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Sample records for testing proton spin

  1. Experimental tests of proton spin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, G.P.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1989-01-01

    We have developed models for the spin-weighted quark and gluon distribution in a longitudinally polarized proton. The model parameters are determined from current algebra sum rules and polarized deep-inelastic scattering data. A number of different scenarios are presented for the fraction of spin carried the constituent parton distributions. A possible long-range experimental program is suggested for measuring various hard scattering processes using polarized lepton and proton beams. With the knowledge gained from these experiments, we can begin to understand the parton contributions to the proton spin. 28 refs., 5 figs

  2. Testing proton spin models with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    We review models for spin-weighted parton distributions in a proton. Sum rules involving the nonsinglet components of the structure function xg 1 p help narrow the range of parameters in these models. The contribution of the γ 5 anomaly term depends on the size of the integrated polarized gluon distribution and experimental predictions depend on its size. We have proposed three models for the polarized gluon distributions, whose range is considerable. These model distributions give an overall range is considerable. These model distributions give an overall range of parameters that can be tested with polarized beam experiments. These are discussed with regard to specific predictions for polarized beam experiments at energies typical of UNK

  3. Measurement of proton and nitrogen polarization in ammonia and a test of equal spin temperature

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067425; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bradtke, C; Bravar, A; Bültmann, S; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Dreshpande, A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dutz, H; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gehring, R; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Harmsen, J; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Kok, E; Krämer, Dietrich; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Martin, A; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Nassalski, J P; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Parks, D P; Pereira da Costa, H D; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Plückthun, M; Polec, J; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Reicherz, G; Rijllart, A; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Tessarotto, F; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K

    1998-01-01

    The 1996 data taking of the SMC experiment used polarized protons to measure the spin dependent structure function $g_1$ of the proton. Three liters of solid granular ammonia were irradiated at the Bonn electron linac in order to create the paramagnetic radicals which are needed for polarizing the protons. Proton polarizations of $\\pm(90\\pm2.5)\\,\\%$ were routinely reached. An analysis based on a theoretical line-shape for spin-1 systems with large quadrupolar broadening was developed which allowed the nitrogen polarization in the ammonia to be determined with a 10% relative error. The measured quadrupolar coupling constant of $^{14}$N agrees well with earlier extrapolated values. The polarization of the nitrogen nuclei was measured as a function of the proton polarization in order to provide a test of the equal spin temperature (EST) hypothesis. It was found to be closely valid under the dynamic nuclear polarization conditions with which the protons are polarized. Large deviations from EST could be induced by...

  4. Violent collisions of spinning protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krisch, A.D. [Michigan Univ., Spin Physics Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The author draws the history of polarized proton beams that has relied on experiments that took place in different accelerators like ZGS (zero gradient synchrotron, Argonne), AGS (Brookhaven) and Fermilab from 1973 till today. The first studies of the behavior and spin-manipulation of polarized protons helped in developing polarized beams around the world: Brookhaven now has 200 GeV polarized protons in the RHIC collider, perhaps someday the 7 TeV LHC at CERN might have polarized protons.

  5. Where is the proton's spin?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    There has been much recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience, which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future. 33 refs

  6. Where is the proton's spin?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    There has been much recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience, which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future

  7. Quantum mechanics and hidden variables: A test of Bell's inequality by the measurement of the spin correlation in low-energy proton-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Mittig, W.

    1976-01-01

    The inequality of Bell has been tested by the measurement of the spin correlation in proton-proton scattering. Measurements were made at E/sub p/ = 13.2 and 13.7 MeV using carbon analyzers of 18.6 and 29 mg/cm 2 , respectively, accumulating a total of 10 4 coincidences. The experimental analyzing power, geometric correlation coefficients, and energy spectra are compared to the result of a Monte Carlo simulation of the apparatus. The results are in good agreement with quantum mechanics and in disagreement with the inequality of Bell if the same additional assumptions are made. The conditions for comparing the results of the experiments to the inequality of Bell are discussed

  8. RHIC spin: The first polarized proton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1994-01-01

    The very successful program of QCD and electroweak tests at the high energy hadron colliders have shown that the perturbative QCD has progressed towards becoming a ''precision'' theory. At the same time, it has been shown that with the help of Siberian Snakes it is feasible to accelerate polarized protons to high enough energies where the proven methods of collider physics can be used to probe the spin content of the proton but also where fundamental tests of the spin effects in the standard model are possible. With Siberian Snakes the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be the first collider to allow for 250 GeV on 250 GeV polarized proton collisions

  9. Proton polarimeters for spin transfer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNaughton, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    The design and use of proton polarimeters for spin transfer (Wolfenstein parameter) measurements is discussed. Polarimeters are compared with polarized targets for spin dependent experiments. 32 refs., 4 figs

  10. The proton spin structure; La structure en spin du proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, V.

    1996-05-13

    The author presents first the theoretical frame of the nucleon spin structure study carried out through the deep inelastic scattering of polarised leptons on a polarised target. The interest of the lepton scattering reaction to study the hadronic structure is discussed and the formalism of the inclusive inelastic scattering presented. If the target and the beam are both polarised, the formalism enables to connect the experimentally measured asymmetries to the contribution of quarks to the spin of nucleon. The recent knowledge about the nucleon spin structure is also presented. The Bjorken sum rule is then discussed: it correlates the difference of spin structure between proton and neutron to the neutron lifetime. Then, the author mentions the experimental results of SMC (CERN) and E142, E143 (SLAC). The transition from rough asymmetry to the g sub 1 structure function integral is discussed as well as the main causes of uncertainty. Compared to theoretical data, the measurements confirm the reliability of the Bjorken sum rule. They also confirm the deficit of the quark contribution with respect to the naive unpolarized strange sea model. The possible origins of this discrepancy and the contributions of the current and planned experiments are also discussed. Finally, the author brings up the next major step for nucleon spin studies: the estimation of the gluon contribution. He discusses the experimental knowledge about the polarised gluon distribution function with regard to the multiple existing parameter set. Concerning the experimental determination of this distribution function, outlooks are proposed with respect to feasibility on current experimental facilities. (N.T.). 134 refs.

  11. Spin structure of the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan Isgur

    1995-01-01

    In these lectures the author argues that their response to the spin crisis should not be to abandon the naive quark model baby, but rather to allow it to mature. He begin by recalling what a beautiful baby the quark model is via an overview of its successes in spectroscopy, dynamics, and valence spin structure. He also introduces the conservative hypothesis that dynamical qanti q pairs are its key missing ingredient. He then discusses dressing the baby. He first shows that it can be clothed in glue without changing its spectroscopic successes. In the process, several dynamical mysteries associated with quark model spectroscopy are potentially explained. Next, he dresses the baby in qanti q pairs, first showing that this can be done without compromising the naive quark model's success with either spectroscopy or the OZI rule. Finally, he shows that despite their near invisibility elsewhere, pairs do play an important role in the proton's spin structure by creating an antipolarized qanti q sea. In the context of an explicit calculation he demonstrate that it is plausible that the entire ''spin crisis'' arises from this effect

  12. The proton's spin: A quark model perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic moments and g A /g V provide information on the correlations among quark spins and flavors in the proton. I compare this information with the deep inelastic polarized data from EMC which has been claimed to show that very little of the proton's spin is due to the quarks. The possibility that there is significant polarization of strange quarks within protons is discussed. 38 refs

  13. Proton spin structure in the rest frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavada, P.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the quark-parton model in the standard infinite momentum approach overestimates the proton spin structure function g 1 (x) in comparison with the approach taking consistently into account the internal motion of quarks described by a spherical phase space in the proton rest frame. Particularly, it is shown the first moment of the spin structure function in the latter approach, assuming only the valence quarks contribution to the proton spin, does not contradict the experimental data. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  14. Spin flipping a stored polarized proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caussyn, D.D.; Derbenev, Y.S.; Ellison, T.J.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E.J.; von Przewoski, B.; Blinov, B.B.; Chu, C.M.; Courant, E.D.; Crandell, D.A.; Kaufman, W.A.; Krisch, A.D.; Nurushev, T.S.; Phelps, R.A.; Ratner, L.G.; Wong, V.K.; Ohmori, C.

    1994-01-01

    We recently studied the spin flipping of a vertically polarized, stored 139-MeV proton beam. To flip the spin, we induced an rf depolarizing resonance by sweeping our rf solenoid magnet's frequency through the resonance frequency. With multiple spin flips, we found a polarization loss of 0.0000±0.0005 per spin flip under the best conditions; this loss increased significantly for small changes in the conditions. Minimizing the depolarization during each spin flip is especially important because frequent spin flipping could significantly reduce the systematic errors in stored polarized-beam experiments

  15. The spin structure function g1p of the proton and a test of the Bjorken sum rule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adolph

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available New results for the double spin asymmetry A1p and the proton longitudinal spin structure function g1p are presented. They were obtained by the COMPASS Collaboration using polarised 200 GeV muons scattered off a longitudinally polarised NH3 target. The data were collected in 2011 and complement those recorded in 2007 at 160 GeV, in particular at lower values of x. They improve the statistical precision of g1p(x by about a factor of two in the region x≲0.02. A next-to-leading order QCD fit to the g1 world data is performed. It leads to a new determination of the quark spin contribution to the nucleon spin, ΔΣ, ranging from 0.26 to 0.36, and to a re-evaluation of the first moment of g1p. The uncertainty of ΔΣ is mostly due to the large uncertainty in the present determinations of the gluon helicity distribution. A new evaluation of the Bjorken sum rule based on the COMPASS results for the non-singlet structure function g1NS(x,Q2 yields as ratio of the axial and vector coupling constants |gA/gV|=1.22±0.05 (stat.±0.10 (syst., which validates the sum rule to an accuracy of about 9%.

  16. The Spin Structure Function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ of the Proton and a Test of the Bjorken Sum Rule

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.Yu; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jorg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.C.; Pereira, F.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rychter, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2016-02-10

    New results for the double spin asymmetry $A_1^{\\rm p}$ and the proton longitudinal spin structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ are presented. They were obtained by the COMPASS collaboration using polarised 200 GeV muons scattered off a longitudinally polarised NH$_3$ target. The data were collected in 2011 and complement those recorded in 2007 at 160\\,GeV, in particular at lower values of $x$. They improve the statistical precision of $g_1^{\\rm p}(x)$ by about a factor of two in the region $x\\lesssim 0.02$. A next-to-leading order QCD fit to the $g_1$ world data is performed. It leads to a new determination of the quark spin contribution to the nucleon spin, $\\Delta \\Sigma$ ranging from 0.26 to 0.36, and to a re-evaluation of the first moment of $g_1^{\\rm p}$. The uncertainty of $\\Delta \\Sigma$ is mostly due to the large uncertainty in the present determinations of the gluon helicity distribution. A new evaluation of the Bjorken sum rule based on the COMPASS results for the non-singlet structure function $g_1^{\\rm...

  17. Observation of Spin Flips with a Single Trapped Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, S.; Blaum, K.; Kracke, H.; Mooser, A.; Quint, W.; Walz, J.

    2011-01-01

    Spin transitions of an isolated trapped proton are observed for the first time. The spin quantum jumps are detected via the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect which is used in an experiment with a single proton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap. This opens the way for a direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton and a new test of the matter-antimatter symmetry in the baryon sector. This method can also be applied to other light atomic nuclei.

  18. Two-proton radioactivity in proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Mamta [Nuclear Science Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2006-07-15

    Two-proton radioactivity in extremely proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spins is investigated in a theoretical framework. Separation energy and entropy fluctuate with spin and hence affect the location of the proton drip line.

  19. Two-proton radioactivity in proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2006-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity in extremely proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spins is investigated in a theoretical framework. Separation energy and entropy fluctuate with spin and hence affect the location of the proton drip line

  20. Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin-flip?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oellers, Dieter Gerd Christian

    2010-01-01

    The present thesis discusses the extraction of the electron-proton spin-flip cross-section. The experimental setup, the data analysis and the results are pictured in detail. The proton is described by a QCD-based parton model. In leading twist three functions are needed. The quark distribution, the helicity distribution and the transversity distribution. While the first two are well-known, the transversity distribution is largely unknown. A self-sufficient measurement of the transversity is possible in double polarized proton-antiproton scattering. This rises the need of a polarized antiproton beam. So far spin filtering is the only tested method to produce a polarized proton beam, which may be capable to hold also for antiprotons. In-situ polarization build-up of a stored beam either by selective removal or by spin-flip of a spin-(1)/(2) beam is mathematically described. A high spin-flip cross-section would create an effective method to produce a polarized antiproton beam by polarized positrons. Prompted by conflicting calculations, a measurement of the spin-flip cross-section in low-energy electron-proton scattering was carried out. This experiment uses the electron beam of the electron cooler at COSY as an electron target. The depolarization of the stored proton beam is detected. An overview of the experiment is followed by detailed descriptions of the cycle setup, of the electron target and the ANKE silicon tracking telescopes acting as a beam polarimeter. Elastic protondeuteron scattering is the analyzing reaction. The event selection is depicted and the beam polarization is calculated. Upper limits of the two electron-proton spin-flip cross-sections σ parallel and σ perpendicular to are deduced using the likelihood method. (orig.)

  1. Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin-flip?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oellers, Dieter Gerd Christian

    2010-04-15

    The present thesis discusses the extraction of the electron-proton spin-flip cross-section. The experimental setup, the data analysis and the results are pictured in detail. The proton is described by a QCD-based parton model. In leading twist three functions are needed. The quark distribution, the helicity distribution and the transversity distribution. While the first two are well-known, the transversity distribution is largely unknown. A self-sufficient measurement of the transversity is possible in double polarized proton-antiproton scattering. This rises the need of a polarized antiproton beam. So far spin filtering is the only tested method to produce a polarized proton beam, which may be capable to hold also for antiprotons. In-situ polarization build-up of a stored beam either by selective removal or by spin-flip of a spin-(1)/(2) beam is mathematically described. A high spin-flip cross-section would create an effective method to produce a polarized antiproton beam by polarized positrons. Prompted by conflicting calculations, a measurement of the spin-flip cross-section in low-energy electron-proton scattering was carried out. This experiment uses the electron beam of the electron cooler at COSY as an electron target. The depolarization of the stored proton beam is detected. An overview of the experiment is followed by detailed descriptions of the cycle setup, of the electron target and the ANKE silicon tracking telescopes acting as a beam polarimeter. Elastic protondeuteron scattering is the analyzing reaction. The event selection is depicted and the beam polarization is calculated. Upper limits of the two electron-proton spin-flip cross-sections {sigma} {sub parallel} and {sigma} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} are deduced using the likelihood method. (orig.)

  2. Single spin asymmetries and the spin of the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Z, G.; Herrera C, G.

    2000-01-01

    We study the spin asymmetries of inclusive π + , π 0 , π - , η and γ production in the interaction of a polarized with a non polarized proton, in the frame of a two component model. Particle production in the model is assumed to consist of a conventional QCD fragmentation process plus a recombination mechanism. The presence of Thomas precession in the recombination process seems to be responsible for the production spin asymmetry. (Author) 12 refs., 8 figs

  3. The Spin-dependent Structure Function of the Proton $g_{1}^p$ and a Test of the Bjorken Sum Rule

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M.G.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Chaberny, D.; Cotic, D.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Efremov, A.; El Alaoui, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Friedrich, J.M.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gazda, R.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Hoppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Ilgner, C.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jasinski, P.; Jegou, G.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Kafer, W.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konopka, R.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Kramer, M.; Kral, A.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Lauser, L.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.N.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nassalski, J.; Negrini, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Pretz, J.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmitt, L.; Schluter, T.; Schopferer, S.; Schroder, W.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Siebert, H.W.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Takekawa, S.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Vossen, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhao, J.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2010-01-01

    The inclusive double-spin asymmetry, $A_{1}^{p}$, has been measured at COMPASS in deepinelastic polarised muon scattering off a large polarised NH3 target. The data, collected in the year 2007, cover the range Q2 > 1 (GeV/c)^2, 0.004 < x < 0.7 and improve the statistical precision of g_{1}^{p}(x) by a factor of two in the region x < 0.02. The new proton asymmetries are combined with those previously published for the deuteron to extract the non-singlet spin-dependent structure function g_1^NS(x,Q2). The isovector quark density, Delta_q_3(x,Q2), is evaluated from a NLO QCD fit of g_1^NS. The first moment of Delta_q3 is in good agreement with the value predicted by the Bjorken sum rule and corresponds to a ratio of the axial and vector coupling constants g_A/g_V = 1.28+-0.07(stat)+-0.10(syst).

  4. Innovative spin precessor for intermediate energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.W.

    1979-01-01

    A spin precessor has been designed to provide arbitrary orientation of the polarization in the external proton beam at LAMPF. The device utilizes two superconducting solenoids, three conventional dipoles, and conversion of polarized H - to H + to provide an achromatic, undeflected beam with tunable spin orientation over a range of energies from 400 MeV to 800 MeV. A portion of this device is being installed to provide compatibility between two facilities which simultaneously use two branches of the external proton beam at LAMPF

  5. Measurement of the spin dependent structure functions of proton and neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rith, K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results from the EMC experiment on the spin dependent structure function g 1 p (x) of the proton are discussed. They suggest that the nucleon spin does not originate from quark spins but rather from angular orbital momentum and gluon contributions. A proposed experiment at HERA is presented which will allow a very accurate measurement of the spin dependent structure functions and their integrals of both proton and neutron and a precise test of the Bjorken sum rule. (orig.)

  6. Spin asymmetry in proton-proton collisions as a probe of sea and gluon polarization in a proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.; Lai, S.

    1990-01-01

    Quark and gluon spin densities in a proton are phenomenologically parametrized based on the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) data and on some plausible theoretical arguments. Four different characteristic values of gluon and sea polarizations suggested by various theoretical conjectures are considered. The sea polarization in a proton is probed by measuring the spin-spin asymmetry A LL DY in the Drell-Yan process, while the helicity asymmetry A LL γ in direct photon production at high p T is employed to test the gluon spin content. Helicity asymmetries in both processes are quite sizable. A LL DY is positive and of order 10 -1 if the sea is polarized opposite to the proton spin, as suggested by the EMC data. However, even in the absence of the sea polarization at the EMC energies, we find A LL DY to be large and negative. Experimental measurements of A LL DY and A LL γ together will not only provide a clean probe of sea and gluon polarizations, but also test whether the combination Δs-(α s /4π)ΔG inferred from the EMC data is valid, i.e., whether gluons contribute to the spin-dependent structure function g 1 p (x,Q 2 ) via the triangular anomaly

  7. Spin observables in proton-neutron scattering at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinka, H.

    1986-05-01

    A summary of np elastic scattering spin measurements at intermediate energy is given. Preliminary results from a LAMPF experiment to measure free neutron-proton elastic scattering spin-spin correlation parameters are presented. A longitudinally polarized proton target was used. These measurements are part of a program to determine the neutron-proton amplitudes in a model independent fashion at 500, 650, and 800 MeV. Some new proton-proton total cross sections in pure helicity states (Δσ/sub L/(pp)) near 3 GeV/c are also given. 37 refs., 2 figs

  8. Measurement of the proton spin structure function g1p

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pussieux, T.

    1994-10-01

    In order to check the Bjorken sum rule and confirm the EMC surprising conclusion on the spin structure of the proton, the measurement of the spin structure function of the proton has been performed by the Spin Muon Collaboration via the polarized muon nucleon deep inelastic scattering. The results of the 1993 run are presented within a kinematical range of 0.003 2 = 10 GeV 2 . The first moment of the polarized spin structure function g 1 p is found to be two standard deviations below the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule. Assuming SU(3) for hyperons β decays, the quark spin contribution to the proton spin is extracted. Combining all available data on proton, neutron and deuton, The Bjorken sum rule is confirmed within 10%. (author). 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Polarized proton target with horizontal spin orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyatova, Eh.I.; Kiselev, Yu.F.; Kozlenko, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    Proton target, the polarization vector of which may be arbitrary oriented in horizontal plane relatively to the beam, is developed and tested. 70% value of polarization is obtained. 0.6 K temperature is acquired through 3 He pumping out continuous cycle. 1.2-propylene glycol - Cr(V) was used as working medium. Magnetic system is made in the form of Helmholtz sperconducting coils with working curren close to critical one. Target polarization is measured by NMR technique using original system of proton signal processing

  10. Leading Twist GPDs and Transverse Spin Densities in a Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Chandan; Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, Dipankar; Zhao, Xingbo

    2018-05-01

    We present a study of both chirally even and odd generalized parton distributions in the leading twist for the quarks in a proton using the light-front wavefunctions of a quark-diquark model predicted by the holographic QCD. For transversely polarized proton, both chiral even and chiral odd GPDs contribute to the spin densities which are related to the GPDs in transverse impact parameter space. Here, we also present a study of the spin densities for transversely polarized quark and proton.

  11. Understanding the proton's spin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myhrer, Fred [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Thomas, Anthony W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the tremendous progress that has been towards an understanding of how the spin of the proton is distributed on its quark and gluon constituents. This is a problem that began in earnest twenty years ago with the discovery of the proton "spin crisis" by the European Muon Collaboration. The discoveries prompted by that original work have given us unprecedented insight into the amount of spin carried by polarized gluons and the orbital angular momentum of the quarks.

  12. Protein proton-proton dynamics from amide proton spin flip rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Daniel S.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.

    2009-01-01

    Residue-specific amide proton spin-flip rates K were measured for peptide-free and peptide-bound calmodulin. K approximates the sum of NOE build-up rates between the amide proton and all other protons. This work outlines the theory of multi-proton relaxation, cross relaxation and cross correlation, and how to approximate it with a simple model based on a variable number of equidistant protons. This model is used to extract the sums of K-rates from the experimental data. Error in K is estimated using bootstrap methodology. We define a parameter Q as the ratio of experimental K-rates to theoretical K-rates, where the theoretical K-rates are computed from atomic coordinates. Q is 1 in the case of no local motion, but decreases to values as low as 0.5 with increasing domination of sidechain protons of the same residue to the amide proton flips. This establishes Q as a monotonous measure of local dynamics of the proton network surrounding the amide protons. The method is applied to the study of proton dynamics in Ca 2+ -saturated calmodulin, both free in solution and bound to smMLCK peptide. The mean Q is 0.81 ± 0.02 for free calmodulin and 0.88 ± 0.02 for peptide-bound calmodulin. This novel methodology thus reveals the presence of significant interproton disorder in this protein, while the increase in Q indicates rigidification of the proton network upon peptide binding, confirming the known high entropic cost of this process

  13. The "Proton Spin Crisis" — a Quantum Query

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson J.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The “proton spin crisis” was introduced in the late 1980s, when the EMC-experiment revealed that little or nothing of a proton’s spin seemed to be carried by its quarks. The main objective of this paper is to point out that it is wrong to assume that the proton spin, as measured by completely different experimental setups, should be the same in all circumstances, an assumption explicitly made in all present theoretical treatments of the “crisis”. As spin is a genuine quantum property, without any objective existence outside its measuring apparatus context, proper account of quantum mechanical measurement theory must be taken.

  14. First observation of spin flips with a single proton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis the very first observation of spin transitions of a single proton stored in a cryogenic double-Penning trap is presented. The experimental observation of spin transitions is based on the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, which couples the spin of the single trapped proton to its axial eigenfrequency, by means of an inhomogeneous magnetic field. A spin transition causes a change of the axial frequency, which can be measured non-destructively. Due to the tiny magnetic moment of the proton, the direct detection of proton spin-flips is an exceeding challenge. To achieve spin-flip resolution, the proton was stored in the largest magnetic field inhomogeneity, which has ever been superimposed to a Penning trap, and its axial frequency was detected non-destructively. Therefore, superconducting detection systems with ultrahigh-sensitivity were developed, allowing the direct observation of the single trapped proton, as well as the high-precision determination of its eigenfrequencies. Based on novel experimental methods, which were developed in the framework of this thesis, the axial frequency of the particle was stabilized to a level, where the observation of single-proton spin-flips is possible, which was demonstrated. This experimental success is one of the most important steps towards the high-precision determination of the magnetic moment of the free proton. With the very first observation of spin transitions with a single trapped proton, a highly exciting perspective opens. All experimental techniques which were developed in this thesis can be directly applied to the antiproton. Thus, the first high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the antiproton becomes possible. This will provide a new high-precision test of the matterantimatter symmetry. (orig.)

  15. The Proton-Spin Crisis another ABJ anomaly?

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. The First Moment Sum Rule for $g_1^p$; 3. The Parton Model and the `Proton Spin'; 4. The CPV Method and Topological Charge Screening; 5. Experiment; 6. Semi-Inclusive Polarised DIS.

  16. Proton spin tracking with symplectic integration of orbit motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    Symplectic integration had been adopted for orbital motion tracking in code SimTrack. SimTrack has been extensively used for dynamic aperture calculation with beam-beam interaction for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Recently proton spin tracking has been implemented on top of symplectic orbital motion in this code. In this article, we will explain the implementation of spin motion based on Thomas-BMT equation, and the benchmarking with other spin tracking codes currently used for RHIC. Examples to calculate spin closed orbit and spin tunes are presented too.

  17. The Toolbox of Proton Spin Physics in Historical Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, Willy

    2008-01-01

    This paper was part of the general-interest session on lecture day, and is thus addressed to a general audience. A 50-year historic overview of the development of the tools of proton spin physics is presented: nuclear scattering, ion sources for polarized protons and deuterons based on atomic beam and optical pumping methods, and polarized gas targets

  18. Resolution of Single Spin-Flips of a Single Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Mooser, A.; Blaum, K.; Bräuninger, S.A.; Franke, K.; Leiteritz, C.; Quint, W.; Rodegheri, C.C.; Ulmer, S.; Walz, J.

    2013-04-04

    The spin magnetic moment of a single proton in a cryogenic Penning trap was coupled to the particle's axial motion with a superimposed magnetic bottle. Jumps in the oscillation frequency indicate spin-flips and were identified using a Bayesian analysis.

  19. Measurement of the spin-spin correlation parameter C/sub LL/(THETA) in proton-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    The experimental procedures and methods of data analysis used to measure the spin-spin correlation parameter C/sub LL/(THETA) in proton-proton scattering at thirteen different energies in the range 300 to 800 MeV are presented. The results compare favorably with previous data. Good agreement is found with phase shift predictions at energies below 500 MeV

  20. Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin flip?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oellers, D.; Barion, L.; Barsov, S.; Bechstedt, U.; Benati, P.; Bertelli, S.; Chiladze, D.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P.F.; Dietrich, J.; Dolfus, N.; Dymov, S.; Engels, R.; Erven, W.; Garishvili, A.; Gebel, R.; Goslawski, P.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss polarizing a proton beam in a storage ring, either by selective removal or by spin flip of the stored ions. Prompted by recent, conflicting calculations, we have carried out a measurement of the spin-flip cross section in low-energy electron-proton scattering. The experiment uses the cooling electron beam at COSY as an electron target. The measured cross sections are too small for making spin flip a viable tool in polarizing a stored beam. This invalidates a recent proposal to use co-moving polarized positrons to polarize a stored antiproton beam.

  1. Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetries in Proton-Proton Collisions at the AFTER@LHC Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kanazawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results for transverse single-spin asymmetries in proton-proton collisions at kinematics relevant for AFTER, a proposed fixed-target experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. These include predictions for pion, jet, and direct photon production from analytical formulas already available in the literature. We also discuss specific measurements that will benefit from the higher luminosity of AFTER, which could help resolve an almost 40-year puzzle of what causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in proton-proton collisions.

  2. Spin filtering neutrons with a proton target dynamically polarized using photo-excited triplet states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, M.; Brandt, B. van den; Eichhorn, T.R.; Hautle, P.; Wenckebach, W.Th.

    2012-01-01

    In a test of principle a neutron spin filter has been built, which is based on dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using photo-excited triplet states. This DNP method has advantages over classical concepts as the requirements for cryogenic equipment and magnets are much relaxed: the spin filter is operated in a field of 0.3 T at a temperature of about 100 K and has performed reliably over periods of several weeks. The neutron beam was also used to analyze the polarization of the target employed as a spin filter. We obtained an independent measurement of the proton spin polarization of ∼0.13 in good agreement with the value determined with NMR. Moreover, the neutron beam was used to measure the proton spin polarization as a function of position in the naphthalene sample. The polarization was found to be homogeneous, even at low laser power, in contradiction to existing models describing the photo-excitation process.

  3. Proton location in metal hydrides using electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) of dilute paramagnetic ions establishes the site symmetry of these ions. In the case of metal hydrides the site symmetry is determined by the number and location of neighboring protons. Typical ESR spectra for trivalent erbium in scandium and yttrium hydrides are presented and analyzed, and this technique is shown to be a versatile microscopic probe of the location, net charge and occupation probability of nearby protons

  4. Thermally excited proton spin-flip laser emission in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    Based on statistical thermodynamic fluctuation arguments, it is shown here for the first time that thermally excited spin-flip laser emission from the fusion product protons can occur in large tokamak devices that are entering the reactor regime of operation. Existing experimental data from TFTR supports this conjecture, in the sense that these measurements are in complete agreement with the predictions of the quasilinear theory of the spin-flip laser

  5. The spin of the proton and the axial anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatsuda, T.; Zahed, I.

    1989-01-01

    We show that a consistent treatment of the abelian axial anomaly in a two-phase model of the proton yields a flavor singlet axial current that is saturated by the anomaly at Q 2 =0 in the chiral limit. This result suggests that at Q 2 =0 the matrix element of the flavor singlet axial current in a polarized proton state is small while the proton spin is still one-half. Modulo the QCD evolution equation, this result is in fair agreement with the recent EMC data. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear spin response studies in inelastic polarized proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    Spin-flip probabilities S/sub nn/ have been measured for inelastic proton scattering at incident proton energies around 300 MeV from a number of nuclei. At low excitation energies S/sub nn/ is below the free value. For excitation energies above about 30 MeV for momentum transfers between about 0.35 fm/sup /minus/1/ and 0.65 fm/sup / minus/1/ S/sub nn/ exceeds free values significantly. These results suggest that the relative ΔS = 1(ΔS = 0 + ΔS = 1) nuclear spin response approaches about 90% in the region of the enhancement. Comparison of the data with slab response calculations are presented. Decomposition of the measured cross sections into σ(ΔS = 0) and σ(ΔS = 1) permit extraction of nonspin-flip and spin-flip dipole and quadrupole strengths. 29 refs., 11 figs

  7. Instantons and the spin of a proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabo, T.A.; Sabov, V.Yi.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of spin crisis related to smallness of an axial charge of a nucleon, found out in SLAC and European Muon Collaboration, is discussed. It is shown that nonperturbative interactions of quarks with vacuum instantons would be taken into account in computing matrix elements of currents over nucleon states. In this case we obtain a qualitative agreement with experimental results for the value of axial charge

  8. Medium effects on spin observables of proton knockout reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krein, G.; Maris, T.A.J.; Rodrigues, B.B.; Veit, E.A.

    1994-07-01

    Medium modifications of the properties of bound nucleons and mesons are investigated by means of medium energy quasi free proton knockout reactions with polarized incident protons. The sensitivity of the spin observables of these reactions to modifications of the nucleon and meson properties is studied using the Bonn one-boson exchange model of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. A method proposed to extract the pp analysing power in medium from the (p, 2 p) asymmetries indicates a reduction of this quantity compared to its free space value. This reduction is linked to modifications of masses and coupling constants of the nucleons and mesons in the nucleus. The implications of these modifications for another spin observable to be measured in the future are discussed. (author). 39 refs, 9 figs

  9. Medium effects on spin observables of proton knockout reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krein, G [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Maris, T A.J.; Rodrigues, B B; Veit, E A [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1994-07-01

    Medium modifications of the properties of bound nucleons and mesons are investigated by means of medium energy quasi free proton knockout reactions with polarized incident protons. The sensitivity of the spin observables of these reactions to modifications of the nucleon and meson properties is studied using the Bonn one-boson exchange model of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. A method proposed to extract the pp analysing power in medium from the (p, 2 p) asymmetries indicates a reduction of this quantity compared to its free space value. This reduction is linked to modifications of masses and coupling constants of the nucleons and mesons in the nucleus. The implications of these modifications for another spin observable to be measured in the future are discussed. (author). 39 refs, 9 figs.

  10. The spin dependent structure function g1 of the deuteron and the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klostermann, L.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents a study on the spin structure of the nucleon, via deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of polarised nuons on polarised proton and deuterium targets. The work was done in the Spin Muon Collaboration (SMC) at CERN in Geneva. From the asymmetry in the scattering cross section for nucleon and lepton spins parallel and anti-parallel, one con determine the spin dependent structure function g 1 , which contains information on the quark and gluon spin distribution functions. The interpretation in the frame work of the quark parton model (QPM) of earlier results on g 1 p by the European Muon Collaboration (EMC), gave an indication that only a small fraction of the proton spin, compatible with zero, is carried by the spins of the constituent quarks. The SMC was set up to check this unexpected result with improved accuracy, and to combine measurements of g 1 p and g 1 d to test a fundamental sum rule in quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the Bjorken sum rule. (orig./WL)

  11. Probing the Spin Structure of the Proton Using Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions and the Production of W Bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumier, Michael J. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This thesis discusses the process of extracting the longitudinal asymmetry, A$W±\\atop{L}$ describing W → μ production in forward kinematic regimes. This asymmetry is used to constrain our understanding of the polarized parton distribution functions characterizing $\\bar{u}$ and $\\bar{d}$ sea quarks in the proton. This asymmetry will be used to constrain the overall contribution of the sea-quarks to the total proton spin. The asymmetry is evaluated over the pseudorapidity range of the PHENIX Muon Arms, 2.1 < |η| 2.6, for longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at 510 GeV √s. In particular, I will discuss the statistical methods used to characterize real muonic W decays and the various background processes is presented, including a discussion of likelihood event selection and the Extended Unbinned Maximum Likelihood t. These statistical methods serve estimate the yields of W muonic decays, which are used to calculate the longitudinal asymmetry.

  12. Spin Observables in h Meson Photoproduction on the Proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Ross [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-05-01

    A series of experiments using a polarized beam incident on a polarized frozen spin target (FROST) was conducted at Jefferson Lab in 2010. Results presented here were taken during the second running period with the FROST target using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) detector at Jefferson Lab, which used transversely-polarized protons in a butanol target and a circularly-polarized incident tagged photon beam with energies between 0:62 and 2:93 GeV. Data are presented for the F and T polarization observables for n meson photoproduction on the proton from W = 1:55 GeV to 1:80 GeV. The data presented here will improve the world database and refine theoretical approaches of nucleon structure.

  13. Performance of a frozen spin polarised proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, F.M.

    1977-12-01

    The operational performance of a frozen spin polarised proton target specifically designed to give an unusually large angular access to the target has been examined. It is concluded that the mean absolute proton polarisation was held at about 64 +- 2% throughout the majority of HEP data recording. An excessive heat input to the target caused by inadequate cooling of the coaxial cable coupling to the nmr coil in the cavity seriously reduced the dwell-time of the target for HEP data collection. However, the short cooldown time of the target and minimal depolarisation associated with recycling of the target between polarising and HEP data collection positions resulted in only a small overall reduction in mean target polarisation and operational efficiency. (author)

  14. The proton ''spin contents'': Current status ampersand perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Ta-Pei; Li, Ling-Fong

    1990-01-01

    The present status of the phenomenological and theoretical interpretation of the EMC result on the polarized deep elastic scattering is reviewed. We focus our discussion on the possibility of a significant gluonic contribution to the proton spin via the axial anomaly. We contrast the variant perspectives on this question: the viewpoint that stresses the interpretation in terms of the parton distributions vs the one that concentrates on the matrix elements of local operators. Some remarks concerning the validity of OZI rule for the strange quark are also included. 53 refs

  15. Polarization reversal of proton spins in solid-state targets by superradiance effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichertz, L.A.

    1991-02-01

    Scattering experiments with polarized targets are prepared at the Bonn accelerator ELSA. The new Bonn frozen spin target (BOFROST) developed for real photon experiments at the PHOENICS detector has been tested in the laboratory. Proton polarization values of -99% and +94% in ammonia, -96% and +90% in butanol have been achieved at a magnetic field of 3.5 Tesla. At a temperature of 70 mK and a magnetic field of 0.35 Tesla a very fast spontaneous polarization reversal has been observed. This effect occured at negative polarization only and has been identified as a self-induced superradiance effect in the proton spin system. This work describes the polarization and relaxation measurements at BOFROST and detailed experiments concerning the superradiance effect. (orig.) [de

  16. Measuring the contribution of low Bjorken-x gluons to the proton spin with polarized proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Scott Justin

    The PHENIX experiment is one of two detectors located at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY. Understanding the spin structure of the proton is a central goal at RHIC, the only polarized proton-on-proton collider in existence. The PHENIX spin program has two primary objectives. The first is to improve the constraints on the polarized parton distributions of the anti-u and anti-d quarks within the proton. The second objective is to improve the constraint on the gluon spin contribution to the proton spin, DeltaG. The focus of this thesis is the second objective. PHENIX experiment has been successful at providing the first meaningful constraints on DeltaG, along with STAR, the other detector located at RHIC. These constraints have, in fact, eliminated the extreme scenarios for gluon polarization through measurements of the double spin asymmetry, ALL, between the cross section of like and unlike sign helicity pp interactions. ALL measurements can be performed with a variety of final states at PHENIX. Until 2009, these final states were only measured for pseudo-rapidities of |eta| Piston Calorimeter (MPC) was installed in 2006 and 2007 at forward rapidity, 3.1 < |eta| < 3.9, with the intention of giving PHENIX the ability to constrain Delta g(x) for x < 0.05. Following this, an electronics upgrade to the MPC will be described which enables the selection of events with two hadrons detected in the MPC. This requirement favors gluons at even lower x than the single hadron event selection. The di-hadron measurement that this upgrade makes possible will allow PHENIX to produce an ALL measurement that constrains Deltag(x) in the range of 5 x 10-4 < x < 0.01. Finally, we discuss the most important systematic uncertainty common to all ALL measurements which arises from the determination of the relative luminosity. A precision ALLL measurement requires measuring the final state yield from the portions of the proton beams that

  17. A study of the internal spin structure of the proton through polarized deep inelastic muon-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piegaia, R.N.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of the internal spin structure of the proton through the measurement performed by the European Muon Collaboration, EMC, at the European Center for Nuclear Research, CERN, of the spin asymmetry in the deep-inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized muons by longitudinally polarized protons. The data obtained considerably extend the kinematic range covered by a previous lower-energy polarized electron-proton scattering experiment. Although the results were found to be in agreement in the region of overlap, the study of the low x range (0.01 1 p was computed and found to be in disagreement with the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule. The result seems to indicate that only a small fraction of the proton spin originates from the spins of the quarks

  18. Construction and test of a proton detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranefeld, G.

    1990-08-01

    Nonmagnetic proton detectors will be used in future at the ELAN experiment. For this purpose a prototype of a proton telescope has being designed. The detector consists of three scintillation counters which are used as dE/dx counter, energy (stopping) counter and veto counter. This telescope was calibrated by using elastic electron proton scattering and tested with quasielastic electrodisintegration of the deuteron. These are no principal problems to identify the protons. In the electrodisintegration of the deuteron a missing mass resolution of ± 5.1 MeV was achieved. It has been shown, that such detectors are well suited for proton detection. (orig.) [de

  19. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Functions G1 and G2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, Al

    2003-04-02

    The SLAC experiment E155 was a deep-inelastic scattering experiment that scattered polarized electrons off polarized proton and deuteron targets in the effort to measure precisely the proton and deuteron spin structure functions. The nucleon structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} are important quantities that help test our present models of nucleon structure. Such information can help quantify the constituent contributions to the nucleon spin. The structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and G{sub 1}{sup d} have been measured over the kinematic range 0.01 {le} x {le} 0.9 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 40 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 48.4 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons and deuterons. In addition, the structure functions g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} have been measured over the kinematic range 0.01 {le} x {le} 0.7 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 17 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 38.8 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off transversely polarized protons and deuterons. The measurements of g{sub 1} confirm the Bjorken sum rule and find the net quark polarization to be {Delta}{Sigma} = 0.23 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.6 while g{sub 2} is found to be consistent with the g{sub 2}{sup WW} model.

  20. Flying spin qualities testing of airplane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Čedomir J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented the theoretical analysis of origins and characteristics of spinning motion. There are precise explanation of every stage spin flight and basic meaning of notion. Personated equation of motion in spin and equitation of motion airplane in settled spin motion, analysis of them and general recommendation for pilots for recovering from spins. Introduced in valid military and civil specifications flight test demonstration requirements for departure resistance and flying stall and spin qualities testing of airplane. Special attention was given on predicting departure, stall and spin susceptibility and theoretical analysis in the name of magnify flight testing security. There are explanation of test equipment and methodology of flying qualities testing of airplanes. Like a support of this theme are described method and results of flight stall and spin qualities testing of airplane G-4(N-62 super see-gull with precise recommendation for pilots for recovering from spins, from TOC SLI VS (Technical testing center, department for fight testing Air Force of Serbia.

  1. Results from EDDA at COSY: Spin Observables in Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohdjess, Heiko

    2003-01-01

    Elastic proton-proton scattering as one of the fundamental hadronic reactions has been studied with the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler-Synchrotron COSY/Juelich. A precise measurement of differential cross section, analyzing power and three spin-correlation parameters over a large angular (θc.m. ≅ 35 deg. - 90 deg.) and energy (Tp ≅ 0.5 - 2.5 GeV) range has been carried out in the past years. By taking scattering data during the acceleration of the COSY beam, excitation functions were measured in small energy steps and consistent normalization with respect to luminosity and polarization. The experiment uses internal fiber targets and a polarized hydrogen atomic-beam target in conjunction with a double-layered, cylindrical scintillator hodoscope for particle detection. The results on differential cross sections and analyzing powers have been published and helped to improve phase shift solutions. Recently data taking with polarized beam and target has been completed. Preliminary results for the spin-correlation parameters A NN, ASS, and ASL are presented. The observable ASS has been measured the first time above 800 MeV and our results are in sharp contrast to phase-shift predictions at higher energies. Our analysis shows that some of the ambiguities in the direct reconstruction of scattering amplitudes which also show up as differences between available phase-shift solutions, will be reduced by these new measurements

  2. New Results on Testing Duality in Spin Structure from Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilanga Liyanage

    2005-10-01

    The Bloom-Gilman duality has been experimentally demonstrated for spin independent structure functions. Duality is observed when the smooth scaling curve at high momentum transfer is an average over the resonance bumps at lower momentum transfer, but at the same value of scaling variable x. Signs of quark-hadron duality for the spin Dependant structure function g1 of the proton has been recently reported by the Hermes collaboration. Experimental Halls A, B and C at Jefferson lab have recently measured spin structure functions in the resonance region for the proton and the neutron. Data from these experiments combined with Deep-Inelastic-Scattering data provide a precision test of quark-hadron duality predictions for spin structure functions for both the proton and the neutron. This will be one of the first precision tests of spin and flavor dependence of quark-hadron duality.

  3. Self-similarity of proton spin and asymmetry of jet production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarev, M.V.; Zborovsky, I.

    2014-01-01

    Self-similarity of jet production in polarized p + p collisions is studied. The concept of z-scaling is applied for description of inclusive spectra obtained with different orientations of proton spin. New data on the double longitudinal spin asymmetry, A LL , of jets produced in proton-proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV measured by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC are analyzed in the z-scaling approach. Hypotheses of self-similarity and fractality of internal spin structure are formulated. A possibility to extract information on spin-dependent fractal dimensions of proton from the asymmetry of jet production is justified. The spin-dependent fractal dimensions for the process p-bar+p-bar→jet+X are estimated.

  4. Measurement of the spin-dependent structure-functions of the proton and the deuteron

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % NA47 %title \\\\ \\\\The physics motivation of the experiments of the Spin Muon Collaboration is to better understand how the nucleon spin is built-up by its partons and to test the fundamental Bjorken sum rule. \\\\ \\\\The spin-dependent structure functions $g _{1}(x)$ of the proton and the deuteron are determined from the measured cross section asymmetries for deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized muons from longitudinally polarized nucleons. The experiment is similar to the NA2 one of the European Muon Collaboration in which the violation of the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule for the proton was found. \\\\ \\\\The apparatus is the upgraded forward spectrometer which was used originally by the European and New Muon Collaborations. To minimize the systematic uncertainties the target contains two oppositely polarized cells, which were exposed to the muon beam simultaneously. For the experiments in 1991 and 1992 the original EMC polarized target was reinstalled. In 1993 a new polarized target was put into operati...

  5. Proton radioactivity at non-collective prolate shape in high spin state of 94Ag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2010-01-01

    We predict proton radioactivity and structural transitions in high spin state of an excited exotic nucleus near proton drip line in a theoretical framework and investigate the nature and the consequences of the structural transitions on separation energy as a function of temperature and spin. It reveals that the rotation of the excited exotic nucleus 94 Ag at excitation energies around 6.7 MeV and angular momentum near 21h generates a rarely seen prolate non-collective shape and proton separation energy becomes negative which indicates proton radioactivity in agreement with the experimental results of Mukha et al. for 94 Ag.

  6. Proton radioactivity at non-collective prolate shape in high spin state of {sup 94}Ag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Mamta, E-mail: mamta.a4@gmail.co [UM-DAE Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, University of Mumbai, Kalina Campus, Mumbai 400 098 (India)

    2010-10-11

    We predict proton radioactivity and structural transitions in high spin state of an excited exotic nucleus near proton drip line in a theoretical framework and investigate the nature and the consequences of the structural transitions on separation energy as a function of temperature and spin. It reveals that the rotation of the excited exotic nucleus {sup 94}Ag at excitation energies around 6.7 MeV and angular momentum near 21h generates a rarely seen prolate non-collective shape and proton separation energy becomes negative which indicates proton radioactivity in agreement with the experimental results of Mukha et al. for {sup 94}Ag.

  7. Complete snake and rotator schemes for spin polarization in proton rings and large electron rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, K.

    1983-11-01

    In order to maintain spin polarization in proton rings and large electron rings, some generalized Siberian Snake scheme may be required to make the spin tune almost independent of energy and thus avoid depolarizing resonances. The practical problem of finding such schemes that, at reasonable technical effort, can be made to work over large energy ranges has been addressed before and is here revisited in a broadened view and with added new suggestions. As a result, possibly optimum schemes for electron rings (LEP) and proton rings are described. In the proposed LEP scheme, spin rotation is devised such that, at the interaction points, the spin direction is longitudinal as required for experiments. (orig.)

  8. The Spin Structure of the Proton at Low Q2: A Measurement of the Structure Function g2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Chao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The spin structure of the nucleon has remained as one of the key points of interest in hadronic physics, which has attracted many efforts from both experimentalists and theorists. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the fundamental theory that describes the strong interaction. It has been verified in the asymptotically free region. However, the non-perturbative confinement of quarks within the nucleon is still not well understood within QCD. In the non-perturbative regime, low-energy effective field theories such as chiral perturbation theory (XPT) provide predictions for the spin structure functions. The neutron spin structure functions, gp1 and gp2 , and the proton spin structure function, gp1, have been measured over a wide kinematic range and compared with the theoretical predictions. However, the proton spin structure function, gp2, remains largely unmeasured. The E08-027 collaboration successfully performed the first measurement of the inclusive electron-proton scattering in the kinematic range 0.02 < Q2 < 0.2 GeV2. The experiment took place in experimental Hall A at Jefferson Lab in 2012. A longitudinally polarized electron beam with incident energies between 1.1 GeV and 3.3 GeV was scattered from a longitudinally or transversely polarized NH3 target. Asymmetries and polarized cross-section differences were measured in the resonance region to extract the proton spin structure functions g2. The results allow us to obtain the generalized spin polarizabilities γ0 and δLT and test the Burkhardtt-Cottingham (BC) sum rule. Chiral perturbation theory is expected to work in this kinematic range and this measurement of δLT will give a benchmark test to XPT calculations. This thesis will discuss preliminary results from the E08-027 data analysis.

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Applications: Proton NMR In Biological Objects Subjected To Magic Angle Spinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Proton NMR in Biological Objects Submitted to Magic Angle Spinning, In Encyclopedia of Analytical Science, Second Edition (Paul J. Worsfold, Alan Townshend and Colin F. Poole, eds.), Elsevier, Oxford 6:333-342. Published January 1, 2005. Proposal Number 10896

  10. Neutron scattering and proton spin conversion in solid CH4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushington, K.J.; Morrison, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The total neutron cross section of pure and O 2 -doped condensed CH 4 has been measured in the temperature range 0.75< T<100 K. The neutron wave length was sufficiently long (4.7 A) so that changes in cross section could be directly related to changes in γI(I + 1)μ, the mean squared proton nuclear angular momentum per molecule, to a sensitivity of about 1%. The temperature dependences of γI(I + 1)μ for the pure and doped specimens differ considerably in solid phase II(T<20.4 K). For the former specimen, the change in cross section is consistent with conversion occurring between the nuclear spin symmetry species on the orientationally disordered sublattices only. The addition of oxygen enhances the rate of conversion such that the value of γI(I + 1)μ corresponds to conversion on both the disordered and ordered sublattices. The characteristic lifetimes of the catalyzed and uncatalyzed conversion processes have been estimated. (author)

  11. Spin structure of the proton from polarized inclusive deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D.; Arik, E.; Arvidson, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballintijn, M.K.; Bardin, G.; Baum, Guenter; Berglund, P.; Betev, L.; Bird, I.G.; Birsa, R.; Bjorkholm, P.; Bonner, B.E.; de Botton, N.; Boutemeur, M.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Bueltmann, Stephen L.; Burtin, E.; Cavata, C.; Crabb, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Cuhadar, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; van Dantzig, R.; Derro, B.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Dulya, C.; Dyring, A.; Eichblatt, S.; Faivre, J.C.; Fasching, D.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandez, C.; Frois, B.; Gallas, A.; Garzon, J.A.; Gaussiran, T.; Giorgi, M.; von Goeler, E.; Gracia, G.; de Groot, N.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gulmez, Erhan; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hautle, P.; Hayashi, N.; Heusch, C.A.; Horikawa, N.; Hughes, V.W.; Igo, G.; Ishimoto, S.; Iwata, T.; Kabuss, E.M.; Karev, A.; Kessler, H.J.; Ketel, T.J.; Kishi, A.; Kiselev, Yu.; Klostermann, L.; Kramer, D.; Krivokhijine, V.; Kroger, W.; Kurek, K.; Kyynarainen, J.; Lamanna, M.; Landgraf, U.; Layda, T.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lehar, F.; de Lesquen, A.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lindqvist, T.; Litmaath, M.; Lowe, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marie, F.; Martin, A.; Martino, J.; Matsuda, T.; Mayes, B.; McCarthy, J.S.; Medved, K.; van Middelkoop, G.; Miller, D.; Mori, K.; Moromisato, J.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nassalski, J.; Naumann, L.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Oberski, J.E.J.; Ogawa, A.; Ozben, C.; Parks, D.P.; Penzo, A.; Kunne, F.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piegaia, R.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Platchkov, S.; Plo, M.; Pose, D.; Postma, H.; Pretz, J.; Pussieux, T.; Pyrlik, J.; Reyhancan, I.; Rijllart, A.; Roberts, J.B.; Rock, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Rondio, E.; Rosado, A.; Sabo, I.; Saborido, J.; Sandacz, A.; Savin, Igor A.; Schiavon, P.; Schuler, K.P.; Segel, R.; Seitz, R.; Semertzidis, Y.; Sever, F.; Shanahan, P.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simeoni, F.; Smirnov, G.I.; Staude, A.; Steinmetz, A.; Stiegler, U.; Stuhrmann, H.; Szleper, M.; Teichert, K.M.; Tessarotto, F.; Tlaczala, W.; Trentalange, S.; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vogt, J.; Voss, R.; Weinstein, R.; Whitten, C.; Windmolders, R.; Willumeit, R.; Wislicki, W.; Witzmann, A.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zaremba, K.; Zhao, J.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of polarized muons off polarized protons, in the kinematic range $0.003 < x < 0.7$ and $1\\gevtwo < Q^2 < 60\\gevtwo$. A next-to-leading order QCD analysis is used to evolve the measured $\\gpone(x,Q^2)$ to a fixed $Q^2_0$. The first moment of $\\gpone$ at $Q^2_0 = 10\\gevtwo$ is $\\gammap = 0.136\\pm 0.013 \\,(\\mbox{stat.}) \\pm 0.009\\,(\\mbox{syst.})\\pm 0.005\\ (\\mbox{evol.})$. This result is below the prediction of the Ellis--Jaffe sum rule by more than two standard deviations. The singlet axial charge $\\dsigt$ is found to be $0.28 \\pm 0.16$. In the Adler--Bardeen factorization scheme, $\\Delta g \\simeq 2$ is required to bring $\\Delta \\Sigma$ in agreement with the Quark-Parton Model. A combined analysis of all available proton and deuteron data confirms the Bjorken sum rule.

