GR functions and derive a classification scheme, and an absolute criterion on accuracy necessary for distinguishing classes of gravity models. Future surveys will be able to constrain the post-GR functions' amplitudes and forms to the required precision, and hence reveal new aspects of gravitation.

  14. Modeling and testing of ethernet transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, David

    2011-12-01

    Twisted-pair Ethernet is now the standard home and office last-mile network technology. For decades, the IEEE standard that defines Ethernet has required electrical isolation between the twisted pair cable and the Ethernet device. So, for decades, every Ethernet interface has used magnetic core Ethernet transformers to isolate Ethernet devices and keep users safe in the event of a potentially dangerous fault on the network media. The current state-of-the-art Ethernet transformers are miniature (explored which are capable of exceptional miniaturization or on-chip fabrication. This dissertation thoroughly explores the performance of the current commercial Ethernet transformers to both increase understanding of the device's behavior and outline performance parameters for replacement devices. Lumped element and distributed circuit models are derived; testing schemes are developed and used to extract model parameters from commercial Ethernet devices. Transfer relation measurements of the commercial Ethernet transformers are compared against the model's behavior and it is found that the tuned, distributed models produce the best transfer relation match to the measured data. Process descriptions and testing results on fabricated thin-film dielectric-core toroid transformers are presented. The best results were found for a 32-turn transformer loaded with 100Ω, the impedance of twisted pair cable. This transformer gave a flat response from about 10MHz to 40MHz with a height of approximately 0.45. For the fabricated transformer structures, theoretical methods to determine resistance, capacitance and inductance are presented. A special analytical and numerical analysis of the fabricated transformer inductance is presented. Planar cuts of magnetic slope fields around the dielectric-core toroid are shown that describe the effect of core height and winding density on flux uniformity without a magnetic core.

  15. Application of spectral deconvolution and inverse mechanistic modelling as a tool for root cause investigation in protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brestrich, Nina; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-03-11

    In chromatographic protein purification, process variations, aging of columns, or processing errors can lead to deviations of the expected elution behavior of product and contaminants and can result in a decreased pool purity or yield. A different elution behavior of all or several involved species leads to a deviating chromatogram. The causes for deviations are however hard to identify by visual inspection and complicate the correction of a problem in the next cycle or batch. To overcome this issue, a tool for root cause investigation in protein chromatography was developed. The tool combines a spectral deconvolution with inverse mechanistic modelling. Mid-UV spectral data and Partial Least Squares Regression were first applied to deconvolute peaks to obtain the individual elution profiles of co-eluting proteins. The individual elution profiles were subsequently used to identify errors in process parameters by curve fitting to a mechanistic chromatography model. The functionality of the tool for root cause investigation was successfully demonstrated in a model protein study with lysozyme, cytochrome c, and ribonuclease A. Deviating chromatograms were generated by deliberately caused errors in the process parameters flow rate and sodium-ion concentration in loading and elution buffer according to a design of experiments. The actual values of the three process parameters and, thus, the causes of the deviations were estimated with errors of less than 4.4%. Consequently, the established tool for root cause investigation is a valuable approach to rapidly identify process variations, aging of columns, or processing errors. This might help to minimize batch rejections or contribute to an increased productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  17. The C. elegans model in toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Piper Reid

    2017-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a small nematode that can be maintained at low cost and handled using standard in vitro techniques. Unlike toxicity testing using cell cultures, C. elegans toxicity assays provide data from a whole animal with intact and metabolically active digestive, reproductive, endocrine, sensory and neuromuscular systems. Toxicity ranking screens in C. elegans have repeatedly been shown to be as predictive of rat LD50 ranking as mouse LD50 ranking. Additionally, many instances of conservation of mode of toxic action have been noted between C. elegans and mammals. These consistent correlations make the case for inclusion of C. elegans assays in early safety testing and as one component in tiered or integrated toxicity testing strategies, but do not indicate that nematodes alone can replace data from mammals for hazard evaluation. As with cell cultures, good C. elegans culture practice (GCeCP) is essential for reliable results. This article reviews C. elegans use in various toxicity assays, the C. elegans model's strengths and limitations for use in predictive toxicology, and GCeCP. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, {Omega}{sub b}, remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that {Omega}{sub b} {approximately} 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming {Omega}{sub total} = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since {Omega}{sub visible} < {Omega}{sub b}. Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M{sub x} {approx gt} 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z{sup 0} coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for {nu}-masses may imply that the {nu}{sub {tau}} is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Assessing the influence of spectral band configuration on automated radiative transfer model inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorigo, W.A.; Richter, R.; Schneider, T.; Schaepman, M.E.; Müller, A.; Wagner, W.

    2009-01-01

    The success of radiative transfer model (RTM) inversion strongly depends on various factors, including the choice of a suited radiative transfer model, the followed inversion strategy, and the band configuration of the remote sensing system. Current study aims at addressing the latter, by

  20. An Analytical Model for Spectral Peak Frequency Prediction of Substrate Noise in CMOS Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an analytical model describing the generation of switching current noise in CMOS substrates. The model eliminates the need for SPICE simulations in existing methods by conducting a transient analysis on a generic CMOS inverter and approximating the switching current waveform us...

  1. Ablative Rocket Deflector Testing and Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Lott, Jeffrey W.; Raines, Nickey

    2010-01-01

    A deflector risk mitigation program was recently conducted at the NASA Stennis Space Center. The primary objective was to develop a database that characterizes the behavior of industry-grade refractory materials subjected to rocket plume impingement conditions commonly experienced on static test stands. The program consisted of short and long duration engine tests where the supersonic exhaust flow from the engine impinged on an ablative panel. Quasi time-dependent erosion depths and patterns generated by the plume impingement were recorded for a variety of different ablative materials. The erosion behavior was found to be highly dependent on the material s composition and corresponding thermal properties. For example, in the case of the HP CAST 93Z ablative material, the erosion rate actually decreased under continued thermal heating conditions due to the formation of a low thermal conductivity "crystallization" layer. The "crystallization" layer produced near the surface of the material provided an effective insulation from the hot rocket exhaust plume. To gain further insight into the complex interaction of the plume with the ablative deflector, computational fluid dynamic modeling was performed in parallel to the ablative panel testing. The results from the current study demonstrated that locally high heating occurred due to shock reflections. These localized regions of shock-induced heat flux resulted in non-uniform erosion of the ablative panels. In turn, it was observed that the non-uniform erosion exacerbated the localized shock heating causing eventual plume separation and reversed flow for long duration tests under certain conditions. Overall, the flow simulations compared very well with the available experimental data obtained during this project.

  2. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J., E-mail: juanjose.vaquero@uc3m.es [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Desco, M. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid ES28029 (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  3. A Spectral Unmixing Model for the Integration of Multi-Sensor Imagery: A Tool to Generate Consistent Time Series Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Doxani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Sentinel missions have been designed to support the operational services of the Copernicus program, ensuring long-term availability of data for a wide range of spectral, spatial and temporal resolutions. In particular, Sentinel-2 (S-2 data with improved high spatial resolution and higher revisit frequency (five days with the pair of satellites in operation will play a fundamental role in recording land cover types and monitoring land cover changes at regular intervals. Nevertheless, cloud coverage usually hinders the time series availability and consequently the continuous land surface monitoring. In an attempt to alleviate this limitation, the synergistic use of instruments with different features is investigated, aiming at the future synergy of the S-2 MultiSpectral Instrument (MSI and Sentinel-3 (S-3 Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI. To that end, an unmixing model is proposed with the intention of integrating the benefits of the two Sentinel missions, when both in orbit, in one composite image. The main goal is to fill the data gaps in the S-2 record, based on the more frequent information of the S-3 time series. The proposed fusion model has been applied on MODIS (MOD09GA L2G and SPOT4 (Take 5 data and the experimental results have demonstrated that the approach has high potential. However, the different acquisition characteristics of the sensors, i.e. illumination and viewing geometry, should be taken into consideration and bidirectional effects correction has to be performed in order to reduce noise in the reflectance time series.

  4. Spectral dependence on the correction factor of erythemal UV for cloud, aerosol, total ozone, and surface properties: A modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Seo; Jung, Yeonjin; Lee, Yun Gon

    2016-07-01

    Radiative transfer model simulations were used to investigate the erythemal ultraviolet (EUV) correction factors by separating the UV-A and UV-B spectral ranges. The correction factor was defined as the ratio of EUV caused by changing the amounts and characteristics of the extinction and scattering materials. The EUV correction factors (CFEUV) for UV-A [CFEUV(A)] and UV-B [CFEUV(B)] were affected by changes in the total ozone, optical depths of aerosol and cloud, and the solar zenith angle. The differences between CFEUV(A) and CFEUV(B) were also estimated as a function of solar zenith angle, the optical depths of aerosol and cloud, and total ozone. The differences between CFEUV(A) and CFEUV(B) ranged from -5.0% to 25.0% for aerosols, and from -9.5% to 2.0% for clouds in all simulations for different solar zenith angles and optical depths of aerosol and cloud. The rate of decline of CFEUV per unit optical depth between UV-A and UV-B differed by up to 20% for the same aerosol and cloud conditions. For total ozone, the variation in CFEUV(A) was negligible compared with that in CFEUV(B) because of the effective spectral range of the ozone absorption band. In addition, the sensitivity of the CFEUVs due to changes in surface conditions (i.e., surface albedo and surface altitude) was also estimated by using the model in this study. For changes in surface albedo, the sensitivity of the CFEUVs was 2.9%-4.1% per 0.1 albedo change, depending on the amount of aerosols or clouds. For changes in surface altitude, the sensitivity of CFEUV(B) was twice that of CFEUV(A), because the Rayleigh optical depth increased significantly at shorter wavelengths.

  5. Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales: A spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C. Dietze; Rodrigo Vargas; Andrew D. Richardson; Paul C. Stoy; Alan G. Barr; Ryan S. Anderson; M. Altaf Arain; Ian T. Baker; T. Andrew Black; Jing M. Chen; Philippe Ciais; Lawrence B. Flanagan; Christopher M. Gough; Robert F. Grant; David Hollinger; R. Cesar Izaurralde; Christopher J. Kucharik; Peter Lafleur; Shugang Liu; Erandathie Lokupitiya; Yiqi Luo; J. William Munger; Changhui Peng; Benjamin Poulter; David T. Price; Daniel M. Ricciuto; William J. Riley; Alok Kumar Sahoo; Kevin Schaefer; Andrew E. Suyker; Hanqin Tian; Christina Tonitto; Hans Verbeeck; Shashi B. Verma; Weifeng Wang; Ensheng Weng

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem models are important tools for diagnosing the carbon cycle and projecting its behavior across space and time. Despite the fact that ecosystems respond to drivers at multiple time scales, most assessments of model performance do not discriminate different time scales. Spectral methods, such as wavelet analyses, present an alternative approach that enables the...

  6. Proton irradiation test on the flight model radiation monitor for LISA Pathfinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, I; Lobo, A; Sanjuan, J; Diaz-Aguilo, M [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Ed. Nexus, Gran Capita 2-4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ramos-Castro, J [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Campus Nord, Ed. C4, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Wass, P J [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento and INFN Gruppo collegato di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo (Italy); Grimani, C, E-mail: mateos@ice.csic.e [Istituto di Fisica Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Urbino (PU) and Istituto a Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence (Italy)

    2010-05-01

    The design of the Radiation Monitor in the LISA Technology Package on board LISA Pathfinder is based on two silicon PIN diodes, placed parallel to each other in a telescopic configuration. One of them will be able to record spectral information of the particle hitting the diode. A test campaign for the Flight Model Radiation Monitor is proposed to verify its performance. This paper shows the results obtained with a simulated flight model geometry using GEANT4, to be compared with the real data that will be obtained in a proton irradiation facility.

  7. Observation-Based Dissipation and Input Terms for Spectral Wave Models, with End-User Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    wave fields), it is applicable to non-homogeneous wave fields, it accounts for Stokes corrections to dispersion relationships and for unlocking the...and Young, in collaboration with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology , use the new versions of WAVEWATCH-III and SWAN in the projects funded by the...Environment Canada, WMO/IOC Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM), 11p Donelan, M.A., 1999: Wind-induced growth

  8. An integrated model of soil-canopy spectral radiances, photosynthesis, fluorescence, temperature and energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. van der Tol

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the model SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes, which is a vertical (1-D integrated radiative transfer and energy balance model. The model links visible to thermal infrared radiance spectra (0.4 to 50 μm as observed above the canopy to the fluxes of water, heat and carbon dioxide, as a function of vegetation structure, and the vertical profiles of temperature. Output of the model is the spectrum of outgoing radiation in the viewing direction and the turbulent heat fluxes, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence. A special routine is dedicated to the calculation of photosynthesis rate and chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf level as a function of net radiation and leaf temperature. The fluorescence contributions from individual leaves are integrated over the canopy layer to calculate top-of-canopy fluorescence. The calculation of radiative transfer and the energy balance is fully integrated, allowing for feedback between leaf temperatures, leaf chlorophyll fluorescence and radiative fluxes. Leaf temperatures are calculated on the basis of energy balance closure. Model simulations were evaluated against observations reported in the literature and against data collected during field campaigns. These evaluations showed that SCOPE is able to reproduce realistic radiance spectra, directional radiance and energy balance fluxes. The model may be applied for the design of algorithms for the retrieval of evapotranspiration from optical and thermal earth observation data, for validation of existing methods to monitor vegetation functioning, to help interpret canopy fluorescence measurements, and to study the relationships between synoptic observations with diurnally integrated quantities. The model has been implemented in Matlab and has a modular design, thus allowing for great flexibility and scalability.

  9. A turbulence spectral model for sound propagation in the atmosphere that incorporates shear and buoyancy forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson

    2000-11-01

    A three-dimensional model for turbulent velocity fluctuations in the atmospheric boundary layer is developed and used to calculate scattering of sound. The model, which is based on von Karman's spectrum, incorporates separate contributions from shear- and buoyancy-forced turbulence. New equations are derived from the model that predict the strength and diffraction parameters for scattering of sound as a function of height from the ground and atmospheric conditions. The need is demonstrated for retaining two distinct scattering length scales, one associated with scattering strength and the other with diffraction. These length scales are height dependent and vary substantially with the relative proportions of shear and buoyancy forcing. The turbulence model predicts that for forward-scattered waves the phase variance is much larger than the log-amplitude variance, a behavior borne out by experimental data. A new method for synthesizing random fields, based on empirical orthogonal functions, is developed to accommodate the height dependence of the turbulence model. The method is applied to numerical calculations of scattering into an acoustic shadow zone, yielding good agreement with previous measurements.

