WorldWideScience

Sample records for testing patient decision

  1. Launching a virtual decision lab: development and field-testing of a web-based patient decision support research platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Aubri S; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary A; Tosteson, Anna N A; O'Connor, Annette M; Volk, Robert J; Tomek, Ivan M; Andrews, Steven B; Bartels, Stephen J

    2014-12-12

    Over 100 trials show that patient decision aids effectively improve patients' information comprehension and values-based decision making. However, gaps remain in our understanding of several fundamental and applied questions, particularly related to the design of interactive, personalized decision aids. This paper describes an interdisciplinary development process for, and early field testing of, a web-based patient decision support research platform, or virtual decision lab, to address these questions. An interdisciplinary stakeholder panel designed the web-based research platform with three components: a) an introduction to shared decision making, b) a web-based patient decision aid, and c) interactive data collection items. Iterative focus groups provided feedback on paper drafts and online prototypes. A field test assessed a) feasibility for using the research platform, in terms of recruitment, usage, and acceptability; and b) feasibility of using the web-based decision aid component, compared to performance of a videobooklet decision aid in clinical care. This interdisciplinary, theory-based, patient-centered design approach produced a prototype for field-testing in six months. Participants (n = 126) reported that: the decision aid component was easy to use (98%), information was clear (90%), the length was appropriate (100%), it was appropriately detailed (90%), and it held their interest (97%). They spent a mean of 36 minutes using the decision aid and 100% preferred using their home/library computer. Participants scored a mean of 75% correct on the Decision Quality, Knowledge Subscale, and 74 out of 100 on the Preparation for Decision Making Scale. Completing the web-based decision aid reduced mean Decisional Conflict scores from 31.1 to 19.5 (p web-based patient decision support research platform that was feasible for use in research studies in terms of recruitment, acceptability, and usage. Within this platform, the web-based decision aid component

  2. Harnessing Information Technology to Inform Patients Facing Routine Decisions: Cancer Screening as a Test Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krist, Alex H; Woolf, Steven H; Hochheimer, Camille; Sabo, Roy T; Kashiri, Paulette; Jones, Resa M; Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Etz, Rebecca S; Tu, Shin-Ping

    2017-05-01

    Technology could transform routine decision making by anticipating patients' information needs, assessing where patients are with decisions and preferences, personalizing educational experiences, facilitating patient-clinician information exchange, and supporting follow-up. This study evaluated whether patients and clinicians will use such a decision module and its impact on care, using 3 cancer screening decisions as test cases. Twelve practices with 55,453 patients using a patient portal participated in this prospective observational cohort study. Participation was open to patients who might face a cancer screening decision: women aged 40 to 49 who had not had a mammogram in 2 years, men aged 55 to 69 who had not had a prostate-specific antigen test in 2 years, and adults aged 50 to 74 overdue for colorectal cancer screening. Data sources included module responses, electronic health record data, and a postencounter survey. In 1 year, one-fifth of the portal users (11,458 patients) faced a potential cancer screening decision. Among these patients, 20.6% started and 7.9% completed the decision module. Fully 47.2% of module completers shared responses with their clinician. After their next office visit, 57.8% of those surveyed thought their clinician had seen their responses, and many reported the module made their appointment more productive (40.7%), helped engage them in the decision (47.7%), broadened their knowledge (48.1%), and improved communication (37.5%). Many patients face decisions that can be anticipated and proactively facilitated through technology. Although use of technology has the potential to make visits more efficient and effective, cultural, workflow, and technical changes are needed before it could be widely disseminated. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  3. Involving women in personalised decision-making on mode of delivery after caesarean section: the development and pilot testing of a patient decision aid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoorel, E.N.; Vankan, E.; Scheepers, H.C.J.; Augustijn, B.C.; Dirksen, C.D.; Koning, M.; Kuijk, S.M. van; Kwee, A.; Melman, S.; Nijhuis, J.G.; Aardenburg, R.; Boer, K. de; Hasaart, T.H.M.; Mol, B.W.; Nieuwenhuijze, M.; Pampus, M.G. van; Roosmalen, J. van; Roumen, F.J.M.E.; Vries, R. de; Wouters, M.G.A.J.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Hermens, R.P.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a patient decision aid (PtDA) for mode of delivery after caesarean section that integrates personalised prediction of vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC) with the elicitation of patient preferences and evidence-based information. DESIGN: A PtDA was developed and pilot tested

  4. Developing and testing a computerized decision support system for nurse-to-patient assignment: a multimethod study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Braaksma, Aleida; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-06-01

    Nurse-to-patient assignment is a frequently recurring, time-consuming, and complex process owing to the many considerations involved. Creating well-balanced, high-quality assignments is crucial to ensuring patient safety, quality of care, and job satisfaction for nurses. A computerized decision support system can assist (charge) nurses in the nurse-to-patient assignment process. In this two-phase multimethod study, a computerized decision support system was developed and evaluated. Three nursing wards in a 1000-bed Dutch university hospital participated. In the first phase of this study, considerations relevant to the assignment process--and their relative importance--were investigated in a literature review, focus group sessions with nurses, and a survey among nurses. Using information from the first phase, the computerized decision support system was developed based on an integer linear program. In the second phase, a before-and-after study was conducted to test and evaluate the computerized decision support system both quantitatively (duration of the assignment process) and qualitatively (survey on workload). Thirty-six measurements were performed to test the computerized decision support system. After implementation, a 30% time reduction was achieved in the nurse-to-patient assignments, and nurses (N = 138) experienced a lower workload. Therefore, the implementation of computerized decision support system would increase both the quality and safety of care as well as the nurses' job satisfaction and should be investigated rigorously in the coming years.

  5. Evaluating surgeons' informed decision making skills: pilot test using a videoconferenced standardised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clever, Sarah L; Novack, Dennis H; Cohen, Diane G; Levinson, Wendy

    2003-12-01

    Standardised patients (SPs) are effective in evaluating communication skills, but not every training site may have the resources to develop and maintain SP programmes. To test whether videoconferencing technology (VT) could enable an interaction between an SP and an orthopaedic surgeon that would allow the SP to accurately evaluate the surgeon's informed decision making (IDM) skills. We also assessed whether this sort of interaction was acceptable to orthopaedic surgeons as a means of learning IDM skills. We trained an SP to represent a 75-year-old woman considering hip replacement surgery. Orthopaedic surgeons in Chicago individually consulted with the SP in Philadelphia; each participant could see and hear the other on large television screens. The SP evaluated the surgeons' advice using a 23-item checklist of IDM elements, and gave each surgeon verbal and written feedback on his IDM skills. The surgeons then gave their evaluations of the exercise. Twenty-two surgeons completed the project. The SP was > or = 80% accurate in classifying 20 of the 23 IDM skills when compared to a clinician rater. Although 12 (55%) of the orthopaedic surgeons felt that some aspects of the technology were distracting, most were pleased with it, and 19 of 22 (86%) would recommend the videoconferenced SP interaction to their colleagues as a means of learning IDM skills. These results suggest that VT allows accurate evaluation of IDM skills in a format that is acceptable to orthopaedic surgeons. Videoconferencing technology may be useful in long-distance SP communication assessment for a variety of learners.

  6. How Patient Interactions with a Computer-Based Video Intervention Affect Decisions to Test for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Ian David; Rajan, Sonali; Marsch, Lisa A.; Bania, Theodore C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines predictors of HIV test acceptance among emergency department patients who received an educational video intervention designed to increase HIV testing. A total of 202 patients in the main treatment areas of a high-volume, urban hospital emergency department used inexpensive netbook computers to watch brief educational…

  7. Developing a comprehensive, effective patient-friendly website to enhance decision making in predictive testing for Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins Virani, Alice K; Creighton, S M; Hayden, M R

    2013-06-01

    Predictive testing for Huntington disease is a complex decision, requiring in-depth counseling, education, and evaluation. Despite the growth in Web-based decision aids and educational resources, such tools for those considering Huntington disease testing are not available. The main objective of this project was to develop a patient-friendly, comprehensive, accessible Web-based tool to provide accurate information about testing for Huntington disease. A semistructured interview study was conducted to determine the informational, educational, and support needs of those considering Huntington disease testing. A dedicated predictive testing website was subsequently developed and pilot tested. The interview study revealed that an effective website should include interactive diagrams, video documentaries, and personal stories of others who had considered testing. The pilot test revealed that the multidimensional site was easy to navigate and understand and provided an accurate, unbiased overview of the important factors to be considered before undergoing predictive testing. This project demonstrates the use of a mixed-method approach to develop the first tailored website dedicated to predictive testing for Huntington disease. Such an approach enabled the development of a comprehensive, accurate, and effective educational tool that supports informed decision making for people considering predictive testing for Huntington disease in an accessible, nonthreatening manner.

  8. Decision support for acute problems: the role of the standardized patient in usability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Jeffrey A; Rose, Alan F; Palchuk, Matvey B; Chang, Frank; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Chan, Joseph C; Middleton, Blackford

    2006-12-01

    For applications that require clinician use while interacting with patients, usability testing with standardized patients has the potential to approximate actual patient care in a controlled setting. We used hypothetical scenarios and a standardized patient to collect quantitative and qualitative results in testing an early prototype of a new application, the Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Smart Form. The standardized patient fit well into the usability testing sessions. Clinicians had a positive response to the standardized patients and behaved as they normally would during a clinical encounter. Positive findings of the ARI Smart Form included that users thought it had impressive functionality and the potential to save time. Criticism focused on the visual design, which could be streamlined, and navigation, which was difficult in some areas. Based on these results, we are modifying the ARI Smart Form in preparation for use in actual patient care. Standardized patients should be considered for usability testing, especially if an application is to be used during the patient interview.

  9. The indication area of a diagnostic test. Part II--the impact of test dependence, physician's decision strategy, and patient's utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers, Lukas J A; Nelemans, Patty J; Geurts, Sandra M E; Jansen, Erik; de Boer, Peter; Verbeek, André L M

    2015-10-01

    Any diagnostic test has an indication area of prior probabilities wherein the gain in diagnostic certainty outweighs its loss. Here, we investigate whether indication area and the maximum diagnostic gain are robust measures if we assume test dependence, alternative physician's heuristics, and varying patient's utilities. Three mathematical functions for the dependence of test sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) on the prior disease probability were studied. In addition, three different decision heuristics for further management were explored for the case that "no test" would be done. Finally, the valuation of test outcomes was varied. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the impact of the alternative assumptions on the indication area and maximum diagnostic gain. By assuming test dependence, the indication area shifts to higher priors and increases the maximum diagnostic gain. Decision strategies assuming a "threshold before treat" can inadvertently widen the indication area and increase the maximum diagnostic gain. Varying patient utilities will usually reduce the net diagnostic gain. A sensitivity analysis revealed the robustness of the model. The indication area and the maximum diagnostic gain are robust measures of test performance and are easier to interpret than the classical performance measures. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Persuasive Interventions for Controversial Cancer Screening Recommendations: Testing a Novel Approach to Help Patients Make Evidence-Based Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saver, Barry G; Mazor, Kathleen M; Luckmann, Roger; Cutrona, Sarah L; Hayes, Marcela; Gorodetsky, Tatyana; Esparza, Nancy; Bacigalupe, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate novel decision aids designed to help patients trust and accept the controversial, evidence-based, US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations about prostate cancer screening (from 2012) and mammography screening for women aged 40 to 49 years (from 2009). We created recorded vignettes of physician-patient discussions about prostate cancer screening and mammography, accompanied by illustrative slides, based on principles derived from preceding qualitative work and behavioral science literature. We conducted a randomized crossover study with repeated measures with 27 men aged 50 to 74 years and 35 women aged 40 to 49 years. All participants saw a video intervention and a more traditional, paper-based decision aid intervention in random order. At entry and after seeing each intervention, they were surveyed about screening intentions, perceptions of benefits and harm, and decisional conflict. Changes in screening intentions were analyzed without regard to order of intervention after an initial analyses showed no evidence of an order effect. At baseline, 69% of men and 86% of women reported wanting screening, with 31% and 6%, respectively, unsure. Mean change on a 3-point, yes, unsure, no scale was -0.93 (P = persuasive video interventions significantly changed the screening intentions of substantial proportions of viewers. Our approach needs further testing but may provide a model for helping patients to consider and accept evidence-based, counterintuitive recommendations. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  11. Shared decision making in prostate-specific antigen testing: the effect of a mailed patient flyer prior to an annual exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrey, Alison R; Matlock, Daniel D; Andrews, Laura; Bronsert, Michael; Denberg, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Professional societies recommend that the decision to screen for prostate cancer involves a shared discussion between patient and provider. Many men are tested without this discussion. Prostate cancer screening decision aids increase patient knowledge and participation in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing decisions under ideal circumstances but are often resource intensive and elaborate. There is a need for evaluation of interventions that are low cost, low literacy, and practical for widespread distribution. The authors evaluated the effect of a mailed low-literacy informational patient flyer about the PSA test on measures of shared decision making. A pragmatic randomized controlled trial comparing the mailed flyer versus usual care was conducted among 303 men aged 50 to 74 years who were scheduled for annual health maintenance exams in 2 general internal medicine clinics (University of Colorado and University of Colorado Hospital). Charts were reviewed after the visits for documentation of PSA screening discussions and PSA testing rates. Follow-up patient surveys assessed include perceived participation in PSA screening decisions, knowledge of the PSA test, and flyer acceptability. Rates of chart-documented PSA discussions were low with no difference between the flyer and control groups (17.7% and 13.6%, respectively; P = .28). Rates of PSA testing were also similar in both groups (62.5% vs 58.5%; P = .48). Rates of patient-reported PSA discussions were higher than the documented rates but also without differences between the groups (71.8% vs 62.3%; P = .22). The intervention had no effect in the PSA knowledge scores (3.5/5 vs 3.3/5, P = .60). Patients found the flyer to be highly acceptable. A mailed low-literacy informational flyer was well received by patients but had no effect on rates of PSA discussions, PSA testing, or patient knowledge of prostate cancer screening.

  12. Applications of decision theory to test-based decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.

    1987-01-01

    The use of Bayesian decision theory to solve problems in test-based decision making is discussed. Four basic decision problems are distinguished: (1) selection; (2) mastery; (3) placement; and (4) classification, the situation where each treatment has its own criterion. Each type of decision can be

  13. Testing Decision Rules for Multiattribute Decision Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidl, C.; Traub, S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper investigates the existence of an editing phase and studies the com- pliance of subjects' behaviour with the most popular multiattribute decision rules. We observed that our data comply well with the existence of an editing phase, at least if we allow for a natural error rate of some 25%.

  14. Decipher test impacts decision making among patients considering adjuvant and salvage treatment after radical prostatectomy: Interim results from the Multicenter Prospective PRO-IMPACT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, John L; du Plessis, Marguerite; Santiago-Jiménez, María; Yousefi, Kasra; Thompson, Darby J S; Karsh, Lawrence; Lane, Brian R; Franks, Michael; Chen, David Y T; Bandyk, Mark; Bianco, Fernando J; Brown, Gordon; Clark, William; Kibel, Adam S; Kim, Hyung L; Lowrance, William; Manoharan, Murugesan; Maroni, Paul; Perrapato, Scott; Sieber, Paul; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Waterhouse, Robert; Davicioni, Elai; Lotan, Yair; Lin, Daniel W

    2017-08-01

    Patients with prostate cancer and their providers face uncertainty as they consider adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) or salvage radiotherapy (SRT) after undergoing radical prostatectomy. The authors prospectively evaluated the impact of the Decipher test, which predicts metastasis risk after radical prostatectomy, on decision making for ART and SRT. A total of 150 patients who were considering ART and 115 who were considering SRT were enrolled. Providers submitted a management recommendation before processing the Decipher test and again at the time of receipt of the test results. Patients completed validated surveys on prostate cancer (PCa)-specific decisional effectiveness and PCa-related anxiety. Before the Decipher test, observation was recommended for 89% of patients considering ART and 58% of patients considering SRT. After Decipher testing, 18% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 12%-25%) of treatment recommendations changed in the ART arm, including 31% among high-risk patients; and 32% (95% CI, 24%-42%) of management recommendations changed in the salvage arm, including 56% among high-risk patients. Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS) scores were better after viewing Decipher test results (ART arm: median DCS before Decipher, 25 and after Decipher, 19 [Pfear of PCa disease recurrence in the ART arm (P = .02) and PCa-specific anxiety in the SRT arm (P = .05) decreased significantly among low-risk patients. Decipher results reported per 5% increase in 5-year metastasis probability were associated with the decision to pursue ART (odds ratio, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.19-1.85) and SRT (odds ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.09-1.81) in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Knowledge of Decipher test results was associated with treatment decision making and improved decisional effectiveness among men with PCa who were considering ART and SRT. Cancer 2017;123:2850-59. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American

  15. Influence of integrated molecular pathology test results on real-world management decisions for patients with pancreatic cysts: analysis of data from a national registry cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loren, David; Kowalski, Thomas; Siddiqui, Ali; Jackson, Sara; Toney, Nicole; Malhotra, Nidhi; Haddad, Nadim

    2016-01-20

    Integrated molecular pathology (IMP) approaches based on DNA mutational profiling accurately determine pancreatic cyst malignancy risk in patients lacking definitive diagnoses following endoscopic ultrasound imaging with fine-needle aspiration of fluid for cytology. In such cases, IMP 'low-risk' and 'high-risk' diagnoses reliably predict benign and malignant disease, respectively, and provide improved risk stratification for malignancy than a model of the 2012 International Consensus Guideline (ICG) recommendations. Our objective was to determine if initial adjunctive IMP testing influenced future real-world pancreatic cyst management decisions for intervention or surveillance relative to ICG recommendations, and if this benefitted patient outcomes. Analysis of data from the previously described National Pancreatic Cyst Registry. Associations between real-world decisions (intervention vs. surveillance), ICG model recommendations (surgery vs. surveillance) and IMP diagnoses (high-risk vs. low-risk) were evaluated using 2 × 2 tables. Kaplan Meier and hazard ratio analyses were used to assess time to malignancy. Odds ratios (OR) for surgery decision were determined using logistic regression. Of 491 patients, 206 received clinical intervention at follow-up (183 surgery, 4 chemotherapy, 19 presumed by malignant cytology). Overall, 13 % (66/491) of patients had a malignant outcome and 87 % (425/491) had a benign outcome at 2.9 years' follow-up. When ICG and IMP were concordant for surveillance/surgery recommendations, 83 % and 88 % actually underwent surveillance or surgery, respectively. However, when discordant, IMP diagnoses were predictive of real-world decisions, with 88 % of patients having an intervention when ICG recommended surveillance but IMP indicated high risk, and 55 % undergoing surveillance when ICG recommended surgery but IMP indicated low risk. These IMP-associated management decisions benefitted patient outcomes in these subgroups, as 57 % had

  16. Avoiding fears and promoting shared decision-making: How should physicians inform patients about radiation exposure from imaging tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbreras, Blanca; Vilar, José; González-Álvarez, Isabel; Guilabert, Mercedes; Pastor-Valero, María; Parker, Lucy Anne; Vilar-Palop, Jorge; Hernández-Aguado, Ildefonso

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the population's awareness about the radiation exposure associated with five specific imaging tests, and their preference regarding three different formats for receiving the information before undergoing an imaging test. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation through a survey and focal groups including general population from two health departments in Spain. The sampling was carried out in stages (according to health department size) and stratified by age and sex, to get a representative sample. We randomly selected the participants from these stages to be contacted by telephone by a trained nurse. Oral informed consent was obtained. Of 602 participants in the quantitative survey, 418 (70.3%) stated that they were aware of the risk associated with radiation. While the majority of these 418 participants knew that x-rays involve radiation (85.4%), fewer were aware that CT (42%) and mammography (38%) also involve radiation, and a substantial proportion believed, incorrectly, that MRI (38%) and ultrasound (18.4%) expose patients to radiation. The population preference was to receive the information using both oral and written formats, accompanied by a table showing the equivalence of the radiation associated with the imaging test to either a number of chest X-rays and exposure number of days of background radiation. The general population does not receive enough information regarding radiation exposure and the associated risks related to imaging tests. Initiatives should be designed to reinforce the patient's awareness when ordering a diagnostic imaging test.

  17. Clinical use of the Oncotype DX genomic test to guide treatment decisions for patients with invasive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McVeigh TP

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Terri P McVeigh, Michael J Kerin Discipline of Surgery, Lambe Institute for Translational Research, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Republic of Ireland Abstract: Implementation of the Oncotype DX assay has led to a change in the manner in which chemotherapy is utilized in patients with early stage, estrogen receptor (ER-positive, node-negative breast cancer; ensuring that patients at highest risk of recurrence are prescribed systemic treatment, while at the same time sparing low-risk patients potential adverse events from therapy unlikely to influence their survival. This test generates a recurrence score between 0 and 100, which correlates with probability of distant disease recurrence. Patients with low-risk recurrence scores (0–17 are unlikely to derive significant survival benefit with adjuvant chemotherapy and hormonal agents derived from using adjuvant hormonal therapy only. Conversely, adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to significantly improve survival in patients with high-risk recurrence scores (≥31. Trials are ongoing to determine how best to manage patients with recurrence scores in the intermediate range. This review outlines the introduction and impact of Oncotype DX testing on practice; ongoing clinical trials investigating its utility; and challenging clinical scenarios where the absolute recurrence score may require careful interpretation. We also performed a bibliometric analysis of publications on the topics of breast cancer and Oncotype DX as a surrogate marker of acceptability and incorporation of the assay into the management of patients with breast cancer. Keywords: Oncotype DX, gene expression profiling, personalized medicine, precision medicine, breast cancer

  18. Test-Retest Reliability of fMRI During Nonverbal Semantic Decisions in Moderate-Severe Nonfluent Aphasia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquie Kurland

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical reorganization in poststroke aphasia is not well understood. Few studies have investigated neural mechanisms underlying language recovery in severe aphasia patients, who are typically viewed as having a poor prognosis for language recovery. Although test-retest reliability is routinely demonstrated during collection of language data in single-subject aphasia research, this is rarely examined in fMRI studies investigating the underlying neural mechanisms in aphasia recovery.

  19. [Patients' decision for aesthetic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fansa, H; Haller, S

    2011-12-01

    Aesthetic surgery is a service which entails a high degree of trust. Service evaluation prior to provision is difficult for the patient. This leads to the question of how to manage the service successfully while still focusing on the medical needs. The decision to undergo an operation is not influenced by the operation itself, but by preoperative events which induce the patient to have the operation done. According to "buying decisions" for products or in service management, the decision for an aesthetic operation is extensive; the patient is highly involved and actively searching for information using different directed sources of information. The real "buying decision" consists of 5 phases: problem recognition, gathering of information, alternative education, purchase decision, and post purchase behaviour. A retrospective survey of 40 female patients who have already undergone an aesthetic operation assessed for problem recognition, which types of information were collected prior to the appointment with the surgeon, and why the patients have had the operation at our hospital. They were also asked how many alternative surgeons they had been seen before. Most of the patients had been thinking about undergoing an operation for several years. They mainly used the web for their research and were informed by other (non-aesthetic) physicians/general practitioners. Requested information was about the aesthetic results and possible problems and complications. Patients came based on web information and because of recommendations from other physicians. 60% of all interviewees did not see another surgeon and decided to have the operation because of positive patient-doctor communication and the surgeon's good reputation. Competence was considered to be the most important quality of the surgeon. However, the attribute was judged on subjective parameters. Environment, office rooms and staff were assessed as important but not very important. Costs of surgery were ranked second

  20. Guidance for patients considering direct-to-consumer genetic testing and health professionals involved in their care: development of a practical decision tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Leigh; Goldsmith, Lesley; Skirton, Heather

    2014-06-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests are available online, but there is little practical guidance for health professionals and consumers concerning their use. Work to produce such guidance was initially informed by three systematic reviews assessing the evidence on views and experiences of users and health professionals and policies of professional and bioethics organizations. The evidence suggested that consumers' motivations include general curiosity, improving their general health, ascertaining the risk of a particular condition or planning for future children. However, health professionals and bioethics organizations expressed concerns about potential harms resulting from these tests. Using this evidence, we constructed a list of topics to be included in proposed guidelines. Using an expert group technique, we aimed to develop guidance for (i) potential consumers and (ii) health professionals approached by patients considering or having undertaken such tests. We considered it important to involve a wide range of participants with relevant experience. Accordingly, researchers and clinicians based in four countries were invited to a 2-day workshop in August 2012. Following an iterative process, we decided to produce clinically relevant and pragmatic guidance in the form of a decision support tool for use in primary care. By utilizing both the relevant literature and the experience of the expert group, we identified seven key underlying reasons that might prompt individuals to consider DTC testing. We considered primary care physicians as the most likely health professionals from whom individuals would seek advice. Based on the outcomes of the workshop, we developed a decision support tool encompassing varied clinical scenarios. Health professionals and patients are guided through a pathway that includes relevant actions and information on the appropriateness of the test. This tool will be freely accessible to health professionals and patients online. © The

  1. Decision making in surgical treatment of chronic low back pain: the performance of prognostic tests to select patients for lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Paul

    2013-02-01

    outcome fusion; 5) to determine the incidence of postdiscography discitis, and whether there is a need for routine antibiotic prophylaxis; 6) to assess whether temporary external transpedicular fixation (TETF) can help to predict the outcome of spinal fusion; 7) to determine the prognostic accuracy of the most commonly used tests in clinical practice to predict the outcome of fusion for CLBP. The results of a national survey among spine surgeons in the Netherlands were presented in Study I. The surgeons were questioned about their opinion on prognostic factors and about the use of predictive tests for lumbar fusion in CLBP patients. The comments were compared with findings from the prevailing literature. The survey revealed a considerable lack of uniformity in the use and appreciation of predictive tests. Prognostic factors known from the literature were not consistently incorporated in the surgeons' decision making process either. This heterogeneity in strategy is most probably caused by the lack of sound scientific evidence for current predictive tests and it was concluded that currently there is not enough consensus among spine surgeons in the Netherlands to create national guidelines for surgical decision making in CLBP. In Study II, the hypothesized working mechanism of a pantaloon cast (i.e., minimisation of lumbosacral joint mobility) was studied. In patients who were admitted for a temporary external transpedicular fixation test (TETF), infrared light markers were rigidly attached to the protruding ends of Steinman pins that were fixed in two spinal levels. In this way three-dimensional motion between these levels could be analysed opto-electronically. During dynamic test conditions such as walking, a plaster cast, either with or without unilateral hip fixation, did not significantly decrease lumbosacral joint motion. Although not substantiated by sound scientific support, lumbosacral orthoses or pantaloon casts are often used in everyday practice as a predictor

  2. Patient decision-making for clinical genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gwen

    2007-03-01

    Medicine is incorporating genetic services into all avenues of health-care, ranging from the rarest to the most common diseases. Cognitive theories of decision-making still dominate professionals' understanding of patient decision-making about how to use genetic information and whether to have testing. I discovered a conceptual model of decision-making while carrying out a phenomenological-hermeneutic descriptive study of a convenience sample of 12 couples who were interviewed while deciding whether to undergo prenatal genetic testing. Thirty-two interviews were conducted with 12 men and 12 women separately. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and all data were analyzed using three levels of coding that were sorted into 30 categories and then abstracted into three emergent meta-themes that described men's and women's attempts to make sense and find meaning in how to best use prenatal genetic technology. Their descriptions of how they thought about, communicated, and coped with their decision were so detailed it was possible to discern nine different types of thinking they engaged in while deciding to accept or decline testing. They believed that decision-making is a process of working through your own personal style of thinking. This might include only one or any combination of the following types of thinking: analytical, ethical, moral, reflective, practical, hypothetical, judgmental, scary, and second sight, as described in detail by these 12 couples.