  12. Spinning charged test particles and Cosmic Censorship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caderni, N [Cambridge Univ. Inst. of Astronomy (UK); Calvani, M [Padua Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Astronomia

    1979-04-16

    The authors consider spinning charged test particles in the gravitational field of a rotating charged black hole, and it is shown that the hole cannot be destroyed, according to the Cosmic Censorship hypothesis.

  13. Spinning charged test particles and Cosmic Censorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caderni, N.; Calvani, M.

    1979-01-01

    The authors consider spinning charged test particles in the gravitational field of a rotating charged black hole, and it is shown that the hole cannot be destroyed, according to the Cosmic Censorship hypothesis. (Auth.)

  14. Spin observables in antiproton-proton to AntiLambda-Lambda and density-matrix constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Elchikh, Mokhtar; Richard, Jean-Marc

    2005-01-01

    The positivity conditions of the spin density matrix constrain the spin observables of the reaction antiproton-proton to AntiLambda-Lambda, leading to model-independent, non-trivial inequalities. The formalism is briefly presented and examples of inequalities are provided.

  15. Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin flip? - A high statistic reanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oellers, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Prompted by recent, conflicting calculations, we have carried out a measurement of the spin flip cross section in low-energy electron-proton scattering. The experiment uses the cooling electron beam at COSY as an electron target. A reanalysis of the data leeds to a reduced statistical errors resulting in a factor of 4 reduced upper limit for the spin flip cross section. The measured cross sections are too small for making spin flip a viable tool in polarizing a stored beam.

  16. Spin flipping a stored polarized proton beam with an rf magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, S.Q.; Blinov, B.B.; Caussyn, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    The authors studied the spin flipping of a vertically polarized, stored 139 MeV proton beam with an rf solenoid magnetic field. By sweeping the rf frequency through an rf depolarizing resonance, they made the spin flip. The spin flipping was more efficient for slower ramp times, and the spin flip efficiency peaked at some optimum ramp time that is not yet fully understood. Since frequent spin flipping could significantly reduce the systematic errors in scattering experiments using a stored polarized beam, it is very important to minimize the depolarization after each spin flip. In this experiment, with multiple spin flips, the authors found a polarization loss of 0.0000 ± 0.0005 per spin flip under the best conditions; this loss increased significantly for small changes in the conditions

  17. On the difference between proton and neutron spin-orbit splittings in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isakov, V.I.; Erokhina, K.I.; Mach, H.; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Fogelberg, B.

    2002-01-01

    The latest experimental data on nuclei at 132 Sn permit us for the first time to determine the spin-orbit splittings of neutrons and protons in identical orbits in this neutron-rich doubly magic region and compare the case to that of 208 Pb. Using the new results, which are now consistent for the two neutron-rich doubly magic regions, a theoretical analysis defines the isotopic dependence of the mean-field spin-orbit potential and leads to a simple explicit expression for the difference between the spin-orbit splittings of neutrons and protons. The isotopic dependence is explained in the framework of different theoretical approaches. (orig.)

  18. Experimental determination of the complete spin structure for anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda at anti-proton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Paschke, K.D.; Berdoz, A.; Franklin, G.B.; Khaustov, P.; Meyer, C.A.; Bradtke, C.; Gehring, R.; Goertz, S.; Harmsen, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.; Reicherz, G.; Dutz, H.; Pluckthun, M.; Schoch, B.; Dennert, H.; Eyrich, W.; Hauffe, J.; Metzger, A.; Moosburger, M.; Stinzing, F.; Wirth, St.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Heinsius, F.H.; Kriegler, E.; Schmitt, H.; Bunker, B.; Hertzog, D.; Jones, T.; Tayloe, R.; Broders, R.; Geyer, R.; Kilian, K.; Oelert, W.; Rohrich, K.; Sachs, K.; Sefzick, T.; Bassalleck, B.; Eilerts, S.; Fields, D.E.; Kingsberry, P.; Lowe, J.; Stotzer, R.; Johansson, T.; Pomp, S.; Wirth, St.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda -> anti-proton + \\pi^+ + proton + \\pi^- has been measured with high statistics at anti-proton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c. The use of a transversely-polarized frozen-spin target combined with the self-analyzing property of \\Lambda/anti-\\Lambda decay allows access to unprecedented information on the spin structure of the interaction. The most general spin-scattering matrix can be written in terms of eleven real parameters for each bin of scattering angle, each of these parameters is determined with reasonable precision. From these results all conceivable spin-correlations are determined with inherent self-consistency. Good agreement is found with the few previously existing measurements of spin observables in anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda near this energy. Existing theoretical models do not give good predictions for those spin-observables that had not been previously measured.

  19. Spin-isospin excitation of 3He with three-proton final state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Souichi

    2018-01-01

    Spin-isospin excitation of the {}^3He nucleus by a proton-induced charge exchange reaction, {}^3He(p,n)ppp, at forward neutron scattering angle is studied in a plane wave impulse approximation (PWIA). In PWIA, cross sections of the reaction are written in terms of proton-neutron scattering amplitudes and response functions of the transition from {}3He to the three-proton state by spin-isospin transition operators. The response functions are calculated with realistic nucleon-nucleon potential models using a Faddeev three-body method. Calculated cross sections agree with available experimental data in substance. Possible effects arising from the uncertainty of proton-neutron amplitudes and three-nucleon interactions in the three-proton system are examined.

  20. Spin-flipping a stored polarized proton beam with an rf dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, B.B.; Derbenev, Ya.S.; Kageya, T.; Kantsyrev, D.Yu.; Krisch, A.D.; Morozov, V.S.; Sivers, D.W.; Wong, V.K.; Anferov, V.A.; Schwandt, P.; Przewoski, B. von

    2000-01-01

    Frequent polarization reversals, or spin-flips, of a stored polarized high-energy beam may greatly reduce systematic errors of spin asymmetry measurements in a scattering asymmetry experiment. We studied the spin-flipping of a 120 MeV horizontally-polarized proton beam stored in the IUCF Cooler Ring by ramping an rf-dipole magnet's frequency through an rf-induced depolarizing resonance in the presence of a nearly-full Siberian snake. After optimizing the frequency ramp parameters, we used multiple spin-flips to measure a spin-flip efficiency of 86.5±0.5%. The spin-flip efficiency was apparently limited by the rf-dipole's field strength. This result indicates that an efficient spin-flipping a stored polarized beam should be possible in high energy rings such as RHIC and HERA where Siberian snakes are certainly needed and only dipole rf-flipper-magnets are practical

  1. Spin flipping a stored polarized proton beam at the IUCF cooler ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    We recently studied the spin flip of a vertically polarized 139 MeV proton beam stored in the IUCF Cooler Ring. We used an rf solenoid to induce a depolarizing resonance in the ring; we flipped the spin by varying the solenoid field's frequency through this resonance. We found a polarization loss after multiple spin flips less than 0.1% per flip; we also found that this loss increased for very slow frequency changes. This spin flip could reduce systematic errors in stored polarization beam experiments by allowing frequent beam polarization reversals during the experiment. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  2. Proposal to measure spin-structure functions and semi-exclusive asymmetries for the proton and neutron at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.E.; Hansen, J.O.; Jones, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Nucleon spin physics will be studied in the HERMES experiment, that will use polarized internal targets of essentially pure atomic H, D, and 3 He in the HERA electron storage ring at DESY. A series of measurements of spin-dependent properties of the nucleon and few-body nuclei will be made; the spin structure function g 1 (x) of the proton and neutron will be measured to test the Bjorken sum rule and study the fraction of the nucleon spin carried by quarks; the spin structure function g 2 W, sensitive to quark-gluon correlations, and the structure functions b 1 (x), and Δ(x), sensitive to nuclear binding effects, will be measured; and, using the particle identification capability of the HERMES detector, pions will be detected in coincidence with the scattered electrons. The coincident hadron measurements represent the most important extension that can be made at this time to the existing measurements on the nucleon spin structure functions because they provide information about the flavor-dependence of the quark spin distribution in the nucleon. Argonne is providing the Cerenkov counter to be used for particle identification and developing the drifilm coating technique for the ultrathin target cell required for this experiment. The HERMES collaboration intends to use polarized targets with the highest available figures of merit, and the Argonne laser-driven source offers the most promise for a significant advance in present-day targets

  3. Spin Tracking of Polarized Protons in the Main Injector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, M. [Fermilab; Lorenzon, W. [Michigan U.; Aldred, C. [Michigan U.

    2016-07-01

    The Main Injector (MI) at Fermilab currently produces high-intensity beams of protons at energies of 120 GeV for a variety of physics experiments. Acceleration of polarized protons in the MI would provide opportunities for a rich spin physics program at Fermilab. To achieve polarized proton beams in the Fermilab accelerator complex, shown in Fig.1.1, detailed spin tracking simulations with realistic parameters based on the existing facility are required. This report presents studies at the MI using a single 4-twist Si-berian snake to determine the depolarizing spin resonances for the relevant synchrotrons. Results will be presented first for a perfect MI lattice, followed by a lattice that includes the real MI imperfections, such as the measured magnet field errors and quadrupole misalignments. The tolerances of each of these factors in maintaining polariza-tion in the Main Injector will be discussed.

  4. Spin transfer matrix formulation and snake resonances for polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1986-01-01

    The polarization of a spin polarized proton beam in a circular accelerator is described by a spin transfer matrix. Using this method, they investigate three problems: (1) the crossing of multiple spin resonances, (2) resonance jumping and (3) an accelerator with Siberian snakes. When crossing two (or more) spin resonances, there are no analytic solutions available. However, they can obtain analytic expressions if the two spin resonances are well separated (nonoverlapping) or very close together (overlapping). Between these two extremes they resort to numerical solution of the spin equations. Resonance jumping can be studied using the tools developed for analyzing the cross of multiple spin resonances. These theoretical results compare favorably with experimental results obtained from the AGS at Brookhaven. For large accelerators, resonance jumping becomes impractical and other methods such as Siberian snakes must be used to keep the beam spin polarized. An accelerator with Siberian snakes and isolated spin resonances can be described with a spin transfer matrix. From this, they find a new type of spin depolarizing resonance, called snake resonances

  5. Proton Testing of Advanced Stellar Compass Digital Processing Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta; Denver, Troelz; Jørgensen, Finn E

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Stellar Compass Digital Processing Unit was radiation tested with 300 MeV protons at Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF), Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland.......The Advanced Stellar Compass Digital Processing Unit was radiation tested with 300 MeV protons at Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF), Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland....

  6. Masses, magnetic moments, QCD and proton spin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1990-10-01

    This talk is dedicated to the memory of Andrei D. Sakharov. In addition to his well-known contributions to society, Sakharov was also a pioneer in spin physics and the application of the basic ideas of QCD to spin structure of hadrons. He took quarks seriously at the time when the particle physicists ridiculed the quark model. Immediately after the quark proposal Sakharov asked: 'Why is M Λ ≠ M Σ ? They contain the same quarks' His answer was 'Spin Physics! A flavor-dependent hyperfine interaction'. (author)

  7. Detection of individual spin transitions of a single proton confined in a cryogenic Penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kracke, Holger

    2013-02-27

    The presented experiment for the determination of the magnetic moment of the proton is based on the measurement of the ratio of cyclotron frequency and Larmor frequency of a single proton confined in a cryogenic double-Penning trap. In the course of this thesis, the simultaneous non-destructive measurement of two of the three eigenfrequencies of the proton in thermal equilibrium with corresponding detection systems was demonstrated, which reduces the measurement time of the cyclotron frequency by a factor of two. Furthermore, this thesis presents the first detection of individual spin transitions of a single proton, which allows for the determination of the Larmor frequency. The continuous Stern-Gerlach effect is utilized to couple the magnetic moment to the axial mode of the trapped proton by means of a magnetic bottle. Thus, a spin flip causes a jump of the axial frequency, which can be measured non-destructively with highly-sensitive detection systems. However, not only the spin momentum is coupled to the axial motion but also the angular momentum. Thus, the main experimental challenge is the elimination of energy fluctuations in the radial modes in order to maintain spin flip resolution. Due to systematic studies on the stability of the axial frequency and a complete revision of the experimental setup, this goal was achieved. The spin state of the proton can be determined with very high fidelity for the very first time. Thus, this thesis represents an important step towards a high-precision determination of the magnetic moment of the proton.

  8. Constraints on long-range spin-gravity and monopole-dipole couplings of the proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson Kimball, Derek F.; Dudley, Jordan; Li, Yan; Patel, Dilan; Valdez, Julian

    2017-10-01

    Results of a search for a long-range monopole-dipole coupling between the mass of the Earth and rubidium (Rb) nuclear spins are reported. The experiment simultaneously measures the spin precession frequencies of overlapping ensembles of 85Rb and 87Rb atoms contained within an evacuated, antirelaxation-coated vapor cell. The nuclear structure of the Rb isotopes makes the experiment particularly sensitive to spin-dependent interactions of the proton. The spin-dependent component of the gravitational energy of the proton in the Earth's field is found to be smaller than 3 ×10-18 eV , improving laboratory constraints on long-range monopole-dipole interactions by over 3 orders of magnitude.

  9. Accelerating proton spin diffusion in perdeuterated proteins at 100 kHz MAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmann, Johannes J.; Agarwal, Vipin; Hellwagner, Johannes; Lends, Alons; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch; Ernst, Matthias, E-mail: maer@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    Fast magic-angle spinning (>60 kHz) has many advantages but makes spin-diffusion-type proton–proton long-range polarization transfer inefficient and highly dependent on chemical-shift offset. Using 100%-HN-[{sup 2}H,{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-ubiquitin as a model substance, we quantify the influence of the chemical-shift difference on the spin diffusion between proton spins and compare two experiments which lead to an improved chemical-shift compensation of the transfer: rotating-frame spin diffusion and a new experiment, reverse amplitude-modulated MIRROR. Both approaches enable broadband spin diffusion, but the application of the first variant is limited due to fast spin relaxation in the rotating frame. The reverse MIRROR experiment, in contrast, is a promising candidate for the determination of structurally relevant distance restraints. The applied tailored rf-irradiation schemes allow full control over the range of recoupled chemical shifts and efficiently drive spin diffusion. Here, the relevant relaxation time is the larger longitudinal relaxation time, which leads to a higher signal-to-noise ratio in the spectra.

  10. Spin structure function measurements with polarized protons and electrons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.D.; Deshpande, A.; Forte, S.; Hughes, V.W.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Ridolfi, G.

    1995-01-01

    Useful insights into the spin structure functions of the nucleon can be achieved by measurements of spin-dependent asymmetries in inclusive scattering of high energy polarized electrons by high energy polarized protons at HERA. Such an experiment would be a natural extension of the polarized lepton-nucleon scattering experiments presently carried out at CERN and SLAC. We present here estimates of possible data in the extended kinematic range of HERA and associated statistical errors. (orig.)

  11. Spin physics experiments at NICA-SPD with polarized proton and deuteron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savin, I.; Efremov, A.; Pshekhonov, D.; Kovalenko, A.; Teryaev, O.; Shevchenko, O.; Nagajcev, A.; Guskov, A.; Kukhtin, V.; Toplilin, N. [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    This is a brief description of suggested measurements of asymmetries of the Drell-Yan (DY) pair production in collisions of non-polarized, longitudinally and transversally polarized protons and deuterons which provide an access to all leading-twist collinear and TMD PDFs of quarks and anti-quarks in nucleons. Other spin effects in hadronic and heavy-ion collisions may be also studied constituting the spin physics program at NICA. (orig.)

  12. Single-Spin Polarization Effects and the Determination of Timelike Proton Form Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S

    2003-10-24

    We show that measurements of the proton's polarization in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} strongly discriminate between analytic forms of models which fit the proton form factors in the spacelike region. In particular, the single-spin asymmetry normal to the scattering plane measures the relative phase difference between the timelike G{sub E} and G{sub M} form factors. The expected proton polarization in the timelike region is large, of order of several tens of percent.

  13. Spin flip in inelastic scattering of protons on 28Si nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Syn Chan; Komsan, M.N.Kh.; Osetinskij, G.M.; Golubev, S.L.; Kurepin, A.B.; Likhosherstov, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    We measured the energy and angular dependences of the spin-flip probability and of the differential cross section for inelastic scattering of protons in the resonance region of the reaction 28 Si(p,p') 23 Si* (2 + , 1.78 MeV) at E sub(p) = 3.095 and 3.34 MeV. The energy dependence of the spin-flip probability was found to have a resonance character. The angular distribution of the inelastic scattering and of the spin-flip probability is asymmetrical with respect to 90 deg in the c.m.s

  14. Bounds on the maximum attainable equilibrium spin polarization of protons at high energy in HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, M.

    2000-12-01

    For some years HERA has been supplying longitudinally spin polarised electron and positron (e ± ) beams to the HERMES experiment and in the future longitudinal polarisation will be supplied to the II1 and ZEUS experiments. As a result there has been a development of interest in complementing the polarised e ± beams with polarised protons. In contrast to the case of e ± where spin flip due to synchrotron radiation in the main bending dipoles leads to self polarisation owing to an up-down asymmetry in the spin flip rates (Sokolov-Ternov effect), there is no convincing self polarisation mechanism for protons at high energy. Therefore protons must be polarised almost at rest in a source and then accelerated to the working energy. At HERA, if no special measures are adopted, this means that the spins must cross several thousand ''spin-orbit resonances''. Resonance crossing can lead to loss of polarisation and at high energy such effects are potentially strong since spin precession is very pronounced in the very large magnetic fields needed to contain the proton beam in HERA-p. Moreover simple models which have been successfully used to describe spin motion at low and medium energies are no longer adequate. Instead, careful numerical spin-orbit tracking simulations are needed and a new, mathematically rigorous look at the theoretical concepts is required. This thesis describes the underlying theoretical concepts, the computational tools (SPRINT) and the results of such a study. In particular strong emphasis is put on the concept of the invariant spin field and its non-perturbative construction. The invariant spin field is then used to define the amplitude dependent spin tune and to obtain numerical non-perturbative estimates of the latter. By means of these two key concepts the nature of higher order resonances in the presence of snakes is clarified and their impact on the beam polarisation is analysed. We then go on to discuss the special aspects of the HERA-p ring

  15. The Spin Structure of the Proton in the Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatemi, Renee H. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Inclusive double spin asymmetries have been measured for $\\vec{p}$($\\vec{e}$,e') using the CLAS detector and a polarized 15NH3 target at Jefferson Lab in 1998. The virtual photon asymmetry A1, the longitudinal spin structure function, g1 (x, Q2), and the first moment Γ$1\\atop{p}$, have been extracted for a Q2 range of 0.15-2.0 GeV2. These results provide insight into the low Q2 evolution of spin dependent asymmetries and structure functions as well as the transition of Γ$1\\atop{p}$ from the photon point, where the Gerasimov, Drell and Hearn Sum Rule is expected to be satisfied, to the deep inelastic region.

  16. Normal Spin Asymmetries in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Gorchtein; P.A.M. Guichon; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the two-photon exchange contribution to observables which involve lepton helicity flip in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. This contribution is accessed through the single spin asymmetry for a lepton beam polarized normal to the scattering plane. We estimate this beam normal spin asymmetry at large momentum transfer using a parton model and we express the corresponding amplitude in terms of generalized parton distributions. We further discuss this observable in the quasi-RCS kinematics which may be dominant at certain kinematical conditions and find it to be governed by the photon helicity-flip RCS amplitudes

  17. Normal Spin Asymmetries in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorchtein, M.; Guichon, P.A.M.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the two-photon exchange contribution to observables which involve lepton helicity flip in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. This contribution is accessed through the single spin asymmetry for a lepton beam polarized normal to the scattering plane. We estimate this beam normal spin asymmetry at large momentum transfer using a parton model and we express the corresponding amplitude in terms of generalized parton distributions. We further discuss this observable in the quasi-RCS kinematics which may be dominant at certain kinematical conditions and find it to be governed by the photon helicity-flip RCS amplitudes

  18. Proton emission from high spin states of proton rich excited 94Ag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2008-01-01

    Recent observation of direct 1P and 2P decay of 21 + isomer in proton rich 94 Ag has led to the present theoretical investigation of proton radioactivity from 94 Ag in ground state and excited state and it's dependence on the structural transitions

  19. Electrical detection of proton-spin motion in a polymer device at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Christoph

    With the emergence of spintronics concepts based on organic semiconductors there has been renewed interest in the role of both, electron as well as nuclear spin states for the magneto-optoelectronic properties of these materials. In spite of decades of research on these molecular systems, there is still much need for an understanding of some of the fundamental properties of spin-controlled charge carrier transport and recombination processes. This presentation focuses on mechanisms that allow proton spin states to influence electronic transition rates in organic semiconductors. Remarkably, even at low-magnetic field conditions and room temperature, nuclear spin states with energy splittings orders of magnitude below thermal energies are able to influence observables like magnetoresistance and fluorescence. While proton spins couple to charge carrier spins via hyperfine interaction, there has been considerable debate about the nature of the electronic processes that are highly susceptible to these weak hyperfine fields. Here, experiments are presented which show how the magnetic resonant manipulation of electron and nuclear spin states in a π-conjugated polymer device causes changes of the device current. The experiments confirm the extraordinary sensitivity of electronic transitions to very weak magnetic field changes and underscore the potential significance of spin-selection rules for highly sensitive absolute magnetic fields sensor concepts. However, the relevance of these magnetic-field sensitive spin-dependent electron transitions is not just limited to semiconductor materials but also radical pair chemistry and even avian magnetoreceptors This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award #DE-SC0000909. The Utah NSF - MRSEC program #DMR 1121252 is acknowledged for instrumentation support.

  20. A study of the internal spin structure of the proton through inclusive and semi-inclusive polarized deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavassiliou, V.

    1988-01-01

    The internal spin structure of the proton was studied in a deep-inelastic scattering experiment a CERN, the European Laboratory for Nuclear Research, by the European Muon Collaboration, using a longitudinally polarized muon beam and a longitudinally polarized target at irradiated ammonia. The spin asymmetry was studied as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x and the results were in agreement over the region of overlap with previous experiments that used lower-energy polarized electron beams. The higher energies of the experiment allowed to study with precision the previously unexplored region of x below 0.1 and to compute the integral of the spin-dependent structure function g 1 of the proton. This integral was found to be in disagreement with the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule which could imply either a breakdown of the SU(3) symmetry in the decays of the members of the baryon octet or a significant polarization of the strange-quark sea of the proton opposite to the proton spin. In either case and assuming the validity of the Bjorken sum rule that relates the integrals of the spin-dependent structure functions of the proton and the neutron, the total helicity of all the quarks is found to account for only a small fraction of the proton helicity. In addition, spin asymmetries in the semi-inclusive reactions where a hadron of definite sign is observed in the final state were studied. The results are consistent with the down quarks being polarized opposite to the proton spin, as expected by symmetry arguments. Implication of the results on different areas in particle physics are presented. Some future prospects for spin physics are discussed and predictions are given for deep-inelastic-scattering experiments on polarized deuterium targets and the spin structure of the neutron

  1. The nuclear spin response to intermediate energy protons and deuterons at low momentum transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, F.T.; Djalali, C.; Glashausser, C.; Lenske, H.; Love, W.G.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Wambach, J.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of polarization transfer in the inelastic scattering of intermediate energy protons and deuterons have yielded a wealth of data on the spin response of nuclei. This work complements the well-known studies of Gamow-Teller strength in charge-exchange reactions. The emphasis here is on a consistent determination of the S=1, T=0 response, practical only with deuterons, and on the proper separation of S=0 and S=1 strength in proton spectra for appropriate comparison with sum rules. We concentrate on two nuclei, 40 Ca and 12 C, at momentum transfers below about 1 fm -1 and on excitations up to about 50 MeV. The continuum second random phase approximation provides the primary theoretical tool for calculating and interpreting the response in terms of properties of the nucleon-nucleon force inside the nuclear medium. The reaction mechanism is described by the DWIA, applied here to continuum proton scattering almost as rigorously as it is usually applied to low energy excitations. A new DWIA formalism for the description of spin observables in deuteron scattering is used. Comparison of the proton and deuteron data with each other and with RPA/DWIA calculations yields interesting insights into the current state of understanding of collectivity and the nuclear spin response. (orig.)

  2. Study on proton spin flip in scattering by Ti and Fe nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korbetskij, E.V.; Prokopenko, V.S.; Sklyarenko, V.D.; Chernievskij, V.K.; Shustov, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    Spin-orbital effects and mechanisms of inelastic scattering of protons with energy of 6.9 MeV by sup(14, 48)Ti and sup(54, 56, 58)Fe are studied by the analysis of experimental results within the framework of the method of coupled channels. Simultaneously angular dependences of cross sections of elastic and inelastic (two first 2 + levels) scatterings and a probability of spin flip of proton at inelastic scattering are analysed. Experimental data were used for analysis, obtained in the given work, as well as the data published earlier. Targets are used in experiment which are in the form of self-sustaining fine (1-2 mg cm -2 ) films, enriched with corresponding isotope. Cross section determination error is 8% in the average. Obtained angular dependences of spin flip probability for sup(54, 56)Fe at Esub(p)=6.9 MeV are very similar in form and close in value to analogous at Esub(p)= 6 MeV, and differ greatly for 56 Fe at Esub(p)=5.88 MeV. Angular distributions of spin flip probabilities of protons from sup(54, 56)Fe (ppsub(1)) reaction at energies of 10, 11 and 12 MeV show the sufficient energy dependence of their shape and value. Experimental data are described satisfactorily witohin the framework of the cupled channel method namely - differential cross sections of elastic and inelastic scattering and angular dependences of the probability of spin flip at the interaction of protons with 6.9 MeV energy with sup(46, 48)Ti and sup(54, 56, 58)Fe nuclei. Difficulties, appearing in the description of cross sections of elastic scattering in case of sup(46, 48)Ti and of inelastic one for 56 Fe show that indirect processes are of importance in the present energy range and they should be taken into consideration [ru

  3. Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-15

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W^{±} and Z/γ^{*} boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at sqrt[s]=510  GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W^{±} were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  4. Measurement of Longitudinal Spin Asymmetries for Weak Boson Production in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W± and Z/γ* boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at √s =510 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W± were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  5. Spin observables in inelastic proton-nucleus scattering at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of spin observables in inelastic proton-nucleus reactions for incident proton energies near 1 GeV. At this energy, the dominant reaction mechanisms are (1) quasi-free knockout of one or more nucleons, and (2) pion production through the Δ resonance. The cross section due to quasi-free knockout can be reasonably well understood theoretically in a multiple scattering picture, which uses measured NN amplitudes as input. Calculations of this sort were carried out in reference [10] using scalar NN amplitudes parameterized as Gaussians. The author has extended this picture to include spin dependent NN amplitudes. This allows calculation of all the spin observables, Ay, DLL, DSS, DNN, DLS, and DSL, as well as the cross section dsigma/dOmegadp due to quasi-free knockout of one or more particles. The cross section and polarization Ay have been measured at the LAMPF High Resolution Spectrometer at T/sub L/ = 800 MeV on 12 C. The theoretical results agree well with the data in the quasi-free region. The results for the remaining spin observables provide predictions for experiments which can be performed at LAMPF. By comparing the calculations with the data, it may be possible to separate the contribution due to a quasi-free knockout, and see a signature of quasi-free Δ production in the spin observables

  6. Measurement of Spin Observables in Inclusive Lambda and Neutral Kaon (short) Production with a 200 GEV Polarized Proton Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravar, Alessandro

    The considerable polarization of hyperons produced at high x_ F has been known for a long time and has been interpreted in various theoretical models in terms of the constituents' spin. The spin dependence in inclusive Lambda and K _sp{s}{circ} production has been studied for the first time at high energy using the Fermilab 200 GeV/c polarized proton beam and a large forward spectrometer. The spin observables analyzing power A_ N, polarization P_0 and depolarization D _{NN} in inclusive Lambda production has been measured in the kinematic range of rm 0.2current picture of spin effects in hadronic interactions is much more complex than naively thought. The data on the spin dependence of the Lambda inclusive production indicate a substantial negative asymmetry A_ N at large x _ F and moderate p_ T, the polarization results P_0 are in fair agreement with previous measurements, and the double spin parameter D_ {NN} increases with x_ F and p_ T to relatively large positive values. The trend of the Lambda A_ N, which shows a kinematical behavior similar to P_0 with same sign but smaller in magnitude, might be suggestive of a common interpretation. These results, however, are difficult to accommodate within the present quark fragmentation models for hyperon polarization, based on SU(6) wave functions where the produced strange quark carries all the spin information of the Lambda, unless spectator di-quarks in the recombination process play a more significant role than generally expected. These results can further test the current ideas on the underlying mechanisms for the hyperon polarization and meson production asymmetry.

  7. On the properties of nuclear matter with an excess of neutrons, spin-up neutrons and spin-up protons using effective nucleon-nucleon potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.Y.; Ramadan, S.

    1978-01-01

    The binding energy of nuclear matter with an excess of neutrons, with spin-up neutrons and spin-up protons (characterized by the corresponding parameters αsub(tau)=(N-Z)/A, αsub(n)=(N(up)-N(down))/A, and αsub(p)=(Z(up)-Z(down))/A) contains three symmetry energies: the isospin symmetry energy epsilon sub(tau), the spin symmetry energy epsilon sub(sigma) and the spin-isospin symmetry energy epsilon sub(sigma tau). These energies are calculated using velocity-dependent effective potential of s-wave interaction, which was developed by Dzhibuti and Mamasakhlisov. The spin, isospin and spin-isospin dependent parts of the single-particle potential in nuclear matter are also calculated using the same effective nucleon-nucleon potentials. The spin-spin part of the optical model potential is estimated. (author)

  8. Medium energy inelastic proton-nucleus scattering with spin dependent NN interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Auger, J.P.

    1981-12-01

    The previously proposed effective profile expansion method for the Glauber multiple scattering model calculation has been extended to the case of proton-nucleus inelastic scattering with spin dependent NN interaction. Using the method which turns out to be computationally simple and of relatively wider applicability, a study of sensitivity of proton-nucleus inelastic scattering calculation to the sometimes neglected momentum transfer dependence of the NN scattering amplitude has been made. We find that the calculated polarization is particularly sensitive in this respect. (author)

  9. Spin Transparency Mode in the NICA Collider with Solenoid Siberian Snakes for Proton and Deuteron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2017-12-01

    Two solenoid Siberian Snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in spin transparency mode of the NICA collider. The snake solenoids with a total field integral of 2×50 T·m are placed into the straight sections of the NICA collider. It allows one to control polarization of protons and deuterons up to 13.5 GeV/c and 4 GeV/c respectively. The snakes introduce a strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Snakes are presented.

  10. New experimental upper limit of the electron–proton spin-flip cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oellers, D.; Weidemann, C.; Lenisa, P.; Meyer, H.O.; Rathmann, F.; Trusov, S.; Augustyniak, W.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Barion, L.; Barsov, S.

    2014-01-01

    In a previous publication, measurements of the depolarization of a stored proton beam by interaction with a co-propagating unpolarized electron beam at low relative energy have been presented and an upper limit of about 3 ×10 7 b for the electron–proton spin-flip cross-section was determined. A refined analysis presented in this paper reduces the previous upper limit by a factor of three by the introduction of a new procedure that also makes use of non-identified particles

  11. Helicity in proton–proton elastic scattering and the spin structure of the pomeron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ewerz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss different models for the spin structure of the nonperturbative pomeron: scalar, vector, and rank-2 symmetric tensor. The ratio of single-helicity-flip to helicity-conserving amplitudes in polarised high-energy proton–proton elastic scattering, known as the complex r5 parameter, is calculated for these models. We compare our results to experimental data from the STAR experiment. We show that the spin-0 (scalar pomeron model is clearly excluded by the data, while the vector pomeron is inconsistent with the rules of quantum field theory. The tensor pomeron is found to be perfectly consistent with the STAR data.

  12. The water proton spin-lattice relaxation times in virus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valensin, G.; Gaggelli, E.; Tiezzi, E.; Valensin, P.E.; Bianchi Bandinelli, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    The water proton spin-lattice relaxation times in HEp-2 cell cultures were determined immediately after 1 h of polio-virus adsorption. The shortening of the water T 1 was closely related to the multiplicity of infection, allowing direct inspections of the virus-cell interaction since the first steps of the infectious cycle. Virus-induced structural and conformational changes of cell constituents were suggested to be detectable by NMR investigation of cell water. (Auth.)

  13. Large Logarithms in the Beam Normal Spin Asymmetry of Elastic Electron--Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Mykola Merenkov

    2004-06-01

    We study a parity-conserving single-spin beam asymmetry of elastic electron-proton scattering induced by an absorptive part of the two-photon exchange amplitude. It is demonstrated that excitation of inelastic hadronic intermediate states by the consecutive exchange of two photons leads to logarithmic and double-logarithmic enhancement due to contributions of hard collinear quasi-real photons. The asymmetry at small electron scattering angles is expressed in terms of the total photoproduction cross section on the proton, and is predicted to reach the magnitude of 20-30 parts per million. At these conditions and fixed 4-momentum transfers, the asymmetry is rising logarithmically with increasing electron beam energy, following the high-energy diffractive behavior of total photoproduction cross section on the proton.

  14. Measurement of the proton $A_1$ and $A_2$ spin asymmetries. Probing Color Forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Whitney [Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) measured the proton spin structure function $g_2$ in a range of Bjorken x, 0.3 < x < 0.8, where extraction of the twist-3 matrix element $d_2^p$ (an integral of $g_2$ weighted by $x^2$) is most sensitive. The data was taken from $Q^2$ equal to 2.5 $GeV^2$ up to 6.5 $GeV^2$. In this polarized electron scattering off a polarized hydrogen target experiment, two double spin asymmetries, A∥ and A⊥ were measured using the BETA (Big Electron Telescope Array) Detector. BETA consisted of a scintillator hodoscope, gas Cerenkov counter, lucite hodoscope and a large lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter. With a unique open geometry, a threshold gas Cerenkov detector allowed BETA to cleanly identify electrons for this inclusive experiment. A measurement of $d_2^p$ is compared to lattice QCD calculations.

  15. Spin excitations in 48Ca and 90Zr with 319 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, S.K.

    1985-05-01

    Cross sections, analyzing powers, and spin-flip probabilities have been measured in the low momentum transfer region in the 90 Zr(p vector, p' vector) 90 Zr* reaction at 319 MeV. A rich fine structure is observed for the first time in inelastic proton scattering in the previously proposed M1 giant resonance region. Angular distribution of most of these states are consistent with M1 excitation. The excitation energies of the fine structure states are in good agreement with similar structure seen in electron scattering; however, discrepancies in spin assignments remain. The measured cross section for the entire bump is about 37 +- 10% of the Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA) prediction for the M1 strength in 90 Zr with simple wave functions. However, an analysis of the fine structure states reveals about 15% of the strength in the M1 region to be due to narrow El states; another 8% is attributed to M2 strength. The spin-flip measurements for 90 Zr reveal a large spin-flip probability value for the M1 region; good agreement is obtained with DWIA calculations. However, a large cross section for spin excitations distributed uniformly over the excitation energy region from about 7 to 25 MeV is observed for the first time. The spin excitation strength in this giant resonance continuum is found to about 0.80 mb/sr/MeV. Angular distributions for the spin-flip cross sections from 7 to 18 MeV in steps of 2 MeV have been analyzed with low multipole spin excitation calculations in the DWIA framework; the observed spin-flip strength in this region is found to be consistent with spin excitation involving angular momentum transfer of up to two. Finally, cross section, analyzing power, and spin-flip probability data have also been obtained for the 10.23 MeV M1 transition in the 48 Ca(p vector, p' vector) 48 Ca* reaction at 319 MeV. The quenching of M1 strength in 48 Ca relative to theoretical predictions is found to be consistent with previous work

  16. Decay of the high-spin isomer in 160Re: Changing single-particle structure beyond the proton drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, I.G.; Page, R.D.; Joss, D.T.; Simpson, J.; Bianco, L.; Cooper, R.J.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Ertuerk, S.; Gall, B.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Hadinia, B.; Jones, P.M.; Judson, D.S.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.

    2011-01-01

    A new high-spin isomeric state (t 1/2 =2.8±0.1 μs) in 160 Re has been identified. This high-spin isomer is unique in that it only decays by γ-decay and not by proton or α-particle emission as is the case in every other proton emitter between Z=64 and 80. Shell model calculations indicate how the convergence of the h 9/2 and f 7/2 neutron levels in this region could open up a γ-decay path from the high-spin isomer to the low-spin ground state of 160 Re, providing a natural explanation for this anomalous absence of charged-particle emission. The consequences of these observations for future searches for proton emission from even more exotic nuclei and in-beam spectroscopic studies are considered.

  17. Proton Testing of nVidia GTX 1050 GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwas, E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Single-Event Effects (SEE) testing was conducted on the nVidia GTX 1050 Graphics Processor Unit (GPU); herein referred to as device under test (DUT). Testing was conducted at Massachusetts General Hospitals (MGH) Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center on April 9th, 2017 using 200-MeV protons. This testing trip was purposed to provide a baseline assessment of the radiation susceptibility of the DUT as no previous testing had been conducted on this component.

  18. Proton Testing of nVidia Jetson TX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwas, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    Single-Event Effects (SEE) testing was conducted on the nVidia Jetson TX1 System on Chip (SOC); herein referred to as device under test (DUT). Testing was conducted at Massachusetts General Hospitals (MGH) Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center on October 16th, 2016 using 200MeV protons. This testing trip was purposed to provide a baseline assessment of the radiation susceptibility of the DUT as no previous testing had been conducted on this component.

  19. Coherence features of the spin-aligned neutron-proton pair coupling scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, C; Blomqvist, J; Bäck, T; Cederwall, B; Johnson, A; Liotta, R J; Wyss, R

    2012-01-01

    The seniority scheme has been shown to be extremely useful for the classification of nuclear states in semi-magic nuclei. The neutron-proton (np) correlation breaks the seniority symmetry in a major way. As a result, the corresponding wave function is a mixture of many components with different seniority quantum numbers. In this paper, we show that the np interaction may favor a new kind of coupling in N=Z nuclei, i.e. the so-called isoscalar spin-aligned np pair mode. Shell model calculations reveal that the ground and low-lying yrast states of the N=Z nuclei 92 Pd and 96 Cd may be mainly built upon such spin-aligned np pairs, each carrying the maximum angular momentum J=9 allowed by the shell 0 g 9/2 which is dominant in this nuclear region.

  20. On the properties of nuclear matter with an excess of neutrons, of spin-up neutrons and of spin-up protons using the Skyrme interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.Y.M.; Ramadan, S.

    1983-11-01

    The binding energy of nuclear matter with an excess of neutrons, of spin-up neutrons, and of spin-up protons (characterized by the corresponding parameters, αsub(tau)=(N-Z/A), αsub(n)=(Nup-Ndown)/A, and αsub(rho)=(Zup-Zdown)/A), contains three symmetry energies: the isospin symmetry energy Esub(tau), the spin symmetry energy Esub(σ), and spin-isospin symmetry energy Esub(σtau). General expressions for Esub(σ), Esub(tau) and Esub(σtau) are given in the case of the Skyrme interaction. These values are compared with previous results obtained by Dabrowski and Haensel (DH) with Brueckner-Gammel-Thaler, the Hamada-Johnston, and the Reid soft core nucleon-nucleon potentials. The spin, isospin and spin-isospin dependent parts of the single-particle potential in nuclear matter are also calculated using the Skyrme interaction. The spin, isospin and spin-isospin incompressibility are calculated using the Skyrme interaction. The spin-spin part of the optical model potential is estimated. The results are compared with those of Dabrowski and Haensel (DH) and Hassan and Ramadan. (author)

  1. Construction and test of a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aures, R.

    1983-12-01

    This work describes experiments in which for the first time a proton target has been constructed which is polarized by the ''brute-force'' method. This method requires very low temperatures and high magnetic fields. The low temperatures (down to 10 mK) are obtained by a 3 He/ 4 He dilution refrigerator, the magnetic field (up to 9 T) is produced by a superconducting split pair magnet. The proton target has a volume of about 18 cm 3 and consists of pressed titaniumhydride powder, which has a titanium/-hydrogen ratio of 1:1,96. The hydrogen content is 1,3 mol. Titaniumhydride has the advantage of sufficient heat conductivity at low temperatures and a very high proton density. The heat conductivity of the sample is measured, with and without the presence of a magnetic field. Thermodynamical measurements and adiabatic demagnetisation experiments proved quantitatively the polarization of the protons. The polarization of the proton has been measured in a transmission experiment using polarized neutrons of 1.2 MeV. The result shows a good agreement of theoretical and actual polarization. From the results it can be concluded, that this sample can be used successfully as a polarized proton target for neutron scattering experiments to measure spin-correlations. (orig.) [de

  2. A Precision Measurement of the Spin Structure of the Proton at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbacher, Robin D

    1999-09-22

    E143 at SLAC Endstation A performed deep-inelastic scattering measurements of polarized electrons from polarized protons and deuterons within cryogenic {sup 15}NH{sub 3} and {sup 15}ND{sub 3}, respectively. Data were taken at incident energies of 29.1, 16.2 and 9.7 GeV, and covered the kinematical range x > 0:03 and 0:3 < Q{sup 2} < 12 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The scattered electrons were detected by two spectrometers at angles of 4.5{sup o} and 7.0{sup o}. From these data, the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p}(x; Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 1}{sup d}(x; Q{sup 2}) were determined. This dissertation describes the experiment, with emphasis on the results on the proton spin structure. The integral of g{sub 1} over the range 0 < x < 1 was found to be {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p} = 0.130 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.008 for the proton and {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup d} = 0.044 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.004 for the deuteron. Both values are in agreement with world data, and violate the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule by more than 3 standard deviations. The neutron structure function was obtained by combining proton and deuteron results, giving {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} = [0.035 {+-} 0.007 {+-} 0.010]. From this the integral {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}-{Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} followed, yielding 0.165 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.016 at Q{sup 2} = 3 (GeV/c){sup 2}, in agreement with the Bjorken sum rule to within one standard deviation. The Q{sup 2}-dependence of the ratio g{sub 1}/F{sub 1} was determined to be small for Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, validating the assumption of no Q{sup 2}-dependence used in obtaining the integrals. A small rise with increasing Q{sup 2} was seen in the ratio for Q{sup 2} < 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, however. The total quark contribution to the spin was found to be {Delta}q = 0.28 {+-} 0.09 for the proton, and {Delta}q = 0.32 {+-} 0.05 for the deuteron. Furthermore, a large negative spin contribution from the strange sea quarks was measured for both nucleons, giving {Delta}s = 0.10 {+-} 0.03 and {Delta}s = -0

  3. Large-xF spin asymmetry in π0 production by 200-GeV polarized protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.L.; Corcoran, M.D.; Cranshaw, J.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Nguyen, C.; Roberts, J.B.; Skeens, J.; White, J.L.; Bystricky, J.; Lehar, F.; Lesquen, A. de; Cossairt, J.D.; Read, A.L.; En'yo, H.; Funahashi, H.; Goto, Y.; Imai, K.; Itow, Y.; Makino, S.; Masaike, A.; Miyake, K.; Nagamine, T.; Saito, N.; Yamashita, S.; Iwatani, K.; Krueger, K.W.; Kuroda, K.; Michalowicz, A.; Luehring, F.C.; Miller, D.H.; Pauletta, G.; Penzo, A.; Schiavon, P.; Zanetti, A.; Salvato, G.; Villari, A.; Takeutchi, F.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, N.; Yoshida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The spin asymmetry A N for inclusive π 0 production by 200-GeV transversely-polarized protons on a liquid hydrogen target has been measured at Fermilab over a wide range of x F , with 0.5 T F >0.3, the asymmetry rises with increasing x F and reaches a value of A N =0.15±0.03 in the region 0.6 F <0.8. This result provides new input regarding the question of the internal spin structure of transversely-polarized protons. (orig.)

  4. Measuring the quark contribution to the proton spin through νp → νp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    The LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) experiment will be performed at LAMPF in the next several years. The main goal of the experiment is to search for ν μ -ν e oscillations with high sensitivity; however, an increasingly important by-product of this search is to measure νp → νp elastic scattering and determine the strange quark contribution, Δs, to the spin of the proton. With the 800-MeV proton energy of LAMPF, neutrinos are produced from pion decay-in-flight with an average energy of about 150 MeV. This energy is sufficiently high so that the νp → νp cross section is large and is sufficiently low so that the low Q 2 approximation (Q 2 much-lt m p 2 ) is valid and the cross section can be expressed in a simple form dependent upon Δs as the only unknown. LAMPF with its 1-mA proton intensity is, therefore, an ideal accelerator to perform this measurement. 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  5. High-spin states beyond the proton drip-line: Quasiparticle alignments in {sup 113}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wady, P.T. [School of Engineering, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (United Kingdom); Smith, J.F., E-mail: John.F.Smith@uws.ac.uk [School of Engineering, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (United Kingdom); Hadinia, B. [School of Engineering, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (United Kingdom); Cullen, D.M.; Freeman, S.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Darby, I.G. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jones, P.M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kettunen, H.; Leino, M.; Leppänen, A.-P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014, Jyväskylä (Finland); McGuirk, B.M. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Nieminen, P.; Nyman, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014, Jyväskylä (Finland); Page, R.D. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Pakarinen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014, Jyväskylä (Finland); and others

    2015-01-05

    Excited states have been studied in the deformed proton emitter {sup 113}Cs. Gamma-ray transitions have been unambiguously assigned to {sup 113}Cs by correlation with its characteristic proton decay, using the method of recoil-decay tagging. Two previously identified rotational bands have been observed and extended to tentative spins of 45/2 and 51/2ħ, with excitation energies over 8 MeV above the lowest state. These are the highest angular momenta and excitation energies observed to date in any nucleus beyond the proton drip-line. Transitions in the bands have been rearranged compared to previous work. A study of aligned angular momenta, in comparison to the predictions of Woods–Saxon cranking calculations, is consistent with the most intense band being based on the πg{sub 7/2}[422]3/2{sup +} configuration, which would contradict the earlier πh{sub 11/2} assignment, and with the second band being based on the πd{sub 5/2}[420]1/2{sup +} configuration. The data suggest that the band based upon the πh{sub 11/2} configuration is not observed.

  6. Polarized proton spin density images the tyrosyl radical locations in bovine liver catalase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Zimmer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A tyrosyl radical, as part of the amino acid chain of bovine liver catalase, supports dynamic proton spin polarization (DNP. Finding the position of the tyrosyl radical within the macromolecule relies on the accumulation of proton polarization close to it, which is readily observed by polarized neutron scattering. The nuclear scattering amplitude due to the polarization of protons less than 10 Å distant from the tyrosyl radical is ten times larger than the amplitude of magnetic neutron scattering from an unpaired polarized electron of the same radical. The direction of DNP was inverted every 5 s, and the initial evolution of the intensity of polarized neutron scattering after each inversion was used to identify those tyrosines which have assumed a radical state. Three radical sites, all of them close to the molecular centre and the haem, appear to be equally possible. Among these is tyr-369, the radical state of which had previously been proven by electron paramagnetic resonance.

  7. TU-EF-BRA-02: Longitudinal Proton Spin Relaxation and T1-Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemen, L.

    2015-01-01

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  8. TU-EF-BRA-02: Longitudinal Proton Spin Relaxation and T1-Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemen, L. [Univ Cincinnati (United States)

    2015-06-15

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  9. Team Update on North American Proton Facilities for Radiation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Label, Kenneth A.; Turflinger, Thomas; Haas, Thurman; George, Jeffrey; Moss, Steven; Davis, Scott; Kostic, Andrew; Wie, Brian; Reed, Robert; Guertin, Steven; hide

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the closure of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF), this presentation provides an overview of the options for North American proton facilities. This includes those in use by the aerospace community as well as new additions from the cancer therapy regime. In addition, proton single event testing background is provided for understanding the criteria needed for these facilities for electronics testing.

  10. Test report: Electron-proton spectrometer qualification test unit, qualification test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Qualification tests of the electron-proton spectrometer test unit are presented. The tests conducted were: (1) functional, (2) thermal/vacuum, (3) electromagnetic interference, (4) acoustic, (5) shock, (6) vibration, and (7) humidity. Results of each type of test are presented in the form of data sheets.

  11. Design and experimental tests of a novel neutron spin analyzer for wide angle spin echo spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, Peter; Farago, Bela; Andersen, Ken H.; Bentley, Phillip M.; Pastrello, Gilles; Sutton, Iain; Thaveron, Eric; Thomas, Frederic [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Moskvin, Evgeny [Helmholtzzentrum Berlin, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Pappas, Catherine [Helmholtzzentrum Berlin, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-09-15

    This paper describes the design and experimental tests of a novel neutron spin analyzer optimized for wide angle spin echo spectrometers. The new design is based on nonremanent magnetic supermirrors, which are magnetized by vertical magnetic fields created by NdFeB high field permanent magnets. The solution presented here gives stable performance at moderate costs in contrast to designs invoking remanent supermirrors. In the experimental part of this paper we demonstrate that the new design performs well in terms of polarization, transmission, and that high quality neutron spin echo spectra can be measured.

  12. Azimuthal transverse single-spin asymmetries of inclusive jets and charged pions within jets from polarized-proton collisions at √{s }=500 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adams, J. R.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barish, K.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Deppner, I. M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fujita, J.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Herrmann, N.; Hirsch, A.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kapukchyan, D.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kim, C.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Krauth, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, H.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Luo, S.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Mayes, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nemes, D. B.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seto, R.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, Z.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stewart, D. J.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, G.; Xie, W.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, J.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    We report the first measurements of transverse single-spin asymmetries for inclusive jet and jet+π± production at midrapidity from transversely polarized proton-proton collisions at √{s }=500 GeV . The data were collected in 2011 with the STAR detector sampled from 23 pb-1 integrated luminosity with an average beam polarization of 53%. Asymmetries are reported for jets with transverse momenta 6 spin asymmetry, sensitive to twist-3 initial-state quark-gluon correlators; the Collins asymmetry, sensitive to quark transversity coupled to the polarized Collins fragmentation function; and the first measurement of the "Collins-like" asymmetry, sensitive to linearly polarized gluons. Within the present statistical precision, inclusive-jet and Collins-like asymmetries are small, with the latter allowing the first experimental constraints on gluon linear polarization in a polarized proton. At higher values of jet transverse momenta, we observe the first nonzero Collins asymmetries in polarized-proton collisions, with a statistical significance of greater than 5 σ . The results span a range of x similar to results from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering but at much higher Q2. The Collins results enable tests of universality and factorization breaking in the transverse momentum-dependent formulation of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  13. Spin Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The 5th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics met in September at Brookhaven. The symposium has evolved to include a number of diverse specialities: theory, including parity violations and proposed quantum chromodynamics (QCD) tests with polarized beams; experiment, including the large spin effects discovered in high transverse momentum elastic scattering and hyperon production, dibaryons, and magnetic moments; acceleration and storage of polarized protons and electrons; and development of polarized sources and targets

  14. Study of high-spin structure of the nuclei around A∼120 near proton-drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, I; Datta Pramanik, U.; Banerjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Goswami, A.; Kshetri, R.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, B.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Basu, S.K.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Rakesh Kumar; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Mandal, S.; Ranjet

    2005-01-01

    It would be interesting to explore the shell structure for nuclei near proton-drip line. The nuclei around A∼ 110-130 region show a wide range of interesting features in high spin states which reflect different types of symmetry breaking mechanisms as well as maintaining symmetries

  15. Recent SLAC measurements of the spin dependent structure functions for the proton and neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapalac, G.