  10. GMOSS: All-sky Model of Spectral Radio Brightness Based on Physical Components and Associated Radiative Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayana Rao, Mayuri; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Udaya Shankar, N.; Chluba, Jens

    2017-01-01

    We present the Global Model for the Radio Sky Spectrum (GMOSS), a novel, physically motivated model of the low-frequency radio sky from 22 MHz to 23 GHz. GMOSS invokes different physical components and associated radiative processes to describe the sky spectrum over 3072 pixels of 5° resolution. The spectra are allowed to be convex, concave, or of more complex form with contributions from synchrotron emission, thermal emission, and free-free absorption included. Physical parameters that describe the model are optimized to best fit four all-sky maps at 150 MHz, 408 MHz, 1420 MHz, and 23 GHz and two maps at 22 and 45 MHz generated using the Global Sky Model of de Oliveira-Costa et al. The fractional deviation of the model from data has a median value of 6% and is less than 17% for 99% of the pixels. Though aimed at the modeling of foregrounds for the global signal arising from the redshifted 21 cm line of hydrogen during the Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), over redshifts 150≲ z≲ 6, GMOSS is well suited for any application that requires simulating spectra of the low-frequency radio sky as would be observed by the beam of any instrument. The complexity in spectral structure that naturally arises from the underlying physics of the model provides a useful expectation for departures from smoothness in EoR foreground spectra and hence may guide the development of algorithms for EoR signal detection. This aspect is further explored in a subsequent paper.

  11. Fingerprints of endogenous process on Europa through linear spectral modeling of ground-based observations (ESO/VLT/SINFONI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligier, Nicolas; Carter, John; Poulet, François; Langevin, Yves; Dumas, Christophe; Gourgeot, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa harbors a very young surface dated, based on cratering rates, to 10-50 M.y (Zahnle et al. 1998, Pappalardo et al. 1999). This young age implies rapid surface recycling and reprocessing, partially engendered by a global salty subsurface liquid ocean that could result in tectonic activity (Schmidt et al. 2011, Kattenhorn et al. 2014) and active plumes (Roth et al. 2014). The surface of Europa should contain important clues about the composition of this sub-surface briny ocean and about the potential presence of material of exobiological interest in it, thus reinforcing Europa as a major target of interest for upcoming space missions such as the ESA L-class mission JUICE. To perform the investigation of the composition of the surface of Europa, a global mapping campaign of the satellite was performed between October 2011 and January 2012 with the integral field spectrograph SINFONI on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. The high spectral binning of this instrument (0.5 nm) is suitable to detect any narrow mineral signature in the wavelength range 1.45-2.45 μm. The spatially resolved spectra we obtained over five epochs nearly cover the entire surface of Europa with a pixel scale of 12.5 by 25 m.a.s (~35 by 70 km on Europa's surface), thus permitting a global scale study. Until recently, a large majority of studies only proposed sulfate salts along with sulfuric acid hydrate and water-ice to be present on Europa's surface. However, recent works based on Europa's surface coloration in the visible wavelength range and NIR spectral analysis support the hypothesis of the predominance of chlorine salts instead of sulfate salts (Hand & Carlson 2015, Fischer et al. 2015). Our linear spectral modeling supports this new hypothesis insofar as the use of Mg-bearing chlorines improved the fits whatever the region. As expected, the distribution of sulfuric acid hydrate is correlated to the Iogenic sulfur ion implantation flux distribution (Hendrix et al

  12. A non-LTE model for the Jovian methane infrared emissions at high spectral resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Decola, Philip L.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution spectra of Jupiter in the 3.3 micrometer region have so far failed to reveal either the continuum or the line emissions that can be unambiguously attributed to the nu(sub 3) band of methane (Drossart et al. 1993; Kim et al. 1991). Nu(sub 3) line intensities predicted with the help of two simple non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) models -- a two-level model and a three-level model, using experimentally determined relaxation coefficients, are shown to be one to three orders of magnitude respectively below the 3-sigma noise level of these observations. Predicted nu(sub 4) emission intensities are consistent with observed values. If the methane mixing ratio below the homopause is assumed as 2 x 10(exp -3), a value of about 300 K is derived as an upper limit to the temperature of the high stratosphere at microbar levels.

  13. A new model of quantum chaotic billiards Spectral Statistics and Wavefunctions in 2D

    CERN Document Server

    Cuevas, E; Vergés, J A

    1996-01-01

    Quantum chaotic dynamics is obtained for a tight-binding model in which the energies of the atomic levels at the boundary sites are chosen at random. Results for the square lattice indicate that the energy spectrum shows a complex behavior with regions that obey the Wigner-Dyson statistics and localized and quasi-ideal states distributed according to Poisson statistics. Although the averaged spatial extension of the eigenstates in the present model scales with the size of the system as in the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble, the fluctuations are much larger.

  14. Trace-Based Code Generation for Model-Based Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanstrén, T.; Piel, E.; Gross, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    Paper Submitted for review at the Eighth International Conference on Generative Programming and Component Engineering. Model-based testing can be a powerful means to generate test cases for the system under test. However, creating a useful model for model-based testing requires expertise in the

  15. Testing computational toxicology models with phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Luis G; Arvidson, Kirk B; Busta, Emily; Minnier, Barbara L; Kruhlak, Naomi L; Benz, R Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Computational toxicology employing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling is an evidence-based predictive method being evaluated by regulatory agencies for risk assessment and scientific decision support for toxicological endpoints of interest such as rodent carcinogenicity. Computational toxicology is being tested for its usefulness to support the safety assessment of drug-related substances (e.g. active pharmaceutical ingredients, metabolites, impurities), indirect food additives, and other applied uses of value for protecting public health including safety assessment of environmental chemicals. The specific use of QSAR as a chemoinformatic tool for estimating the rodent carcinogenic potential of phytochemicals present in botanicals, herbs, and natural dietary sources is investigated here by an external validation study, which is the most stringent scientific method of measuring predictive performance. The external validation statistics for predicting rodent carcinogenicity of 43 phytochemicals, using two computational software programs evaluated at the FDA, are discussed. One software program showed very good performance for predicting non-carcinogens (high specificity), but both exhibited poor performance in predicting carcinogens (sensitivity), which is consistent with the design of the models. When predictions were considered in combination with each other rather than based on any one software, the performance for sensitivity was enhanced, However, Chi-square values indicated that the overall predictive performance decreases when using the two computational programs with this particular data set. This study suggests that complementary multiple computational toxicology software need to be carefully selected to improve global QSAR predictions for this complex toxicological endpoint.

  16. Designing healthy communities: Testing the walkability model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana A. Zuniga-Teran

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research from multiple domains has provided insights into how neighborhood design can be improved to have a more favorable effect on physical activity, a concept known as walkability. The relevant research findings/hypotheses have been integrated into a Walkability Framework, which organizes the design elements into nine walkability categories. The purpose of this study was to test whether this conceptual framework can be used as a model to measure the interactions between the built environment and physical activity. We explored correlations between the walkability categories and physical activity reported through a survey of residents of Tucson, Arizona (n=486. The results include significant correlations between the walkability categories and physical activity as well as between the walkability categories and the two motivations for walking (recreation and transportation. To our knowledge, this is the first study that reports links between walkability and walking for recreation. Additionally, the use of the Walkability Framework allowed us to identify the walkability categories most strongly correlated with the two motivations for walking. The results of this study support the use of the Walkability Framework as a model to measure the built environment in relation to its ability to promote physical activity.

  17. Spectral sensitivity analysis of FWI in a constant-gradient background velocity model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazei, V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Full waveform inversion suffers from local minima, due to a lack of low frequencies in the data. A reflector below the zone of interest may help in recovering the long-wavelength components of a velocity perturbation, as demonstrated in a paper by Mora. Because smooth models are more popular as

  18. USE OF ROUGH SETS AND SPECTRAL DATA FOR BUILDING PREDICTIVE MODELS OF REACTION RATE CONSTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model for predicting the log of the rate constants for alkaline hydrolysis of organic esters has been developed with the use of gas-phase min-infrared library spectra and a rule-building software system based on the mathematical theory of rough sets. A diverse set of 41 esters ...

  19. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon at Regional Scale by Combining Multi-Spectral Images with Laboratory Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Yi; Xiong, Xiong; Adhikari, Kabindra

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), were very important predictors in SOC spatial models. Furthermore, the ‘upland model’ was able to more accurately predict SOC compared with the ‘upland & wetland model’. However, the separately calibrated ‘upland and wetland model’ did not improve...

  20. A mixed spectral-integration model for neutral mean wind flow over hills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corbett, Jean-Francois; Ott, Søren; Landberg, Lars

    2008-01-01

    A linear model for neutral surface-layer flow over orography is presented. The Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes and E - epsilon turbulence closure equations are expressed in a terrain-following coordinate system created from a simple analytical expression in the Fourier domain. The perturbation...

  1. A Hybrid DBN and CRF Model for Spectral-Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral image classification plays an important role in remote sensing image analysis. Recent techniques have attempted to investigate the capabilities of deep learning approaches to tackle the hyperspectral image classification. This work shows how to further improve the hyperspectral image classification through using both a deep representation and contextual information. To implement this objective, this work proposes a new Conditional Random Field (CRF model (named DBN-CRF with the potentials defined over the deep features produced by a Deep Belief Network (DBN. The newly formulated DBN-CRF model takes advantage of the strength of DBNs in learning a good representation and the ability of CRFs to model contextual (spatial information in both the observations and labels. Within a piecewise training framework, an efficient training method is proposed to train the whole DBN-CRF model end-to-end. This means that the parameters in DBN and CRF can be jointly trained and thus the proposed method can fully use the strength of both DBN and CRF. Moreover, in the proposed training method, the end-to-end training can be implemented with a standard back-propagation algorithm, avoiding the repeated inference usually involved in CRF training and thus is computationally efficient. Experiments on real-world hyperspectral data show that our method outperforms the most recent approaches in hyperspectral image classification.

  2. Modeling Well Sampled Composite Spectral Energy Distributions of Distant Galaxies via an MCMC-driven Inference Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Imad; Kriek, Mariska; Johnson, Benjamin; Conroy, Charlie

    2018-01-01

    Using a novel, MCMC-driven inference framework, we have modeled the stellar and dust emission of 32 composite spectral energy distributions (SEDs), which span from the near-ultraviolet (NUV) to far infrared (FIR). The composite SEDs were originally constructed in a previous work from the photometric catalogs of the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey, in which SEDs of individual galaxies at 0.5 PACS 100 μm, PACS160 μm, SPIRE 25 μm, and SPIRE 350 μm photometry have been added to extend the range of the composite SEDs into the FIR. We fit the composite SEDs with the Prospector code, which utilizes an MCMC sampling to explore the parameter space for models created by the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis (FSPS) code, in order to investigate how specific star formation rate (sSFR), dust temperature, and other galaxy properties vary with SED type.This work is also being used to better constrain the SPS models within FSPS.

  3. A person fit test for IRT models for polytomous items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, Cornelis A.W.; Dagohoy, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    A person fit test based on the Lagrange multiplier test is presented for three item response theory models for polytomous items: the generalized partial credit model, the sequential model, and the graded response model. The test can also be used in the framework of multidimensional ability

  4. A case study of forward calculations of the gravity anomaly by spectral method for a three-dimensional parameterised fault model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weimin; Chen, Shi

    2018-02-01

    Spectral methods provide many advantages for calculating gravity anomalies. In this paper, we derive a kernel function for a three-dimensional (3D) fault model in the wave number domain, and present the full Fortran source code developed for the forward computation of the gravity anomalies and related derivatives obtained from the model. The numerical error and computing speed obtained using the proposed spectral method are compared with those obtained using a 3D rectangular prism model solved in the space domain. The error obtained using the spectral method is shown to be dependent on the sequence length employed in the fast Fourier transform. The spectral method is applied to some examples of 3D fault models, and is demonstrated to be a straightforward and alternative computational approach to enhance computational speed and simplify the procedures for solving many gravitational potential forward problems involving complicated geological models. The proposed method can generate a great number of feasible geophysical interpretations based on a 3D model with only a few variables, and can thereby improve the efficiency of inversion.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Variables Affecting the Testing of Pavements by the Spectral-Analysis-of-Surface-Waves Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    sinusoidally oscillating mass placed on the surface to excite the system with primarily Rayleigh waves (Jones [1958]; Heukelom and Foster [19601; Jones...Among wave propagation methods, the steady-state technique is most widely used in nondestructive pavement testing ( Heukelom and Foster [1960], Jones [1962...of Surface Waves," Research Record No. 852, Transportation Research Board, pp. 22-31. 301 Heukelom , W. and Foster, C. R. (1960), "Dynamic Testing of

  6. New Method for Dual-Axis Fatigue Testing of Large Wind Turbine Blades Using Resonance Excitation and Spectral Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.

    2004-04-01

    The blades of a wind turbine are generally considered to be the most critical component of the wind turbine system. The fundamental purpose of performing fatigue tests on wind turbine blades is to demonstrate that a blade, when manufactured to a certain set of specifications, has the prescribed reliability and service life. The purpose of the research conducted for this project is the advancement of knowledge and capabilities in the area of wind turbine blade fatigue testing.

  7. Probabilistic modeling and global sensitivity analysis for CO 2 storage in geological formations: a spectral approach

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Bilal Mohammed

    2017-09-18

    This work focuses on the simulation of CO2 storage in deep underground formations under uncertainty and seeks to understand the impact of uncertainties in reservoir properties on CO2 leakage. To simulate the process, a non-isothermal two-phase two-component flow system with equilibrium phase exchange is used. Since model evaluations are computationally intensive, instead of traditional Monte Carlo methods, we rely on polynomial chaos (PC) expansions for representation of the stochastic model response. A non-intrusive approach is used to determine the PC coefficients. We establish the accuracy of the PC representations within a reasonable error threshold through systematic convergence studies. In addition to characterizing the distributions of model observables, we compute probabilities of excess CO2 leakage. Moreover, we consider the injection rate as a design parameter and compute an optimum injection rate that ensures that the risk of excess pressure buildup at the leaky well remains below acceptable levels. We also provide a comprehensive analysis of sensitivities of CO2 leakage, where we compute the contributions of the random parameters, and their interactions, to the variance by computing first, second, and total order Sobol’ indices.

  8. Molecular modeling, FTIR spectral characterization and mechanical properties of carbonated-hydroxyapatite prepared by mechanochemical synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youness, Rasha A. [Spectroscopy Department, National Research Centre, El-Bohouth Str., 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Taha, Mohammed A. [Solid-State Physics Department, National Research Centre, El-Bohouth Str., 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Elhaes, Hanan [Physics Department, Faculty of Women for Arts, Science, and Education, Ain Shams University, 11757 Cairo (Egypt); Ibrahim, Medhat, E-mail: medahmed6@yahoo.com [Spectroscopy Department, National Research Centre, El-Bohouth Str., 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt)

    2017-04-01

    Nanocrystalline B-type carbonate substituted hydroxyapatite (B-CHA) powder has been successively synthesized by mechanochemical method. The effect of milling times on the formation of B-CHA was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction technique and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, physical as well as mechanical properties were examined as a function of milling time. Furthermore, theoretical model was presented for hydroxyapatite (HA). Semiempirical calculations at PM6 level were used to calculate thermal parameters including entropy; enthalpy; heat capacity; free energy and heat of formation in the temperature range from 200 up to 500 k. The results revealed that single phase B-CHA was successfully formed after 8 h of milling when Ball to Powder Ratio (BPR) equals to 10:1. Results revealed that entropy; enthalpy and heat capacity gradually increased as a function of temperature while, free energy and heat of formation decreased with the increasing of temperature. Comparison with higher level of theory was conducted at HF and DFT using the models HF/3-21g**; B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and B3LYP/LANL2DZ, respectively and indicated that PM6 could be utilized with appropriate accuracy and time to study physical and thermochemical parameters for HA. - Highlights: • Preparation of Nanocrystalline B-type carbonate substituted hydroxyapatite (B-CHA) powder by mechanochemical method. • Characterization of CHA. • Semiemperical and DFT models for CHA.