  3. 'Who is the ideal candidate?': decisions and issues relating to visual neuroprosthesis development, patient testing and neuroplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Lotfi B.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2007-03-01

    Appropriate delivery of electrical stimulation to intact visual structures can evoke patterned sensations of light in individuals who have been blind for many years. This pivotal finding has lent credibility to the concept of restoring functional vision by artificial means. As numerous groups worldwide pursue human clinical testing with visual prosthetic devices, it is becoming increasingly clear that there remains a considerable gap between the challenges of prosthetic device development and the rehabilitative strategies needed to implement this new technology in patients. An important area of future work will be the development of appropriate pre- and post-implantation measures of performance and establishing candidate selection criteria in order to quantify technical advances, guide future device design and optimize therapeutic success. We propose that the selection of an 'ideal' candidate should also be considered within the context of the variable neuroplastic changes that follow vision loss. Specifically, an understanding of the adaptive and compensatory changes that occur within the brain could assist in guiding the development of post-implantation rehabilitative strategies and optimize behavioral outcomes.

  4. Use of the Prostate Core Mitomic Test in Repeated Biopsy Decision-Making: Real-World Assessment of Clinical Utility in a Multicenter Patient Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legisi, Lorena; DeSa, Elise; Qureshi, M Nasar

    2016-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men in developed countries. Using molecular testing may help to improve outcomes in this clinically challenging group. Since 2011, the Prostate Core Mitomic Test (PCMT), which quantifies a 3.4-kb mitochondrial DNA deletion strongly associated with prostate cancer, has been used by more than 50 urology practices accessing pathology services through our laboratory in New Jersey. However, the use of a molecular test can only be beneficial if it affects patient management and improves outcomes. To determine whether repeated biopsy decision-making was affected in a quantifiable manner through the adjunct use of molecular testing with the PCMT. In this observational study we conducted 2 independent, structured query language database queries of our patient records at our laboratory, QDx Pathology Services, in Cranford, NJ. Query 1 included all men who had a negative prostate biopsy and a negative PCMT between February 1, 2011, and June 30, 2013. Men with a previous diagnosis of cancer were excluded. Query 2 included all men who had a negative prostate biopsy and a repeated biopsy between February 1, 2011, and September 30, 2013. The data exported for each query included the unique specimen number for an index biopsy, the interval between biopsies where present, the unique specimen number for a follow-up biopsy where present, histopathology for all biopsies, the biopsy procedure dates, the patient's date of birth, and the PCMT result when utilized. The patient rebiopsy rates and intervals were compared between the patients who were using PCMT and those who were not to assess whether the adjunct use of the PCMT impacted the rebiopsy decision-making process. Query 1 identified 644 men who had a negative biopsy and a negative PCMT result within the study period. Query 2 identified 823 men with a repeat biopsy after the initial negative index biopsy within the study period. Of these men, 132 had PCMT to inform their care

  5. Performance of a sample of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI, Alzheimer's Disease (AD and healthy elderly on a lexical decision test (LDT as a measure of pre-morbid intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Trunkl Serrao

    Full Text Available Objective:The objective of this study was to describe the performance of healthy elderly patients with aging-related pathologies (MCI and patients with AD on a lexical decision test.Methods:The study included 38 healthy elderly subjects, 61 MCI and 26 AD patients from the Neurology Department of the Hospital das Clinicas, Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Group. The neuropsychological instruments included the episodic memory test (RAVLT, subtests from the WAIS-III (Matrix Reasoning and Vocabulary to determine estimated IQ, the Boston naming test (BNT and Lexical Decision Test (LDT.Results:All groups differed on the MMSE, as expected according to their pathologies, memory tests, naming and estimated IQ. For the vocabulary and the LDT - measures of crystalized intelligence no differences were found.Conclusion:The LDT demonstrated that lexical decision can be used as a measure of pre-morbid IQ among the individuals assessed in a Brazilian sample.

  6. Understanding patient perceptions of shared decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, L Aubree; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to develop a conceptual model of patient-defined SDM, and understand what leads patients to label a specific, decision-making process as shared. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 23 primary care patients following a recent appointment. Patients were asked about the meaning of SDM and about specific decisions that they labeled as shared. Interviews were coded using qualitative content analysis. Patients' conceptual definition of SDM included four components of an interactive exchange prior to making the decision: both doctor and patient share information, both are open-minded and respectful, patient self-advocacy, and a personalized physician recommendation. Additionally, a long-term trusting relationship helps foster SDM. In contrast, when asked about a specific decision labeled as shared, patients described a range of interactions with the only commonality being that the two parties came to a mutually agreed-upon decision. There is no one-size-fits all process that leads patients to label a decision as shared. Rather, the outcome of "agreement" may be more important than the actual decision-making process for patients to label a decision as shared. Studies are needed to better understand how longitudinal communication between patient and physicians and patient self-advocacy behaviors affect patient perceptions of SDM. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Realism Training Through Decision-Theoretic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, David W.

    Decision-theoretic testing is used to explore whether students can improve their realism, i.e. congruence between reported and true probabilities. Randomized sets of math problems were presented at computer terminals to 49 seventh graders from two classes (high/low achievers) over a period of three weeks. The subject assigned values to each of…

  8. Computerized Adaptive Test vs. decision trees: Development of a support decision system to identify suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Gomez, D; Baca-Garcia, E; Aguado, D; Courtet, P; Lopez-Castroman, J

    2016-12-01

    Several Computerized Adaptive Tests (CATs) have been proposed to facilitate assessments in mental health. These tests are built in a standard way, disregarding useful and usually available information not included in the assessment scales that could increase the precision and utility of CATs, such as the history of suicide attempts. Using the items of a previously developed scale for suicidal risk, we compared the performance of a standard CAT and a decision tree in a support decision system to identify suicidal behavior. We included the history of past suicide attempts as a class for the separation of patients in the decision tree. The decision tree needed an average of four items to achieve a similar accuracy than a standard CAT with nine items. The accuracy of the decision tree, obtained after 25 cross-validations, was 81.4%. A shortened test adapted for the separation of suicidal and non-suicidal patients was developed. CATs can be very useful tools for the assessment of suicidal risk. However, standard CATs do not use all the information that is available. A decision tree can improve the precision of the assessment since they are constructed using a priori information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The indication area of a diagnostic test. Part II-the impact of test dependence, physician's decision strategy, and patient's utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, L.J.; Nelemans, P.J.; Geurts, S.M.; Jansen, E.; Boer, P.; Verbeek, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Any diagnostic test has an indication area of prior probabilities wherein the gain in diagnostic certainty outweighs its loss. Here, we investigate whether indication area and the maximum diagnostic gain are robust measures if we assume test dependence, alternative physician's

  10. The Mother’s Autonomy in Decision Making (MADM) scale: Patient-led development and psychometric testing of a new instrument to evaluate experience of maternity care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam, Saraswathi; Stoll, Kathrin; Martin, Kelsey; Rubashkin, Nicholas; Partridge, Sarah; Thordarson, Dana; Jolicoeur, Ganga

    2017-01-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) is core to person-centered care and is associated with improved health outcomes. Despite this, there are no validated scales measuring women’s agency and ability to lead decision making during maternity care. Objective To develop and validate a new instrument that assesses women’s autonomy and role in decision making during maternity care. Design Through a community-based participatory research process, service users designed, content validated, and administered a cross-sectional quantitative survey, including 31 items on the experience of decision-making. Setting and participants Pregnancy experiences (n = 2514) were reported by 1672 women who saw a single type of primary maternity care provider in British Columbia. They described care by a midwife, family physician or obstetrician during 1, 2 or 3 maternity care cycles. We conducted psychometric testing in three separate samples. Main outcome measures We assessed reliability, item-to-total correlations, and the factor structure of the The Mothers’ Autonomy in Decision Making (MADM) scale. We report MADM scores by care provider type, length of prenatal appointments, preferences for role in decision-making, and satisfaction with experience of decision-making. Results The MADM scale measures a single construct: autonomy in decision-making during maternity care. Cronbach alphas for the scale exceeded 0.90 for all samples and all provider groups. All item-to-total correlations were replicable across three samples and exceeded 0.7. Eigenvalue and scree plots exhibited a clear 90-degree angle, and factor analysis generated a one factor scale. MADM median scores were highest among women who were cared for by midwives, and 10 or more points lower for those who saw physicians. Increased time for prenatal appointments was associated with higher scale scores, and there were significant differences between providers with respect to average time spent in prenatal appointments. Midwifery care

  11. Modelling elderly cardiac patients decision making using Cognitive Work Analysis: identifying requirements for patient decision aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhukaram, Anandhi Vivekanandan; Baber, Chris

    2015-06-01

    Patients make various healthcare decisions on a daily basis. Such day-to-day decision making can have significant consequences on their own health, treatment, care, and costs. While decision aids (DAs) provide effective support in enhancing patient's decision making, to date there have been few studies examining patient's decision making process or exploring how the understanding of such decision processes can aid in extracting requirements for the design of DAs. This paper applies Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) to analyse patient's decision making in order to inform requirements for supporting self-care decision making. This study uses focus groups to elicit information from elderly cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients concerning a range of decision situations they face on a daily basis. Specifically, the focus groups addressed issues related to the decision making of CVD in terms of medication compliance, pain, diet and exercise. The results of these focus groups are used to develop high level views using CWA. CWA framework decomposes the complex decision making problem to inform three approaches to DA design: one design based on high level requirements; one based on a normative model of decision-making for patients; and the third based on a range of heuristics that patients seem to use. CWA helps in extracting and synthesising decision making from different perspectives: decision processes, work organisation, patient competencies and strategies used in decision making. As decision making can be influenced by human behaviour like skills, rules and knowledge, it is argued that patients require support to different types of decision making. This paper also provides insights for designers in using CWA framework for the design of effective DAs to support patients in self-management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Mother's Autonomy in Decision Making (MADM) scale: Patient-led development and psychometric testing of a new instrument to evaluate experience of maternity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam, Saraswathi; Stoll, Kathrin; Martin, Kelsey; Rubashkin, Nicholas; Partridge, Sarah; Thordarson, Dana; Jolicoeur, Ganga

    2017-01-01

    To develop and validate a new instrument that assesses women's autonomy and role in decision making during maternity care. Through a community-based participatory research process, service users designed, content validated, and administered a cross-sectional quantitative survey, including 31 items on the experience of decision-making. Pregnancy experiences (n = 2514) were reported by 1672 women who saw a single type of primary maternity care provider in British Columbia. They described care by a midwife, family physician or obstetrician during 1, 2 or 3 maternity care cycles. We conducted psychometric testing in three separate samples. We assessed reliability, item-to-total correlations, and the factor structure of the The Mothers' Autonomy in Decision Making (MADM) scale. We report MADM scores by care provider type, length of prenatal appointments, preferences for role in decision-making, and satisfaction with experience of decision-making. The MADM scale measures a single construct: autonomy in decision-making during maternity care. Cronbach alphas for the scale exceeded 0.90 for all samples and all provider groups. All item-to-total correlations were replicable across three samples and exceeded 0.7. Eigenvalue and scree plots exhibited a clear 90-degree angle, and factor analysis generated a one factor scale. MADM median scores were highest among women who were cared for by midwives, and 10 or more points lower for those who saw physicians. Increased time for prenatal appointments was associated with higher scale scores, and there were significant differences between providers with respect to average time spent in prenatal appointments. Midwifery care was associated with higher MADM scores, even during short prenatal appointments (decisions around their care (90.8%), and who were dissatisfied with their experience of decision making, MADM scores were very low (median 14). Women with physician carers were consistently more likely to report dissatisfaction with

  13. The Mother's Autonomy in Decision Making (MADM scale: Patient-led development and psychometric testing of a new instrument to evaluate experience of maternity care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswathi Vedam

    Full Text Available To develop and validate a new instrument that assesses women's autonomy and role in decision making during maternity care.Through a community-based participatory research process, service users designed, content validated, and administered a cross-sectional quantitative survey, including 31 items on the experience of decision-making.Pregnancy experiences (n = 2514 were reported by 1672 women who saw a single type of primary maternity care provider in British Columbia. They described care by a midwife, family physician or obstetrician during 1, 2 or 3 maternity care cycles. We conducted psychometric testing in three separate samples.We assessed reliability, item-to-total correlations, and the factor structure of the The Mothers' Autonomy in Decision Making (MADM scale. We report MADM scores by care provider type, length of prenatal appointments, preferences for role in decision-making, and satisfaction with experience of decision-making.The MADM scale measures a single construct: autonomy in decision-making during maternity care. Cronbach alphas for the scale exceeded 0.90 for all samples and all provider groups. All item-to-total correlations were replicable across three samples and exceeded 0.7. Eigenvalue and scree plots exhibited a clear 90-degree angle, and factor analysis generated a one factor scale. MADM median scores were highest among women who were cared for by midwives, and 10 or more points lower for those who saw physicians. Increased time for prenatal appointments was associated with higher scale scores, and there were significant differences between providers with respect to average time spent in prenatal appointments. Midwifery care was associated with higher MADM scores, even during short prenatal appointments (<15 minutes. Among women who preferred to lead decisions around their care (90.8%, and who were dissatisfied with their experience of decision making, MADM scores were very low (median 14. Women with physician carers were

  14. Feeding policy protects patients' rights, decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, D

    1985-06-01

    In adopting a policy to guide patients and care givers in treatment decisions, the Carmelite Sisters for the Aged and Infirm, Davenport, IA, have taken an important step toward resolving issues related to force-feeding. The policy enables residents of Kahl Home for the Aged and Infirm to discuss their future health care with relatives and physicians while they are competent. It also establishes guidelines concerning the insertion of feeding tubes and provides for periodic evaluation of residents' feeding needs. Formulating such a policy, of course, requires consideration of the ethical assumptions underlying decisions to withdraw or withhold life-sustaining therapy. It requires an understanding of the difference between a diminished capacity to pursue life's ends and the complete inability to do so when a person is permanently comatose. this difference affects the decision as to whether it is time to allow one to die--a decision that should precede the medical decision to withhold or withdraw treatment. For example, to present as an option the removal of feeding tubes and intravenous equipment when a patient is brain dead is poor medicine and bad ethics. The patient is dead; thus no choice exists whether to end treatment. Despite objections to decision making based on quality-of-life criteria, this concept--when related to a person's ability to pursue life's temporal goals--is critical to good decision making and allows decision makers to avoid arbitrary judgments in determining when it is time to let a person die.

  15. Decision making about Pap test use among Korean immigrant women: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyounghae; Kim, Soohyun; Gallo, Joseph J; Nolan, Marie T; Han, Hae-Ra

    2017-08-01

    Understanding how individuals make decisions about Pap tests concerning their personal values helps health-care providers offer tailored approaches to guide patients' decision making. Yet research has largely ignored decision making about Pap tests among immigrant women who experience increased risk of cervical cancer. To explore decision making about Pap tests among Korean immigrant women. We conducted a qualitative descriptive study using 32 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with Korean immigrant women residing in a north-eastern metropolitan area. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using inductive coding. Although most women with positive decisions made their own decisions, some women deferred to their providers, and others made decisions in collaboration with their providers and significant others. While women making positive decisions tended to consider both barriers to and facilitators of having Pap tests, women making negative decisions predominantly discussed the barriers to having Pap tests, such as modesty and differences between the South Korean and US health-care systems. The women's reflections on their decisions differed regarding their Pap test decisions. Women's desired roles in the decision-making process and reflection on their decision outcome appeared to vary, although most participants with positive decisions made their own decisions and were satisfied with their decisions. Future research should conduct longitudinal, quantitative studies to test our findings regarding decision-making processes and outcomes about Pap tests. The findings should be incorporated into cervical cancer screening practices to fulfil the unmet needs of immigrant women in patient-provider communication and to facilitate women's decision making about Pap tests. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Greedy algorithms for construction of approximate tests for decision tables with many-valued decisions

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad

    2012-12-14

    The paper is devoted to the study of a greedy algorithm for construction of approximate tests (super-reducts) This algorithm is applicable to decision tables with many-valued decisions where each row is labeled with a set of decisions For a given row, we should find a decision from the set attached to this row We consider bounds on the precision of this algorithm relative to the cardinality of tests.

  17. Targeted Next Generation Sequencing Approach in Patients Referred for Silver-Russell Syndrome Testing Increases the Mutation Detection Rate and Provides Decisive Information for Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Robert; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Dicks, Severin; Fekete, György; Rahner, Nils; Zerres, Klaus; Elbracht, Miriam; Eggermann, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the contribution of differential diagnoses to the mutation spectrum of patients referred for Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) testing. Forty-seven patients referred for molecular testing for SRS were examined after exclusion of one of the SRS-associated alterations. After clinical classification, a targeted next generation sequencing approach comprising 25 genes associated with other diagnoses or postulated as SRS candidate genes was performed. By applying the Netchine-Harbinson clinical scoring system, indication for molecular testing for SRS was confirmed in 15 out of 47 patients. In 4 out of these 15 patients, disease-causing variants were found in genes associated with other diagnoses. These patients carried mutations associated with Bloom syndrome, Mulibrey nanism, KBG syndrome, or IGF1R-associated short stature. We could not detect any pathogenic mutation in patients with a negative clinical score. Some of the differential diagnoses detected in the cohort presented here have a major impact on clinical management. Therefore, we emphasize that the molecular defects associated with these clinical pictures should be excluded before the clinical diagnosis "SRS" is made. Finally, we could show that a broad molecular approach including the differential diagnoses of SRS increases the detection rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors associated with the decision of the rheumatologist to order sacroiliac joints magnetic resonance imaging (SI-MRI) or HLA-B27 testing in the diagnostic work-up of patients with spondyloarthritis in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Molano, Wilson; Landewé, Robert B M; Serna, Cesar; Valle-Oñate, Rafael; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the patients' characteristics associated with the clinical decision to request SI-MRI and/or HLA-B27 in patients with SpA in daily practice. Patients referred to a rheumatology outpatient-clinic in a national referral-centre were selected. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of SpA according to the rheumatologist were included. SI-MRI and HLA-B27 was available for patients in whom the rheumatologists had ordered these tests. Characteristics associated with ordering SI-MRI or HLA-B27 were identified with univariable analyses. Variables with p-value 80% completeness were selected for further analysis. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the determinants related with the decision to perform SI-MRI and/or HLA-B27 and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. In total, 581 patients with SpA were included in the cohort, 72% were men, mean age 34.6±12.1 and disease duration 7.3±9.7 years. Of these patients, 24% (n=137) had SI-MRI and 77% (n=441) had HLA-B27 tests ordered. Independently predictive factors for ordering a SI-MRI were the presence of IBP (OR=1.81), enthesitis (OR=1.57) and the number of initial-symptoms at presentation (OR=1.27 per additional symptom present). Independently predictive factors of HLA-B27 testing were the number of initial-symptoms (OR=1.45 per symptom) and uveitis (OR=3.19). This study strongly suggests that rheumatologists use certain clinical clues to decide if they order expensive and scarce tests in the diagnostic work-up of SpA patients. These manifestations may increase the efficiency of these tests in clinical practice and suggest that clinical reasoning follows principles of Bayesian theory.

  19. Advances in the application of decision theory to test-based decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.

    This paper reviews recent research in the Netherlands on the application of decision theory to test-based decision making about personnel selection and student placement. The review is based on an earlier model proposed for the classification of decision problems, and emphasizes an empirical

  20. Patient and professional accuracy of recalled treatment decisions in out-patient consultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, T. C.; Barnard, K.; Cradock, S.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To test the assumption that professional recall of consultation decisions is valid and more accurate than patient recall of consultation decisions. Methods: One hundred and thirty-four consultations between diabetes specialist nurses and diabetes specialist dietitians in an adult out-patien...