    1995-09-01

    The authors present results from SLAC experiments E142 and E143 for the spin dependent structure functions of the proton g 1 p (x, Q 2 ) and neutron g 1 n (x,Q 2 ) measured in deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized target. Experiment E142 measures ∫ 0 1 g 1 n (x)dx = -0.022 ± 0.011 at 2 > = 2 (GeV/c) 2 using a polarized 3 He target. Experiment E143 measures ∫ 0 1 g 1 p (x)dx = 0.129 ± 0.011 at 2 > = 3 (GeV/c) 2 using a polarized NH 3 target. These results are combined at Q 2 = 3 (GeV/c) 2 to yield ∫ 0 1 [g 1 p (x) - g 1 n (x)]dx = 0.151 ± 0.015. The Bjorken sum rule predicts 0.171 ± 0.008

  16. Spin-flip measurements in the proton inelastic scattering on 12C and giant resonance effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leo, R.; D'Erasmo, G.; Ferrero, F.; Pantaleo, A.; Pignanelli, M.

    1975-01-01

    Differential cross sections and spin-flip probabilities (SFP) for the inelastic scattering of protons, exciting the 2 + state at 4.43 MeV in 12 C, have been measured at several incident energies between 15.9 and 37.6 MeV. The changes in the shape of the SFP angular distributions are rather limited, while the absolute values show a pronounced increase, resonant like, in two energy regions centered at about 20 and 29 MeV. The second resonance reproduces very closely the energy dependence of the E2 giant quadrupole strength found in a previous experiment. The resonance at 20 MeV should correspond to a substructure of the E1 giant dipole resonance. (Auth.)

  17. Transverse Beam Spin Asymmetries in Forward-Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Armstrong; Francois Arvieux; Razmik Asaturyan; Todd Averett; Stephanie Bailey; Guillaume Batigne; Douglas Beck; Elizabeth Beise; Jay Benesch; Louis Bimbot; James Birchall; Angela Biselli; Peter Bosted; Elodie Boukobza; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Robert Carr; Nicholas Chant; Yu-Chiu Chao; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Russell Clark; Silviu Covrig; Anthony Cowley; Daniel Dale; Charles Davis; Willie Falk; John Finn; Tony Forest; Gregg Franklin; Christophe Furget; David Gaskell; Joseph Grames; Keith Griffioen; Klaus Grimm; Benoit Guillon; Hayko Guler; Lars Hannelius; Richard HASTY; Alice Hawthorne Allen; Tanja Horn; Kathleen Johnston; Mark Jones; Peter Kammel; Reza Kazimi; Paul King; Ameya Kolarkar; Elie Korkmaz; Wolfgang Korsch; Serge Kox; Joachim Kuhn; Jeff Lachniet; Lawrence Lee; Jason Lenoble; Eric Liatard; Jianglai Liu; Berenice Loupias; Allison Lung; Dominique Marchand; Jeffery Martin; Kenneth McFarlane; David McKee; Robert McKeown; Fernand Merchez; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Bryan Moffit; M. Morlet; Itaru Nakagawa; Kazutaka Nakahara; Retief Neveling; Silvia Niccolai; S. Ong; Shelley Page; Vassilios Papavassiliou; Stephen Pate; Sarah Phillips; Mark Pitt; Benard Poelker; Tracy Porcelli; Gilles Quemener; Brian Quinn; William Ramsay; Aamer Rauf; Jean-Sebastien Real; Julie Roche; Philip Roos; Gary Rutledge; Jeffery Secrest; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Damon Spayde; Samuel Stepanyan; Marcy Stutzman; Vince Sulkosky; Vincent Sulkosky; Vince Sulkosky; Vincent Sulkosky; Vardan Tadevosyan; Raphael Tieulent; Jacques Van de Wiele; Willem van Oers; Eric Voutier; William Vulcan; Glen Warren; Steven Wells; Steven Williamson; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Junho Yun; Valdis Zeps

    2007-08-01

    We have measured the beam-normal single-spin asymmetry in elastic scattering of transversely-polarized 3 GeV electrons from unpolarized protons at Q^2 values of 0.15 and 0.25 (GeV/c)^2 with results of A_n = -4.06 +- 0.99(stat) +- 0.63(syst) and A_n = -4.82 +- 1.87(stat) +- 0.98(syst) ppm. These results are inconsistent with calculations solely using the elastic nucleon intermediate state, and generally agree with calculations with significant inelastic hadronic intermediate state contributions. A_n provides a direct probe of the imaginary component of the two-photon exchange amplitude, the complete description of which is important in the interpretation of data from precision electron-scattering experiments.

  18. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Function g1 in the Resonance Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Perry Anthony; Antonov, R.; Arnold, R.G.; Todd Averett; Band, H.R.; Bauer, J.M.; Borel, H.; Peter Bosted; Vincent Breton; Button-Shafer, J.; Jian-Ping Chen; T.E. Chupp; J. Clendenin; C. Comptour; K.P. Coulter; G. Court; Donald Crabb; M. Daoudi; Donal Day; F.S. Dietrich; James Dunne; H. Dutz; R. Erbacher; J. Fellbaum; Andrew Feltham; Helene Fonvieille; Emil Frlez; D. Garvey; R. Gearhart; Javier Gomez; P. Grenier; Keith Griffioen; S. Hoeibraten; Emlyn Hughes; Charles Hyde-Wright; J.R. Johnson; D. Kawall; Andreas Klein; Sebastian Kuhn; M. Kuriki; Richard Lindgren; T.J. Liu; R.M. Lombard-Nelsen; Jacques Marroncle; Tomoyuki Maruyama; X.K. Maruyama; James Mccarthy; Werner Meyer; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Ralph Minehart; Joseph Mitchell; J. Morgenstern; Gerassimos Petratos; R. Pitthan; Dinko Pocanic; C. Prescott; R. Prepost; P. Raines; Brian Raue; D. Reyna; A. Rijllart; Yves Roblin; L. Rochester; Stephen Rock; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Ingo Sick; Lee Smith; Tim Smith; M. Spengos; F. Staley; P. Steiner; S. St. Lorant; L.M. Stuart; F. Suekane; Z.M. Szalata; Huabin Tang; Y. Terrien; Tracy Usher; Dieter Walz; Frank Wesselmann; J.L. White; K. Witte; C. Young; Brad Youngman; Haruo Yuta; G. Zapalac; Benedikt Zihlmann; Zimmermann, D.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the proton and deuteron spin structure functions g 1 p and g 1 d in the region of the nucleon resonances for W 2 2 and Q 2 ≅ 0.5 and Q 2 ≅ 1.2 GeV 2 by inelastically scattering 9.7 GeV polarized electrons off polarized 15 NH 3 and 15 ND 3 targets. We observe significant structure in g 1 p in the resonance region. We have used the present results, together with the deep-inelastic data at higher W 2 , to extract Γ(Q 2 ) (triple b ond) ∫ 0 1 g 1 (x,Q 2 ) dx. This is the first information on the low-Q 2 evolution of Gamma toward the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn limit at Q 2 = 0

  19. Test of superconducting radio-frequency cavity bombarded by protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J. M.; McCloud, B. J.; Morris, C. L.; McClelland, J. B.; Rusnak, B.; Thiessen, H. A.; Langenbrunner, J. L.

    1992-05-01

    A beam of 2 × 10 10 protons/s was focused onto a small area on the high-field iris of a superconducting cavity operating at the resonance frequency. The input, reflected, and stored power were monitored. The cavity remained in steady state during this test. We conclude that such superconducting cavities will remain viable in the high-proton-flux environments proposed in the design of a superconducting accelerator for pions (PILAC).

  20. Test of superconducting radio-frequency cavity bombarded by protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, J.M.; McCloud, B.J.; Morris, C.L.; McClelland, J.B.; Rusnak, B.; Thiessen, H.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Langenbrunner, J.L. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States))

    1992-05-10

    A beam of 2x10{sup 10} protons/s was focused onto a small area on the high-field iris of a superconducting cavity operating at the resonance frequency. The input, reflected, and stored power were monitored. The cavity remained in steady state during this test. We conclude that such superconducting cavities will remain viable in the high-proton-flux environments proposed in the design of a superconducting accelerator for pions (PILAC). (orig.).

  1. Spin Transfer in Inclusive Λ0 Production by Transversely Polarized Protons at 200GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosnick, D.P.; Hill, D.A.; Laghai, M.; Lopiano, D.; Ohashi, Y.; Spinka, H.; Stanek, R.W.; Underwood, D.G.; Yokosawa, A.; Bystricky, J.; Lehar, F.; Lesquen, A. de; Rossum, L. van; Cossairt, J.D.; Read, A.L.; Iwatani, K.; Belikov, N.I.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Grachov, O.A.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Meschanin, A.P.; Nurushev, S.B.; Patalakha, D.I.; Rykov, V.L.; Solovyanov, V.L.; Vasiliev, A.N.; Akchurin, N.; Onel, Y.; Maki, T.; Enyo, H.; Funahashi, H.; Goto, Y.; Iijima, T.; Imai, K.; Itow, Y.; Makino, S.; Masaike, A.; Miyake, K.; Nagamine, T.; Saito, N.; Yamashita, S.; Takashima, R.; Takeutchi, F.; Kuroda, K.; Michalowicz, A.; Rappazzo, G.F.; Salvato, G.; Luehring, F.C.; Miller, D.H.; Tamura, N.; Yoshida, T.; Adams, D.L.; Bonner, B.E.; Corcoran, M.D.; Cranshaw, J.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Nguyen, C.; Roberts, J.B.; Skeens, J.; White, J.L.; Bravar, A.

    1997-01-01

    Surprisingly large polarizations in hyperon production by unpolarized protons have been known for a long time. The spin dynamics of the production process can be further investigated with polarized beams. Recently, a negative asymmetry A N was found in inclusive Λ 0 production with a 200GeV/c transversely polarized proton beam. The depolarization D NN in p↑+p→Λ 0 +X has been measured with the same beam over a wide x F range and at moderate p T . D NN reaches positive values of about 30% at high x F and p T ∼1.0GeV/c . This result shows a sizable spin transfer from the incident polarized proton to the outgoing Λ 0 . copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. High-energy test of proton radiography concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amann, J.F.; Atencio, L.G.; Espinoza, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this work was to demonstrate the use of high energy protons to produce radiographs of heavy metal test objects. The authors executed a proof-of-principle experiment using GeV proton beams available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The experiment produced proton radiographs of a suitably dense, unclassified test object. The experiment tested capabilities in data collection, image reconstruction, and hydro-code simulation and validated models of high-energy proton radiography. A lens was designed using existing quadrupole magnets, constructed on the A1 beam line of the AGS and used to image 10-GeV protons. The results include: (1) images made with an integrating detector, (2) measurements of the background and measurements of the resolution functions, and (3) forward model fits to the transmission data. In all cases the results agree with initial estimates and provide strong support for the utility of proton radiography as a new hydrotest diagnostic

  3. Acoustic noise reduction in T 1- and proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Martin; Blaimer, Martin; Breuer, Felix; Grodzki, David; Heismann, Björn; Jakob, Peter

    2016-02-01

    To reduce acoustic noise levels in T 1-weighted and proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences, which typically reach acoustic noise levels up to 100 dB(A) in clinical practice. Five acoustic noise reduction strategies were combined: (1) gradient ramps and shapes were changed from trapezoidal to triangular, (2) variable-encoding-time imaging was implemented to relax the phase-encoding gradient timing, (3) RF pulses were adapted to avoid the need for reversing the polarity of the slice-rewinding gradient, (4) readout bandwidth was increased to provide more time for gradient activity on other axes, (5) the number of slices per TR was reduced to limit the total gradient activity per unit time. We evaluated the influence of each measure on the acoustic noise level, and conducted in vivo measurements on a healthy volunteer. Sound recordings were taken for comparison. An overall acoustic noise reduction of up to 16.8 dB(A) was obtained by the proposed strategies (1-4) and the acquisition of half the number of slices per TR only. Image quality in terms of SNR and CNR was found to be preserved. The proposed measures in this study allowed a threefold reduction in the acoustic perception of T 1-weighted and proton-density-weighted TSE sequences compared to a standard TSE-acquisition. This could be achieved without visible degradation of image quality, showing the potential to improve patient comfort and scan acceptability.

  4. One-hadron transverse spin effects on a proton target at COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolph, Christoph

    2013-02-19

    distribution functions, the aforementioned transversity and Sivers functions, the worm-gear 2 function and the Pretzelosity function. The other four are of subleading order. The investigation of the structure of the nucleon spin is one of the main goals of the COMPASS experiment at CERN. For the measurement of transverse spin effects a 160 GeV/c polarized μ{sup +} beam is scattered off a polarized nucleon target. In the years 2002-2004 a deuterium ({sup 6}LiD) target was used, while in 2007 and 2010 the measurement was done on a proton (NH{sub 3}) target. In this thesis the methods of analysis and the results for the eight transverse spin dependent distribution functions from the 2010 data-taking period will be shown for unidentified hadrons as well as for identified pions and kaons. Furthermore the Collins and Sivers asymmetries for the production of K{sup 0} are presented. The work is concluded by a comparison of the measured asymmetries with the results of the HERMES experiment at DESY and existing model predictions. A short interpretation of the results for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries is also given.

  5. A Fano cavity test for Monte Carlo proton transport algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, Edmond; Sorriaux, Jefferson; Souris, Kevin; Vynckier, Stefaan; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the scope of reference dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to compute ionization chamber dose response accurately. Uncertainties related to the transport algorithm can be verified performing self-consistency tests, i.e., the so-called “Fano cavity test.” The Fano cavity test is based on the Fano theorem, which states that under charged particle equilibrium conditions, the charged particle fluence is independent of the mass density of the media as long as the cross-sections are uniform. Such tests have not been performed yet for MC codes simulating proton transport. The objectives of this study are to design a new Fano cavity test for proton MC and to implement the methodology in two MC codes: Geant4 and PENELOPE extended to protons (PENH). Methods: The new Fano test is designed to evaluate the accuracy of proton transport. Virtual particles with an energy ofE 0 and a mass macroscopic cross section of (Σ)/(ρ) are transported, having the ability to generate protons with kinetic energy E 0 and to be restored after each interaction, thus providing proton equilibrium. To perform the test, the authors use a simplified simulation model and rigorously demonstrate that the computed cavity dose per incident fluence must equal (ΣE 0 )/(ρ) , as expected in classic Fano tests. The implementation of the test is performed in Geant4 and PENH. The geometry used for testing is a 10 × 10 cm 2 parallel virtual field and a cavity (2 × 2 × 0.2 cm 3 size) in a water phantom with dimensions large enough to ensure proton equilibrium. Results: For conservative user-defined simulation parameters (leading to small step sizes), both Geant4 and PENH pass the Fano cavity test within 0.1%. However, differences of 0.6% and 0.7% were observed for PENH and Geant4, respectively, using larger step sizes. For PENH, the difference is attributed to the random-hinge method that introduces an artificial energy straggling if step size is not

  6. And the World Turned: Spin Testing the DG-1000S

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    mainly glass-fiber reinforced plastic, with steel as necessary for the landing gear. Load factor limits are +7/- 5g . Manufactured in Germany, the DG...Forward CG’s carry an additional type of risk for spin testing: structural failure due to over- speed /overload. After spin entry, if the aircraft’s...become “sloppy” in the DG-1000S near stall speed , careful attention to the yaw string was required for coordinated flight: anything less tended to cause

  7. Test of a two-dimensional neutron spin analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falus, Peter; Vorobiev, Alexei; Krist, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this measurement was to test the new large-area spin polarization analyzer for the EVA-SERGIS beamline at Institute Laue Langevin (ILL). The spin analyzer, which was built in Berlin selects one of the two spin states of a neutron beam of wavelength 5.5 A impinging on a horizontal sample and reflected or scattered from the sample. The spin is analyzed for all neutrons scattered into a detector with an area of 190 mmx190 mm positioned 2.7 m behind the sample, thus covering an angular interval of 4 o x4 o . The tests were done at the HMI V14 beamline followed by tests at the EVA beamline at ILL. The transmission for the two spin components, the flipping ratio and small angle scattering were recorded while scanning the incoming beam on the analyzer. It was clearly visible, that due to the stacked construction the intensity is blocked at regular intervals. Careful inspection shows that the transmission of the good spin component is more than 0.72 for 60% of the detector area and the corrected flipping ratio is more than 47 for 60% of the detector area. Although some small-angle scattering is visible, it is notable that this analyzer design has small scattering intensities

  8. Test of a two-dimensional neutron spin analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falus, Péter; Vorobiev, Alexei; Krist, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this measurement was to test the new large-area spin polarization analyzer for the EVA-SERGIS beamline at Institute Laue Langevin (ILL). The spin analyzer, which was built in Berlin selects one of the two spin states of a neutron beam of wavelength 5.5 Å impinging on a horizontal sample and reflected or scattered from the sample. The spin is analyzed for all neutrons scattered into a detector with an area of 190 mm×190 mm positioned 2.7 m behind the sample, thus covering an angular interval of 4°×4°. The tests were done at the HMI V14 beamline followed by tests at the EVA beamline at ILL. The transmission for the two spin components, the flipping ratio and small angle scattering were recorded while scanning the incoming beam on the analyzer. It was clearly visible, that due to the stacked construction the intensity is blocked at regular intervals. Careful inspection shows that the transmission of the good spin component is more than 0.72 for 60% of the detector area and the corrected flipping ratio is more than 47 for 60% of the detector area. Although some small-angle scattering is visible, it is notable that this analyzer design has small scattering intensities.

  9. Tests of spinning turbine fragment impact on casing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbeck, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Ten 1/11-scale model turbine missile impact tests were conducted at a Naval spin chamber test facility to assess turbine missile effects in nuclear plant design. The objective of the tests was to determine the effects of missile spin, blade crush, and target edge conditions on the impact of turbine disk fragments on the steel casing. The results were intended for use in making realistic estimates for the initial conditions of fragments that might escape the casing in the event of a disk burst in a nuclear plant. The burst of a modified gas turbine rotor in a high-speed spin chamber provided three missiles with the proper rotational and translational velocities of actual steam turbine fragments. Tests of bladed, spinning missiles were compared with previous tests of unbladed, nonspinning missiles. The total residual energy of the spinning missiles, as observed from high-speed photographs of disk burst, was the same as that of the nonspinning missiles launched in a piercing orientation. Tests with bladed missiles showed that for equal burst speeds, the residual energy of bladed missiles is less than that of unbladed missiles. Impacts of missiles near the edge of targets resulted in residual missile velocities greater than for central impact. (orig.)

  10. The g$p\\atop{2}$ Experiment: A Measurement of the Proton's Spin Structure Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, Ryan B. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The E08-027 (g$p\\atop{2}$) experiment measured the spin structure functions of the proton at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Va. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered from a transversely and longitudinally polarized solid ammonia target in Hall A, with the polarized NH$_3$ acting as an effective proton target. Focusing on small scattering angle events at the electron energies available at Jefferson Lab, the experiment covered a kinematic phase space of 0.02 GeV$^2$ $< Q^2 <$ 0.20 GeV$^2$ in the proton's resonance region. The spin structure functions, $g_{1}^p(x,Q^2)$ and $g_{2}^p(x,Q^2)$ , are extracted from an inclusive polarized cross section measurement of the electron-proton interaction. Integrated moments of $g_1(x,Q^2)$ are calculated and compared to theoretical predictions made by Chiral Perturbation Theory. The $g_1(x,Q^2)$ results are in agreement with previous measurements, but include a significant increase in statistical precision. The spin structure function contributions to the hyperfine energy levels in the hydrogen atom are also investigated. The $g_2(x,Q^2)$ measured contribution to the hyperfine splitting is the first ever experimental determination of this quantity. The results of this thesis suggest a disagreement of over 100% with previously published model results.

  11. Spinning test particles in the field of a black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tod, K P; de Felice, F [Padua Univ. (Italy); Calvani, M [Padua Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Astronomia

    1976-08-11

    It is studied the motion of spinning test bodies in the gravitational field of a rotating black hole, confining the examination of the pole-dipole approximation and of the special case of motion in the equatorial plane with the spin vector perpendicular to it. The study also provides the locus of the turning points for the equatorial orbits and also the exact limits of validity of the pole-dipole approximation for any given set of particle parameters. The innermost stable circular orbits are studied in details, and it is found that opposite spinning accreting particles are separated by the gravitational field of the black hole and that the fraction of energy ''at infinity'' which can be extracted when the particle spin is opposite to that of the black hole can be as high as 100%.

  12. Testing quantum chromodynamics in anti-proton reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1987-10-01

    An experimental program with anti-protons at intermediate energy can serve as an important testing ground for QCD. Detailed predictions for exclusive cross sections at large momentum transfer based on perturbative QCD and the QCD sum rule form of the proton distribution amplitude are available for anti p p → γγ for both real and virtual photons. Meson-pair and lepton-pair final states also give sensitive tests of the theory. The production of charmed hadrons in exclusive anti p p channels may have a non-negligible cross section. Anti-proton interactions in a nucleus, particularly J/psi production, can play an important role in clarifying fundamental QCD issues, such as color transparency, critical length phenomena, and the validity of the reduced nuclear amplitude phenomenology

  13. Investigation of proton spin relaxation in water with dispersed silicon nanoparticles for potential magnetic resonance imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargina, Yu. V.; Gongalsky, M. B.; Perepukhov, A. M.; Gippius, A. A.; Minnekhanov, A. A.; Zvereva, E. A.; Maximychev, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Porous and nonporous silicon (Si) nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by ball-milling of electrochemically etched porous Si layers and crystalline Si wafers were studied as potential agents for enhancement of the proton spin relaxation in aqueous media. While nonporous Si NPs did not significantly influence the spin relaxation, the porous ones resulted in strong shortening of the transverse relaxation times. In order to investigate an effect of the electron spin density in porous Si NPs on the proton spin relaxation, we use thermal annealing of the NPs in vacuum or in air. The transverse relaxation rate of about 0.5 l/(g s) was achieved for microporous Si NPs, which were thermally annealing in vacuum to obtain the electron spin density of the order of 1017 g-1. The transverse relaxation rate was found to be almost proportional to the concentration of porous Si NPs in the range from 0.1 to 20 g/l. The obtained results are discussed in view of possible biomedical applications of Si NPs as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Determination of the proton spin structure functions for 0.05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fersch, R. G.; Guler, N.; Bosted, P.; Deur, A.; Griffioen, K.; Keith, C.; Kuhn, S. E.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adhikari, S.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Balossino, I.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Thanh Cao, Frank; Carman, D. S.; Careccia, S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khachatryan, M.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lagerquist, V. G.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pierce, J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Riser, D.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of our final analysis of the full data set of g1p(Q2) , the spin structure function of the proton, collected using CLAS at Jefferson Laboratory in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2, and 5.7 GeV were scattered from proton targets (NH153 dynamically polarized along the beam direction) and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetries, we extracted virtual photon asymmetries A1p and A2p and spin structure functions g1p and g2p over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2test pQCD predictions for quark polarizations at large x , offer a better understanding of quark-hadron duality, and provide more precise values of higher twist matrix elements in the framework of the operator product expansion.

  15. Large-x sub F spin asymmetry in. pi. sup 0 production by 200-GeV polarized protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D L; Corcoran, M D; Cranshaw, J; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Nessi, M; Nguyen, C; Roberts, J B; Skeens, J; White, J L [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). T.W. Bonner Nuclear Lab.; Akchurin, N; Onel, Y [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Belikov, N I; Derevschikov, A A; Grachov, O A; Matulenko, Yu A; Meschanin, A P; Nurushev, S B; Patalakha, D I; Rykov, V L; Solovyanov, V L; Vasiliev, A N [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russia); Bystricky, J; Lehar, F; Lesquen, A de [CEN-Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cossairt, J D; Read, A L [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); En' yo, H; Funahashi, H; Goto, Y; Imai, K; Itow, Y; Makino, S; Masaike, A; Miyake, K; Nagamine, T; Saito, N; Yamashita, S [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Grosnick, D P; Hill, D A; Laghai, M; Lopiano, D; Ohashi, Y; Spinka, H; Underwood, D G; Yokosawa, A [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); FNAL E704 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    The spin asymmetry A{sub N} for inclusive {pi}{sup 0} production by 200-GeV transversely-polarized protons on a liquid hydrogen target has been measured at Fermilab over a wide range of x{sub F}, with 0.50.3, the asymmetry rises with increasing x{sub F} and reaches a value of A{sub N}=0.15{+-}0.03 in the region 0.6spin structure of transversely-polarized protons. (orig.).

  16. Beam-spin asymmetry of pion, kaon, proton and antiproton production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagrebelnyy, Vitaly [DESY Hamburg Notkestrasse 85 (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Beam-spin asymmetries in the azimuthal distribution of pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) extracted from 2000-2007 HERMES data are presented. The asymmetries were measured in the kinematic region Q{sup 2}>1 GeV{sup 2}, W{sup 2} > 10 GeV{sup 2}, 0.1 protons and antiprotons are shown. Assuming that the SIDIS cross section factorizes to distribution (DF) and fragmentation (FF) functions that dependent on transverse quark momentum (TMD functions), one can obtain novel information about the spin-orbit correlations inside the nucleon and orbital angular momentum of quarks.

  17. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Single-beam, single-target, and double spin asymmetries for hard exclusive electroproduction of a photon on the proton e →p →→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer and a longitudinally polarized NH3 14 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 four-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of generalized parton distributions. The measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H ˜ Compton form factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  18. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e→p→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  19. The effect of amine protonation on the electrical properties of spin-assembled single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opatkiewicz, Justin P; LeMieux, Melburne C; Bao Zhenan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Patil, Nishant P; Wei Hai; Mitra, Subhasish, E-mail: zbao@stanford.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-03-25

    Amine-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been shown to selectively adsorb semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWNTs). Previous studies have shown that when deposited by spin coating, the resulting nanotube networks (SWNTnts) can be strongly influenced by the charge state of the amine (primary, secondary, and tertiary). When the amine surfaces were exposed to varying pH solutions, the conductivity and overall quality of the resulting fabricated networks were altered. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topography had shown that the density of the SWNTnts was reduced as the amine protonation decreased, indicating that the electrostatic attraction between the SWNTs in solution and the surface influenced the adsorption. Simultaneously, {mu}-Raman analysis had suggested that when exposed to more basic conditions, the resulting networks were enhanced with sc-SWNTs. To directly confirm this enhancement, Ti/Pd contacts were deposited and devices were tested in air. Key device characteristics were found to match the enhancement trends previously observed by spectroscopy. For the primary and secondary amines, on/off current ratios were commensurate with the Raman trends in metallic contribution, while no trends were observed on the tertiary amine (due to weaker interactions). Finally, differing SWNT solution volumes were used to compensate for adsorption differences and yielded identical SWNTnt densities on the various pH-treated samples to eliminate the influence of network density. These results further the understanding of the amine-SWNT interaction during the spin coating process. Overall, we provide a convenient route to provide SWNT-based TFTs with highly tunable electronic charge transport through better understanding of the influence of these specific interactions.

  20. The effect of amine protonation on the electrical properties of spin-assembled single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opatkiewicz, Justin P; LeMieux, Melburne C; Bao Zhenan; Patil, Nishant P; Wei Hai; Mitra, Subhasish

    2011-01-01

    Amine-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been shown to selectively adsorb semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWNTs). Previous studies have shown that when deposited by spin coating, the resulting nanotube networks (SWNTnts) can be strongly influenced by the charge state of the amine (primary, secondary, and tertiary). When the amine surfaces were exposed to varying pH solutions, the conductivity and overall quality of the resulting fabricated networks were altered. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topography had shown that the density of the SWNTnts was reduced as the amine protonation decreased, indicating that the electrostatic attraction between the SWNTs in solution and the surface influenced the adsorption. Simultaneously, μ-Raman analysis had suggested that when exposed to more basic conditions, the resulting networks were enhanced with sc-SWNTs. To directly confirm this enhancement, Ti/Pd contacts were deposited and devices were tested in air. Key device characteristics were found to match the enhancement trends previously observed by spectroscopy. For the primary and secondary amines, on/off current ratios were commensurate with the Raman trends in metallic contribution, while no trends were observed on the tertiary amine (due to weaker interactions). Finally, differing SWNT solution volumes were used to compensate for adsorption differences and yielded identical SWNTnt densities on the various pH-treated samples to eliminate the influence of network density. These results further the understanding of the amine-SWNT interaction during the spin coating process. Overall, we provide a convenient route to provide SWNT-based TFTs with highly tunable electronic charge transport through better understanding of the influence of these specific interactions.

  1. Motion of a spinning test particle in Vaidya's radiating metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmeli, M.; Charach, C.; Kaye, M.

    1977-01-01

    The motion of a spinning test particle in Vaidya's gravitational field is considered in the framework of Papapetrou's equations of motion. Use is made of the supplementary condition S/sup μ//sup u/ = 0, where u is the retarded Schwarzschild time coordinate. We derive the equations for the dynamical variables, and consider the conservation laws, that follow from the equations of motion. Particular cases of motion are also discussed and additional first integrals corresponding to these cases are found. Some of the new extra integrals are related to the Casimir operators of the Poincare group. It is found that under special conditions on the spin tensor components the particle follows a geodesic. Motion of the spinning test particle in the Schwarzschild field is considered as one of the particular cases

  2. Measurement of the strange quark contribution to the proton spin using neutral kaons at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shaojun

    2007-03-15

    This thesis reports a new ''isoscalar'' measurement of {delta}s + {delta} anti s. Because strange quarks carry no isospin, the strange seas in the proton and neutron are identical. In the deuteron, an isoscalar target, the fragmentation process in DIS can be described without any assumptions regarding isospin dependent fragmentation. In the isoscalar extraction of {delta}s + {delta} anti s only the spin asymmetry for K{sup 0}{sub s} A{sup K{sup 0}{sub s1,d}} (x,Q{sup 2}, z) and the inclusive asymmetry A{sub 1,d}(x,Q{sup 2}) are used. An accurate measurement of the total non-strange quark polarisation {delta}Q = {delta}u + {delta} anti u + {delta}d + {delta} anti d comes directly from A{sub 1,d}(x,Q{sup 2}). The fragmentation functions needed for a leading order (LO) extraction of {delta}S = {delta}s + {delta} anti s are measured directly at HERMES kinematics using the same data. As a result of this analysis, the helicity densities for the strange quarks are consistent with zero with the experimental uncertainty over the measured x kinematic range. (orig.)

  3. Solid state proton spin-lattice relaxation in four structurally related organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.; Burbank, Kendra S.; Lau, Matty M.W.; Ree, Jessica N.; Weber, Tracy L.

    2003-01-01

    We report and interpret the temperature dependence of the proton spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50 and 22.5 MHz in four polycrystalline solids composed of structurally related molecules: 2-ethylanthracene, 2-t-butylanthracene, 2-ethylanthraquinone, and 2-t-butylanthraquinone. We have been unable to grow single crystals and therefore do not know the crystal structures. Hence, we use the NMR relaxometry data to make predictions about the solid state structures. As expected, we are able to conclude that the ethyl groups do not reorient in the solid state but that the t-butyl groups do. The anthraquinones have a ''simpler'' structure than the anthracenes. The best dynamical models suggest that there is a unique crystallographic site for the t-butyl groups in 2-t-butylanthraquinone and two sites, each with half the molecules, for the ethyl groups in 2-ethylanthraquinone. There are also two sites in 2-ethylanthracene, but with unequal weights, suggesting four sites in the unit cell with lower symmetry than the two anthraquinones. Finally, the observed relaxation rate data in 2-t-butylanthracene is very complex and its interpretation demonstrates the uniqueness problem that arises in interpreting relaxometry data without the knowledge of the crystal structure

  4. From direct detection to relic abundance: the case of proton-philic spin-dependent inelastic Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yu, Hyeonhye, E-mail: scopel@sogang.ac.kr, E-mail: skyh2yu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    We discuss strategies to make inferences on the thermal relic abundance of a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) when the same effective dimension-six operator that explains an experimental excess in direct detection is assumed to drive decoupling at freeze-out, and apply them to the explicit scenario of WIMP inelastic up-scattering with spin-dependent couplings to protons (proton-philic Spin-dependent Inelastic Dark Matter, pSIDM), a phenomenological set-up containing two Dark Matter (DM) particles χ{sub 1} and χ{sub 2} with masses m {sub χ}= m {sub χ{sub 1}} and m {sub χ{sub 2}}= m {sub χ}+δ that we have shown in a previous paper to explain the DAMA effect in compliance with the constraints from other detectors. We also update experimental constraints on pSIDM, extend the analysis to the most general spin-dependent momentum-dependent interactions allowed by non-relativistic Effective Field Theory (EFT), and consider for the WIMP velocity distribution in our Galaxy f ( v ) both a halo-independent approach and a standard Maxwellian. Under these conditions we find that the DAMA effect can be explained in terms of the particle χ{sub 1} in compliance with all the other constraints for all the analyzed EFT couplings and also for a Maxwellian f ( v ). As far as the relic abundance is concerned, we show that the problem of calculating it by using direct detection data to fix the model parameters is affected by a strong sensitivity on f ( v ) and by the degeneracy between the WIMP local density ρ{sub χ} and the WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, since ρ{sub χ} must be rescaled with respect to the observed DM density in the neighborhood of the Sun when the calculated relic density Ω is smaller than the observed one Ω{sub 0}. As a consequence, a DM direct detection experiment is not directly sensitive to the physical cut-off scale of the EFT, but on some dimensional combination that does not depend on the actual value of Ω. However, such degeneracy

  5. Measurement of the deep-inelastic spin-dependent structure functions of the proton and neutron at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, D.H.; Filippone, B.W.; Jourdan, J.

    1988-01-01

    It is possible to measure the deep-inelastic spin-dependent structure functions g 1 /sup p/(x) and g 1 /sup n/(x) for the proton and neutron using internal polarized hydrogen, deuterium, and 3 He targets of polarization 50% and thickness 10 14 to 10 15 cm -2 and the 60 mA longitudinally polarized 30 GeV electron beam in the HERA electron storage ring. The measurement of the deep-inelastic spin-structure of both isospin states of the nucleon at the same kinematics and using the same apparatus allows the Bjorken sum rule to be experimentally checked. In addition, it uniquely constrains the spin distribution of the u and d quarks as a function of x in any model of the nucleon. Possible target and detector configurations are described and an estimate of the accuracy of such a measurement is presented

  6. Probability of spin flipping of proton with energy 6.9 MeV at inelastic scattering with sup(54,56)Fe nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokopenko, V.S.; Sklyarenko, V.; Chernievskij, V.K.; Shustov, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    Spin-orbital effects of inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei with mean atomic weight are investigated along with the mechanisms of the reaction course by measuring proton spin flip. The experiment consists in measuring proton-gamma coincidences in mutually perpendicular planes by the technique of quick-slow coincidences. The excitation function of the 56 Fe(P,P 1 ) reaction is measured in the 3.5-6.2 MeV energy range. Angular dependences of probability of proton spin flip (a level of 2 + , 0.847 MeV) are measured at energies of incident protons of 4.96; 5.58 and 5.88 MeV. Measurements of probabilities of proton spin flipping at inelastic scattering by sup(54,56)Fe nuclei are performed in the process of studying spin-orbital effects and mechanisms of the reaction course. A conclusion is made that the inelastic scattering process in the energy range under investigation is mainly realized by two equivalent mechanisms: direct interaction and formation of a compound nucleus. Angular dependences for 54 Fe and 56 Fe noticeably differ in the values of probability of spin flip in the angular range of 50-150 deg

  7. Construction and test of the Bonn frozen spin target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutz, H.

    1989-04-01

    For γN→ΠN and γd→pn scattering experiments at the PHOENICS detector, a new 'bonn frozen spin target' (BOFROST) is developed. The target with a maximum volume of 30 cm 3 is cooled in a vertical 3 He- 4 He dilution kryostat. The lowest temperature of the dilution kryostat in the frozen spin mode should be 50 mk. In a first stage, the magnet system consist of two superconducting solenoids: A polarisation magnet with a maximum field of 7 T with a homogenity of 10 -5 over the target area and a 'vertical holding' magnet with a maximum field in the target area of 0.57 T. This work describes the construction and the set-up of the 'frozen spin target' in the laboratory and the first tests of the dilution kryostat and the superconducting magnet system. (orig.) [de

  8. Test of internal halo targets in the HERA proton ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hast, C.; Hofmann, W.; Khan, S.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Reber, M.; Rieling, J.; Spahn, M.; Spengler, J.; Lohse, T.; Pugatch, V.

    1995-01-01

    Internal wire targets in the halo of stored proton beams provide a line source of proton-nucleus interactions for highest-rate fixed target experiments. We have studied such internal halo targets at the 820 GeV proton ring of the HERA ep collider. The tests showed that most of the protons in the beam halo - which would otherwise hit the collimators - can be brought to interaction in a relatively thin target wire at distances of 7 to 8 beam widths from the center of the beam. At less than 10% of the HERA total design current, and less than 20% of the current per bunch, interaction rates up to 8 MHz were observed, corresponding to more than 2 interactions per bunch crossing. The halo targets were used in parallel to the HERA luminosity operation; no significant disturbances of the HERA ep experiments, of the machine stability or beam quality were observed. We present data on the steady-state and transient behaviour of interaction rates and discuss the interpretation in terms of a simple beam dynamics model. Issues of short-, medium- and long-term rate fluctuations and of rate stabilization by feedback are addressed. ((orig.))

  9. Test of internal halo targets in the HERA proton ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hast, C.; Hofmann, W.; Khan, S.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Reber, M.; Rieling, J.; Spahn, M.; Spengler, J.; Lohse, T.; Pugatch, V.

    1994-07-01

    Internal wire targets in the halo of stored proton beams provide a line source of proton-nucleus interactions for highest-rate fixed target experiments. We have studied such internal halo targets at the 820 GeV proton ring of the HERA ep collider. The tests showed that most of the protons in the beam halo - which would otherwise hit the collimators - can be brought to interaction in a relatively thin target wire at distances of 7 to 8 beam widths from the center of the beam. At less than 10% of the HERA total design current, and less than 20% of the current per bunch, interaction rates up to 8 MHz were observed, corresponding to more than 2 interactions per bunch crossing. The halo targets were used in parallel to the HERA luminosity operation; no significant disturbances of the HERA ep experiments, of the machine stability or beam quality were observed. We present data on the steady-state and transient behaviour of interaction rates and discuss the interpretation in terms of a simple beam dynamics model. Issues of short-, medium- and long-term rate fluctuations and of rate stabilization by feedback are addressed. (orig.)

  10. Spin-locking vs. chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI for investigating chemical exchange process between water and labile metabolite protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Autio, Joonas; Obata, Takayuki; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking (SL) experiments were both able to probe the exchange process between protons of non-equivalent chemical environments. To compare the characteristics of the CEST and SL approaches in the study of chemical exchange effects, we performed CEST and SL experiments at varied pH and concentrated metabolites with exchangeable amide, amine, and hydroxyl protons at 9.4 T. Our results show that: i) On-resonance SL is most sensitive to chemical exchanges in the intermediate exchange regime and is able to detect hydroxyl and amine protons on a millimolar concentration scale. Off-resonance SL and CEST approaches are sensitive to slow-exchanging protons when an optimal SL or saturation pulse power matches the exchanging rate, respectively. ii) Offset frequency-dependent SL and CEST spectra are very similar, and can be explained well with an SL model recently developed by Trott and Palmer. iii) The exchange rate and population of metabolite protons can be determined from offset-dependent SL or CEST spectra or from on-resonance SL relaxation dispersion measurements. iv) The asymmetry of the magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) is highly dependent on the choice of saturation pulse power. In the intermediate exchange regime, MTRasym becomes complicated and should be interpreted with care. PMID:21500270

  11. Spin-locking versus chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI for investigating chemical exchange process between water and labile metabolite protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Autio, Joonas; Obata, Takayuki; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2011-05-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking (SL) experiments were both able to probe the exchange process between protons of nonequivalent chemical environments. To compare the characteristics of the CEST and SL approaches in the study of chemical exchange effects, we performed CEST and SL experiments at varied pH and concentrated metabolite phantoms with exchangeable amide, amine, and hydroxyl protons at 9.4 T. Our results show that: (i) on-resonance SL is most sensitive to chemical exchanges in the intermediate-exchange regime and is able to detect hydroxyl and amine protons on a millimolar concentration scale. Off-resonance SL and CEST approaches are sensitive to slow-exchanging protons when an optimal SL or saturation pulse power matches the exchanging rate, respectively. (ii) Offset frequency-dependent SL and CEST spectra are very similar and can be explained well with an SL model recently developed by Trott and Palmer (J Magn Reson 2002;154:157-160). (iii) The exchange rate and population of metabolite protons can be determined from offset-dependent SL or CEST spectra or from on-resonance SL relaxation dispersion measurements. (iv) The asymmetry of the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR(asym)) is highly dependent on the choice of saturation pulse power. In the intermediate-exchange regime, MTR(asym) becomes complicated and should be interpreted with care. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Achieving 99.9% proton spin-flip efficiency at higher energy with a small rf dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Leonova, M A; Gebel, R; Hinterberger, F; Krisch, A D; Lehrach, A; Lorentz, B; Maier, R; Morozov, V S; Prasuhn, D; Raymond, R S; Schnase, A; Stockhorst, H; Ulbrich, K; Wong, V K; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.224801

    2004-01-01

    We recently used a new ferrite rf dipole to study spin flipping of a 2.1 GeV/c vertically polarized proton beam stored in the COSY Cooler Synchrotron in Julich, Germany. We swept the rf dipole's frequency through an rf-induced spin resonance to flip the beam's polarization direction. After determining the resonance's frequency, we varied the frequency range, frequency ramp time, and number of flips. At the rf dipole's maximum strength and optimum frequency range and ramp time, we measured a spin-flip efficiency of 99.92+or-0.04%. This result, along with a similar 0.49 GeV/c IUCF result, indicates that, due to the Lorentz invariance of an rf dipole's transverse integral Bdl and the weak energy dependence of its spin-resonance strength, an only 35% stronger rf dipole should allow efficient spin flipping in the 100 GeV BNL RHIC Collider or even the 7 TeV CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  13. Experimental Test of the Spin Mixing Interface Conductivity Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiler, M.; Althammer, M.; Schreier, M.; Lotze, J.; Pernpeintner, M.; Meyer, S.; Huebl, H.; Gross, R.; Kamra, A.; Xiao, J.; Chen, Y.T.; Jiao, H.J.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Goennenwein, S.T.B.

    2013-01-01

    We perform a quantitative, comparative study of the spin pumping, spin Seebeck, and spin Hall magnetoresistance effects, all detected via the inverse spin Hall effect in a series of over 20??yttrium???iron?garnet/Pt samples. Our experimental results fully support present, exclusively spin

  14. A conformal invariant model of localized spinning test particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, C.; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 13 - Marseille; Fliche, H.H.; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 13 - Marseille

    1977-02-01

    A purely classical model of massless test particle with spin s is introduced as the dynamical system defined by the 10 dimensional 0(4,2) co-adjoint orbit with Casimir numbers (s 2 ,0,0). The Mathisson Papapetrou et al. equations of motion in a gravitational field are recovered, and moreover the particle appears to travel on null geodesics. Several implications are discussed

  15. Tests of SEC stability in high flux proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agoritsas, V.; Witkover, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The Secondary Emission Chamber (SEC) is used to measure the beam intensity in slow extracted beam channels of proton synchrotrons around the world. With the improvements in machine intensity, these monitors have been exposed to higher flux conditions than in the past. A change in sensitivity of up to 25% has been observed in the region around the beam spot. Using SEC's of special construction, a series of tests was performed at FNAL, BNL-AGS and CERN-PS. The results of these tests and conclusions about the construction of more stable SEC's are presented

  16. The first acceleration test of polarized protons in KEK PS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramatsu, Shigenori; Sato, Hikaru; Toyama, Takeshi

    1984-03-01

    The outline of the polarized proton acceleration project at KEK and the results of the first acceleration test are described. Depolarization in the 500 MeV booster synchrotron was investigated as the first step of this program. The beam polarization was measured in the 20 MeV beam transport line from the linac to the booster and in the main ring at the injection energy. About 40 % of the linac beam polarization was kept in the main ring. This acceleration test encouraged us to proceed with this program. (author)

  17. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  18. Proton T2 relaxation effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide. Comparison between fast spin echo and conventional spin echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Akihiro; Satoh, Yoshinori; Higuchi, Nobuya; Izutsu, Mutsumu; Yuasa, Yuji; Hiramatsu, Kyoichi

    1995-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles have been known to show a great T 2 relaxation effect in the liver, which contributes to significant liver signal decrease and detection of hepatic neoplasms. Recently, fast spin echo (FSE) sequence with less scanning time than conventional spin echo (SE) sequence has been rapidly introduced in clinical MR imaging. To investigate whether SPIO would show decreased T 2 relaxation effect on FSE, we obtained T 2 relaxivity (R2) of SPIO in vitro and liver signal decrease caused by SPIO in vivo. SPIO showed 20% less R2 on Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence than on SE. Relative liver signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decrease caused by SPIO was significantly smaller (p 2 relaxation effect on FSE than on SE. However, further studies will be required to assess the diagnostic capability of SPIO on FSE, in the detection of hepatic neoplasms. (author)

  19. Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers. Proton spin-lattice relaxation times of skeletal muscles on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, K.; Nakano, I. (Shimoshizu National Hospital, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Neurology); Fukuda, N.; Ikehira, H.; Tateno, Y. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Clinical Research); Aoki, Y. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    By means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1 values) of the skeletal muscles were measured in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers and normal controls. The bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from the T1 values obtained, according to the fast proton diffusion model. In the DMD carriers, T1 values of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris muscles were significantly higher, and BWFs of these muscles were significantly lower than in normal control. Degenerative muscular changes accompanied by interstitial edema were presumed responsible for this abnormality. No correlation was observed between the muscle T1 and serum creatine kinase values. The present study showed that MRI could be a useful method for studying the dynamic state of water in both normal and pathological skeletal muscles. Its possible utility for DMD carrier detection was discussed briefly. (orig.).

  20. Measurement of solute proton spin-lattice relaxation times in water using the 1,3,3,1 sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, S.S.; Mole, P.A.; Coulson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    1 H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the N-CH3 proton resonances of phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) in water solutions were obtained using the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. These T1 values were equivalent to those obtained in D 2 O and water using either the conventional inversion-recovery experiment or the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. Thus, the 1,3,3,1 sequence of proton NMR can provide an independent means along with phosphorous NMR for assess PCr and for the study of the creatine kinase reaction (PCr + ADP in equilibrium ATP + Cr) in aqueous solutions and perhaps in biological preparations

  1. NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation time of human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Rosenthal, J.S.; Winston, A.; Stern, A.

    1988-01-01

    NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation times were studied as probes of water structure in human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions. Normal saline had a relaxation time of about 3000 ms while packed red blood cells had a relaxation time of about 500 ms. The relaxation time of a red blood cell suspension at 50% hematocrit was about 750 ms showing that surface charges and polar groups of the red cell membrane effectively structure extracellular water. Incubation of red cells in hypotonic saline increases relaxation time whereas hypertonic saline decreases relaxation time. Relaxation times varied independently of mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration in a sample population. Studies with lysates and resealed membrane ghosts show that hemoglobin is very effective in lowering water-proton relaxation time whereas resealed membrane ghosts in the absence of hemoglobin are less effective than intact red cells. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  2. Spin-flip transitions in 46Ti, 48Ti and 50Cr excited by inelastic proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.; Morlet, M.; Marty, N.; Djalali, C.; Bohle, D.; Richter, A.; Stein, H.

    1989-01-01

    Forward angle cross sections for 1 + states have been measured in the non closed shell nuclei 46 Ti, 48 Ti, 50 Cr by 201 MeV proton inelastic scattering. The total measured 1 + strength is compared with microscopic distorted wave impulse approximation calculations using large scale shell model wave functions. The quenching for the 1 + strength ranges from 0.3 to 0.5. For the low energy isovector 1 + states the ratio of the orbital to the spin excitation is extracted

  3. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-01-01

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption

  4. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  5. Self-similarity of proton spin and asymmetry of jet production

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tokarev, M. V.; Zborovský, Imrich

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2015), s. 214-220 ISSN 1547-4771 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : asymmetry * high energy * jets * polarization * proton-proton collisions * Self-similarity Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics

  6. Spin Parity Measurement of Centrally Produced $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ in Proton Proton Collisions at 800 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markianos, Kyriacos [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Experiment E690 at Fennilab recorded 5.5 billion p + p → p + X events using an 800 GeV/c proton beam and a liquid hydrogen target, during the 1991 fixed target run. We use a 0.5 billion subset of this sample, to study the reaction p + p → Ps + π-)p f for dipion invariant mass between threshold and 2.3 GeV/c2. We perform a partial wave analysis for dipion invariant mass between threshold and 1.5 GeV/c2. The assumption of S-wave dominance near threshold is sufficient to determine a single, continuous solution throughout the considered mass spectrum. Precision measurement of the production amplitude aids the mapping the low lying meson spectrum. Other possible studies using this data sample and analysis technique are: ( l) the extension of the amplitude analysis above the 1.5 Ge V tc2 mass region using a the full event sample, and (2) the study of the produced amplitudes as a function of the relative angle between the two proton planes.

  7. Proton polarization above 70% by DNP using photo-excited triplet states, a first step towards a broadband neutron spin filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, T.R.; Niketic, N.; Brandt, B. van den; Filges, U.; Panzner, T.; Rantsiou, E.; Wenckebach, W.Th.; Hautle, P.

    2014-01-01

    The use of polarized protons as neutron spin filter is an attractive alternative to the well established neutron polarization techniques, as the large, spin-dependent neutron scattering cross-section for protons is useful up to the sub-MeV region. Employing optically excited triplet states for the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the protons relieves the stringent requirements of classical DNP schemes, i.e low temperatures and strong magnetic fields, making technically simpler systems with open geometries possible. Using triplet DNP a record polarization of 71% has been achieved in a pentacene doped naphthalene single crystal at a field of 0.36 T using a simple helium flow cryostat for cooling. Furthermore, by placing the polarized crystal in a neutron optics focus and de-focus scheme, the actual sample cross-section could be increased by a factor 35 corresponding to an effective spin filter cross-section of 18×18mm 2

  8. First results for the two-spin parameter ALL in π0 production by 200 GeV polarized protons and antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.L.; Corcoran, M.D.; Cranshaw, J.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Nguyen, C.; Roberts, J.B.; Skeens, J.; White, J.L.; Bystricky, J.; Chaumette, P.; Deregel, J.; Durand, G.; Fabre, J.; Lehar, F.; Lesquen, A. de; Cossairt, J.D.; Read, A.L.; En'yo, H.; Funahashi, H.; Goto, Y.; Imai, K.; Itow, Y.; Makino, S.; Masaike, A.; Miyake, K.; Nagamine, T.; Saito, N.; Yamashita, S.; Grosnick, D.P.; Hill, D.A.; Kasprzyk, T.; Laghai, M.; Lopiano, D.; Ohashi, Y.; Shepard, J.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.; Yokosawa, A.; Iwatani, K.; Krueger, K.W.; Kuroda, K.; Michalowicz, A.; Pauletta, G.; Penzo, A.; Schiavon, P.; Zanetti, A.; Salvato, G.; Villari, A.; Takeutchi, F.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, N.; Yoshida, T.

    1991-01-01

    The two-spin parameter A LL in inclusive π 0 production by longitudinally-polarized protons and antiprotons on a longitudinally-polarized proton target has been measured at the 200 GeV Fermilab spin physics facility, for π 0 's at x F = 0 with 1 ≤ p t ≤ 3 GeV/c. The results exclude, at the 95% confidence level, values of A LL (pp) > 0.1 and 0 's produced by protons, and values of A LL (anti pp) > 0.1 and LL (pp) for the gluon spin density is discussed. The data are in good agreement with 'conventional' small or zero, gluon polarization. (orig.)