  9. Application of a partial least-squares regression model to retrieve chlorophyll- a concentrations in coastal waters using hyper-spectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kimberly; Ali, Khalid

    2016-03-01

    Coastal and inland waters represent a diverse set of resources that support natural habitats and provide valuable ecosystem services to the human population. Monitoring the quality of these waters is essential to maintaining the resources they provide, and long-term monitoring may offer a better understanding of the relationship between human development and the health of these resource producers. The implementation of conventional monitoring is typically time-intensive and limited in geographic scale. Alternatively, the use of airborne and spaceborne remote sensors provides a synoptic view of water quality with better spatial coverage to more accurately identify dynamic and unique parameters. Concentrations of optically active constituents (OACs) such as suspended sediments and the phytoplankton pigment chlorophylla (CHL a), act as proxies for water quality and can be detected by optical sensors. Traditional remote sensing techniques were developed using multispectral sensors, and employ band ratio algorithms that seek to predict the concentrations of OACs in relation to water quality. In complex coastal waters, overlapping spectral signatures of OACs often confound these algorithms and reduce their predictive capacity. The objective of this study was to develop a dataset to test the predictive capabilities of partial least-squares regression, a multivariate statistical method, for hyperspectral remote sensing and in situ CHL a concentrations. This paper presents the model performance for a dataset developed in Long Bay, a ~160 km arcuate bay that spans the border between North and South Carolina. The model uses multivariate-based statistical modeling to capitalize on the spectral advantage gained by hyperspectral sensors when observing such waters. Following this approach, a multivariate-based monitoring tool for the prediction of CHL a concentrations is presented with a partial least-squares regression (PLSR) method using hyperspectral and laboratory

  10. Testing slim-disk models on the thermal spectra of LMC X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, O.; Bursa, M.; Sądowski, A.; Steiner, J. F.; Abramowicz, M. A.; Kluźniak, W.; McClintock, J. E.; Narayan, R.; Remillard, R. A.

    2011-09-01

    Slim-disk models describe advective accretion flows at high luminosities, while reducing to the standard thin disk form in the low luminosity limit. We have developed a new spectral model, slimbb, within the framework of XSPEC, which describes fully relativistic slim-disk accretion and includes photon ray-tracing that starts from the disk photosphere, rather than the equatorial plane. We demonstrate the features of this model by applying it to RXTE spectra of the persistent black-hole X-ray binary LMC X-3. LMC X-3 has the virtues of exhibiting large intensity variations while maintaining itself in soft spectral states which are well described using accretion-disk models, making it an ideal candidate to test the aptness of slimbb. Our results demonstrate consistency between the low-luminosity (thin-disk) and high luminosity (slim-disk) regimes. The results also illustrate that advection alone does not solve the problem of the origin of the surprisingly soft high-luminosity spectra in LMC X-3. We show that X-ray continuum-fitting in the high accretion rate regime can powerfully test black-hole accretion disk models.

  11. Successful intelligence: A model for testing intelligence beyond IQ tests

    OpenAIRE

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Standard conventional tests only assess a narrow sampling of the abilities required for success in school and in life. In contrast, the augmented theory of successful intelligence asserts that intelligence involves creative skills in producing new ideas, analytical skills in evaluating whether the ideas are good ones, practical skills in putting the ideas into practice and in convincing other people of the value of the ideas, and wisdom-based skills in confirming that one is using one's knowl...

  12. Improving the detection of evoked responses to periodic stimulation by using bivariate local spectral F-test - Application to EEG during photic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Leonardo Bonato; Rocha, Paulo Fábio; Mendes, Eduardo Mazoni Andrade Marçal; Miranda de Sá, Antonio Mauricio Ferreira Leite

    2017-10-01

    The spectral local F-test has been applied for detecting evoked responses to rhythmic stimulation that are embedded in the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG). Based on the sampling distribution of a flat spectrum at the neighbourhood of the stimulation frequency, spectral peaks in an EEG signal that are due to the stimulation may be readily assessed. Nevertheless, the performance of the technique is strongly affected by both the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the responses and the number of data segments used in the estimation. The present work aims at both deriving and evaluating a multivariate extension of local F-test by including the EEG collected at a second distinct derivation. The detection rate with this multivariate detector was found to be greater than that using a single channel in case of equal SNR in both signals. Monte Carlo simulation results showed that the probability of detection with this new detector saturates for signal-to-noise ratios above 12 dB and indicated a greater detection rate in practical situations, even when smaller SNR-values are found in the added signal (e.g. 5 dB for 16 neighbouring frequencies used in the estimation). The technique was next applied to the EEG from 12 subjects during intermittent, photic stimulation leading to superior performance in comparison with the univariate local F-test. Since a higher detection rate with the proposed technique is achieved without the need of increasing the number of data segments, it allows evoked responses to be detected faster, once the same detection rate may be accomplished with less segments. This might be useful in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spectral Predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  14. Ceres spectral modelling with VIR data onboard Dawn: Method and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raponi, A.; Ciarniello, M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Frigeri, A.; Fonte, S.; Giardino, M.; Longobardo, A.; Magni, G.; Palomba, E.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    The Dawn spacecraft [1] is at Ceres, the closest of the IAU-defined dwarf planets to the Sun and the only one found in the inner Solar System. Despite it has been one of the most intensely observed objects in the asteroid belt, many issues about its surface and internal composition remain unanswered. Topic of this work is the interpretation of Ceres' surface composition based on the data coming from the VIR instrument [2] onboard Dawn. We have attempted to reproduce the composition modeled by previous works, focused on Earth-based observations.

  15. Addition of a 5/cm Spectral Resolution Band Model Option to LOWTRAN5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    Ocean Background Radiance Measurements ............. . ........................ 2-19 20. Comparison of LOWTRAN5 (Band Model) Predictions to University...THETA-PHI CEO 880 SALP -RX*SPHI CEO 890 IF (SPHIl.GT.1 .E-10) DS-(RE+2)*SIN(BET*CA)ISPHI CEO 900 BETA-BETA+BET CEO 910 PSI-BETA+PHI-ANGLE CEO 920 PHI...9,I+1 )/EH(9,I) CEO 1250 SPHI-SPHI*RX/RN CEO 1260 IF (SALP.CE .RN) SFRI- SALP CEO 1270 -J75 CONTINUE CEO 1280 GO TO 190 CEO 1290 C HORIZONTAL PATH CEO

  16. The kinematics of σ-drop bulges from spectral synthesis modelling of a hydrodynamical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portaluri, Elisa; Debattista, Victor P.; Fabricius, Maximillian; Cole, David R.; Corsini, Enrico M.; Drory, Niv; Rowe, Andrew; Morelli, Lorenzo; Pizzella, Alessandro; Dalla Bontà, Elena

    2017-05-01

    A minimum in stellar velocity dispersion is often observed in the central regions of disc galaxies. To investigate the origin of this feature, known as a σ-drop, we analyse the stellar kinematics of a high-resolution N-body + smooth particle hydrodynamical simulation, which models the secular evolution of an unbarred disc galaxy. We compared the intrinsic mass-weighted kinematics to the recovered luminosity-weighted ones. The latter were obtained by analysing synthetic spectra produced by a new code, syntra, that generates synthetic spectra by assigning a stellar population synthesis model to each star particle based on its age and metallicity. The kinematics were derived from the synthetic spectra as in real spectra to mimic the kinematic analysis of real galaxies. We found that the recovered luminosity-weighted kinematics in the centre of the simulated galaxy are biased to higher rotation velocities and lower velocity dispersions due to the presence of young stars in a thin and kinematically cool disc, and are ultimately responsible for the σ-drop. Our procedure for building mock observations and thus recovering the luminosity-weighted kinematics of the stars in a galaxy simulation is a powerful tool that can be applied to a variety of scientific questions, such as multiple stellar populations in kinematically decoupled cores and counter-rotating components, and galaxies with both thick and thin disc components.

  17. Dynamic Models for LES of Turbulent Front Propagation With a Spectral Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, H. G.; Lund, T. S.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows places extreme demands on computational resources. At the present time, simulations can be performed only for greatly simplified reaction systems and for very low Reynolds numbers. Direct simulation of more realistic cases occurring at higher Reynolds number and including multiple species and numerous chemical reactions will exceed available computational resources far into the future. Because of this, there is a clear need to develop the technique of large eddy simulation for reacting flows. Unfortunately this task is complicated by the fact that combustion arises from chemical reactions that occur at the smallest scales of the flow. Capturing the large-scale behavior without resolving the small-scale details is extremely difficult in combustion problems. Thus LES modeling for turbulent combustion encounters difficulties not present in modeling momentum transport, in which the main effect of the small scales is to provide dissipation. The difficulty is more pronounced in premixed combustion, where detailed chemistry plays an essential role in determining the flame speed (or overall burning rate); in nonpremixed combustion infinite rate chemistry can be assumed, eliminating the small scale features to a first approximation.

  18. Modeling epileptic brain states using EEG spectral analysis and topographic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Bruno; Teixeira, César; Ribeiro, Bernardete; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Sales, Francisco; Dourado, António

    2012-09-30

    Changes in the spatio-temporal behavior of the brain electrical activity are believed to be associated to epileptic brain states. We propose a novel methodology to identify the different states of the epileptic brain, based on the topographic mapping of the time varying relative power of delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency sub-bands, estimated from EEG. Using normalized-cuts segmentation algorithm, points of interest are identified in the topographic mappings and their trajectories over time are used for finding out relations with epileptogenic propagations in the brain. These trajectories are used to train a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), which models the different epileptic brain states and the transition among them. Applied to 10 patients suffering from focal seizures, with a total of 30 seizures over 497.3h of data, the methodology shows good results (an average point-by-point accuracy of 89.31%) for the identification of the four brain states--interictal, preictal, ictal and postictal. The results suggest that the spatio-temporal dynamics captured by the proposed methodology are related to the epileptic brain states and transitions involved in focal seizures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A new model for the spectral induced polarization signature of bacterial growth in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Revil, A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Jardani, A.; Smith, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent biogeophysics studies demonstrated the sensitivity of complex conductivity to bacterial growth and microbial mediated mineral transformations in porous media. Frequency-domain induced polarization is a minimally invasive manner to measure the complex conductivity of a material over a broad range of frequencies. The real component of complex conductivity is associated with electromigration of the charge carriers, and the imaginary component represents reversible energy storage of charge carriers at polarization length scales. Quantitative relationship between frequency-domain induced polarization responses and bacterial growth and decay in porous media is analyzed in this study using a new developed model. We focus on the direct contribution of bacteria themselves to the complex conductivity in porous media in the absence of biomineralization. At low frequencies, the induced polarization of bacteria (α-polarization) is related to the properties of the electrical double layer surrounding the membrane surface of bacteria. Surface conductivity and α-polarization are due to the Stern layer of the counterions occurring in a brush of polymers coating the surface of the bacteria, and can be related to the cation exchange capacity of the bacteria. From the modeling results, at low frequencies (Monod kinetics, we show that the changes in imaginary conductivity with time can be used to determine bacterial growth kinetics parameters such as the growth and endogenous decay coefficient.

  20. Accelerated testing statistical models, test plans, and data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Wayne B

    2009-01-01

    The Wiley-Interscience Paperback Series consists of selected books that have been made more accessible to consumers in an effort to increase global appeal and general circulation. With these new unabridged softcover volumes, Wiley hopes to extend the lives of these works by making them available to future generations of statisticians, mathematicians, and scientists. "". . . a goldmine of knowledge on accelerated life testing principles and practices . . . one of the very few capable of advancing the science of reliability. It definitely belongs in every bookshelf on engineering.""-Dev G.

  1. Modelling the optical constants of cubic ZnS in the 0-20 eV spectral region

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuchiya, T; Adachi, S

    2003-01-01

    We have analysed the complex dielectric-function spectra epsilon(E) epsilon sub 1 (E) + i epsilon sub 2 (E) of cubic (c-)ZnS in the full spectral range (E = 0-20 eV) using a classical harmonic oscillator and a simplified interband transition model. The experimental epsilon(E) spectra reveal the reststrahlen band, distinct critical-point structures and cation d-band excitations in the spectra. The critical points are assigned to specific points in the Brillouin zone with the aid of the band-structure calculation. They are E sub 0 doublet at approx 3.8 eV; E sub 1 at approx 6.4 eV; E sub 2 at approx 7.0 eV; E sub 2 + delta at approx 7.4 eV; E sub 0 ' at approx 7.9 eV and E sub 1 ' at approx 9.4 eV. Excellent agreement is also achieved between the modelled and experimental epsilon(E) spectra over the entire range of photon energies. The sum rules are used to extract more detailed information. The high-frequency and static dielectric constants of c-ZnS are determined to be epsilon subinfinity = 5.1 and epsilon su...

  2. Pulmonary parenchyma segmentation in thin CT image sequences with spectral clustering and geodesic active contour model based on similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nana; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Juanjuan; Zhao, Huilan; Qiang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    While the popular thin layer scanning technology of spiral CT has helped to improve diagnoses of lung diseases, the large volumes of scanning images produced by the technology also dramatically increase the load of physicians in lesion detection. Computer-aided diagnosis techniques like lesions segmentation in thin CT sequences have been developed to address this issue, but it remains a challenge to achieve high segmentation efficiency and accuracy without much involvement of human manual intervention. In this paper, we present our research on automated segmentation of lung parenchyma with an improved geodesic active contour model that is geodesic active contour model based on similarity (GACBS). Combining spectral clustering algorithm based on Nystrom (SCN) with GACBS, this algorithm first extracts key image slices, then uses these slices to generate an initial contour of pulmonary parenchyma of un-segmented slices with an interpolation algorithm, and finally segments lung parenchyma of un-segmented slices. Experimental results show that the segmentation results generated by our method are close to what manual segmentation can produce, with an average volume overlap ratio of 91.48%.

  3. Methods and models for the construction of weakly parallel tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, J.J.; Adema, Jos J.