  1. Impact of rapid methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus polymerase chain reaction testing on mortality and cost effectiveness in hospitalized patients with bacteraemia: a decision model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jack; Paladino, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    Patients hospitalized with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia have an unacceptably high mortality rate. Literature available to date has shown that timely selection of the most appropriate antibacterial may reduce mortality. One tool that may help with this selection is a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay that distinguishes methicillin (meticillin)-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) from methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) in less than 1 hour. To date, no information is available evaluating the impact of this PCR technique on clinical or economic outcomes. To evaluate the effect of a rapid PCR assay on mortality and economics compared with traditional empiric therapy, using a literature-derived model. A literature search for peer-reviewed European (EU) and US publications regarding treatment regimens, outcomes and costs was conducted. Information detailing the rates of infection, as well as the specificity and sensitivity of a rapid PCR assay (Xpert MRSA/SA Blood Culture PCR) were obtained from the peer-reviewed literature. Sensitivity analysis varied the prevalence rate of MRSA from 5% to 80%, while threshold analysis was applied to the cost of the PCR test. Hospital and testing resource consumption were valued with direct medical costs, adjusted to year 2009 values. Adjusted life-years were determined using US and WHO life tables. The cost-effectiveness ratio was defined as the cost per life-year saved. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated to determine the additional cost necessary to produce additional effectiveness. All analyses were performed using TreeAge Software (2008). The mean mortality rates were 23% for patients receiving empiric vancomycin subsequently switched to semi-synthetic penicillin (SSP) for MSSA, 36% for patients receiving empiric vancomycin treatment for MRSA, 59% for patients receiving empiric SSP subsequently switched to vancomycin for MRSA and 12% for patients receiving empiric SSP for MSSA. Furthermore, with an

  2. Developing and user-testing Decision boxes to facilitate shared decision making in primary care - a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rousseau François

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Applying evidence is one of the most challenging steps of evidence-based clinical practice. Healthcare professionals have difficulty interpreting evidence and translating it to patients. Decision boxes are summaries of the most important benefits and harms of diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive health interventions provided to healthcare professionals before they meet the patient. Our hypothesis is that Decision boxes will prepare clinicians to help patients make informed value-based decisions. By acting as primers, the boxes will enhance the application of evidence-based practices and increase shared decision making during the clinical encounter. The objectives of this study are to provide a framework for developing Decision boxes and testing their value to users. Methods/Design We will begin by developing Decision box prototypes for 10 clinical conditions or topics based on a review of the research on risk communication. We will present two prototypes to purposeful samples of 16 family physicians distributed in two focus groups, and 32 patients distributed in four focus groups. We will use the User Experience Model framework to explore users' perceptions of the content and format of each prototype. All discussions will be transcribed, and two researchers will independently perform a hybrid deductive/inductive thematic qualitative analysis of the data. The coding scheme will be developed a priori from the User Experience Model's seven themes (valuable, usable, credible, useful, desirable, accessible and findable, and will include new themes suggested by the data (inductive analysis. Key findings will be triangulated using additional publications on the design of tools to improve risk communication. All 10 Decision boxes will be modified in light of our findings. Discussion This study will produce a robust framework for developing and testing Decision boxes that will serve healthcare professionals and patients alike. It

  3. Neuropsychological correlates of decision making in patients with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Matthias; Franke-Sievert, Christiane; Jacoby, Georg E; Markowitsch, Hans J; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2007-11-01

    In addition to the core psychopathology of bulimia nervosa (BN), patients with BN often show impulsive behavior that has been related to decision making deficits in other patient groups, such as individuals with anorexia nervosa and pathological gamblers. However, it remains unclear whether BN patients also show difficulties in decision making. In this study, 14 patients with BN and 14 healthy comparison subjects, matched for age, gender, education, body mass index, and intelligence, were examined with the Game of Dice Task (M. Brand, E. Fujiwara, et al., 2005), a gambling task that has fixed winning probabilities and explicit rules for gains and losses, as well as with a neuropsychological test battery and personality questionnaires. On the task, the patients with BN chose the disadvantageous alternatives more frequently than did the comparison subjects. Performance on the Game of Dice Task was related to executive functioning but not to other neuropsychological functions, personality, or disease-specific variables in the BN group. Thus, in patients with BN, decision making abnormalities and executive reductions can be demonstrated and might be neuropsychological correlates of the patients' dysfunctional everyday-life decision making behavior. Neurocognitive functions should be considered in the treatment of BN. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Patient-Centered Decision Support: Formative Usability Evaluation of Integrated Clinical Decision Support With a Patient Decision Aid for Minor Head Injury in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Edward R; Hess, Erik P; Guo, George; Breslin, Maggie; Lopez, Kevin; Pavlo, Anthony J; Abujarad, Fuad; Powsner, Seth M; Post, Lori A

    2017-05-19

    The Canadian Computed Tomography (CT) Head Rule, a clinical decision rule designed to safely reduce imaging in minor head injury, has been rigorously validated and implemented, and yet expected decreases in CT were unsuccessful. Recent work has identified empathic care as a key component in decreasing CT overuse. Health information technology can hinder the clinician-patient relationship. Patient-centered decision tools to support the clinician-patient relationship are needed to promote evidence-based decisions. Our objective is to formatively evaluate an electronic tool that not only helps clinicians at the bedside to determine the need for CT use based on the Canadian CT Head Rule but also promotes evidence-based conversations between patients and clinicians regarding patient-specific risk and patients' specific concerns. User-centered design with practice-based and participatory decision aid development was used to design, develop, and evaluate patient-centered decision support regarding CT use in minor head injury in the emergency department. User experience and user interface (UX/UI) development involved successive iterations with incremental refinement in 4 phases: (1) initial prototype development, (2) usability assessment, (3) field testing, and (4) beta testing. This qualitative approach involved input from patients, emergency care clinicians, health services researchers, designers, and clinical informaticists at every stage. The Concussion or Brain Bleed app is the product of 16 successive iterative revisions in accordance with UX/UI industry design standards. This useful and usable final product integrates clinical decision support with a patient decision aid. It promotes shared use by emergency clinicians and patients at the point of care within the emergency department context. This tablet computer app facilitates evidence-based conversations regarding CT in minor head injury. It is adaptable to individual clinician practice styles. The resultant tool

  5. Engaging Patients in Decisions About Cancer Screening: Exploring the Decision Journey Through the Use of a Patient Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Steven H; Krist, Alex H; Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Jones, Resa M; Lehman, Rebecca R; Hochheimer, Camille J; Sabo, Roy T; Frosch, Dominick L; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Longo, Daniel R

    2018-02-01

    Engaging patients to make informed choices is paramount but difficult in busy practices. This study sought to engage patients outside the clinical setting to better understand how they approach cancer screening decisions, including their primary concerns and their preferences for finalizing their decision. Twelve primary care practices offering patients an online personal health record invited eligible patients to complete a 17-item online interactive module. Among 11,458 registered users, invitations to complete the module were sent to adults aged 50-74 years who were overdue for colorectal cancer screening and to women aged 40-49 years and men aged 55-69 who had not undergone a recent mammogram or prostate-specific antigen test, respectively. The module was started by 2,355 patients and completed by 903 patients. Most respondents (76.8%) knew they were eligible for screening. Preferred next steps were talking to the clinician (76.6%), reading/research (28.6%), and consulting trusted friends/family (16.4%). Priority topics included how much screening improves life expectancy, comparative test performance, and the prevalence/health risks of the cancer. Leading fears were getting cancer/delayed detection (79.2%), abnormal results (40.5%), and testing complications (39.1%), the last referring to false test results, medical complications, or unnecessary treatments. Men eligible for prostate-specific antigen screening were more likely than women eligible for mammography to express concerns about testing complications and to prioritize weighing pros and cons over gut feelings (p<0.05). Although this sample was predisposed to screening, most patients wanted help in finalizing their decision. Many wanted to weigh the pros and cons and expressed fears of potential harms from screening. Understanding how patients approach decisions may help design more effective engagement strategies. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Information and shared decision-making are top patients' priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronstein Alexander

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The profound changes in medical care and the recent stress on a patient-centered approach mandate evaluation of current patient priorities. Methods Hospitalized and ambulatory patients at an academic medical center in central Israel were investigated. Consecutive patients (n = 274 indicated their first and second priority for a change or improvement in their medical care out of a mixed shortlist of 6 issues, 3 related to patient-physician relationship (being better informed and taking part in decisions; being seen by the same doctor each time; a longer consultation time and 3 issues related to the organizational aspect of care (easier access to specialists/hospital; shorter queue for tests; less charges for drugs. Results Getting more information from the physician and taking part in decisions was the most desirable patient choice, selected by 27.4% as their first priority. The next choices – access and queue – also relate to more patient autonomy and control over that of managed care regulations. Patients studied were least interested in continuity of care, consultation time or cost of drugs. Demographic or clinical variables were not significantly related to patients' choices. Conclusion Beyond its many benefits, being informed by their doctor and shared decision making is a top patient priority.

  7. Assessing the quality of decision support technologies using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards instrument (IPDASi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn Elwyn

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe the development, validation and inter-rater reliability of an instrument to measure the quality of patient decision support technologies (decision aids. DESIGN: Scale development study, involving construct, item and scale development, validation and reliability testing. SETTING: There has been increasing use of decision support technologies--adjuncts to the discussions clinicians have with patients about difficult decisions. A global interest in developing these interventions exists among both for-profit and not-for-profit organisations. It is therefore essential to have internationally accepted standards to assess the quality of their development, process, content, potential bias and method of field testing and evaluation. METHODS: Scale development study, involving construct, item and scale development, validation and reliability testing. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five researcher-members of the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Collaboration worked together to develop the instrument (IPDASi. In the fourth Stage (reliability study, eight raters assessed thirty randomly selected decision support technologies. RESULTS: IPDASi measures quality in 10 dimensions, using 47 items, and provides an overall quality score (scaled from 0 to 100 for each intervention. Overall IPDASi scores ranged from 33 to 82 across the decision support technologies sampled (n = 30, enabling discrimination. The inter-rater intraclass correlation for the overall quality score was 0.80. Correlations of dimension scores with the overall score were all positive (0.31 to 0.68. Cronbach's alpha values for the 8 raters ranged from 0.72 to 0.93. Cronbach's alphas based on the dimension means ranged from 0.50 to 0.81, indicating that the dimensions, although well correlated, measure different aspects of decision support technology quality. A short version (19 items was also developed that had very similar mean scores to IPDASi and high correlation

  8. Development and field testing of a decision support tool to facilitate shared decision making in contraceptive counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehlendorf, Christine; Fitzpatrick, Judith; Steinauer, Jody; Swiader, Lawrence; Grumbach, Kevin; Hall, Cara; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2017-07-01

    We developed and formatively evaluated a tablet-based decision support tool for use by women prior to a contraceptive counseling visit to help them engage in shared decision making regarding method selection. Drawing upon formative work around women's preferences for contraceptive counseling and conceptual understanding of health care decision making, we iteratively developed a storyboard and then digital prototypes, based on best practices for decision support tool development. Pilot testing using both quantitative and qualitative data and cognitive testing was conducted. We obtained feedback from patient and provider advisory groups throughout the development process. Ninety-six percent of women who used the tool in pilot testing reported that it helped them choose a method, and qualitative interviews indicated acceptability of the tool's content and presentation. Compared to the control group, women who used the tool demonstrated trends toward increased likelihood of complete satisfaction with their method. Participant responses to cognitive testing were used in tool refinement. Our decision support tool appears acceptable to women in the family planning setting. Formative evaluation of the tool supports its utility among patients making contraceptive decisions, which can be further evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tooth extraction decision model in periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelut, A; Rousval, B; Fromentin, O; Feghali, M; Mora, F; Bouchard, P

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to build, around several types of input data, a decision analysis model for dental extraction strategy in periodontitis patients. The decision analysis was based on the following scenario: a fictitious adult chronic periodontitis patient with no chief complaint, being referred to make a decision of extraction on one single tooth presenting a periodontal defect that may affect the decision-making process. A decision tree was used to identify the treatment options within the next 5 years. Scientific evidences were based on probabilities given by a literature analysis using a systematic approach. Clinical expertize was based on subjective utilities (SUs) assigned by an experts' panel. Expected utilities (EUs) were used to rank the following options: no treatment (EU(1)) or periodontal treatment (EU(2)); extraction followed by a tooth-supported fixed partial denture - FPD - (EU(3)) or an implant-supported single crown - ISC - (EU(4)). The robustness analysis calculation indicates that the probability of tooth survival needed to be equal to 0.78 in order that the passive option becomes optimal. However, EU(1) was impossible to calculate due to the lack of available probabilities. The EU intervals were 79-96, 86-89 and 94-95 for EU(2), EU(3) and EU(4), respectively. Consequently, the FPD option is dominated by the ISC option, and it is not possible to conclude to a difference between the periodontal and the ISC therapy. Within the limits of this model, tooth extraction followed by FPD is the worst strategy compared with ISC or periodontal therapies.

  10. Pain Assessment and Treatment Decisions for Virtual Human Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Steven Z.; Lok, Benjamin C.; Torres, Calia A.; Chuah, Joon Hao; Robinson, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Laypeople and healthcare professionals use demographic cues when making pain management decisions. These decisions can negatively affect patient outcomes. This study examined whether laypeople base their pain management decisions in part on pain-related postures and demographic cues. Virtual human (VH) technology was used to research whether sex and race, as well as body posture, influenced pain management decisions. Ninety-seven laypersons examined VH patients exhibiting low back pain related body postures whose demographic cues varied by VH sex and VH race. T tests validated that participants were able to distinguish between high pain related body postures and low pain related body postures. The participants assessed male VH patients to be experiencing more pain than female VH patients. This study suggests that participants use sex as a cue when assessing pain. Participants may perceive VH male patients as experiencing high pain intensity if the participants are willing to counter male stereotypes and acknowledge that the male VH patients display pain behaviors. PMID:23971429

  11. Decision aids for patients facing health treatment or screening decisions: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Annette M; Rostom, Alaa; Fiset, Valerie; Tetroe, Jacqueline; Entwistle, Vikki; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Barry, Michael; Jones, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review of randomised trials of patient decision aids in improving decision making and outcomes. Design We included randomised trials of interventions providing structured, detailed, and specific information on treatment or screening options and outcomes to aid decision making. Two reviewers independently screened and extracted data on several evaluation criteria. Results were pooled by using weighted mean differences and relative risks. Results 17 studies met the inclusion criteria. Compared with the controls, decision aids produced higher knowledge scores (weighted mean difference=19/100, 95% confidence interval 14 to 25); lower decisional conflict scores (weighted mean difference=−0.3/5, −0.4 to −0.1); more active patient participation in decision making (relative risk = 2.27, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 4); and no differences in anxiety, satisfaction with decisions (weighted mean difference=0.6/100, −3 to 4), or satisfaction with the decision making process (2/100,−3 to 7). Decision aids had a variable effect on decisions. When complex decision aids were compared with simpler versions, they were better at reducing decisional conflict, improved knowledge marginally, but did not affect satisfaction. Conclusions Decision aids improve knowledge, reduce decisional conflict, and stimulate patients to be more active in decision making without increasing their anxiety. Decision aids have little effect on satisfaction and a variable effect on decisions. The effects on outcomes of decisions (persistence with choice, quality of life) remain uncertain. PMID:10487995

  12. Development of a decision support tool to facilitate primary care management of patients with abnormal liver function tests without clinically apparent liver disease [HTA03/38/02]. Abnormal Liver Function Investigations Evaluation (ALFIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Frank M

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver function tests (LFTs are routinely performed in primary care, and are often the gateway to further invasive and/or expensive investigations. Little is known of the consequences in people with an initial abnormal liver function (ALF test in primary care and with no obvious liver disease. Further investigations may be dangerous for the patient and expensive for Health Services. The aims of this study are to determine the natural history of abnormalities in LFTs before overt liver disease presents in the population and identify those who require minimal further investigations with the potential for reduction in NHS costs. Methods/Design A population-based retrospective cohort study will follow up all those who have had an incident liver function test (LFT in primary care to subsequent liver disease or mortality over a period of 15 years (approx. 2.3 million tests in 99,000 people. The study is set in Primary Care in the region of Tayside, Scotland (pop approx. 429,000 between 1989 and 2003. The target population consists of patients with no recorded clinical signs or symptoms of liver disease and registered with a GP. The health technologies being assessed are LFTs, viral and auto-antibody tests, ultrasound, CT, MRI and liver biopsy. The study will utilise the Epidemiology of Liver Disease In Tayside (ELDIT database to determine the outcomes of liver disease. These are based on hospital admission data (Scottish Morbidity Record 1, dispensed medication records, death certificates, and examination of medical records from Tayside hospitals. A sample of patients (n = 150 with recent initial ALF tests or invitation to biopsy will complete questionnaires to obtain quality of life data and anxiety measures. Cost-effectiveness and cost utility Markov model analyses will be performed from health service and patient perspectives using standard NHS costs. The findings will also be used to develop a computerised clinical decision

  13. A Review of Shared Decision-Making and Patient Decision Aids in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Kristina Demas; Tremont, Katie; Vachani, Anil; Schapira, Marilyn M; Vapiwala, Neha; Simone, Charles B; Berman, Abigail T

    2017-06-01

    Cancer treatment decisions are complex and may be challenging for patients, as multiple treatment options can often be reasonably considered. As a result, decisional support tools have been developed to assist patients in the decision-making process. A commonly used intervention to facilitate shared decision-making is a decision aid, which provides evidence-based outcomes information and guides patients towards choosing the treatment option that best aligns with their preferences and values. To ensure high quality, systematic frameworks and standards have been proposed for the development of an optimal aid for decision making. Studies have examined the impact of these tools on facilitating treatment decisions and improving decision-related outcomes. In radiation oncology, randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that decision aids have the potential to improve patient outcomes, including increased knowledge about treatment options and decreased decisional conflict with decision-making. This article provides an overview of the shared-decision making process and summarizes the development, validation, and implementation of decision aids as patient educational tools in radiation oncology. Finally, this article reviews the findings from decision aid studies in radiation oncology and offers various strategies to effectively implement shared decision-making into clinical practice.

  14. Factors associated with the decision of the rheumatologist to order sacroiliac joints magnetic resonance imaging (SI-MRI) or HLA-B27 testing in the diagnostic work-up of patients with spondyloarthritis in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bautista-Molano, Wilson; Landewé, Robert B. M.; Serna, Cesar; Valle-Oñate, Rafael; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the patients' characteristics associated with the clinical decision to request SI-MRI and/or HLA-B27 in patients with SpA in daily practice. Patients referred to a rheumatology outpatient-clinic in a national referral-centre were selected. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of SpA

  15. Decision to resuscitate or not in patients with chronic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltbæk, Lena; Tvedegaard, Erling

    2012-01-01

    Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) decisions are frequently made without informing the patients. We attempt to determine whether patients and physicians wish to discuss the DNR decision, who they think, should be the final decision maker and whether they agree on the indication for cardiopulmonary resuscit...... resuscitation (CPR) in case of cardiac arrest....

  16. Can patient decision aids help people make good decisions about participating in clinical trials? A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergusson Dean A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence shows that the standard process for obtaining informed consent in clinical trials can be inadequate, with study participants frequently not understanding even basic information fundamental to giving informed consent. Patient decision aids are effective decision support tools originally designed to help patients make difficult treatment or screening decisions. We propose that incorporating decision aids into the informed consent process will improve the extent to which participants make decisions that are informed and consistent with their preferences. A mixed methods study will test this proposal. Methods Phase one of this project will involve assessment of a stratified random sample of 50 consent documents from recently completed investigator-initiated clinical trials, according to existing standards for supporting good decision making. Phase two will involve interviews of a purposive sample of 50 trial participants (10 participants from each of five different clinical areas about their experience of the informed consent process, and how it could be improved. In phase three, we will convert consent forms for two completed clinical trials into decision aids and pilot test these new tools using a user-centered design approach, an iterative development process commonly employed in computer usability literature. In phase four, we will conduct a pilot observational study comparing the new tools to standard consent forms, with potential recruits to two hypothetical clinical trials. Outcomes will include knowledge of key aspects of the decision, knowledge of the probabilities of different outcomes, decisional conflict, the hypothetical participation decision, and qualitative impressions of the experience. Discussion This work will provide initial evidence about whether a patient decision aid can improve the informed consent process. The larger goal of this work is to examine whether study recruitment can be improved from

  17. Effect of patient decision aid was influenced by presurgical evaluation among patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Laura; Taljaard, Monica; Dervin, Geoffrey; Trenaman, Logan; Tugwell, Peter; Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Stacey, Dawn

    2018-02-01

    Decision aids help patients make total joint arthroplasty decisions, but presurgical evaluation might influence the effects of a decision aid. We compared the effects of a decision aid among patients considering total knee arthroplasty at 2 surgical screening clinics with different evaluation processes. We performed a subgroup analysis of a randomized controlled trial. Patients were recruited from 2 surgical screening clinics: an academic clinic providing 20-minute physician consultations and a community clinic providing 45-minute physiotherapist/nurse consultations with education. We compared the effects of decision quality, decisional conflict and surgery rate using Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel χ2 tests and the Breslow-Day test. We evaluated 242 patients: 123 from the academic clinic (61 who used the decision aid and 62 controls) and 119 from the community clinic (59 who used the decision aid and 60 controls). Results suggested a between-site difference in the effect of the decision aid on the patients' decision quality (p = 0.09): at the academic site, patients who used the decision aid were more likely to make better-quality decisions than controls (54% v. 35%, p = 0.044), but not at the community site (47% v. 51%, p = 0.71). Fewer patients who used decision aids at the academic site than at the community site experienced decisional conflict (p = 0.007) (33% v. 52%, p = 0.05 at the academic site and 40% v. 24%, p = 0.08 at the community site). The effect of the decision aid on surgery rates did not differ between sites (p = 0.65). The decision aid had a greater effect at the academic site than at the community site, which provided longer consultations with more verbal education. Hence, decision aids might be of greater value when more extensive total knee arthroplasty presurgical assessment and counselling are either impractical or unavailable.

  18. Presenting quantitative information about decision outcomes: a risk communication primer for patient decision aid developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevena, Lyndal J; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Edwards, Adrian; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Galesic, Mirta; Han, Paul K J; King, John; Lawson, Margaret L; Linder, Suzanne K; Lipkus, Isaac; Ozanne, Elissa; Peters, Ellen; Timmermans, Danielle; Woloshin, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Making evidence-based decisions often requires comparison of two or more options. Research-based evidence may exist which quantifies how likely the outcomes are for each option. Understanding these numeric estimates improves patients' risk perception and leads to better informed decision making. This paper summarises current "best practices" in communication of evidence-based numeric outcomes for developers of patient decision aids (PtDAs) and other health communication tools. An expert consensus group of fourteen researchers from North America, Europe, and Australasia identified eleven main issues in risk communication. Two experts for each issue wrote a "state of the art" summary of best evidence, drawing on the PtDA, health, psychological, and broader scientific literature. In addition, commonly used terms were defined and a set of guiding principles and key messages derived from the results. The eleven key components of risk communication were: 1) Presenting the chance an event will occur; 2) Presenting changes in numeric outcomes; 3) Outcome estimates for test and screening decisions; 4) Numeric estimates in context and with evaluative labels; 5) Conveying uncertainty; 6) Visual formats; 7) Tailoring estimates; 8) Formats for understanding outcomes over time; 9) Narrative methods for conveying the chance of an event; 10) Important skills for understanding numerical estimates; and 11) Interactive web-based formats. Guiding principles from the evidence summaries advise that risk communication formats should reflect the task required of the user, should always define a relevant reference class (i.e., denominator) over time, should aim to use a consistent format throughout documents, should avoid "1 in x" formats and variable denominators, consider the magnitude of numbers used and the possibility of format bias, and should take into account the numeracy and graph literacy of the audience. A substantial and rapidly expanding evidence base exists for risk

  19. Patient age and dentists’ decisions about occlusal caries treatment thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakudate, Naoki; Sumida, Futoshi; Matsumoto, Yuki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Gilbert, Gregg H; Gordan, Valeria V

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was performed to (1) quantify dentists’ treatment thresholds for occlusal primary caries; (2) determine if patient's age affects dentists’ decisions to surgically treat these carious lesions; (3) test the hypothesis that patients’, dentists’, and practices’ characteristics are significantly associated with surgical enamel intervention. Methods The study used a cross-sectional design consisting of a questionnaire survey in Japan. This study queried dentists working in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan (JDPBRN), which aims to allow dentists to investigate research questions and share experiences and expertise (n=282). Participants were asked whether they would surgically intervene in a series of cases depicting occlusal caries. Each case included a photograph of an occlusal surface displaying typical characteristics of caries penetration, and written descriptions of adult and pediatric patients at high caries risk. Results In a case of a carious lesion within inner enamel, the proportion of dentists who indicated surgical intervention was significantly higher in the adult patient (48%) when compared to the pediatric patient (34%) (pdentists’ decisions to intervene surgically into the inner enamel carious lesion. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that over one-third of participants chose to intervene surgically into inner enamel carious lesions, and patients’ age affects dentists’ decisions about when to intervene surgically (clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT01680848). PMID:24809540

  20. Supporting Shared Decision-making for Children's Complex Behavioral Problems: Development and User Testing of an Option Grid™ Decision Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Erin R; Boucher, Elizabeth A; Daviss, William B; Elwyn, Glyn

    2018-01-01

    There is a lack of research to guide collaborative treatment decision-making for children who have complex behavioral problems, despite the extensive use of mental health services in this population. We developed and pilot-tested a one-page Option Grid™ patient decision aid to facilitate shared decision-making for these situations. An editorial team of parents, child psychiatrists, researchers, and other stakeholders developed the scope and structure of the decision aid. Researchers included information about a carefully chosen number of psychosocial and pharmacological treatment options, using descriptions based on the best available evidence. Using semi-structured qualitative interviews (n = 18), we conducted user testing with four parents and four clinical prescribers and field testing with four parents, four clinical prescribers, and two clinic administrators. The researchers coded and synthesized the interview responses using mixed inductive and deductive methods. Parents, clinicians, and administrators felt the Option Grid had significant value, although they reported that additional training and other support would be required in order to successfully implement the Option Grid and achieve shared decision-making in clinical practice.

  1. Decision Making for Pap Testing among Pacific Islander Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jie W.; Mouttapa, Michele; Sablan-Santos, Lola; DeGuzman Lacsamana, Jasmine; Quitugua, Lourdes; Park Tanjasiri, Sora

    2016-01-01

    This study employed a Multi-Attribute Utility (MAU) model to examine the Pap test decision-making process among Pacific Islanders (PI) residing in Southern California. A total of 585 PI women were recruited through social networks from Samoan and Tongan churches, and Chamorro family clans. A questionnaire assessed Pap test knowledge, beliefs and…

  2. Enhancing shared decision making through assessment of patient-clinician concordance on decision quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Selby, Warwick; Salkeld, Glenn

    for the latter. The patient’s MDQ scores were .886 and .954 with SWD scores of 1.0 and .8 respectively. (The correlation between MDQ and SWD instruments for the initial 29 patients was 0.70.) Conclusion: Proof of concept and method is presented in relation to the degree of concordance between patient......Purpose: To explore the feasibility and potential of a prescriptive, web-based, decomposable measure of decision quality (MyDecisionQuality (MDQ)); to assess and enhance patient-clinician decision concordance, thereby facilitating more transparent shared decision making and documentation of better...... informed consent. Methods: Data presented are from patient-clinician dyads in an Inflammatory Bowel Disease decision aid study: web (log, MDQ scores, patient comments), interviews (with patients), presentations of the MDQ and concordance measures. Matched sets of MDQ data (Weightings (W) and Ratings (R...