  9. First results for the two-spin parameter A sub LL in. pi. sup 0 production by 200 GeV polarized protons and antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D L; Corcoran, M D; Cranshaw, J; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Nessi, M; Nguyen, C; Roberts, J B; Skeens, J; White, J L [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Bonner Nuclear Labs.; Akchurin, N; Onel, Y [Iowa Univ., Iowa City (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Belikov, N I; Derevschikov, A A; Grachov, O A; Matulenko, Yu A; Meschanin, A P; Nurushev, S B; Patalakha, D I; Rykov, V L; Solovyanov, V L; Vasiliev, A N [Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Serpukhov (USSR); Bystricky, J; Chaumette, P; Deregel, J; Durand, G; Fabre, J; Lehar, F; Lesquen, A de [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cossairt, J D; Read, A L [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA); En' yo, H; Funahashi, H; Goto, Y; Imai, K; Itow, Y; Makino, S; Masaike, A; Miyake, K; Nagamine, T; Saito, N; Yamashita, S [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Fukuda, K [Meiji Coll. of Oriental Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Grosnick, D P; Hill, D A; FNAL E581/704 Collaboration

    1991-05-23

    The two-spin parameter A{sub LL} in inclusive {pi}{sup 0} production by longitudinally-polarized protons and antiprotons on a longitudinally-polarized proton target has been measured at the 200 GeV Fermilab spin physics facility, for {pi}{sup 0}'s at x{sub F} = 0 with 1 {le} p{sub t} {le} 3 GeV/c. The results exclude, at the 95% confidence level, values of A{sub LL} (pp) > 0.1 and < -0.1, for {pi}{sup 0}'s produced by protons, and values of A{sub LL} (anti pp) > 0.1 and < -0.2 for incident antiprotons. The relevance of A{sub LL}(pp) for the gluon spin density is discussed. The data are in good agreement with 'conventional' small or zero, gluon polarization. (orig.).

  10. Proton polarization above 70% by DNP using photo-excited triplet states, a first step towards a broadband neutron spin filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, T.R. [Laboratory for Developments and Methods (LDM), Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratory of Functional and Metabolic Imaging, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Niketic, N.; Brandt, B. van den; Filges, U.; Panzner, T.; Rantsiou, E.; Wenckebach, W.Th. [Laboratory for Developments and Methods (LDM), Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Hautle, P., E-mail: patrick.hautle@psi.ch [Laboratory for Developments and Methods (LDM), Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-08-01

    The use of polarized protons as neutron spin filter is an attractive alternative to the well established neutron polarization techniques, as the large, spin-dependent neutron scattering cross-section for protons is useful up to the sub-MeV region. Employing optically excited triplet states for the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the protons relieves the stringent requirements of classical DNP schemes, i.e low temperatures and strong magnetic fields, making technically simpler systems with open geometries possible. Using triplet DNP a record polarization of 71% has been achieved in a pentacene doped naphthalene single crystal at a field of 0.36 T using a simple helium flow cryostat for cooling. Furthermore, by placing the polarized crystal in a neutron optics focus and de-focus scheme, the actual sample cross-section could be increased by a factor 35 corresponding to an effective spin filter cross-section of 18×18mm{sup 2}.

  11. Precise determination of the spin structure function g{sub 1} of the proton, deuteron and neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z. [Yerevan Physics Insitute, Yerevan (AM)] (and others)

    2006-09-15

    Precise measurements of the spin structure functions of the proton g{sup p}{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) and deuteron g{sup d}{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) are presented over the kinematic range 0.0041 {<=} x {<=} 0.9 and 0.18 GeV{sup 2} {<=} Q{sup 2} {<=} 20 GeV{sup 2}. The data were collected at the HERMES experiment at DESY, in deep-inelastic scattering of 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized positrons off longitudinally polarized hydrogen and deuterium gas targets internal to the HERA storage ring. The neutron spin structure function g{sup n}{sub 1} is extracted by combining proton and deuteron data. The integrals of g{sup p,d}{sub 1} at Q{sup 2}=5 GeV{sup 2} are evaluated over the measured x range. Neglecting any possible contribution to the g{sup d}{sub 1} integral from the region x {<=} 0.021, a value of 0.330{+-}0.011(theo.){+-}0.025(exp.){+-}0.028(evol.) is obtained for the flavor-singlet axial charge a{sub 0} in a leading-twist NNLO analysis. (orig.)

  12. Spin decomposition of the responses of 44Ca and 48Ca to 300 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, F.T.; Bimbot, L.; Fergerson, R.W.; Glashausser, C.; Green, A.; Haeusser, O.; Hicks, K.; Jones, K.; Miller, C.A.; Vetterli, M.; Abegg, R.; Beatty, D.; Bonin, B.; Castel, B.; Chen, X.Y.; Cupps, V.; Djalali, C.; Henderson, R.; Jackson, K.P.; Jeppesen, R.; Nakayama, K.; Nanda, S.K.; Sawafta, R.; Yen, S.; Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay, France; Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854; Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada V5A1S6; TRIUMF, 4004 Westbrook Mall, Vancouver, Canada V6T2A3; Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544; Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette, CEDEX, France; Queen's University, Kingston, Canada K7L3N6; University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309; University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208; Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, Virginia 23606; University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G2J1)

    1991-01-01

    Angular distributions of the double-differential cross section d 2 σ/dΩ dE(σ) and the spin-flip probability S nn have been measured for inclusive proton inelastic scattering from 44 Ca at 290 MeV and from 48 Ca at 318 MeV. Excitation energies up to about 50 MeV for 44 Ca and 40 MeV for 48 Ca have been investigated over the laboratory angular ranges of 3 degree to 12 degree for 44 Ca and 3 degree to 9 degree for 48 Ca. Multipole decompositions of angular distributions of both the spin-flip cross section σS nn and the estimated cross section for ΔS=0 transitions have been performed. Distributions of strengths were deduced for ΔL=1, ΔS=0 (the giant dipole), ΔL=2, ΔS=0 (the giant quadrupole), ΔL=0, ΔS=1 (the magnetic dipole), ΔL=1, ΔS=1 (the spin dipole), and ΔL=2, ΔS=1 (the spin quadrupole). The ΔS=0 summed strengths for 44 Ca are lower than for 40 Ca and 48 Ca. The spin-dipole summed strengths are found to be approximately independent of A. For 48 Ca, essentially all M1 strength observed was in the 10.23 MeV 1 + state; for 44 Ca, M1 strength was observed to be fragmented over a range of 7 to 18 Mev

  13. Meniscal tear evaluation. Comparison of a conventional spin-echo proton density sequence with a fast spin-echo sequence utilizing a 512x358 matrix size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, M.A.; Robinson, P.; Grainger, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the sensitivities, specificities, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs) for sagittal conventional spin-echo proton density (SE-PD) and fast spin-echo proton density (FSE-PD) sequences in the diagnosis of meniscal tears when compared to arthroscopic findings utilizing increased FSE matrix acquisition size. Method and materials: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 97 knees (194 menisci) were independently and prospectively interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists over four separate readings at least 3 weeks apart. Readings 1 and 2 included images in all three planes in accordance with the standard protocol with either a SE or FSE sagittal PD, at readings 3 and 4 just the SE or FSE sagittal PD sequences were reported. The FSE sequence was acquired with an increased matrix size, compared to the SE sequence, to provide increased resolution. Menisci were graded for the presence of a tear and statistical analysis to calculate sensitivity and specificity was performed comparing to arthroscopy as the reference standard. ROC analysis for the diagnosis of meniscal tears on the SE and FSE sagittal sequences was also evaluated. Reader concordance for the SE and FSE sequences was calculated. Results: Sixty-seven tears were noted at arthroscopy; 60 were detected on SE and 56 on FSE. The sensitivity and specificity for SE was 90 and 90%, and for FSE was 84 and 94%, respectively, with no significant difference. ROC analysis showed no significant difference between the two sequences and kappa values demonstrated a higher level of reader agreement for the FSE than for the SE reading. Conclusion: Use of a FSE sagittal PD sequence with an increased matrix size provides comparable performance to conventional SE sagittal PD when evaluating meniscal disease with a modern system. The present study indicates an increased level of concordance between readers for the FSE sagittal sequence compared to the conventional SE.

  14. Meniscal tear evaluation. Comparison of a conventional spin-echo proton density sequence with a fast spin-echo sequence utilizing a 512x358 matrix size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, M.A.; Robinson, P. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J., E-mail: andrew.grainger@leedsth.nhs.u [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Aim: To determine the sensitivities, specificities, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs) for sagittal conventional spin-echo proton density (SE-PD) and fast spin-echo proton density (FSE-PD) sequences in the diagnosis of meniscal tears when compared to arthroscopic findings utilizing increased FSE matrix acquisition size. Method and materials: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 97 knees (194 menisci) were independently and prospectively interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists over four separate readings at least 3 weeks apart. Readings 1 and 2 included images in all three planes in accordance with the standard protocol with either a SE or FSE sagittal PD, at readings 3 and 4 just the SE or FSE sagittal PD sequences were reported. The FSE sequence was acquired with an increased matrix size, compared to the SE sequence, to provide increased resolution. Menisci were graded for the presence of a tear and statistical analysis to calculate sensitivity and specificity was performed comparing to arthroscopy as the reference standard. ROC analysis for the diagnosis of meniscal tears on the SE and FSE sagittal sequences was also evaluated. Reader concordance for the SE and FSE sequences was calculated. Results: Sixty-seven tears were noted at arthroscopy; 60 were detected on SE and 56 on FSE. The sensitivity and specificity for SE was 90 and 90%, and for FSE was 84 and 94%, respectively, with no significant difference. ROC analysis showed no significant difference between the two sequences and kappa values demonstrated a higher level of reader agreement for the FSE than for the SE reading. Conclusion: Use of a FSE sagittal PD sequence with an increased matrix size provides comparable performance to conventional SE sagittal PD when evaluating meniscal disease with a modern system. The present study indicates an increased level of concordance between readers for the FSE sagittal sequence compared to the conventional SE.

  15. The Spin Structure Function of the Proton from SLAC Experiment E155

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, P

    2004-02-17

    Experiment E155 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measured the longitudinal and transverse deep inelastic structure functions of the proton and deuteron using a polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam and solid polarized targets of ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) for proton measurements and lithium deuteride ({sup 6}Li{sup 2}H) for deuteron measurements. Three electromagnetic spectrometers at angles of 2.75{sup o}, 5.5{sup o}, and 10.5{sup o} measured the scattered electrons. This work presents an analysis of the longitudinal structure function of the proton, g{sub 1}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}). Included is a re-analysis of the proton target polarization data that for the first time corrects a problem encountered which altered those measurements.

  16. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusive neutral pion production at midrapidity in polarized proton collisions at s=200 GeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D.R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M.J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielčík, Jaroslav; Bielčíková, Jana; Biritz, B.; Bland, L.C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bysterský, Michal; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M.C.D.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, Petr; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K.E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R.F.; Codrington, M.J.M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T.M.; Coserea, R. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L.C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; de Souza, R.D.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dunlop, J.C.; Mazumdar, M.R.D.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Gangaharan, D.R.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y.N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Hofman, D.J.; Hollis, R.S.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, Pavel; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C.L.; Jones, P.G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitán, Jan; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kikola, D.P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.R.; Knospe, A.G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kopytine, M.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kushpil, Vasilij; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, Richard; Lee, Ch.; Lee, J.H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, N.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O.I.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H.S.; Matulenko, Yu.A.; McShane, T.S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N.G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D.A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B.K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J.M.; Netrakanti, P.K.; Ng, M.J.; Nogach, L.V.; Nurushev, S.B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.S.; Pal, S.K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S.Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S.C.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Potukuchi, B.V.K.S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N.K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H.G.; Roberts, J.B.; Rogachevskiy, O.V.; Romero, J.L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M.J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S.S.; Shi, X.H.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R.N.; Skoby, M.J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H.M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A.A.P.; Suarez, M.C.; Subba, N.L.; Šumbera, Michal; Sun, X.M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T.J.M.; de Toledo, A. S.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J.H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A.R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M. V.; Trainor, T.A.; Tram, V.N.; Trattner, A.L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O.D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A.M.; Vanfossen, J.A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.S.M.; Vasilevski, I.M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S.E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S.A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J.S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J.C.; Westfall, G.D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Tlustý, David; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q.H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, P.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, X.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J.X.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 11 (2009), 111108/1-111108/7 ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0079; GA MŠk LC07048; GA MŠk LA09013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : PARTON DISTRIBUTIONS * PROTON SPIN * SPIN ASSYMETRY Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.922, year: 2009

  17. Proton-recoil proportional counter tests at TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.L.; Eichholz, J.J.; Burrows, D.R.; DeVolpi, A.

    1979-01-01

    A methane filled proton-recoil proportional counter will be used as a fission neutron detector in the fast-neutron hodoscope. To provide meaningful fuel-motion information the proportional counter should have: a linear response over a wide range of reactor powers background ratio (the number of high energy neutrons detected must be maximized relative to low energy neutrons, and gamma ray sensitivity must be kept small); and a detector efficiency for fission neutrons above 1 MeV of approximately 1%. In addition, it is desirable that the detector and the associated amplifier/discriminator be capable of operating at counting rates in excess of 500 kHz. This paper reports on tests that were conducted on several proportional counters at the TREAT reactor

  18. Yield surface investigation of alloys during model disk spin tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Kuzmin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-turbine engines operate under heavy subsequently static loading conditions. Disks of gas-turbine engine are high loaded parts of irregular shape having intensive stress concentrators wherein a 3D stress strain state occurs. The loss of load-carrying capability or burst of disk can lead to severe accident or disaster. Therefore, development of methods to assess deformations and to predict burst is one of the most important problems.Strength assessment approaches are used at all levels of engine creation. In recent years due to actively developing numerical method, particularly FEA, it became possible to investigate load-carrying capability of irregular shape disks, to use 3D computing schemes including flow theory and different options of force and deformation failure criteria. In spite of a wide progress and practical use of strength assessment approaches, there is a lack of detailed research data on yield surface of disk alloys. The main purpose of this work is to validate the use of basis hypothesis of flow theory and investigate the yield surface of disk alloys during the disks spin test.The results of quasi-static numerical simulation of spin tests of model disk made from high-temperature forged alloy are presented. To determine stress-strain state of disk during loading finite element analysis is used. Simulation of elastic-plastic strain fields was carried out using incremental theory of plasticity with isotropic hardening. Hardening function was taken from the results of specimens tensile test. Specimens were cut from a sinkhead of model disk. The paper investigates the model sensitivity affected by V.Mises and Tresca yield criteria as well as the Hosford model. To identify the material model parameters the eddy current sensors were used in the experimental approach to measure rim radial displacements during the load-unload of spin test. The results of calculation made using different material models were compared with the

  19. Evidence for quark-hadron duality in the proton spin asymmetry A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetissian, E.; Elbakian, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Marukyan, H.; Rostomyan, A.; Taroian, S.; Zohrabian, H.; Amarian, M.; Ammosov, V.V.; Gapienko, V.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Boettcher, H.; Ehrenfried, M.; Ellinghaus, F.; Jung, P.

    2003-01-01

    Spin-dependent lepton-nucleon scattering data have been used to investigate the validity of the concept of quark-hadron duality for the spin asymmetry A 1 . Longitudinally polarized positrons were scattered off a longitudinally polarized hydrogen target for values of Q 2 between 1.2 and 12 GeV 2 and values of W 2 between 1 and 4 GeV 2 . The average double-spin asymmetry in the nucleon resonance region is found to agree with that measured in deep-inelastic scattering at the same values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. This finding implies that the description of A 1 in terms of quark degrees of freedom is valid also in the nucleon resonance region for values of Q 2 above 1.6 GeV 2

  20. Measurement of the free neutron-proton analyzing power and spin transfer parameters in the charge exchange region at 790 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransome, R.D.

    1981-07-01

    The free neutron-proton analyzing power and the spin transfer parameters (K/sub NN/, K/sub SS/, K/sub SL/, and K/sub LL/) were measured at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility at 790 MeV between 165 0 and 180 0 center of mass. A 40% polarized neutron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target was used. The recoil protons were momentum analyzed with a magnetic spectrometer to isolate elastic scatters. A large solid angle carbon polarimeter was used to measure the proton polarization. The measurements are the first at this energy and are in basic agreement with pre-existing phase shift solutions. The proton-carbon analyzing power was measured between 500 and 750 MeV. An empirical fit to the proton-carbon analyzing power between 100 and 750 MeV was done

  1. Gluon-spin contribution to the proton spin from the double helicity asymmetry in inclusive pi0 production in polarized p + p collisions at s**(1/2) = 200 GeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Růžička, Pavel; Tomášek, Lukáš; Vrba, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 1 (2009), 012003/1-012003/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : PHENIX * gluon * proton spin Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.328, year: 2009 http://arxiv.org/pdf/0810.0694

  2. Determination of the strange quarks's contribution to the proton spin in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electroproduction of K and π mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizade, V.N.; Efremov, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    A possibility of extracting pure contribution of s-quarks to the proton spin in the processes 1+A->1+h+X(A=p,nN; h=K + ,K 0 ,K 0 ,π + show that measurements of the quantities δσ K and δυ π . 10 refs.; 1 fig

  3. Spin Physics Experiments at NICA-SPD with polarized proton and deuteron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savin I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The brief description of the Letter of Intent proposing primarily to perform measurements of asymmetries of the DY pair production in collisions of non-polarized, longitudinally and transversally polarized protons and deuterons which provide an access to all leading twist collinear and TMD PDFs of quarks and anti-quarks in nucleons.

  4. The Proton Spin, Semi-Inclusive processes, and measurements at a future Electron Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhay, Deshpande

    2018-01-12

    We discuss spin physics, Guido’s contribution to it, and what we still have to learn. We set out in particular a programme for incorporating constraints from semi-inclusive data into global fits of polarized PDFs, and discuss the need for the EIC to increase the precision and kinematic coverage of current measurements.

  5. arXiv Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry $A_1^{\\rm p}$ and spin-dependent structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ of the proton at small values of $x$ and $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Aghasyan, M.; The COMPASS collaboration; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N.V.; Anosov, V.; Antoshkin, A.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtsev, V.E.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chumakov, A.G.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Dünnweber, W.; Dusaev, R.R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; jr.,M.Finger; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giarra, J.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grasso, A.; Gridin, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F.H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Iwata, T.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Kerbizi, A.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.M.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Kuznetsov, I.I.; Kveton, A.; Lednev, A.A.; Levchenko, E.A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Mamon, S.A.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Moretti, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Pešková, M.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rogacheva, N.S.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thiel, A.; Tomsa, J.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Vasilishin, B.I.; Vauth, A.; Veloso, J.; Vidon, A.; Virius, M.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2018-06-10

    We present a precise measurement of the proton longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A1p and the proton spin-dependent structure function g1p at photon virtualities 0.006(GeV/c)2spin effects are found at such low values of x .

  6. Charge-exchange breakup of the deuteron with the production of two protons and spin structure of the amplitude of the nucleon charge transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glagolev, V.V.; Lyuboshits, V.L.; Lyuboshits, V.V.; Piskunov, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the impulse approximation, the relation between the effective cross section of the charge-exchange breakup of a fast deuteron d + a → (pp) + b and the effective cross section of the charge transfer process n + a → p + b is discussed. In doing so, the effects of the proton identity (Fermi-statistics) and of the Coulomb and strong interactions of protons in the final state are taken into account. The distribution over relative momenta of the protons, produced in the charge-exchange process d + p → (pp) + n in the forward direction, is investigated. At the transfer momenta being close to zero the effective cross section of the charge-exchange breakup of a fast deuteron, colliding with the proton target, is determined only by the spin-flip part of the amplitude of the charge transfer reaction n + p → p + n at the zero angle. It is shown that the study of the process d + p → (pp) + n in a beam of the polarized (aligned) deuterons allows one, in principle, to separate two spin-dependent terms in the amplitude of the charge transfer reaction n + p → p + n, one of which does not conserve and the other one conserves the projection of the nucleon spin onto the direction of momentum at the transition of the neutron into the proton

  7. Beam tests on a proton linac booster for hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    De Martinis, C; Berra, P; Birattari, C; Calabretta, L; Crandall, K; Giove, D; Masullo, M R; Mauri, M; Rosso, E; Rovelli, A; Serafini, L; Szeless, Balázs; Toet, D Z; Vaccaro, Vittorio G; Weiss, M; Zennaro, R

    2002-01-01

    LIBO is a 3 GHz modular side-coupled proton linac booster designed to deliver beam energies up to 200 MeV, as required for the therapy of deep seated tumours. The injected beam of 50 to 70 MeV is produced by a cyclotron like those in several hospitals and research institutes. A full-scale prototype of the first module with an input/output energy of 62/74 MeV, respectively, was designed and built in 1999 and 2000. Full power RF tests were carried out successfully at CERN using a test facility at LIL at the end of the year 2000. In order to prove the feasibility of the acceleration process, an experimental setup with this module was installed at the INFN Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud (LNS) in Catania during 2001. The superconducting cyclotron provided the 62 MeV test beam. A compact solid-state RF modulator with a 4 MW klystron, made available by IBA-Scanditronix, was put into operation to power the linac. In this paper the main features of the accelerator are reviewed and the experimental results obtained duri...

  8. A 3% Measurement of the Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Qweak Setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waidyawansa, Dinayadura Buddhini [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The beam normal single spin asymmetry generated in the scattering of transversely polarized electrons from unpolarized nucleons is an observable of the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange process. Moreover, it is a potential source of false asymmetry in parity violating electron scattering experiments. The Q{sub weak} experiment uses parity violating electron scattering to make a direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton. The targeted 4% measurement of the weak charge of the proton probes for parity violating new physics beyond the Standard Model. The beam normal single spin asymmetry at Q{sub weak} kinematics is at least three orders of magnitude larger than 5 ppb precision of the parity violating asymmetry. To better understand this parity conserving background, the Q{sub weak} Collaboration has performed elastic scattering measurements with fully transversely polarized electron beam on the proton and aluminum. This dissertation presents the analysis of the 3% measurement (1.3% statistical and 2.6% systematic) of beam normal single spin asymmetry in electronproton scattering at a Q2 of 0.025 (GeV/c)2. It is the most precise existing measurement of beam normal single spin asymmetry available at the time. A measurement of this precision helps to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process.

  9. Comparison of spin echo T1-weighted sequences versus fast spin-echo proton density-weighted sequences for evaluation of meniscal tears at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Andrew B.; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Wu, Jim S.; Smart, L.R.; Medvecky, Michael J.; Haims, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    At our institution, fast spin-echo (FSE) proton density (PD) imaging is used to evaluate articular cartilage, while conventional spin-echo (CSE) T1-weighted sequences have been traditionally used to characterize meniscal pathology. We sought to determine if FSE PD-weighted sequences are equivalent to CSE T1-weighted sequences in the detection of meniscal tears, obviating the need to perform both sequences. We retrospectively reviewed the records of knee arthroscopies performed by two arthroscopy-focused surgeons from an academic medical center over a 2-year period. The preoperative MRI images were interpreted independently by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists who graded the sagittal CSE T1 and FSE PD sequences at different sittings with grades 1-5, where 1 = normal meniscus, 2 = probable normal meniscus, 3 indeterminate, 4 = probable torn meniscus, and 5 = torn meniscus. Each meniscus was divided into an anterior and posterior half, and these halves were graded separately. Operative findings provided the gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to compare the two sequences. There were 131 tears in 504 meniscal halves. Using ROC analysis, the reader 1 area under curve for FSE PD was significantly better than CSE T1 (0.939 vs. 0.902, >95% confidence). For reader 2, the difference met good criteria for statistical non-inferiority but not superiority (0.913 for FSE PD and 0.908 for CSE T1; >95% non-inferiority for difference at most of -0.027). FSE PD-weighted sequences, using our institutional protocol, are not inferior to CSE T1-weighted sequences for the detection of meniscal tears and may be superior. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of spin asymmetries and cross sections in. pi. sup 0 production by 200 GeV polarized antiprotons and protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D L; Corcoran, M D; Cranshaw, J; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Nessi, M; Nguyen, C; Roberts, J B; Skeens, J; White, J L [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Bonner Nuclear Labs.; Akchurin, N; Onel, Y [Iowa Univ., Iowa City (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Belikov, N I; Derevschikov, A A; Grachov, O A; Matulenko, Yu A; Meschanin, A P; Nurushev, S B; Patalakha, D I; Rykov, V L; Solovyanov, V L; Vasiliev, A N [Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Serpukhov (USSR); Bystricky, J; Lehar, F; Lesquen, A de [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cossairt, J D; Read, A L [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA); En' yo, H; Funahashi, H; Goto, Y; Imai, K; Itow, Y; Makino, S; Masaike, A; Miyake, K; Nagamine, T; Saito, N; Yamashita, S [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Grosnick, D P; Hill, D A; Laghai, M; Lopiano, D; Ohashi, Y; Spinka, H; Underwood, D G; Yokosawa, A [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); FNAL E581/704 Collaboration

    1991-05-23

    The single-spin asymmetry A{sub N}(anti pp) for inclusive {pi}{sup 0} production at 0.5 < p{sub t} < 2GeV/c by 200 GeV transversely-polarized antiprotons on protons has been measured at Fermilab over a wide range of x{sub F}. We observe that A{sub N}(anti pp) has the same sign, a similar x{sub F} dependence, and about half the magnitude as A{sub N}(pp) for {pi}{sup 0} production by protons. We also present the ratio of the spin-averaged sections for {pi}{sup 0} production by antiproton and by protons. (orig.).

  11. A measurement of the spin asymmetry and determination of the structure function g1 in deep inelastic muon-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashman, J.; Combley, F.; Salmon, D.; Wheeler, S.; Baum, G.; Caputo, M.C.; Hughes, V.W.; Oppenheim, R.F.; Papavassiliou, V.; Piegaia, R.; Schueler, K.P.; Bee, C.P.; Brown, S.C.; Court, G.; Francis, D.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hayman, P.; Holt, J.R.; Jones, T.; Matthews, M.; Wimpenny, S.J.; Coignet, G.; Windmolders, R.

    1988-01-01

    The spin asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarised muons by longitudinally polarised protons has been measured over a large x range (0.01 1 (x) for the proton has been determined and its integral over x found to be 0.114±0.012±0.026, in disagreement with the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule. Assuming the validity of the Bjorken sum rule, this result implies a significant negative value for the integral of g 1 for the neutron. These values for the integrals of g 1 lead to the conclusion that the total quark spin constitutes a rather small fraction of the spin of the nucleon. (orig.)

  12. Proposed new test of spin effects in general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R F

    2004-08-20

    The recent discovery of a double-pulsar PSR J0737-3039A/B provides an opportunity of unequivocally observing, for the first time, spin effects in general relativity. Existing efforts involve detection of the precession of the spinning body itself. However, for a close binary system, spin effects on the orbit may also be discernible. Not only do they add to the advance of the periastron (by an amount which is small compared to the conventional contribution) but they also give rise to a precession of the orbit about the spin direction. The measurement of such an effect would also give information on the moment of inertia of pulsars.

  13. Flight test of a spin parachute for use with a Super Arcas sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, M. N.

    1975-01-01

    The development and flight testing of a specially configured 16.6 ft Disc Band Gap (DBG) Spin Parachute is discussed. The parachute is integrated with a modified Super Arcas launch vehicle. Total payload weight was 17.6 lbs including the Spin Parachute and a scientific payload, and lift-off weight was 100.3 lbs. The Super Arcas vehicle was despun from 18.4 cps. After payload separation at 244,170 ft the Spin Parachute and its payload attained a maximum spin rate of 2.4 cps. Total suspended weight of the Spin Parachute and its payload was 14.64 lbs.

  14. Asymmetry of spin-flip of polarized protons in the inelastic scattering to the first 2+ states of 48Ti and 50Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomizawa, M.; Aoki, T.; Aoki, Y.; Sakai, T.; Tagishi, Y.; Yagi, K.; Murayama, T.

    1990-01-01

    Angular distributions of differential cross section, analyzing power, spin-flip probability and spin-flip asymmetry in the excitation of the first 2 + states in 48 Ti and 50 Ti were measured at incident energies of 11 and 18 MeV using (p,p'γ) coincidence technique with polarized proton beam. The angular distributions show strong incident energy and target dependence. The results were analyzed in terms of a macroscopic coupled channels method based on the vibrational model and of the microscopic distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) based on shell-model wave functions and effective nucleon-nucleon interactions. The spin-flip asymmetry is quite sensitive to the spin-dependent part in the interaction which causes the inelastic scattering. (author)

  15. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  16. Probing Proton Spin Structure: A Measurement of g2 at Four-momentum Transfer of 2 to 6 GeV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, James [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment investigated the spin structure of the proton via inclusive electron scattering at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA. A double-polarization measurement of polarized asymmetries was performed using the University of Virginia solid polarized ammonia target with target polarization aligned longitudinal and near transverse to the electron beam, allowing the extraction of the spin asymmetries A1 and A2, and spin structure functions g1 and g2. Polarized electrons of energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV were scattered to be viewed by a novel, non-magnetic array of detectors observing a four-momentum transfer range of 2 to 6 GeV2. This document addresses the extraction of the spin asymmetries and spin structure functions, with a focus on spin structure function g2, which we have measured as a function of x and W in four Q2 bins.

  17. New results on the proton spin-dependent structure function $g^{p}_{1}$ at COMPASS with $E = 200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Zemlyanichkina, Elena

    2014-01-01

    New results of the double spin asymmetry A p 1 and the spin-dependent structure function of the proton g p 1 as a function of x Bj and Q 2 will be presented. New COMPASS data on longitudinal polarized NH 3 target were collected during the year 2011 with a beam of positive muons with energy E = 200 GeV. It allows us to cover low x region down to 0 : 0025 in the range Q 2 > 1 GeV = c 2 for the first time

  18. Spin asymmetries $A_1$ of the proton and the deuteron in the low $x$ and low $Q^2$ region from polarized high energy muon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067425; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Krämer, Dietrich; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Willumeit, R; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of the spin asymmetries $A_1$ of the proton and the deuteron in the kinematic region extending down to $x=6\\cdot 10^{-5}$ and $Q^2=0.01$ GeV$^2$. The data were taken with a dedicated low $x$ trigger, which required hadron detection in addition to the scattered muon, so as to reduce the background at low $x$. The results complement our previous measurements and the two sets are consistent in the overlap region. No sig\\-ni\\-fi\\-cant spin effects are found in the newly explored region.

  19. Scattering of spinning test particles by gravitational plane waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, D.; Gemelli, G.

    1997-01-01

    The authors study the motion of spinning particles in the gravitational plane-wave background and discuss particular solutions under a suitable choice of supplementary conditions. An analysis of the discontinuity of the motion across the wavefront is presented too

  20. Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Inelastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Q-Weak Apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ., Nuruzzaman [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (B_n) on H_2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic B_n is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of B_n background studies, we made the first measurement of B_n in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be B_n = 42.82 ± 2.45 (stat) ± 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy E_beam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 deg, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. B_n from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma^* Delta Delta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ~10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system

  1. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Functions g2 and Asymmetry A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry Anthony; Arnold, R.G.; Todd Averett; Band, H.R.; Berisso, M.C.; Borel, H.; Peter Bosted; Stephen Bueltmann; M. Buenerd; T. Chupp; Steve Churchwell; G.R. Court; Donald Crabb; Donal Day; Piotr Decowski; P. DePietro; Robin D. Erbacher; R. Erickson; Andrew Feltham; Helene Fonvieille; Emil Frlez; R. Gearhart; V. Ghazikhanian; Javier Gomez; Keith Griffioen; C. Harris; M.A. Houlden; E.W. Hughes; Charles Hyde-Wright; G. Igo; Sebastien Incerti; John Jensen; J.K. Johnson; Paul King; Yu.G. Kolomensky; Sebastian Kuhn; Richard Lindgren; R.M. Lombard-Nelsen; Jacques Marroncle; James Mccarthy; Paul McKee; W. Meyer; Gregory Mitchell; Joseph Mitchell; Michael Olson; S. Penttila; Gerald Peterson; Gerassimos Petratos; R. Pitthan; Dinko Pocanic; R. Prepost; C. Prescott; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; D. Reyna; L.S. Rochester; Stephen Rock; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Franck Sabatie; Ingo Sick; T. Smith; L. Sorrell; F. Staley; S. St. Lorant; L.M. Stuart; Z. Szalata; Y. Terrien; William Tobias; Luminita Todor; T. Toole; S. Trentalange; Dieter Walz; Robert Welsh; Frank Wesselmann; T.R. Wright; C.C. Young; Markus Zeier; Hong Guo Zhu; Benedikt Zihlmann

    1999-01-01

    We have measured the spin structure functions g 2 p and g 2 d and the virtual photon asymmetries A 2 p and A 2 d over the kinematic range 0.02 2 (le) 30(GeV/c) 2 by scattering 38.8 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons from transversely polarized NH 3 and 6 LiD targets.The absolute value of A 2 is significantly smaller than the √R positivity limit over the measured range, while g 2 is consistent with the twist-2 Wandzura-Wilczek calculation. We obtain results for the twist-3 reduced matrix elements d 2 p , d 2 d and d 2 n . The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule integral (g 2 (x)dx) is reported for the range 0.02 (le) x (le) 0.8

  2. Low-intensive proton generators for radiation testing; Nizkointensivnyj protonnyj generator dlya radiatsionnykh ispytanij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Istomin, I V; Gurbich, A F; Semenov, A V

    1994-12-31

    Experiment is conducted and calculations are performed grounding the possibility of creating a low-intensity proton generator based on nuclear reaction. The necessity in such a proton source is defined by the need of conducting long-term testings and by the absence of appropriate equipment.

  3. Using spin to probe hadronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, G.P.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1994-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of high energy spin phenomena is summarized, with emphasis on the spin properties of nucleons. It is stressed that crucial tests of the Standard Model can be made with polarization experiments. By performing the experiments discussed here, the authors will reveal important constituent and composite properties of protons and neutrons. The future prospects for planned polarization experiments are discussed

  4. RHIC spin program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.

    1995-01-01

    Colliding beams of high energy polarized protons at RHIC is an excellent way to probe the polarization of gluons, u and d quarks in a polarized proton. RHIC is the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider being built now at Brookhaven in the ISABELLE tunnel. It is designed to collide gold ions on gold ions at 100 GeV/nucleon. Its goal is to discover the quark-gluon plasma, and the first collisions are expected in March, 1999. RHIC will also make an ideal polarized proton collider with high luminosity and 250 GeV x 250 GeV collisions. The RHIC spin physics program is: (1) Use well-understood perturbative QCD probes to study non-perturbative confining dynamics in QCD. We will measure - gluon and sea quark polarization in a polarized proton, polarization of quarks in a transversely polarized proton. (2) Look for additional surprises using the first high energy polarized proton collider. We will - look for the expected maximal parity violation in W and Z boson production, - search for parity violation in other processes, - test parton models with spin. This lecture is organized around a few of the key ideas: Siberian Snakes--What are they? High energy proton-proton collisions are scatters of quarks and leptons, at high x, a polarized proton beam is a beam of polarized u quarks, quark and gluon collisions are very sensitive to spin. We will discuss two reactions: how direct photon production measures gluon polarization, and how W + boson production measures u and d quark polarization

  5. RHIC spin program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunce, G.

    1995-12-31

    Colliding beams of high energy polarized protons at RHIC is an excellent way to probe the polarization of gluons, u and d quarks in a polarized proton. RHIC is the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider being built now at Brookhaven in the ISABELLE tunnel. It is designed to collide gold ions on gold ions at 100 GeV/nucleon. Its goal is to discover the quark-gluon plasma, and the first collisions are expected in March, 1999. RHIC will also make an ideal polarized proton collider with high luminosity and 250 GeV x 250 GeV collisions. The RHIC spin physics program is: (1) Use well-understood perturbative QCD probes to study non-perturbative confining dynamics in QCD. We will measure - gluon and sea quark polarization in a polarized proton, polarization of quarks in a transversely polarized proton. (2) Look for additional surprises using the first high energy polarized proton collider. We will - look for the expected maximal parity violation in W and Z boson production, - search for parity violation in other processes, - test parton models with spin. This lecture is organized around a few of the key ideas: Siberian Snakes--What are they? High energy proton-proton collisions are scatters of quarks and leptons, at high x, a polarized proton beam is a beam of polarized u quarks, quark and gluon collisions are very sensitive to spin. We will discuss two reactions: how direct photon production measures gluon polarization, and how W{sup +} boson production measures u and d quark polarization.

  6. pH-Dependent spin state population and 19F NMR chemical shift via remote ligand protonation in an iron(ii) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudette, Alexandra I; Thorarinsdottir, Agnes E; Harris, T David

    2017-11-30

    An Fe II complex that features a pH-dependent spin state population, by virtue of a variable ligand protonation state, is described. This behavior leads to a highly pH-dependent 19 F NMR chemical shift with a sensitivity of 13.9(5) ppm per pH unit at 37 °C, thereby demonstrating the potential utility of the complex as a 19 F chemical shift-based pH sensor.

  7. Target and double spin asymmetries of deeply virtual π0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target and CLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The target and double spin asymmetries of the exclusive pseudoscalar channel e→p→→epπ0 were measured for the first time in the deep-inelastic regime using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS. The data were collected over a large kinematic phase space and divided into 110 four-dimensional bins of Q2, xB, −t and ϕ. Large values of asymmetry moments clearly indicate a substantial contribution to the polarized structure functions from transverse virtual photon amplitudes. The interpretation of experimental data in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs provides the first insight on the chiral-odd GPDs H˜T and ET, and complement previous measurements of unpolarized structure functions sensitive to the GPDs HT and E¯T. These data provide a crucial input for parametrizations of essentially unknown chiral-odd GPDs and will strongly influence existing theoretical calculations based on the handbag formalism.

  8. Target and double spin asymmetries of deeply virtual π 0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target and CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A.; Avakian, H.; Burkert, V.; Joo, K.; Kim, W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Badui, R. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garc con, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.

    2017-05-01

    The target and double spin asymmetries of the exclusive pseudoscalar channel e→p→→epπ0 were measured for the first time in the deep-inelastic regime using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The data were collected over a large kinematic phase space and divided into 110 four-dimensional bins of Q2, xB, -t and Φ. Large values of asymmetry moments clearly indicate a substantial contribution to the polarized structure functions from transverse virtual photon amplitudes. The interpretation of experimental data in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) provides the first insight on the chiral-odd GPDs H˜T and ET, and complement previous measurements of unpolarized structure functions sensitive to the GPDs HT and E¯T. These data provide a crucial input for parametrizations of essentially unknown chiral-odd GPDs and will strongly influence existing theoretical calculations based on the handbag formalism.

  9. Target and double spin asymmetries of deeply virtual π0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target and CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A.; Avakian, H.; Burkert, V.; Joo, K.; Kim, W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Badui, R. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Djalali, C.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garc con, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.

    2017-05-01

    The target and double spin asymmetries of the exclusive pseudoscalar channel e → p → → epπ0 were measured for the first time in the deep-inelastic regime using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The data were collected over a large kinematic phase space and divided into 110 four-dimensional bins of Q2, xB, -t and ϕ. Large values of asymmetry moments clearly indicate a substantial contribution to the polarized structure functions from transverse virtual photon amplitudes. The interpretation of experimental data in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) provides the first insight on the chiral-odd GPDs H˜T and ET, and complement previous measurements of unpolarized structure functions sensitive to the GPDs HT and EbarT. These data provide a crucial input for parametrizations of essentially unknown chiral-odd GPDs and will strongly influence existing theoretical calculations based on the handbag formalism.

  10. Quark helicity distributions from longitudinal spin asymmetries in muon-proton and muon-deuteron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M G; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Austregesilo, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Brona, G; Burtin, E; Bussa, M P; Chaberny, D; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Colantoni, M; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Das, S; Dasgupta, S S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Diaz, V; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dunnweber, W; Efremov, A; El Alaoui, A; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Filin, A; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr; Fischer, H; Franco, C; Friedrich, J M; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gazda, R; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gnesi, I; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Grabmuller, S; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; Hoppner, Ch; d'Hose, N; Ilgner, C; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jasinski, P; Jegou, G; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu.A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Konigsmann, K; Konopka, R; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kowalik, K; Kramer, M; Kral, A; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuhn, R; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Lauser, L; Le Goff, J M; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Maggiora, A; Maggiora, M; Magnon, A; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Massmann, F; Matsuda, T; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu.V; Moinester, M A; Mutter, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nassalski, J; Negrini, T; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B; Perevalova, E; Pesaro, G; Peshekhonov, D V; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pontecorvo, G; Pretz, J; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J F; Ramos, S; Rapatsky, V; Reicherz, G; Richter, A; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Rondio, E; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, H; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schluter, T; Schmitt, L; Schopferer, S; Schroder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Siebert, H W; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Takekawa, S; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Tkatchev, L G; Uhl, S; Uman, I; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Vossen, A; Weitzel, Q; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zhao, J; Zhuravlev, N; Zvyagin, A

    2010-01-01

    Double-spin asymmetries for production of charged pions and kaons in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic muon scattering have been measured by the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The data, obtained by scattering a 160 GeV muon beam off a longitudinally polarised NH_3 target, cover a range of the Bjorken variable x between 0.004 and 0.7. A leading order evaluation of the helicity distributions for the three lightest quarks and antiquark flavours derived from these asymmetries and from our previous deuteron data is presented. The resulting values of the sea quark distributions are small and do not show any sizable dependence on x in the range of the measurements. No significant difference is observed between the strange and antistrange helicity distributions, both compatible with zero. The integrated value of the flavour asymmetry of the helicity distribution of the light-quark sea, \\Delta u-bar - \\Delta d-bar, is found to be slightly positive, about 1.5 standard deviations away from zero.

  11. Morpholino spin-labeling for base-pair sequencing of a 3'-terminal RNA stem by proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements: yeast ribosomal 5S RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.M.; Marshall, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Base-pair sequences for 5S and 5.8S RNAs are not readily extracted from proton homonuclear nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) connectivity experiments alone, due to extensive peak overlap in the downfield (11-15 ppm) proton NMR spectrum. In this paper, we introduce a new method for base-pair proton peak assignment for ribosomal RNAs, based upon the distance-dependent broadening of the resonances of base-pair protons spatially proximal to a paramagnetic group. Introduction of a nitroxide spin-label covalently attached to the 3'-terminal ribose provides an unequivocal starting point for base-pair hydrogen-bond proton NMR assignment. Subsequent NOE connectivities then establish the base-pair sequence for the terminal stem of a 5S RNA. Periodate oxidation of yeast 5S RNA, followed by reaction with 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxy (TEMPO-NH2) and sodium borohydride reduction, produces yeast 5S RNA specifically labeled with a paramagnetic nitroxide group at the 3'-terminal ribose. Comparison of the 500-MHz 1H NMR spectra of native and 3'-terminal spin-labeled yeast 5S RNA serves to identify the terminal base pair (G1 . C120) and its adjacent base pair (G2 . U119) on the basis of their proximity to the 3'-terminal spin-label. From that starting point, we have then identified (G . C, A . U, or G . U) and sequenced eight of the nine base pairs in the terminal helix via primary and secondary NOE's

  12. A quantum mechanical alternative to the Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatowicz, Piotr; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Osior, Agnieszka; Kamieński, Bohdan; Szymański, Sławomir

    2015-11-21

    The theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum effects are at stake, the relaxation behaviour of the nuclear spins in methyl groups is controlled by thermally activated classical jumps of the methyl group between its three orientations. The temperature effects on the relaxation rates can be modelled by Arrhenius behaviour of the correlation time of the jump process. The entire variety of relaxation effects in protonated methyl groups have recently been given a consistent quantum mechanical explanation not invoking the jump model regardless of the temperature range. It exploits the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory originally developed to describe NMR line shape effects for hindered methyl groups. In the DQR model, the incoherent dynamics of the methyl group include two quantum rate (i.e., coherence-damping) processes. For proton relaxation only one of these processes is relevant. In this paper, temperature-dependent proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in polycrystalline methyltriphenyl silane and methyltriphenyl germanium, both deuterated in aromatic positions, are reported and interpreted in terms of the DQR model. A comparison with the conventional approach exploiting the phenomenological Arrhenius equation is made. The present observations provide further indications that incoherent motions of molecular moieties in the condensed phase can retain quantum character over much broader temperature range than is commonly thought.

  13. Quantum mechanical alternative to Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    Theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum effects are at stake, the relaxation behaviour of the nuclear spins in methyl groups is controlled by thermally activated classical jumps of the methyl group between its three orientations. The temperature effects on the relaxation rates can be modelled by Arrhenius behaviour of the correlation time of the jump process. The entire variety of relaxation effects in protonated methyl groups has recently been given a consistently quantum mechanical explanation not invoking the jump model regardless of the temperature range. It exploits the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory originally developed to describe NMR line shape effects for hindered methyl groups. In the DQR model, the incoherent dynamics of the methyl group include two quantum rate, i.e., coherence-damping processes. For proton relaxation only one of these processes is relevant. In this paper, temperature-dependent proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in polycrystalline methyltriphenyl silane and methyltriphenyl germanium, both deuterated in aromatic positions, are reported and interpreted in terms of the DQR model. A comparison with the conventional approach exploiting the phenomenological Arrhenius equation is made. The present observations provide further indications that incoherent motions of molecular moieties in condensed phase can retain quantum character over much broad temperature range than is commonly thought.

  14. MR fingerprinting for rapid quantification of myocardial T1 , T2 , and proton spin density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jesse I; Jiang, Yun; Chen, Yong; Ma, Dan; Lo, Wei-Ching; Griswold, Mark; Seiberlich, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    To introduce a two-dimensional MR fingerprinting (MRF) technique for quantification of T 1 , T 2 , and M 0 in myocardium. An electrocardiograph-triggered MRF method is introduced for mapping myocardial T 1 , T 2 , and M 0 during a single breath-hold in as short as four heartbeats. The pulse sequence uses variable flip angles, repetition times, inversion recovery times, and T 2 preparation dephasing times. A dictionary of possible signal evolutions is simulated for each scan that incorporates the subject's unique variations in heart rate. Aspects of the sequence design were explored in simulations, and the accuracy and precision of cardiac MRF were assessed in a phantom study. In vivo imaging was performed at 3 Tesla in 11 volunteers to generate native parametric maps. T 1 and T 2 measurements from the proposed cardiac MRF sequence correlated well with standard spin echo measurements in the phantom study (R 2  > 0.99). A Bland-Altman analysis revealed good agreement for myocardial T 1 measurements between MRF and MOLLI (bias 1 ms, 95% limits of agreement -72 to 72 ms) and T 2 measurements between MRF and T 2 -prepared balanced steady-state free precession (bias, -2.6 ms; 95% limits of agreement, -8.5 to 3.3 ms). MRF can provide quantitative single slice T 1 , T 2 , and M 0 maps in the heart within a single breath-hold. Magn Reson Med 77:1446-1458, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Construction and test of the PRIOR proton microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Philipp-Michael

    2015-01-01

    The study of High Energy Density Matter (HEDM) in the laboratory makes great demands on the diagnostics because these states can usually only be created for a short time and usual diagnostic techniques with visible light or X-rays come to their limit because of the high density. The high energy proton radiography technique that was developed in the 1990s at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is a very promising possibility to overcome those limits so that one can measure the density of HEDM with high spatial and time resolution. For this purpose the proton microscope PRIOR (Proton Radiography for FAIR) was set up at GSI, which not only reproduces the image, but also magnifies it by a factor of 4.2 and thereby penetrates matter with a density up to 20 g/cm 2 . Straightaway a spatial resolution of less than 30 μm and a time resolution on the nanosecond scale was achieved. This work describes details to the principle, design and construction of the proton microscope as well as first measurements and simulations of essential components like magnetic lenses, a collimator and a scintillator screen. For the latter one it was possible to show that plastic scintillators can be used as converter as an alternative to the slower but more radiation resistant crystals, so that it is possible to reach a time resolution of 10 ns. Moreover the characteristics were investigated for the system at the commissioning in April 2014. Also the changes in the magnetic field due to radiation damage were studied. Besides that an overview about future applications is given. First experiments with Warm Dense Matter created by using a Pulsed Power Setup have already been performed. Furthermore the promising concept of combining proton radiography with particle therapy has been investigated in context of the PaNTERA project. An outlook on the possibilities with future experiments at the FAIR accelerator facility is given as well. Because of higher beam intensity an energy one can expect even

  16. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Engineering Model Powerplant. Test Report: Benchmark Tests in Three Spatial Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the leading candidate to replace the aging alkaline fuel cell technology, currently used on the Shuttle, for future space missions. This test effort marks the final phase of a 5-yr development program that began under the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, transitioned into the Next Generation Launch Technologies (NGLT) Program, and continued under Constellation Systems in the Exploration Technology Development Program. Initially, the engineering model (EM) powerplant was evaluated with respect to its performance as compared to acceptance tests carried out at the manufacturer. This was to determine the sensitivity of the powerplant performance to changes in test environment. In addition, a series of tests were performed with the powerplant in the original standard orientation. This report details the continuing EM benchmark test results in three spatial orientations as well as extended duration testing in the mission profile test. The results from these tests verify the applicability of PEM fuel cells for future NASA missions. The specifics of these different tests are described in the following sections.

  17. Equations of motion of test particles for solving the spin-dependent Boltzmann–Vlasov equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yin [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Jun, E-mail: xujun@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, Bao-An [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX 75429-3011 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Shen, Wen-Qing [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-08-10

    A consistent derivation of the equations of motion (EOMs) of test particles for solving the spin-dependent Boltzmann–Vlasov equation is presented. The resulting EOMs in phase space are similar to the canonical equations in Hamiltonian dynamics, and the EOM of spin is the same as that in the Heisenburg picture of quantum mechanics. Considering further the quantum nature of spin and choosing the direction of total angular momentum in heavy-ion reactions as a reference of measuring nucleon spin, the EOMs of spin-up and spin-down nucleons are given separately. The key elements affecting the spin dynamics in heavy-ion collisions are identified. The resulting EOMs provide a solid foundation for using the test-particle approach in studying spin dynamics in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. Future comparisons of model simulations with experimental data will help to constrain the poorly known in-medium nucleon spin–orbit coupling relevant for understanding properties of rare isotopes and their astrophysical impacts.

  18. Quantum Measurements using Diamond Spins : From Fundamental Tests to Long-Distance Teleportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, R.

    2014-01-01

    Spin qubits in diamond provide an excellent platform both for fundamental tests and for realizing extended quantum networks . Here we present our latest results, including the deterministic teleportation over three meters.

  19. Test facility of proton beam utilization of the PEFP at the SNU-AMS tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. R.; Park, B. S.; Lee, H. R.

    2004-01-01

    The PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) will supply users with a 20-MeV proton beam by the middle of 2007. A survey on users' demand was performed to draw the concept for the 20-MeV user facilities and to investigate users' requirements. In the mean time, a 6-MeV test facility has been developed to give users opportunities to experiment with proton beams. That facility will be attached to the 3-MV tandem accelerator at Seoul National University.

  20. Spin flip at unelastic scattering of protons with energy near 6 NeV o 50Cr and 52Cr nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronov, Yu.F.; Chubinskij, O.V.; Vinogradov, L.I.; Ehl'-Ashri, F.I.; Gustova, L.V.

    1978-01-01

    Angular S(Q) and energy S(E) dependences spin flip probability S were studied in inelastic scattering of protons with excitation of the 2 1 + states of 50 Cr (Q=-0.782 MeV) and 52 Cr (Q=-1.434 MeV) energy range from 5.6 to 5.95 MeV. In particular, it is elucidated how strongly the behaviour of the spin flip probability depends upon the energy and angle of scattering at Esub(p) approximately 6 MeV for 50 Cr and 52 Cr. Thereby some additional information on specific features of the mechanism of inelastic sccattering by th nuclei is obtained. Measurements were carried out simultaneously in two proton detection channels at scattering angles differing by 30 deg. For targets use was made of self-sustaining enriched foils (87% 50 Cr and 99% 52 Cr). The angular and energy dependences of the spin flip probabilities for 50 Cr and 52 Cr are shown to be rather different: for 52 Cr has a relatively slight energy dependence in the range of a resonance observed in the excitation function; for 50 Cr the behaviour of S(E) undergoes sharp changes. The experimetnal values of S(Q) for sup(50, 52)Cr differ rather strongly from the calculations made on the statistical model and depend considerably upon the scattering angle

  1. Wind tunneling testing and analysis relating to the spinning of light aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccormick, B. W.; Zilliac, G. G.; Ballin, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    Included is a summary of two studies related to the spinning of light aircraft. The first study was conducted to demonstrate that the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a tail of a spinning aircraft can be obtained from static wind-tunnel tests. The second study analytically investigated spinning using a high angle-of-attack aerodynamic model derived from a static wind-tunnel data base. The validity of the aerodynamic model is shown by comparisons with rotary-balance data and forced-oscillation tests. The results of a six-degree-of-freedom analysis show that the dynamics and aerodynamics of the steep- and flat-spin modes of a modified Yankee have been properly modeled.