    1990-01-01

    Methods are proposed for the construction of weakly parallel tests, that is, tests with the same test information function. A mathematical programing model for constructing tests with a prespecified test information function and a heuristic for assigning items to tests such that their information

  4. Successful intelligence: A model for testing intelligence beyond IQ tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Sternberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Standard conventional tests only assess a narrow sampling of the abilities required for success in school and in life. In contrast, the augmented theory of successful intelligence asserts that intelligence involves creative skills in producing new ideas, analytical skills in evaluating whether the ideas are good ones, practical skills in putting the ideas into practice and in convincing other people of the value of the ideas, and wisdom-based skills in confirming that one is using one's knowledge and skills to serve a common good. Three projects were created to evaluate the theory with regard to college admissions: First, the Rainbow Project demonstrated that prediction of first-year college academic performance could be increased while simultaneously decreasing differences between ethnic groups on a predictive assessment, in comparison with the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT. Second, the Kaleidoscope Project improved prediction of academic and extracurricular performance over SAT scores alone; but the ethnic-group differences usually obtained vanished. Third, the Panorama Project showed the success of similar techniques in a less selective population. The projects demonstrate the application of the augmented theory of successful intelligence in enhancing college and university admissions procedures

  5. Successful intelligence: A model for testing intelligence beyond IQ tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Sternberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Standard conventional tests only assess a narrow sampling of the abilities required for success in school and in life. In contrast, the augmented theory of successful intelligence asserts that intelligence involves creative skills in producing new ideas, analytical skills in evaluating whether the ideas are good ones, practical skills in putting the ideas into practice and in convincing other people of the value of the ideas, and wisdom-based skills in confirming that one is using one's knowledge and skills to serve a common good. Three projects were created to evaluate the theory with regard to college admissions: First, the Rainbow Project demonstrated that prediction of first-year college academic performance could be increased while simultaneously decreasing differences between ethnic groups on a predictive assessment, in comparison with the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT. Second, the Kaleidoscope Project improved prediction of academic and extracurricular performance over SAT scores alone; but the ethnic-group differences usually obtained vanished. Third, the Panorama Project showed the success of similar techniques in a less selective population. The projects demonstrate the application of the augmented theory of successful intelligence in enhancing college and university admissions procedures.

  6. Guest:host interactions of lidocaine and prilocaine with natural cyclodextrins: Spectral and molecular modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, N.; Mohandoss, T.; Saravanan, J.

    2014-11-01

    Inclusion complex formation of two local anesthetics drugs (lidocaine (LC) and prilocaine (PC)) with α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) in aqueous solution were studied by absorption, fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence and molecular modeling methods. The formation of inclusion complexes was confirmed by 1H NMR, FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry, SEM, TEM and X-ray diffractometry. Both drugs formed 1:1 inclusion complex and exhibit biexponential decay in water whereas triexponential decay in the CD solution. Nanosized self-aggregated particles of drug: CD complexes were found by TEM. Both experimental and theoretical studies revealed that the phenyl ring with the amide group of the drug is encapsulated in the hydrophobic CD nanocavity. Investigations of energetic and thermodynamic properties confirmed the stability of the inclusion complexes. van der Waals interactions are mainly responsible for enthalpy driven complex formation of LC and PC with CDs.

  7. Nonlinear Spectral Mixture Modeling to Estimate Water-Ice Abundance of Martian Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyalay, Szilard; Chu, Kathryn; Zeev Noe Dobrea, Eldar

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel technique to estimate the abundance of water-ice in the Martian permafrost using Phoenix Surface Stereo Imager multispectral data. In previous work, Cull et al. (2010) estimated the abundance of water-ice in trenches dug by the Mars Phoenix lander by modeling the spectra of the icy regolith using the radiative transfer methods described in Hapke (2008) with optical constants for Mauna Kea palagonite (Clancy et al., 1995) as a substitute for unknown Martian regolith optical constants. Our technique, which uses the radiative transfer methods described in Shkuratov et al. (1999), seeks to eliminate the uncertainty that stems from not knowing the composition of the Martian regolith by using observations of the Martian soil before and after the water-ice has sublimated away. We use observations of the desiccated regolith sample to estimate its complex index of refraction from its spectrum. This removes any a priori assumptions of Martian regolith composition, limiting our free parameters to the estimated real index of refraction of the dry regolith at one specific wavelength, ice grain size, and regolith porosity. We can then model mixtures of regolith and water-ice, fitting to the original icy spectrum to estimate the ice abundance. To constrain the uncertainties in this technique, we performed laboratory measurements of the spectra of known mixtures of water-ice and dry soils as well as those of soils after desiccation with controlled viewing geometries. Finally, we applied the technique to Phoenix Surface Stereo Imager observations and estimated water-ice abundances consistent with pore-fill in the near-surface ice. This abundance is consistent with atmospheric diffusion, which has implications to our understanding of the history of water-ice on Mars and the role of the regolith at high latitudes as a reservoir of atmospheric H2O.

  8. SIMULASI NUMERIK GELOMBANG (SPECTRAL WAVES DAN BENCANA ROB MENGGUNAKAN FLEXIBLE MESH DAN DATA ELEVATION MODEL DI PERAIRAN KECAMATAN SAYUNG, DEMAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koko Ondara

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pesisir Kecamatan Sayung merupakan wilayah abrasi di Kabupaten Demak yang terkena dampak paling parah dari kenaikan muka air laut. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui dinamika gelombang yang terjadi pada setiap kondisi pasang surut dan pengaruhnya terhadap rob serta overtopping yang terjadi. Metode penelitian adalah deskriptif kuantitatif menggunakan persamaan numerik, simulasi MIKE 21 dan model elevasi ArcGis. Hs tahun 2016 pada pasang purnama 0,015 – 0,359 m dan pada surut purnama 0,009 – 0,358 m. Hasil pengolahan data menunjukkan ada perbedaan yang drastis genangan yang terjadi pada saat pasang dan surut. Luas area model genangan rob pada tahun 2016 sebesar 7200,36 Ha. Untuk jarak terjauh genangan rob dari garis pantai pada tahun 2016 sejauh 10826,7 m. Terdapat peningkatan tinggi gelombang termasuk kondisi pasut purnama dan perbani tiap tahunnya. Hal ini menunjukkan abrasi terjadi di pengaruhi oleh kikisan gelombang yang terjadi secara terus-menerus. Kenaikan muka air laut yang terjadi setiap tahunnya berbanding terbalik dengan luas genangan yang dihasilkan, sehingga perlu dilakukan tindakan yang preventif pada proses tata kelola ruang pesisir.  Kata kunci: model elevasi, gelombang, model numerik, banjir rob, SayungNUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SPECTRAL WAVES AND ROB DISASTER USING FLEXIBLE MESH AND DATA ELEVATION MODEL IN WATERS OF SAYUNG DISTRICT, DEMAKCoastline area in subdistrict Sayung is an abrasion area in Demak which has the worst affected of sea level rise. The purpose of this study to determine the wave dynamics that occur in any tidal conditions and their effects on tidal flood and overtopping happened. The research method is quantitative descriptive using numerical equations, MIKE 21 simulation and ArcGIS elevation models. Hs 2016 on a tide 0.015 to 0.359 m and in full retroactively from 0.009 to 0.358 m. The results of data processing showed no drastic difference puddle that occur at high tide and low tide. The area of tidal

  9. Impacts from Time-dependent Freezing of Rain and Wet Hail on Deep Convection Simulated by a Cloud Model with Spectral Bin Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, V. T.; Khain, A.; Ilotoviz, E.; BenMoshe, N.

    2014-12-01

    Any hydrometeor containing some supercooled liquid can only freeze it as fast as latent heat is dissipated to the ambient air. Consequently, at sub-zero temperatures any given particle in a cloud can contain both ice and liquid water. Wet growth of hail occurs when supercooled cloud-liquid is accreted faster than it can freeze immediately on impact. Equally, raindrops in clear air can take up to a few mins to freeze. A new theory of time-dependent freezing is proposed in this presentation. First, wet growth of hail is represented by treating inhomogeneities of liquid coverage and temperature over the surface of the particle. Radial heat fluxes from the sponge layer through the liquid skin to the air are predicted, as well as heat fluxes between its wet and dry parts. Gradual internal freezing of liquid that soaks the interior of the hail or graupel particle during dry growth ('riming') is represented. The microphysical recycling with alternating episodes of wet and dry growth is predicted. Second, the time-dependent process of raindrop freezing is represented by including thermodynamic effects from accretion of cloud-liquid and -ice. Freezing drops larger than about 0.1 mm are represented as a new microphysical species in a cloud model with spectral bin microphysics. The freezing drops consist of interior water covered by ice initially. Possibilities of both dry and wet growth of freezing drops are represented. Schemes of time-dependent freezing for rain and wet growth of hail and graupel were implemented in a spectral bin microphysics cloud model. The model predicted that accretion of liquid produces giant freezing drops of 0.5-2 cm in diameter, due to downdraft-updraft recirculation and wet growth of freezing drops. Appreciable contents of freezing drops reach a height level of 7 km (-30 degC) in the simulated storm. The critical diameter separating wet and dry growth regimes is predicted to increase with height for freezing drops. It is more vertically uniform

  10. DYNAMIC CHANGES IN SPECTRAL HEART RATE VARIABILITY PARAMETERS IN PACED BREATHING TEST IN PATIENT WITH UNCONTROLLED ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND POLYMORBIDITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Oyeleye

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A clinical case of a patient with uncontrolled hypertension and polymorbidity. The paced breathing test was made, was found prevalence of low frequency influences at the initial stage and its intensification at the resting stage, growth of the total power of heart rate variability spectrum (TP with respiratory modulation. The course of the disease worsened the appearance of new-onset atrial fibrillation (registered paroxysm on Holter monitoring; the general deterioration of the patient’s state reflected HRV changes on sinus rhythm tracing - significantly reduced TP growth in response to paced breathing, an increase in LF/HF (ratio of low frequency to high frequency waves, as well as switching to the neurohormonal level of heart rate regulation at the resting stage. After the treatment the growth of TP in response to the test has increased and LF/HF level has decreased.

  11. Application of model-based spectral analysis to wind-profiler radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Boyer

    Full Text Available A classical way to reduce a radar’s data is to compute the spectrum using FFT and then to identify the different peak contributions. But in case an overlapping between the different echoes (atmospheric echo, clutter, hydrometeor echo. . . exists, Fourier-like techniques provide poor frequency resolution and then sophisticated peak-identification may not be able to detect the different echoes. In order to improve the number of reduced data and their quality relative to Fourier spectrum analysis, three different methods are presented in this paper and applied to actual data. Their approach consists of predicting the main frequency-components, which avoids the development of very sophisticated peak-identification algorithms. The first method is based on cepstrum properties generally used to determine the shift between two close identical echoes. We will see in this paper that this method cannot provide a better estimate than Fourier-like techniques in an operational use. The second method consists of an autoregressive estimation of the spectrum. Since the tests were promising, this method was applied to reduce the radar data obtained during two thunder-storms. The autoregressive method, which is very simple to implement, improved the Doppler-frequency data reduction relative to the FFT spectrum analysis. The third method exploits a MUSIC algorithm, one of the numerous subspace-based methods, which is well adapted to estimate spectra composed of pure lines. A statistical study of performances of this method is presented, and points out the very good resolution of this estimator in comparison with Fourier-like techniques. Application to actual data confirms the good qualities of this estimator for reducing radar’s data.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (tropical meteorology- Radio science (signal processing- General (techniques applicable in three or more fields

  12. Application of model-based spectral analysis to wind-profiler radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, E.; Petitdidier, M.; Corneil, W.; Adnet, C.; Larzabal, P.

    2001-08-01

    A classical way to reduce a radar’s data is to compute the spectrum using FFT and then to identify the different peak contributions. But in case an overlapping between the different echoes (atmospheric echo, clutter, hydrometeor echo. . . ) exists, Fourier-like techniques provide poor frequency resolution and then sophisticated peak-identification may not be able to detect the different echoes. In order to improve the number of reduced data and their quality relative to Fourier spectrum analysis, three different methods are presented in this paper and applied to actual data. Their approach consists of predicting the main frequency-components, which avoids the development of very sophisticated peak-identification algorithms. The first method is based on cepstrum properties generally used to determine the shift between two close identical echoes. We will see in this paper that this method cannot provide a better estimate than Fourier-like techniques in an operational use. The second method consists of an autoregressive estimation of the spectrum. Since the tests were promising, this method was applied to reduce the radar data obtained during two thunder-storms. The autoregressive method, which is very simple to implement, improved the Doppler-frequency data reduction relative to the FFT spectrum analysis. The third method exploits a MUSIC algorithm, one of the numerous subspace-based methods, which is well adapted to estimate spectra composed of pure lines. A statistical study of performances of this method is presented, and points out the very good resolution of this estimator in comparison with Fourier-like techniques. Application to actual data confirms the good qualities of this estimator for reducing radar’s data.

  13. Radiative modeling and characterization of aerosol plumes hyper-spectral imagery; Modelisation radiative et caracterisation des panaches d'aerosols en imagerie hyperspectrale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alakian, A

    2008-03-15

    This thesis aims at characterizing aerosols from plumes (biomass burning, industrial discharges, etc.) with hyper-spectral imagery. We want to estimate the optical properties of emitted particles and also their micro-physical properties such as number, size distribution and composition. To reach our goal, we have built a forward semi-analytical model, named APOM (Aerosol Plume Optical Model), which allows to simulate the radiative effects of aerosol plumes in the spectral range [0,4-2,5 {mu}m] for nadir viewing sensors. Mathematical formulation and model coefficients are obtained from simulations performed with the radiative transfer code COMANCHE. APOM is assessed on simulated data and proves to be accurate with modeling errors between 1% and 3%. Three retrieval methods using APOM have been developed: L-APOM, M-APOM and A-APOM. These methods take advantage of spectral and spatial dimensions in hyper-spectral images. L-APOM and M-APOM assume a priori knowledge on particles but can estimate their optical and micro-physical properties. Their performances on simulated data are quite promising. A-APOM method does not require any a priori knowledge on particles but only estimates their optical properties. However, it still needs improvements before being usable. On real images, inversion provides satisfactory results for plumes above water but meets some difficulties for plumes above vegetation, which underlines some possibilities of improvement for the retrieval algorithm. (author)

  14. Energy transfers and spectral eddy viscosity in large-eddy simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence : Comparison of dynamic Smagorinsky and multiscale models over a range of discretizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, T.J.R.; Wells, G.N.; Wray, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Energy transfers within large-eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) grids are studied. The spectral eddy viscosity for conventional dynamic Smagorinsky and variational multiscale LES methods are compared with DNS results. Both models underestimate the DNS results for a very

  15. Assessment of autonomic nervous system function in nursing students using an autonomic reflex orthostatic test by heart rate spectral analysis

    OpenAIRE

    HASEGAWA, MAO; HAYANO, AZUSA; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students experience academic demands, such as tests, theoretical and practical coursework, research activities, various aspects of professional practice, and contact with health professionals and patients. Consequently, nursing students face numerous types of stress, and increased stress levels contribute to physical and psychological distress in nursing students. The aim of the present study was to investigate the autonomic nervous system function of nursing students by assessing act...