  3. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Groleau, Danielle; Légaré, France; MacDonald, Mary Ellen; Marchand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions) that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1) exposing uncertainty, (2) co-constructing patient preferences, (3) affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4) upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to legitimize

  4. Communicating uncertainty can lead to less decision satisfaction: a necessary cost of involving patients in shared decision making?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Politi, M.C.; Clark, M.A.; Ombao, H.; Dizon, D.; Elwyn, G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given the large number of interventions of uncertain effectiveness, research on communicating uncertainty is needed to examine its impact on patients' health decisions. OBJECTIVE: To examine physicians' communication of uncertainty and its impact on patients' decisions and decision

  5. Pretherapy dental decisions in patients with head and neck cancer. A proposed model for dental decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruins, H H; Koole, R; Jolly, D E

    1998-09-01

    The proposed model was designed to function as a tool for the development and testing of evidence-based clinical guidelines for the pretherapy oral screening and dental management of patients with head and neck cancer. Methods of clinical decision analysis were used to analyze the decision dilemma and construct a decision algorithm and decision tree. The robustness of the model was tested by means of a probabilistic sensitivity analysis with second-order Monte Carlo simulations (n = 10.000). Clinical criteria for evaluating dental pathologic conditions and malignancy- and patient-related conditions were transformed in probability estimates. The tradeoffs between the benefits and drawbacks of the dental intervention were integrated into the model to identify the optimal option for dental intervention. The calculation process of "folding back and averaging out" the decision tree enabled the identification of the optimal options for dental intervention in four different pretherapy risk conditions. A priori testing of the proposed model with 95% confidence intervals suggests that it has a great potential for solving clinical dilemmas associated with pretherapy dental decision-making. In addition, it seems a useful tool for the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines. A posteriori clinical testing should further validate the model before its assimilation into clinical practice takes place.

  6. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Bélanger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1 exposing uncertainty, (2 co-constructing patient preferences, (3 affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4 upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to

  7. Why cancer patients enter randomized clinical trials: exploring the factors that influence their decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R; Whelan, Timothy J; Schiff, Susan; Dubois, Sacha; Crooks, Dauna; Haines, Patricia T; DeRosa, Diane; Roberts, Robin S; Gafni, Amiram; Pritchard, Kathleen; Levine, Mark N

    2004-11-01

    Few interventions have been designed and tested to improve recruitment to clinical trials in oncology. The multiple factors influencing patients' decisions have made the prioritization of specific interventions challenging. The present study was undertaken to identify the independent predictors of a cancer patient's decision to enter a randomized clinical trial. A list of factors from the medical literature was augmented with a series of focus groups involving cancer patients, physicians, and clinical research associates (CRAs). A series of questionnaires was developed with items based on these factors and were administered concurrently to 189 cancer patients, their physicians, and CRAs following the patient's decision regarding trial entry. Forward logistic regression modeling was performed using the items significantly correlated (by univariate analysis) with the decision to enter a clinical trial. A number of items were significantly correlated with the patient's decision. In the multivariate logistic regression model, the patient's perception of personal benefit was the most important, with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.08 (P decision-making process were also important. These included whether the CRA helped with the decision (OR = 1.71; P decision was hard for the patient to make (OR = 0.52; P decision-making process while respecting the need for information and patient autonomy may also lead to meaningful improvements in accrual.

  8. Exploring the impact of a decision support intervention on vascular access decisions in chronic hemodialysis patients: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnelly Sandra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease who require renal replacement therapy a major decision concerns modality choice. However, many patients defer the decision about modality choice or they have an urgent or emergent need of RRT, which results in them starting hemodialysis with a Central Venous Catheter. Thereafter, efforts to help patients make more timely decisions about access choices utilizing education and resource allocation strategies met with limited success resulting in a high prevalent CVC use in Canada. Providing decision support tailored to meet patients' decision making needs may improve this situation. The Registered Nurses Association of Ontario has developed a clinical practice guideline to guide decision support for adults living with Chronic Kidney Disease (Decision Support for Adults with Chronic Kidney Disease. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of implementing selected recommendations this guideline on priority provincial targets for hemodialysis access in patients with Stage 5 CKD who currently use Central Venous Catheters for vascular access. Methods/Design A non-experimental intervention study with repeated measures will be conducted at St. Michaels Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Decisional conflict about dialysis access choice will be measured using the validated SURE tool, an instrument used to identify decisional conflict. Thereafter a tailored decision support intervention will be implemented. Decisional conflict will be re-measured and compared with baseline scores. Patients and staff will be interviewed to gain an understanding of how useful this intervention was for them and whether it would be feasible to implement more widely. Quantitative data will be analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Statistical significance of difference between means over time for aggregated SURE scores (pre/post will be assessed using a paired t-test. Qualitative analysis

  9. Patients' perspectives of the substitute decision maker: who makes better decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Komeil; Milanifar, Alireza; Asghari, Fariba

    2011-09-01

    Substitute decision making on behalf of incapable patients is based on the ethical principle of 'respect for autonomy'. This study was conducted to assess patients' wishes and preferences in terms of a substitute decision maker and determinants of such preferences. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study and selected samples randomly from patients presenting at Farabi Eye Hospital clinics who were 18 years of age or older. Questionnaires were completed through interviews. 200 patients between the ages of 18 and 83 years were interviewed. About 52% (N=105) were men and 73% (N=77) were married. Among married patients, the spouse was chosen as the substitute decision maker in only 51% of cases. Single men preferred their father first in 36% (N=9) of cases, while single girls chose their father in 5.6% (N=1) of cases and their most prevalent choice was other unmentioned people (33.3%, N=6). Most patients (93.5%) wished to be asked about their substitute decision maker when hospitalised. The results of this study show that the people we usually consult for decisions concerning patient treatment are significantly different from the patients' preferred substitute decision makers. The authors suggest patients be allowed to choose their substitute decision maker while conscious.

  10. Beneficent persuasion: techniques and ethical guidelines to improve patients' decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindell, J S; McGuire, Amy L; Halpern, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    Physicians frequently encounter patients who make decisions that contravene their long-term goals. Behavioral economists have shown that irrationalities and self-thwarting tendencies pervade human decision making, and they have identified a number of specific heuristics (rules of thumb) and biases that help explain why patients sometimes make such counterproductive decisions. In this essay, we use clinical examples to describe the many ways in which these heuristics and biases influence patients' decisions. We argue that physicians should develop their understanding of these potentially counterproductive decisional biases and, in many cases, use this knowledge to rebias their patients in ways that promote patients' health or other values. Using knowledge of decision-making psychology to persuade patients to engage in healthy behaviors or to make treatment decisions that foster their long-term goals is ethically justified by physicians' duties to promote their patients' interests and will often enhance, rather than limit, their patients' autonomy. We describe techniques that physicians may use to frame health decisions to patients in ways that are more likely to motivate patients to make choices that are less biased and more conducive to their long-term goals. Marketers have been using these methods for decades to get patients to engage in unhealthy behaviors; employers and policy makers are beginning to consider the use of similar approaches to influence healthy choices. It is time for clinicians also to make use of behavioral psychology in their interactions with patients.

  11. Patient decision making about organ quality in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Michael L; Tocco, Rachel S; Pelletier, Shawn J; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Lok, Anna S F

    2011-12-01

    It is challenging to discuss the use of high-risk organs with patients, in part because of the lack of information about how patients view this topic. This study was designed to determine how patients think about organ quality and to test formats for risk communication. Semistructured interviews of 10 patients on the waiting list revealed limited understanding about the spectrum of organ quality and a reluctance to consider anything but the best organs. A computerized quantitative survey was then conducted with an interactive graph to elicit the risk of graft failure that patients would accept. Fifty-eight percent of the 95 wait-listed patients who completed the survey would accept only organs with a risk of graft failure of 25% or less at 3 years, whereas 18% would accept only organs with the lowest risk possible (19% at 3 years). Risk tolerance was increased when the organ quality was presented relative to average organs rather than the best organs and when feedback was provided about the implications for organ availability. More than three-quarters of the patients reported that they wanted an equal or dominant role in organ acceptance decisions. Men tended to prefer lower risk organs (mean acceptable risk = 29%) in comparison with women (mean acceptable risk = 35%, P = 0.04), but risk tolerance was not associated with other demographic or clinical characteristics (eg, the severity of liver disease). In summary, patients want to be involved in decisions about organ quality. Patients' risk tolerance varies widely, and their acceptance of high-risk organs can be facilitated if we present the risks of graft failure with respect to average organs and provide feedback about the implications for organ availability. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. Clinicians' views on conversations and shared decision making in diagnostic testing for Alzheimer's disease: The ABIDE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunneman, Marleen; Smets, Ellen M A; Bouwman, Femke H; Schoonenboom, Niki S M; Zwan, Marissa D; Pel-Littel, Ruth; van der Flier, Wiesje M

    2017-09-01

    This study explores clinicians' views on and experiences with when, how, and by whom decisions about diagnostic testing for Alzheimer's disease are made and how test results are discussed with patients. Following a preparatory focus group with 13 neurologists and geriatricians, we disseminated an online questionnaire among 200 memory clinic clinicians. Respondents were 95 neurologists and geriatricians (response rate 47.5%). Clinicians (74%) indicated that decisions about testing are made before the first encounter, yet they favored a shared decision-making approach. Patient involvement seems limited to receiving information. Clinicians with less tolerance for uncertainty preferred a bigger say in decisions (P dementia (66%). Clinicians favor patient involvement in deciding about diagnostic testing, but conversations about decisions and test results can be improved and supported.

  13. TESTING MULTI-CRITERIA DECISION ANALYSIS FOR MORE TRANSPARENT RESOURCE-ALLOCATION DECISION MAKING IN COLOMBIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Jaramillo, Hector Eduardo; Goetghebeur, Mireille; Moreno-Mattar, Ornella

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, Colombia experienced an important institutional transformation after the establishment of the Health Technology Assessment Institute (IETS), the disbandment of the Regulatory Commission for Health and the reassignment of reimbursement decision-making powers to the Ministry of Health and Social Protection (MoHSP). These dynamic changes provided the opportunity to test Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) for systematic and more transparent resource-allocation decision-making. During 2012 and 2013, the MCDA framework Evidence and Value: Impact on Decision Making (EVIDEM) was tested in Colombia. This consisted of a preparatory stage in which the investigators conducted literature searches and produced HTA reports for four interventions of interest, followed by a panel session with decision makers. This method was contrasted with a current approach used in Colombia for updating the publicly financed benefits package (POS), where narrative health technology assessment (HTA) reports are presented alongside comprehensive budget impact analyses (BIAs). Disease severity, size of population, and efficacy ranked at the top among fifteen preselected relevant criteria. MCDA estimates of technologies of interest ranged between 71 to 90 percent of maximum value. The ranking of technologies was sensitive to the methods used. Participants considered that a two-step approach including an MCDA template, complemented by a detailed BIA would be the best approach to assist decision-making in this context. Participants agreed that systematic priority setting should take place in Colombia. This work may serve as the basis to the MoHSP on its interest of setting up a systematic and more transparent process for resource-allocation decision-making.

  14. Applications of Bayesian decision theory to sequential mastery testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Hendrik J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to formulate optimal sequential rules for mastery tests. The framework for the approach is derived from Bayesian sequential decision theory. Both a threshold and linear loss structure are considered. The binomial probability distribution is adopted as the psychometric

  15. Patient involvement in health care decision making: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdat, Shaghayegh; Hamzehgardeshi, Leila; Hessam, Somayeh; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Patient participation means involvement of the patient in decision making or expressing opinions about different treatment methods, which includes sharing information, feelings and signs and accepting health team instructions. Given the importance of patient participation in healthcare decision making which empowers patients and improves services and health outcomes, this study was performed to review previous studies on patient participation in healthcare decision making. To prepare this narrative review article, researchers used general and specific search engines, as well as textbooks addressing this subject for an in-depth study of patient involvement in healthcare decision-making. As a result, 35 (out of 100 relevant) articles and also two books were selected for writing this review article. BASED ON THE REVIEW OF ARTICLES AND BOOKS, TOPICS WERE DIVIDED INTO SIX GENERAL CATEGORIES: definition of participation, importance of patient participation, factors influencing participation of patients in healthcare decisions, method of patient participation, tools for evaluating participation, and benefits and consequences of patient participation in health care decision-making. IN MOST STUDIES, FACTORS INFLUENCING PATIENT PARTICIPATION CONSISTED OF: factors associated with health care professionals such as doctor-patient relationship, recognition of patient's knowledge, allocation of sufficient time for participation, and also factors related to patients such as having knowledge, physical and cognitive ability, and emotional connections, beliefs, values and their experiences in relation to health services.

  16. Decision-making about prenatal genetic testing among pregnant Korean-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Myunghee; Thongpriwan, Vipavee; Choi, Jeeyae; Sook Choi, Kyung; Anderson, Gwen

    2017-10-06

    to understand the prenatal genetic testing decision-making processes among pregnant Korean-American women. a qualitative, descriptive research design. referrals and snowball sampling techniques were used to recruit 10 Korean-American women who had been recommended for amniocentesis during pregnancy in the United States (U.S.). All participants were born in Korea and had immigrated to the U.S. The number of years living in the U.S. ranged from 4 to 11 (M=5.7). various regional areas of the U.S. the researchers conducted face-to-face or phone interviews using semi-structured interview guides. The interviews were conducted in the Korean language and lasted approximately 50-100minutes. The interview guides focused on the decision-making process and experiences with prenatal genetic testing, as well as reflections on the decisions. Four core themes emerged related to the participants' decision-making processes, according to their descriptions. These themes are (1) facing the challenges of decision-making, (2) seeking support, (3) determining one's preferred role in the decision-making process, and (4) feeling uncomfortable with the degree of patient autonomy in U.S. health care. researchers concluded that many distinctive factors influence the decision-making processes used by pregnant Korean-American women. The results have the potential to improve shared decision-making practices regarding prenatal genetic testing. clinicians need to understand the sociocultural underpinnings of pregnant Korean-American immigrants regarding prenatal genetic screening and testing as an initial step to engage these patients in shared decision-making. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Test-Retest Reliability of Common Behavioral Decision Making Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Melissa T; Barnhart, Wesley R

    2018-02-01

    To examine test-retest reliability of common behavioral decision making tasks. A total of 98 undergraduate students completed two administrations of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), Columbia Card Task (CCT), and Game of Dice Task (GDT), three weeks apart. The BART, CCT, and GDT showed moderately strong correlations across time. On the IGT, no correlations were seen between Time 1 Trials 1-40 and Time 2 performance; however, weak correlations were observed between Time 1 Trials 41-100 and Time 2 performance. Paired-samples t-tests indicated participants were riskier at Time 1 than Time 2 on the IGT and GDT, but riskier at Time 2 on the BART. The BART, CCT, and GDT showed moderate test-retest reliability, with the IGT showing weak reliability during the decision making under risk trials only. Implications for repeated test administration in clinical and non-clinical settings are discussed.

  18. [A model for shared decision-making with frail older patients: consensus reached using Delphi technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, M H J; Fluit, C R M G; Lagro, J; Lagro-Janssen, A L M; Olde Rikkert, M G M

    2017-01-01

    To develop a model for shared decision-making with frail older patients. Online Delphi forum. We used a three-round Delphi technique to reach consensus on the structure of a model for shared decision-making with older patients. The expert panel consisted of 16 patients (round 1), and 59 professionals (rounds 1-3). In round 1, the panel of experts was asked about important steps in the process of shared decision-making and the draft model was introduced. Rounds 2 and 3 were used to adapt the model and test it for 'importance' and 'feasibility'. Consensus for the dynamic shared decision-making model as a whole was achieved for both importance (91% panel agreement) and feasibility (76% panel agreement). Shared decision-making with older patients is a dynamic process. It requires a continuous supportive dialogue between health care professional and patient.

  19. Informed consent and decision making by cataract patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Christopher G; Richter-Mueksch, Sibylla; Stifter, Eva; Diendorfer-Radner, Gabriela; Velikay-Parel, Michaela; Radner, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    To investigate decision making by patients on the day before cataract surgery and to evaluate to what extent the informed consent process influences the patients' decision regarding consent. On the day before surgery, 70 patients (mean +/- SD age, 70.3 +/- 10.3 years) underwent a standardized informed consent procedure. They were also invited to answer 15 questions established in interdisciplinary cooperation among clinical psychologists, lawyers, and ophthalmologists. We assessed presurgical information and personal estimation of risks in cataract surgery; the patient-physician relationship regarding surgery-related decisions; and evaluations of the informed consent procedure and the patients' decision. Questionnaire answers indicated that 28 (40%) of the 70 participating patients arrived for surgery without any information; 16 (23%) believed that there were surgical procedures without risks; and 53 (76%) estimated that there were no risks for their cataract surgery. A physician-dominated decision for surgery was preferred by 31 patients (44%); 16 (26%) wanted to decide together with their ophthalmologist. Possible risks of a sight-threatening complication did not influence 54 patients' (77%) decisions, and 55 patients (78%) said the informed consent process did not influence their decision. The remaining 15 (22%) stated that the informed consent process positively confirmed their decision. Informed consent 1 day preoperatively does not seem to influence the decision for cataract surgery. Cognitive dissonance as part of a decision-making process makes changes in an already chosen option unlikely. The resulting limited decisive potential is very important for credibility in a trial and has to be considered in ophthalmologic surgery.

  20. Altered moral decision-making in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Jan B; Rott, Elisa; Ebersbach, Georg; Kalbe, Elke

    2015-10-01

    Moral decision-making essentially contributes to social conduct. Although patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) show deficits in (non-moral) decision making and related neuropsychological functions, i.e. executive functions, theory of mind (ToM), and empathy, moral decision-making has rarely been examined in PD patients. We examined possible alterations of moral decision-making and associated functions in PD. Twenty non-demented PD patients and 23 age- and education-matched healthy control participants were examined with tests that assess reasoning, executive functions (set-shifting and planning), ToM and empathy, decision-making under risk, and moral intuitions. Moral decision-making was assessed with a close-to-everyday moral dilemma paradigm that opposes socially oriented "altruistic" choices to self-beneficial "egoistic" choices in 20 moral dilemma short stories (10 high and 10 low emotional). Concurrently, electrodermal activity was recorded. PD patients made more egoistic moral decisions than healthy controls. Remarkably, while reasoning, planning and empathy correlated with moral decision-making in the control group, in the PD group neuropsychological functions and dopaminergic medication did not correlate with moral decisions. No evidence for reduced skin conductance responses in PD patients and no relationships between skin conductance responses and moral decisions were observed. This study provides evidence for moral decision-making dysfunctions in PD patients who made more egoistic moral decisions. As a possible underlying mechanism, reduced exercise of attentional control due to a dysfunctional interplay between the prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia is discussed. Future research will have to determine the impact of PD patients' moral decision-making dysfunctions on everyday life and further determine correlates of the deficits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Collision Avoidance Maneuver Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Markley, F. Landis

    2010-01-01

    When facing a conjunction between space objects, decision makers must chose whether to maneuver for collision avoidance or not. We apply a well-known decision procedure, the sequential probability ratio test, to this problem. We propose two approaches to the problem solution, one based on a frequentist method, and the other on a Bayesian method. The frequentist method does not require any prior knowledge concerning the conjunction, while the Bayesian method assumes knowledge of prior probability densities. Our results show that both methods achieve desired missed detection rates, but the frequentist method's false alarm performance is inferior to the Bayesian method's

  2. Presenting quantitative information about decision outcomes: a risk communication primer for patient decision aid developers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trevena, L.J.; Zikmund-Fisher, B.J.; Edwards, A.; Gaissmaier, W.; Galesic, M.; Han, P.K.J.; King, J.; Lawson, M.L.; Linder, S.K.; Lipkus, I.; Ozanne, E.; Peters, E.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; Woloshin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Making evidence-based decisions often requires comparison of two or more options. Research-based evidence may exist which quantifies how likely the outcomes are for each option. Understanding these numeric estimates improves patients' risk perception and leads to better informed decision

  3. Decision Aids: the Effect of Labeling Options on Patient choices and Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G.; Cherkasky, Olena A.; Chin, Nancy; Veazie, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Conscious and unconscious biases can influence how people interpret new information and make decisions. Current standards for creating decision aids, however, do not address this issue. Method Using a 2×2 factorial design we sent surveys to members of two Internet survey panels containing a decision scenario involving a choice between aspirin or a statin drug to lower risk of heart attack and a decision aid. Each aid presented identical information about reduction in heart attack risk and likelihood of a major side effect. They differed in whether the options were labeled and amount of decisional guidance: information only (a balance sheet) versus information plus values clarification (a multicriteria decision analysis). After using the decision aid, participants indicated their preferred medication. Those using a multicriteria decision aid also judged differences in the comparative outcome data provided for the two options and the relative importance of achieving benefits versus avoiding risks in making the decision. Results The study sample size is 536. Participants using decision aids with unlabeled options were more likely to choose a statin: 56% versus 25%, p < 0.001. The type of decision aid made no difference. This effect persists after adjusting for differences in survey company, age, gender, education level, health literacy, and numeracy. Participants using unlabeled decision aids were also more likely to interpret the data presented as favoring a statin with regard to both treatment benefits and risk of side effects (p ≤ 0.01). There were no significant differences in decision priorities (p=0.21). Conclusion Identifying the options in patient decision aids can influence patient preferences and change how they interpret comparative outcome data. PMID:26229084

  4. Decision Aids: The Effect of Labeling Options on Patient Choices and Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G; Cherkasky, Olena A; Chin, Nancy; Veazie, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    Conscious and unconscious biases can influence how people interpret new information and make decisions. Current standards for creating decision aids, however, do not address this issue. Using a 2×2 factorial design, we developed surveys that contained a decision scenario (involving a choice between aspirin or a statin drug to lower risk of heart attack) and a decision aid. Each aid presented identical information about reduction in heart attack risk and likelihood of a major side effect. They differed in whether the options were labeled and the amount of decisional guidance: information only (a balance sheet) versus information plus values clarification (a multicriteria decision analysis). We sent the surveys to members of 2 Internet survey panels. After using the decision aid, participants indicated their preferred medication. Those using a multicriteria decision aid also judged differences in the comparative outcome data provided for the 2 options and the relative importance of achieving benefits versus avoiding risks in making the decision. The study sample size was 536. Participants using decision aids with unlabeled options were more likely to choose a statin: 56% versus 25% (P < 0.001). The type of decision aid made no difference. This effect persisted after adjustment for differences in survey company, age, gender, education level, health literacy, and numeracy. Participants using unlabeled decision aids were also more likely to interpret the data presented as favoring a statin with regard to both treatment benefits and risk of side effects (P ≤ 0.01). There were no significant differences in decision priorities (P = 0.21). Identifying the options in patient decision aids can influence patient preferences and change how they interpret comparative outcome data. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Communicating uncertainty can lead to less decision satisfaction: a necessary cost of involving patients in shared decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Mary C; Clark, Melissa A; Ombao, Hernando; Dizon, Don; Elwyn, Glyn

    2011-03-01

    Given the large number of interventions of uncertain effectiveness, research on communicating uncertainty is needed to examine its impact on patients' health decisions. To examine physicians' communication of uncertainty and its impact on patients' decisions and decision satisfaction. Participants included female patients seen in a breast health centre whose physicians were discussing a decision with them, with no clear 'best' choice based on outcome evidence. Decision communication was measured using the OPTION scale, a measure of the degree to which physicians involve patients in a decision-making process. One-to-two weeks after the discussion, patients reported their satisfaction with the decision-making process and their decision. Decisions were verified in medical charts with patient consent. Seventy-five women agreed to participate (94% response rate). The mean translated score of the OPTION scale was 68.0 (SD 18.3), but only 33.2 (SD 19.1) for the uncertainty items. Among cancer patients, communicating uncertainty was negatively related to decision satisfaction (P uncertainty in relation to patients' decision satisfaction (P uncertainty might lead to less decision satisfaction among women facing cancer treatment decisions; this could be a natural outcome of the decision making process. Involving patients in decisions might help them tolerate uncertainty. Future studies should consider assessing other outcomes (e.g. knowledge, physician support) of the decision making process. There may be trade-offs between acknowledging uncertainty and immediate decision satisfaction. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Treatment decision-making among breast cancer patients in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Yong Hui; Islahudin, Farida; Chong, Wei Wen; Abdullah, Norlia; Ismail, Fuad; Ahmad Bustamam, Ros Suzanna; Wong, Yoke Fui; Saladina, J J; Mohamed Shah, Noraida

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated breast cancer patients' involvement level in the treatment decision-making process and the concordance between patients' and physician's perspectives in decision-making. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving physicians and newly diagnosed breast cancer patients from three public/teaching hospitals in Malaysia. The Control Preference Scale (CPS) was administered to patients and physicians, and the Krantz Health Opinion Survey (KHOS) was completed by the patients alone. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the association between sociodemographic characteristics, the patients' involvement in treatment decision-making, and patients' preference for behavioral involvement and information related to their disease. The majority of patients preferred to share decision-making with their physicians (47.5%), while the second largest group preferred being passive (42.6%) and a small number preferred being active (9.8%). However, the physicians perceived that the majority of patients preferred active decision-making (56.9%), followed by those who desired shared decision-making (32.8%), and those who preferred passive decision-making (10.3%). The overall concordance was 26.5% (54 of 204 patient-physician dyads). The median of preference for information score and behavioral involvement score was 4 (interquartile range [IQR] =3-5) and 2 (IQR =2-3), respectively. In univariate analysis, the ethnicity and educational qualification of patients were significantly associated with the patients' preferred role in the process of treatment decision-making and the patients' preference for information seeking (p>0.05). However, only educational qualification (p=0.004) was significantly associated with patients' preference for information seeking in multivariate analysis. Physicians failed to understand patients' perspectives and preferences in treatment decision-making. The concordance between physicians' perception and patients' perception was

  7. Cultural challenges to engaging patients in shared decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Sarah T; Morris, Arden M

    2017-01-01

    Engaging patients in their health care through shared decision-making is a priority embraced by several national and international groups. Missing from these initiatives is an understanding of the challenges involved in engaging patients from diverse backgrounds in shared decision-making. In this commentary, we summarize some of the challenges and pose points for consideration regarding how to move toward more culturally appropriate shared decision-making. The past decade has seen repeated calls for health policies, research projects and interventions that more actively include patients in decision making. Yet research has shown that patients from different racial/ethnic and cultural backgrounds appraise their decision making process less positively than do white, U.S.-born patients who are the current demographic majority. While preliminary conceptual frameworks have been proposed for considering the role of race/ethnicity and culture in healthcare utilization, we maintain that more foundational and empirical work is necessary. We offer recommendations for how to best involve patients early in treatment and how to maximize decision making in the way most meaningful to patients. Innovative and sustained efforts are needed to educate and train providers to communicate effectively in engaging patients in informed, shared decision-making and to provide culturally competent health care. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Moral decision-making and theory of mind in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Jan B; Brand, Matthias; Polzer, Christin; Ebersbach, Georg; Kalbe, Elke

    2013-09-01

    Cognitive impairments in theory of mind (ToM), executive processing, and decision-making are frequent and highly relevant symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). These functions have been related to moral decision-making. Their association to moral decision-making in PD, however, has not been studied yet. It was hypothesized that moral decisions in patients with PD differ from those in healthy control participants, and that more egoistic decisions are related to ToM as well as executive dysfunctions in patients with PD. Nineteen patients with PD and 20 healthy control participants were examined with an everyday moral decision-making task, comprised of 10 low and 10 high emotional forced-choice moral dilemma short stories with egoistic and altruistic options. All participants received an elaborate neuropsychological test battery. Electrodermal skin conductance responses were recorded to examine possible unconscious emotional reactions during moral decision-making. The groups performed comparably in total scores of moral decision-making. Although ToM did not differ between groups, it was inversely related to altruistic moral decisions in the healthy control group, but not in patients with PD. Executive functions were not related to moral decision-making. No differences were found for skin conductance responses, yet they differed from zero in both groups. Our findings indicate that moral decisions do not differ between patients with PD and healthy control participants. However, different underlying processes in both groups can be presumed. While healthy control participants seem to apply ToM to permit egoistic moral decisions in low emotional dilemmas, patients with PD seem to decide independently from ToM. These mechanisms as well as neuropsychological and neurophysiological correlates are discussed.