  2. Analyzing powers and proton spin transfer coefficients in the elastic scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from an L-type polarized deuteron target at small momentum transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.L.

    1986-10-01

    Analyzing powers and spin transfer coefficients which describe the elastic scattering of polarized protons from a polarized deuteron target have been measured. The energy of the proton beam was 800 MeV and data were taken at laboratory scattering angles of 7, 11, 14, and 16.5 degrees. One analyzing power was also measured at 180 degrees. Three linearly independent orientations of the beam polarization were used and the target was polarized parallel and antiparallel to the direction of the beam momentum. The data were taken with the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (experiment 685). The results are compared with multiple scattering predictions based on Dirac representations of the nucleon-nucleon scattering matrices. 27 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Plot of expected distributions of the test statistics q=log(L(0^+)/L(2^+)) for the spin-0 and spin-2 (produced by gluon fusion) hypotheses

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Expected distributions of the test statistics q=log(L(0^+)/L(2^+)) for the spin-0 and spin-2 (produced by gluon fusion) hypotheses. The observed value is indicated by a vertical line. The coloured areas correspond to the integrals of the expected distributions used to compute the p-values for the rejection of each hypothesis.

  4. Spin asymmetries $A_1$ and structure functions $g_1$ of the proton and the deuteron from polarized high energy muon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067425; Arik, E; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Birsa, R; Björkholm, P; De Botton, N R; Boutemeur, M; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Cavata, C; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dyring, A; Eichblatt, S; Faivre, Jean-Claude; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Golutvin, I A; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiryushin, Yu T; Kishi, A; Kiselev, Yu F; Klostermann, L; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kukhtin, V V; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindqvist, T; Litmaath, M; Loewe, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nagaitsev, A P; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Pussieux, T; Rädel, G; Rijllart, A; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J; Rock, S E; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Schüler, K P; Seitz, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Sergeev, S; Shanahan, P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zamiatin, N I; Zhao, J

    1998-01-01

    We present the final results of the spin asymmetries $A_1$ and the spin structure functions $g_1$ of the proton and the deuteron in the kinematic range $0.0008

  5. Spin in hadron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The following topics were ealt with: Hadron physics with proton and deuteron probes, physics projects with Georgian participation, spin physics with antiprotons and leptons, spin filtering experiments, ISTC projects, technical issues for FAIR. (HSI)

  6. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-12-22

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) and the differential cross section for inclusive midrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5 < pT < 50 GeV/c and agree with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD evaluations. The A(LL) data cover 5 < pT < 17 GeV/c and disfavor at 98% C.L. maximal positive gluon polarization in the polarized nucleon.

  7. Proton form factor ratio, μpGEP/GMP from double spin asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habarakada Liyanage, Anusha Pushpakumari [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon representing the effect of its structure on its response to electromagnetic probes such as electrons. They are functions of the four-momentum transfer squared Q2 between the electron and the proton. This thesis reports the results of a new measurement of the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton up to Q2 = 5.66 (GeV/c)2 using the double spin asymmetry with a polarized beam and target. Experiment E07-003 (SANE, Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment) was carried out in Hall C at Jefferson Lab in 2009 to study the proton spin structure functions with a dynamically polarized ammonia target and longitudinally polarized electron beam. By detecting elastically scattered protons in the High-Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) in coincidence with the electrons in the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), elastic measurements were carried out in parallel. The elastic double spin asymmetry allows one to extract the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio GpE/GpM at high-momentum transfer, Q2= 5.66 (GeV/c)2. In addition to the coincidence data, inclusively scattered electrons from the polarized ammonia target were detected by HMS, which allows to measure the beam-target asymmetry in the elastic region with the target spin nearly perpendicular to the momentum transfer, and to extract GpE/GpM at low Q2= 2.06 (GeV/c)2. This alternative measurement of GpE/GpM has verified and confirmed the dramatic discrepancy at high Q2 between the Rosenbluth and the recoil-polarization-transfer iv method with a different measurement technique and systematic uncertainties uncorrelated to those of the recoil-polarization measurements. The measurement of the form factor ratio at Q2 = 2

  8. Proton and Neutron Irradiation Tests of Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Menke, Sven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The readout electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter will have to withstand the about ten times larger radiation environment of the future high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) compared to their design values. The GaAs ASIC which comprises the heart of the readout electronics has been exposed to neutron and proton radiation with fluences up to ten times the total expected fluences for ten years of running of the HL-LHC. Neutron tests where performed at the NPI in Rez, Czech Republic, where a 36 MeV proton beam is directed on a thick heavy water target to produce neutrons. The proton irradiation was done with 200 MeV protons at the PROSCAN area of the Proton Irradiation Facility at the PSI in Villigen, Switzerland. In-situ measurements of S-parameters in both tests allow the evaluation of frequency dependent performance parameters - like gain and input impedance - as a function of the fluence. The linearity of the ASIC response has been measured directly in the neutron tests with a triangular input pulse of...

  9. Proton and Neutron Irradiation Tests of Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00106910

    2012-01-01

    The readout electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter will have to withstand the about ten times larger radiation environment of the future high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) compared to their design values. The GaAs ASIC which comprises the heart of the readout electronics has been exposed to neutron and proton radiation with fluences up to ten times the total expected fluences for ten years of running of the HL-LHC. Neutron tests were performed at the NPI in Rez, Czech Republic, where a 36 MeV proton beam is directed on a thick heavy water target to produce neutrons. The proton irradiation was done with 200 MeV protons at the PROSCAN area of the Proton Irradiation Facility at the PSI in Villigen, Switzerland. In-situ measurements of S-parameters in both tests allow the evaluation of frequency dependent performance parameters - like gain and input impedance - as a function of the fluence. The linearity of the ASIC response has been measured directly in the neutron tests with a triangular input pulse of ...

  10. A measurement of ΔσL(np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddo, M.E.

    1990-10-01

    A measurement off Δσ L (np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states, is described. The results will help determine the isospin-zero (I = 0) scattering amplitudes, which are not well known above laboratory energies of 500 MeV, whereas the isospin-one (I = 1) amplitudes are fairly well-determined to 1 GeV. Data points were taken at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos, New Mexico, for five neutron beam energies: 484, 568, 634,720 and 788 MeV; they are the first in this energy range. Polarized neutrons were produced by charge-exchange of polarized protons on a liquid deuterium target (LD 2 ). Large-volume neutron counters detected the neutrons that passed through a polarized proton target. The counters subtended a range of solid angles large enough to allow extrapolation of the scattered neutrons to 0 degree. Two modifications to the LAMPF accelerator system which were made for this work are described. They included a ''beam buncher,'' which modified the normal rf-time structure of the proton beam and allowed for the selection of peak-energy neutrons by time-of-flight means, and a computerized beam steering program, which reduced systematic effects due to beam motion at the LD 2 target. The experimental values of Δσ L (np) are found to be consistent with other np data, including preliminary data from SIN and Saclay, but not with some results from Argonne which used a polarized proton beam and a polarized deuteron target. The I = 0 component was extracted from Δσ L (np) using existing pp data (I = 1), with the unexpected result that Δσ L (I = 0) was found to be essentially identical in shape to Δσ L (I = 1). The significance of this is not yet understood

  11. Limited ability of the proton-pump inhibitor test to identify patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Jones, Roger; Vakil, Nimish

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy often is assessed to determine whether patients' symptoms are acid-related and if patients have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although the accuracy of this approach is questionable. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the PPI test...

  12. Beam tests of prototype fiber detectors for the H1 forward proton spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehr, J.; Hiller, K.; Hoffmann, B.; Luedecke, H.; Menchikov, A.; Nahnhauer, R.; Roloff, H.E.; Tonisch, F.; Voelkert, R.

    1994-07-01

    Different prototypes of fiber detectors with an internal trigger system were tested in a 5 GeV electron beam at DESY. A silicon microstrip telescope was used for an external reference measurement of the beam to study the spatial resolution of the fiber detectors. On average 75% of all crossing electron tracks could be reconstructed with a precision better than 150 μm. These successful methodical investigations led to the installation of similar detectors in the proton beamline 81 m downstream of the central H1-detector at HERA as part of a forward proton spectrometer in spring 1994. (orig.)

  13. Beam tests of prototype fiber detectors for the H1 forward proton spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehr, J.; Hiller, K.; Hoffmann, B.; Luedecke, H.; Menchikov, A.; Nahnhauer, R.; Roloff, H.E.; Tonisch, F.; Voelkert, R.

    1995-01-01

    Different prototypes of fiber detectors with an internal trigger system were tested in a 5 GeV electron beam at DESY. A silicon microstrip telescope was used for an external reference measurement of the beam to study the spatial resolution of the fiber detectors. On average 75% of all crossing electron tracks could be reconstructed with a precision better than 150 μm. These successful methodical investigations led to the installation of similar detectors in the proton beamline 81 m downstream of the central H1-detector at HERA as part of a forward proton spectrometer in spring 1994. (orig.)

  14. The unusual high-spin isomer in 182Os and the proton-neutron interaction in high-j orbitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Naoki; Onishi, Naoki

    1986-01-01

    An intermediate-coupling model of particle-plus-γ-soft-rotor is applied to a qualitative interpretation of the recently observed isomer of 182 Os and the characteristic decay pattern. In the model h 11/2 protons and i 13/2 neutrons are incorporated at the same time. The isomer is realized as the bandhead of a two-proton - two-neutron-aligned band from the present calculation. (orig.)

  15. Developments, characterization and proton irradiation damage tests of AlN detectors for VUV solar observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BenMoussa, A., E-mail: ali.benmoussa@stce.be [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence (STCE), Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Soltani, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Saito, T. [Department of Environment and Energy, Tohoku Institute of Technology, 35-1, Yagiyama-Kasumi-cho, Taihaku-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 982-8577 (Japan); Averin, S. [Fryazino Branch of the Kotel’nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 141190 Square Vvedenski 1, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gissot, S.; Giordanengo, B. [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence (STCE), Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Berger, G. [Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain la Neuve (Belgium); Kroth, U. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); De Jaeger, J.-C. [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Gottwald, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    For next generation spaceborne solar ultraviolet radiometers, innovative metal–semiconductor–metal detectors based on wurtzite aluminum nitride are being developed and characterized. A set of measurement campaigns and proton irradiation damage tests was carried out to obtain their ultraviolet-to-visible characterization and degradation mechanisms. First results on large area prototypes up to 4.3 mm diameter are presented here. In the wavelength range of interest, this detector is reasonably sensitive and stable under brief irradiation with a negligible low dark current (3–6 pA/cm{sup 2}). No significant degradation of the detector performance was observed after exposure to protons of 14.4 MeV energy, showing a good radiation tolerance up to fluences of 1 × 10{sup 11} protons/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Experimental test of Bell's inequality with a proton pair and quantum nonlocality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hideyuki; Saito, Takaaki

    2009-01-01

    One of the most profound feature of quantum mechanics is the non-locality of entangled system. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) criticized this non-locality from the classical view point, realistic local theory. This criticism is known as the EPR paradox which has been thought as a philosophical argument between Copenhagen interpretation and EPR rather than the experimental issue. About 30 years later, John Bell found the inequality which is amenable to experiments. We succeeded to measure the spin correlation of an entangled proton pair in high accuracy which disagrees with Bell's inequality and confirmed the nonlocality of quantum mechanics in the massive Fermion pair. This short article introduces our experiment. The difference between present experiment and photon experiments is briefly mentioned. (author)

  17. A test of Wigner's spin-isospin symmetry from double binding energy differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Warner, D.D.; Brenner, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The spin-isospin or SU(4) symmetry is investigated. It is shown that the N = Z enhancements of |δV np | are an unavoidable consequence of Wigner's SU(4) symmetry and that the degree of the enhancement provides a sensitive test of the quality of the symmetry itself. (K.A.)

  18. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  19. Advantages of chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock (CESL) over chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) for hydroxyl- and amine-water proton exchange studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2014-11-01

    The chemical exchange (CE) rate of endogenous hydroxyl and amine protons with water is often comparable to the difference in their chemical shifts. These intermediate exchange processes have been imaged by the CE saturation transfer (CEST) approach with low-power and long-duration irradiation. However, the sensitivity is not optimal and, more importantly, the signal is contaminated by slow magnetization transfer processes. Here, the properties of CEST signals are compared with those of a CE-sensitive spin-lock (CESL) technique irradiating at the labile proton frequency. First, using a higher power and shorter irradiation in CE-MRI, we obtain: (i) an increased selectivity to faster CE rates via a higher sensitivity to faster CEs and a lower sensitivity to slower CEs and magnetization transfer processes; and (ii) a decreased in vivo asymmetric magnetization transfer contrast measured at ±15 ppm. The sensitivity gain of CESL over CEST is higher for a higher power and shorter irradiation. Unlike CESL, CEST signals oscillate at a very high power and short irradiation. Second, time-dependent CEST and CESL signals are well modeled by analytical solutions of CE-MRI with an asymmetric population approximation, which can be used for quantitative CE-MRI and validated by simulations of Bloch-McConnell equations and phantom experiments. Finally, the in vivo amine-water proton exchange contrast measured at 2.5 ppm with ω1 = 500 Hz is 18% higher in sensitivity for CESL than CEST at 9.4 T. Overall, CESL provides better exchange rate selectivity and sensitivity than CEST; therefore, CESL is more suitable for CE-MRI of intermediate exchange protons. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Advantages of Chemical Exchange-Sensitive Spin-Lock (CESL) Over Saturation Transfer (CEST) for Hydroxyl- and Amine-Water Proton Exchange Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2014-01-01

    The chemical exchange (CE) rate of endogenous hydroxyl and amine protons with water is often comparable to the difference in their chemical shifts. These intermediate exchange (IMEX) processes have been imaged by the CE saturation transfer (CEST) approach with low-power and long-duration irradiation. However, its sensitivity is not optimal, and more importantly, the signal is contaminated by slow magnetization transfer processes. Here, the property of CEST signals is compared to a CE-sensitive spin-locking (CESL) technique irradiating at the labile proton frequency. Firstly, using a higher power and shorter irradiation in CE-MRI yields i) increasing selectivity to faster chemical exchange rates by higher sensitivity to faster exchanges and less sensitivity to slower CE and magnetization transfer processes, and ii) decreasing in vivo asymmetric magnetization transfer contrast measured at ±15 ppm. The sensitivity gain of CESL over CEST is higher for a higher-power and shorter irradiation. Unlike CESL, CEST signals oscillate at a very high power and short irradiation. Secondly, time-dependent CEST and CESL signals are well modeled by analytical solutions of CE-MRI with asymmetric population approximation (CEAPA), which can be used for quantitative CE-MRI, and validated by simulations of Bloch-McConnell equations and phantom experiments. Lastly, in vivo amine-water proton exchange contrast measured at 2.5 ppm with ω1 of 500 Hz is 18% higher in sensitivity for CESL than CEST at 9.4 T. Overall, CESL provides better exchange rate selectivity and sensitivity than CEST; therefore, CESL is more suitable for CE-MRI of IMEX protons. PMID:25199631

  1. Testing of low pressure proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettoni, M; Naso, V; Lucentini, M; Rubini, L

    1998-07-01

    One of the main issues concerning PEMFC is the choice of operating pressure, for both stationary and automotive applications. This is because the air compressor may absorb a significant amount--up to 25%--of the power output of the fuel cells stack. A comparison has been made between the performance of various stacks of different dimensions, tested in the De Nora Laboratories operated at high (4 bar) and low (1.5 bar) pressures, considering power output reduced by the compressor power absorption. Differences of performance and efficiency between high and low pressure stacks have been noticed in the range of 10%. In operating at low pressure, higher efficiency is obtainable, but the maximum power of the stack is less; this means less fuel consumption, but requires a greater reacting surface and larger dimension of the stack. Consequently low pressures make the system simpler (a blower can be used instead of a compressor), and safer (there is practically no risk of breaking the membrane).

  2. Board Level Proton Testing Book of Knowledge for NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    This book of knowledge (BoK) provides a critical review of the benefits and difficulties associated with using proton irradiation as a means of exploring the radiation hardness of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) systems. This work was developed for the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Board Level Testing for the COTS task. The fundamental findings of this BoK are the following. The board-level test method can reduce the worst case estimate for a board's single-event effect (SEE) sensitivity compared to the case of no test data, but only by a factor of ten. The estimated worst case rate of failure for untested boards is about 0.1 SEE/board-day. By employing the use of protons with energies near or above 200 MeV, this rate can be safely reduced to 0.01 SEE/board-day, with only those SEEs with deep charge collection mechanisms rising this high. For general SEEs, such as static random-access memory (SRAM) upsets, single-event transients (SETs), single-event gate ruptures (SEGRs), and similar cases where the relevant charge collection depth is less than 10 µm, the worst case rate for SEE is below 0.001 SEE/board-day. Note that these bounds assume that no SEEs are observed during testing. When SEEs are observed during testing, the board-level test method can establish a reliable event rate in some orbits, though all established rates will be at or above 0.001 SEE/board-day. The board-level test approach we explore has picked up support as a radiation hardness assurance technique over the last twenty years. The approach originally was used to provide a very limited verification of the suitability of low cost assemblies to be used in the very benign environment of the International Space Station (ISS), in limited reliability applications. Recently the method has been gaining popularity as a way to establish a minimum level of SEE performance of systems that require somewhat higher reliability performance than previous applications. This sort of application of

  3. Quantum entanglement for systems of identical bosons: II. Spin squeezing and other entanglement tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, B J; Goold, J; Garraway, B M; Reid, M D

    2017-01-01

    These two accompanying papers are concerned with entanglement for systems of identical massive bosons and the relationship to spin squeezing and other quantum correlation effects. The main focus is on two mode entanglement, but multi-mode entanglement is also considered. The bosons may be atoms or molecules as in cold quantum gases. The previous paper I dealt with the general features of quantum entanglement and its specific definition in the case of systems of identical bosons. Entanglement is a property shared between two (or more) quantum sub-systems. In defining entanglement for systems of identical massive particles, it was concluded that the single particle states or modes are the most appropriate choice for sub-systems that are distinguishable, that the general quantum states must comply both with the symmetrization principle and the super-selection rules (SSR) that forbid quantum superpositions of states with differing total particle number (global SSR compliance). Further, it was concluded that (in the separable states) quantum superpositions of sub-system states with differing sub-system particle number (local SSR compliance) also do not occur. The present paper II determines possible tests for entanglement based on the treatment of entanglement set out in paper I. Several inequalities involving variances and mean values of operators have been previously proposed as tests for entanglement between two sub-systems. These inequalities generally involve mode annihilation and creation operators and include the inequalities that define spin squeezing. In this paper, spin squeezing criteria for two mode systems are examined, and spin squeezing is also considered for principle spin operator components where the covariance matrix is diagonal. The proof, which is based on our SSR compliant approach shows that the presence of spin squeezing in any one of the spin components requires entanglement of the relevant pair of modes. A simple Bloch vector test for

  4. Quantum entanglement for systems of identical bosons: II. Spin squeezing and other entanglement tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, B. J.; Goold, J.; Garraway, B. M.; Reid, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    These two accompanying papers are concerned with entanglement for systems of identical massive bosons and the relationship to spin squeezing and other quantum correlation effects. The main focus is on two mode entanglement, but multi-mode entanglement is also considered. The bosons may be atoms or molecules as in cold quantum gases. The previous paper I dealt with the general features of quantum entanglement and its specific definition in the case of systems of identical bosons. Entanglement is a property shared between two (or more) quantum sub-systems. In defining entanglement for systems of identical massive particles, it was concluded that the single particle states or modes are the most appropriate choice for sub-systems that are distinguishable, that the general quantum states must comply both with the symmetrization principle and the super-selection rules (SSR) that forbid quantum superpositions of states with differing total particle number (global SSR compliance). Further, it was concluded that (in the separable states) quantum superpositions of sub-system states with differing sub-system particle number (local SSR compliance) also do not occur. The present paper II determines possible tests for entanglement based on the treatment of entanglement set out in paper I. Several inequalities involving variances and mean values of operators have been previously proposed as tests for entanglement between two sub-systems. These inequalities generally involve mode annihilation and creation operators and include the inequalities that define spin squeezing. In this paper, spin squeezing criteria for two mode systems are examined, and spin squeezing is also considered for principle spin operator components where the covariance matrix is diagonal. The proof, which is based on our SSR compliant approach shows that the presence of spin squeezing in any one of the spin components requires entanglement of the relevant pair of modes. A simple Bloch vector test for

  5. Initial testing of a pixelated silicon detector prototype in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroe, Andrew J; McAuley, Grant; Teran, Anthony V; Wong, Jeannie; Petasecca, Marco; Lerch, Michael; Slater, James M; Rozenfeld, Anatoly B

    2017-09-01

    As technology continues to develop, external beam radiation therapy is being employed, with increased conformity, to treat smaller targets. As this occurs, the dosimetry methods and tools employed to quantify these fields for treatment also have to evolve to provide increased spatial resolution. The team at the University of Wollongong has developed a pixelated silicon detector prototype known as the dose magnifying glass (DMG) for real-time small-field metrology. This device has been tested in photon fields and IMRT. The purpose of this work was to conduct the initial performance tests with proton radiation, using beam energies and modulations typically associated with proton radiosurgery. Depth dose and lateral beam profiles were measured and compared with those collected using a PTW parallel-plate ionization chamber, a PTW proton-specific dosimetry diode, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and Monte Carlo simulations. Measurements of the depth dose profile yielded good agreement when compared with Monte Carlo, diode and ionization chamber. Bragg peak location was measured accurately by the DMG by scanning along the depth dose profile, and the relative response of the DMG at the center of modulation was within 2.5% of that for the PTW dosimetry diode for all energy and modulation combinations tested. Real-time beam profile measurements of a 5 mm 127 MeV proton beam also yielded FWHM and FW90 within ±1 channel (0.1 mm) of the Monte Carlo and EBT3 film data across all depths tested. The DMG tested here proved to be a useful device at measuring depth dose profiles in proton therapy with a stable response across the entire proton spread-out Bragg peak. In addition, the linear array of small sensitive volumes allowed for accurate point and high spatial resolution one-dimensional profile measurements of small radiation fields in real time to be completed with minimal impact from partial volume averaging. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published

  6. Spin symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-01-15

    The recent 8th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota, opened with a bang when L. Pondrom (Wisconsin), donning a hard hat borrowed from construction workers, ventured that 'spin, the notorious inessential complication of hadronic physics, is finally telling us what real QCD (quantum chromodynamics, the field theory of quarks and gluons) looks like.' He was referring to an animated discussion on the meaning of the recent spin oriented (polarized) scattering results from the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) at CERN and reported at the Symposium by R. Garnet (Liverpool) and P. Schuler (Yale) which show that the proton spin is not simply a reflection of the spins of its constituent quarks.

  7. Lifetime test on a high-performance dc microwave proton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, J.D.; Hodgkins, D.J.; Lara, P.D.; Schneider, J.D.; Stevens, R.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Powerful CW proton linear accelerators (100 mA at 0.5--1 GeV) are being proposed for spallation neutron source applications.These production accelerators require high availability and reliability. A microwave proton source, which has already demonstrated several key beam requirements, was operated for one week (170 hours) in a dc mode to test the reliability and lifetime of its plasma generator. The source was operated with 570 W of microwave (2.45 GHz) discharge power and with a 47-kV extraction voltage. This choice of operating parameters gave a proton current density of 250-mA/cm 2 at 83% proton fraction, which is sufficient for a conservative dc injector design. The beam current was 60--65 mA over most of the week, and was sufficiently focused for RFQ injection. Total beam availability, defined as 47-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was 96.2%. Spark downs in the high voltage column and a gas flow control problem caused all the downtime; no plasma generator failures were observed

  8. Measurement of the 3He Spin Structure Functions in the Resonance Region: A Test of Quark-Hadron Duality on the Neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solvignon, Patricia [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-08-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the study of the nucleon structure is the understanding of the transition from partonic degrees of freedom to hadronic degrees of freedom. In 1970, Bloom and Gilman noticed that structure function data taken at SLAC in the resonance region average to the scaling curve of deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Early theoretical interpretations suggested that these two very different regimes can be linked under the condition that the quark-gluon and quark-quark interactions are suppressed. Substantial efforts are ongoing to investigate this phenomenon both experimentally and theoretically. Quark-hadron duality has been confirmed for the unpolarized structure function F2 of the proton and the deuteron using data from the experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Indications of duality have been seen for the proton polarized structure function g1 and the virtual photon asymmetry A1 at JLab Hall B and HERMES. Because of the different resonance behavior, it is expected that the onset of duality for the neutron will happen at lower momentum transfer than for the proton. Now that precise spin structure data in the DIS region are available at large x, data in the resonance region are greatly needed in order to test duality in spin-dependent structure functions. The goal of experiment E01-012 was to provide such data on the neutron (3He) in the moderate momentum transfer (Q2) region, 1.0 < Q2 < 4.0 (GeV/c2), where duality is expected to hold. The experiment ran successfully in early 2003 at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. It was an inclusive measurement of longitudinally polarized electrons scattering from a longitudinally or transversely polarized 3He target. Asymmetries and cross section differences were measured in order to extract the 3He spin structure function g1 and virtual photon asymmetry A1 in the resonance region. A test

  9. Measurement of the 3He Spin Structure Functions in the Resonance Region: A Test of Quark-Hadron Duality on the Neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patricia Solvignon

    2006-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the study of the nucleon structure is the understanding of the transition from partonic degrees of freedom to hadronic degrees of freedom. In 1970, Bloom and Gilman noticed that structure function data taken at SLAC in the resonance region average to the scaling curve of deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Early theoretical interpretations suggested that these two very different regimes can be linked under the condition that the quark-gluon and quark-quark interactions are suppressed. Substantial efforts are ongoing to investigate this phenomenon both experimentally and theoretically. Quark-hadron duality has been confirmed for the unpolarized structure function F 2 of the proton and the deuteron using data from the experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Indications of duality have been seen for the proton polarized structure function g 1 and the virtual photon asymmetry A 1 at JLab Hall B and HERMES. Because of the different resonance behavior, it is expected that the onset of duality for the neutron will happen at lower momentum transfer than for the proton. Now that precise spin structure data in the DIS region are available at large x, data in the resonance region are greatly needed in order to test duality in spin-dependent structure functions. The goal of experiment E01-012 was to provide such data on the neutron ( 3 He) in the moderate momentum transfer (Q 2 ) region, 1.0 2 2 ), where duality is expected to hold. The experiment ran successfully in early 2003 at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. It was an inclusive measurement of longitudinally polarized electrons scattering from a longitudinally or transversely polarized 3 He target. Asymmetries and cross section differences were measured in order to extract the 3 He spin structure function g 1 and virtual photon asymmetry A 1 in the resonance region. A test of quark-hadron duality has then been performed for the 3 He and neutron structure functions. The study of spin duality for

  10. Single and Double Spin Asymmetries for Deeply Virtual Exclusive π0 Production on Longitudinally Polarized Proton Target with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Andrew [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive processes probe the internal structure of nucleons through measurements of structure functions and their ratios, which are sensitive to the chiral-even generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and the chiral-odd transversity GPDs. The GPDs encode correlations of parton distributions in longitudinal momentum space and transverse impact parameter space and are accessible through the measurements of the xB and t dependence of meson production. The wide kinematic coverage of CLAS detector allowed measurements of exclusive π0 electroproduction in full azimuthal range. The target and double spin asymmetries for the deeply virtual exclusive π0 electroproduction were measured for the first time in the DIS region. The experiment was carried out at Hall B, Jefferson Lab using the longitudinally polarized electron beam with energy of up to 6 GeV and a dynamically polarized NH3 target with spins of free protons aligned along the beam axis. All four final-state particles from exclusive channel, electron, proton and two photons from π0 decay, were identified. The asymmetries were fitted according to their angular modulations in the hadronic center-of-mass system, and their moments were extracted. The data comparison with two handbag-based calculations involving the contribution from both chiral-even and chiral-odd GPDs was performed in wide kinematic range. The applicability of a formalism based on generalized parton distributions within the framework of modified perturbative approach is discussed.

  11. A proton irradiation test facility for space research in Ankara, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencer, Ayşenur; Yiǧitoǧlu, Merve; Bilge Demirköz, Melahat; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation often affects the electronic components' performance during the mission duration. In order to ensure reliable performance, the components must be tested to at least the expected dose that will be received in space, before the mission. Accelerator facilities are widely used for such irradiation tests around the world. Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) has a 15MeV to 30MeV variable proton cyclotron in Ankara and the facility's main purpose is to produce radioisotopes in three different rooms for different target systems. There is also an R&D room which can be used for research purposes. This paper will detail the design and current state of the construction of a beamline to perform Single Event Effect (SEE) tests in Ankara for the first time. ESA ESCC No.25100 Standard Single Event Effect Test Method and Guidelines is being considered for these SEE tests. The proton beam kinetic energy must be between 20MeV and 200MeV according to the standard. While the proton energy is suitable for SEE tests, the beam size must be 15.40cm x 21.55cm and the flux must be between 10 ^{5} p/cm ^{2}/s to at least 10 ^{8} p/cm ^{2}/s according to the standard. The beam size at the entrance of the R&D room is mm-sized and the current is variable between 10μA and 1.2mA. Therefore, a defocusing beam line has been designed to enlarge the beam size and reduce the flux value. The beam line has quadrupole magnets to enlarge the beam size and the collimators and scattering foils are used for flux reduction. This facility will provide proton fluxes between 10 ^{7} p/cm ^{2}/s and 10 ^{10} p/cm ^{2}/s for the area defined in the standard when completed. Also for testing solar cells developed for space, the proton beam energy will be lowered below 10MeV. This project has been funded by Ministry of Development in Turkey and the beam line construction will finish in two years and SEE tests will be performed for the first time in Turkey.

  12. Polarization of a stored beam by spin filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidemann, C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011 the PAX Collaboration has performed a successful spin-filtering test using protons at Tp = 49.3 MeV at the COSY ring, which confirms that spin filtering is a viable method to polarize a stored beam and that the present interpretation of the mechanism in terms of the proton-proton interaction is correct. The equipment and the procedures to produce stored polarized beams was successfully commissioned and are established. The outcome of the experiment is of utmost importance in view of the possible application of the method to polarize a beam of stored antiprotons. (author)

  13. Real time data acquisition system for the High Current Test Facility proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlais, C.E.; Erickson, P.D.; Caissie, L.P.

    1975-01-01

    A real time data acquisition system was developed to monitor and control the High Current Test Facility Proton Accelerator. It is a PDP-8/E computer system with virtual memory capability that is fully interrupt driven and operates under a real-time, multi-tasking executive. The application package includes mode selection to automatically modify programs and optimize operation under varying conditions. (U.S.)

  14. A measurement of. Delta. sigma. sub L (np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddo, M.E.

    1990-10-01

    A measurement off {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states, is described. The results will help determine the isospin-zero (I = 0) scattering amplitudes, which are not well known above laboratory energies of 500 MeV, whereas the isospin-one (I = 1) amplitudes are fairly well-determined to 1 GeV. Data points were taken at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos, New Mexico, for five neutron beam energies: 484, 568, 634,720 and 788 MeV; they are the first in this energy range. Polarized neutrons were produced by charge-exchange of polarized protons on a liquid deuterium target (LD{sub 2}). Large-volume neutron counters detected the neutrons that passed through a polarized proton target. The counters subtended a range of solid angles large enough to allow extrapolation of the scattered neutrons to 0{degree}. Two modifications to the LAMPF accelerator system which were made for this work are described. They included a beam buncher,'' which modified the normal rf-time structure of the proton beam and allowed for the selection of peak-energy neutrons by time-of-flight means, and a computerized beam steering program, which reduced systematic effects due to beam motion at the LD{sub 2} target. The experimental values of {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np) are found to be consistent with other np data, including preliminary data from SIN and Saclay, but not with some results from Argonne which used a polarized proton beam and a polarized deuteron target. The I = 0 component was extracted from {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np) using existing pp data (I = 1), with the unexpected result that {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(I = 0) was found to be essentially identical in shape to {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(I = 1). The significance of this is not yet understood.

  15. Complex methyl groups dynamics in [(CH3)4P]3Sb2Br9 (PBA) from low to high temperatures by proton spin-lattice relaxation and narrowing of proton NMR spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latanowicz, L; Medycki, W; Jakubas, R

    2009-11-01

    Molecular dynamics of a polycrystalline sample of [(CH(3))(4)P](3)Sb(2)Br(9) (PBA) has been studied on the basis of the T(1) (24.7 MHz) relaxation time measurement, the proton second moment of NMR and the earlier published T(1) (90 MHz) relaxation times. The study was performed in a wide range of temperatures (30-337 K). The tunnel splitting omega(T) of the methyl groups was estimated as of low frequency (from kHz to few MHz). The proton spin pairs of the methyl group are known to perform a complex internal motion being a resultant of four components. Three of them involve mass transportation over and through the potential barrier and are characterized by the correlation times tau(3) and tau(T)of the jumps over the barrier and tunnel jumps in the threefold potential of the methyl group and tau(iso) the correlation time of isotropic rotation of the whole TMP cation. For tau(3) and tau(iso) the Arrhenius temperature dependence was assumed, while for tau(T)--the Schrödinger one. The fourth motion causes fluctuations of the tunnel splitting frequency, omega(T), and it is related to the lifetime of the methyl spin at the energy level. The correlation function for this fourth motion (tau(omega) correlation time) has been proposed by Müller-Warmuth et al. In this paper a formula for the correlation function and spectral density of the complex motion made of the above-mentioned four components was derived and used in interpretation of the T(1) relaxation time. The second moment of proton NMR line at temperatures below 50K is four times lower than its value for the rigid structure. The three components of the internal motion characterized by tau(T), tau(H), and tau(iso) were proved to reduce the second moment of the NMR line. The tunnel jumps of the methyl group reduce M(2) at almost 0K, the classical jumps over the barrier reduce M(2) in the vicinity of 50K, while the isotropic motion near 150K. Results of the study on the dynamics of CH(3) groups of TMP cation based on

  16. Construction and test of the PRIOR proton microscope; Aufbau und Test des Protonenmikroskops PRIOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Philipp-Michael

    2015-01-15

    The study of High Energy Density Matter (HEDM) in the laboratory makes great demands on the diagnostics because these states can usually only be created for a short time and usual diagnostic techniques with visible light or X-rays come to their limit because of the high density. The high energy proton radiography technique that was developed in the 1990s at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is a very promising possibility to overcome those limits so that one can measure the density of HEDM with high spatial and time resolution. For this purpose the proton microscope PRIOR (Proton Radiography for FAIR) was set up at GSI, which not only reproduces the image, but also magnifies it by a factor of 4.2 and thereby penetrates matter with a density up to 20 g/cm{sup 2}. Straightaway a spatial resolution of less than 30 μm and a time resolution on the nanosecond scale was achieved. This work describes details to the principle, design and construction of the proton microscope as well as first measurements and simulations of essential components like magnetic lenses, a collimator and a scintillator screen. For the latter one it was possible to show that plastic scintillators can be used as converter as an alternative to the slower but more radiation resistant crystals, so that it is possible to reach a time resolution of 10 ns. Moreover the characteristics were investigated for the system at the commissioning in April 2014. Also the changes in the magnetic field due to radiation damage were studied. Besides that an overview about future applications is given. First experiments with Warm Dense Matter created by using a Pulsed Power Setup have already been performed. Furthermore the promising concept of combining proton radiography with particle therapy has been investigated in context of the PaNTERA project. An outlook on the possibilities with future experiments at the FAIR accelerator facility is given as well. Because of higher beam intensity an energy one can expect even

  17. Scintillating anticoincidence detection elements design and tests with muons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliot, M.; Chabaud, J.; Baronick, J.P.; Colonges, S.; Laurent, P.

    2010-01-01

    Design, construction and tests of anticoincidence detection elements are presented. Initially planned to be used as active shielding parts of the anticoincidence detector of the Simbol-X mission, they are aimed to detect cosmic protons and provide veto signal against charged-particle background induced on imaging detectors. The sample is made of a scintillator plate into which grooves are machined and waveshifting fibers glued. The fibers are connected to multianode photomultiplier (PM) tubes. The tubes characteristics have been evaluated for this application. The device has been tested with atmospheric muons that deposit similar energy to that of cosmic protons thanks to a specially designed muon telescope also described in this paper. Tests have also been performed with protons of a tandem accelerator beam line. The response is on average above 10 photoelectrons, which is not complicated to detect, which allows very good detection efficiency as well as very good ability to reject noise. In addition many evolution and performance improvements appear possible.

  18. Scintillating anticoincidence detection elements design and tests with muons and protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliot, M.; Chabaud, J.; Baronick, J. P.; Colonges, S.; Laurent, P.

    2010-09-01

    Design, construction and tests of anticoincidence detection elements are presented. Initially planned to be used as active shielding parts of the anticoincidence detector of the Simbol-X mission, they are aimed to detect cosmic protons and provide veto signal against charged-particle background induced on imaging detectors. The sample is made of a scintillator plate into which grooves are machined and waveshifting fibers glued. The fibers are connected to multianode photomultiplier (PM) tubes. The tubes characteristics have been evaluated for this application. The device has been tested with atmospheric muons that deposit similar energy to that of cosmic protons thanks to a specially designed muon telescope also described in this paper. Tests have also been performed with protons of a tandem accelerator beam line. The response is on average above 10 photoelectrons, which is not complicated to detect, which allows very good detection efficiency as well as very good ability to reject noise. In addition many evolution and performance improvements appear possible.

  19. Scintillating anticoincidence detection elements design and tests with muons and protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliot, M., E-mail: mickael.gilliot@univ-reims.f [Laboratoire APC, AstroParticules and Cosmologie, Batiment Condorcet, 10 rue Alice Domont et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Chabaud, J.; Baronick, J.P.; Colonges, S. [Laboratoire APC, AstroParticules and Cosmologie, Batiment Condorcet, 10 rue Alice Domont et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Laurent, P. [Laboratoire APC, AstroParticules and Cosmologie, Batiment Condorcet, 10 rue Alice Domont et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); CEA/DSM/Irfu/SAp, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2010-09-21

    Design, construction and tests of anticoincidence detection elements are presented. Initially planned to be used as active shielding parts of the anticoincidence detector of the Simbol-X mission, they are aimed to detect cosmic protons and provide veto signal against charged-particle background induced on imaging detectors. The sample is made of a scintillator plate into which grooves are machined and waveshifting fibers glued. The fibers are connected to multianode photomultiplier (PM) tubes. The tubes characteristics have been evaluated for this application. The device has been tested with atmospheric muons that deposit similar energy to that of cosmic protons thanks to a specially designed muon telescope also described in this paper. Tests have also been performed with protons of a tandem accelerator beam line. The response is on average above 10 photoelectrons, which is not complicated to detect, which allows very good detection efficiency as well as very good ability to reject noise. In addition many evolution and performance improvements appear possible.

  20. Measurements of the spin rotation parameterf A in the elastic pion- proton scattering in the D$_{13}$(1700) resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, I G; Beloglasov, Yu A; Budkovsky, P E; Bunyatova, E I; Kanavets, V P; Kovalev, A I; Koroleva, L I; Kruglov, S P; Morozov, B V; Nesterov, V M; Novinsky, D V; Ryltzov, V V; Shchedrov, V A; Sulimov, A D; Sumachev, Yu V; Svirida, D N; Trautman, V Yu; Zhurkin, V V

    2001-01-01

    The spin rotation parameters A and R were measured for the elastic pion-proton scattering by the PNPI-ITEP collaboration in the D/sub 13 /(1700) resonance region. The main goal of the experimental program is to resolve the current partial-wave analyses (PWA) uncertainties. Simultaneously with A and R the polarization parameter P was measured with the purpose to improve the experimental database and estimate systematic errors. The constraint which demands a smooth energy dependence of all pi /sup -/p transverse amplitude zeros in the complex plane together with the new experimental data on the A parameter can lead to the conclusion that the Barrelet branch of "zero trajectories" is chosen improperly in PWA of the Carnegie- Mellon-Lawrence-Berkeley-Laboratory groups at the range of the pion beam momentum near 1.0 GeV/c. The setup included a longitudinally polarized proton target with superconductive magnet, multiwire spark chambers and carbon polarimeter with thick filter. The experiment was performed at the IT...

  1. SANE's Measurement of the Proton's Virtual Photon Spin Asymmetry, Ap1, at Large Bjorken x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulholland, Jonathan [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    The experiment SANE (Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment) measured inclusive double polarization electron asymmetries on a proton target at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory in Newport News Virgina. Polarized electrons were scattered from a solid 14NH3 polarized target provided by the University of Virginia target group. Measurements were taken with the target polarization oriented at 80 degrees and 180 degrees relative to the beam direction, and beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV were used. Scattered electrons were detected by a multi-component novel non-magnetic detector package constructed for this experiment. Asymmetries measured at the two target orientations allow for the extraction of the virtual Compton asymmetries A1p and A2p as well as the spin structure functions g1p and g2p. This work addresses the extraction of the virtual Compton asymmetry A1p in the deep inelastic regime. The analysis uses data in the kinematic range from Bjorken x of 0.30 to 0.55, separated into four Q2 bins from 1.9 to 4.7 GeV2.

  2. An application of vector coherent state theory to the SO95) proton-neutron quasi-spin algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berej, W.

    2002-01-01

    Vector coherent state theory (VCS), developed for computing Lie group and Lie algebra representations and coupling coefficients, has been used for many groups of interest an actual physics applications. It is shown that VCS construction of a rotor type can be performed for the SO(5) ∼ Sp(4) quasi-spin group where the relevant physical subgroup SU(2) x U(1) is generalized by the isospin operators and the number of particle operators [ru

  3. Comparison of proton microbeam and gamma irradiation for the radiation hardness testing of silicon PIN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakšić, M.; Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Majer, M.; Jung, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, N. H.

    2013-09-01

    Simple and cost-effective solutions using Si PIN diodes as detectors are presently utilized in various radiation-related applications in which excessive exposure to radiation degrades their charge transport properties. One of the conventional methods for the radiation hardness testing of such devices is time-consuming irradiation with electron beam or gamma-ray irradiation facilities, high-energy proton accelerators, or with neutrons from research reactors. Recently, for the purpose of radiation hardness testing, a much faster nuclear microprobe based approach utilizing proton irradiation has been developed. To compare the two different irradiation techniques, silicon PIN diodes have been irradiated with a Co-60 gamma radiation source and with a 6 MeV proton microbeam. The signal degradation in the silicon PIN diodes for both irradiation conditions has been probed by the IBIC (ion beam induced charge) technique, which can precisely monitor changes in charge collection efficiency. The results presented are reviewed on the basis of displacement damage calculations and NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) concept.

  4. Memory testing with Saturne synchrotron beams. Experiments with protons and deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buisson, J.

    1989-01-01

    For simulate light ions of the cosmic rays CEA will use facilities used in fundamental physic research. SATURNE is a synchrotron especially designed to accelerate light particles, for example protons with energy up to 2.9 GeV. Two experiments are made on SATURNE to specify the beam characteristics (energy and intensity) and to adapt the beam for irradiation of electronic components. During these preliminary experimentation memories and microprocessors was tested. The results of the tests (cross-section) are given in this paper [fr

  5. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  6. Self-polarization of stored (anti-)protons: Status of the Spin-Splitter experiment at IUCF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossmanith, R.

    1990-01-01

    Several years ago a selfpolarization effect for stored (anti-)protons and ions was investigated theoretically. The effect is based on the well-known Stern-Gerlach effect in gradient fields. The aim of the ongoing measurements at IUCF is to verify experimentally the various assumptions on which this effect is based. The final goal is to demonstrate this new polarization effect. The proposed effect could be a powerful tool to produce polarized stored hadron beams both in the low energy range and at SSC and LHC energies

  7. Prospects for a Muon Spin Resonance Facility in the MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, John A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-04-12

    This paper investigates the feasibility of re-purposing the MuCool Test Area beamline and experimental hall to support a Muon Spin Resonance facility, which would make it the only such facility in the US. This report reviews the basic muon production concepts studied and operationally implemented at TRIUMF, PSI, and RAL and their application to the MTA facility. Two scenarios were determined feasible. One represents an initial minimal-shielding and capital-cost investment stage with a single secondary muon beamline that transports the primary beam to an existing high-intensity beam absorber located outside of the hall. Another, upgraded stage, involves an optimized production target pile and high-intensity absorber installed inside the experimental hall and potentially multiple secondary muon lines. In either scenario, with attention to target design, the MTA can host enabling and competitive Muon Spin Resonance experiments

  8. The spin-dependent structure function $g_1(x)$ of the proton from polarized deep-inelastic muon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067425; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Birsa, R; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kukhtin, V V; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Rijllart, A; Reicherz, G; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Roscherr, B; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K

    1997-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the virtual photon proton asymmetry $A_1^{\\rm p}$ from deep inelastic scattering of polarized muons on polarized protons in the kinematic range $0.0008 1$ GeV$^{2}$. A perturbative QCD evolution in next-to-leading order is used to determine $g_1^{\\rm p}(x)$ at a constant $Q^2$. At $Q^{2} = 10$ GeV$^{2}$ we find, in the measured range, $\\int_{0.003}^{0.7} g_{1}^{\\rm p}(x){\\rm d}x = 0.139 \\pm 0.006~({\\rm stat})\\pm 0.008~({\\rm syst)} \\pm 0.006~({\\rm evol})$. The value of the first moment $\\Gamma_{1}^{\\rm p} = \\int_{0}^{1} g_{1}^{\\rm p}(x){\\rm d}x$ of $g_{1}^{\\rm p}$ depends on the approach used to describe the behaviour of $g_{1}^{\\rm p}$ at low $x$. We find that the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule is violated. With our published result for $\\Gamma_{1}^{\\rm d}$ we confirm the Bjorken sum rule with an accuracy of $\\approx 15\\%$ at the one standard deviation level.

  9. WE-DE-206-01: MRI Signal in Biological Tissues - Proton, Spin, T1, T2, T2*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorny, K. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  10. NUCLEON SPIN: Enigma confirmed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In 1987 the European Muon Collaboration (EMC - June 1988, page 9) reported results from a polarized muon-proton scattering experiment at CERN which puzzled the particle and nuclear physics communities. Contrary to the prediction of the naive quark model, the EMC found that little of the proton spin seemed to be carried by the spins of the quarks. An extensive experimental programme was therefore immediately proposed at CERN, SLAC (Stanford) and DESY (Hamburg) to measure the spin structure function of the neutron and to repeat the proton measurement with improved accuracy

  11. Measurements of spin correlation in top-antitop quark events from proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 11 (2014), "112016-1"-"112016-33" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ATLAS * CERN LHC Coll * jet * multiplicity * standard model * validity test * model * production * experimental results Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.643, year: 2014

  12. Comparison of Weibull strength parameters from flexure and spin tests of brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1991-01-01

    Fracture data from five series of four point bend tests of beam and spin tests of flat annular disks were reanalyzed. Silicon nitride and graphite were the test materials. The experimental fracture strengths of the disks were compared with the predicted strengths based on both volume flaw and surface flaw analyses of four point bend data. Volume flaw analysis resulted in a better correlation between disks and beams in three of the five test series than did surface flaw analysis. The Weibull (moduli) and characteristic gage strengths for the disks and beams were also compared. Differences in the experimental Weibull slopes were not statistically significant. It was shown that results from the beam tests can predict the fracture strength of rotating disks.

  13. Determination of proton-nucleon analyzing powers and spin-rotation-depolarization parameters at 500 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, J.A.; Barlett, M.L.; Fergerson, R.W.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Milner, E.C.; Ray, L.; Amann, J.F.; Bonner, B.E.; McClelland, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    500 MeV p-arrow-right+p elastic and quasielastic, and p-arrow-right+n quasielastic, analyzing powers (A/sub y/) and spin-rotation-depolarization parameters (D/sub S//sub S/, D/sub S//sub L/, D/sub L//sub S/, D/sub L//sub L/, D/sub N//sub N/) were determined for center-of-momentum angular ranges 6.8 0 -55.4 0 (elastic) and 22.4 0 -55.4 0 (quasielastic); liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets were used. The p-arrow-right+p elastic and quasielastic results are in good agreement; both the p-arrow-right+p and p-arrow-right+n parameters are well described by current phase shift solutions

  14. Level structure of 68149Er81 and high-spin isomerism in proton-rich N=81, 82, 83 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, R.; Daly, P.J.; McNeill, J.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Radford, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    The level structure of the N=81 nucleus 149 Er has been studied by γ-ray spectroscopy following the reaction 92 Mo+255 MeV 60 Ni. Yrast levels in 149 Er are established up to ≅ 3.3 MeV, including 0.61 and 4.8 μs isometric states. Most of the observed levels are interpreted as seniority-three states arising from the coupling of s 1/2 , d 3/2 and h 11/2 neutron holes with πh n 11/2 . Isomers identified in the reaction 96 Ru+255 MeV 58 Ni are tentatively assigned to 151 Yb. The B(E2) values of high-spin isomers in Z=66-70, N=81-83 nuclei are surveyed. (orig.)

  15. Testing the Tester: Lessons Learned During the Testing of a State-of-the-Art Commercial 14nm Processor Under Proton Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Carl M., Jr.; Duncan, Adam R.; Label, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Testing of an Intel 14nm desktop processor was conducted under proton irradiation. We share lessons learned, demonstrating that complex devices beget further complex challenges requiring practical and theoretical investigative expertise to solve.

  16. Predicition of the first spinning cylinder test using continuum damage mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidbury, D.P.G.; Sherry, A.H.; Bilby, B.A.; Howard, I.C.; Li, Z.H.; Eripret, C.

    1993-01-01

    For many years large-scale experiments have been performed world-wide to validate aspects of fracture mechanics methodology. Special emphasis has been given to correlations between small- and large-scale specimen behaviour in quantifying the structural behaviour of pressure vessels, piping and closures. Within this context, the first three Spinning Cylinder Tests, performed by AEA Technology at its Risley Laboratory, addressed the phenomenon of stable crack growth by ductile tearing in contained yield and conditions simulating pressurized thermal shock loading in a PWR reactor pressure vessel. A notable feature of the test data was that the effective resistance to crack growth, as measured in terms of the J R-curve, was appreciably greater than that anticipated from small-scale testing, both at initiation and after small amounts (a few millimeters) of tearing. In the present paper, two independent finite element analyses of the First Spinning Cylinder Test (SC 1) are presented and compared. Both involved application of the Rousselier ductile damage theory in an attempt to better understand the transferability of test data from small specimens to structural validation tests. In each instance, the parameters associated with the theory's constitutive equation were calibrated in terms of data from notched-tensile and (or) fracture mechanics tests, metallographic observation and (or) chemical composition. The evolution of ductile damage local to the crack tip during SC 1 was thereby calculated and, together with a crack growth criterion based on the maximization of opening-mode stress, used as the basis for predicting cylinder R-Curves (angular velocity vs. Δa, J-integral vs. Δa). The results show the Rousselier model to be capable of correctly predicting the enhancement of tearing toughness of the cylinder relative to that of conventional test specimens, given an appropriate choice of finite element cell size in the region representing the crack tip

  17. Gluon polarization in the proton: Constraints at low x from the measurement of the double longitudinal spin asymmetry for forward-rapidity hadrons with the PHENIX detector at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Cameron Palmer

    In the 1980s, polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering experiments revealed that only about a third of the proton's spin of ½ h is carried by the quarks and antiquarks, leaving physicists with the puzzle of how to account for the remaining spin. As gluons carry roughly 50% of the proton's momentum, it seemed most logical to look to the gluon spin as another significant contributor. However, lepton-nucleon scattering experiments only access the gluon helicity distribution, Delta g, through effects on the quark distributions via scaling violations. Constraining Deltag through scaling violations requires experiments that together cover a large range of Q 2. Such experiments had been carried out with unpolarized beams, leaving g(x) (the unpolarized gluon distribution) relatively well-known, but the polarized experiments have only thus far provided weak constraints on Deltag in a limited momentum fraction range. With the commissioning in 2000 of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, the first polarized proton-proton (pp) collider, and the first polarized pp running in 2002, the gluon distributions could be accessed directly by studying quark-gluon and gluon-gluon interactions. In 2009, data from measurements of double longitudinal spin asymmetries, ALL, at the STAR and PHENIX experiments through 2006 were included in a QCD global analysis performed by Daniel de Florian, Rodolfo Sassot, Marco Stratmann, and Werner Vogelsang (DSSV), yielding the first direct constraints on the gluon helicity. The DSSV group found that the contribution of the gluon spin to the proton spin was consistent with zero, but the data provided by PHENIX and STAR was all at mid-rapidity, meaning Delta g was constrained by data only a range in x from 0.05 to 0.2, leaving out helicity contributions from the huge number of low- x gluons. A more recent analysis by DSSV from 2014 including RHIC data through 2009 for the first time points to significant gluon polarization at intermediate

  18. Experimental Test of Entropic Noise-Disturbance Uncertainty Relations for Spin-1/2 Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulyok, Georg; Sponar, Stephan; Demirel, Bülent; Buscemi, Francesco; Hall, Michael J W; Ozawa, Masanao; Hasegawa, Yuji

    2015-07-17

    Information-theoretic definitions for noise and disturbance in quantum measurements were given in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 050401 (2014)] and a state-independent noise-disturbance uncertainty relation was obtained. Here, we derive a tight noise-disturbance uncertainty relation for complementary qubit observables and carry out an experimental test. Successive projective measurements on the neutron's spin-1/2 system, together with a correction procedure which reduces the disturbance, are performed. Our experimental results saturate the tight noise-disturbance uncertainty relation for qubits when an optimal correction procedure is applied.