  16. Global approach to the spectral problem of microinstabilities in tokamak plasmas using a gyrokinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, S. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-08-01

    Ion temperature gradient (ITG)-related instabilities are studied in tokamak-like plasmas with the help of a new global eigenvalue code. Ions are modelled in the frame of gyrokinetic theory so that finite Larmor radius effects of these particles are retained to all orders. Non-adiabatic trapped electron dynamics is taken into account through the bounce-averaged drift kinetic equation. Assuming electrostatic perturbations, the system is closed with the quasineutrality relation. Practical methods are presented which make this global approach feasible. These include a non-standard wave decomposition compatible with the curved geometry as well as adapting an efficient root finding algorithm for computing the unstable spectrum. These techniques are applied to a low pressure configuration given by a large aspect ratio torus with circular, concentric magnetic surfaces. Simulations from a linear, time evolution, particle in cell code provide a useful benchmark. Comparisons with local ballooning calculations for different parameter scans enable further validation while illustrating the limits of that representation at low toroidal wave numbers or for non-interchange-like instabilities. The stabilizing effect of negative magnetic shear is also considered, in which case the global results show not only an attenuation of the growth rate but also a reduction of the radial extent induced by a transition from the toroidal- to the slab-ITG mode. Contributions of trapped electrons to the ITG instability as well as the possible coupling to the trapped electron mode are clearly brought to the fore. (author) figs., tabs., 69 refs.

  17. Engineering Abstractions in Model Checking and Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achenbach, Michael; Ostermann, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstractions are used in model checking to tackle problems like state space explosion or modeling of IO. The application of these abstractions in real software development processes, however, lacks engineering support. This is one reason why model checking is not widely used in practice yet...... and implementing abstractions will improve the applicability of model checking in practice....

  18. Putting hydrological modelling practice to the test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melsen, Lieke Anna

    2017-01-01

    Six steps can be distinguished in the process of hydrological modelling: the perceptual model (deciding on the processes), the conceptual model (deciding on the equations), the procedural model (get the code to run on a computer), calibration (identify the parameters), evaluation (confronting output

  19. Early Detection of Complete Vascular Occlusion in a Pedicle Flap Model Using Quantitation Spectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharaon, Michael R.; Scholz, Thomas; Bogdanoff, Scott; Cuccia, David; Durkin, Anthony J.; Hoyt, David B.; Evans, Gregory R. D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular occlusion after tissue transfer is a devastating complication that can lead to complete flap loss. Spatial frequency domain imaging is a new, noncontact, noninvasive, wide-field imaging technology capable of quantifying oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin levels, total hemoglobin, and tissue saturation. Methods Pedicled fasciocutaneous flaps on Wistar rats (400 to 500 g) were created and underwent continuous imaging using spatial frequency domain imaging before and after selective vascular occlusion. Three flap groups (control, selective arterial occlusion, and selective venous occlusion) and a fourth group composed of native skin between the flaps were measured. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the control flap group and the experimental flap groups before selective vascular occlusion: oxyhemoglobin (p = 0.2017), deoxyhemoglobin (p = 0.3145), total hemoglobin (p = 0.2718), and tissue saturation,(p = 0.0777). In the selective arterial occlusion flap group, percentage change in total hemoglobin was statistically different from that of the control flap group (p = 0.0218). The remaining parameters were not statistically different from those of the control flap: percentage change in oxyhemoglobin (p = 0.0888), percentage change in deoxyhemoglobin (p = 0.5198), and percentage change in tissue saturation (p = 0.4220). The selective venous occlusion flap group demonstrated changes statistically different compared with the control flap group: percentage change in oxyhemoglobin (p = 0.0029) and deoxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin, and tissue saturation (p oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin, and tissue saturation. Results presented here indicate that this can be used to quantify and detect physiologic changes that occur after arterial and venous occlusion in a rodent tissue transfer flap model. This portable, noncontact, noninvasive device may have a high clinical applicability in monitoring postoperative

  20. Early detection of complete vascular occlusion in a pedicle flap model using quantitative [corrected] spectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharaon, Michael R; Scholz, Thomas; Bogdanoff, Scott; Cuccia, David; Durkin, Anthony J; Hoyt, David B; Evans, Gregory R D

    2010-12-01

    Vascular occlusion after tissue transfer is a devastating complication that can lead to complete flap loss. Spatial frequency domain imaging is a new, noncontact, noninvasive, wide-field imaging technology capable of quantifying oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin levels, total hemoglobin, and tissue saturation. Pedicled fasciocutaneous flaps on Wistar rats (400 to 500 g) were created and underwent continuous imaging using spatial frequency domain imaging before and after selective vascular occlusion. Three flap groups (control, selective arterial occlusion, and selective venous occlusion) and a fourth group composed of native skin between the flaps were measured. There were no statistically significant differences between the control flap group and the experimental flap groups before selective vascular occlusion: oxyhemoglobin (p=0.2017), deoxyhemoglobin (p=0.3145), total hemoglobin (p=0.2718), and tissue saturation, (p=0.0777). In the selective arterial occlusion flap group, percentage change in total hemoglobin was statistically different from that of the control flap group (p=0.0218). The remaining parameters were not statistically different from those of the control flap: percentage change in oxyhemoglobin (p=0.0888), percentage change in deoxyhemoglobin (p=0.5198), and percentage change in tissue saturation (p=0.4220). The selective venous occlusion flap group demonstrated changes statistically different compared with the control flap group: percentage change in oxyhemoglobin (p=0.0029) and deoxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin, and tissue saturation (poxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin, and tissue saturation. Results presented here indicate that this can be used to quantify and detect physiologic changes that occur after arterial and venous occlusion in a rodent tissue transfer flap model. This portable, noncontact, noninvasive device may have a high clinical applicability in monitoring postoperative patients.

  1. Characterizing the Purple Earth: Modeling the globally integrated spectral variability of the Archean Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanromá, E.; Pallé, E.; López, R.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), Vía Láctea s/n E-38200, La Laguna (Spain); Parenteau, M. N. [NASA Ames Research Center, Exobiology Branch, Mountain View, CA 94035 (United States); Kiang, N. Y. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Gutiérrez-Navarro, A. M., E-mail: mesr@iac.es [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of La Laguna, ES-38206 La Laguna (Spain)

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing searches for exoplanetary systems have revealed a wealth of planets with diverse physical properties. Planets even smaller than the Earth have already been detected and the efforts of future missions are aimed at the discovery, and perhaps characterization, of small rocky exoplanets within the habitable zone of their stars. Clearly, what we know about our planet will be our guideline for the characterization of such planets. However, the Earth has been inhabited for at least 3.8 Gyr and its appearance has changed with time. Here, we have studied the Earth during the Archean eon, 3.0 Gyr ago. At that time, one of the more widespread life forms on the planet was purple bacteria. These bacteria are photosynthetic microorganisms and can inhabit both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Here, we use a radiative transfer model to simulate the visible and near-infrared radiation reflected by our planet, taking into account several scenarios regarding the possible distribution of purple bacteria over continents and oceans. We find that purple bacteria have a reflectance spectrum that has a strong reflectivity increase, similar to the red edge of leafy plants, although shifted redward. This feature produces a detectable signal in the disk-averaged spectra of our planet, depending on cloud amount and purple bacteria concentration/distribution. We conclude that by using multi-color photometric observations, it is possible to distinguish between an Archean Earth in which purple bacteria inhabit vast extensions of the planet and a present-day Earth with continents covered by deserts, vegetation, or microbial mats.

  2. A test for the parameters of multiple linear regression models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A test for the parameters of multiple linear regression models is developed for conducting tests simultaneously on all the parameters of multiple linear regression models. The test is robust relative to the assumptions of homogeneity of variances and absence of serial correlation of the classical F-test. Under certain null and ...

  3. Complex network modeling of spectral remotely sensed imagery: A case study of massive green algae blooms detection based on MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Yi; Shao, Fengjing; Wang, Changying; Sun, Rencheng; Ji, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Feature bands selection and targets classification is of great importance in spectral remotely sensed imagery interpretation. In this work, complex network is adopted for modeling spectral remotely sensed imagery. Subnet is constructed for each band based on spatial neighboring characteristic. Feature bands could be obtained by analyzing and comparing topological characteristics between subnets. After finding feature bands, subnets of feature bands are compounded. Targets classification could be measured by degree distribution of the composited network. This approach is evaluated with empirical experiments based on detecting massive green algae blooms with MODIS data. Feature bands found are coincided with spectral mechanism of green algae. By comparing with FAI, RVI, NDVI, EVI and OSABI methods, our approach improves correct classification rates.

  4. Scale Dependency of Convective Momentum Transport as Diagnosed from Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation with Spectral-bin Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. C.; Fan, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, K. M.; Ghan, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Convective momentum transport (CMT) has been demonstrated to have a large impact on global atmospheric circulation in both observational and numerical studies. In General Circulation Models (GCMs) CMT is often parameterized in a simple way by assuming that in-cloud horizontal momentum depends only on lateral entrainment and detrainment rates [Schneider and Lindzen, 1976]. In addition to lateral entrainment and detrainment rates the effect of perturbation pressure gradient force induced by convection (Pc) on momentum transport is significant. Because it is the most complicated term to be parameterized, a very simple form of products among a constant coefficient, mass flux, and environment vertical wind shear was employed to parameterize it [Gregory et al., 1997]. In addition, none of these CMT parameterizations deal with the scale problems. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate the past CMT parameterizations and explore the scale dependencies of Pc and CMT using Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) coupled with the most sophisticated spectral-bin microphysics. Our preliminary results show that the parameterized CMT from the top-hat approach is underestimated especially at the gray zone scale (~4-50 km); using the simplified 3-updraft and 1-downdraft formulation proposed in our previous study for eddy transport of moisture, the CMT can be represented well. The formulation also produced a more accurate mass flux compared to the top-hat approach, which can potentially improve the parameterization of Pc. We investigate the relative contributions from linear and nonlinear forcing to Pc at different model grid spacing (dx). Our results show that the assumption that non-linear forcing is much smaller than linear force is valid only at dx > 128 km and dx < 8 km. At the dx = 32~16 km, linear and nonlinear forcings become compatible, suggesting a more sophisticated formula for Pc might be needed.

  5. Assessment of autonomic nervous system function in nursing students using an autonomic reflex orthostatic test by heart rate spectral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Mao; Hayano, Azusa; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2015-11-01

    Nursing students experience academic demands, such as tests, theoretical and practical coursework, research activities, various aspects of professional practice, and contact with health professionals and patients. Consequently, nursing students face numerous types of stress, and increased stress levels contribute to physical and psychological distress in nursing students. The aim of the present study was to investigate the autonomic nervous system function of nursing students by assessing active standing load using the autonomic reflex orthostatic tolerance test, which enables quantitative analysis of dynamic autonomic nervous system function. The autonomic nervous system activity in the resting state was low in fourth-year students, they had parasympathetic hypotension, and there was a tendency towards higher sympathetic nervous system activity of fourth-year students compared with first-, second- and third-year students. In the standing state, there was a trend towards a higher autonomic nervous system activity response of fourth-year students compared with first-, second- and third-year students. These results suggest that stress may influence autonomic nervous activity in fourth-year nursing students. By correcting stress in fourth-year nursing students, it may be possible to prevent the development of health problems.

  6. Possible Patient Early Diagnosis by Ultrasonic Noninvasive Estimation of Thermal Gradients into Tissues Based on Spectral Changes Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bazan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve a precise noninvasive temperature estimation, inside patient tissues, would open promising research fields, because its clinic results would provide early-diagnosis tools. In fact, detecting changes of thermal origin in ultrasonic echo spectra could be useful as an early complementary indicator of infections, inflammations, or cancer. But the effective clinic applications to diagnosis of thermometry ultrasonic techniques, proposed previously, require additional research. Before their implementations with ultrasonic probes and real-time electronic and processing systems, rigorous analyses must be still made over transient echotraces acquired from well-controlled biological and computational phantoms, to improve resolutions and evaluate clinic limitations. It must be based on computing improved signal-processing algorithms emulating tissues responses. Some related parameters in echo-traces reflected by semiregular scattering tissues must be carefully quantified to get a precise processing protocols definition. In this paper, approaches for non-invasive spectral ultrasonic detection are analyzed. Extensions of author's innovations for ultrasonic thermometry are shown and applied to computationally modeled echotraces from scattered biological phantoms, attaining high resolution (better than 0.1°C. Computer methods are provided for viability evaluation of thermal estimation from echoes with distinct noise levels, difficult to be interpreted, and its effectiveness is evaluated as possible diagnosis tool in scattered tissues like liver.

  7. SNR and BER Models and the Simulation for BER Performance of Selected Spectral Amplitude Codes for OCDMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Latif Memon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many encoding schemes are used in OCDMA (Optical Code Division Multiple Access Network but SAC (Spectral Amplitude Codes is widely used. It is considered an effective arrangement to eliminate dominant noise called MAI (Multi Access Interference. Various codes are studied for evaluation with respect to their performance against three noises namely shot noise, thermal noise and PIIN (Phase Induced Intensity Noise. Various Mathematical models for SNR (Signal to Noise Ratios and BER (Bit Error Rates are discussed where the SNRs are calculated and BERs are computed using Gaussian distribution assumption. After analyzing the results mathematically, it is concluded that ZCC (Zero Cross Correlation Code performs better than the other selected SAC codes and can serve larger number of active users than the other codes do. At various receiver power levels, analysis points out that RDC (Random Diagonal Code also performs better than the other codes. For the power interval between -10 and -20 dBm performance of RDC is better ZCC. Their lowest BER values suggest that these codes should be part of an efficient and cost effective OCDM access network in the future.

  8. Abnormal resting state effective connectivity within the default mode network in major depressive disorder: A spectral dynamic causal modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Li, Baojuan; Bai, Yuanhan; Liu, Wenlei; Wang, Huaning; Leung, Hoi-Chung; Tian, Ping; Zhang, Linchuan; Guo, Fan; Cui, Long-Biao; Yin, Hong; Lu, Hongbing; Tan, Qingrong

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the neural basis underlying major depressive disorder (MDD) is essential for the diagnosis and treatment of this mental disorder. Aberrant activation and functional connectivity of the default mode network (DMN) have been consistently found in patients with MDD. It is not known whether effective connectivity within the DMN is altered in MDD. The primary object of this study is to investigate the effective connectivity within the DMN during resting state in MDD patients before and after eight weeks of antidepressant treatment. We defined four regions of the DMN (medial frontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, left parietal cortex, and right parietal cortex) for each participant using a group independent component analysis. The coupling parameters reflecting the causal interactions among the DMN regions were estimated using spectral dynamic causal modeling (DCM). Twenty-seven MDD patients and 27 healthy controls were included in the statistical analysis. Our results showed declined influences from the left parietal cortex to other DMN regions in the pre-treatment patients as compared with healthy controls. After eight weeks of treatment, the influence from the right parietal cortex to the posterior cingulate cortex significantly decreased. These findings suggest that the reduced excitatory causal influence of the left parietal cortex is the key alteration of the DMN in patients with MDD, and the disrupted causal influences that parietal cortex exerts on the posterior cingulate cortex is responsive to antidepressant treatment.