  9. Development of a patient decision aid for type 2 diabetes mellitus for patients not achieving glycemic control on metformin alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shillington AC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alicia C Shillington,1 Nananda Col,2 Robert A Bailey,3 Mark A Jewell11EPI-Q, Inc., Oak Brook, IL, USA; 2Shared Decision-making Resources, Georgetown, ME, USA; 3Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Raritan, NJ, USAPurpose: To describe the process used to develop an evidence-based patient decision aid (PDA that facilitates shared decision-making for treatment intensification in inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM consistent with International Patient Decision Aids Standards.Methods: A PDA was developed by a multidisciplinary steering committee of clinicians, patient advocate, nurse, certified diabetes educators, and decision scientist, using a systematic development process. The process included defining the PDA scope and purpose, outlining the framework, content creation, and designing for integration into clinical practice. This was accomplished through a review of the literature and publically available educational materials and input from practicing clinicians and patients during development and iteratively refining content based on input. Patients with poorly controlled T2DM on metformin considering additional medication assessed the PDA during a pilot.Results: Testing identified six preference-sensitive domains important for choosing T2DM treatment: degree of glycemic response, avoiding weight gain, hypoglycemia risk and other adverse events, avoiding injections, convenience of dose administration, blood glucose monitoring, and cost of therapy. Patient feedback guided content revision. Treatment options were offered after presenting medication class risk–benefit information and eliciting patient values, goals, and preferences. The PDA received the highest International Patient Decision Aids Standards global score to date, 88/100, with 100% of criteria fully met for the following dimensions: development process, disclosures, evaluation process, evidence quality, guidance for users, information quality, language

  10. Patient engagement in healthcare: pathways for effective medical decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Barello

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Making patients protagonists of decisions about their care is a primacy in the 21st century medical ethics. Precisely, to favor shared treatment decisions potentially enables patients’ autonomy and self-determination, and protects patients’ rights to make decisions about their own future care. To fully accomplish this goal, medicine should take into account the complexity of the healthcare decision making processes: patients may experience dilemmas when having to take decisions that not only concern their patient role/identity but also involve the psychosocial impact of treatments on their overall life quality. A deeper understanding of the patients’ expected role in the decision making process across their illness journey may favor the optimal implementation of this practice into the day-to-day medical agenda. In this paper, authors discuss the value of assuming the Patient Health Engagement Model to sustain successful pathways for effective medical decision making throughout the patient’s illness course. This model and its relational implication for the clinical encounter might be the base for an innovative “patient-doctor relational agenda” able to sustain an “engagement-sensitive” medical decision making.

  11. Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Spacecraft Collision Avoidance Maneuver Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Markley, F. Landis

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses sequential probability ratio tests that explicitly allow decision-makers to incorporate false alarm and missed detection risks, and are potentially less sensitive to modeling errors than a procedure that relies solely on a probability of collision threshold. Recent work on constrained Kalman filtering has suggested an approach to formulating such a test for collision avoidance maneuver decisions: a filter bank with two norm-inequality-constrained epoch-state extended Kalman filters. One filter models the null hypotheses that the miss distance is inside the combined hard body radius at the predicted time of closest approach, and one filter models the alternative hypothesis. The epoch-state filter developed for this method explicitly accounts for any process noise present in the system. The method appears to work well using a realistic example based on an upcoming, highly elliptical orbit formation flying mission.

  12. Knowledge of prenatal screening and psychological management of test decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Katja; Hvidman, Lone; Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    2010-01-01

    well-being respectively worries in pregnancy. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study with 6,427 pregnant women consecutively included before the time of a nuchal translucency scan. Participants were recruited from three Danish obstetric departments offering prenatal screening free of charge...... level of knowledge for the pregnant women making choices about participation in prenatal screening for Down's syndrome in order to improve psychological management of test decisions. Copyright © 2010 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  13. Exploring patient values in medical decision making: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yew Kong Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patient decisions are influenced by their personal values. However, there is a lack of clarity and attention on the concept of patient values in the clinical context despite clear emphasis on patient values in evidence-based medicine and shared decision making. The aim of the study was to explore the concept of patient values in the context of making decisions about insulin initiation among people with type 2 diabetes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted individual in-depth interviews with people with type 2 diabetes who were making decisions about insulin treatment. Participants were selected purposively to achieve maximum variation. A semi-structured topic guide was used to guide the interviews which were audio-recorded and analysed using a thematic approach. We interviewed 21 participants between January 2011 and March 2012. The age range of participants was 28-67 years old. Our sample comprised 9 women and 12 men. Three main themes, 'treatment-specific values', 'life goals and philosophies', and 'personal and social background', emerged from the analysis. The patients reported a variety of insulin-specific values, which were negative and/or positive beliefs about insulin. They framed insulin according to their priorities and philosophies in life. Patients' decisions were influenced by sociocultural (e.g. religious background and personal backgrounds (e.g. family situations. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlighted the need for expanding the current concept of patient values in medical decision making. Clinicians should address more than just values related to treatment options. Patient values should include patients' priorities, life philosophy and their background. Current decision support tools, such as patient decision aids, should consider these new dimensions when clarifying patient values.

  14. Deferential vulnerability and patient decision-making

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-01

    Dec 1, 2017 ... Deferential vulnerability arises when individuals subordinate themselves or submit to an authority figure when making decisions about their day-to-day lives and existence within their specific environment and relationships. This customary obedience occurs in cultures where certain hierarchical systems ...

  15. Presenting quantitative information about decision outcomes: a risk communication primer for patient decision aid developers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Making evidence-based decisions often requires comparison of two or more options. Research-based evidence may exist which quantifies how likely the outcomes are for each option. Understanding these numeric estimates improves patients’ risk perception and leads to better informed decision making. This paper summarises current “best practices” in communication of evidence-based numeric outcomes for developers of patient decision aids (PtDAs) and other health communication tools. Method An expert consensus group of fourteen researchers from North America, Europe, and Australasia identified eleven main issues in risk communication. Two experts for each issue wrote a “state of the art” summary of best evidence, drawing on the PtDA, health, psychological, and broader scientific literature. In addition, commonly used terms were defined and a set of guiding principles and key messages derived from the results. Results The eleven key components of risk communication were: 1) Presenting the chance an event will occur; 2) Presenting changes in numeric outcomes; 3) Outcome estimates for test and screening decisions; 4) Numeric estimates in context and with evaluative labels; 5) Conveying uncertainty; 6) Visual formats; 7) Tailoring estimates; 8) Formats for understanding outcomes over time; 9) Narrative methods for conveying the chance of an event; 10) Important skills for understanding numerical estimates; and 11) Interactive web-based formats. Guiding principles from the evidence summaries advise that risk communication formats should reflect the task required of the user, should always define a relevant reference class (i.e., denominator) over time, should aim to use a consistent format throughout documents, should avoid “1 in x” formats and variable denominators, consider the magnitude of numbers used and the possibility of format bias, and should take into account the numeracy and graph literacy of the audience. Conclusion A substantial and

  16. Feasibility of web-based decision aids in neurological patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Til, Janine Astrid; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Snoek, Govert J.; Dijkstra, Evelien; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2010-01-01

    Decision aids (DAs) may be helpful in improving patients' participation in medical decision-making. We investigated the potential for web-based DAs in a rehabilitation population. Two self-administered DAs focused on the treatment of acquired ankle-foot impairment in stroke and the treatment of

  17. The Effects of Computerized Clinical Decision Support Systems on Laboratory Test Ordering: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, Nicolas; Van Thienen, Katrien; Heselmans, Annemie; de Velde, Stijn Van; Ramaekers, Dirk; Aertgeerts, Bert

    2017-04-01

    - Inappropriate laboratory test ordering has been shown to be as high as 30%. This can have an important impact on quality of care and costs because of downstream consequences such as additional diagnostics, repeat testing, imaging, prescriptions, surgeries, or hospital stays. - To evaluate the effect of computerized clinical decision support systems on appropriateness of laboratory test ordering. - We used MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Clinicaltrials.gov, Cochrane Library, and Inspec through December 2015. Investigators independently screened articles to identify randomized trials that assessed a computerized clinical decision support system aimed at improving laboratory test ordering by providing patient-specific information, delivered in the form of an on-screen management option, reminder, or suggestion through a computerized physician order entry using a rule-based or algorithm-based system relying on an evidence-based knowledge resource. Investigators extracted data from 30 papers about study design, various study characteristics, study setting, various intervention characteristics, involvement of the software developers in the evaluation of the computerized clinical decision support system, outcome types, and various outcome characteristics. - Because of heterogeneity of systems and settings, pooled estimates of effect could not be made. Data showed that computerized clinical decision support systems had little or no effect on clinical outcomes but some effect on compliance. Computerized clinical decision support systems targeted at laboratory test ordering for multiple conditions appear to be more effective than those targeted at a single condition.

  18. Development of a decision aid to inform patients' and families' renal replacement therapy selection decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameling, Jessica M; Auguste, Priscilla; Ephraim, Patti L; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia; DePasquale, Nicole; Greer, Raquel C; Crews, Deidra C; Powe, Neil R; Rabb, Hamid; Boulware, L Ebony

    2012-12-01

    Few educational resources have been developed to inform patients' renal replacement therapy (RRT) selection decisions. Patients progressing toward end stage renal disease (ESRD) must decide among multiple treatment options with varying characteristics. Complex information about treatments must be adequately conveyed to patients with different educational backgrounds and informational needs. Decisions about treatment options also require family input, as families often participate in patients' treatment and support patients' decisions. We describe the development, design, and preliminary evaluation of an informational, evidence-based, and patient-and family-centered decision aid for patients with ESRD and varying levels of health literacy, health numeracy, and cognitive function. We designed a decision aid comprising a complementary video and informational handbook. We based our development process on data previously obtained from qualitative focus groups and systematic literature reviews. We simultaneously developed the video and handbook in "stages." For the video, stages included (1) directed interviews with culturally appropriate patients and families and preliminary script development, (2) video production, and (3) screening the video with patients and their families. For the handbook, stages comprised (1) preliminary content design, (2) a mixed-methods pilot study among diverse patients to assess comprehension of handbook material, and (3) screening the handbook with patients and their families. The video and handbook both addressed potential benefits and trade-offs of treatment selections. The 50-minute video consisted of demographically diverse patients and their families describing their positive and negative experiences with selecting a treatment option. The video also incorporated health professionals' testimonials regarding various considerations that might influence patients' and families' treatment selections. The handbook was comprised of written

  19. Not All Patients Want to Participate in Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Wendy; Kao, Audiey; Kuby, Alma; Thisted, Ronald A

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine calls for physicians to engage patients in making clinical decisions, but not every patient may want the same level of participation. OBJECTIVES 1) To assess public preferences for participation in decision making in a representative sample of the U.S. population. 2) To understand how demographic variables and health status influence people's preferences for participation in decision making. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS A population-based survey of a fully representative sample of English-speaking adults was conducted in concert with the 2002 General Social Survey (N= 2,765). Respondents expressed preferences ranging from patient-directed to physician-directed styles on each of 3 aspects of decision making (seeking information, discussing options, making the final decision). Logistic regression was used to assess the relationships of demographic variables and health status to preferences. MAIN RESULTS Nearly all respondents (96%) preferred to be offered choices and to be asked their opinions. In contrast, half of the respondents (52%) preferred to leave final decisions to their physicians and 44% preferred to rely on physicians for medical knowledge rather than seeking out information themselves. Women, more educated, and healthier people were more likely to prefer an active role in decision making. African-American and Hispanic respondents were more likely to prefer that physicians make the decisions. Preferences for an active role increased with age up to 45 years, but then declined. CONCLUSION This population-based study demonstrates that people vary substantially in their preferences for participation in decision making. Physicians and health care organizations should not assume that patients wish to participate in clinical decision making, but must assess individual patient preferences and tailor care accordingly. PMID:15987329

  20. Which test is best for Helicobacter pylori? A cost-effectiveness model using decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Taubert, Mark; Davies, Shan; Brown, Ginevra; Allison, Miles; Phillips, Ceri

    2007-05-01

    GPs face a potential dilemma in deciding which test to use for detection of Helicobacter pylori. For patients with dyspepsia, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) advises primary care practitioners to adopt a 'test and treat' policy before considering a referral for gastroscopy. There are many ways of testing: serology, urea breath test, and faecal antigen test. NICE does not advocate any preferred single test for detecting H. pylori. In the current study a multi-stakeholder 2-day workshop was established to agree and populate a cost-effectiveness decision analysis model. The aim was to analyse the three types of tests available for H. pylori and to determine which is the most practical and cost effective. Agreement on the costs and diagnostic values to be entered into the decision-analytic model was achieved. Results indicate that the faecal antigen test was the most effective in terms of true outcomes and cost. One thousand virtual patients were allocated to each of the three tests. Serology had 903, urea breath test had 961, and the faecal antigen test had 968 true positive outcomes. Data indicate that the faecal antigen test is the preferable strategy for diagnosis of H. pylori in primary care. This has implications for implementing new testing processes and for commissioning new diagnostic pathways for use in primary care.

  1. Patient perspectives on informed decision-making surrounding dialysis initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Lin, Feng-Chang; Gilet, Constance A; Arnold, Robert M; Bridgman, Jessica C; Ward, Sandra E

    2013-11-01

    Careful patient-clinician shared decision-making about dialysis initiation has been promoted, but few studies have addressed patient perspectives on the extent of information provided and how decisions to start dialysis are made. Ninety-nine maintenance dialysis patients recruited from 15 outpatient dialysis centers in North Carolina completed semistructured interviews on information provision and communication about the initiation of dialysis. These data were examined with content analysis. In addition, informed decision-making (IDM) scores were created by summing patient responses (yes/no) to 10 questions about the decision-making. The mean IDM score was 4.4 (of 10; SD = 2.0); 67% scored 5 or lower. Age at the time of decision-making (r = -0.27, P = 0.006), years of education (r = 0.24, P = 0.02) and presence of a warning about progressing to end-stage kidney disease (t = 2.9, P = 0.005) were significantly associated with IDM scores. Nearly 70% said that the risks and burdens of dialysis were not mentioned at all, and only one patient recalled that the doctor offered the option of not starting dialysis. While a majority (67%) said that they felt they had no choice about starting dialysis (because the alternative would be death) or about dialysis modality, only 21.2% said that they had felt rushed to make a decision. About one-third of the patients perceived that the decision to start dialysis and modality was already made by the doctor. A majority of patients felt unprepared and ill-informed about the initiation of dialysis. Improving the extent of IDM about dialysis may optimize patient preparation prior to starting treatment and their perceptions about the decision-making process.

  2. A Model of Cancer Clinical Trial Decision-making Informed by African-American Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Jennifer A; Mbah, Olive; Xu, Jiayun; Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Saleem, Haneefa; Sakyi, Kwame; Ford, Jean G

    2015-06-01

    Clinical trials are critical to advancing cancer treatment. Minority populations are underrepresented among trial participants, and there is limited understanding of their decision-making process and key determinants of decision outcomes regarding trial participation. To understand research decision-making among clinical trial-eligible African-American cancer patients at Johns Hopkins, we conducted seven focus groups (n=32) with trial-offered patients ≥ 18 years diagnosed with lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer ≤ 5 years. Three "acceptor" and four "decliner" focus groups were conducted. Questions addressed: attitudes towards clinical trials, reasons for accepting or declining participation, and recommendations to improve minority recruitment and enrollment. Data were transcribed and analyzed using traditional approaches to content and thematic analysis in NVivo 9.0. Data coding resulted in themes that supported model construction. Participant experiences revealed the following themes when describing the decision-making process: Information gathering, Intrapersonal perspectives, and Interpersonal influences. Decision outcomes included the presence or absence of decision regret and satisfaction. From these themes, we generated a Model of Cancer Clinical Trial Decision-making. Our model should be tested in hypothesis-driven research to elucidate factors and processes influencing decision balance and outcomes of trial-related decision-making. The model should also be tested in other disparities populations and for diagnoses other than cancer.

  3. Decision-Making for an Incapacitated Pregnant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabel, Hilary; Rose, Susannah L; Kodish, Eric

    2017-07-01

    Decisions about continuing or terminating a pregnancy touch on profound, individualized questions about bodily integrity, reproductive autonomy, deeply held values regarding one's capacity for parenthood, and, in the case of a high-risk pregnancy, the risks one is willing to take to have a baby. So far as possible, reproductive decisions are made between a patient, in some cases her partner, and her medical provider. However, this standard framework cannot be applied if the patient lacks decision-making capacity. In this essay, we discuss one such case that came before our clinical ethics team. We describe the challenges of respecting a patient's reproductive preferences when the patient cannot share what those preferences are, and we argue that decisions regarding reproductive health care should not be treated with exceptionalism. Rather, they should proceed under the normal processes of surrogate decision-making, including the application of substituted judgment. This approach enables us to take the patient's values into account when considering the questions implicated in reproductive health care, just as we do for other kinds of health care decisions in which a patient's deeply held values are salient. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  4. Decision-Making in Pediatric Transport Team Dispatch Using Script Concordance Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapreyar, Prakadeshwari; Marcdante, Karen; Zhang, Liyun; Simpson, Pippa; Meyer, Michael T

    2017-11-01

    Our objective was to compare decision-making in dispatching pediatric transport teams by Medical Directors of pediatric transport teams (serving as experts) to that of Pediatric Intensivists and Critical Care fellows who often serve as Medical Control physicians. Understanding decision-making around team composition and dispatch could impact clinical management, cost effectiveness, and educational needs. Survey was developed using Script Concordance Testing guidelines. The survey contained 15 transport case vignettes covering 20 scenarios (45 questions). Eleven scenarios assessed impact of intrinsic patient factors (e.g., procedural needs), whereas nine assessed extrinsic factors (e.g., weather). Pediatric Critical Care programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (the United States). Pediatric Intensivists and senior Critical Care fellows at Pediatric Critical Care programs were the target population with Transport Medical Directors serving as the expert panel. None. Survey results were scored per Script Concordance Testing guidelines. Concordance within groups was assessed using simple percentage agreement. There was little concordance in decision-making by Transport Medical Directors (median Script Concordance Testing percentage score [interquartile range] of 33.9 [30.4-37.3]). In addition, there was no statistically significant difference between the median Script Concordance Testing scores among the senior fellows and Pediatric Intensivists (31.1 [29.6-33.2] vs 29.7 [28.3-32.3], respectively; p = 0.12). Transport Medical Directors were more concordant on reasoning involving intrinsic patient factors rather than extrinsic factors (10/21 vs 4/24). Our study demonstrates pediatric transport team dispatch decision-making discordance by pediatric critical care physicians of varying levels of expertise and experience. Script Concordance Testing at a local level may better elucidate standards in medical decision-making within

  5. [Involving patients, the insured and the general public in healthcare decision making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Axel C; Juhnke, Christin

    2016-01-01

    No doubt, the public should be involved in healthcare decision making, especially when decision makers from politics and self-government agencies are faced with the difficult task of setting priorities. There is a general consensus on the need for a stronger patient centeredness, even in HTA processes, and internationally different ways of public participation are discussed and tested in decision making processes. This paper describes how the public can be involved in different decision situations, and it shows how preference measurement methods are currently being used in an international context to support decision making. It distinguishes between different levels of decision making on health technologies: approval, assessment, pricing, and finally utilization. The range of participation efforts extends from qualitative surveys of patients' needs (Citizen Councils of NICE in the UK) to science-based documentation of quantitative patient preferences, such as in the current pilot projects of the FDA in the US and the EMA at the European level. Possible approaches for the elicitation and documentation of preference structures and trade-offs in relation to alternate health technologies are decision aids, such as multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), that provide the necessary information for weighting and prioritizing decision criteria. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Communicative processes and decision-making in relation to prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netsey-Afedo, Mette Margrethe Løwe; Birkelund, Regner

    2016-01-01

    is far from being something patients experience. For many men with prostate cancer the disease and its treatment have long-term, and often lifelong, serious physical and psychological consequences. Many patients experience a reduced quality of life. In relation to the significant side effects...... of treatment, it is essential to involve patients' preferences, needs and desires when making decisions during the course of their disease. Furthermore, it is important that patients are adequately informed about treatment, side effects, and other specific issues important for the individual patient. The aim...... for a specific intervention study, including developing and testing decision aids for the use of both patients and health professionals. This could enhance focus on the person rather than the patient and contribute to a greater extent of involvement in decision-making....

  7. A new fit-for-purpose model testing framework: Decision Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Bryan; Craig, James

    2016-04-01

    Decision-makers in water resources are often burdened with selecting appropriate multi-million dollar strategies to mitigate the impacts of climate or land use change. Unfortunately, the suitability of existing hydrologic simulation models to accurately inform decision-making is in doubt because the testing procedures used to evaluate model utility (i.e., model validation) are insufficient. For example, many authors have identified that a good standard framework for model testing called the Klemes Crash Tests (KCTs), which are the classic model validation procedures from Klemeš (1986) that Andréassian et al. (2009) rename as KCTs, have yet to become common practice in hydrology. Furthermore, Andréassian et al. (2009) claim that the progression of hydrological science requires widespread use of KCT and the development of new crash tests. Existing simulation (not forecasting) model testing procedures such as KCTs look backwards (checking for consistency between simulations and past observations) rather than forwards (explicitly assessing if the model is likely to support future decisions). We propose a fundamentally different, forward-looking, decision-oriented hydrologic model testing framework based upon the concept of fit-for-purpose model testing that we call Decision Crash Tests or DCTs. Key DCT elements are i) the model purpose (i.e., decision the model is meant to support) must be identified so that model outputs can be mapped to management decisions ii) the framework evaluates not just the selected hydrologic model but the entire suite of model-building decisions associated with model discretization, calibration etc. The framework is constructed to directly and quantitatively evaluate model suitability. The DCT framework is applied to a model building case study on the Grand River in Ontario, Canada. A hypothetical binary decision scenario is analysed (upgrade or not upgrade the existing flood control structure) under two different sets of model building

  8. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Légaré

    Full Text Available Knowledge translation (KT interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties.We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing.We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153 published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC and Consumers and Communication.We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%. Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1 and educational outreach (n = 1. Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15, communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7, personalized risk communication (n = 3 and mobile phone messaging (n = 1. Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective.More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations.