  19. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  20. Beam tests of an integrated prototype of the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00397348

    2016-09-19

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is intended to measure protons scattered at small angles from the ATLAS interaction point. To this end, a combination of 3D Silicon pixel tracking modules and Quartz-Cherenkov time-of-flight (ToF) detectors is installed 210m away from the interaction point at both sides of ATLAS. Beam tests with an AFP prototype detector combining tracking and timing sub-detectors and a common readout have been performed at the CERN-SPS test-beam facility in November 2014 and September 2015 to complete the system integration and to study the detector performance. The successful tracking-timing integration was demonstrated. Good tracker hit efficiencies above 99.9% at a sensor tilt of 14{\\deg}, as foreseen for AFP, were observed. Spatial resolutions in the short pixel direction with 50 {\\mu}m pitch of 5.5 +/- 0.5 {\\mu}m per pixel plane and of 2.8 +/- 0.5 {\\mu}m for the full four-plane tracker at 14{\\deg} were found, largely surpassing the AFP requirement of 10 {\\mu}m. The timing detector...

  1. Anisotropy of the proton spin--lattice relaxation time in the superconducting intercalation complex TaS2(NH3): Structural and bonding implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, F.R.; Silbernagel, B.G.

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the interaction responsible for the formation of molecular intercalation complexes between Lewis bases and layered transition metal dichalcogenides is not well understood. To some extent this is due to a lack of structural information. A prototype of these complexes is TaS 2 (NH 3 ), in which monolayers of ammonia are inserted between the metallic, superconducting layers of TaS 2 . The compound is crystalline and stoichiometric. Measurement of the anisotropy of the proton spin--lattice relaxation time at 300 degreeK indicates that the molecular threefold symmetry axis is not perpendicular to the disulfide layers as suggested by other workers, but is parallel to the layers. This orientation precludes direct interaction between the molecular lone pair orbital and the transition metal atoms. The interactions governing the structure of this complex may be similar to those obtaining in the intercalation complexes between TaS 2 and a number of substituted pyridines, in which complexes the axis of the lone pair orbital is also parallel to the layers

  2. Measurement of the virtual-photon asymmetry A{sub 2} and the spin-structure function g{sub 2} of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigian Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2011-12-15

    A measurement of the virtual-photon asymmetry A{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and of the spin-structure function g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) of the proton are presented for the kinematic range 0.004

  3. First spinning cylinder test analysis by using local approach to fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eripret, C.; Rousselier, G.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, several experimental programs on large scale specimens were organized to evaluate capabilities of the fracture mechanics concepts employed in structural integrity assessment of PWR pressure vessels. During the first spinning cylinder test, a geometry effect was experimentally pointed out and exhibited the problem of transferability of toughness data from small scale to large scale specimens. An original analysis of this test, by means of local approach to fracture is presented in this paper. Both compact tension specimen and spinning cylinder fracture behaviour were computed by using a continuum damage mechanics model developed at EDF. The authors confirmed by numerical analysis that the cylinder's resistance to ductile tearing was considerably larger than in small scale fracture mechanics specimens tests, about 50 percent. The final crack growth predicted by the model was close to the experimental value. Discrepancies in J-R curves seemed to be due to an effect of stress triaxiality and plastic zone evolution. The geometry effect inducing differences in resistance to ductile tearing of the material involved in the specimens can be investigated and explained by using local approach to fracture methodology. 14 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Proton spin-lattice relaxation in a liquid crystal-Aerosil complex above the bulk isotropization temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoardo, E.; Grinberg, F.; Vilfan, M.; Kimmich, R

    2004-02-16

    We present a study of the molecular dynamics in an octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB)-Aerosil complex above the bulk isotropization temperature. Using proton nuclear magnetic relaxation experiments in the laboratory frame (T{sub 1}{sup -1}) and in the rotating-frame (T{sub 1{rho}}{sup -1}), we found a notable increase of the relaxation rates in the kHz frequency range as compared to the bulk 8CB liquid crystal at the same temperature. The field-cycling technique was used for the laboratory frame experiments while a conventional apparatus was used for the rotating frame method. The observed behavior is analyzed with the aid of Monte Carlo simulations on the basis of a two-phase fast-exchange model distinguishing surface-ordered and bulk phases. Two processes affecting the low frequency relaxation could be identified: reorientation mediated by translational displacements, accounting for molecular reorientations, and exchange losses of molecules from the surface to the bulk.

  5. Precision measurement of the proton and deuteron spin structure functions g{sub 2} and asymmetries A{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, P.L.; Arnold, R.G.; Averett, T.; Band, H.R.; Benmouna, N.; Boeglin, W.; Borel, H.; Bosted, P.E.; Bueltmann, S.L.; Court, G.R.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Decowski, P.; DePietro, P.; Egiyan, H.; Erbacher, R.; Erickson, R.; Fatemi, R.; Frlez, E.; Griffioen, K.A.; Harris, C.; Hughes, E.W.; Hyde-Wright, C.; Igo, G.; Johnson, J.; King, P.; Kramer, K.; Kuhn, S.E.; Lawrence, D.; Liang, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lombard-Nelsen, R.M.; McKee, P.; McNulty, D.E.; Meyer, W.; Mitchell, G.S.; Mitchell, J.; Olson, M.; Penttila, S.; Peterson, G.A.; Pitthan, R.; Pocanic, D.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.; Raue, B.A.; Reyna, D.; Ryan, P.; Rochester, L.S.; Rock, S.; Rondon-Aramayo, O.; Sabatie, F.; Smith, T.; Sorrell, L.; Lorant, S.St.; Szalata, Z.; Terrien, Y.; Tobias, A.; Toole, T.; Trentalange, S.; Wesselmann, F.R.; Wright, T.R.; Zeier, M.; Zhu, H.; Zihlmann, B

    2003-01-30

    We have measured the spin structure functions g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} and the virtual photon asymmetries A{sub 2}{sup p} and A{sub 2}{sup d} over the kinematic range 0.02{<=}x{<=}0.8 and 0.7{<=}Q{sup 2}{<=}20 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 29.1 and 32.3 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons from transversely polarized NH{sub 3} and {sup 6}LiD targets. Our measured g{sub 2} approximately follows the twist-2 Wandzura-Wilczek calculation. The twist-3 reduced matrix elements d{sub 2}{sup p} and d{sub 2}{sup n} are less than two standard deviations from zero. The data are inconsistent with the Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule if there is no pathological behavior as x{yields}0. The Efremov-Leader-Teryaev integral is consistent with zero within our measured kinematic range. The absolute value of A{sub 2} is significantly smaller than the A{sub 2}<{radical}(R(1+A{sub 1})/2) limit.

  6. End-to-end tests using alanine dosimetry in scanned proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, A.; Gouldstone, C.; Kragl, G.; Traneus, E.; Marrale, M.; Vatnitsky, S.; Stock, M.; Palmans, H.

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes end-to-end test procedures as the last fundamental step of medical commissioning before starting clinical operation of the MedAustron synchrotron-based pencil beam scanning (PBS) therapy facility with protons. One in-house homogeneous phantom and two anthropomorphic heterogeneous (head and pelvis) phantoms were used for end-to-end tests at MedAustron. The phantoms were equipped with alanine detectors, radiochromic films and ionization chambers. The correction for the ‘quenching’ effect of alanine pellets was implemented in the Monte Carlo platform of the evaluation version of RayStation TPS. During the end-to-end tests, the phantoms were transferred through the workflow like real patients to simulate the entire clinical workflow: immobilization, imaging, treatment planning and dose delivery. Different clinical scenarios of increasing complexity were simulated: delivery of a single beam, two oblique beams without and with range shifter. In addition to the dose comparison in the plastic phantoms the dose obtained from alanine pellet readings was compared with the dose determined with the Farmer ionization chamber in water. A consistent systematic deviation of about 2% was found between alanine dosimetry and the ionization chamber dosimetry in water and plastic materials. Acceptable agreement of planned and delivered doses was observed together with consistent and reproducible results of the end-to-end testing performed with different dosimetric techniques (alanine detectors, ionization chambers and EBT3 radiochromic films). The results confirmed the adequate implementation and integration of the new PBS technology at MedAustron. This work demonstrates that alanine pellets are suitable detectors for end-to-end tests in proton beam therapy and the developed procedures with customized anthropomorphic phantoms can be used to support implementation of PBS technology in clinical practice.

  7. Fatigue and creep to leak tests of proton exchange membranes using pressure-loaded blisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongqiang; Dillard, David A.; Case, Scott W. [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0219 (United States); Ellis, Michael W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0238 (United States); Lai, Yeh-Hung; Gittleman, Craig S.; Miller, Daniel P. [Fuel Cell Research Lab, GM R and D, General Motors Corporation, 10 Carriage Street, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472-0603 (United States)

    2009-12-01

    In this study, three commercially available proton exchange membranes (PEMs) are biaxially tested using pressure-loaded blisters to characterize their resistance to gas leakage under either static (creep) or cyclic fatigue loading. The pressurizing medium, air, is directly used for leak detection. These tests are believed to be more relevant to fuel cell applications than quasi-static uniaxial tensile-to-rupture tests because of the use of biaxial cyclic and sustained loading and the use of gas leakage as the failure criterion. They also have advantages over relative humidity cycling test, in which a bare PEM or catalyst coated membrane is clamped with gas diffusion media and flow field plates and subjected to cyclic changes in relative humidity, because of the flexibility in allowing controlled mechanical loading and accelerated testing. Nafion {sup registered} NRE-211 membranes are tested at three different temperatures and the time-temperature superposition principle is used to construct stress-lifetime master curve. Tested at 90 C, 2%RH extruded Ion Power {sup registered} N111-IP membranes have a longer lifetime than Gore trademark -Select {sup registered} 57 and Nafion {sup registered} NRE-211 membranes. (author)

  8. Spin physics at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenstein, D.I.

    1985-01-01

    Spin Physics at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory is the most recent of new capabilities being explored at this facility. During the summer of 1984 the AGS accelerated beams of polarized protons to 16.5 GeV/c at 40% polarization to two experiments (E782, E785). These experiments; single spin asymmetry in inclusive polarized pp interactions; and spin-spin effects in polarized pp elastic scattering, operated at the highest polarized proton energy ever achieved by any accelerator in the world. These experiments are reviewed after the complementary spin physics program with unpolarized protons, and the future possibilities with a booster injector for the AGS and the secondary benefits of a Relativisitic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), are placed within the context of the present physics program

  9. Novel spin effects in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1993-02-01

    This report discusses a number of interesting hadronic spin effects which test fundamental features of perturbative and non-perturbative QCD. These include constraints on the shape and normalization of the polarized quark and gluon structure functions of the proton; the principle of hadron helicity retention in high x F inclusive reactions; predictions based on total hadron helicity conservation in high momentum transfer exclusive reactions; the dependence of nuclear structure functions and shadowing on virtual photon polarization; and general constraints on the magnetic moment of hadrons. I also will discuss the implications of several measurements which are in striking conflict with leading-twist perturbative QCD predictions, such as the extraordinarily large spin correlation A NN observed in large angle proton-proton scattering, the anomalously large ρπ branching ratio of the J/ψ, and the rapidly changing polarization dependence of both J/ψ and continuum lepton pair hadroproduction observed at large x F

  10. An integral test of FLUKA nuclear models with 160 MeV proton beams in multi-layer Faraday cups

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, I; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Mairani, A

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are useful tools to simulate the complex processes of proton beam interactions with matter. In proton therapy, nuclear reactions influence the dose distribution. Therefore, the validation of nuclear models adopted in MC codes is a critical requisite for their use in this field. A simple integral test can be performed using a multi-layer Faraday cup (MLFC). This method allows separation of the nuclear and atomic interaction processes, which are responsible for secondary particle emission and the finite primary proton range, respectively. In this work, the propagation of 160 MeV protons stopping in two MLFCs made of polyethylene and copper has been simulated by the FLUKA MC code. The calculations have been performed with and without secondary electron emission and transport, as well as charge sharing in the dielectric layers. Previous results with other codes neglected those two effects. The impact of this approximation has been investigated and found to be relevant only in the proximity ...

  11. Dynamic Pressure of Liquid Mercury Target During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, S.W.; Andriulli, J.B.; Cates, M.R.; Earl, D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Morrissey, F.X.; Tsai, C.C.; Wender, S.

    2000-01-01

    Described here are efforts to diagnose transient pressures generated by a short-pulse (about 0.5 microseconds) high intensity proton (∼ 2 * 10 14 per pulse) beam. Proton energy is 800-MeV. The tests were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE-WNR). Such capability is required for understanding target interaction for the Spallation Neutron Source project as described previously at this conference.1-4 The main approach to effect the pressure measurements utilized the deflection of a diaphragm in intimate contact with the mercury. There are a wide variety of diaphragm-deflection methods used in scientific and industrial applications. Many deflection-sensing approaches are typically used, including, for instance, capacitive and optical fiber techniques. It was found, however, that conventional pressure measurement using commercial pressure gages with electrical leads was not possible due to the intense nuclear radiation environment. Earlier work with a fiber optic strain gauge demonstrated the viability of using fiber optics for this environment

  12. High temperature tensile testing of modified 9Cr-1Mo after irradiation with high energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Hamilton, M.L.; Maloy, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the effect of tensile test temperatures ranging from 50 to 600 deg. C on the tensile properties of a modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel after high energy proton irradiation at about 35-67 deg. C to doses from 1 to 3 dpa and 9 dpa. For the specimens irradiated to doses between 1 and 3 dpa, it was observed that the yield strength and ultimate strength decreased monotonically as a function of tensile test temperature, whereas the uniform elongation (UE) remained at approximately 1% for tensile test temperatures up to 250 deg. C and then increased for tensile test temperatures up to and including 500 deg. C. At 600 deg. C, the UE was observed to be less than the values at 400 and 500 deg. C. UE of the irradiated material tensile tested at 400-600 deg. C was observed to be greater than the values for the unirradiated material at the same temperatures. Tensile tests on the 9 dpa specimens followed similar trends

  13. Diagnostic value of the proton pump inhibitor test for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, M. C.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Numans, M. E.; de Wit, N. J.; Baron, A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the proton pump inhibitor test in a primary care population as well as its additional value over reflux history, using the symptom association probability outcome during 24-h oesophageal pH recording as reference test for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  14. Pre-test analyses for the NESC1 spinning cylinder experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokkens, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    The spinning cylinder experiment organised by the Network for the Evaluation of Steel Components (NESC) is designed to investigate the cleavage initiation behaviour of both surface breaking and subclad defects in simulated end of life RPV material, exposed to a pressurised thermal shock transient. Pre-test structural integrity assessments are performed by the NESC Structural Analysis Task Group (TG3). The results of these structural integrity assessments are used to determine the design of the experiment and especially the sizes of the introduced defects. In this report the results of the pre-test analyses performed by the group Applied Mechanics at ECN - Nuclear Energy are described. Elastic as well as elasto-plastic structural analyses are performed for a surface breaking and a subclad defect in a forged cylinder with a 4 mm cladding. The semi elliptical defects have a depth of 40 mm and an aspect ratio of 1:3. (orig.)

  15. Brookhaven: Spin result underlined

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    A recent experiment looking at violent proton-proton elastic scattering confirms, with high precision, earlier data which puzzled many theorists. Most pictures of strong interactions based on perturbative quark-gluon field theory (Quantum Chromodynamics, QCD) suggested that spin effects should disappear with energy and as the collisions become more violent.

  16. Brookhaven: Spin result underlined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    A recent experiment looking at violent proton-proton elastic scattering confirms, with high precision, earlier data which puzzled many theorists. Most pictures of strong interactions based on perturbative quark-gluon field theory (Quantum Chromodynamics, QCD) suggested that spin effects should disappear with energy and as the collisions become more violent

  17. Experimental test of the PCAC-hypothesis in charged current neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; O'Neale, S. W.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hoffmann, E.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Allport, P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1987-03-01

    Data obtained with the bubble chamber BEBC at CERN are used for the first significant test of Adler's prediction for the neutrino and antineutrino-proton scattering cross sections at vanishing four-momentum transfer squared Q 2. An Extended Vector Meson Dominance Model (EVDM) is applied to extrapolate Adler's prediction to experimentally accessible values of Q 2. The data show good agreement with Adler's prediction for Q 2→0 thus confirming the PCAC hypothesis in the kinematical region of high leptonic energy transfer ν>2 GeV. The good agreement of the data with the theoretical predictions also at higher Q 2, where the EVDM terms are dominant, also supports this model. However, an EVDM calculation without PCAC is clearly ruled out by the data.

  18. Experimental test of the PCAC-hypothesis in charged current neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; O'Neale, S.W.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Allport, P.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1987-01-01

    Data obtained with the bubble chamber BEBC at CERN are used for the first significant test of Adler's prediction for the neutrino and antineutrino-proton scattering cross sections at vanishing four-momentum transfer squared Q 2 . An Extended Vector Meson Dominance Model (EVDM) is applied to extrapolate Adler's prediction to experimentally accessible values of Q 2 . The data show good agreement with Adler's prediction for Q 2 → 0 thus confirming the PCAC hypothesis in the kinematical region of high leptonic energy transfer ν > 2 GeV. The good agreement of the data with the theoretical predictions also at higher Q 2 , where the EVDM terms are dominant, also supports this model. However, an EVDM calculation without PCAC is clearly ruled out by the data. (orig.)

  19. QCD SPIN PHYSICS IN HADRONIC INTERACTIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VOGELSANG,W.

    2007-06-19

    We discuss spin phenomena in high-energy hadronic scattering, with a particular emphasis on the spin physics program now underway at the first polarized proton-proton collider, RHIC. Experiments at RHIC unravel the spin structure of the nucleon in new ways. Prime goals are to determine the contribution of gluon spins to the proton spin, to elucidate the flavor structure of quark and antiquark polarizations in the nucleon, and to help clarify the origin of transverse-spin phenomena in QCD. These lectures describe some aspects of this program and of the associated physics.

  20. Value of Fat-Suppressed Proton-Density-Weighted Turbo Spin-Echo Sequences in Detecting Meniscal Lesions: Comparison with Arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, F.K.W.; Schaefer, P.J.; Brossmann, J.; Frahm, C.; Hilgert, R.E.; Heller, M.; Jahnke, T.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate fat-suppressed (FS) proton-density-weighted (PDw) turbo spin-echo (TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to arthroscopy in the detection of meniscal lesions. Material and Methods: In a prospective study, 31 knee joints were imaged on a 1.5T MR scanner before arthroscopy using the following sequences: (a) coronal and sagittal FS-PDw TSE (TR/TE: 4009/15 ms); (b) coronal T1w SE (TR/TE: 722/20 ms), and sagittal PDw TSE (TR/TE: 3800/15 ms). Other imaging parameters were: slice thickness 3 mm, FOV 160 mm, matrix 256x256. A total of 186 meniscal regions (62 menisci; anterior horn, body, posterior horn) were evaluated. Standard of reference was arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (npv), positive predictive value (ppv), and accuracy were calculated. Results: Arthroscopically, meniscal lesions were detected in 55/186 segments (35 medial and 20 lateral meniscal lesions). Sensitivity, specificity, npv, ppv, and accuracy for combination of coronal and sagittal FS PDw TSE were 91.4%, 98.3%, 95%, 97%, and 93.5% for the medial meniscus, and 90%, 98.6%, 97.3%, 94.7%, and 96.8% for the lateral. The results were comparable to the combination of coronal T1w SE and sagittal PDw TSE for the medial (88.6%, 98.3%, 93.4%, 96.9%, 91.4%) and the lateral (90%, 95.9%, 97.2%, 85.7%, 92.5%) meniscus. Conclusion: FS PDw TSE-MR sequences are an excellent alternative for the detection of meniscal lesions in comparison with diagnostic arthroscopy

  1. Spin Physics at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bland, L.C.

    2003-01-01

    The physics goals that will be addressed by colliding polarized protons at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are described. The RHIC spin program provides a new generation of experiments that will unfold the quark, anti-quark and gluon contributions to the proton's spin. In addition to these longer term goals, this paper describes what was learned from the first polarized proton collisions at √(s)=200 GeV. These collisions took place in a five-week run during the second year of RHIC operation

  2. Benchmark tests and spin adaptation for the particle-particle random phase approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yang; Steinmann, Stephan N.; Peng, Degao [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Aggelen, Helen van, E-mail: Helen.VanAggelen@UGent.be [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Yang, Weitao, E-mail: Weitao.Yang@duke.edu [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    The particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) provides an approximation to the correlation energy in density functional theory via the adiabatic connection [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)]. It has virtually no delocalization error nor static correlation error for single-bond systems. However, with its formal O(N{sup 6}) scaling, the pp-RPA is computationally expensive. In this paper, we implement a spin-separated and spin-adapted pp-RPA algorithm, which reduces the computational cost by a substantial factor. We then perform benchmark tests on the G2/97 enthalpies of formation database, DBH24 reaction barrier database, and four test sets for non-bonded interactions (HB6/04, CT7/04, DI6/04, and WI9/04). For the G2/97 database, the pp-RPA gives a significantly smaller mean absolute error (8.3 kcal/mol) than the direct particle-hole RPA (ph-RPA) (22.7 kcal/mol). Furthermore, the error in the pp-RPA is nearly constant with the number of atoms in a molecule, while the error in the ph-RPA increases. For chemical reactions involving typical organic closed-shell molecules, pp- and ph-RPA both give accurate reaction energies. Similarly, both RPAs perform well for reaction barriers and nonbonded interactions. These results suggest that the pp-RPA gives reliable energies in chemical applications. The adiabatic connection formalism based on pairing matrix fluctuation is therefore expected to lead to widely applicable and accurate density functionals.

  3. Data collection and analysis software development for rotor dynamics testing in spin laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Arble, Daniel; Woike, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Gas turbine engine components undergo high rotational loading another complex environmental conditions. Such operating environment leads these components to experience damages and cracks that can cause catastrophic failure during flights. There are traditional crack detections and health monitoring methodologies currently being used which rely on periodic routine maintenances, nondestructive inspections that often times involve engine and components dis-assemblies. These methods do not also offer adequate information about the faults, especially, if these faults at subsurface or not clearly evident. At NASA Glenn research center, the rotor dynamics laboratory is presently involved in developing newer techniques that are highly dependent on sensor technology to enable health monitoring and prediction of damage and cracks in rotor disks. These approaches are noninvasive and relatively economical. Spin tests are performed using a subscale test article mimicking turbine rotor disk undergoing rotational load. Non-contact instruments such as capacitive and microwave sensors are used to measure the blade tip gap displacement and blade vibrations characteristics in an attempt develop a physics based model to assess/predict the faults in the rotor disk. Data collection is a major component in this experimental-analytical procedure and as a result, an upgrade to an older version of the data acquisition software which is based on LabVIEW program has been implemented to support efficiently running tests and analyze the results. Outcomes obtained from the tests data and related experimental and analytical rotor dynamics modeling including key features of the updated software are presented and discussed.

  4. ZGS beam transport for transverse or longitudinally polarized protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, E.; Auer, I.P.; Beretvas, A.

    1977-01-01

    A combination of dipole magnets and a superconducting solenoid is utilized to transform the spin direction of transversely polarized protons from the Argonne ZGS for use in proton-proton scattering experiments

  5. Tests of prototype magnets and study on a MCP based proton detector for the neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materne, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The precision experiment PENeLOPE will store ultra-cold neutrons in a magnetic trap and determine the neutron lifetime via the time-resolved counting of the decay-protons. The thesis reports on training and performance tests of prototypes of the superconducting coils. Additionally, a magnetic field mapper for PENeLOPE was characterized. In the second part of the thesis, microchannel plates (MCPs) were studied with alpha particles and protons as a possible candidate for the decay particle detector in PENeLOPE.

  6. Micromachining of commodity plastics by proton beam writing and fabrication of spatial resolution test-chart for neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, T.; Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Matsubayashi, M.; Kada, W.; Kohka, M.; Satoh, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Ishii, Y.; Takano, K.

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam writing is a direct-write technique and a promising method for the micromachining of commodity plastics such as acrylic resins. Herein, we describe the fabrication of microscopic devices made from a relatively thick (∼75 μm) acrylic sheet using proton beam writing. In addition, a software package that converts image pixels into coordinates data was developed, and the successful fabrication of a very fine jigsaw puzzle was achieved. The size of the jigsaw puzzle pieces was 50 × 50 μm. For practical use, a prototype of a line and space test-chart was also successfully fabricated for the determination of spatial resolution in neutron radiography

  7. SEDS MIL-STD-1773 fiber optic data bus: Proton irradiation test results and spaceflight SEU data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBel, K.A.; Stassinopoulos, E.G.; Miller, J.T. (NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Marshall, P. (NRL/SFA, Washington, DC (United States)); Dale, C. (NRL, Washington, DC (United States)); Crabtree, C.M. (Hughes/ST Systems Corp., Seabrook, MD (United States)); Gates, M.M. (Jackson and Tull, Seabrook, MD (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The Small Explorer Data System (SEDS) was launched in July of 1992 as part of the Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) mission. The SEDS utilizes NASA's first MIL-STD-1773 Fiber Optic Multiplexed Data Bus (or 1773 bus) to communicate with other spacecraft subsystems in the space environment. The 1773 bus is the fiber optic version of the MIL-STD-1553 Data Bus, a electronic wire bus used in many avionics applications. The authors present proton test and space flight single event effect data for NASA's first fiber optic data bus. Bit error rate predictions based on a new proton direct ionization model agree well with flight data for proton belt and solar flare effects.

  8. Recent results of the STAR high-energy polarized proton-proton program at RHIC at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surrow, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at √(s) 200 - 500GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of ALL for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at √(s) = 200GeV. In addition to these measurements involving longitudinal polarized proton beams, the STAR collaboration has performed several important measurements employing transverse polarized proton beams. New results on the measurement of the transverse single-spin asymmetry, AN, for forward neutral pion production and the first measurement of AN for mid-rapidity di-jet production will be discussed

  9. A finite size scaling test of an SU(2) gauge-spin system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiya, M.; Hattori, T.

    1984-01-01

    We calculate the correlation functions in the SU(2) gauge-spin system with spins in the fundamental representation. We analyze the result making use of finite size scaling. There is a possibility that there are no second order phase transition lines in this model, contrary to previous assertions. (orig.)

  10. Prescription Drug Use among College Students: A Test of Criminal Spin Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Criminal spin theory developed by Ronel intends to provide a more comprehensive explanation of criminal behavior. It includes wide-ranging factors that impact human behavior at an individual, group, and cultural level. According to criminal spin theory, an event or a set of events can impact human emotions, thoughts, and behaviors. With the…

  11. Spin-selective recombination reactions of radical pairs: Experimental test of validity of reaction operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Kiminori [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Centre for Advanced Electron Spin Resonance, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford (United Kingdom); Liddell, Paul; Gust, Devens [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, 85287-1604 (United States); Hore, P. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-21

    Spin-selective reactions of radical pairs are conventionally modelled using an approach that dates back to the 1970s [R. Haberkorn, Mol. Phys. 32, 1491 (1976)]. An alternative approach based on the theory of quantum measurements has recently been suggested [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. We present here the first experimental attempt to discriminate between the two models. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate intramolecular electron transfer in the radical pair form of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene molecular triad. The rate of spin-spin relaxation of the fullerene radical in the triad was found to be inconsistent with the quantum measurement description of the spin-selective kinetics, and in accord with the conventional model when combined with spin-dephasing caused by rotational modulation of the anisotropic g-tensor of the fullerene radical.

  12. Testing a Quantum Heat Pump with a Two-Level Spin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Correa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Once in its non-equilibrium steady state, a nanoscale system coupled to several heat baths may be thought of as a “quantum heat pump”. Depending on the direction of its stationary heat flows, it may function as, e.g., a refrigerator or a heat transformer. These continuous heat devices can be arbitrarily complex multipartite systems, and yet, their working principle is always the same: they are made up of several elementary three-level stages operating in parallel. As a result, it is possible to devise external “black-box” testing strategies to learn about their functionality and performance regardless of any internal details. In particular, one such heat pump can be tested by coupling a two-level spin to one of its “contact transitions”. The steady state of this external probe contains information about the presence of heat leaks and internal dissipation in the device and, also, about the direction of its steady-state heat currents. Provided that the irreversibility of the heat pump is low, one can further estimate its coefficient of performance. These techniques may find applications in the emerging field of quantum thermal engineering, as they facilitate the diagnosis and design optimization of complex thermodynamic cycles.

  13. Innovative thin silicon detectors for monitoring of therapeutic proton beams: preliminary beam tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, A.; Monaco, V.; Attili, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Donetti, M.; Fadavi Mazinani, M.; Fausti, F.; Ferrero, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Hammad Ali, O.; Mandurrino, M.; Manganaro, L.; Mazza, G.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Staiano, A.; Cirio, R.; Boscardin, M.; Paternoster, G.; Ficorella, F.

    2017-12-01

    To fully exploit the physics potentials of particle therapy in delivering dose with high accuracy and selectivity, charged particle therapy needs further improvement. To this scope, a multidisciplinary project (MoVeIT) of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) aims at translating research in charged particle therapy into clinical outcome. New models in the treatment planning system are being developed and validated, using dedicated devices for beam characterization and monitoring in radiobiological and clinical irradiations. Innovative silicon detectors with internal gain layer (LGAD) represent a promising option, overcoming the limits of currently used ionization chambers. Two devices are being developed: one to directly count individual protons at high rates, exploiting the large signal-to-noise ratio and fast collection time in small thicknesses (1 ns in 50 μm) of LGADs, the second to measure the beam energy with time-of-flight techniques, using LGADs optimized for excellent time resolutions (Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors, UFSDs). The preliminary results of first beam tests with therapeutic beam will be presented and discussed.

  14. Rotordynamic Analysis and Feasibility Study of a Disk Spin Test Facility for Rotor Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) initiated a program to achieve the significant improvement in aviation safety. One of the technical challenges is the design and development of accelerated experiments that mimic critical damage cases encountered in engine components. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is currently addressing the goal concerning propulsion health management and the development of propulsion system specific technologies intended to detect potential failures prior to catastrophe. For this goal the unique disk spin simulation system was assembled at NASA GRC, which allows testing of rotors with the spinning speeds up to 10K RPM, and at the elevated temperature environment reaching 540 C (1000 F). It is anticipated that the facility can be employed for detection of Low Cycle Fatigue disk cracking and further High Cycle Fatigue blade vibration. The controlled crack growth studies at room and elevated temperatures can be conducted on the turbine wheels, and various NDE techniques can be integrated and assessed as in-situ damage monitoring tools. Critical rotating parts in advanced gas turbine engines such as turbine disks frequently operate at high temperature and stress for long periods of time. The integrity of these parts must be proven by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) during various machining steps ranging from forging blank to finished shape, and also during the systematic overhaul inspections. Conventional NDE methods, however, have unacceptable limits. Some of these techniques are time-consuming and inconvenient for service aircraft testing. Almost all of these techniques require that the vicinity of the damage is known in advance. These experimental techniques can provide only local information and no indication of the structural strength at a component and/or system level. The shortcomings of currently available NDE methods lead to the requirement of new damage

  15. Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc., Proton Exchange Member (PEM) Fuel Cell Engineering Model Powerplant. Test Report: Initial Benchmark Tests in the Original Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the leading candidate to replace the alkaline fuel cell technology, currently used on the Shuttle, for future space missions. During a 5-yr development program, a PEM fuel cell powerplant was developed. This report details the initial performance evaluation test results of the powerplant.

  16. Search in 8 TeV proton-proton collisions with the MoEDAL monopole-trapping test array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinfold, J.; Soluk, R.; Lacarrère, D.; Katre, A.; Mermod, P.; Bendtz, K.; Milstead, D.

    2014-06-01

    The magnetic monopole appears in theories of spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking and its existence would explain the quantisation of electric charge. MoEDAL is the latest approved LHC experiment, designed to search directly for monopoles produced in high-energy collisions. It has now taken data for the first time. The MoEDAL detectors are based on two complementary techniques: nuclear-track detectors are sensitive to the high-ionisation signature expected from a monopole, and the magnetic monopole trapper (MMT) relies on the stopping and trapping of monopoles inside an aluminium array which is then analysed with a superconducting magnetometer. The first results obtained with the MoEDAL MMT test array deployed in 2012 are presented. This experiment probes monopoles carrying a multiple of the fundamental unit magnetic charge for the first time at the LHC.

  17. Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

    2002-03-01

    In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

  18. Test of GEANT3 and GEANT4 nuclear models for 160 MeV protons stopping in CH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganetti, H.; Gottschalk, B.

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used for many problems in proton radiation therapy, some of which are sensitive to the nuclear interaction model. The available models have been little tested in the regime of interest, namely in their ability to predict the secondary particle yield, including their angle and energy, when 70-250 MeV protons stop in various materials. The present study provides one such test in carbon, complementing a previous one in copper. Using a multilayer Faraday cup we have measured the projected range distribution of charged nuclear secondaries from 160 MeV protons stopping in polyethylene (CH 2 ). To test the popular GEANT Monte Carlo we have simulated the experiment with GEANT3 using the 'Gheisha' (default) and 'Fluka' models and with GEANT4.5 using the 'low-energy' and 'precompound' models. The GEANT3/Fluka and GEANT4/precompound simulations agree moderately well with the observed range distribution. The data are given in a convenient form for testing other Monte Carlo programs

  19. An integral test of FLUKA nuclear models with 160 MeV proton beams in multi-layer Faraday cups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldi, I; Ferrari, A; Mairani, A; Parodi, K; Paganetti, H; Sala, P

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are useful tools to simulate the complex processes of proton beam interactions with matter. In proton therapy, nuclear reactions influence the dose distribution. Therefore, the validation of nuclear models adopted in MC codes is a critical requisite for their use in this field. A simple integral test can be performed using a multi-layer Faraday cup (MLFC). This method allows separation of the nuclear and atomic interaction processes, which are responsible for secondary particle emission and the finite primary proton range, respectively. In this work, the propagation of 160 MeV protons stopping in two MLFCs made of polyethylene and copper has been simulated by the FLUKA MC code. The calculations have been performed with and without secondary electron emission and transport, as well as charge sharing in the dielectric layers. Previous results with other codes neglected those two effects. The impact of this approximation has been investigated and found to be relevant only in the proximity of the Bragg peak. Longitudinal charge distributions computed with FLUKA with both approaches have been compared with experimental data from the literature. Moreover, the contribution of different processes to the measurable signal has been addressed. A thorough analysis of the results has demonstrated that the nuclear and electromagnetic models of FLUKA reproduce the two sets of experimental data reasonably well.

  20. First test of the prompt gamma ray timing method with heterogeneous targets at a clinical proton therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso-González, Fernando; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Golnik, Christian; Petzoldt, Johannes; Pausch, Guntram; Fiedler, Fine; Priegnitz, Marlen; Römer, Katja E; Wagner, Andreas; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Smeets, Julien; Vander Stappen, François

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam therapy promises enhanced tumour coverage compared to conventional radiotherapy, but particle range uncertainties significantly blunt the achievable precision. Experimental tools for range verification in real-time are not yet available in clinical routine. The prompt gamma ray timing method has been recently proposed as an alternative to collimated imaging systems. The detection times of prompt gamma rays encode essential information about the depth-dose profile thanks to the measurable transit time of ions through matter. In a collaboration between OncoRay, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and IBA, the first test at a clinical proton accelerator (Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen, Germany) with several detectors and phantoms is performed. The robustness of the method against background and stability of the beam bunch time profile is explored, and the bunch time spread is characterized for different proton energies. For a beam spot with a hundred million protons and a single detector, range differences of 5 mm in defined heterogeneous targets are identified by numerical comparison of the spectrum shape. For higher statistics, range shifts down to 2 mm are detectable. A proton bunch monitor, higher detector throughput and quantitative range retrieval are the upcoming steps towards a clinically applicable prototype. In conclusion, the experimental results highlight the prospects of this straightforward verification method at a clinical pencil beam and settle this novel approach as a promising alternative in the field of in vivo dosimetry. (paper)

  1. Study of quantum spin correlations of relativistic electron pairs - Testing nonlocality of relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, K.; Rozpędzik, D.; Zejma, J.; Caban, P.; Rembieliński, J.; Włodarczyk, M.; Ciborowski, J.; Enders, J.; Köhler, A.; Kozela, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Polish-German project QUEST aims at studying relativistic quantum spin correlations of the Einstein-Rosen-Podolsky-Bohm type, through measurement of the correlation function and the corresponding probabilities for relativistic electron pairs. The results will be compared to theoretical predictions obtained by us within the framework of relativistic quantum mechanics, based on assumptions regarding the form of the relativistic spin operator. Agreement or divergence will be interpreted in the context of non-uniqueness of the relativistic spin operator in quantum mechanics as well as dependence of the correlation function on the choice of observables representing the spin. Pairs of correlated electrons will originate from the Mo/ller scattering of polarized 15 MeV electrons provided by the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC, TU Darmstadt, incident on a Be target. Spin projections will be determined using the Mott polarimetry technique. Measurements (starting 2013) are planned for longitudinal and transverse beam polarizations and different orientations of the beam polarization vector w.r.t. the Mo/ller scattering plane. This is the first project to study relativistic spin correlations for particles with mass

  2. Propulsion health monitoring of a turbine engine disk using spin test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark; Oza, Nikunj; Matthews, Bryan; Baakilini, George

    2010-03-01

    is expected to present a select evaluation of online health monitoring of a rotating disk using these high caliber sensors and test the capability of the in-house spin system.

  3. Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell Powerplants Developed and Tested for Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.; Pham, Nang T.

    2005-01-01

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology has received major attention for terrestrial applications, such as the automotive and residential markets, for the past 20 years. This attention has significantly advanced the maturity of the technology, resulting in ever more compact, efficient, reliable, and inexpensive PEMFC designs. In comparison to the terrestrial operating environment, the space operating environment is much more demanding. Microgravity to high-gravity loads and the need to use pure oxygen (rather than air) as the fuel cell oxidizer place more stringent demands on PEMFC technology. NASA and its partners from industry are leveraging terrestrial PEMFC advancements by conducting parallel space technology development for future exploration missions. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Center, and NASA Kennedy Space Center recently completed the first phase of a PEMFC powerplant development effort for exploration missions. The industry partners for this phase of the development effort were ElectroChem, Inc., and Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc. Under contract to Glenn, both of these industry partners successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a breadboard PEMFC powerplant in the 1- to 5-kW power range. These powerplants were based on existing company-proprietary fuel cell stack designs, combined with off-the-shelf components, which formed the balance of the powerplant design. Subsequent to the contractor development efforts, both powerplants were independently tested at Johnson to verify operational and performance characteristics, and to determine suitability for further technology development in the second phase of the NASA-led effort. Following the independent NASA testing, Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc., was selected to develop an engineering model PEMFC powerplant. This effort was initiated by the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program Office in 2001; it transitioned to the Next Generation Launch

  4. Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell Powerplants Developed and Tested for Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.; Pham, Nang T.

    2005-06-01

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology has received major attention for terrestrial applications, such as the automotive and residential markets, for the past 20 years. This attention has significantly advanced the maturity of the technology, resulting in ever more compact, efficient, reliable, and inexpensive PEMFC designs. In comparison to the terrestrial operating environment, the space operating environment is much more demanding. Microgravity to high-gravity loads and the need to use pure oxygen (rather than air) as the fuel cell oxidizer place more stringent demands on PEMFC technology. NASA and its partners from industry are leveraging terrestrial PEMFC advancements by conducting parallel space technology development for future exploration missions. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Center, and NASA Kennedy Space Center recently completed the first phase of a PEMFC powerplant development effort for exploration missions. The industry partners for this phase of the development effort were ElectroChem, Inc., and Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc. Under contract to Glenn, both of these industry partners successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a breadboard PEMFC powerplant in the 1- to 5-kW power range. These powerplants were based on existing company-proprietary fuel cell stack designs, combined with off-the-shelf components, which formed the balance of the powerplant design. Subsequent to the contractor development efforts, both powerplants were independently tested at Johnson to verify operational and performance characteristics, and to determine suitability for further technology development in the second phase of the NASA-led effort. Following the independent NASA testing, Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc., was selected to develop an engineering model PEMFC powerplant. This effort was initiated by the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program Office in 2001; it transitioned to the Next Generation Launch

  5. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  6. Charge collection control using retrograde well tested by proton microprobe irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayama, Hirokazu; Takai, Mikio; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yoshikazu; Satoh, Shinichi; Sonoda, Kenichirou; Katani, Norihiko.

    1993-01-01

    Soft error reduction by high-energy ion-implanted layers has been investigated by novel evaluation techniques using high-energy proton microprobes. A retrograde well formed by 160 and 700 keV boron ion implantation could completely suppress soft errors induced by the proton microprobes at 400 keV. The proton-induced current revealed the charge collection efficiency for the retrograde well structure. The collected charge for the retrograde well in the soft-error mapping was proved to be lower than the critical charge of the measured DRAMs(dynamic random-access memories). Complementary use of soft-error mapping and ion-induced-current measurement could clarify well structures immune against soft errors. (author)

  7. Radiation tests of the EMU spacesuit for the International SpaceStation using energetic protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.; Shavers, M.

    2001-06-04

    Measurements using silicon detectors to characterize theradiation transmitted through the EMU spacesuit and a human phantom havebeen performed using 155 and 250 MeV proton beams at the Loma LindaUniversity Medical Center (LLUMC). The beams simulate radiationencountered in space, where trapped protons having kinetic energies onthe order of 100 MeV are copious. Protons with 100 MeV kinetic energy andabove can penetrate many centimeters of water of other light materials,so that astronauts exposed to such energetic particles will receive dosesto their internal organs. This dose can be enhanced or reduced byshielding - either from the spacesuit or the self-shielding of the body -but minimization of the risk depends on details of the incident particleflux (in particular the energy spectrum) and on the dose responses of thevarious critical organs.

  8. Technical Note: Validation of halo modeling for proton pencil beam spot scanning using a quality assurance test pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Liyong, E-mail: linl@uphs.upenn.edu; Huang, Sheng; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D.; McDonough, James E.; Ainsley, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive test pattern in validating calculation models that include the halo component (low-dose tails) of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) spots. Such a pattern has been used previously for quality assurance purposes to assess spot shape, position, and dose. Methods: In this study, a scintillation detector was used to measure the test pattern in air at isocenter for two proton beam energies (115 and 225 MeV) of two IBA universal nozzles (UN #1 and UN #2). Planar measurements were compared with calculated dose distributions based on the weighted superposition of location-independent (UN #1) or location-dependent (UN #2) spot profiles, previously measured using a pair-magnification method and between two nozzles. Results: Including the halo component below 1% of the central dose is shown to improve the gamma-map comparison between calculation and measurement from 94.9% to 98.4% using 2 mm/2% criteria for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #1. In contrast, including the halo component below 1% of the central dose does not improve the gamma agreement for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #2, due to the cutoff of the halo component at off-axis locations. When location-dependent spot profiles are used for calculation instead of spot profiles at central axis, the gamma agreement is improved from 98.0% to 99.5% using 2 mm/2% criteria. The two nozzles clearly have different characteristics, as a direct comparison of measured data shows a passing rate of 89.7% for the 115 MeV proton beam. At 225 MeV, the corresponding gamma comparisons agree better between measurement and calculation, and between measurements in the two nozzles. Conclusions: In addition to confirming the primary component of individual PBS spot profiles, a comprehensive test pattern is useful for the validation of the halo component at off-axis locations, especially for low energy protons.

  9. Quantum mechanical alternative to Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Osior, Agnieszka; Kamieński, Bohdan; Szymański, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum

  10. Testing a spin-2 mediator by angular observables in b →s μ+μ-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajfer, Svjetlana; Melić, Blaženka; Patra, Monalisa

    2018-05-01

    We consider the effects of the spin-2 particle in the b →s μ+μ- transition assuming that the spin-2 particle couples in a flavor-nonuniversal way to b and s quarks and in the leptonic sector couples only to the muons, thereby only contributing to the process b →s μ+μ-. The Bs-B¯s transition gives the strong constraint on the coupling of the spin-2 mediator and b and s quarks, while the observed discrepancy from the standard model prediction for the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g -2 )μ serves to constrain the μ coupling to a spin-2 particle. We find that the spin-2 particle can modify the angular observables in the B →K μ+μ- and B →K*μ+μ- decays and produce effects that do not exist in the standard model. The generated forward-backward asymmetries in these processes can reach 15%, while other observables for these decays receive tiny effects.

  11. Polarization correlations of 1S0 proton pairs as tests of Bell and Wigner inequalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polachic, C.; Rangacharyulu, C.; van den Berg, A.M.; Hamieh, S.; Harakeh, M.N.; Hunyadi, M.D.; de Huu, M.A.; Wörtche, H.J.; Heyse, J.; Bäumer, C.; Frekers, D.; Rakers, S.

    2004-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of nuclear physics experiments designed to overcome the loopholes of observer-dependent reality and satisfying the counterfactuality condition. In a first approach, we have measured polarization correlations of proton pairs produced in 12C(d, 2He) and 1H(d, 2He)

  12. Polarization correlations of S-1(0) proton pairs as tests of hidden-variable theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polachic, C; Rangacharyulu, C; van den Berg, AM; Hamieh, S; Harakeh, MN; Hunyadi, M; de Huu, MA; Wortche, HJ; Heyse, J; Baumer, C; Frekers, D; Brooke, JA; Busch, P

    2004-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of nuclear physics experiments designed to overcome the loopholes of observer-dependent reality and satisfying the counterfactuality condition. In a first approach, we have measured polarization correlations of S-1(0) proton pairs produced in C-12(d, He-2) and

  13. Lorentz-Symmetry Test at Planck-Scale Suppression With a Spin-Polarized 133Cs Cold Atom Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihan-Le Bars, H; Guerlin, C; Lasseri, R-D; Ebran, J-P; Bailey, Q G; Bize, S; Khan, E; Wolf, P

    2018-06-01

    We present the results of a local Lorentz invariance (LLI) test performed with the 133 Cs cold atom clock FO2, hosted at SYRTE. Such a test, relating the frequency shift between 133 Cs hyperfine Zeeman substates with the Lorentz violating coefficients of the standard model extension (SME), has already been realized by Wolf et al. and led to state-of-the-art constraints on several SME proton coefficients. In this second analysis, we used an improved model, based on a second-order Lorentz transformation and a self-consistent relativistic mean field nuclear model, which enables us to extend the scope of the analysis from purely proton to both proton and neutron coefficients. We have also become sensitive to the isotropic coefficient , another SME coefficient that was not constrained by Wolf et al. The resulting limits on SME coefficients improve by up to 13 orders of magnitude the present maximal sensitivities for laboratory tests and reach the generally expected suppression scales at which signatures of Lorentz violation could appear.

  14. Neutron spin quantum precession using multilayer spin splitters and a phase-spin echo interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Toru; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawai, Takeshi; Hino, Masahiro; Akiyoshi, Tsunekazu; Achiwa, Norio; Otake, Yoshie; Funahashi, Haruhiko.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron spin quantum precession by multilayer spin splitter has been demonstrated using a new spin interferometer. The multilayer spin splitter consists of a magnetic multilayer mirror on top, followed by a gap layer and a non magnetic multilayer mirror which are evaporated on a silicon substrate. Using the multilayer spin splitter, a polarized neutron wave in a magnetic field perpendicular to the polarization is split into two spin eigenstates with a phase shift in the direction of the magnetic field. The spin quantum precession is equal to the phase shift, which depends on the effective thickness of the gap layer. The demonstration experiments verify the multilayer spin splitter as a neutron spin precession device as well as the coherent superposition principle of the two spin eigenstates. We have developed a new phase-spin echo interferometer using the multilayer spin splitters. We present successful performance tests of the multilayer spin splitter and the phase-spin echo interferometer. (author)

  15. Test of the local form of higher-spin equations via AdS/CFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.E. Didenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The local form of higher-spin equations found recently to the second order [1] is shown to properly reproduce the anticipated AdS/CFT correlators for appropriate boundary conditions. It is argued that consistent AdS/CFT holography for the parity-broken boundary models needs a nontrivial modification of the bosonic truncation of the original higher-spin theory with the doubled number of fields, as well as a nonlinear deformation of the boundary conditions in the higher orders.

  16. Preliminary test of the MONDO project secondary fast and ultrafast neutrons tracker response using protons and MIP particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, G.; Battistoni, G.; Giacometti, V.; Gioscio, E.; Marafini, M.; Mirabelli, R.; Pinci, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Patera, V.

    2018-04-01

    The risk of developing a second malignant cancer as a late time consequence of undergoing a treatment, is one of the main concerns in particle therapy (PT). Since neutrons can release a significant dose far away from the tumour region, a precise characterisation of their production point, kinetic energy and abundance is eagerly needed. The treatment planning system (TPS) software that predicts the normal tissue toxicity in the target region and the risk of late complications in the whole body is currently based on the poorly known production cross-sections and will greatly benefit from improved precision double differential measurements. The MONDO (MOnitor for Neutron Dose in hadrOntherapy) project aims to build an ultrafast neutron tracker that could be used to characterise the production of secondary neutrons with energies in the 20–400 MeV range. The neutron tracking will proceed via the detection of recoil protons produced in two consecutive (n, p) elastic scattering interactions. The MONDO detector consists of a 10 × 10 × 20 cm3 matrix of thin scintillating fibres, arranged in orthogonally oriented layers. A compact read-out sensor with single photon detection capabilities employing the CMOS SPAD technology has been developed in collaboration with Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK). The detector will be completed by the end of 2018. A 4 × 4 × 4.8 cm3 prototype has been built using 250 μ m thick scintillating fibres of squared section and was tested using a proton beam and minimum ionising particles. In this contribution we present the experimental results related to the prototype test performed with a proton beam at the Proton Therapy Centre of the Trento Hospital (PTC) in May 2017. The results are compared with the results of a Monte Carlo simulation performed with the FLUKA software.

  17. TESTING MODELS OF MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION OF NEUTRON STARS WITH THE STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THEIR SPIN EVOLUTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuangnan; Xie Yi

    2012-01-01

    We test models for the evolution of neutron star (NS) magnetic fields (B). Our model for the evolution of the NS spin is taken from an analysis of pulsar timing noise presented by Hobbs et al.. We first test the standard model of a pulsar's magnetosphere in which B does not change with time and magnetic dipole radiation is assumed to dominate the pulsar's spin-down. We find that this model fails to predict both the magnitudes and signs of the second derivatives of the spin frequencies (ν-double dot). We then construct a phenomenological model of the evolution of B, which contains a long-term decay (LTD) modulated by short-term oscillations; a pulsar's spin is thus modified by its B-evolution. We find that an exponential LTD is not favored by the observed statistical properties of ν-double dot for young pulsars and fails to explain the fact that ν-double dot is negative for roughly half of the old pulsars. A simple power-law LTD can explain all the observed statistical properties of ν-double dot. Finally, we discuss some physical implications of our results to models of the B-decay of NSs and suggest reliable determination of the true ages of many young NSs is needed, in order to constrain further the physical mechanisms of their B-decay. Our model can be further tested with the measured evolutions of ν-dot and ν-double dot for an individual pulsar; the decay index, oscillation amplitude, and period can also be determined this way for the pulsar.