  9. Assessing cortical and subcortical changes in a western diet mouse model using spectral/Fourier domain OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernucci, Marcel T.; Norman, Jennifer E.; Merkle, Conrad W.; Aung, Hnin H.; Rutkowsky, Jennifer; Rutledge, John C.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2017-02-01

    The Western diet, causative in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, has recently been associated with the development of diffuse white matter disease (WMD) and other subcortical changes. Yet, little is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms by which a high-fat diet can cause WMD. Mechanistic studies of deep brain regions in mice have been challenging due to a lack of non-invasive, high-resolution, and deep imaging technologies. Here we used Optical Coherence Tomography to study mouse cortical/subcortical structures noninvasively and in vivo. To better understand the role of Western Diet in the development of WMD, intensity and Doppler flow OCT images, obtained using a 1300 nm spectral / Fourier domain OCT system, were used to observe the structural and functional alterations in the cortex and corpus callosum of Western Diet and control diet mouse models. Specifically, we applied segmentation to the OCT images to identify the boundaries of the cortex/corpus callosum, and further quantify the layer thicknesses across animals between the two diet groups. Furthermore, microvasculature alterations such as changes in spatiotemporal flow profiles within diving arterioles, arteriole diameter, and collateral tortuosity were analyzed. In the current study, while the arteriole vessel diameters between the two diet groups was comparable, we show that collateral tortuosity was significantly higher in the Western diet group, compared to control diet group, possibly indicating remodeling of brain vasculature due to dietary changes. Moreover, there is evidence showing that the corpus callosum is thinner in Western diet mice, indicative of tissue atrophy.

  10. Possible patient early diagnosis by ultrasonic noninvasive estimation of thermal gradients into tissues based on spectral changes modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, I; Ramos, A; Calas, H; Ramirez, A; Pintle, R; Gomez, T E; Negreira, C; Gallegos, F J; Rosales, A J

    2012-01-01

    To achieve a precise noninvasive temperature estimation, inside patient tissues, would open promising research fields, because its clinic results would provide early-diagnosis tools. In fact, detecting changes of thermal origin in ultrasonic echo spectra could be useful as an early complementary indicator of infections, inflammations, or cancer. But the effective clinic applications to diagnosis of thermometry ultrasonic techniques, proposed previously, require additional research. Before their implementations with ultrasonic probes and real-time electronic and processing systems, rigorous analyses must be still made over transient echotraces acquired from well-controlled biological and computational phantoms, to improve resolutions and evaluate clinic limitations. It must be based on computing improved signal-processing algorithms emulating tissues responses. Some related parameters in echo-traces reflected by semiregular scattering tissues must be carefully quantified to get a precise processing protocols definition. In this paper, approaches for non-invasive spectral ultrasonic detection are analyzed. Extensions of author's innovations for ultrasonic thermometry are shown and applied to computationally modeled echotraces from scattered biological phantoms, attaining high resolution (better than 0.1 °C). Computer methods are provided for viability evaluation of thermal estimation from echoes with distinct noise levels, difficult to be interpreted, and its effectiveness is evaluated as possible diagnosis tool in scattered tissues like liver.

  11. Reliable sequential testing for statistical model checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijsbergen, D.P.; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a framework for comparing statistical model checking (SMC) techniques and propose a new, more reliable, SMC technique. Statistical model checking has recently been implemented in tools like UPPAAL and PRISM to be able to handle models which are too complex for numerical analysis.

  12. A full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach based on the material decomposition model applied in dual-energy computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, C. [CEA, LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France and CNRS, SUPELEC, UNIV PARIS SUD, L2S, 3 rue Joliot-Curie, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rodet, T.; Mohammad-Djafari, A. [CNRS, SUPELEC, UNIV PARIS SUD, L2S, 3 rue Joliot-Curie, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Legoupil, S. [CEA, LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) makes it possible to get two fractions of basis materials without segmentation. One is the soft-tissue equivalent water fraction and the other is the hard-matter equivalent bone fraction. Practical DECT measurements are usually obtained with polychromatic x-ray beams. Existing reconstruction approaches based on linear forward models without counting the beam polychromaticity fail to estimate the correct decomposition fractions and result in beam-hardening artifacts (BHA). The existing BHA correction approaches either need to refer to calibration measurements or suffer from the noise amplification caused by the negative-log preprocessing and the ill-conditioned water and bone separation problem. To overcome these problems, statistical DECT reconstruction approaches based on nonlinear forward models counting the beam polychromaticity show great potential for giving accurate fraction images.Methods: This work proposes a full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach which allows the reconstruction of high quality fraction images from ordinary polychromatic measurements. This approach is based on a Gaussian noise model with unknown variance assigned directly to the projections without taking negative-log. Referring to Bayesian inferences, the decomposition fractions and observation variance are estimated by using the joint maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation method. Subject to an adaptive prior model assigned to the variance, the joint estimation problem is then simplified into a single estimation problem. It transforms the joint MAP estimation problem into a minimization problem with a nonquadratic cost function. To solve it, the use of a monotone conjugate gradient algorithm with suboptimal descent steps is proposed.Results: The performance of the proposed approach is analyzed with both simulated and experimental data. The results show that the proposed Bayesian approach is robust to noise and materials. It is also

  13. A full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach based on the material decomposition model applied in dual-energy computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, C; Rodet, T; Legoupil, S; Mohammad-Djafari, A

    2013-11-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) makes it possible to get two fractions of basis materials without segmentation. One is the soft-tissue equivalent water fraction and the other is the hard-matter equivalent bone fraction. Practical DECT measurements are usually obtained with polychromatic x-ray beams. Existing reconstruction approaches based on linear forward models without counting the beam polychromaticity fail to estimate the correct decomposition fractions and result in beam-hardening artifacts (BHA). The existing BHA correction approaches either need to refer to calibration measurements or suffer from the noise amplification caused by the negative-log preprocessing and the ill-conditioned water and bone separation problem. To overcome these problems, statistical DECT reconstruction approaches based on nonlinear forward models counting the beam polychromaticity show great potential for giving accurate fraction images. This work proposes a full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach which allows the reconstruction of high quality fraction images from ordinary polychromatic measurements. This approach is based on a Gaussian noise model with unknown variance assigned directly to the projections without taking negative-log. Referring to Bayesian inferences, the decomposition fractions and observation variance are estimated by using the joint maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation method. Subject to an adaptive prior model assigned to the variance, the joint estimation problem is then simplified into a single estimation problem. It transforms the joint MAP estimation problem into a minimization problem with a nonquadratic cost function. To solve it, the use of a monotone conjugate gradient algorithm with suboptimal descent steps is proposed. The performance of the proposed approach is analyzed with both simulated and experimental data. The results show that the proposed Bayesian approach is robust to noise and materials. It is also necessary to have the

  14. Test Driven Development of Scientific Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Test-Driven Development (TDD), a software development process that promises many advantages for developer productivity and software reliability, has become widely accepted among professional software engineers. As the name suggests, TDD practitioners alternate between writing short automated tests and producing code that passes those tests. Although this overly simplified description will undoubtedly sound prohibitively burdensome to many uninitiated developers, the advent of powerful unit-testing frameworks greatly reduces the effort required to produce and routinely execute suites of tests. By testimony, many developers find TDD to be addicting after only a few days of exposure, and find it unthinkable to return to previous practices.After a brief overview of the TDD process and my experience in applying the methodology for development activities at Goddard, I will delve more deeply into some of the challenges that are posed by numerical and scientific software as well as tools and implementation approaches that should address those challenges.

  15. State of the art hydraulic turbine model test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Violaine; Duparchy, Alexandre; Andre, Francois; Larroze, Pierre-Yves

    2016-11-01

    Model tests are essential in hydraulic turbine development and related fields. The methods and technologies used to perform these tests show constant progress and provide access to further information. In addition, due to its contractual nature, the test demand evolves continuously in terms of quantity and accuracy. Keeping in mind that the principal aim of model testing is the transposition of the model measurements to the real machine, the measurements should be performed accurately, and a critical analysis of the model test results is required to distinguish the transposable hydraulic phenomena from the test rig interactions. Although the resonances’ effects are known and described in the IEC standard, their identification is difficult. Leaning on a strong experience of model testing, we will illustrate with a few examples of how to identify the potential problems induced by the test rig. This paper contains some of our best practices to obtain the most accurate, relevant, and independent test-rig measurements.

  16. Comparison of background EEG activity of different groups of patients with idiopathic epilepsy using Shannon spectral entropy and cluster-based permutation statistical testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Urigüen

    Full Text Available Idiopathic epilepsy is characterized by generalized seizures with no apparent cause. One of its main problems is the lack of biomarkers to monitor the evolution of patients. The only tools they can use are limited to inspecting the amount of seizures during previous periods of time and assessing the existence of interictal discharges. As a result, there is a need for improving the tools to assist the diagnosis and follow up of these patients. The goal of the present study is to compare and find a way to differentiate between two groups of patients suffering from idiopathic epilepsy, one group that could be followed-up by means of specific electroencephalographic (EEG signatures (intercritical activity present, and another one that could not due to the absence of these markers. To do that, we analyzed the background EEG activity of each in the absence of seizures and epileptic intercritical activity. We used the Shannon spectral entropy (SSE as a metric to discriminate between the two groups and performed permutation-based statistical tests to detect the set of frequencies that show significant differences. By constraining the spectral entropy estimation to the [6.25-12.89 Hz range, we detect statistical differences (at below 0.05 alpha-level between both types of epileptic patients at all available recording channels. Interestingly, entropy values follow a trend that is inversely related to the elapsed time from the last seizure. Indeed, this trend shows asymptotical convergence to the SSE values measured in a group of healthy subjects, which present SSE values lower than any of the two groups of patients. All these results suggest that the SSE, measured in a specific range of frequencies, could serve to follow up the evolution of patients suffering from idiopathic epilepsy. Future studies remain to be conducted in order to assess the predictive value of this approach for the anticipation of seizures.

  17. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF EXCHANGE RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEŠA LOTRIČ DOLINAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Using spectral analysis is very common in technical areas but rather unusual in economics and finance, where ARIMA and GARCH modeling are much more in use. To show that spectral analysis can be useful in determining hidden periodic components for high-frequency finance data as well, we use the example of foreign exchange rates

  18. Characterization and modelling of the spatially- and spectrally-varying point-spread function in hyperspectral imaging systems for computational correction of axial optical aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špiclin, Žiga; Bürmen, Miran; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Spatial resolution of hyperspectral imaging systems can vary significantly due to axial optical aberrations that originate from wavelength-induced index-of-refraction variations of the imaging optics. For systems that have a broad spectral range, the spatial resolution will vary significantly both with respect to the acquisition wavelength and with respect to the spatial position within each spectral image. Variations of the spatial resolution can be effectively characterized as part of the calibration procedure by a local image-based estimation of the pointspread function (PSF) of the hyperspectral imaging system. The estimated PSF can then be used in the image deconvolution methods to improve the spatial resolution of the spectral images. We estimated the PSFs from the spectral images of a line grid geometric caliber. From individual line segments of the line grid, the PSF was obtained by a non-parametric estimation procedure that used an orthogonal series representation of the PSF. By using the non-parametric estimation procedure, the PSFs were estimated at different spatial positions and at different wavelengths. The variations of the spatial resolution were characterized by the radius and the fullwidth half-maximum of each PSF and by the modulation transfer function, computed from images of USAF1951 resolution target. The estimation and characterization of the PSFs and the image deconvolution based spatial resolution enhancement were tested on images obtained by a hyperspectral imaging system with an acousto-optic tunable filter in the visible spectral range. The results demonstrate that the spatial resolution of the acquired spectral images can be significantly improved using the estimated PSFs and image deconvolution methods.

  19. Nebular Emission From AGN In The Ultraviolet/Optical: Linking Observations and Theory With New Generation Spectral Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltre, Anna; Charlot, S.; Gutkin, J.; Hirschmann, M.; Mignoli, M.; Calura, F.; Gilli, R.; Bongiorno, A.; NEOGAL Team

    2016-10-01

    Spectroscopic studies of AGN are powerful means of probing the physical properties of the ionized gas within them. In particular, forthcoming facilities such as JWST and the E-ELT, will provide rest-frame ultraviolet and optical spectra of the very distant AGN. To lay the groundwork for the interpretation of the revolutionary datasets, we have recently computed new photoionization models of the narrow-line emitting regions (NLR) of AGN and combined them with similar models of the nebular emission from star-forming galaxies. In this talk, I will first describe how new ultraviolet and standard optical spectral diagnostics allow one to distinguish between nuclear activity and star formation. I will then present how the nebular emission from both young stars and AGN can be coupled with a new set of cosmological hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations of massive galaxies to achieve a better understanding of black hole growth and galaxy evolution with cosmic time. I will also present an innovative Bayesian fitting code that can help us best interpret current, and future, spectro-photometric data on active galaxies. In particular, the implementation of AGN photoionization calculations within this fitting tool allows us to better understand the physical properties of the AGN NLR gas. I will conclude showing some results from a recent analysis on one of the most comprehensive set of optical spectra (from VIMOS/VLT) sampling the rest-frame ultraviolet range of 90 type 2 AGN (1.5 < z < 3), drawn from the z-COSMOS deep survey.

  20. Modeling and inversion of the microtremor H/ V spectral ratio: physical basis behind the diffuse field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.