  9. Rigorously testing multialternative decision field theory against random utility models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitsch, Nicolas A J; Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive models of decision making aim to explain the process underlying observed choices. Here, we test a sequential sampling model of decision making, multialternative decision field theory (MDFT; Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001), on empirical grounds and compare it against 2 established random utility models of choice: the probit and the logit model. Using a within-subject experimental design, participants in 2 studies repeatedly choose among sets of options (consumer products) described on several attributes. The results of Study 1 showed that all models predicted participants' choices equally well. In Study 2, in which the choice sets were explicitly designed to distinguish the models, MDFT had an advantage in predicting the observed choices. Study 2 further revealed the occurrence of multiple context effects within single participants, indicating an interdependent evaluation of choice options and correlations between different context effects. In sum, the results indicate that sequential sampling models can provide relevant insights into the cognitive process underlying preferential choices and thus can lead to better choice predictions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Clinical Performance and Management Outcomes with the DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Profile Test in a Prospective Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Meldi Plasseraud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Uveal melanoma management is challenging due to its metastatic propensity. DecisionDx-UM is a prospectively validated molecular test that interrogates primary tumor biology to provide objective information about metastatic potential that can be used in determining appropriate patient care. To evaluate the continued clinical validity and utility of DecisionDx-UM, beginning March 2010, 70 patients were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, IRB-approved study to document patient management differences and clinical outcomes associated with low-risk Class 1 and high-risk Class 2 results indicated by DecisionDx-UM testing. Thirty-seven patients in the prospective study were Class 1 and 33 were Class 2. Class 1 patients had 100% 3-year metastasis-free survival compared to 63% for Class 2 (log rank test p=0.003 with 27.3 median follow-up months in this interim analysis. Class 2 patients received significantly higher-intensity monitoring and more oncology/clinical trial referrals compared to Class 1 patients (Fisher’s exact test p=2.1×10-13 and p=0.04, resp.. The results of this study provide additional, prospective evidence in an independent cohort of patients that Class 1 and Class 2 patients are managed according to the differential metastatic risk indicated by DecisionDx-UM. The trial is registered with Clinical Application of DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Assay Results (NCT02376920.

  11. Clinical Performance and Management Outcomes with the DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Profile Test in a Prospective Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasseraud, Kristen Meldi; Cook, Robert W; Tsai, Tony; Shildkrot, Yevgeniy; Middlebrook, Brooke; Maetzold, Derek; Wilkinson, Jeff; Stone, John; Johnson, Clare; Oelschlager, Kristen; Aaberg, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma management is challenging due to its metastatic propensity. DecisionDx-UM is a prospectively validated molecular test that interrogates primary tumor biology to provide objective information about metastatic potential that can be used in determining appropriate patient care. To evaluate the continued clinical validity and utility of DecisionDx-UM, beginning March 2010, 70 patients were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, IRB-approved study to document patient management differences and clinical outcomes associated with low-risk Class 1 and high-risk Class 2 results indicated by DecisionDx-UM testing. Thirty-seven patients in the prospective study were Class 1 and 33 were Class 2. Class 1 patients had 100% 3-year metastasis-free survival compared to 63% for Class 2 (log rank test p = 0.003) with 27.3 median follow-up months in this interim analysis. Class 2 patients received significantly higher-intensity monitoring and more oncology/clinical trial referrals compared to Class 1 patients (Fisher's exact test p = 2.1 × 10(-13) and p = 0.04, resp.). The results of this study provide additional, prospective evidence in an independent cohort of patients that Class 1 and Class 2 patients are managed according to the differential metastatic risk indicated by DecisionDx-UM. The trial is registered with Clinical Application of DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Assay Results (NCT02376920).

  12. Communicative processes and decision-making in relation to prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løwe Netsey-Afedo, Mette Margrethe; Birkelund, Regner

    of data will be based on Ricoeur's theory of interpretation, i.e. a naive interpretation, a structural analysis, and a critical interpretation. In addition to contributing with detailed knowledge about patient involvement related to prostate cancer patients, the project will provide the basis...... for a specific intervention study, including developing and testing decision aids for the use of both patients and health professionals. This could enhance focus on the person rather than the patient and contribute to a greater extent of involvement in decision-making....

  13. Shared decision making in patients with low risk chest pain: prospective randomized pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Erik P; Hollander, Judd E; Schaffer, Jason T; Kline, Jeffrey A; Torres, Carlos A; Diercks, Deborah B; Jones, Russell; Owen, Kelly P; Meisel, Zachary F; Demers, Michel; Leblanc, Annie; Shah, Nilay D; Inselman, Jonathan; Herrin, Jeph; Castaneda-Guarderas, Ana; Montori, Victor M

    2016-12-05

     To compare the effectiveness of shared decision making with usual care in choice of admission for observation and further cardiac testing or for referral for outpatient evaluation in patients with possible acute coronary syndrome.  Multicenter pragmatic parallel randomized controlled trial.  Six emergency departments in the United States.  898 adults (aged >17 years) with a primary complaint of chest pain who were being considered for admission to an observation unit for cardiac testing (451 were allocated to the decision aid and 447 to usual care), and 361 emergency clinicians (emergency physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) caring for patients with chest pain.  Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) by an electronic, web based system to shared decision making facilitated by a decision aid or to usual care. The primary outcome, selected by patient and caregiver advisers, was patient knowledge of their risk for acute coronary syndrome and options for care; secondary outcomes were involvement in the decision to be admitted, proportion of patients admitted for cardiac testing, and the 30 day rate of major adverse cardiac events.  Compared with the usual care arm, patients in the decision aid arm had greater knowledge of their risk for acute coronary syndrome and options for care (questions correct: decision aid, 4.2 v usual care, 3.6; mean difference 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 0.86), were more involved in the decision (observing patient involvement scores: decision aid, 18.3 v usual care, 7.9; 10.3, 9.1 to 11.5), and less frequently decided with their clinician to be admitted for cardiac testing (decision aid, 37% v usual care, 52%; absolute difference 15%; Ppatients at low risk for acute coronary syndrome increased patient knowledge about their risk, increased engagement, and safely decreased the rate of admission to an observation unit for cardiac testing.Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01969240. Published by the BMJ

  14. The perspectives of Iranian physicians and patients towards patient decision aids: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Hamideh; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Majdzadeh, Reza; Gholami, Jaleh; Haghjou, Leila; Abdollahi, Bahar Sadeghi; Davatchi, Fereydoun; Rashidian, Arash

    2013-09-25

    Patient preference is one of the main components of clinical decision making, therefore leading to the development of patient decision aids. The goal of this study was to describe physicians' and patients' viewpoints on the barriers and limitations of using patient decision aids in Iran, their proposed solutions, and, the benefits of using these tools. This qualitative study was conducted in 2011 in Iran by holding in-depth interviews with 14 physicians and 8 arthritis patient. Interviewees were selected through purposeful and maximum variation sampling. As an example, a patient decision aid on the treatment of knee arthritis was developed upon literature reviews and gathering expert opinion, and was presented at the time of interview. Thematic analysis was conducted to analyze the data by using the OpenCode software. The results were summarized into three categories and ten codes. The extracted categories were the perceived benefits of using the tools, as well as the patient-related and physician-related barriers in using decision aids. The following barriers in using patient decision aids were identified in this study: lack of patients and physicians' trainings in shared decision making, lack of specialist per capita, low treatment tariffs and lack of an exact evaluation system for patient participation in decision making. No doubt these barriers demand the health authorities' special attention. Hence, despite patients and physicians' inclination toward using patient decision aids, these problems have hindered the practical usage of these tools in Iran--as a developing country.

  15. Patients' attitudes towards animal testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masterton, Malin; Renberg, Tobias; Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    A strong argument for the practice of animal testing in medical research is the potential benefit to patients in getting improved pain relief, minimising morbidity and mortality. However, patients’ opinions on the ethics of animal testing are seldom sought, despite their role as principal...... stakeholders. This study compared the attitudes of patients and researchers on animal testing. Focus-group interviews were held with patients suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases, resulting in a questionnaire that was distributed January–May 2011. The questionnaire was posted to patient members...... of the Swedish Rheumatism Association (n=1195) and to all scientific experts serving on Ethical Review Boards in Sweden (n=364), with response rates of 65 per cent and 60 per cent, respectively. Results show that patients hold a positive stance towards animal testing, but with many caveats, and the level...

  16. Patients' participation in decision-making in the medical field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Oeye, Christine; Thrysøe, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on patients’ participation in decision-making in meetings with healthcare professionals in a healthcare system which appeared to be governed in a neoliberal manner. Drawing on two constructed empirical cases, this article analyses and discusses the clinical practice around...... is going to happen in his life. Both professionals and patients have an underlying, tacit preconception that every medical treatment is better than no treatment. Patients do not always want to be a ‘customer’ in the healthcare system; they want to be a patient, consulting an expert for help and advice......, which creates resistance to the some parts of the decision-making process. Both professionals and patients are subject to the structural frame of the medical field, formed of both neoliberal frame and medical logic. The decision-making competence in relation to the choice of treatment is placed away...

  17. Decision Rules, Trees and Tests for Tables with Many-valued Decisions–comparative Study

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad

    2013-10-04

    In this paper, we present three approaches for construction of decision rules for decision tables with many-valued decisions. We construct decision rules directly for rows of decision table, based on paths in decision tree, and based on attributes contained in a test (super-reduct). Experimental results for the data sets taken from UCI Machine Learning Repository, contain comparison of the maximum and the average length of rules for the mentioned approaches.

  18. Extensions to regret-based decision curve analysis: an application to hospice referral for terminal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Barnes, Laura E; Hozo, Iztok; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2011-12-23

    Despite the well documented advantages of hospice care, most terminally ill patients do not reap the maximum benefit from hospice services, with the majority of them receiving hospice care either prematurely or delayed. Decision systems to improve the hospice referral process are sorely needed. We present a novel theoretical framework that is based on well-established methodologies of prognostication and decision analysis to assist with the hospice referral process for terminally ill patients. We linked the SUPPORT statistical model, widely regarded as one of the most accurate models for prognostication of terminally ill patients, with the recently developed regret based decision curve analysis (regret DCA). We extend the regret DCA methodology to consider harms associated with the prognostication test as well as harms and effects of the management strategies. In order to enable patients and physicians in making these complex decisions in real-time, we developed an easily accessible web-based decision support system available at the point of care. The web-based decision support system facilitates the hospice referral process in three steps. First, the patient or surrogate is interviewed to elicit his/her personal preferences regarding the continuation of life-sustaining treatment vs. palliative care. Then, regret DCA is employed to identify the best strategy for the particular patient in terms of threshold probability at which he/she is indifferent between continuation of treatment and of hospice referral. Finally, if necessary, the probabilities of survival and death for the particular patient are computed based on the SUPPORT prognostication model and contrasted with the patient's threshold probability. The web-based design of the CDSS enables patients, physicians, and family members to participate in the decision process from anywhere internet access is available. We present a theoretical framework to facilitate the hospice referral process. Further rigorous

  19. Extensions to Regret-based Decision Curve Analysis: An application to hospice referral for terminal patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsalatsanis Athanasios

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the well documented advantages of hospice care, most terminally ill patients do not reap the maximum benefit from hospice services, with the majority of them receiving hospice care either prematurely or delayed. Decision systems to improve the hospice referral process are sorely needed. Methods We present a novel theoretical framework that is based on well-established methodologies of prognostication and decision analysis to assist with the hospice referral process for terminally ill patients. We linked the SUPPORT statistical model, widely regarded as one of the most accurate models for prognostication of terminally ill patients, with the recently developed regret based decision curve analysis (regret DCA. We extend the regret DCA methodology to consider harms associated with the prognostication test as well as harms and effects of the management strategies. In order to enable patients and physicians in making these complex decisions in real-time, we developed an easily accessible web-based decision support system available at the point of care. Results The web-based decision support system facilitates the hospice referral process in three steps. First, the patient or surrogate is interviewed to elicit his/her personal preferences regarding the continuation of life-sustaining treatment vs. palliative care. Then, regret DCA is employed to identify the best strategy for the particular patient in terms of threshold probability at which he/she is indifferent between continuation of treatment and of hospice referral. Finally, if necessary, the probabilities of survival and death for the particular patient are computed based on the SUPPORT prognostication model and contrasted with the patient's threshold probability. The web-based design of the CDSS enables patients, physicians, and family members to participate in the decision process from anywhere internet access is available. Conclusions We present a theoretical

  20. [Treatment Decision-Making Process of Cancer Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shiu-Yu C Katie

    2016-10-01

    The decision-making process that is used by cancer patients to determine their treatment has become more multi-foci, difficult and complicated in recent years. This has in part been attributed to the increasing incidence rate of cancer in Taiwan and the rapid development of medical technologies and treatment modalities. Oncology nurses must assist patients and family to make informed and value-based treatment decisions. Decision-making is an information process that involves appraising one's own expectation and values based on his/her knowledge on cancer and treatment options. Because cancer treatment involves risks and uncertainties, and impacts quality of life, the treatment decision-making for cancer is often stressful, or even conflicting. This paper discusses the decision-making behaviors of cancer patients and the decisional conflict, participation, and informational needs that are involved in cancer treatment. The trend toward shared decision-making and decisional support will be also explored in order to facilitate the future development of appropriate clinical interventions and research.

  1. [Patients facing with the decision to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbio, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a common procedure to treat coronary artery stenoses. Several studies had demonstrated that PCI does not reduce the risk of death or myocardial infarction when performed to patients with stable angina. However it has been observed that most patients believe that PCI will reduce their risk for death and myocardial infarction. On the other hand, cardiologists generally acknowledge the limitation of PCI according to the current literature.Cardiologists' decision to refer a patient to PCI is based on factors other then perceived benefits such as fear of missing a needed procedure, defensive medicine, desire of demonstrating their professional competence, vested professional and economic interests, accomplish patient expectation, the so called oculo-stenotic reflex, when a lesion is dilated regardless the clinical indication. Patients' misleading perception of harm and benefits of a procedure is mainly related to the cognitive dissonance, when individuals tend to reduce the conflict of an uncomfortable decision adopting information, which are likely to reduce their discomfort. Furthermore, patients believe that doing more means doing better, that technologic intervention are better than pharmacological treatment that in turn are better than doing nothing. Finally, they assume that a procedure is really effective since their physician suggested it.It should be emphasized that physicians and patients do not communicate successfully about key decision and how little we know about patient understanding of the factors that influence important medical care decisions. Although considerable attention is given to facilitating informed consent, patients' perceived benefits of elective PCI do not match existing evidence, as they overestimated both the benefits and urgency of their procedures. These findings suggest that an even greater effort at patient education is needed prior to elective PCI to facilitate fully informed decision-making.

  2. Treatment decision making in prostate cancer: patients' participation in complex decisions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, M.; Visser, A.; Voerman, B.; Garssen, B.; Andel, G. van; Bensing, J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: (1) To explore to what degree prostate cancer (PC) patients felt they had participated in treatment decision making (TDM). (2) To determine whether perceived roles during TDM were associated with medical and sociodemographic variables. (3) To examine to what extent satisfaction with TDM

  3. Modeling and Testing Landslide Hazard Using Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem Sh. Alkhasawneh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a decision tree model for specifying the importance of 21 factors causing the landslides in a wide area of Penang Island, Malaysia. These factors are vegetation cover, distance from the fault line, slope angle, cross curvature, slope aspect, distance from road, geology, diagonal length, longitude curvature, rugosity, plan curvature, elevation, rain perception, soil texture, surface area, distance from drainage, roughness, land cover, general curvature, tangent curvature, and profile curvature. Decision tree models are used for prediction, classification, and factors importance and are usually represented by an easy to interpret tree like structure. Four models were created using Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID, Exhaustive CHAID, Classification and Regression Tree (CRT, and Quick-Unbiased-Efficient Statistical Tree (QUEST. Twenty-one factors were extracted using digital elevation models (DEMs and then used as input variables for the models. A data set of 137570 samples was selected for each variable in the analysis, where 68786 samples represent landslides and 68786 samples represent no landslides. 10-fold cross-validation was employed for testing the models. The highest accuracy was achieved using Exhaustive CHAID (82.0% compared to CHAID (81.9%, CRT (75.6%, and QUEST (74.0% model. Across the four models, five factors were identified as most important factors which are slope angle, distance from drainage, surface area, slope aspect, and cross curvature.

  4. Decision aids that support decisions about prenatal testing for Down syndrome: an environmental scan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leiva Portocarrero, Maria Esther; Garvelink, Mirjam M; Becerra Perez, Maria Margarita; Giguère, Anik; Robitaille, Hubert; Wilson, Brenda J; Rousseau, François; Légaré, France

    2015-01-01

    ...) can help healthcare providers support women in this decision. Using an environmental scan, we aimed to identify publicly available DAs focusing on prenatal screening/diagnosis for Down syndrome that provide effective support for decision making...

  5. Patient decision making competence: outlines of a conceptual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welie, J V; Welie, S P

    2001-01-01

    In order to protect patients against medical paternalism, patients have been granted the right to respect of their autonomy. This right is operationalized first and foremost through the phenomenon of informed consent. If the patient withholds consent, medical treatment, including life-saving treatment, may not be provided. However, there is one proviso: The patient must be competent to realize his autonomy and reach a decision about his own care that reflects that autonomy. Since one of the most important patient rights hinges on the patient's competence, it is crucially important that patient decision making incompetence is clearly defined and can be diagnosed with the greatest possible degree of sensitivity and, even more important, specificity. Unfortunately, the reality is quite different. There is little consensus in the scientific literature and even less among clinicians and in the law as to what competence exactly means, let alone how it can be diagnosed reliably. And yet, patients are deemed incompetent on a daily basis, losing the right to respect of their autonomy. In this article, we set out to fill that hiatus by beginning at the very beginning, the literal meaning of the term competence. We suggest a generic definition of competence and derive four necessary conditions of competence. We then transpose this definition to the health care context and discuss patient decision making competence.

  6. Patient and citizen participation in health care decisions in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Claudia; Renzi, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing recognition in Western healthcare systems of the importance of considering preferences of patients and the public in tailoring health services and treatment plans. The active collaboration between doctor and patient has recently been encouraged through the shared decision-making model. Aim of the present contribution is to describe the current state of patient and public participation in healthcare in Italy. First, we will briefly outline the organization of the Italian National Health Service; second, we will describe the governmental and institutional initiatives regarding participation; third, some examples of associations and initiatives promoting patient participation will be provided; forth, we will report on research projects on patient participation published in peer-reviewed journals; and finally, we will provide some examples on training activities promoting patient participation. The Italian National Health Plan and many regional and local health authorities in Italy explicitly recognize the importance of patient/citizen participation in healthcare decisions at the macro, meso and micro level of decision-making. However, application of a shared model is still at an early stage in Italy. The reported experiences have yielded positive results and have shown that particular attention should be dedicated to more disadvantaged subgroups of the population, involving patient organisations, enhancing patient/citizen knowledge and adopting approaches that take the specific context into account.

  7. User-centered design and the development of patient decision aids: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witteman, Holly O; Dansokho, Selma Chipenda; Colquhoun, Heather; Coulter, Angela; Dugas, Michèle; Fagerlin, Angela; Giguere, Anik Mc; Glouberman, Sholom; Haslett, Lynne; Hoffman, Aubri; Ivers, Noah; Légaré, France; Légaré, Jean; Levin, Carrie; Lopez, Karli; Montori, Victor M; Provencher, Thierry; Renaud, Jean-Sébastien; Sparling, Kerri; Stacey, Dawn; Vaisson, Gratianne; Volk, Robert J; Witteman, William

    2015-01-26

    Providing patient-centered care requires that patients partner in their personal health-care decisions to the full extent desired. Patient decision aids facilitate processes of shared decision-making between patients and their clinicians by presenting relevant scientific information in balanced, understandable ways, helping clarify patients' goals, and guiding decision-making processes. Although international standards stipulate that patients and clinicians should be involved in decision aid development, little is known about how such involvement currently occurs, let alone best practices. This systematic review consisting of three interlinked subreviews seeks to describe current practices of user involvement in the development of patient decision aids, compare these to practices of user-centered design, and identify promising strategies. A research team that includes patient and clinician representatives, decision aid developers, and systematic review method experts will guide this review according to the Cochrane Handbook and PRISMA reporting guidelines. A medical librarian will hand search key references and use a peer-reviewed search strategy to search MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, the ACM library, IEEE Xplore, and Google Scholar. We will identify articles across all languages and years describing the development or evaluation of a patient decision aid, or the application of user-centered design or human-centered design to tools intended for patient use. Two independent reviewers will assess article eligibility and extract data into a matrix using a structured pilot-tested form based on a conceptual framework of user-centered design. We will synthesize evidence to describe how research teams have included users in their development process and compare these practices to user-centered design methods. If data permit, we will develop a measure of the user-centeredness of development processes and identify practices that are likely

  8. Individual Differences in Decision-Making and Confidence: Capturing Decision Tendencies in a Fictitious Medical Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Simon A.; Kleitman, Sabina

    2014-01-01

    Decision-making is a complex process that is largely studied from an experimental perspective or in specific organizational contexts. As such, no generalizable framework exists with which to study decision-making from an individual differences perspective for predictive/selection purposes. By generalising a context-specific decision model proposed…

  9. Decisions to withhold diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a clinical suspicion of venous thromboembolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike J Schouten

    Full Text Available This study aimed to gather insights in physicians' considerations for decisions to either refer for- or to withhold additional diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a suspicion of venous thromboembolism.Our study was nested in an observational study on diagnostic strategies for suspected venous thromboembolism in nursing home patients. Patient characteristics, bleeding-complications and mortality were related to the decision to withhold investigations. For a better understanding of the physicians' decisions, 21 individual face-to-face in-depth interviews were performed and analysed using the grounded theory approach.Referal for additional diagnostic investigations was forgone in 126/322 (39.1% patients with an indication for diagnostic work-up. 'Blind' anticoagulant treatment was initiated in 95 (75.4% of these patients. The 3 month mortality rates were higher for patients in whom investigations were withheld than in the referred patients, irrespective of anticoagulant treatment (odds ratio 2.45; 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 4.29 but when adjusted for the probability of being referred (i.e. the propensity score, there was no relation of non-diagnosis decisions to mortality (odds ratio 1.75; 0.98 to 3.11. In their decisions to forgo diagnostic investigations, physicians incorporated the estimated relative impact of the potential disease; the potential net-benefits of diagnostic investigations and whether performing investigations agreed with established management goals in advance care planning.Referral for additional diagnostic investigations is withheld in almost 40% of Dutch nursing home patients with suspected venous thromboembolism and an indication for diagnostic work-up. We propose that, given the complexity of these decisions and the uncertainty regarding their indirect effects on patient outcome, more attention should be focused on the decision to either use or withhold additional diagnostic tests.

  10. Patient decision making in the face of conflicting medication information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Elstad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available When patients consult more than one source of information about their medications, they may encounter conflicting information. Although conflicting information has been associated with negative outcomes, including worse medication adherence, little is known about how patients make health decisions when they receive conflicting information. The objective of this study was to explore the decision making strategies that individuals with arthritis use when they receive conflicting medication information. Qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with 20 men and women with arthritis. Interview vignettes posed scenarios involving conflicting information from different sources (e.g., doctor, pharmacist, and relative, and respondents were asked how they would respond to the situation. Data analysis involved inductive coding to identify emergent themes and deductive contextualization to make meaning from the emergent themes. In response to conflicting medication information, patients used rules of thumb, trial and error, weighed benefits and risks, and sought more information, especially from a doctor. Patients relied heavily on trial and error when there was no conflicting information involved in the vignette. In contrast, patients used rules of thumb as a unique response to conflicting information. These findings increase our understanding of what patients do when they receive conflicting medication information. Given that patient exposure to conflicting information is likely to increase alongside the proliferation of medication information on the Internet, patients may benefit from assistance in identifying the most appropriate decision strategies for dealing with conflicting information, including information about best information sources.