  18. Polarized protons at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krisch, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Various aspects of the project of modifying the Brookhaven AGS for the production of polarized proton beams are discussed. It is observed that pure spin state cross sections are of great importance in many investigations since differences between spin states are frequently significant. Financial and technical aspects of the modification of the Brookhaven accelerator are also discussed

  19. A Shandon PapSpin liquid-based gynecological test: A split-sample and direct-to-vial test with histology follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimiene J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies for liquid-based Papanicolaou (Pap tests reveal that liquid-based cytology (LBC is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional Pap smear. Although there is research on ThinPrep and SurePath systems, information is lacking to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of systems based on cytocentrifugation. This study is designed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the Shandon PapSpin (ThermoShandon, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA liquid-based gynecological system. We used split-sample and direct-to-vial study design. Materials and Methods: 2,945 women referred to prophylactic check-up were enrolled in this study. Split sample design was used in 1,500 women and residual cervical cytology specimen from all these cases was placed in fluid for PapSpin preparation after performing conventional smear. The direct-to-vial study was carried out in another cohort of 1,445 women in whom the entire cervical material was investigated using only the PapSpin technique. Follow up histological diagnoses for 141 women were obtained from both study arms following 189 abnormal cytology cases. 80 LBC cases from the split sample group and 61 LBC cases in the direct-to-vial group were correlated with the histology results. The sensitivity and secificity of the conventional smear and PapSpin tests in both study arms were compared. Results: In the split sample group, conventional smears showed a higher proportion of ASC-US (atypical cells undetermined significance: 31 (2.1% vs 10 (0.7% in PapSpin (P = 0.001. A higher proportion of unsatisfactory samples was found in the conventional smear group: 25 (1.7% vs 6 (0.4% cases (P = 0.001. In the split sample group, the sensitivity of the conventional and PapSpin tests was 68.7% vs 78.1%, and the specificity 93.8% vs 91.8%, respectively. In the direct to vial group PapSpin sensitivity was 75.9% and specificity 96.5%. The differences in sensitivity and specificity were not significant. The

  20. Development and test of model apparatus of non-contact spin processor for photo mask production applying radial-type superconducting magnetic bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiyo; Fukui, Satoshi; Maezawa, Masaru; Ogawa, Jun; Oka, Tetsuo; Sato, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We develop test spinner for non-contact spinning process in photo mask production. ► This test spinner shows improved spinning ability compared with our previous one. ► Large vertical movement of turn table still occurs during acceleration. ► Method to control vertical movement of turn table should be developed in next step. -- Abstract: In semiconductor devices, miniaturization of circuit patterning on wafers is required for higher integrations of circuit elements. Therefore, very high tolerance and quality are also required for patterning of microstructures of photo masks. The deposition of particulate dusts generated from mechanical bearings of the spin processor in the patterns of the photo mask is one of main causes of the deterioration of pattern preciseness. In our R and D, application of magnetic bearing utilizing bulk high temperature superconductors to the spin processors has been proposed. In this study, we develop a test spinner for the non-contact spinning process in the photo mask production system. The rotation test by using this test spinner shows that this test spinner accomplishes the improvement of the spinning ability compared with the test spinner developed in our previous study. This paper describes the rotation test results of the new test spinner applying the magnetic bearing with bulk high temperature superconductors

  1. Where does the nucleon spin come from?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.; CEA Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette; Karliner, M.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes current thinking on exactly how quarks form neutrons and protons, and where nucleon spin is derived. The European Muon Collaboration has recently shown that, contrary to previous thinking, little of the proton spin is carried by quarks, rather that virtual strange quarks in a sea contribute to nucleon spin. Thus a fundamental gap is revealed in our understanding of nucleon structure which is explored in this article, by looking at several ways of accounting for these surprising results using the ''axiaanomaly'' and the idea of gluon polarization. Future experiments already planned, on polarized scattering, should resolve the enigma of proton spin. (UK)

  2. Selection and acquisition of data for the measurement of the spin rotation parameters in pion-proton scattering at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoul, Jean-Claude

    1971-01-01

    The experiment consists in measuring the polarisation of the recoil protons from elastic scattering of positive or negative pions on a polarised proton target (L. M. N.). The polarimeter consists in carbon plates alternated with wire spark chambers, The associated electronics has the following main functions: selective triggering of the spark chambers, acquisition and transcription on magnetic tape of all relevant information, continuous check of the various parts of the equipment. About one hundred scintillation counters provide information on the geometry of the pion-proton scattering. A fast logic treats these information. This logic, made of integrated circuits MECL, generates the selective trigger with a transit time of less than 150 ns, it reduces the triggering rate on background events by almost one order of magnitude. A small computer is used for acquisition and transcription of the data, and for the control of the experiment. (author) [fr

  3. Test of supersymmetry in the 193Ir→194Pt proton stripping reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergnes, M.; Rotbard, G.; Kalifa, J.; Berrier-Ronsin, G.; Vernotte, J.; Seltz, R.; Burke, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    A breakdown of the selection rules of the supersymmetry model is observed for the population of the 0 2 + and 2 2 + levels of 194 Pt in the 193 Ir → 194 Pt proton stripping reactions performed using the Orsay and Mc Master University tandem accelerators. The existence of other violations in the neighbouring nuclei leads to believe that we are seeing the limitations of the supersymmetry scheme itself, at least for particle transfer reactions

  4. Isoscalar spin excitation in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlet, M.; Willis, A.; Van de Wiele, J.; Marty, N.; Johnson, B.N.; Bimbot, L.; Guillot, J.; Jourdan, F.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Rosier, L.; Glashausser, C.; Beatty, D.; Edwards, G.W.R.; Green, A.; Djalali, C.; Youn, M.Y.

    1992-01-01

    A signature S d y of isoscalar spin-transfer strength has been tested in the inelastic scattering of 400 MeV deuterons from 12 C. It was then applied to the study of 40 Ca over an angular range from 3 deg to 7 deg (momentum transfer range from 0.26 to 0.8 fm -1 ) and an excitation energy range from 6.25 to 42 MeV. This is the first study of isoscalar spin strength in the continuum. Spin excitations were found in the 9 MeV region, and over a broad range in the continuum with a cluster of strength around 15 MeV. The results are compared with spin-flip probability measurements in proton scattering. In contrast to the total relative spin response, which is strongly enhanced at high excitation, the isoscalar relative spin response is roughly consistent with non interacting Fermi gas values. (authors) 39 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  5. A next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the spin structure function $g_1$

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067425; Arik, E; Badelek, B; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Birsa, R; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kukhtin, V V; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Rijllart, A; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1998-01-01

    We present a next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the presently available data on the spin structure function $g_1$ including the final data from the Spin Muon Collaboration (SMC). We present resu lts for the first moments of the proton, deuteron and neutron structure functions, and determine singlet and non-singlet parton distributions in two factorization schemes. We also test the Bjor ken sum rule and find agreement with the theoretical prediction at the level of 10\\%.

  6. Cross sections and transverse single-spin asymmetries in forward neutral-pion production from proton collisions at sqrt[s]=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-04-30

    Measurements of the production of forward high-energy pi(0) mesons from transversely polarized proton collisions at sqrt[s]=200 GeV are reported. The cross section is generally consistent with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The analyzing power is small at x(F) below about 0.3, and becomes positive and large at higher x(F), similar to the trend in data at sqrt[s]1 GeV/c at a polarized proton collider.

  7. Acceleration of polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1998-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. Full Siberian snakes are being developed for RHIC to make the acceleration of polarized protons to 250 GeV possible. A similar scheme is being studied for the 800 GeV HERA proton accelerator

  8. Experimental study of the test module of the electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter for the ATLAS experiment. Study of the spin correlation in the production of pairs tt-bar; Etude experimentale des performances du module 0 du calorimetre electromagnetique bouchon d'ATLAS. Etude de la correlation de spin dans la production des paires tt-bar au LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinz, L

    2001-06-01

    LHC, the future CERN proton collider, will start in 2006. It will be devoted to a better understanding of the Standard Model and new physics research. With a 10 {integral}b{sup -1} per year at low luminosity during the first three years, then 100 {integral}b{sup -1} per year, and energy of 14 TeV in the center of mass, the LHC is designed to discover the Standard or SUSY Higgs boson, or probe signature of new physics. ATLAS, one of the four experiments at the LHC, can study a large physics range, as Higgs boson, top and bottom, gauge bosons and new particles expected by SUSY model or other models beyond the Standard Model. The CPPM laboratory is responsible of a part of the electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter for the ATLAS experiment. In 1999, an ATLAS-like prototype of module was stacked in Marseille and intensively tested at CERN. Description of the calorimeter and a part of test-beam results are presented in this PhD manuscript. In parallel, a study about potentiality of the tt-bar spin correlation measurement was done. The high tt-bar statistic produced at the LHC allows to explore the quark top properties in details and being sensitive to new physics phenomena. Signatures of such physics can be extracted from tt-bar decay product angular distributions which are sensitive to tt-bar spin correlation. (authors)

  9. Transverse target-spin asymmetry associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton and a resulting model-dependent constraint on the total angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zhenyu

    2007-02-15

    In this thesis we report on the rst results on the transverse target-spin asymmetry associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton. It is shown that this asymmetry can provide one of the rare possibilities to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) E of the nucleon, and thus, through models for E, also to the total angular momentum of u and d quarks in the nucleon. The measurement was performed using the 27.6 GeV positron beam of the HERA storage ring and the transversely polarized hydrogen target of the HERMES experiment at DESY. The two leading azimuthal amplitudes of the asymmetry are extracted from the HERMES 2002-2004 data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 65.3 pb.1. By comparing the results obtained at HERMES and theoretical predictions based on a phenomenological model of GPDs, we obtain a model-dependent constraint on the total angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  10. Transverse target-spin asymmetry associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton and a resulting model-dependent constraint on the total angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Zhenyu

    2007-02-01

    In this thesis we report on the rst results on the transverse target-spin asymmetry associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton. It is shown that this asymmetry can provide one of the rare possibilities to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) E of the nucleon, and thus, through models for E, also to the total angular momentum of u and d quarks in the nucleon. The measurement was performed using the 27.6 GeV positron beam of the HERA storage ring and the transversely polarized hydrogen target of the HERMES experiment at DESY. The two leading azimuthal amplitudes of the asymmetry are extracted from the HERMES 2002-2004 data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 65.3 pb.1. By comparing the results obtained at HERMES and theoretical predictions based on a phenomenological model of GPDs, we obtain a model-dependent constraint on the total angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  11. High-x sub T single-spin asymmetry in. pi. sup 0 and. eta. production at x sub F =0 by 200 GeV polarized antiprotons and protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D L; Akchurin, N; Belikov, N I; Bystricky, J; Corcoran, M D; Cossairt, J D; Cranshaw, J; Derevschikov, A A; En' yo, H; Funahashi, H; Goto, Y; Grachov, O A; Grosnick, D P; Hill, D A; Imai, K; Itow, Y; Iwatani, K; Krueger, K W; Kuroda, K; Laghai, M; Lehar, F; Lesquen, A de; Lopiano, D; Luehring, F C; Maki, T; Makino, S; Masaike, A; Matulenko, Yu A; Meschanin, A P; Michalowicz, A; Miller, D H; Miyake, K; Nagamine, T; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Nessi, M; Nguyen, C; Nurushev, S B; Ohashi, Y; Onel, Y; Patalakha, D I; Pauletta, G; Penzo, A; Read, A L; Roberts, J B; Van Rossum, L; Rykov, V L; Saito, N; Salvato, G; Schiavon, P; Skeens, J; Solovyanov, V L; Spinka, H; Takashima, R; Takeutchi, F; Tamura, N; Tanaka, N; Underwood, D G; Vasiliev, A N; Villari, A; White, J L; Yamashita, S; Yokosawa, A; Yoshida, T; Zanetti, A [T.W. Bonner Nuclear Lab., Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States) Dept. of Physics, Univ. Iowa, Iowa City, IA (Unite; FNAL E704 Collaboration

    1992-02-20

    A measurement of the single-spin asymmetry A{sub N} in p{up arrow}+p{yields}{pi}{sup 0}+X at 200 GeV with x{sub F}=0 shows a transition in the production process from a 'low-x{sub T}' regime with A{sub N}=0, through an intermediate region of negative asymmetry, to a 'high-x{sub T}' regime with A{sub N}>0.3. This transition occurs at x{sub T}{approx equal}0.4 and is consistent with x{sub T}-scaling of A{sub N} in pion production using polarized beams or targets from {radical}-s=5.2 to 19.4 GeV. Results for A{sub N} in {eta} production by polarized protons and in {pi}{sup 0} production by polarized antiprotons are also presented. (orig.).

  12. A high-statistics measurement of transverse spin effects in dihadron production from muon-proton semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joerg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu A.; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W. D.; Nunes, A. S.; Orlov, I.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rychter, A.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2014-01-01

    A measurement of the azimuthal asymmetry in dihadron production in deep-inelastic scattering of muons on transversely polarised proton (NH3) targets is presented. They provide independent access to the transversity distribution functions through the measurement of the Collins asymmetry in single

  13. Prospects for spin physics at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinett, R.W.; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA

    1995-06-01

    The proposal to perform polarized proton-proton collisions at collider energies at RHIC is reviewed. After a brief reminder of the desirability of high energy spin physics measurements, we discuss the machine parameters and detector features which are taken to define a program of spin physics at RHIC. Some of the many physics processes which can provide information on polarized parton distributions and the spin-dependence of QCD and the electroweak model at RHIC energies are discussed

  14. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous $\\mathrm{HVV}$ couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Kim, Jae Yool; Moon, Dong Ho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; 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Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Krohn, Michael; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vega Morales, Roberto; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gainer, J.; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Ratnikov, Fedor; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Malik, Sudhir; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Korjenevski, Sergey; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-07-13

    The study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z} \\mathrm{Z}$, $\\mathrm{Z}\\gamma^*$, $\\gamma^*\\gamma^* \\rightarrow 4\\ell$, $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{W} \\mathrm{W} \\rightarrow \\ell\

  15. Polarization correlations of {sup 1}S{sub 0} proton pairs as tests of hidden-variable theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polachic, C.; Rangacharyulu, C.; Berg, A.M. van den; Hamieh, S.; Harakeh, M.N.; Hunyadi, M.; Huu, M.A. de; Woertche, H.J.; Heyse, J.; Baeumer, C.; Frekers, D.; Rakers, S.; Brooke, J.A.; Busch, P

    2004-03-22

    We are investigating the feasibility of nuclear physics experiments designed to overcome the loopholes of observer-dependent reality and satisfying the counterfactuality condition. In a first approach, we have measured polarization correlations of {sup 1}S{sub 0} proton pairs produced in {sup 12}C(d, {sup 2}He) and {sup 1}H(d, {sup 2}He) reactions in one setting. The results of these measurements are used to test the Bell and Wigner-Belinfante inequalities against the predictions of quantum mechanics.

  16. The NEOTωIST mission (Near-Earth Object Transfer of angular momentum spin test)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drube, Line; Harris, Alan W.; Engel, Kilian; Falke, Albert; Johann, Ulrich; Eggl, Siegfried; Cano, Juan L.; Ávila, Javier Martín; Schwartz, Stephen R.; Michel, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    We present a concept for a kinetic impactor demonstration mission, which intends to change the spin rate of a previously-visited asteroid, in this case 25143 Itokawa. The mission would determine the efficiency of momentum transfer during an impact, and help mature the technology required for a kinetic impactor mission, both of which are important precursors for a future space mission to deflect an asteroid by collisional means in an emergency situation. Most demonstration mission concepts to date are based on changing an asteroid's heliocentric orbit and require a reconnaissance spacecraft to measure the very small orbital perturbation due to the impact. Our concept is a low-cost alternative, requiring only a single launch. Taking Itokawa as an example, an estimate of the order of magnitude of the change in the spin period, δP, with such a mission results in δP of 4 min (0.5%), which could be detectable by Earth-based observatories. Our preliminary study found that a mission concept in which an impactor produces a change in an asteroid's spin rate could provide valuable information for the assessment of the viability of the kinetic-impactor asteroid deflection concept. Furthermore, the data gained from the mission would be of great benefit for our understanding of the collisional evolution of asteroids and the physics behind crater and ejecta-cloud development.

  17. RHIC spin physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.

    1994-01-01

    The physics potential of colliding beams of protons, polarized either longitudinally or transversely, at RHIC is remarkable. A luminosity of L = 2 x 10 32 cm -2 with 70% polarized beams will be available with up to 250 GeV energy in each beam. The proposal to collide polarized protons in RHIC was submitted in August 1992 and approved in October 1993. We have funding for R ampersand D on Siberian Snakes, so that RHIC will be able to accelerate polarized protons early in its program. The expected date of the first heavy ion collisions is 1999. The spin physics program includes measurement of gluon and sea quark polarization in the longitudinally polarized proton, measurement and then application of parity violation in W and Z production, measurement of hard scattering parton-parton asymmetries, and quark polarization or transversity in transversely polarized protons. Single spin asymmetries allow sensitive searches for parity violation (longitudinal polarization), and correlations between quark spin and gluons (transverse). Probes include direct photons (to P T = 20 GeV/c), jets (to P T > 50 GeV/c), Drell-Yan pairs to M ell ell = 9 GeV, W ± , Z. This program is described in our Particle World paper. Here we will emphasize the new information included in our Update, given to the Brookhaven PAC this September

  18. RHIC spin physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.

    1993-01-01

    The physics potential of colliding beams of protons, polarized either longitudinally or transversely, at RHIC is remarkable. A luminosity of L = 2 x 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 with 70% polarized beams will be available with up to 250 GeV energy in each beam. The proposal to collide polarized protons in RHIC was submitted in August 1992 and approved in October 1993, just after this workshop. The collaboration has been encouraged to complete R ampersand D on Siberian Snakes, so that RHIC will be able to accelerate polarized protons early in its program. The expected date of the first heavy ion collisions is 1999. The spin physics program includes measurement of gluon and sea quark polarization in the longitudinally polarized proton, measurement and then application of parity violation in W and Z production, measurement of hard scattering parton-parton asymmetries, and quark polarization or transversity in transversely polarized protons. Single spin asymmetries allow sensitive searches for parity violation (longitudinal polarization), and correlations between quark spin and gluons (transverse). Probes include direct photons (to p T = 20 GeV/c), jets (to p T > 50 GeV/c), Drell-Yan pairs (to m ll = 9 GeV), W +/- , Z. Here, the collaboration emphasizes the new information included in the Update, given to the Brookhaven PAC this September

  19. The spin structure function g(1)(p) of the proton and a test of the Bjorken sum rulecf

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregisilio, A.; Azevedo, C.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.V.; Eversheim, P.; Eyrich, W.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger jr., M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse-Perdekapm, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Yu.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jörg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.; Khokhlov, Y.; Kisselev, Y.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.; Kolosov, V.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.; Kotzinian, A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Y.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W. D.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D.; Rychter, A.; Samoylenko, V.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, Aleš; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 753, FEB 10 (2016), s. 18-28 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : deep-inelastic-scattering * dependent structure-function * parton distributions Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.807, year: 2016

  20. The spin-dependent structure function of the proton g(1)(p) and a test of the Bjorken sum rule

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alekseev, M.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Austregisilio, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.; Chaberny, D.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Cotic, D.; Crespo, M.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Denisov, O.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Donskov, S.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Efremov, A.V.; El Alaoui, A.; Eversheim, P.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger jr., M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Friedrich, J.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.; Gazda, R.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heinsius, F.; Hermann, R.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Höppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Ilgner, C.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jasinski, P.; Jegou, G.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Käfer, W.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.; Khokhlov, Y.; Kisselev, Y.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.; Kolosov, V.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konopka, R.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Krämer, M.; Kral, A.; Kroumchtein, Z.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Lauser, L.; Le Goff, J.; Lednev, A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Y.; Moinester, M.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nassalski, J.; Negrini, S.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.; Pontecorvo, G.; Pretz, J.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Ryabchikov, D.; Samoylenko, V.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlütter, T.; Schmitt, L.; Schopferer, S.; Schröder, W.; Shevchenko, O.; Siebert, H.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, Aleš; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Takekawa, S.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.; Vossen, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhao, J.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 690, č. 5 (2010), s. 466-472 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 492 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : deep inelastic scattering * structure function * QCD analysis * Bjorken sum rule Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 5.255, year: 2010

  1. Overview of spin physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1992-01-01

    Spin physics activities at medium and high energies became significantly active when polarized targets and polarized beams became accessible for hadron-hadron scattering experiments. My overview of spin physics will be inclined to the study of strong interaction using facilities at Argonne ZGS, Brookhaven AGS (including RHIC), CERN, Fermilab, LAMPF, an SATURNE. In 1960 accelerator physicists had already been convinced that the ZGS could be unique in accelerating a polarized beam; polarized beams were being accelerated through linear accelerators elsewhere at that time. However, there was much concern about going ahead with the construction of a polarized beam because (i) the source intensity was not high enough to accelerate in the accelerator, (ii) the use of the accelerator would be limited to only polarized-beam physics, that is, proton-proton interaction, and (iii) p-p elastic scattering was not the most popular topic in high-energy physics. In fact, within spin physics, π-nucleon physics looked attractive, since the determination of spin and parity of possible πp resonances attracted much attention. To proceed we needed more data beside total cross sections and elastic differential cross sections; measurements of polarization and other parameters were urgently needed. Polarization measurements had traditionally been performed by analyzing the spin of recoil protons. The drawbacks of this technique are: (i) it involves double scattering, resulting in poor accuracy of the data, and (ii) a carbon analyzer can only be used for a limited region of energy

  2. Measurement of the spin asymmetry of the beam in the polarized virtual Compton scattering on the proton. Study of the nucleon's energy spectra through the QCD-type potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensafa, I.K.

    2006-05-01

    The first part of this work presents the analysis and results of the VCS-SSA (virtual Compton scattering - single spin asymmetry) experiment at MAMI (Mainz). It was carried out with beam energy 883 MeV and longitudinal polarization (about 80%), at virtual photon four-momentum transfer squared (Q 2 = 0.35 GeV 2 ) to measure the beam asymmetry in the ep → epγ and ep → epπ 0 reactions. The asymmetry obtained in photon (resp. pion) electro-production is between 0-15% (resp. 0-2%). The dispersion relation model for virtual Compton scattering and MAID model (for π 0 ) reproduce the amplitude globally but not completely the shape of the asymmetry. Perhaps this discrepancy is due to an imperfect parameterization of some pion production multipoles (γ * N → πN). The second part is dedicated to the study of the nucleon energy spectrum in ground-state L=0 and excited-state L=1 in the quark model, using the Coulomb + linear potential type (CL) and a relativistic correction. The hyperfine correction is applied to discriminate the nucleon masses. The values of the mass found for the proton and the Δ(1232) are respectively equal to (968 MeV, 1168 MeV), and the masses of the excited states are between 1564 - 1607 MeV. This part is completed by an application of the CL model to an approximate calculation of generalized polarizabilities of the proton. (author)

  3. Nucleon spin structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    There has been recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future, and discuss the polarization dependence of inclusive hadron production. 35 refs

  4. Nuclear spectroscopy of very proton rich nuclei through HI induced reactions; the 14s high spin isomer in /sup 95/Pd

    CERN Document Server

    Nolte, E; Geier, R; Gui, S Z; Heim, U; Hick, H; Komninos, P; Korschinek, G; Kubik, P; Morinaga, H; Schollmeier, W

    1981-01-01

    /sup 40/Ca, /sup 58/Ni and /sup 60/Ni beams from the Munich tandem and the Munich heavy ion postaccelerator have been used to produce very proton rich nuclei in the N=50 N=82 regions. The residual nuclei have been studied with the help of gamma and particle spectroscopy. The level schemes of /sup 95/Rh, /sup 146/Dy and /sup 150/Er and the beta -decay schemes, /sup 95/Pd/sup m/ to /sup 95/Rh, /sup 144/Tb to /sup 144/Gd, /sup 146/Ho to /sup 146/Dy to /sup 146/Tb to /sup 146/Gd, /sup 148/Er to /sup 148/Ho to /sup 148/Dy and /sup 150/Tm to /sup 150/Er to /sup 150/Dy have been investigated. beta delayed proton emission from a J/sup pi / approximately=21/sup +/ isomeric state in /sup 95/Pd has been observed. (12 refs).

  5. Proton T2 Relaxation effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide on fast spin echo sequence. Influence of echo number (even or odd) of effective TE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Maki, Toshio; Kitagawa, Matsuo; Suzuki, Takeshi; Fujita, Isao

    1999-01-01

    The T 2 relaxation effect of the fast spin echo sequence (FSE) was investigated using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles. When even echoes were used as the effective TE of FSE, the signal intensity ratio [signal intensity of FSE/signal intensity of conventional spin echo sequence (CSE)] of FSE and CSE increased, whereas the T 2 relaxation effect of SPIO with FSE was reduced. However, when odd echoes were used, neither signal intensity changed, and weakening of the T 2 relaxation effect, considered a problem with FSE, was reduced. This phenomenon was not observed when the refocusing flip angle was changed to 30 and 60 degrees. However, it was observed when the refocusing flip angle was 120 and 150 degrees. Thus, this phenomenon can be considered to be related to oscillation in longitudinal magnetization when using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique. (author)

  6. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  7. A high-statistics measurement of transverse spin effects in dihadron production from muon-proton semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexandrov, Y.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A measurement of the azimuthal asymmetry in dihadron production in deep-inelastic scattering of muons on transversely polarised proton (NH3) targets is presented. They provide independent access to the transversity distribution functions through the measurement of the Collins asymmetry in single hadron production. The data were taken in the year 2010 with the COMPASS spectrometer using a 160 GeV/c muon beam of the CERN SPS, increasing by a factor of about four the overall statistics with resp...

  8. Cross sections and transverse single-spin asymmetries in forward jet production from proton collisions at s=500 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Bland

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the production of forward jets from transversely polarized proton collisions at s=500 GeV conducted at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC are reported. Our measured jet cross section is consistent with hard scattering expectations. Our measured analyzing power for forward jet production is small and positive, and provides constraints on the Sivers functions that are related to partonic orbital angular momentum through theoretical models.

  9. Spin tests for intermediate states in radiative psi'(3684) decay chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, P.K.; Hey, A.J.G.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the multiple angular-correlation functions for the sequential decays psi'(1 - ) → γ + chi, chi → M anti M, where M is a spinless meson, and psi'(1 - ) → γ 1 + chi, chi → γ 2 + psi, psi (1 - ) → l anti l, when the psi' is formed in e + e - collisions, shows that these can unambiguously distinguish between the spin assignments s/sub chi/ = 0, 1 or 2 for the intermediate states occurring in these decays, as well as determine the multipole amplitudes contributing to the radiative transitions. No dynamical assumptions are made beyond the conservation of angular momentum and parity; recoils are fully taken into account

  10. Comparison of Enamel and Stainless Steel Electron Cloud Clearing Electrodes Tested in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Mahner, C; Wendel, JC

    2010-01-01

    During the 2007 run with the nominal LHC proton beam, electron cloud has been clearly identified and characterized in the PS using a dedicated setup with shielded button-type pickups. Efficient electron cloud suppression could be achieved with a stainless steel stripline-type electrode biased to negative and positive voltages up to ± 1 kV. For the 2008 run, a second setup was installed in straight section 84 of the PS where the stainless steel was replaced by a stripline composed of an enamel insulator with a resistive coating. In contrast to ordinary stripline electrodes this setup presents a very low beam coupling impedance and could thus be envisaged for long sections of high-intensity machines. Here, we present first comparative measurements with this new type of enamel clearing electrode using the nominal LHC beam with 72 bunches and 25 ns bunch spacing.

  11. Design, manufacture and spin test of high contact ratio helicopter transmission utilizing Self-Aligning Bearingless Planetary (SABP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folenta, Dezi; Lebo, William

    1988-01-01

    A 450 hp high ratio Self-Aligning Bearingless Planetary (SABP) for a helicopter application was designed, manufactured, and spin tested under NASA contract NAS3-24539. The objective of the program was to conduct research and development work on a high contact ratio helical gear SABP to reduce weight and noise and to improve efficiency. The results accomplished include the design, manufacturing, and no-load spin testing of two prototype helicopter transmissions, rated at 450 hp with an input speed of 35,000 rpm and an output speed of 350 rpm. The weight power density ratio of these gear units is 0.33 lb hp. The measured airborne noise at 35,000 rpm input speed and light load is 94 dB at 5 ft. The high speed, high contact ratio SABP transmission appears to be significantly lighter and quieter than comtemporary helicopter transmissions. The concept of the SABP is applicable not only to high ratio helicopter type transmissions but also to other rotorcraft and aircraft propulsion systems.

  12. Spin Tests of 1/20-Scale Models of the Chance Vought Revised XF6U-1 and F6U-1 Airplanes, TED No. NACA 2390

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Berman, Theodore

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on the 1/20-scale model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane altered to represent the XF6U-1 airplane as it will be spin-tested in flight, and also altered to represent the F6U-1 airplane as it will be produced for service use. Spin tests were made to determine the effects of control settings and movements at the normal loading. The results show that the spins obtained on the revised XF6U-1 airplane will be oscillatory in roll and yaw and that recoveries by rudder reversal will be rapid. Model test results indicate that the F6U-1 airplane will probably not spin. Inasmuch as the results of this investigation show that the new designs are as good as or better than the original XF6U-1 design in regard to spin recovery, it is felt that the conclusions and recommendations reached for the original design can be applied to the new designs for all loading conditions.

  13. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cudd, A B; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-08-28

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A_{LL}, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy sqrt[s]=200  GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x>0.05.

  14. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at √{s }=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cudd, A. B.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, AL L, in polarized p p collisions at center-of-mass energy √{s }=200 GeV . The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC p p data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3 σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x >0.05 .

  15. How It's Made - Polarized Proton Beam (444th Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenski, Anatoli

    2008-01-01

    Experiments with polarized beams at RHIC will provide fundamental tests of QCD, and the electro-weak interaction reveal the spin structure of the proton. Polarization asymmetries and parity violation are the strong signatures for identification of the fundamental processes, which are otherwise inaccessible. Such experiments require the maximum available luminosity and therefore polarization must be obtained as an extra beam quality without sacrificing intensity. There are proposals to polarize the high-energy proton beam in the storage rings by the Stern-Gerlach effect or spin-filter techniques. But so far, the only practically available option is acceleration of the polarized beam produced in the source and taking care of polarization survival during acceleration and storage. Two major innovations -- the 'Siberian Snake' technique for polarization preservation during acceleration and high current polarized proton sources make spin physics with the high-energy polarized beams feasible. The RHIC is the first high-energy collider, where the 'Siberian Snake' technique allowed of polarized proton beam acceleration up-to 250 GeV energy. The RHIC unique Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source produces sufficient polarized beam intensity for complete saturation of the RHIC acceptance. This polarization technique is based on spin-transfer collisions between a proton or atomic hydrogen beam of a few keV beam energy and optically pumped alkali metal vapors. From the first proposal and feasibility studies to the operational source this development can be considered as example of successful unification of individual scientists ingenuity, international collaboration and modern technology application for creation of a new polarization technique, which allowed of two-to-three order of magnitude polarized beam intensity increase sufficient for loading the RHIC to its full capacity for polarization studies.

  16. Single-spin asymmetry in electro-production of {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} pairs from a transversely polarized proton target at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiao-Rui

    2008-10-15

    In this thesis, the measurement of an azimuthal amplitude of the asymmetry in the lepto-production of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} pairs at the HERMES experiment is reported. The experiment was carried out at DESY in Germany, utilizing the longitudinally polarized 27.6 GeV electron/positron beam of the HERA storage ring in combination with a longitudinally or transversely polarized gaseous target internal to the beam pipe. For the present measurement, the transversely polarized proton target was used and the beam polarization was averaged out in order to measure the asymmetry A{sub UT}. A Ring Imaging Cerenkov (RICH) detector allows the precise identification of pions, kaons and protons over essentially the entire momentum range of the experiment. The asymmetry A{sub UT} for {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} pair production was measured for the first time in the world by HERMES. The amplitudes are extracted as functions of different kinematic variables, which can facilitate the comparison with the theoretical models and the extraction of transversity with combination of the measurement of the dihadron fragmentation function. (orig.)

  17. Single-spin asymmetry in electro-production of π+ π- pairs from a transversely polarized proton target at the HERMES experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiao-Rui

    2008-09-01

    In this thesis, the measurement of an azimuthal amplitude of the asymmetry in the lepto-production of π + π - pairs at the HERMES experiment is reported. The experiment was carried out at DESY in Germany, utilizing the longitudinally polarized 27.6 GeV electron/positron beam of the HERA storage ring in combination with a longitudinally or transversely polarized gaseous target internal to the beam pipe. For the present measurement, the transversely polarized proton target was used and the beam polarization was averaged out in order to measure the asymmetry A UT . A Ring Imaging Cerenkov (RICH) detector allows the precise identification of pions, kaons and protons over essentially the entire momentum range of the experiment. The asymmetry A UT for π + π - pair production was measured for the first time in the world by HERMES. The amplitudes are extracted as functions of different kinematic variables, which can facilitate the comparison with the theoretical models and the extraction of transversity with combination of the measurement of the dihadron fragmentation function. (orig.)

  18. Spin manipulation and spin-lattice interaction in magnetic colloidal quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Moro, F.; Turyanska, L.; Granwehr, J.; Patane, A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the spin-lattice interaction and coherent manipulation of electron spins in Mn-doped colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) by electron spin resonance. We show that the phase memory time,TM, is limited by Mn-Mn dipolar interactions, hyperfine interactions of the protons (H1) on the QD capping ligands with Mn ions in their proximity (

  19. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  20. DUBNA: Spin effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Earlier this year, a collaboration of Russian, Ukrainian and French laboratories measured the difference between the polarized neutron and proton total reaction rate (total cross section difference) at slightly higher energies than previous experiments, providing an interesting hint of an effect predicted by theory. This was measured using a beam of longitudinally polarized neutrons and a longitudinally polarized proton target with parallel and antiparallel polarization directions. The polarized neutron beam, from the break-up of polarized deuterons, was accelerated by the Synchrophasotron at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Laboratory of High Energies, Dubna (Russian Federation). The polarized target, 20 cm long and 3 cm in diameter, provided by DAPNIA (Saclay, France) and Argonne (USA), had also been used in 1989-1990 at Fermilab for the E704 experiment. Equipment from Saclay and Argonne was shipped to Dubna and work started in June 1994. The International Association for the Promotion of Cooperation with Scientists from the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union (INTAS) supported the construction and improvement of the target in a suitable transportable form. The target was mounted in the JINR Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (LNP) by experts from DAPNIA (Saclay), JINR Dubna (LNP, LHE and Laboratory of Particle Physics - LPP), Gatchina (Russia), RASMoscow and the Kharkov (Ukraine) laboratories. The Saturne National Laboratory (Saclay), helped with computer programmes for the NMR target polarization measurements. Apparatus was tested in early February. The beam of 2 x 109 polarized deuterons produced 106 polarized neutrons at 3.6 GeV. The neutron beam polarization was about 52%. The new superconducting Nuclotron accelerator should allow the beam intensity to be increased and beam quality improved after an upgrade of the injection system. Preliminary results for the polarized neutron-proton cross section difference at neutron kinetic

  1. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

  2. The research of the beam phase and energy test system for DTL in the proton accelerator of CSNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lei; Liu Shubin; An Qi

    2009-01-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source is now in the process of research and design,in which the proton accelerator is an important part. This beam phase and energy test system imports the signal from the Drift Tube Linac and computes its phase and energy, which is feedback to tune the beam. The signals to be processed here are modulated impulses of high frequency (repetition rate is 352.2 MHz, while the leading edge is only hundreds of ps), and the dynamic range of the amplitude is from 20 mv to 900 mv (peak to peak); therefore, special techniques are required to obtain its phase information. Moreover, to confirm the basic theory of corresponding techniques and evaluate their effects, some simulations are implemented in the platform of Matlab. (authors)

  3. A phantom test of proton-induced dual-energy X-ray angiography using iodinated contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguri, Y.; Hasegawa, J.; Ogawa, M.; Kaneko, J.; Sasa, K.

    2007-01-01

    Characteristic-line radiation from heavy metal targets bombarded by MeV proton beams has been tested as an X-ray source for dual-energy K-edge subtraction imaging for human angiography (blood vessel imaging) based on iodinated contrast media. To utilize the strong absorption by iodine (Z=53) at its K-absorption edge (33.2 keV), we used K α -line of La (lanthanum, Z=57) at 33.4 keV. As a reference, also K α X emission of Sn (tin, Z=50) at 25.2 keV was employed. Metallic plates of La and Sn were irradiated by 7-MeV protons to produce these characteristic X-rays. Energy-subtraction method was tested using Lucite phantoms which contain aqueous solutions of KI (potassium iodide) with different concentrations. Also Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 powder was stuffed in these phantoms to simulate bones. The transmission images of the phantoms were recorded on imaging plates. During the exposure, the energy spectra of the X-rays were monitored by a CdTe detector. We found that the contrast of images of iodide solutions taken with La X-rays was higher than that with Sn X-rays. Also the energy subtraction procedure was successfully applied to reduce the graphical noise due to the bones and inhomogeneity of the soft tissue. However, to apply the present method to actual clinical use, the X-ray intensity must be increased by several orders of magnitude. Also the transmission of the 'lower-energy' photons has to be a few orders higher for imaging of objects as thick as human chest. (author)

  4. Spin Physics at COMPASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schill, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment is a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS using muon and hadron beams for the investigation of the spin structure of the nucleon and hadron spectroscopy. The main objective of the muon physics program is the study of the spin of the nucleon in terms of its constituents, quarks and gluons. COMPASS has accumulated data during 6 years scattering polarized muons off longitudinally or transversely polarized deuteron ( 6 LiD) or proton (NH 3 ) targets. Results for the gluon polarization are obtained from longitudinal double spin cross section asymmetries using two different channels, open charm production and high transverse momentum hadron pairs, both proceeding through the photon-gluon fusion process. Also, the longitudinal spin structure functions of the proton and the deuteron were measured in parallel as well as the helicity distributions for the three lightest quark flavours. With a transversely polarized target, results were obtained with proton and deuteron targets for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries for charged hadrons as well as for identified kaons and pions. The Collins asymmetry is sensitive to the transverse spin structure of the nucleon, while the Sivers asymmetry reflects correlations between the quark transverse momentum and the nucleon spin. Recently, a new proposal for the COMPASS II experiment was accepted by the CERN SPS which includes two new topics: Exclusive reactions like DVCS and DVMP using the muon beam and a hydrogen target to study generalized parton distributions and Drell-Yan measurements using a pion beam and a polarized NH 3 target to study transverse momentum dependent distributions.

  5. A high-statistics measurement of transverse spin effects in dihadron production from muon-proton semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C; Alekseev, M G; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Andrieux, V; Anosov, V; Austregesilo, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Beck, R; Bedfer, Y; Berlin, A; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bicker, K; Bieling, J; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bodlak, M; Boer, M; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Buchele, M; Burtin, E; Capozza, L; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Curiel, Q; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dunnweber, W; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Elia, C; Eversheim, P.D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Filin, A; Finger, M; Finger jr, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gnesi, I; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Gorzellik, M; Grabmuller, S; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Guskov, A; Guthorl, T; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Hahne, D; Hashimoto, R; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hinterberger, F; Hoppner, Ch; Horikawa, N; d'Hose, N; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, A; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jasinski, P; Joerg, P; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Konigsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kral, Z; Kramer, M; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuchinski, N; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Kurjata, R P; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matousek, J; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu. V; Miyachi, Y; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Novy, J; Nowak, W D; Nunes, A S; Orlov, I; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Pesek, M; Peshekhonov, D; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Reicherz, G; Rocco, E; Rodionov, V; Rondio, E; Rychter, A; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schluter, T; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, K; Schmieden, H; Schonning, K; Schopferer, S; Schott, M; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sirtl, S; Slunecka, M; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Steiger, L; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Suzuki, H; Szabeleski, A; Szameitat, T; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; Ter Wolbeek, J; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Thibaud, F; Uhl, S; Uman, I; Vandenbroucke, M; Virius, M; Vondra, J; Wang, L; Weisrock, T; Wilfert, M; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M

    2014-01-01

    A measurement of the azimuthal asymmetry in dihadron production in deep-inelastic scattering of muons on transversely polarised proton (NH$_{3}$) targets are presented. They provide independent access to the transversity distribution functions through the measurement of the Collins asymmetry in single hadron production. The data were taken in the year $2010$ with the COMPASS spectrometer using a $160\\,\\mbox{GeV}/c$ muon beam of the CERN SPS, increasing by a factor of about three the available statistics of the previously published data taken in the year $2007$. The measured sizeable asymmetry is in good agreement with the published data. An approximate equality of the Collins asymmetry and the dihadron asymmetry is observed, suggesting a common physical mechanism in the underlying fragmentation.

  6. A high-statistics measurement of transverse spin effects in dihadron production from muon–proton semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adolph

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A measurement of the azimuthal asymmetry in dihadron production in deep-inelastic scattering of muons on transversely polarised proton (NH3 targets is presented. They provide independent access to the transversity distribution functions through the measurement of the Collins asymmetry in single hadron production. The data were taken in the year 2010 with the COMPASS spectrometer using a 160 GeV/c muon beam of the CERN SPS, increasing by a factor of about four the overall statistics with respect to the previously published data taken in the year 2007. The measured sizeable asymmetry is in good agreement with the published data. An approximate equality of the Collins asymmetry and the dihadron asymmetry is observed, suggesting a common physical mechanism in the underlying fragmentation.

  7. Single spin asymmetry for charm mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez Zacarias, G. [PIMAyC, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Apdo. Postal 14-805, D.F. (Mexico); Herrera, G.; Mercado, J. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Apdo. Postal 14-740, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-08-15

    We study single spin asymmetries of D{sup 0} and D{sup -} mesons in polarized proton-proton collisions. A two component model is used to describe charm meson production. The production of D mesons occurs by recombination of the constituents present in the initial state as well as by fragmentation of quarks in the final state. This model has proved to describe the production of charm. The recombination component involves a mechanism of spin alignment that ends up in a single spin asymmetry. Experimental measurements of single spin asymmetry for pions at RHIC are compared with the model. Predictions for the asymmetry in D mesons are presented. (orig.)

  8. Single spin asymmetry for charm mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Zacarias, G.; Herrera, G.; Mercado, J.

    2007-01-01

    We study single spin asymmetries of D 0 and D - mesons in polarized proton-proton collisions. A two component model is used to describe charm meson production. The production of D mesons occurs by recombination of the constituents present in the initial state as well as by fragmentation of quarks in the final state. This model has proved to describe the production of charm. The recombination component involves a mechanism of spin alignment that ends up in a single spin asymmetry. Experimental measurements of single spin asymmetry for pions at RHIC are compared with the model. Predictions for the asymmetry in D mesons are presented. (orig.)

  9. Developing and testing the density of states FFA method in the SU(3) spin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliani, Mario; Gattringer, Christof, E-mail: christof.gattringer@uni-graz.at; Törek, Pascal

    2016-12-15

    The Density of States Functional Fit Approach (DoS FFA) is a recently proposed modern density of states technique suitable for calculations in lattice field theories with a complex action problem. In this article we present an exploratory implementation of DoS FFA for the SU(3) spin system at finite chemical potential μ – an effective theory for the Polyakov loop. This model has a complex action problem similar to the one of QCD but also allows for a dual simulation in terms of worldlines where the complex action problem is solved. Thus we can compare the DoS FFA results to the reference data from the dual simulation and assess the performance of the new approach. We find that the method reproduces the observables from the dual simulation for a large range of μ values, including also phase transitions, illustrating that DoS FFA is an interesting approach for exploring phase diagrams of lattice field theories with a complex action problem.

  10. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  11. Spin puzzle in nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, R.

    1994-09-01

    The object of this brief review is to reconcile different points of view on how the spin of proton is made up from its constituents. On the basis of naive quark model with flavour symmetry such as isospin or SU(3) one finds a static description. On the contrary the local SU(3) colour symmetry gives a dynamical view. Both these views are contrasted and the role of U(1) axial anomaly and the ambiguity for the measurable spin content is discussed. (author). 16 refs, 1 fig

  12. Exceptional F(4) higher-spin theory in AdS{sub 6} at one-loop and other tests of duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günaydin, Murat [Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos Physics Department, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Skvortsov, Evgeny [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Theresienstr. 37, D-80333 Munich (Germany); Lebedev Institute of Physics, Leninsky ave. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tran, Tung [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2016-11-28

    We study the higher-spin gauge theory in six-dimensional anti-de Sitter space AdS{sub 6} that is based on the exceptional Lie superalgebra F(4). The relevant higher-spin algebra was constructed in http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.2185. We determine the spectrum of the theory and show that it contains the physical fields of the Romans F(4) gauged supergravity. The full spectrum consists of an infinite tower of unitary supermultiplets of F(4) which extend the Romans multiplet to higher spins plus a single short supermultiplet. Motivated by applications to this novel supersymmetric higher-spin theory as well as to other theories, we extend the known one-loop tests of AdS/CFT duality in various directions. The spectral zeta-function is derived for the most general case of fermionic and mixed-symmetry fields, which allows one to test the Type-A and B theories and supersymmetric extensions thereof in any dimension. We also study higher-spin doubletons and partially-massless fields. While most of the tests are successfully passed, the Type-B theory in all even dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetimes presents an interesting puzzle: the free energy as computed from the bulk is not equal to that of the free fermion on the CFT side, though there is some systematics to the discrepancy.

  13. Measurement of the spin asymmetry of the beam in the polarized virtual Compton scattering on the proton. Study of the nucleon's energy spectra through the QCD-type potential model; Mesure de l'asymetrie de spin de faisceau en diffusion compton virtuelle polarisee sur le proton. Etude du spectre d'energie du nucleon par le modele de potentiel de type QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensafa, I.K

    2006-05-15

    The first part of this work presents the analysis and results of the VCS-SSA (virtual Compton scattering - single spin asymmetry) experiment at MAMI (Mainz). It was carried out with beam energy 883 MeV and longitudinal polarization (about 80%), at virtual photon four-momentum transfer squared (Q{sup 2} = 0.35 GeV{sup 2}) to measure the beam asymmetry in the ep {yields} ep{gamma} and ep {yields} ep{pi}{sup 0} reactions. The asymmetry obtained in photon (resp. pion) electro-production is between 0-15% (resp. 0-2%). The dispersion relation model for virtual Compton scattering and MAID model (for {pi}{sup 0}) reproduce the amplitude globally but not completely the shape of the asymmetry. Perhaps this discrepancy is due to an imperfect parameterization of some pion production multipoles ({gamma}{sup *}N {yields} {pi}N). The second part is dedicated to the study of the nucleon energy spectrum in ground-state L=0 and excited-state L=1 in the quark model, using the Coulomb + linear potential type (CL) and a relativistic correction. The hyperfine correction is applied to discriminate the nucleon masses. The values of the mass found for the proton and the {delta}(1232) are respectively equal to (968 MeV, 1168 MeV), and the masses of the excited states are between 1564 - 1607 MeV. This part is completed by an application of the CL model to an approximate calculation of generalized polarizabilities of the proton. (author)

  14. Results of SC proton cavity tests (B = 1 and B = 0.65)

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F et al

    2013-01-01

    The two superconducting cavities were carefully designed for challenging performance. They were fabricated in industry with intermediate tests and specialized processing in CEA and CNRS. The results are promising, except for a degradation of the field flatness of the low velocity cavity, after electron-beam welding. This might reduce the accelerating gradient. Due to delays in manufacturing, the final performance tests will be carried out in the coming months.

  15. Collimation quench test with 6.5 TeV proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Bruce, Roderik; Hermes, Pascal Dominik; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Jacquet, Delphine; Kalliokoski, Matti; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano; Skordis, Eleftherios; Valentino, Gianluca; Valloni, Alessandra; Wollmann, Daniel; Zerlauth, Markus; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    We show here the analysis of the MD test that aimed to quench the superconducting magnets in the dispersion suppressor region downstream of the main betatron collimation system. In Run I there were several attempts to quench the magnets in the same region. This was done by exciting the Beam 2 in a controlled way using the transverse damper and generating losses leaking from the collimation cleaning. No quench was achieved in 2013 with a maximum of 1 MW of beam power loss absorbed by the collimation system at 4 TeV beam energy. In 2015 a new collimation quench test was done at 6.5 TeV aiming at similar power loss over longer period, 5-10 s. The main outcome of this test is reviewed.

  16. Metabolomics by Proton High-Resolution Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Tomato Plants Treated with Two Secondary Metabolites Isolated from Trichoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Vinale, Francesco; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Pascale, Alberto; Lorito, Matteo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2016-05-11

    Trichoderma fungi release 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (1) and harzianic acid (2) secondary metabolites to improve plant growth and health protection. We isolated metabolites 1 and 2 from Trichoderma strains, whose different concentrations were used to treat seeds of Solanum lycopersicum. The metabolic profile in the resulting 15 day old tomato leaves was studied by high-resolution magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) spectroscopy directly on the whole samples without any preliminary extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) of HRMAS NMR showed significantly enhanced acetylcholine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content accompanied by variable amount of amino acids in samples treated with both Trichoderma secondary metabolites. Seed germination rates, seedling fresh weight, and the metabolome of tomato leaves were also dependent upon doses of metabolites 1 and 2 treatments. HRMAS NMR spectroscopy was proven to represent a rapid and reliable technique for evaluating specific changes in the metabolome of plant leaves and calibrating the best concentration of bioactive compounds required to stimulate plant growth.

  17. Performance test of multicomponent quantum mechanical calculation with polarizable continuum model for proton chemical shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2015-05-21

    Multicomponent quantum mechanical (MC_QM) calculations with polarizable continuum model (PCM) have been tested against liquid (1)H NMR chemical shifts for a test set of 80 molecules. Improvement from conventional quantum mechanical calculations was achieved for MC_QM calculations. The advantage of the multicomponent scheme could be attributed to the geometrical change from the equilibrium geometry by the incorporation of the hydrogen nuclear quantum effect, while that of PCM can be attributed to the change of the electronic structure according to the polarization by solvent effects.

  18. Measurements of proton strength functions and comparisons with theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, E.; Ozawa, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Using a high-resolution proton beam of the Tokyo Institute of Technology Van de Graaff, precise measurements of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections have been performed in the past 15 years. By directly observing individual proton resonances, their spins, parities and proton decay widths were deduced. From these experiments we have evaluated (1) proton strength functions in terms of target mass number and of incident proton energy and (2) Coulomb matrix elements for split analogue resonances. (orig.)

  19. Analysis of 440 GeV proton beam-matter interaction experiments at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Raginel, V.; Wollmann, D.; Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    In a previous paper [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we presented the first results on beam-matter interaction experiments that were carried out at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN. In these experiments, extended cylindrical targets of solid copper were irradiated with beam of 440 GeV protons delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The beam comprised of a large number of high intensity proton bunches, each bunch having a length of 0.5 ns with a 50 ns gap between two neighboring bunches, while the length of this entire bunch train was about 7 μs. These experiments established the existence of the hydrodynamic tunneling phenomenon the first time. Detailed numerical simulations of these experiments were also carried out which were reported in detail in another paper [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 063112 (2014)]. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental measurements and the simulation results that validate our previous simulations done using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam of 7 TeV protons [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.--Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. According to these simulations, the range of the full LHC proton beam and the hadronic shower can be increased by more than an order of magnitude due to the hydrodynamic tunneling, compared to that of a single proton. This effect is of considerable importance for the design of machine protection system for hadron accelerators such as SPS, LHC, and Future Circular Collider. Recently, using metal cutting technology, the targets used in these experiments have been dissected into finer pieces for visual and microscopic inspection in order to establish the precise penetration depth of the protons and the corresponding hadronic shower. This, we believe will be helpful in studying the very important phenomenon of hydrodynamic tunneling in a more quantitative manner. The details of this experimental work together with a comparison with the numerical

  20. Spherical nanoindentation of proton irradiated 304 stainless steel: A comparison of small scale mechanical test techniques for measuring irradiation hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Jordan S.; Pathak, Siddhartha; Reichardt, Ashley; Vo, Hi T.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Hosemann, Peter; Mara, Nathan A.