    2017-07-01

    Microtremor H/ V spectral ratio (MHVSR) has gained popularity to assess the dominant frequency of soil sites. It requires measurement of ground motion due to seismic ambient noise at a site and a relatively simple processing. Theory asserts that the ensemble average of the autocorrelation of motion components belonging to a diffuse field at a given receiver gives the directional energy densities (DEDs) which are proportional to the imaginary parts of the Green's function components when both source and receiver are the same point and the directions of force and response coincide. Therefore, the MHVSR can be modeled as the square root of 2 × Im G 11/Im G 33, where Im G 11 and Im G 33 are the imaginary parts of Green's functions at the load point for the horizontal (sub-index 1) and vertical (sub-index 3) components, respectively. This connection has physical implications that emerge from the duality DED force and allows understanding the behavior of the MHVSR. For a given model, the imaginary parts of the Green's functions are integrals along a radial wavenumber. To deal with these integrals, we have used either the popular discrete wavenumber method or the Cauchy's residue theorem at the poles that account for surface waves normal modes giving the contributions due to Rayleigh and Love waves. For the retrieval of the velocity structure, one can minimize the weighted differences between observations and calculated values using the strategy of an inversion scheme. In this research, we used simulated annealing but other optimization techniques can be used as well. This last approach allows computing separately the contributions of different wave types. An example is presented for the mouth of Andarax River at Almería, Spain. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. A Dynamic Eddy Viscosity Model for the Shallow Water Equations Solved by Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Simone; Suckale, Jenny; Giraldo, Francis X.; Constantinescu, Emil

    2016-04-01

    We present the solution of the viscous shallow water equations where viscosity is built as a residual-based subgrid scale model originally designed for large eddy simulation of compressible [1] and stratified flows [2]. The necessity of viscosity for a shallow water model not only finds motivation from mathematical analysis [3], but is supported by physical reasoning as can be seen by an analysis of the energetics of the solution. We simulated the flow of an idealized wave as it hits a set of obstacles. The kinetic energy spectrum of this flow shows that, although the inviscid Galerkin solutions -by spectral elements and discontinuous Galerkin [4]- preserve numerical stability in spite of the spurious oscillations in the proximity of the wave fronts, the slope of the energy cascade deviates from the theoretically expected values. We show that only a sufficiently small amount of dynamically adaptive viscosity removes the unwanted high-frequency modes while preserving the overall sharpness of the solution. In addition, it yields a physically plausible energy decay. This work is motivated by a larger interest in the application of a shallow water model to the solution of tsunami triggered coastal flows. In particular, coastal flows in regions around the world where coastal parks made of mitigation hills of different sizes and configurations are considered as a means to deviate the power of the incoming wave. References [1] M. Nazarov and J. Hoffman (2013) "Residual-based artificial viscosity for simulation of turbulent compressible flow using adaptive finite element methods" Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 71:339-357 [2] S. Marras, M. Nazarov, F. X. Giraldo (2015) "Stabilized high-order Galerkin methods based on a parameter-free dynamic SGS model for LES" J. Comput. Phys. 301:77-101 [3] J. F. Gerbeau and B. Perthame (2001) "Derivation of the viscous Saint-Venant system for laminar shallow water; numerical validation" Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. Ser. B, 1:89?102 [4] F

  2. Design and Test of a Cognitive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Michael A.; Gary, Harry J.

    1974-01-01

    A presentation of arguments demonstrating piaget's sensorimotor stages in Hebb's terms, and the suggestion for performing a computer test. This paper is an early progress report of an attempt to translate some plausible arguments into a rigorous demonstration. (Author)

  3. Landsat 8 six spectral band data and MODIS NDVI data for assessing the optimal regression tree models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yingxin; Wylie, Bruce K.; Boyte, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed a method that identifies an optimal sample data usage strategy and rule numbers that minimize over- and underfitting effects in regression tree mapping models. A LANDFIRE tile (r04c03, located mainly in northeastern Nevada), which is a composite of multiple Landsat 8 scenes for a target date, was selected for the study. To minimize any cloud and bad detection effects in the original Landsat 8 data, the compositing approach used cosine-similarity-combined pixels from multiple observations based on data quality and temporal proximity to a target date. Julian date 212, which yielded relatively low "no data and/or cloudy” pixels, was used as the target date with Landsat 8 observations from days 140–240 in 2013. The 30-m Landsat 8 composited data were then upscaled to 250 m using a spatial averaging method. Six Landsat 8 spectral bands (bands 1–6) at 250-m resolution were used as independent variables for developing the piecewise regression-tree models to predict the 250-m eMODIS NDVI (dependent variable). Furthermore, to ensure the high quality of the derived 250-m Landsat 8 data, and avoid any additional cloud and atmospheric effects, the percentage of 30-m pixels with “0” values within a 250-m pixel was calculated. Only those 250-m pixels with 0% of “0” values (i.e., all the 30-m pixels within a 250-m pixel have no zero values pixels) were selected to develop the regression-tree model.The 7-day maximum value composites of 250-m MODIS NDVI for the year 2013 were obtained from the USGS expedited MODIS (eMODIS) data archive (https://lta.cr.usgs.gov/emodis). Pixels with bad quality, negative values, clouds, snow cover, and low view angles were filtered out based on the MODIS quality assurance data to ensure high quality eMODIS NDVI data. The 2013 weekly NDVI data were then stacked and temporally smoothed using a weighted least-squares approach to reduce additional atmospheric noise. Temporal smoothing helps to ensure reliable

  4. 2-D Model Test Study of the Suape Breakwater, Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.; Sopavicius, A.

    This report deals with a two-dimensional model test study of the extension of the breakwater in Suape, Brazil. One cross-section was tested for stability and overtopping in various sea conditions. The length scale used for the model tests was 1:35. Unless otherwise specified all values given...

  5. A Lagrange Multiplier Test for Testing the Adequacy of the Constant Conditional Correlation GARCH Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catani, Paul; Teräsvirta, Timo; Yin, Meiqun

    A Lagrange multiplier test for testing the parametric structure of a constant conditional correlation generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (CCC-GARCH) model is proposed. The test is based on decomposing the CCC-GARCH model multiplicatively into two components, one of which...... represents the null model, whereas the other one describes the misspeci…cation. A simulation study shows that the test has good …nite sample properties. We compare the test with other tests for misspeci…cation of multivariate GARCH models. The test has high power against alternatives where the misspeci......…cation is in the GARCH parameters and is superior to other tests. The test is not greatly affected by misspeci…cation in the conditional correlations and is therefore well suited for considering misspeci…cation of GARCH equations....

  6. Direct Test of the Brown Dwarf Evolutionary Models Through Secondary Eclipse Spectroscopy of LHS 6343

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Loic

    2015-10-01

    As the number of field Brown Dwarfs counts in the thousands, interpreting their physical parameters (mass, temperature, radius, luminosity, age, metallicity) relies as heavily as ever on atmosphere and evolutionary models. Fortunately, models are largely successful in explaining observations (colors, spectral types, luminosity), so they appear well calibrated in a relative sense. However, an absolute model-independent calibration is still lacking. Eclipsing BDs systems are a unique laboratory in this respect but until recently only one such system was known, 2M0535-05 - a very young (Brown Dwarfs showing a peculiar temperature reversal (Stassun et al. 2006). Due to its young age, 2M0535-05 is an ill-suited test for Gyr-old field Brown Dwarfs whose population is by far the most common in the solar neighborhood. Recently, a second system - an evolved BD (>1 Gyr) - was identified (62.1+/-1.2 MJup, 0.783+/-0.011 RJup) transiting LHS6343 with a 12.7-day period. We propose to use WFC3 in drift scan mode and 5 HST orbits to determine the spectral type (a proxy for temperature) as well as the near-infrared luminosity of this brown dwarf. We conducted simulations that predict a signal-to-noise ratio ranging between 10 and 30 per resolution element in the peaks of the spectrum. These measurements, coupled with existing luminosity measurements with Spitzer at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, will allow us to trace the spectral energy distribution of the Brown Dwarf and directly calculate its blackbody temperature. It will be the first field Brown Dwarfs with simultaneous measurements of its radius, mass, luminosity and temperature all measured independently of models.

  7. "A regression error specification test (RESET) for generalized linear models".

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil Sapra

    2005-01-01

    Generalized linear models (GLMs) are generalizations of linear regression models, which allow fitting regression models to response data that follow a general exponential family. GLMs are used widely in social sciences for fitting regression models to count data, qualitative response data and duration data. While a variety of specification tests have been developed for the linear regression model and are routinely applied for testing for misspecification of functional form, omitted variables,...

  8. Three-dimensional modeling of ionized gas. II. Spectral energy distributions of massive and very massive stars in stationary and time-dependent modeling of the ionization of metals in H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. A.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Hoffmann, T. L.

    2015-11-01

    Context. H II regions play a crucial role in the measurement of the chemical composition of the interstellar medium and provide fundamental data about element abundances that constrain models of galactic chemical evolution. Discrepancies that still exist between observed emission line strengths and those predicted by nebular models can be partly attributed to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the sources of ionizing radiation used in the models as well as to simplifying assumptions made in nebular modeling. Aims: One of the main influences on the nebular spectra is the metallicity, both nebular and stellar, which shows large variations even among nearby galaxies. Although nebular modeling often involves testing of different nebular metallicities against their influence on the predicted spectra, adequate grids of stellar atmospheres and realistic SEDs for different metallicities are still lacking. This is unfortunate because the influence of stellar metallicity on nebular line strength ratios, via its effect on the SEDs, is of similar importance as variations in the nebular metallicity. To overcome this deficiency we have computed a grid of model atmosphere SEDs for massive and very massive O-type stars covering a range of metallicities from significantly subsolar (0.1 Z⊙) to supersolar (2 Z⊙). Methods: The SEDs have been computed using a state-of-the-art model atmosphere code that takes into account the attenuation of the ionizing flux by the spectral lines of all important elements and the hydrodynamics of the radiatively driven winds and their influence on the SEDs. For the assessment of the SEDs in nebular simulations we have developed a (heretofore not available) 3D radiative transfer code that includes a time-dependent treatment of the metal ionization. Results: Using the SEDs in both 1D and 3D nebular models we explore the relative influence of stellar metallicity, gas metallicity, and inhomogeneity of the gas on the nebular ionization structure

  9. Simulation of a Model Tank Gunnery Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-03-01

    the first and second rounds. Time data might also be measured from the sound track of gun camera tapes. This soundtrack can be used to record...j. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY IN CRITERION-REFERENCED TESTING Traditional methods of assessing reliability and validity have a long history and much

  10. Mountain Bike Wheel Endurance Testing and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Published by Elsevier Ltd. Keywords: Mountain biking; wheels; failure testing 1. Introduction Mountain bike ( MTB ) wheels are subject to a wide range of...accumulates over the life of the wheel and leads to part failure. MTB wheels must be designed to withstand many miles of this loading before failure

  11. Testing constancy of unconditional variance in volatility models by misspecification and specification tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvennoinen, Annastiina; Terasvirta, Timo

    The topic of this paper is testing the hypothesis of constant unconditional variance in GARCH models against the alternative that the unconditional variance changes deterministically over time. Tests of this hypothesis have previously been performed as misspecification tests after fitting a GARCH...... fitting a GARCH model to the data is discussed. The power of the ensuing test is vastly superior to that of the misspecification test and the size distortion minimal. The test has reasonable power already in very short time series. It would thus serve as a test of constant variance in conditional mean...

  12. Testing Pearl Model In Three European Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouraoui, F.; Bidoglio, G.

    The Plant Protection Product Directive (91/414/EEC) stresses the need of validated models to calculate predicted environmental concentrations. The use of models has become an unavoidable step before pesticide registration. In this context, European Commission, and in particular DGVI, set up a FOrum for the Co-ordination of pes- ticide fate models and their USe (FOCUS). In a complementary effort, DG research supported the APECOP project, with one of its objective being the validation and im- provement of existing pesticide fate models. The main topic of research presented here is the validation of the PEARL model for different sites in Europe. The PEARL model, actually used in the Dutch pesticide registration procedure, was validated in three well- instrumented sites: Vredepeel (the Netherlands), Brimstone (UK), and Lanna (Swe- den). A step-wise procedure was used for the validation of the PEARL model. First the water transport module was calibrated, and then the solute transport module, using tracer measurements keeping unchanged the water transport parameters. The Vrede- peel site is characterised by a sandy soil. Fourteen months of measurements were used for the calibration. Two pesticides were applied on the site: bentazone and etho- prophos. PEARL predictions were very satisfactory for both soil moisture content, and pesticide concentration in the soil profile. The Brimstone site is characterised by a cracking clay soil. The calibration was conducted on a time series measurement of 7 years. The validation consisted in comparing predictions and measurement of soil moisture at different soil depths, and in comparing the predicted and measured con- centration of isoproturon in the drainage water. The results, even if in good agreement with the measuremens, highlighted the limitation of the model when the preferential flow becomes a dominant process. PEARL did not reproduce well soil moisture pro- file during summer months, and also under-predicted the arrival of

  13. Spectral Identification of Lighting Type and Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvidge, Christopher D.; Keith, David M.; Tuttle, Benjamin T.; Baugh, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the optimal spectral bands for the identification of lighting types and the estimation of four major indices used to measure the efficiency or character of lighting. To accomplish these objectives we collected high-resolution emission spectra (350 to 2,500 nm) for forty-three different lamps, encompassing nine of the major types of lamps used worldwide. The narrow band emission spectra were used to simulate radiances in eight spectral bands including the human eye photoreceptor bands (photopic, scotopic, and “meltopic”) plus five spectral bands in the visible and near-infrared modeled on bands flown on the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). The high-resolution continuous spectra are superior to the broad band combinations for the identification of lighting type and are the standard for calculation of Luminous Efficacy of Radiation (LER), Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) and Color Rendering Index (CRI). Given the high cost that would be associated with building and flying a hyperspectral sensor with detection limits low enough to observe nighttime lights we conclude that it would be more feasible to fly an instrument with a limited number of broad spectral bands in the visible to near infrared. The best set of broad spectral bands among those tested is blue, green, red and NIR bands modeled on the band set flown on the Landsat Thematic Mapper. This set provides low errors on the identification of lighting types and reasonable estimates of LER and CCT when compared to the other broad band set tested. None of the broad band sets tested could make reasonable estimates of Luminous Efficacy (LE) or CRI. The photopic band proved useful for the estimation of LER. However, the three photoreceptor bands performed poorly in the identification of lighting types when compared to the bands modeled on the Landsat Thematic Mapper. Our conclusion is that it is feasible to identify lighting type and make reasonable estimates of LER and CCT using four or more

  14. Tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines: unfiltered x-ray spectra from 20 kV to 640 kV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Andrew M; Boone, John M

    2014-04-01

    Monte Carlo methods were used to generate lightly filtered high resolution x-ray spectra spanning from 20 kV to 640 kV. X-ray spectra were simulated for a conventional tungsten anode. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended radiation transport code (MCNPX 2.6.0) was used to produce 35 spectra over the tube potential range from 20 kV to 640 kV, and cubic spline interpolation procedures were used to create piecewise polynomials characterizing the photon fluence per energy bin as a function of x-ray tube potential. Using these basis spectra and the cubic spline interpolation, 621 spectra were generated at 1 kV intervals from 20 to 640 kV. The tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) produces minimally filtered (0.8 mm Be) x-ray spectra with 1 keV energy resolution. The TASMICS spectra were compared mathematically with other, previously reported spectra. Using pairedt-test analyses, no statistically significant difference (i.e., p > 0.05) was observed between compared spectra over energy bins above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence. For all energy bins, the correlation of determination (R(2)) demonstrated good correlation for all spectral comparisons. The mean overall difference (MOD) and mean absolute difference (MAD) were computed over energy bins (above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence) and over all the kV permutations compared. MOD and MAD comparisons with previously reported spectra were 2.7% and 9.7%, respectively (TASMIP), 0.1% and 12.0%, respectively [R. Birch and M. Marshall, "Computation of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra and comparison with spectra measured with a Ge(Li) detector," Phys. Med. Biol. 24, 505-517 (1979)], 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (Poludniowski), and 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (AAPM TG 195). The effective energy of TASMICS spectra with 2.5 mm of added Al filtration ranged from 17 keV (at 20 kV) to 138 keV (at 640 kV); with 0.2 mm of added Cu filtration the effective energy was 9 keV at 20 kV and 169 keV at 640 k

  15. A Spectral Finite Element Model for Vibration Analysis of a Beam Based on General Higher-Order Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Sujuan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectral element matrix is derived for a straight and uniform beam element having an arbitrary cross-section. The general higher-order beam theory is used, which accurately accounts for the transverse shear deformation out of the cross-sectional plane and antielastic-type deformation within the cross-sectional plane. Two coupled equations of motion are derived by use of Hamilton's principle along with the full three-dimensional constitutive relations. The theoretical expressions of the spectral element matrix are formulated from the exact solutions of the coupled governing equations. The developed spectral element matrix is directly applied to calculate the exact natural frequencies and mode shapes of the illustrative examples. Numerical results of the thick isotropic beams with rectangular and elliptical cross-sections are presented for a wide variety of cross-section aspect ratios.