  11. Do choosing wisely tools meet criteria for patient decision aids? A descriptive analysis of patient materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Hébert, Jessica; Goh, Larissa; Lewis, Krystina B; Leiva Portocarrero, Maria Ester; Robitaille, Hubert; Stacey, Dawn

    2016-08-26

    Choosing Wisely is a remarkable physician-led campaign to reduce unnecessary or harmful health services. Some of the literature identifies Choosing Wisely as a shared decision-making approach. We evaluated the patient materials developed by Choosing Wisely Canada to determine whether they meet the criteria for shared decision-making tools known as patient decision aids. Descriptive analysis of all Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials. In May 2015, we selected all Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials from its official website. Four team members independently extracted characteristics of the English materials using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) modified 16-item minimum criteria for qualifying and certifying patient decision aids. The research team discussed discrepancies between data extractors and reached a consensus. Descriptive analysis was conducted. Of the 24 patient materials assessed, 12 were about treatments, 11 were about screening and 1 was about prevention. The median score for patient materials using IPDAS criteria was 10/16 (range: 8-11) for screening topics and 6/12 (range: 6-9) for prevention and treatment topics. Commonly missed criteria were stating the decision (21/24 did not), providing balanced information on option benefits/harms (24/24 did not), citing evidence (24/24 did not) and updating policy (24/24 did not). Out of 24 patient materials, only 2 met the 6 IPDAS criteria to qualify as patient decision aids, and neither of these 2 met the 6 certifying criteria. Patient materials developed by Choosing Wisely Canada do not meet the IPDAS minimal qualifying or certifying criteria for patient decision aids. Modifications to the Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials would help to ensure that they qualify as patient decision aids and thus as more effective shared decision-making tools. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  12. Cognitive decision strategies adopted by consumers in reminder difference tests: Influence of the authenticity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, M; Shepherd, D; Lee, H-S; van Hout, D; Hautus, M J

    2017-07-01

    Discrimination tests are used in food companies to quantify small differences between products. Within the diversity of methods available, some are quicker to conduct, whereas others are more sensitive or statistically powerful. One class of methods includes the reminder tasks in which the reference product is given before tasting the actual test stimuli. During the task, such a 'reminder' can be compared directly to each test stimulus, or alternatively, only serve to prime the memory of the judge without being taken into account in decision-making. Previous research with trained judges provided evidence for the latter process while research with untrained consumers has provided some evidence for the former process. Two studies were conducted with untrained consumers using the A Not-AR and 2-AFCR reminder tasks. Objectives were to determine the decision strategies used in, and the relative sensitivity of the tasks. In addition, the use of an "authenticity test" was explored to see if this has a positive effect on test performance. In the first study, mayonnaise and ice tea with small stimulus differences (d'decision strategy used, though the use of an authenticity test increased the sensitivity for these small differences, as it improved the performance of 6 out of 8 tests. In the second study, ice teas with larger stimulus differences (at two levels) were tested using the A Not-AR and 2-AFCR tasks, in comparison to the same-different task. The results showed that consumers use the less optimal strategies and that the authenticity test decreases performance, which is contradictory to the results of the first study. It seems that for very small stimulus differences the authenticity test can improve performance, but with larger differences the authenticity test decreases performance; it seems to confuse the judges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Outpatient Treatment Based on the Hestia Clinical Decision Rule with or without N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Testing in Patients with Acute Pulmonary Embolism. A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Exter, Paul L; Zondag, Wendy; Klok, Frederikus A; Brouwer, Rolf E; Dolsma, Janneke; Eijsvogel, Michiel; Faber, Laura M; van Gerwen, Marijke; Grootenboers, Marco J; Heller-Baan, Roxane; Hovens, Marcel M; Jonkers, Gé J P M; van Kralingen, Klaas W; Melissant, Christian F; Peltenburg, Henny; Post, Judith P; van de Ree, Marcel A; Vlasveld, L Th Tom; de Vreede, Mariëlle J; Huisman, Menno V

    2016-10-15

    Outpatient treatment of pulmonary embolism (PE) may lead to improved patient satisfaction and reduced healthcare costs. However, trials to assess its safety and the optimal method for patient selection are scarce. To validate the utility and safety of selecting patients with PE for outpatient treatment by the Hestia criteria and to compare the safety of the Hestia criteria alone with the Hestia criteria combined with N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) testing. We performed a randomized noninferiority trial in 17 Dutch hospitals. We randomized patients with PE without any of the Hestia criteria to direct discharge or additional NT-proBNP testing. We discharged the latter patients as well if NT-proBNP did not exceed 500 ng/L or admitted them if NT-proBNP was greater than 500 ng/L. The primary endpoint was 30-day adverse outcome defined as PE- or bleeding-related mortality, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or intensive care unit admission. The noninferiority margin for the primary endpoint was 3.4%. We randomized 550 patients. In the NT-proBNP group, 34 of 275 (12%) had elevated NT-proBNP values and were managed as inpatients. No patient (0 of 34) with an elevated NT-proBNP level treated in hospital (0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0-10.2%), versus no patient (0 of 23) with a post hoc-determined elevated NT-proBNP level from the direct discharge group (0%; 95% CI, 0-14.8%), experienced the primary endpoint. In both trial cohorts, the primary endpoint occurred in none of the 275 patients (0%; 95% CI, 0-1.3%) subjected to NT-proBNP testing, versus in 3 of 275 patients (1.1%; 95% CI, 0.2-3.2%) in the direct discharge group (P = 0.25). During the 3-month follow-up, recurrent venous thromboembolism occurred in two patients (0.73%; 95% CI, 0.1-2.6%) in the NT-proBNP group versus three patients (1.1%; 95% CI, 0.2-3.2%) in the direct discharge group (P = 0.65). Outpatient treatment of patients with PE selected on the basis of the Hestia criteria

  14. Preradiation dental decisions in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, H.H. (Hubert Herman)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a series of studies that investigated preradiation dental decision making in patients with head and neck cancer. In Chapter 1, it is ascertained that in view of the risk for oral sequelae resulting from high-dose radiotherapy, special attention to preradiation dental planning

  15. Video-based patient decision aids: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Karin; Grendarova, Petra; Rabi, Doreen

    2017-10-18

    This study reviews the published literature on the use of video-based decision aids (DA) for patients. The authors describe the areas of medicine in which video-based patient DA have been evaluated, the medical decisions targeted, their reported impact, in which countries studies are being conducted, and publication trends. The literature review was conducted systematically using Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsychInfo, and Pubmed databases from inception to 2016. References of identified studies were reviewed, and hand-searches of relevant journals were conducted. 488 studies were included and organized based on predefined study characteristics. The most common decisions addressed were cancer screening, risk reduction, advance care planning, and adherence to provider recommendations. Most studies had sample sizes of fewer than 300, and most were performed in the United States. Outcomes were generally reported as positive. This field of study was relatively unknown before 1990s but the number of studies published annually continues to increase. Videos are largely positive interventions but there are significant remaining knowledge gaps including generalizability across populations. Clinicians should consider incorporating video-based DA in their patient interactions. Future research should focus on less studied areas and the mechanisms underlying effective patient decision aids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Selecting a provider: what factors influence patients' decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jean; Sick, Brian; Anderson, Joseph; Berg, Andrea; Dehmer, Chad; Tufano, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Each year consumers make a variety of decisions relating to their healthcare. Some experts argue that stronger consumer engagement in decisions about where to obtain medical care is an important mechanism for improving efficiency in healthcare delivery and financing. Consumers' ability and motivation to become more active decision makers are affected by several factors, including financial incentives and access to information. This study investigates the set of factors that consumers consider when selecting a provider, including attributes of the provider and the care experience and the reputation of the provider. Additionally, the study evaluates consumers awareness and use of formal sources of provider selection information. Our results from analyzing data from a survey of 467 patients at four clinics in Minnesota suggest that the factors considered of greatest importance include reputation of the physician and reputation of the healthcare organization. Contractual and logistical factors also play a role, with respondents highlighting the importance of seeing a provider affiliated with their health plan and appointment availability. Few respondents indicated that advertisements or formal sources of quality information affected their decision making. The key implication for provider organizations is to carefully manage referral sources to ensure that they consistently meet the needs of referrers. Excellent service to existing patients and to the network of referring physicians yields patient and referrer satisfaction that is critical to attracting new patients. Finally, organizations more generally may want to explore the capabilities of new media and social networking sites for building reputation.

  17. Preferences for shared decision making in chronic pain patients compared with patients during a premedication visit.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spies, C.D.; Schulz, C.M.; Weiss-Gerlach, E.; Neuner, B.; Neumann, T.; Dossow, V. von; Schenk, M.; Wernecke, K.D.; Elwyn, G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that patients' outcomes improve if they are involved in shared decision making (SDM). A chronic pain clinic or premedication visit could be adequate settings for the implementation of SDM. So far, the patients' preference for involvement in decision making and

  18. Helping Patients to Make Informed Decisions : The PARE Guide to Disseminate EULAR Recommendations Among Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M.; Bakker, M.; van Bodegom-Vos, L.; Buch, M.; Caeyers, N.; Carluccio, A.; Geenen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/087017571; Greiff, R.; Glüsing, B.; Gossec, L.; Kent, A.; Poldema, I.; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Wiek, D.; Schipper, K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Accurate patient information is necessary to make informed health decisions. However, the traditional, scientific wording of professional recommendations is often difficult to understand for lay people. OBJECTIVES To develop a practical guide for patient organizations and health

  19. Decision-Making in Patients with Hyperthyroidism: A Neuropsychological Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Yuan

    Full Text Available Cognitive and behavioral impairments are common in patients with abnormal thyroid function; these impairments cause a reduction in their quality of life. The current study investigates the decision making performance in patients with hyperthyroidism to explore the possible mechanism of their cognitive and behavioral impairments.Thirty-eight patients with hyperthyroidism and forty healthy control subjects were recruited to perform the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT, which assessed decision making under ambiguous conditions.Patients with hyperthyroidism had a higher score on the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (Z-SAS, and exhibited poorer executive function and IGT performance than did healthy control subjects. The patients preferred to choose decks with a high immediate reward, despite a higher future punishment, and were not capable of effectively using feedback information from previous choices. No clinical characteristics were associated with the total net score of the IGT in the current study.Patients with hyperthyroidism had decision-making impairment under ambiguous conditions. The deficits may result from frontal cortex and limbic system metabolic disorders and dopamine dysfunction.

  20. Decision-Making in Patients with Hyperthyroidism: A Neuropsychological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lili; Tian, Yanghua; Zhang, Fangfang; Ma, Huijuan; Chen, Xingui; Dai, Fang; Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive and behavioral impairments are common in patients with abnormal thyroid function; these impairments cause a reduction in their quality of life. The current study investigates the decision making performance in patients with hyperthyroidism to explore the possible mechanism of their cognitive and behavioral impairments. Thirty-eight patients with hyperthyroidism and forty healthy control subjects were recruited to perform the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), which assessed decision making under ambiguous conditions. Patients with hyperthyroidism had a higher score on the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (Z-SAS), and exhibited poorer executive function and IGT performance than did healthy control subjects. The patients preferred to choose decks with a high immediate reward, despite a higher future punishment, and were not capable of effectively using feedback information from previous choices. No clinical characteristics were associated with the total net score of the IGT in the current study. Patients with hyperthyroidism had decision-making impairment under ambiguous conditions. The deficits may result from frontal cortex and limbic system metabolic disorders and dopamine dysfunction.

  1. Factors influencing triage decisions in patients referred for ICU admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Jose; Butala, Ashvin; Ahmad, Noeen; Llosa, Alfonso; Prajapati, Ramesh; Fishkin, Edward

    2013-10-01

    Few data is available on triage of critically ill patients. Because the demand for ICU beds often exceeds their availability, frequently intensivists need to triage these patients in order to equally and efficiently distribute the available resources based on the concept of potential benefit and reasonable chance of recovery. The objective of this study is to evaluate factors influencing triage decisions among patients referred for ICU admission and to assess its impact in outcome. A single-center, prospective, observational study of 165 consecutive triage evaluations was conducted in patients referred for ICU admission that were either accepted, or refused and treated on the medical or surgical wards as well as the step-down and telemetry units. Seventy-one patients (43.0%) were accepted for ICU admission. Mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE)-II score was 15.3 (0 - 36) and 13.9 (0 - 30) for accepted and refused patients, respectively. Three patients (4.2%) had active advance directives on admission to ICU. Age, gender, and number of ICU beds available at the time of evaluation were not associated with triage decisions. Thirteen patients (18.3%) died in ICU, while the in-hospital mortality for refused patients was 12.8%. Refusal of admission to ICU is common, although patients in which ICU admission is granted have higher mortality. Presence of active advance directives seems to play an important role in the triage decision process. Further efforts are needed to define which patients are most likely to benefit from ICU admission. Triage protocols or guidelines to promote efficient critical care beds use are warranted.

  2. Coaching patients in the use of decision and communication aids: RE-AIM evaluation of a patient support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkora, Jeff; Volz, Shelley; Loth, Meredith; Teng, Alexandra; Zarin-Pass, Margot; Moore, Dan; Esserman, Laura

    2015-05-28

    Decision aids educate patients about treatment options and outcomes. Communication aids include question lists, consultation summaries, and audio-recordings. In efficacy studies, decision aids increased patient knowledge, while communication aids increased patient question-asking and information recall. Starting in 2004, we trained successive cohorts of post-baccalaureate, pre-medical interns to coach patients in the use of decision and communication aids at our university-based breast cancer clinic. From July 2005 through June 2012, we used the RE-AIM framework to measure Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance of our interventions. 1. Reach: Over the study period, our program sent a total of 5,153 decision aids and directly administered 2,004 communication aids. In the most recent program year (2012), out of 1,524 eligible patient appointments, we successfully contacted 1,212 (80%); coached 1,110 (73%) in the self-administered use of decision and communication aids; sent 958 (63%) decision aids; and directly administered communication aids for 419 (27%) patients. In a 2010 survey, coached patients reported self-administering one or more communication aids in 81% of visits 2. Effectiveness: In our pre-post comparisons, decision aids were associated with increased patient knowledge and decreased decisional conflict. Communication aids were associated with increased self-efficacy and number of questions; and with high ratings of patient preparedness and satisfaction 3. Adoption: Among visitors sent decision aids, 82% of survey respondents reviewed some or all; among those administered communication aids, 86% reviewed one or more after the visit 4. Through continuous quality adaptations, we increased the proportion of available staff time used for patient support (i.e. exploitation of workforce capacity) from 29% in 2005 to 84% in 2012 5. Maintenance: The main barrier to sustainability was the cost of paid intern labor. We addressed this by

  3. 'That's the doctor's job': Overcoming patient reluctance to be involved in medical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal-Barby, J S

    2017-01-01

    To review the barriers to patient engagement and techniques to increase patients' engagement in their medical decision-making and care. Barriers exist to patient involvement in their decision-making and care. Individual barriers include education, language, and culture/attitudes (e.g., deference to physicians). Contextual barriers include time (lack of) and timing (e.g., lag between test results being available and patient encounter). Clinicians should gauge patients' interest in being involved and their level of current knowledge about their condition and options. Framing information in multiple ways and modalities can enhance understanding, which can empower patients to become more engaged. Tools such as decision aids or audio recording of conversations can help patients remember important information, a requirement for meaningful engagement. Clinicians and researchers should work to create social norms and prompts around patients asking questions and expressing their values. Telehealth and electronic platforms are promising modalities for allowing patients to ask questions on in a non-intimidating atmosphere. Researchers and clinicians should be motivated to find ways to engage patients on the ethical imperative that many patients prefer to be more engaged in some way, shape, or form; patients have better experiences when they are engaged, and engagement improves health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring the requirements for a decision aid on familial breast cancer in the UK context: a qualitative study with patients referred to a cancer genetics service.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iredale, R.; Rapport, F.; Sivell, S.; Jones, W.; Edwards, A.; Gray, J.; Elwyn, G.

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: Patients concerned about a family history of breast cancer can face difficult decisions about screening, prophylactic surgery and genetic testing. Decision aids can facilitate patient decision making and currently include leaflets and computerized tools. These are largely aimed at the

  5. Why do patients want to have their blood tested? : A qualitative study of patient expectations in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhoven, M.A. van; Pleunis-van Empel, M.C.; Koch, H.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Dinant, G.J.; Weijden, T. van der

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners often take their impression of patients' expectations into account in their decision to have blood tests done. It is commonly recommended to involve patients in decision-making during consultations. The study aimed to obtain detailed information on patients'

  6. Evidence-based patient choice: a prostate cancer decision aid in plain language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohene-Frempong Janet

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision aids (DA to assist patients in evaluating treatment options and sharing in decision making have proliferated in recent years. Most require high literacy and do not use plain language principles. We describe one of the first attempts to design a decision aid using principles from reading research and document design. The plain language DA prototype addressed treatment decisions for localized prostate cancer. Evaluation assessed impact on knowledge, decisions, and discussions with doctors in men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer. Methods Document development steps included preparing an evidence-based DA in standard medical parlance, iteratively translating it to emphasize shared decision making and plain language in three formats (booklet, Internet, and audio-tape. Scientific review of medical content was integrated with expert health literacy review of document structure and design. Formative evaluation methods included focus groups (n = 4 and survey of a new sample of men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer (n = 60, compared with historical controls (n = 184. Results A transparent description of the development process and design elements is reported. Formative evaluation among newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients found the DA to be clear and useful in reaching a decision. Newly diagnosed patients reported more discussions with doctors about treatment options, and showed increases in knowledge of side effects of radiation therapy. Conclusion The plain language DA presenting medical evidence in text and numerical formats appears acceptable and useful in decision-making about localized prostate cancer treatment. Further testing should evaluate the impact of all three media on decisions made and quality of life in the survivorship period, especially among very low literacy men.

  7. [Preferences, satisfaction level of patient participation in making decisions in health centre nursing clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Moral, Roger; Alba Dios, Antonia; Dios Guerra, Caridad; Jiménez García, Celia; González Neubauer, Valeria; Pérula de Torres, Luis Ángel; Barrios Blasco, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    To assess patient preferences their satisfaction level and their participation in decision making with nurses. Cross-sectional and mixed quantitative-qualitative study carried out in people attending the nursing services of 9 Health Centres in Andalusia. Patients were interviewed immediately after receiving nursing treatment using two different questionnaires for assessing their opinions, satisfaction and perception of involvement in the decisional process. A descriptive analysis using the χ(2) test (Popen-ended questions. Qualitative analysis: Open-ended questions were grouped into categories by a process involving three researchers independently. A total of 235 patients took part, of whom 59% (138) preferred a collaborative role with the nurse when making decisions. In the closed questions, 96.2% (228) of the surveyed patients declared to be satisfied or very satisfied with the decision making process; nevertheless 17.4% (41) made specific suggestions for improving this process. For them the main improvement areas were related to: general communication skills or a more specific one such as: strategies for helping them make decisions, reaching common ground or giving advice. Nurses should be aware that most patients wish to be involved in decision making and in clinical practice this participation can be improved by obtaining specific communicational skills. Surveys that include open-ended questions are more useful to assess the quality of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Distributed training, testing, and decision aids within one solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strini, Robert A.; Strini, Keith

    2002-07-01

    Military air operations in the European theater require U.S. and NATO participants to send various mission experts to 10 Combined Air Operations Centers (CAOCs). Little or no training occurs prior to their arrival for tours of duty ranging between 90 days to 3 years. When training does occur, there is little assessment of its effectiveness in raising CAOC mission readiness. A comprehensive training management system has been developed that utilizes traditional and web based distance-learning methods for providing instruction and task practice as well as distributed simulation to provide mission rehearsal training opportunities on demand for the C2 warrior. This system incorporates new technologies, such as voice interaction and virtual tutors, and a Learning Management System (LMS) that tracks trainee progress from academic learning through procedural practice and mission training exercises. Supervisors can monitor their subordinate's progress through synchronous or asynchronous methods. Embedded within this system are virtual tutors, which provide automated performance measurement as well as tutoring. The training system offers a true time management savings for current instructors and training providers that today must perform On the Job Training (OJT) duties before, during and after each event. Many units do not have the resources to support OJT and are forced to maintain an overlap of several days to minimally maintain unit readiness. One CAOC Commander affected by this paradigm has advocated supporting a beta version of this system to test its ability to offer training on-demand and track the progress of its personnel and unit readiness. If successful, aircrew simulation devices can be connected through either Distributed Interactive Simulation or High Level Architecture methods to provide a DMT-C2 air operations training environment in Europe. This paper presents an approach to establishing a training, testing and decision aid capability and means to assess

  9. Can people find patient decision aids on the Internet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Debra; Drake, Elizabeth; Saarimaki, Anton; Bennett, Carol; O'Connor, Annette

    2008-12-01

    To determine if people could find patient decision aids (PtDAs) on the Internet using the most popular general search engines. We chose five medical conditions for which English language PtDAs were available from at least three different developers. The search engines used were: Google (www.google.com), Yahoo! (www.yahoo.com), and MSN (www.msn.com). For each condition and search engine we ran six searches using a combination of search terms. We coded all non-sponsored Web pages that were linked from the first page of the search results. Most first page results linked to informational Web pages about the condition, only 16% linked to PtDAs. PtDAs were more readily found for the breast cancer surgery decision (our searches found seven of the nine developers). The searches using Yahoo and Google search engines were more likely to find PtDAs. The following combination of search terms: condition, treatment, decision (e.g. breast cancer surgery decision) was most successful across all search engines (29%). While some terms and search engines were more successful, few resulted in direct links to PtDAs. Finding PtDAs would be improved with use of standardized labelling, providing patients with specific Web site addresses or access to an independent PtDA clearinghouse.

  10. Personalization and Patient Involvement in Decision Support Systems: Current Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, L.; Lanzola, G.; Viani, N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives This survey aims at highlighting the latest trends (2012-2014) on the development, use, and evaluation of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) based decision support systems (DSSs) in medicine, with a particular focus on patient-centered and personalized care. Methods We considered papers published on scientific journals, by querying PubMed and Web of Science™. Included studies focused on the implementation or evaluation of ICT-based tools used in clinical practice. A separate search was performed on computerized physician order entry systems (CPOEs), since they are increasingly embedding patient-tailored decision support. Results We found 73 papers on DSSs (53 on specific ICT tools) and 72 papers on CPOEs. Although decision support through the delivery of recommendations is frequent (28/53 papers), our review highlighted also DSSs only based on efficient information presentation (25/53). Patient participation in making decisions is still limited (9/53), and mostly focused on risk communication. The most represented medical area is cancer (12%). Policy makers are beginning to be included among stakeholders (6/73), but integration with hospital information systems is still low. Concerning knowledge representation/management issues, we identified a trend towards building inference engines on top of standard data models. Most of the tools (57%) underwent a formal assessment study, even if half of them aimed at evaluating usability and not effectiveness. Conclusions Overall, we have noticed interesting evolutions of medical DSSs to improve communication with the patient, consider the economic and organizational impact, and use standard models for knowledge representation. However, systems focusing on patient-centered care still do not seem to be available at large. PMID:26293857

  11. Personalization and Patient Involvement in Decision Support Systems: Current Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglini, S; Sacchi, L; Lanzola, G; Viani, N

    2015-08-13

    This survey aims at highlighting the latest trends (2012-2014) on the development, use, and evaluation of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) based decision support systems (DSSs) in medicine, with a particular focus on patient-centered and personalized care. We considered papers published on scientific journals, by querying PubMed and Web of ScienceTM. Included studies focused on the implementation or evaluation of ICT-based tools used in clinical practice. A separate search was performed on computerized physician order entry systems (CPOEs), since they are increasingly embedding patient-tailored decision support. We found 73 papers on DSSs (53 on specific ICT tools) and 72 papers on CPOEs. Although decision support through the delivery of recommendations is frequent (28/53 papers), our review highlighted also DSSs only based on efficient information presentation (25/53). Patient participation in making decisions is still limited (9/53), and mostly focused on risk communication. The most represented medical area is cancer (12%). Policy makers are beginning to be included among stakeholders (6/73), but integration with hospital information systems is still low. Concerning knowledge representation/management issues, we identified a trend towards building inference engines on top of standard data models. Most of the tools (57%) underwent a formal assessment study, even if half of them aimed at evaluating usability and not effectiveness. Overall, we have noticed interesting evolutions of medical DSSs to improve communication with the patient, consider the economic and organizational impact, and use standard models for knowledge representation. However, systems focusing on patient-centered care still do not seem to be available at large.

  12. The development and evaluation of a computerised decision support system for primary care based upon 'patient profile decision analysis'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Short

    2003-12-01

    Conclusions The feasibility of individualised decision analysis for general practice has been questioned. Patient profile decision analysis, however, may be a valuable means of harnessing some of the advantages of the methodology to produce more patient-specific guidelines for primary care.

  13. Qualitative analysis of patient-centered decision attributes associated with initiating hepatitis C treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Zuchowski, Jessica L.; Hamilton, Alison B.; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Clark, Jack A.; Naik, Aanand D.; Smith, Donna L.; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2015-01-01

    Background In this era of a constantly changing landscape of antiviral treatment options for chronic viral hepatitis C (CHC), shared clinical decision-making addresses the need to engage patients in complex treatment decisions. However, little is known about the decision attributes that CHC patients consider when making treatment decisions. We identify key patient-centered decision attributes, and explore relationships among these attributes, to help inform the development of a future CHC sha...