    2017-09-01

    Experimentally quantifying the mechanical effects of radiation damage in reactor materials is necessary for the development and qualification of new materials for improved performance and safety. This can be achieved in a high-throughput fashion through a combination of ion beam irradiation and small scale mechanical testing in contrast to the high cost and laborious nature of bulk testing of reactor irradiated samples. The current work focuses on using spherical nanoindentation stress-strain curves on unirradiated and proton irradiated (10 dpa at 360 °C) 304 stainless steel to quantify the mechanical effects of radiation damage. Spherical nanoindentation stress-strain measurements show a radiation-induced increase in indentation yield strength from 1.36 GPa to 2.72 GPa and a radiation-induced increase in indentation work hardening rate of 10 GPa-30 GPa. These measurements are critically compared against Berkovich nanohardness, micropillar compression, and micro-tension measurements on the same material and similar grain orientations. The ratio of irradiated to unirradiated yield strength increases by a similar factor of 2 when measured via spherical nanoindentation or Berkovich nanohardness testing. A comparison of spherical indentation stress-strain curves to uniaxial (micropillar and micro-tension) stress-strain curves was achieved using a simple scaling relationship which shows good agreement for the unirradiated condition and poor agreement in post-yield behavior for the irradiated condition. The disagreement between spherical nanoindentation and uniaxial stress-strain curves is likely due to the plastic instability that occurs during uniaxial tests but is absent during spherical nanoindentation tests.

  1. Indiana: Siberian Snake saves spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-01-15

    A team working at the Indiana University Cooler Ring has used a 'Siberian Snake' system to accelerate a spin-polarized proton beam through two depolarizing resonances with no loss of spin. The Michigan/lndiana/Brookhaven team under Alan Krisch overcame their first imperfection resonance hurdle at 108 MeV, and in a subsequent run vanquished a further resonance at 177 MeV.

  2. Indiana: Siberian Snake saves spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    A team working at the Indiana University Cooler Ring has used a 'Siberian Snake' system to accelerate a spin-polarized proton beam through two depolarizing resonances with no loss of spin. The Michigan/lndiana/Brookhaven team under Alan Krisch overcame their first imperfection resonance hurdle at 108 MeV, and in a subsequent run vanquished a further resonance at 177 MeV

  3. Helical spin rotators and snakes for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ptitsin, V.I.; Shatunov, Yu.M.; Peggs, S.

    1995-01-01

    The RHIC collider, now under construction at BNL, will have the possibility of polarized proton-proton collisions up to a beam energy of 250 Gev. Polarized proton beams of such high energy can be only obtained with the use of siberian snakes, a special kind of spin rotator that rotates the particle spin by 180 degree around an axis lying in the horizontal plane. Siberian snakes help to preserve the beam polarization while numerous spin depolarizing resonances are crossed, during acceleration. In order to collide longitudinally polarized beams, it is also planned to install spin rotators around two interaction regions. This paper discusses snake and spin rotator designs based on sequences of four helical magnets. The schemes that were chosen to be applied at RHIC are presented

  4. Spin current

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, Sergio O; Saitoh, Eiji; Kimura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In a new branch of physics and technology called spin-electronics or spintronics, the flow of electrical charge (usual current) as well as the flow of electron spin, the so-called 'spin current', are manipulated and controlled together. This book provides an introduction and guide to the new physics and application of spin current.

  5. To Test a Prototype of a Proton Lifetime Detector in a Neutrino Beam at the PS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In order to test the performances of the calorimeter method in a nucleon lifetime experiment, a 3 ton prototype calorimeter made of iron and polystyrene scintillator sandwiches and of fine-grain counters has been designed by our collaboration. The energy and angular resolution will be tested by exposing this prototype to charged particles ($e, \\mu , \\pi$) in the 0.5 GeV/c range at Orsay and at CERN in Summer 1980. Since an unavoidable background to any experiment on nucleon decay consists of atmospheric neutrino events, which could in some cases simulate a nucleon decay, the knowledge of the configuration of such events in our detector is essential. It has been shown that the energy distribution of the $\

  6. Fractal structure of hadrons in processes with polarized protons at SPD NICA (proposal for experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarev, M.V.; Aparin, A.A.; Zborovsky, I.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of z-scaling previously developed for analysis of inclusive reactions in proton-proton collisions is applied for description of processes with polarized protons at the planned Spin Physics Detector NICA in Dubna. A hypothesis of self-similarity and fractality of the proton spin structure is discussed. The possibilities to extract information on spin-dependent fractal dimensions of hadrons and fragmentation process from asymmetries and coefficients of polarization transfer are justified. The double longitudinal spin asymmetry A LL of π 0 -meson production and the coefficient of the polarization transfer D LL of Λ hyperon production in proton-proton collisions measured at RHIC are analyzed in the framework of z-scaling. The spin-dependent fractal dimensions of proton and fragmentation process with polarized Λ hyperon are estimated. A study of the spin-dependent constituent energy loss as a function of transverse momentum of the inclusive hadron and collision energy is suggested.

  7. The influence of the Coulomb-distortion effect on proton-proton observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plessas, W.; Mathelitsch, L.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the Coulomb distortion of the strong interaction is studied on the basis of nucleon-nucleon observables. In particular, cross sections, polarizations, spin-correlation parameters, and spin-transfer coefficients are considered for proton-proton as well as neutron-neutron scattering at laboratory kinetic energies Esub(Lab) = 10, 20, and 50 MeV. The calculations are performed for the meson-theoretical PARIS potential, the nonlocal separable GRAZ potential and also using the Arndt-Hackman-Roper parametrization of proton-proton scattering phase shifts. Important conclusions are drawn with respect to phenomenological phase-shift analyses. (Auth.)

  8. Scattering of intermediate energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaumeaux, Alain.

    1980-06-01

    The scattering of 1 GeV protons appears to be a powerful means of investigating nuclear matter. We worked with SPESI and the formalism of Kerman-Mc Manus and Thaler. The amplitude of nucleon-nucleon scattering was studied as were the aspects of 1 GeV proton scattering (multiple scattering, absorption, spin-orbit coupling, N-N amplitude, KMT-Glauber comparison, second order effects). The results of proton scattering on 16 O, the isotopes of calcium, 58 Ni, 90 Zr and 208 Pb are given [fr

  9. Strangeness production with protons and pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the spectrum of physics questions related to strangeness which could be addressed with intense beams of protons and pions in the few GeV region. We focus on various aspects of strangeness production, including hyperon production in pp collisions, studies of hyperon-nucleon scattering, production of hypernuclei in proton and pion-nucleus collisions, and spin phenomena in hypernuclei

  10. Interlaboratory indoor ageing of roll-to-roll and spin coated organic photovoltaic devices: Testing the ISOS tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren A.; Corazza, Michael; Madsen, Morten Vesterager

    2014-01-01

    to roll-to-roll production. Furthermore, the reproducibility of current–voltage (IV) measurement and preconditioning (light soaking treatments) are addressed. Additionally, the inter-comparison of the degradation rates of the samples aged under three different dark test conditions (ambient, dry/heat, damp...

  11. Spinning test body orbiting around a Kerr black hole: Circular dynamics and gravitational-wave fluxes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukes-Gerakopoulos, Georgios; Harms, E.; Bernuzzi, S.; Nagar, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 6 (2017), 064051/1-064051/13 ISSN 2470-0010 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-06962Y Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : general-relativity * test particles * conserved quantities Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 4.568, year: 2016

  12. A model of quasi-free scattering with polarized protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodoro, M.R.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative evaluation, based on a simple model for spin-free coplanar and asymmetric reaction in 16 O, for 215 MeV incoming polarized protons confirms the use of the strong effective polarization of the knocked-out proton by the spin-orbit coupling and of the strong dependence of free, medium energy, proton-proton cross section on the relative orientation of the proton spins. Effective polarizations, momentum distributions and correlation cross sections have been calculated for the 1p sub(1/2), 1 p sub(3/2) and 1s sub(1/2) states in 16 O, using protons totally polarized orthogonal to the scattering plane. Harmonic oscillator and square wells have been used to generate the bound state wave functions, whereas the optical potentials have been taken spin-independent and purely imaginary [pt

  13. Development of the warm snake and acceleration of polarized protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Junpei

    2007-01-01

    Acceleration of polarized protons is one of interesting issues of the high energy and accelerator physics. As known as the proton spin crisis, the total of the quark spin is not equal to the proton spin. To explore sources of the proton spin, it has been required to accelerate polarized protons to higher energy as hundreds GeV with higher polarization. However it is difficult to accelerate the polarized protons to higher energy with preserving higher polarization by using circular accelerators since the polarized beam crosses several types of depolarizing resonances. To overcome the depolarizing resonances, unique components are employed to the accelerator chain at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). On this description, developing a normal conducting helical dipole partial Siberian snake is explained in detail. As the results of upgrading the accelerators, the polarization has been increased recently. (author)

  14. Development of a LabVIEW-based surface with innovative controls for the control system of the spin-polarized electron test source Photo-CATCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, Heidi Ayse; Enders, Joachim; Espig, Martin; Fritzsche, Yuliya; Wagner, Markus [TU Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Operations of the spin-polarized electron source of the S-DALINAC will be supported by a photo-cathode activation, test and cleaning system, Photo-CATCH. Besides cathode-performance studies, this teststand produces spin-polarized electron bunches from a GaAs photo-cathode that are then transported, manipulated, and characterized by devices in a low-energy beam line. To set and monitor the various components of the beamline, a control system was developed, based on the EPICS framework. As interfaces, LabVIEW was used in combination with a gamepad as a controlling device.

  15. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-01-01

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  16. Summary: Symmetries and spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    I discuss a number of the themes of the Symmetries and Spin session of the 8th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics: parity nonconservation, CP/T nonconservation, and tests of charge symmetry and charge independence. 28 refs., 1 fig

  17. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertarelli, A., E-mail: alessandro.bertarelli@cern.ch [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Berthome, E. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccone, V. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carra, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cerutti, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charitonidis, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Machines and Experimental Facilities Group (EN-MEF), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Charrondiere, C. [CERN, Engineering Department, Industrial Controls and Engineering Group (EN-ICE), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Masi, A. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marques dos Santos, S.D.; Moyret, P. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Peroni, L. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Redaelli, S. [CERN, Beams Department, Accelerators and Beams Physics Group (BE-ABP), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scapin, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.)

  18. FERMILAB: High energy spin effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1991-03-15

    While many physicists would agree that it is important to study interactions of different isospin states (for example comparing proton and neutron data), many of them also accept as normal data averaged or integrated over ordinary spin. However an ongoing programme at Brookhaven studying elastic scattering (where the incoming particles 'bounce' off each other) produced marked spin effects which are not well understood. Our understanding of particle interactions should not be influenced by which observables are easy to measure and which aren't, and until a clear understanding of spin effects emerges, it is important to continue and extend these studies.

  19. Summary of spin physics sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1988-01-01

    The list of topics in the many talks given during the Spin Physics sessions of this Intersections conference is nearly as long as the one of this conference: P and T Violation NN Interaction πp and πd Elastic Scattering Nuclear Matter Spin Effects Muon (g-2) Polarized Proton Beams Polarized Gas Targets This points to the almost trivial fact that spin is fundamental to our understanding of nuclear and particle physics. I will discuss in some detail only four of these topics. Needless to say this choice is very much personally biased and I apologize to all the speakers whose excellent contributions I did not include

  20. Spin structure of the nucleon and polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1994-09-01

    Recent experiments at CERN and SLAC have added new knowledge about the spin structure of the proton and the deuteron. A brief historical background is presented, the status of experiments is discussed, and progress in the understanding of the spin of the nucleon in the context of the quark parton model is summarized

  1. Analytical treatment of the spin splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M.; Penzo, A.; Pisent, A.; Pusterla, M.

    1988-01-01

    The spin-orbit coupling associated with the interaction of the magnetic of proton-antiproton, circulating in a low energy storage ring, with appropriate field gradients of quadrupole elements in the machine, is studied analytically. The conditions for a separation of opposite spin states are discussed and methods are proposed for working at very low energies

  2. Spin polarized states in strongly asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isayev, A.A.; Yang, J.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of appearance of spin polarized states in strongly asymmetric nuclear matter is analyzed within the framework of a Fermi liquid theory with the Skyrme effective interaction. The zero temperature dependence of the neutron and proton spin polarization parameters as functions of density is found for SLy4 and SLy5 effective forces. It is shown that at some critical density strongly asymmetric nuclear matter undergoes a phase transition to the state with the oppositely directed spins of neutrons and protons while the state with the same direction of spins does not appear. In comparison with neutron matter, even small admixture of protons strongly decreases the threshold density of spin instability. It is clarified that protons become totally polarized within a very narrow density domain while the density profile of the neutron spin polarization parameter is characterized by the appearance of long tails near the transition density

  3. Rejuvenation of the Innocent Bystander: Testing Spin-Up in a Dwarf Carbon Star Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Carbon stars (C>O) were long assumed to all be giants, because only AGB stars dredge up significant carbon into their atmospheres. We now know that dwarf carbon (dC) stars are actually far more common than C giants. These dC stars are hypothesized to have accreted C-rich envelope material from an AGB companion, in systems that have likely undergone a planetary nebula phase, eventually yielding a white dwarf and a dC star that has gained both significant mass and angular momentum. To test whether the X-ray emission strength and spectral properties are consistent with a rejuvenated dynamo, we propose a Chandra pilot study of dCs selected from the SDSS; some have hot white dwarf companions (indicating more recent mass transfer), and all show Balmer emission lines (a sign of activity).

  4. Rejuvenation of the Innocent Bystander: Testing Spin-Up in Dwarf Carbon Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Carbon stars (C>O) were long assumed to all be giants, because only AGB stars dredge up significant carbon into their atmospheres. We now know that dwarf carbon (dC) stars are actually far more common than C giants. These dCs are hypothesized to have accreted C-rich envelope material from an AGB companion, in systems that have likely undergone a planetary nebula phase, eventually yielding a white dwarf and a dC that has gained both significant mass and angular momentum. To test whether the X-ray emission strength and spectral properties are consistent with a rejuvenated dynamo, we propose a Chandra pilot study of dCs selected from the SDSS; some have hot white dwarf companions (indicating more recent mass transfer), and all show Balmer emission lines (a sign of activity).

  5. NESC-1 spinning cylinder experiment. Pre-test fracture analysis evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Pitard-Bouet, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    A pre-test structural analysis evaluation has been conducted by Electricite de France (EDF) including several three dimensional elastic and elastic-plastic computations. Two cylinder geometries have been studied. Higher values of the stress intensity factor are obtained in both geometries in the elastic-plastic computations due to the yielding of the cladding during the thermal transient. The comparisons between the stress intensity factors and the expected base metal toughness show that cleavage initiation must occur preferably in base metal near the interface with cladding. The comparison between both geometries show also that the thicker vessel with a deeper semi-elliptical sub-clad flaw (70 mm deep) is more favourable to cleavage initiation near the base metal - cladding interface. (K.A.)

  6. SU-F-T-180: Evaluation of a Scintillating Screen Detector for Proton Beam QA and Acceptance Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghebremedhin, A; Taber, M; Koss, P; Camargo, G; Patyal, B [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Ebstein, S [Lexitek, Inc, Wellesley, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test the performance of a commercial scintillating screen detector for acceptance testing and Quality Assurance of a proton pencil beam scanning system. Method: The detector (Lexitek DRD 400) has 40cm × 40cm field, uses a thin scintillator imaged onto a 16-bit scientific CCD with ∼0.5mm resolution. A grid target and LED illuminators are provided for spatial calibration and relative gain correction. The detector mounts to the nozzle with micron precision. Tools are provided for image processing and analysis of single or multiple Gaussian spots. Results: The bias and gain of the detector were studied to measure repeatability and accuracy. Gain measurements were taken with the LED illuminators to measure repeatability and variation of the lens-CCD pair as a function with f-stop. Overall system gain was measured with a passive scattering (broad) beam whose shape is calibrated with EDR film placed in front of the scintillator. To create a large uniform field, overlapping small fields were recorded with the detector translated laterally and stitched together to cover the full field. Due to the long exposures required to obtain multiple spills of the synchrotron and very high detector sensitivity, borated polyethylene shielding was added to reduce direct radiation events hitting the CCD. Measurements with a micro ion chamber were compared to the detector’s spot profile. Software was developed to process arrays of Gaussian spots and to correct for radiation events. Conclusion: The detector background has a fixed bias, a small component linear in time, and is easily corrected. The gain correction method was validated with 2% accuracy. The detector spot profile matches the micro ion chamber data over 4 orders of magnitude. The multiple spot analyses can be easily used with plan data for measuring pencil beam uniformity and for regular QA comparison.

  7. SU-F-T-180: Evaluation of a Scintillating Screen Detector for Proton Beam QA and Acceptance Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghebremedhin, A; Taber, M; Koss, P; Camargo, G; Patyal, B; Ebstein, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the performance of a commercial scintillating screen detector for acceptance testing and Quality Assurance of a proton pencil beam scanning system. Method: The detector (Lexitek DRD 400) has 40cm × 40cm field, uses a thin scintillator imaged onto a 16-bit scientific CCD with ∼0.5mm resolution. A grid target and LED illuminators are provided for spatial calibration and relative gain correction. The detector mounts to the nozzle with micron precision. Tools are provided for image processing and analysis of single or multiple Gaussian spots. Results: The bias and gain of the detector were studied to measure repeatability and accuracy. Gain measurements were taken with the LED illuminators to measure repeatability and variation of the lens-CCD pair as a function with f-stop. Overall system gain was measured with a passive scattering (broad) beam whose shape is calibrated with EDR film placed in front of the scintillator. To create a large uniform field, overlapping small fields were recorded with the detector translated laterally and stitched together to cover the full field. Due to the long exposures required to obtain multiple spills of the synchrotron and very high detector sensitivity, borated polyethylene shielding was added to reduce direct radiation events hitting the CCD. Measurements with a micro ion chamber were compared to the detector’s spot profile. Software was developed to process arrays of Gaussian spots and to correct for radiation events. Conclusion: The detector background has a fixed bias, a small component linear in time, and is easily corrected. The gain correction method was validated with 2% accuracy. The detector spot profile matches the micro ion chamber data over 4 orders of magnitude. The multiple spot analyses can be easily used with plan data for measuring pencil beam uniformity and for regular QA comparison.

  8. Simultaneous pH-sensitive and oxygen-sensitive MRI of human gliomas at 3 T using multi-echo amine proton chemical exchange saturation transfer spin-and-gradient echo echo-planar imaging (CEST-SAGE-EPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert J; Yao, Jingwen; Chakhoyan, Ararat; Raymond, Catalina; Leu, Kevin; Liau, Linda M; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Lai, Albert; Salamon, Noriko; Pope, Whitney B; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2018-04-06

    To introduce a new pH-sensitive and oxygen-sensitive MRI technique using amine proton CEST echo spin-and-gradient echo (SAGE) EPI (CEST-SAGE-EPI). pH-weighting was obtained using CEST estimations of magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR asym ) at 3 ppm, and oxygen-weighting was obtained using R2' measurements. Glutamine concentration, pH, and relaxation rates were varied in phantoms to validate simulations and estimate relaxation rates. The values of MTR asym and R2' in normal-appearing white matter, T 2 hyperintensity, contrast enhancement, and macroscopic necrosis were measured in 47 gliomas. Simulation and phantom results confirmed an increase in MTR asym with decreasing pH. The CEST-SAGE-EPI estimates of R 2 , R2*, and R2' varied linearly with gadolinium diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid concentration (R 2  = 6.2 mM -1 ·sec -1 and R2* = 6.9 mM -1 ·sec -1 ). The CEST-SAGE-EPI and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill estimates of R 2 (R 2  = 0.9943) and multi-echo gradient-echo estimates of R2* (R 2  = 0.9727) were highly correlated. T 2 lesions had lower R2' and higher MTR asym compared with normal-appearing white matter, suggesting lower hypoxia and high acidity, whereas contrast-enhancement tumor regions had elevated R2' and MTR asym , indicating high hypoxia and acidity. The CEST-SAGE-EPI technique provides simultaneous pH-sensitive and oxygen-sensitive image contrasts for evaluation of the brain tumor microenvironment. Advantages include fast whole-brain acquisition, in-line B 0 correction, and simultaneous estimation of CEST effects, R 2 , R2*, and R2' at 3 T. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  10. First test of the Siberian Snake concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krisch, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    Test results of the Siberian Snake concept at the Indiana University Cooler Ring are presented. The Siberian Snake is a clever and interesting concept for accelerating polarized protons to high energy. Thus it would be especially useful at TeV energies where there are thousands of depolarizing resonances. The Snake is the device which job is to rotate the proton's spin by 180 deg. every time the proton goes around the ring. The Snake's main element is the superconducting solenoid magnet. Examples of the Siberian Snake overcoming depolarizing resonances are presented. 6 refs.; 24 figs

  11. Spin gymnastics with selective radiofrequency pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, R.; Kupce, E. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Although high resolution NMR spectra are normally excited with short intense radiofrequency pulses, there is an entire family of new experiments that can be performed with frequency-selective or ``soft`` pulses. Time-consuming two-dimensional spectroscopy may be reduced to a much shorter one-dimensional version with much finer digitization in the frequency domain. A large number of soft pulses can be combined to form a ``polychromatic pulse`` that has uniform excitation over the entire range of proton shifts except for a rejection notch at the water frequency. Polychromatic pulses can also be used to create antiphase magnetization in preparation for a coherence transfer or double-quantum experiment. An excitation profile can be designed in the form of a ``template`` that exactly matches the spectrum of a given chemical compound but has zero excitation elsewhere. This is achieved by using the information in the experimental free induction decay to construct a suitable array of soft pulses that has the required excitation pattern. In this manner, interpenetrating spectra can be separated into the spectra of the pure components, for example those of a and b glucose. Selective Hartmann-Hahn coherence transfer experiments employ similar soft pulse techniques. If several such transfers are concatenated, the method may be used as a test to see whether a group of protons is linked in an unbroken chain by scalar spin-spin interactions. (authors). 24 refs., 18 figs.

  12. A high-field adiabatic fast passage ultracold neutron spin flipper for the UCNA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holley, A. T.; Pattie, R. W.; Young, A. R. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Broussard, L. J. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Davis, J. L.; Ito, T. M.; Lyles, J. T. M.; Makela, M.; Morris, C. L.; Mortensen, R.; Saunders, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Hickerson, K.; Mendenhall, M. P. [W. K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Liu, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Mammei, R. R. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Rios, R. [Department of Physics, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho 83209 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The UCNA collaboration is making a precision measurement of the {beta} asymmetry (A) in free neutron decay using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). A critical component of this experiment is an adiabatic fast passage neutron spin flipper capable of efficient operation in ambient magnetic fields on the order of 1 T. The requirement that it operate in a high field necessitated the construction of a free neutron spin flipper based, for the first time, on a birdcage resonator. The design, construction, and initial testing of this spin flipper prior to its use in the first measurement of A with UCN during the 2007 run cycle of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's 800 MeV proton accelerator is detailed. These studies determined the flipping efficiency of the device, averaged over the UCN spectrum present at the location of the spin flipper, to be {epsilon}=0.9985(4).

  13. Analysis of 440 GeV proton beam–matter interaction experiments at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Wollmann, D.; Raginel, V.; Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous paper [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we presented the first results on beam–matter interaction experiments that were carried out at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN. In these experiments, extended cylindrical targets of solid copper were irradiated with beam of 440 GeV protons delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The beam comprised of a large number of high intensity proton bunches, each bunch having a length of 0.5 ns with a 50 ns gap between two neighboring bunches, while the length of this entire bunch train was about 7 μs. These experiments established the existence of the hydrodynamic tunneling phenomenon the first time. Detailed numerical simulations of these experiments were also carried out which were reported in detail in another paper [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 063112 (2014)]. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental measurements and the simulation results that validate our previous simulations done using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam of 7 TeV protons [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.--Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. According to these simulations, the range of the full LHC proton beam and the hadronic shower can be increased by more than an order of magnitude due to the hydrodynamic tunneling, compared to that of a single proton. This effect is of considerable importance for the design of machine protection system for hadron accelerators such as SPS, LHC, and Future Circular Collider. Recently, using metal cutting technology, the targets used in these experiments have been dissected into finer pieces for visual and microscopic inspection in order to establish the precise penetration depth of the protons and the corresponding hadronic shower. This, we believe will be helpful in studying the very important phenomenon of hydrodynamic tunneling in a more quantitative manner. The details of this experimental work together with a comparison with the

  14. Spacecraft Spin Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides the capability to correct unbalances of spacecraft by using dynamic measurement techniques and static/coupled measurements to provide products of...

  15. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed “The QUASAR reproducibility study”. Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87±0.95mm and rotations of 1.56±0.66°. Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4±7.5 [ml/100g/min] with a between subject standard variation SDb = 5.5 [ml/100g/min] and a within subject standard deviation SDw = 4.7 [ml/100g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies. PMID:19660557

  16. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87+/-0.95 mm and rotations of 1.56+/-0.66 degrees . Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4+/-7.5 [ml/100 g/min] with a between-subject standard variation SD(b)=5.5 [ml/100 g/min] and a within-subject standard deviation SD(w)=4.7 [ml/100 g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100 g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies.

  17. More spinoff from spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaike, Akira

    1993-01-01

    Despite playing a major role in today's Standard Model, spin - the intrinsic angular momentum carried by particles - is sometimes dismissed as an inessential complication. However several major spin questions with important implications for the Standard Model remain unanswered, and recent results and new technological developments made the 10th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics, held in Nagoya, Japan, in November, highly topical. The symposium covered a wide range of physics, reflecting the diversity of spin effects, however four main themes were - the spin content of the nucleon, tests of symmetries and physics beyond standard models, intermediate energy physics, and spin technologies. Opening the meeting, T. Kinoshita reviewed the status of measurements of the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) of the electron and the muon. The forthcoming experiment at Brookhaven (September 1991, page 23) will probe beyond the energy ranges open to existing electronpositron colliders. For example muon substructure will be opened up to 5 TeV and Ws to 2 TeV. R.L. Jaffe classified quark-parton distributions in terms of their spin dependence, pointing out their leftright attributes, and emphasized the importance of measuring transverse spin distributions through lepton pair production

  18. Performance tests and comparison of microdosimetric measurements with four tissue-equivalent proportional counters in scanning proton therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farah, J.; De Saint-Hubert, M.; Mojzeszek, N.; Chiriotti, S.; Gryzinski, M.; Ploc, Ondřej; Trompier, F.; Turek, Karel; Vanhavere, F.; Olko, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, JAN (2017), s. 42-52 ISSN 1350-4487 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 662287 - CONCERT Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : tissue-equivalent proportional counters * microdosimetry * proton therapy * stray neutrons and prothons Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.442, year: 2016

  19. Spin Sum Rules and Polarizabilities: Results from Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2006-01-01

    The nucleon spin structure has been an active, exciting and intriguing subject of interest for the last three decades. Recent experimental data on nucleon spin structure at low to intermediate momentum transfers provide new information in the confinement regime and the transition region from the confinement regime to the asymptotic freedom regime. New insight is gained by exploring moments of spin structure functions and their corresponding sum rules (i.e. the generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn, Burkhardt-Cottingham and Bjorken). The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule is verified to good accuracy. The spin structure moments data are compared with Chiral Perturbation Theory calculations at low momentum transfers. It is found that chiral perturbation calculations agree reasonably well with the first moment of the spin structure function g 1 at momentum transfer of 0.05 to 0.1 GeV 2 but fail to reproduce the neutron data in the case of the generalized polarizability (delta) LT (the (delta) LT puzzle). New data have been taken on the neutron ( 3 He), the proton and the deuteron at very low Q 2 down to 0.02 GeV 2 . They will provide benchmark tests of Chiral dynamics in the kinematic region where the Chiral Perturbation theory is expected to work

  20. SU-G-IeP1-07: Inaccuracy of Lesion Blood Flow Quantification Related to the Proton Density Reference Image in Arterial Spin Labeling MRI of Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, M; Johnson, J; Hou, P; Liu, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cerebral blood flow quantification in arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI requires an estimate of the equilibrium magnetization of blood, which is often obtained by a set of proton density (PD) reference image. Normally, a constant blood-brain partition coefficient is assumed across the brain. However, this assumption may not be valid for brain lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lesion-related PD variations on ASL quantification in patients with brain tumors. Methods: MR images for posttreatment evaluation of 42 patients with brain tumors were retrospectively analyzed. These images were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner, including T2-weighted FLAIR, 3D pseudo-continuous ASL and post-contrast T1-weighted images. Anatomical images were coregistered with ASL images using the SPM software. Regions of interest (ROIs) of the enhancing and FLAIR lesions were manually drawn on the coregistered images. ROIs of the contralateral normal appearing tissues were also determined, with the consideration of approximating coil sensitivity patterns in lesion ROIs. Relative lesion blood flow (lesion/contralateral tissue) was calculated from both the CBF map (dependent on the PD) and the ΔM map for comparison. Results: The signal intensities in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions were significantly different than contralateral tissues on the PD reference image (p<0.001). The percent signal difference ranged from −15.9 to 19.2%, with a mean of 5.4% for the enhancing lesion, and from −2.8 to 22.9% with a mean of 10.1% for the FLAIR lesion. The high/low lesion-related PD signal resulted in inversely proportional under-/over-estimation of blood flow in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions. Conclusion: Significant signal differences were found between lesions and contralateral tissues in the PD reference image, which introduced errors in blood flow quantification in ASL. The error can be up to 20% in individual patients with an average of 5- 10% for the group of patients

  1. SU-G-IeP1-07: Inaccuracy of Lesion Blood Flow Quantification Related to the Proton Density Reference Image in Arterial Spin Labeling MRI of Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, M; Johnson, J; Hou, P; Liu, H [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cerebral blood flow quantification in arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI requires an estimate of the equilibrium magnetization of blood, which is often obtained by a set of proton density (PD) reference image. Normally, a constant blood-brain partition coefficient is assumed across the brain. However, this assumption may not be valid for brain lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lesion-related PD variations on ASL quantification in patients with brain tumors. Methods: MR images for posttreatment evaluation of 42 patients with brain tumors were retrospectively analyzed. These images were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner, including T2-weighted FLAIR, 3D pseudo-continuous ASL and post-contrast T1-weighted images. Anatomical images were coregistered with ASL images using the SPM software. Regions of interest (ROIs) of the enhancing and FLAIR lesions were manually drawn on the coregistered images. ROIs of the contralateral normal appearing tissues were also determined, with the consideration of approximating coil sensitivity patterns in lesion ROIs. Relative lesion blood flow (lesion/contralateral tissue) was calculated from both the CBF map (dependent on the PD) and the ΔM map for comparison. Results: The signal intensities in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions were significantly different than contralateral tissues on the PD reference image (p<0.001). The percent signal difference ranged from −15.9 to 19.2%, with a mean of 5.4% for the enhancing lesion, and from −2.8 to 22.9% with a mean of 10.1% for the FLAIR lesion. The high/low lesion-related PD signal resulted in inversely proportional under-/over-estimation of blood flow in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions. Conclusion: Significant signal differences were found between lesions and contralateral tissues in the PD reference image, which introduced errors in blood flow quantification in ASL. The error can be up to 20% in individual patients with an average of 5- 10% for the group of patients

  2. Spin current

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, Sergio O; Saitoh, Eiji; Kimura, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistance effect in magnetic multilayers in 1988, a new branch of physics and technology, called spin-electronics or spintronics, has emerged, where the flow of electrical charge as well as the flow of electron spin, the so-called “spin current,” are manipulated and controlled together. The physics of magnetism and the application of spin current have progressed in tandem with the nanofabrication technology of magnets and the engineering of interfaces and thin films. This book aims to provide an introduction and guide to the new physics and applications of spin current, with an emphasis on the interaction between spin and charge currents in magnetic nanostructures.

  3. Spin doctoring

    OpenAIRE

    Vozková, Markéta

    2011-01-01

    1 ABSTRACT The aim of this text is to provide an analysis of the phenomenon of spin doctoring in the Euro-Atlantic area. Spin doctors are educated people in the fields of semiotics, cultural studies, public relations, political communication and especially familiar with the infrastructure and the functioning of the media industry. Critical reflection of manipulative communication techniques puts spin phenomenon in historical perspective and traces its practical use in today's social communica...

  4. Accurate and fast creep test for viscoelastic fluids using disk-probe-type and quadrupole-arrangement-type electromagnetically spinning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Taichi; Sakai, Keiji

    2017-07-01

    Viscoelasticity is a unique characteristic of soft materials and describes its dynamic response to mechanical stimulations. A creep test is an experimental method for measuring the strain ratio/rate against an applied stress, thereby assessing the viscoelasticity of the materials. We propose two advanced experimental systems suitable for the creep test, adopting our original electromagnetically spinning (EMS) technique. This technique can apply a constant torque by a noncontact mechanism, thereby allowing more sensitive and rapid measurements. The viscosity and elasticity of a semidilute wormlike micellar solution were determined using two setups, and the consistency between the results was assessed.

  5. An overview of recent nucleon spin structure measurements at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allada, Kalyan [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Jefferson Lab have made significant contributions to improve our knowledge of the longitudinal spin structure by measuring polarized structure functions, g1 and g2, down to Q2 = 0.02 GeV2. The low Q2 data is especially useful in testing the Chiral Perturbation theory (cPT) calculations. The spin-dependent sum rules and the spin polarizabilities, constructed from the moments of g1 and g2, provide an important tool to study the longitudinal spin structure. We will present an overview of the experimental program to measure these structure functions at Jefferson Lab, and present some recent results on the neutron polarizabilities, proton g1 at low Q2, and proton and neutron d2 measurement. In addition to this, we will discuss the transverse spin structure of the nucleon which can be accessed using chiral-odd transversity distribution (h1), and show some results from measurements done on polarized 3He target in Hall A.

  6. Elastic scattering of polarized protons on helium three at 800 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizi, A.

    1985-07-01

    A set of spin dependent parameters and cross sections has been measured for polarized p- 3 He elastic scattering over the range of q .7 to 4.2 fm -1 . The experiment was done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) with a polarized proton beam at .8 GeV. The focal plane polarimeter of the HRS was used to determine the spin direction of the scattered proton. Since 3 He is one of the simplest nuclei, polarized p- 3 He scattering provides a very sensitive test of multiple scattering theories. The theoretical analysis was done by using two different wave functions for 3 He as input to the multiple scattering theory. The theoretical calculations and experimental data together will give us useful information about nucleon-nucleon amplitudes and also help us to obtain a better understanding of the scattering process. 68 refs., 55 figs., 9 tabs

  7. Spin 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, Gisela

    1990-01-01

    The idea of the intrinsic angular momentum, or 'spin', of a particle has played an essential part in fundamental physics for more than 60 years, and its continuing importance was underlined at the 9th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics, held in September in Bonn.

  8. Spin 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, Gisela

    1990-12-15

    The idea of the intrinsic angular momentum, or 'spin', of a particle has played an essential part in fundamental physics for more than 60 years, and its continuing importance was underlined at the 9th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics, held in September in Bonn.

  9. Spin tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ariano, G M [Quantum Optics and Information Group, INFM Udr Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica ' Alessandro Volta' and INFM, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Maccone, L [Quantum Optics and Information Group, INFM Udr Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica ' Alessandro Volta' and INFM, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Paini, M [Quantum Optics and Information Group, INFM Udr Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica ' Alessandro Volta' and INFM, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2003-02-01

    We propose a tomographic reconstruction scheme for spin states. The experimental set-up, which is a modification of the Stern-Gerlach scheme, can be easily performed with currently available technology. The method is generalized to multiparticle states, analysing the spin-1/2 case for indistinguishable particles. Some Monte Carlo numerical simulations are given to illustrate the technique.

  10. Spin tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ariano, G M; Maccone, L; Paini, M

    2003-01-01

    We propose a tomographic reconstruction scheme for spin states. The experimental set-up, which is a modification of the Stern-Gerlach scheme, can be easily performed with currently available technology. The method is generalized to multiparticle states, analysing the spin-1/2 case for indistinguishable particles. Some Monte Carlo numerical simulations are given to illustrate the technique

  11. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  12. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.

    1995-01-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons

  13. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victoria, M. [Association EURATOM, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons.

  14. High energy hadron spin-flip amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selyugin, O.V.

    2016-01-01

    The high-energy part of the hadron spin-flip amplitude is examined in the framework of the new high-energy general structure (HEGS) model of the elastic hadron scattering at high energies. The different forms of the hadron spin-flip amplitude are compared in the impact parameter representation. It is shown that the existing experimental data of the proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energy in the region of the diffraction minimum and at large momentum transfer give support in the presence of the energy-independent part of the hadron spin-flip amplitude with the momentum dependence proposed in the works by Galynskii-Kuraev. [ru

  15. Relativistic polarized deuteron fragmentation into protons as test of six-quark nature of deuteron at small distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobushkin, A.P.; Vizireva, L.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the nature of the short-range few-nucleon correlations in nuclei is proposed in the polarized high-energy deuteron fragmentation experiments. The presence of 6q-state in deuteron with probability of several percents is shown to change essentially the cross-section behaviour of this process in the momentum region where the fraction of the deuteron momentum carried out by proton in the infinite momentum frame is about 0.78. It is shown how the character of the cross-section of the transverse polarized deuteron fragmentation is changed depending on the parameters of 6q-admixure in deuteron [ru

  16. Nuclear spin content and constraints on exotic spin-dependent couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimball, D F Jackson

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous recent and ongoing experiments employing a variety of atomic species to search for couplings of atomic spins to exotic fields. In order to meaningfully compare these experimental results, the coupling of the exotic field to the atomic spin must be interpreted in terms of the coupling to electron, proton, and neutron spins. Traditionally, constraints from atomic experiments on exotic couplings to neutron and proton spins have been derived using the single-particle Schmidt model for nuclear spin. In this model, particular atomic species are sensitive to either neutron or proton spin couplings, but not both. More recently, semi-empirical models employing nuclear magnetic moment data have been used to derive new constraints for non-valence nucleons. However, comparison of such semi-empirical models to detailed large-scale nuclear shell model calculations and analysis of known physical effects in nuclei show that existing semi-empirical models cannot reliably be used to predict the spin polarization of non-valence nucleons. The results of our re-analysis of nuclear spin content are applied to searches for exotic long-range monopole–dipole and dipole–dipole couplings of nuclei leading to significant revisions of some published constraints. (paper)

  17. SU-E-T-180: Fano Cavity Test of Proton Transport in Monte Carlo Codes Running On GPU and Xeon Phi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, E; Sorriaux, J; Souris, K; Lee, J; Vynckier, S; Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In proton dose calculation, clinically compatible speeds are now achieved with Monte Carlo codes (MC) that combine 1) adequate simplifications in the physics of transport and 2) the use of hardware architectures enabling massive parallel computing (like GPUs). However, the uncertainties related to the transport algorithms used in these codes must be kept minimal. Such algorithms can be checked with the so-called “Fano cavity test”. We implemented the test in two codes that run on specific hardware: gPMC on an nVidia GPU and MCsquare on an Intel Xeon Phi (60 cores). Methods: gPMC and MCsquare are designed for transporting protons in CT geometries. Both codes use the method of fictitious interaction to sample the step-length for each transport step. The considered geometry is a water cavity (2×2×0.2 cm 3 , 0.001 g/cm 3 ) in a 10×10×50 cm 3 water phantom (1 g/cm 3 ). CPE in the cavity is established by generating protons over the phantom volume with a uniform momentum (energy E) and a uniform intensity per unit mass I. Assuming no nuclear reactions and no generation of other secondaries, the computed cavity dose should equal IE, according to Fano's theorem. Both codes were tested for initial proton energies of 50, 100, and 200 MeV. Results: For all energies, gPMC and MCsquare are within 0.3 and 0.2 % of the theoretical value IE, respectively (0.1% standard deviation). Single-precision computations (instead of double) increased the error by about 0.1% in MCsquare. Conclusion: Despite the simplifications in the physics of transport, both gPMC and MCsquare successfully pass the Fano test. This ensures optimal accuracy of the codes for clinical applications within the uncertainties on the underlying physical models. It also opens the path to other applications of these codes, like the simulation of ion chamber response

  18. SU-E-T-180: Fano Cavity Test of Proton Transport in Monte Carlo Codes Running On GPU and Xeon Phi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterpin, E; Sorriaux, J; Souris, K; Lee, J; Vynckier, S [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Jia, X; Jiang, S [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In proton dose calculation, clinically compatible speeds are now achieved with Monte Carlo codes (MC) that combine 1) adequate simplifications in the physics of transport and 2) the use of hardware architectures enabling massive parallel computing (like GPUs). However, the uncertainties related to the transport algorithms used in these codes must be kept minimal. Such algorithms can be checked with the so-called “Fano cavity test”. We implemented the test in two codes that run on specific hardware: gPMC on an nVidia GPU and MCsquare on an Intel Xeon Phi (60 cores). Methods: gPMC and MCsquare are designed for transporting protons in CT geometries. Both codes use the method of fictitious interaction to sample the step-length for each transport step. The considered geometry is a water cavity (2×2×0.2 cm{sup 3}, 0.001 g/cm{sup 3}) in a 10×10×50 cm{sup 3} water phantom (1 g/cm{sup 3}). CPE in the cavity is established by generating protons over the phantom volume with a uniform momentum (energy E) and a uniform intensity per unit mass I. Assuming no nuclear reactions and no generation of other secondaries, the computed cavity dose should equal IE, according to Fano's theorem. Both codes were tested for initial proton energies of 50, 100, and 200 MeV. Results: For all energies, gPMC and MCsquare are within 0.3 and 0.2 % of the theoretical value IE, respectively (0.1% standard deviation). Single-precision computations (instead of double) increased the error by about 0.1% in MCsquare. Conclusion: Despite the simplifications in the physics of transport, both gPMC and MCsquare successfully pass the Fano test. This ensures optimal accuracy of the codes for clinical applications within the uncertainties on the underlying physical models. It also opens the path to other applications of these codes, like the simulation of ion chamber response.

  19. Thick target benchmark test for the code used in the design of high intensity proton accelerator project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Harada, Masatoshi

    2003-01-01

    In the neutronics design for the JAERI and KEK Joint high intensity accelerator facilities, transport codes of NMTC/JAM, MCNPX and MARS are used. In order to confirm the predict ability for these code, it is important to compare with the experiment result. For the validation of the source term of neutron, the calculations are compared with the experimental spectrum of neutrons produced from thick target, which are carried out at LANL and KEK. As for validation of low energy incident case, the calculations are compared with experiment carried out at LANL, in which target of C, Al, Fe, and 238 U are irradiated with 256-MeV protons. By the comparison, it is found that both NMTC/JAM and MCNPX show good agreement with the experiment within by a factor of 2. MARS shows good agreement for C and Al target. MARS, however, gives rather underestimation for all targets in the neutron energy region higher than 30 MeV. For the validation high incident energy case, the codes are compared with the experiment carried out at KEK. In this experiment, W and Pb targets are bombarded with 0.5- and 1.5-GeV protons. Although slightly disagreement exists, NMTC/JAM, MCNPX and MARS are in good agreement with the experiment within by a factor of 2. (author)

  20. Performance Test Results of a Single-sided Silicon Strip Detector with a Radioactive Source and a Proton Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Y. I.; Kah, D. H.; Son, D. H.; Kang, H. D.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Bae, J. B.; Ryu, S.; Park, H.; Kim, K. R.

    2007-01-01

    Due to high intrinsic precision and high speed properties of a silicon material, the silicon detector has been used in various applications such as medical imaging detector, radiation detector, positioning detectors in space science and experimental particle physics. High technology, modern equipment, and deep expertise are required to design and fabricate good quality of silicon sensors. Only few facilities in the world can develop silicon sensors which meet requirements of sensor performances. That is one of main reasons that the silicon sensor is so expensive and it takes time to purchase the silicon sensor once it is ordered. We designed and fabricated AC-coupled single-sided silicon strip sensors and developed front-end electronics and DAQ system to read out sensor signals. The silicon strip sensors were fabricated on a 5-in. n-type silicon wafer which has an orientation, high resistivity (>5 kΩ · cm) and a thickness of 380 μm. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of each channel by using a radioactive source and a 45 MeV proton beam from the MC-50 cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS) in Seoul. We present the measurement results of the SNRs of the silicon strip sensor with a proton beam and radioactive sources

  1. Nucleon Form Factors Using Spin Degrees of Freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Mark

    2002-01-01

    An overview of recent measurements of the neutron and proton electromagnetic form factors from double polarization experiments. Spin observables are sensitive to the product of nucleon form factor which allows access to the small nucleon electric form factors

  2. Negative Effect of Proton-pump Inhibitors (PPIs) on Helicobacter pylori Growth, Morphology, and Urease Test and Recovery after PPI Removal--An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saniee, Parastoo; Shahreza, Somayeh; Siavoshi, Farideh

    2016-04-01

    Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) consumption does lead to false-negative results of Helicobacter pylori diagnostic tests such as biopsy culture and rapid urease test (RUT). Helicobacter pylori isolates from 112 dyspeptic patients with (56.5%) or without (43.5%) PPI consumption were recruited for examining the negative effects of omeprazole (OMP), lansoprazole (LPZ), and pantoprazole (PAN) on H. pylori viability, morphology, and urease, in vitro. The effect of a sublethal concentration of OMP on bacterial features and their recovery after removal of OMP was also assessed. Of 112 culture-positive gastric biopsies, 87.5% were RUT positive and 12.5% RUT negative. There was a significant correlation between negative RUT results and PPI consumption (p urease of 90.3% of isolates between 0 and 40 minutes and 54.4% between 20 and 40 minutes, respectively. PAN did not inhibit H. pylori growth and urease. Three 3-day (9 days) consecutive subcultures of H. pylori on brucella blood agar (BBA) supplemented with OMP resulted in reduced bacterial viability (1+), compared with control (4+), change of spiral morphology to coccoid, and reduction in pink color intensity in urea agar. Bacterial growth (1+), morphology, and urease test did not improve after the first 3-day and second 3-day (6 days) subcultures on BBA. However, relative recovery occurred after the third 3-day (9 days) subculture and complete recovery was observed after the fourth 3-day (12 days) subculture, as confluent growth (4+), 100% spiral cells, and strong urease test. Proton-pump Inhibitors exert transient negative effects on H. pylori viability, morphology, and urease test. Accordingly, cessation of PPI consumption at least 12 days before endoscopy could help avoiding false-negative results of H. pylori diagnostic tests. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Spin systems

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, W J

    1989-01-01

    This book is about spin systems as models for magnetic materials, especially antiferromagnetic lattices. Spin-systems are well-defined models, for which, in special cases, exact properties may be derived. These special cases are for the greater part, one- dimensional and restricted in their applicability, but they may give insight into general properties that also exist in higher dimension. This work pays special attention to qualitative differences between spin lattices of different dimensions. It also replaces the traditional picture of an (ordered) antiferromagnetic state of a Heisenberg sy

  4. Recent on-beam tests of wide angle neutron polarization analysis with a 3He spin filter: Magic PASTIS on V20 at HZB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, E.; Salhi, Z.; Gainov, R.; Woracek, R.; Soltner, H.; Pistel, P.; Beule, F.; Bussmann, K.; Heynen, A.; Kämmerling, H.; Suxdorf, F.; Strobl, M.; Russina, M.; Voigt, J.; Ioffe, A.

    2017-06-01

    A complete XYZ polarization analysis solution is under development for the new thermal time of flight spectrometer TOPAS [1], to be operated in the coming east neutron guide hall at the MLZ. Polarization Analysis Studies on a Thermal Inelastic Spectrometer, commonly called PASTIS [2], is based on polarized 3He neutron spin filters and an XYZ field configuration for the sample environment and a polarization-preserving neutron guide field. The complete system was designed to provide adiabatic transport of the neutron polarization to the sample position while maintaining the homogeneity of the XYZ field. This system has now been tested on the polarized time-of-flight ESS test beam line V20 at HZB [3]. Down to the minimum wavelength of 1.6 Å on the instrument, the magnetic configuration worked ideally for neutron spin transport while giving full experimental freedom to change between the X, Y or Z field configuration. The 3He cell used was polarized at the 3He lab of the JCNS at the MLZ in Garching and transported to HZB in Berlin via car showing that such a transport is indeed feasible for such experiments. We present results of this test and the next steps forward.

  5. THE FUTURE OF SPIN PHYSICS AT BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ARONSON, S.; DESHPANDE, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL is the world's only polarized proton-proton collider. Collisions at center-of-mass energies up to 500 GeV and beam polarizations approaching 70% (longitudinal or transverse) are provided to two experiments, STAR and PHENIX, at luminosities (ge) 10 32 /cm 2 /sec. Transverse polarized beam has also been provided to the BRAHMS experiment. Measurements that bear on the important question of the spin content of the nucleon are beginning to appear. Over the next 10 years, as the performance of polarized proton running at RHIC is further developed, the Spin Physics program at RHIC will provide definitive measurements of the contributions to the proton's spin of the gluon, the sea quarks and the orbital motion of the partons in the proton's wave function. We plan to extend the reach of our study of the role of spin in QCD with the development of ''eRHIC'', which will provide polarized e-p collisions to a new detector

  6. The Future Of Spin Physics At BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, Samuel; Deshpande, Abhay

    2007-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL is the world's only polarized proton-proton collider. Collisions at center-of-mass energies up to 500 GeV and beam polarizations approaching 70% (longitudinal or transverse) are provided to two experiments, STAR and PHENIX, at luminosities ≥ 1032/cm2/sec. Transverse polarized beam has also been provided to the BRAHMS experiment. Measurements that bear on the important question of the spin content of the nucleon are beginning to appear. Over the next 10 years, as the performance of polarized proton running at RHIC is farmer developed, the Spin Physics program at RHIC will provide definitive measurements of the contributions to the proton's spin of the gluon, the sea quarks and the orbital motion of the partons in the proton's wave function. We plan to extend the reach of our study of the role of spin in QCD with the development of 'eRHIC', which will provide polarized e-p collisions to a new detector

  7. The magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, S.; Blaum, K.; Braeuninger, S.; Franke, K.; Kracke, H.; Leiteritz, C.; Matsuda, Y.; Nagahama, H.; Ospelkaus, C.; Rodegheri, C.C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Smorra, C.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recent exciting progress in the preparation and manipulation of the motional quantum states of a single trapped proton enabled the first direct detection of the particle's spin state. Based on this success the proton magnetic moment $\\mu_p$ was measured with ppm precision in a Penning trap with a superimposed magnetic field inhomogeneity. An improvement by an additional factor of 1000 in precision is possible by application of the so-called double Penning trap technique. In a recent paper we reported the first demonstration of this method with a single trapped proton, which is a major step towards the first direct high-precision measurement of $\\mu_p$. The techniques required for the proton can be directly applied to measure the antiproton magnetic moment $\\mu_{\\bar{p}}$. An improvement in precision of $\\mu_{\\bar{p}}$ by more than three orders of magnitude becomes possible, which will provide one of the most sensitive tests of CPT invariance. To achieve this research goal we are currently setting up the Baryo...

  8. Proton permeation of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, D W

    1987-10-01

    Proton permeation of the lipid bilayer barrier has two unique features. First, permeability coefficients measured at neutral pH ranges are six to seven orders of magnitude greater than expected from knowledge of other monovalent cations. Second, proton conductance across planar lipid bilayers varies at most by a factor of 10 when pH is varied from near 1 to near 11. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for this anomalous behavior: proton conductance related to contaminants of lipid bilayers, and proton translocation along transient hydrogen-bonded chains (tHBC) of associated water molecules in the membrane. The weight of evidence suggests that trace contaminants may contribute to proton conductance across planar lipid membranes at certain pH ranges, but cannot account for the anomalous proton flux in liposome systems. Two new results will be reported here which were designed to test the tHBC model. These include measurements of relative proton/potassium permeability in the gramicidin channel, and plots of proton flux against the magnitude of pH gradients. (1) The relative permeabilities of protons and potassium through the gramicidin channel, which contains a single strand of hydrogen-bonded water molecules, were found to differ by at least four orders of magnitude when measured at neutral pH ranges. This result demonstrates that a hydrogen-bonded chain of water molecules can provide substantial discrimination between protons and other cations. It was also possible to calculate that if approximately 7% of bilayer water was present in a transient configuration similar to that of the gramicidin channel, it could account for the measured proton flux. (2) The plot of proton conductance against pH gradient across liposome membranes was superlinear, a result that is consistent with one of three alternative tHBC models for proton conductance described by Nagle elsewhere in this volume.