  16. Human-structure interaction effects on the maximum dynamic response based on an equivalent spectral model for pedestrian-induced loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassoli, E.; Van Nimmen, K.; Vincenzi, L.; Van den Broeck, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the effects of the human-structure interaction (HSI) on the dynamic response based on a spectral model for vertical pedestrian-induced forces. The spectral load model proposed in literature can be applied for the vibration serviceability analysis of footbridges subjected to unrestricted pedestrian traffic as well as in crowded conditions, however, in absence of HSI phenomena. To allow for a more accurate prediction of the maximum structural response, the present study in addition accounts for the vertical mechanical interaction between pedestrians, represented by simple lumped parameter models, and the supporting structure. By applying the classic methods of linear random dynamics, the maximum dynamic response is evaluated based on the analytical expression of the spectral model of the loading and the frequency response function (FRF) of the coupled system. The most significant HSI-effect is in the increase of the effective damping ratio of the coupled system that leads to a reduction of the structural response. However, in some cases the effect of the change in the frequency of the coupled system is more significant, whereby this results into a higher structural response when the HSI-effects are accounted for.

  17. Testing Software Development Project Productivity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Ilya

    Software development is an increasingly influential factor in today's business environment, and a major issue affecting software development is how an organization estimates projects. If the organization underestimates cost, schedule, and quality requirements, the end results will not meet customer needs. On the other hand, if the organization overestimates these criteria, resources that could have been used more profitably will be wasted. There is no accurate model or measure available that can guide an organization in a quest for software development, with existing estimation models often underestimating software development efforts as much as 500 to 600 percent. To address this issue, existing models usually are calibrated using local data with a small sample size, with resulting estimates not offering improved cost analysis. This study presents a conceptual model for accurately estimating software development, based on an extensive literature review and theoretical analysis based on Sociotechnical Systems (STS) theory. The conceptual model serves as a solution to bridge organizational and technological factors and is validated using an empirical dataset provided by the DoD. Practical implications of this study allow for practitioners to concentrate on specific constructs of interest that provide the best value for the least amount of time. This study outlines key contributing constructs that are unique for Software Size E-SLOC, Man-hours Spent, and Quality of the Product, those constructs having the largest contribution to project productivity. This study discusses customer characteristics and provides a framework for a simplified project analysis for source selection evaluation and audit task reviews for the customers and suppliers. Theoretical contributions of this study provide an initial theory-based hypothesized project productivity model that can be used as a generic overall model across several application domains such as IT, Command and Control

  18. Precision tests of the standard electroweak model

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    High precision measurements of weak neutral current and charged current processes and of the properties of the Z and W bosons have established the standard electroweak model as correct down to a distance scale of 10-16 cm, and are a sensitive probe of possible underlying physics. In this book, all aspects of the program are considered in detail, including the structure of the standard model, radiative corrections, high precision experiments, and their implications. The major classes of experiments are surveyed, covering the experiments themselves, the data analysis, results, and prospects. Thi

  19. Port Adriano, 2D-Model tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Meinert, Palle; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    the crown wall have been measured. The model has been subjected to irregular waves corresponding to typical conditions offshore from the intended prototype location. Characteristic situations have been video recorded. The stability of the toe has been investigated. The wave-generated forces on the caisson...

  20. Modal testing for model validation of structures with discrete nonlinearities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ewins, D J; Weekes, B; delli Carri, A

    2015-01-01

    Model validation using data from modal tests is now widely practiced in many industries for advanced structural dynamic design analysis, especially where structural integrity is a primary requirement...

  1. Active control rotor model testing at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A description of the model helicopter rotor tests currently in progress at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory is presented. The tests are designed to provide data for rotor dynamic modeling for use with active control system design. The model rotor to be used incoporates the capability for Individual Blade Control (IBC) or Higher Harmonic Control through the use of a standard swashplate on a three bladed hub. Sample results from the first series of tests are presented, along with the methodology used for state and parameter identification. Finally, pending experiments and possible research directions using this model and test facility are outlined.

  2. Investigation of retinal morphology alterations using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in a mouse model of retinal branch and central retinal vein occlusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Ebneter

    Full Text Available Retinal vein occlusion is a leading cause of visual impairment. Experimental models of this condition based on laser photocoagulation of retinal veins have been described and extensively exploited in mammals and larger rodents such as the rat. However, few reports exist on the use of this paradigm in the mouse. The objective of this study was to investigate a model of branch and central retinal vein occlusion in the mouse and characterize in vivo longitudinal retinal morphology alterations using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Retinal veins were experimentally occluded using laser photocoagulation after intravenous application of Rose Bengal, a photo-activator dye enhancing thrombus formation. Depending on the number of veins occluded, variable amounts of capillary dropout were seen on fluorescein angiography. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were markedly elevated early and peaked at day one. Retinal thickness measurements with spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed significant swelling (p<0.001 compared to baseline, followed by gradual thinning plateauing two weeks after the experimental intervention (p<0.001. Histological findings at day seven correlated with spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging. The inner layers were predominantly affected by degeneration with the outer nuclear layer and the photoreceptor outer segments largely preserved. The application of this retinal vein occlusion model in the mouse carries several advantages over its use in other larger species, such as access to a vast range of genetically modified animals. Retinal changes after experimental retinal vein occlusion in this mouse model can be non-invasively quantified by spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and may be used to monitor effects of potential therapeutic interventions.

  3. Evaluation of Shelter Ventilation by Model Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    ventilation is created by mechanical devices such as pedal venti- lators and Kearny pumps. If natural ventilation in a shelter. can be predicted with...past have centered around the design, performance analysis and deployment of mechanical ventilating units (Ref. 11-14). Other studies include one on...calculated as the sum of the air volume flow rates through all the windward openings. The variation of model ventilation througnput versus wind speed

  4. A test-tube model for rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Michael

    2014-05-01

    If the temperature of a cell containing two partially miscible liquids is changed very slowly, so that the miscibility is decreased, microscopic droplets nucleate, grow and migrate to the interface due to their buoyancy. The system may show an approximately periodic variation of the turbidity of the mixture, as the mean droplet size fluctuates. These precipitation events are analogous to rainfall. This paper considers a theoretical model for these experiments. After nucleation the initial growth is by Ostwald ripening, followed by a finite-time runaway growth of droplet sizes due to larger droplets sweeping up smaller ones. The model predicts that the period \\Delta t and the temperature sweep rate ξ are related by \\Delta t\\sim C \\xi^{-3/7} , and is in good agreement with experiments. The coefficient C has a power-law divergence approaching the critical point of the miscibility transition: C\\sim (T-T_{\\text{c}})^{-\\eta} , and the critical exponent η is determined. It is argued that while the mechanism does not provide a quantitative description of terrestrial rainfall, it may be a faithful model for precipitation on other planets.

  5. Mixed Portmanteau Test for Diagnostic Checking of Time Series Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Chand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Model criticism is an important stage of model building and thus goodness of fit tests provides a set of tools for diagnostic checking of the fitted model. Several tests are suggested in literature for diagnostic checking. These tests use autocorrelation or partial autocorrelation in the residuals to criticize the adequacy of fitted model. The main idea underlying these portmanteau tests is to identify if there is any dependence structure which is yet unexplained by the fitted model. In this paper, we suggest mixed portmanteau tests based on autocorrelation and partial autocorrelation functions of the residuals. We derived the asymptotic distribution of the mixture test and studied its size and power using Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Spectral CT modeling and reconstruction with hybrid detectors in dynamic-threshold-based counting and integrating modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2015-03-01

    Spectral CT with photon counting detectors can significantly improve CT performance by reducing image noise and dose, increasing contrast resolution and material specificity, as well as enabling functional and molecular imaging with existing and emerging probes. However, the current photon counting detector architecture is difficult to balance the number of energy bins and the statistical noise in each energy bin. Moreover, the hardware support for multi-energy bins demands a complex circuit which is expensive. In this paper, we promote a new scheme known as hybrid detectors that combine the dynamic-threshold-based counting and integrating modes. In this scheme, an energy threshold can be dynamically changed during a spectral CT scan, which can be considered as compressive sensing along the spectral dimension. By doing so, the number of energy bins can be retrospectively specified, even in a spatially varying fashion. To establish the feasibility and merits of such hybrid detectors, we develop a tensor-based PRISM algorithm to reconstruct a spectral CT image from dynamic dual-energy data, and perform experiments with simulated and real data, producing very promising results.

  7. A linear model to predict with a multi-spectral radiometer the amount of nitrogen in winter wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyniers, M.; Walvoort, D.J.J.; Baardemaaker, De J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to develop an optimal vegetation index (VIopt) to predict with a multi-spectral radiometer nitrogen in wheat crop (kg[N] ha-1). Optimality means that nitrogen in the crop can be measured accurately in the field during the growing season. It also means that the measurements are

  8. Inhibition in speed and concentration tests: The Poisson inhibition model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.C.; Ven, A.H.G.S. van der

    1995-01-01

    A new model is presented to account for the reaction time fluctuations in concentration tests. The model is a natural generalization of an earlier model, the so-called Poisson-Erlang model, published by Pieters & van der Ven (1982). First, a description is given of the type of tasks for which the

  9. General score tests for regression models incorporating 'robust' variance estimates

    OpenAIRE

    David Clayton; Joanna Howson

    2002-01-01

    Stata incorporates commands for carrying out two of the three general approaches to asymptotic significance testing in regression models, namely likelihood ratio (lrtest) and Wald tests (testparms). However, the third approach, using "score" tests, has no such general implementation. This omission is particularly serious when dealing with "clustered" data using the Huber-White approach. Here the likelihood ratio test is lost, leaving only the Wald test. This has relatively poor asymptotic pro...

  10. Normalized spectral damage of a linear system over different spectral loading patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Jung

    2017-08-01

    Spectral fatigue damage is affected by different loading patterns; the damage may be accumulated in a different manner because the spectral pattern has an influence on stresses or strains. The normalization of spectral damage with respect to spectral loading acceleration is a novel solution to compare the accumulated fatigue damage over different spectral loading patterns. To evaluate the sensitivity of fatigue damage over different spectral loading cases, a simple notched specimen is used to conduct a uniaxial vibration test for two representative spectral patterns-random and harmonic-between 30 and 3000 Hz. The fatigue damage to the simple specimen is analyzed for different spectral loading cases using the normalized spectral damage from the measured response data for both acceleration and strain. The influence of spectral loading patterns is discussed based on these analyses.

  11. Upgraded Analytical Model of the Cylinder Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souers, P. Clark; Lauderbach, Lisa; Garza, Raul; Ferranti, Louis; Vitello, Peter

    2013-03-15

    A Gurney-type equation was previously corrected for wall thinning and angle of tilt, and now we have added shock wave attenuation in the copper wall and air gap energy loss. Extensive calculations were undertaken to calibrate the two new energy loss mechanisms across all explosives. The corrected Gurney equation is recommended for cylinder use over the original 1943 form. The effect of these corrections is to add more energy to the adiabat values from a relative volume of 2 to 7, with low energy explosives having the largest correction. The data was pushed up to a relative volume of about 15 and the JWL parameter ω was obtained directly. The total detonation energy density was locked to the v=7 adiabat energy density, so that the Cylinder test gives all necessary values needed to make a JWL.

  12. Upgraded Analytical Model of the Cylinder Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souers, P. Clark [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center; Lauderbach, Lisa [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center; Garza, Raul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center; Ferranti, Louis [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center; Vitello, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2013-03-15

    A Gurney-type equation was previously corrected for wall thinning and angle of tilt, and now we have added shock wave attenuation in the copper wall and air gap energy loss. Extensive calculations were undertaken to calibrate the two new energy loss mechanisms across all explosives. The corrected Gurney equation is recommended for cylinder use over the original 1943 form. The effect of these corrections is to add more energy to the adiabat values from a relative volume of 2 to 7, with low energy explosives having the largest correction. The data was pushed up to a relative volume of about 15 and the JWL parameter ω was obtained directly. Finally, the total detonation energy density was locked to the v = 7 adiabat energy density, so that the Cylinder test gives all necessary values needed to make a JWL.

  13. Affective Robotics: Modelling and Testing Cultural Prototypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Wilson, Paul; Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    If robots are to successfully interact with humans, they need to measure, quantify and respond to the emotions we produce. Similar to humans, the perceptual cue inputs to any modelling that allows this will be based on behavioural expression and body activity features that are prototypical of each emotion. However, the likely employment of such robots in different cultures necessitates the tuning of the emotion feature recognition system to the specific feature profiles present in these cultures. The amount of tuning depends on the relative convergence of the cross-cultural mappings between the emotion feature profiles of the cultures where the robots will be used. The GRID instrument and the cognitive corpus linguistics methodology were used in a contrastive study analysing a selection of behavioural expression and body activity features to compare the feature profiles of joy, sadness, fear and anger within and between Polish and British English. The intra-linguistic differences that were found in the profile of emotion features suggest that weightings based on this profile can be used in robotic modelling to create emotion-sensitive socially interacting robots. Our cross-cultural results further indicate that this profile of features needs to be tuned in robots to make them emotionally competent in different cultures.

  14. Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

  15. Using Built-In Domain-Specific Modeling Support to Guide Model-Based Test Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Kanstrén

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a model-based testing approach to support automated test generation with domain-specific concepts. This includes a language expert who is an expert at building test models and domain experts who are experts in the domain of the system under test. First, we provide a framework to support the language expert in building test models using a full (Java programming language with the help of simple but powerful modeling elements of the framework. Second, based on the model built with this framework, the toolset automatically forms a domain-specific modeling language that can be used to further constrain and guide test generation from these models by a domain expert. This makes it possible to generate a large set of test cases covering the full model, chosen (constrained parts of the model, or manually define specific test cases on top of the model while using concepts familiar to the domain experts.

  16. Model