  14. Cultural targeting and tailoring of shared decision making technology: a theoretical framework for improving the effectiveness of patient decision aids in culturally diverse groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, Dana L; Friend, John; Schapira, Marilyn; Stiggelbout, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Patient decision aids are known to positively impact outcomes critical to shared decision making (SDM), such as gist knowledge and decision preparedness. However, research on the potential improvement of these and other important outcomes through cultural targeting and tailoring of decision aids is very limited. This is the case despite extensive evidence supporting use of cultural targeting and tailoring to improve the effectiveness of health communications. Building on prominent psychological theory, we propose a two-stage framework incorporating cultural concepts into the design process for screening and treatment decision aids. The first phase recommends use of cultural constructs, such as collectivism and individualism, to differentially target patients whose cultures are known to vary on these dimensions. Decision aid targeting is operationalized through use of symbols and values that appeal to members of the given culture. Content dimensions within decision aids that appear particularly appropriate for targeting include surface level visual characteristics, language, beliefs, attitudes and values. The second phase of the framework is based on evidence that individuals vary in terms of how strongly cultural norms influence their approach to problem solving and decision making. In particular, the framework hypothesizes that differences in terms of access to cultural mindsets (e.g., access to interdependent versus independent self) can be measured up front and used to tailor decision aids. Thus, the second phase in the framework emphasizes the importance of not only targeting decision aid content, but also tailoring the information to the individual based on measurement of how strongly he/she is connected to dominant cultural mindsets. Overall, the framework provides a theory-based guide for researchers and practitioners who are interested in using cultural targeting and tailoring to develop and test decision aids that move beyond a "one-size fits all" approach

  15. Negative Attitudes toward Older Workers and Hiring Decisions: Testing the Moderating Role of Decision Makers' Core Self-Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasbender, Ulrike; Wang, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Organizational hiring practices have been charged for unfair treatment on the grounds of age. Drawing on theories of planned behavior and core self-evaluations, this research investigated the impact of negative attitudes toward older workers on hiring decisions and examined the moderating role of decision-makers' core self-evaluations. We tested our hypotheses based on a structured online questionnaire and a vignette study using a sample of 102 participants working in human resource management across different industries. As predicted, negative attitudes toward older workers were positively related to avoidance of hiring older people, which in turn was negatively related to the likelihood to select the oldest candidate. Because hiring decisions are not only about the hiring subject but also about the decision-maker, we tested the moderating role of decision-makers' core self-evaluations. Results showed that core self-evaluations buffered the relationship between negative attitudes toward older workers and avoidance of hiring older people. Theoretical implications of the findings with regard to hiring decisions about older people and practical recommendations to improve diversity management strategies and age-balanced hiring practices in organizations are discussed.

  16. A 'combined framework' approach to developing a patient decision aid: the PANDAs model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chirk Jenn; Mathers, Nigel; Bradley, Alastair; Colwell, Brigitte

    2014-10-24

    There is a lack of practical research frameworks to guide the development of patient decision aids [PtDAs]. This paper described how a PtDA was developed using the International Patient Decision Aids (IPDAS) guideline and UK Medical Research Council (UKMRC) frameworks to support patients when making treatment decisions in type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study used mixed methods to develop a PtDA for use in a UK general practice setting. A 10-member expert panel was convened to guide development and patients and clinicians were also interviewed individually using semi-structured interview guides to identify their decisional needs. Current literature was reviewed systematically to determine the best available evidence. The Ottawa Decision Support Framework was used to guide the presentation of the information and value clarification exercise. An iterative draft-review-revise process by the research team and review panel was conducted until the PtDA reached content and format 'saturation'. The PtDA was then pilot-tested by users in actual consultations to assess its acceptability and feasibility. The IPDAS and UKMRC frameworks were used throughout to inform the development process. The PANDAs PtDA was developed systematically and iteratively. Patients and clinicians highlighted the needs for information, decisional, emotional and social support, which were incorporated into the PtDA. The literature review identified gaps in high quality evidence and variations in patient outcome reporting. The PtDA comprised five components: background of the treatment options; pros and cons of each treatment option; value clarification exercise; support needs; and readiness to decide. This study has demonstrated the feasibility of combining the IPDAS and the UKMRC frameworks for the development and evaluation of a PtDA. Future studies should test this model for developing PtDAs across different decisions and healthcare contexts.

  17. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  18. The decision-making threshold and the factors that affect it: A qualitative study of patients' decision-making in knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, T; Scott, P; Thomson, L; Griffin, D; Realpe, A

    2017-05-04

    Osteoarthritis is a significant cause of burden to the ageing population and knee replacement is a common operation for treatment of end-stage disease. We aimed to explore these factors to help understand patients' decision-making, which is critical in informing patient-centred care. These can be used to enhance decision-making and dialogue between clinicians and patients, allowing a more informed choice. The study consisted of two focus groups, in a patient cohort after total knee replacement followed by more in-depth interviews to further test and explore themes from the focus groups, in patients in either the deliberation stage or the decision-making stage. Using qualitative research methods (iterative thematic analysis) reviewing decision-making and deliberation phases of making informed choices we found nine key themes that emerged from the study groups. An awareness of the deliberation phase, the factors that influence it, the stress associated with it, preferred models of care, and the influence of the decision-making threshold will aid useful communication between doctors and patients. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Executive functions and risky decision-making in patients with opiate dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Matthias; Roth-Bauer, Martina; Driessen, Martin; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2008-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that individuals with opiate dependence may have cognitive dysfunctions particularly within the spectrum of executive functioning and emotional processing. Such dysfunctions can also compromise daily decisions associated with risk-taking behaviors. However, it remains unclear whether patients addicted to opiates show impaired decision-making on gambling tasks that specify explicit rules for rewards and punishments and provide information about probabilities associated with different long-term outcomes. In this study, we examined 18 individuals with opiate dependence and 18 healthy comparison subjects, matched for age, gender, and education with the Game of Dice Task (GDT). The GDT is a gambling task with explicit rules for gains and losses and fix winning probabilities. In addition, all subjects completed a neuropsychological test battery that primarily focused on executive functions and a personality questionnaire. On the GDT, patients chose the risky alternatives more frequently than the control group. Patients' GDT performance was related to executive functioning but not to other neuropsychological constructs, personality or dependence specific variables with one exception that is the number of days of abstinence. Thus, patients with opiate dependence demonstrate abnormalities in decision-making that might be neuropsychologically associated with dysfunctional behavior in patients' daily lives. Decision-making and other neuropsychological functioning should be considered in the treatment of opiate dependence.

  20. Testing interventions to influence women's dietary decisions in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    It will host a workshop with researchers, local nutrition specialists and social anthropologists, government stakeholders, and potential implementers to discuss evidence on the psychology of dietary behaviour and practical solutions to improve nutrition decisions. It will develop a set of data collection instruments designed to ...

  1. Assessing Patient Participation in Health Policy Decision-Making in Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Souliotis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the importance of patient participation in the design and evaluation of health programs and services is well-documented, there is scarcity of research with regard to patient association (PA participation in health policy decision-making processes. To this end, the present study aimed to validate further a previously developed instrument as well as to investigate the degree of PA participation in health policy decision-making in Cyprus. A convenient sample of 114 patients-members of patients associations took part in the study. Participants were recruited from an umbrella organization, the Pancyprian Federation of Patient Associations and Friends (PFPA. PA participation in health policy decision-making was assessed with the Health Democracy Index (HDI, an original 8-item tool. To explore its psychometric properties, Cronbach α was computed as regards to its internal consistency, while its convergent validity was tested against a self-rated question enquiring about the degree of PA participation in health policy decision-making. The findings revealed that the HDI has good internal consistency and convergent validity. Furthermore, PAs were found to participate more in consultations in health-related organizations and the Ministry of Health (MoH as well as in reforms or crucial decisions in health policy. Lower levels were documented with regard to participation in hospital boards, ethics committees in clinical trials and health technology assessment (HTA procedures. Overall, PA participation levels were found to be lower than the mid-point of the scale. Targeted interventions aiming to facilitate patients’ involvement in health policy decision-making processes and to increase its impact are greatly needed in Cyprus.

  2. Usability Testing of a Complex Clinical Decision Support Tool in the Emergency Department: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Anne; McCullagh, Lauren; Khan, Sundas; Schachter, Andy; Pardo, Salvatore; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-09-10

    As the electronic health record (EHR) becomes the preferred documentation tool across medical practices, health care organizations are pushing for clinical decision support systems (CDSS) to help bring clinical decision support (CDS) tools to the forefront of patient-physician interactions. A CDSS is integrated into the EHR and allows physicians to easily utilize CDS tools. However, often CDSS are integrated into the EHR without an initial phase of usability testing, resulting in poor adoption rates. Usability testing is important because it evaluates a CDSS by testing it on actual users. This paper outlines the usability phase of a study, which will test the impact of integration of the Wells CDSS for pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosis into a large urban emergency department, where workflow is often chaotic and high stakes decisions are frequently made. We hypothesize that conducting usability testing prior to integration of the Wells score into an emergency room EHR will result in increased adoption rates by physicians. The objective of the study was to conduct usability testing for the integration of the Wells clinical prediction rule into a tertiary care center's emergency department EHR. We conducted usability testing of a CDS tool in the emergency department EHR. The CDS tool consisted of the Wells rule for PE in the form of a calculator and was triggered off computed tomography (CT) orders or patients' chief complaint. The study was conducted at a tertiary hospital in Queens, New York. There were seven residents that were recruited and participated in two phases of usability testing. The usability testing employed a "think aloud" method and "near-live" clinical simulation, where care providers interacted with standardized patients enacting a clinical scenario. Both phases were audiotaped, video-taped, and had screen-capture software activated for onscreen recordings. Phase I: Data from the "think-aloud" phase of the study showed an overall positive outlook on

  3. Decision-making in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: Delay gratification ability is not impaired in patients with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzezak, Patricia; Lima, Ellen Marise; Pereira, Fabricio; Gargaro, Ana Carolina; Coimbra, Erica; de Vincentiis, Silvia; Velasco, Tonicarlo Rodrigues; Leite, João Pereira; Busatto, Geraldo F; Valente, Kette D

    2016-07-01

    Decision-making abilities have rarely been examined in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy related to hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS). We aimed to investigate the ability to delay gratification, a decision-making subdomain, in patients with intractable TLE-HS and to verify the association of delay gratification performance and cool executive function tests. We evaluated 27 patients with TLE-HS (mean age: 35.46 [±13.31] years; 7 males) and their cognitive performance was compared with that of 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age: 35.33 [±12.05] years; 7 males), without epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Patients were assessed using the delay discounting task (DDT) and tests of attention, shifting, inhibitory control, and concept formation. Results were correlated with clinical epilepsy variables such as age of onset, epilepsy duration, AED use, history of status epilepticus, febrile seizures, and the presence of generalized seizures. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANCOVA with years of education as a confounding factor. Patients and controls demonstrated similar performance on DDT, showing similar discount rate (p=0.935) and probability rate (p=0.585). Delay gratification was not related to cool executive function tests (Digit Span, Stroop Color Test, Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Connors' CPT). History of status epilepticus, presence of generalized seizures and higher seizure frequency, age at onset, and epilepsy duration had a significant impact on DDT. Patients with intractable TLE-HS showed unimpaired delay gratification abilities, being able to accept a higher delay and a lower amount of chance for receiving a higher reward in the future. Clinical variables related to the epilepsy severity impacted the performance on delay gratification. Impairment on cool aspects of executive function was unrelated to this decision-making domain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Medical Decision-Making Incapacity among Newly Diagnosed Older Patients with Hematological Malignancy Receiving First Line Chemotherapy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Patients and Physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sugano

    Full Text Available Decision-making capacity to provide informed consent regarding treatment is essential among cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency of decision-making incapacity among newly diagnosed older patients with hematological malignancy receiving first-line chemotherapy, to examine factors associated with incapacity and assess physicians' perceptions of patients' decision-making incapacity.Consecutive patients aged 65 years or over with a primary diagnosis of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma were recruited. Decision-making capacity was assessed using the Structured Interview for Competency and Incompetency Assessment Testing and Ranking Inventory-Revised (SICIATRI-R. Cognitive impairment, depressive condition and other possible associated factors were also evaluated.Among 139 eligible patients registered for this study, 114 completed the survey. Of these, 28 (25%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 17%-32% were judged as having some extent of decision-making incompetency according to SICIATRI-R. Higher levels of cognitive impairment and increasing age were significantly associated with decision-making incapacity. Physicians experienced difficulty performing competency assessment (Cohen's kappa -0.54.Decision-making incapacity was found to be a common and under-recognized problem in older patients with cancer. Age and assessment of cognitive impairment may provide the opportunity to find patients that are at a high risk of showing decision-making incapacity.

  5. Decision-tree model of treatment-seeking behaviors after detecting symptoms by Korean stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyo-Sook; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2006-06-01

    This study was performed to develop and test a decision-tree model of treatment-seeking behaviors about when Korean patients visit a doctor after experiencing stroke symptoms. The study used methodological triangulation. The model was developed based on qualitative data collected from in-depth interviews with 18 stroke patients. The model was tested using quantitative data collected from interviews and a structured questionnaire involving 150 stroke patients. The predictability of the decision-tree model was quantified as the proportion of participants who followed the pathway predicted by the model. Decision outcomes of the model were categorized into immediate and delayed treatment-seeking behavior. The model was influenced by lowered consciousness, social-group influences, perceived seriousness of symptoms, past history of hypertension or stroke, and barriers to hospital visits. The predictability of the model was found to be 90.7%. The results from this study can help healthcare personnel understand the education needs of stroke patients regarding treatment-seeking behaviors, and hence aid in the development of educational strategies for stroke patients.

  6. Decision making about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic test strategies. Paper 4: International guidelines show variability in their approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Reem A; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Arevalo-Rodriguez, Ingrid; Cheung, Adrienne; Prediger, Barbara; Ivanova, Liudmila; Ventresca, Matthew; Brozek, Jan; Santesso, Nancy; Bossuyt, Patrick; Garg, Amit X; Lloyd, Nancy; Lelgemann, Monika; Bühler, Diedrich; Schünemann, Holger J

    2017-12-01

    The objective of the study was to describe and compare current practices in developing guidelines about the use of healthcare-related tests and diagnostic strategies (HCTDS). We sampled 37 public health and clinical practice guidelines about HCTDS from various sources without language restrictions. Detailed descriptions of the systems used to assess the quality of evidence and develop recommendations were challenging to find within guidelines. We observed much variability among and within organizations with respect to how they develop recommendations about HCTDS. Twenty-four percent of the guidelines did not consider health benefits and harms but based decisions solely on test accuracy. We did not identify guidelines that described the main potential care pathways involving tests for a healthcare problem. In addition, we did not identify guidelines that systematically assessed, described, and referenced the evidence that linked test accuracy and patient-important outcomes. There is considerable variability among the processes used and factors considered in developing recommendations about the use of tests. This variability may be the cause for the disagreement we observed in recommendations about testing for the same condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Decision-Making Impairments in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Brand

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A high percentage of Parkinson’s disease (PD patients show cognitive impairments in addition to the cardinal motor symptoms. These deficits primarily concern executive functions most probably linked to dysfunctions in prefrontal regions due to decreased dopaminergic transmission in fronto-striatal loops. To investigate possible associations between decision-making and executive functions in PD, we examined 20 non-demented PD patients and 20 healthy control subjects with a neuropsychological test battery and the Game of Dice Task. In this computerised decision-making task, the rules for gains and losses and the winning probabilities are obvious and stable. Thus, strategic components besides feedback processing might influence decision-making in this task. We found that PD patients were impaired in the Game of Dice task performance and that the frequency of disadvantageous choices correlated with both executive functions and feedback processing. We suggest that decision-making deficits of PD patients in explicit gambling situations might be associated with dysfunctions in two different fronto-striatal loops: the limbic-orbitofrontal-striatal loop, involved in feedback processing, and the dorsolateral prefrontal-striatal loop, involved in executive functions.

  8. Treatment decisions for elderly patients with haematological malignancies: a dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrade, Frédéric; Gastaud, Lauris; Ré, Daniel; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Thyss, Antoine

    2012-08-01

    Over the past decade, haematological malignant diseases have been diagnosed with increasing frequency in patients older than 65 years. The management of these diseases is particularly difficult in elderly patients, as non-tumour-related life expectancy is highly variable and the benefit-to-risk ratio for oncological treatments depends on comorbidities and pharmacological factors. Very few data are available in very old or frail patients, and management decisions are usually based on data obtained in younger patients. Patients might, therefore, be overtreated or undertreated without clear clinical or biological justification. In this Review we discuss the management of haematological malignant diseases in the elderly, with respect to biology or pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic features. We focus on acute myeloid leukaemia and aggressive lymphoma. Additionally, we discuss how the implementation of geriatric tools, such as comprehensive geriatric assessment scores, in the clinical management of elderly patients might help to adapt treatment to meet individual patients' needs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Refractive Eye Surgery: Helping Patients Make Informed Decisions About LASIK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John M; Cozine, Elizabeth W; Kahn, Amir R

    2017-05-15

    A variety of refractive surgery techniques, which reshape the corneal stroma using laser energy, have been marketed as simple and safe alternatives to glasses or contact lenses. Laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is the most common of these procedures. Although there are few high-quality prospective studies of long-term outcomes, complications, or stability for refractive surgery procedures, there is at least general agreement that more than 90% of appropriately selected patients achieve excellent uncorrected distance vision. In addition to well-recognized contraindications (e.g., unstable refraction, pregnancy and lactation, chronic eye disease, systemic illness, corneal abnormalities), there are other conditions that warrant caution (e.g., excessively dry eyes, contact lens intolerance, chronic pain syndromes). Postoperative dry eye, which may in part represent a corneal neuropathy, usually resolves after six to 12 months but persists in up to 20% of patients. Up to 20% of patients may have new visual disturbances, particularly with night driving. Vision-threatening complications are rare. Intraocular lenses, implanted following cataract extraction, may be an alternative to LASIK in older patients. Although the overall dependence on corrective lenses is markedly reduced, many patients still require glasses or contact lenses after LASIK, particularly in low-light conditions and as they age. Most patients report satisfaction with the results. Family physicians can help patients make informed decisions by exploring their values, preferences, expectations, and tolerance of uncertainty and risk.

  10. Identifying patients for early discharge: performance of decision rules among patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Simon A; Miller, Chadwick D; Hollander, Judd E; Nagurney, John T; Birkhahn, Robert; Singer, Adam J; Shapiro, Nathan I; Glynn, Ted; Nowak, Richard; Safdar, Basmah; Peberdy, Mary; Counselman, Francis L; Chandra, Abhinav; Kosowsky, Joshua; Neuenschwander, James; Schrock, Jon W; Plantholt, Stephen; Diercks, Deborah B; Peacock, W Frank

    2013-09-30

    The HEART score and North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR) are decision rules designed to identify acute chest pain patients for early discharge without stress testing or cardiac imaging. This study compares the clinical utility of these decision rules combined with serial troponin determinations. A secondary analysis was conducted of 1005 participants in the Myeloperoxidase In the Diagnosis of Acute coronary syndromes Study (MIDAS). MIDAS is a prospective observational cohort of Emergency Department (ED) patients enrolled from 18 US sites with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The ability to identify participants for early discharge and the sensitivity for ACS at 30 days were compared among an unstructured assessment, NACPR, and HEART score, each combined with troponin measures at 0 and 3h. ACS, defined as cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, or unstable angina, occurred in 22% of the cohort. The unstructured assessment identified 13.5% (95% CI 11.5-16%) of participants for early discharge with 98% (95% CI 95-99%) sensitivity for ACS. The NACPR identified 4.4% (95% CI 3-6%) for early discharge with 100% (95% CI 98-100%) sensitivity for ACS. The HEART score identified 20% (95% CI 18-23%) for early discharge with 99% (95% CI 97-100%) sensitivity for ACS. The HEART score had a net reclassification improvement of 10% (95% CI 8-12%) versus unstructured assessment and 19% (95% CI 17-21%) versus NACPR. The HEART score with 0 and 3 hour serial troponin measures identifies a substantial number of patients for early discharge while maintaining high sensitivity for ACS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Decision-Making about Healthcare Related Tests and Diagnostic Strategies: User Testing of GRADE Evidence Tables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem A Mustafa

    Full Text Available To develop guidance on what information to include and how to present it in tables summarizing the evidence from systematic reviews of test accuracy following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE approach.To design and refine the evidence tables, we used an iterative process based on the analysis of data from four rounds of discussions, feedback and user testing. During the final round, we conducted one-on-one user testing with target end users. We presented a number of alternative formats of evidence tables to participants and obtained information about users' understanding and preferences.More than 150 users participated in initial discussions and provided their formal and informal feedback. 20 users completed one-on-one user testing interviews. Almost all participants preferred summarizing the results of systematic reviews of test accuracy in tabular format rather than plain text. Users generally preferred less complex tables but found presenting sensitivity and specificity estimates only as too simplistic. Users found the presentation of test accuracy for several values of prevalence initially confusing but modifying table layout and adding sample clinical scenarios for each prevalence reduced this confusion. Providing information about clinical consequences of testing result was viewed as not feasible for authors of systematic reviews.We present the current formats for tables presenting test accuracy following the GRADE approach. These tables can be developed using GRADEpro guidelines development tool (www.guidelinedevelopment.org or www.gradepro.org and are being further developed into electronic interactive tables that will suit the needs of different end users. The formatting of these tables, and how they influence result interpretation and decision-making will be further evaluated in a randomized trial.

  12. Amplifying Each Patient's Voice: A Systematic Review of Multi-criteria Decision Analyses Involving Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kevin; Caro, J Jaime; Hamed, Alaa; Zaiser, Erica

    2017-04-01

    Qualitative methods tend to be used to incorporate patient preferences into healthcare decision making. However, for patient preferences to be given adequate consideration by decision makers they need to be quantified. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is one way to quantify and capture the patient voice. The objective of this review was to report on existing MCDAs involving patients to support the future use of MCDA to capture the patient voice. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched in June 2014 for English-language papers with no date restriction. The following search terms were used: 'multi-criteria decision*', 'multiple criteria decision*', 'MCDA', 'benefit risk assessment*', 'risk benefit assessment*', 'multicriteri* decision*', 'MCDM', 'multi-criteri* decision*'. Abstracts were included if they reported the application of MCDA to assess healthcare interventions where patients were the source of weights. Abstracts were excluded if they did not apply MCDA, such as discussions of how MCDA could be used; or did not evaluate healthcare interventions, such as MCDAs to assess the level of health need in a locality. Data were extracted on weighting method, variation in patient and expert preferences, and discussion on different weighting techniques. The review identified ten English-language studies that reported an MCDA to assess healthcare interventions and involved patients as a source of weights. These studies reported 12 applications of MCDA. Different methods of preference elicitation were employed: direct weighting in workshops; discrete choice experiment surveys; and the analytical hierarchy process using both workshops and surveys. There was significant heterogeneity in patient responses and differences between patients, who put greater weight on disease characteristics and treatment convenience, and experts, who put more weight on efficacy. The studies highlighted cognitive challenges associated with some weighting methods, though patients' views on their

  13. Performance of soccer players on tests of field dependence/independence and soccer-specific decision-making tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorris, T

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of the performance of male amateur soccer players on tests of field dependence/independence and soccer-specific decision-making tests. The relationships between the participants' (N = 14) accuracy, and speed of decision, on simple and complex soccer decision-making tests; scores on Parts B or C of the Group Embedded Figures Test under normal conditions: scores on Parts B or C of the Group Embedded Figures Test when timed; and time taken to complete the timed condition of the Group Embedded Figures Test were examined. There were no significant correlations between performance on the soccer specific tests and the tests of field dependence/independence.

  14. Weighing Clinical Evidence Using Patient Preferences: An Application of Probabilistic Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhuizen, Henk; IJzerman, Maarten J; Hauber, A Brett; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina G M

    2017-03-01

    The need for patient engagement has been recognized by regulatory agencies, but there is no consensus about how to operationalize this. One approach is the formal elicitation and use of patient preferences for weighing clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to demonstrate how patient preferences can be used to weigh clinical outcomes when both preferences and clinical outcomes are uncertain by applying a probabilistic value-based multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) method. Probability distributions were used to model random variation and parameter uncertainty in preferences, and parameter uncertainty in clinical outcomes. The posterior value distributions and rank probabilities for each treatment were obtained using Monte-Carlo simulations. The probability of achieving the first rank is the probability that a treatment represents the highest value to patients. We illustrated our methodology for a simplified case on six HIV treatments. Preferences were modeled with normal distributions and clinical outcomes were modeled with beta distributions. The treatment value distributions showed the rank order of treatments according to patients and illustrate the remaining decision uncertainty. This study demonstrated how patient preference data can be used to weigh clinical evidence using MCDA. The model takes into account uncertainty in preferences and clinical outcomes. The model can support decision makers during the aggregation step of the MCDA process and provides a first step toward preference-based personalized medicine, yet requires further testing regarding its appropriate use in real-world settings.

  15. Shared decision making after severe stroke-How can we improve patient and family involvement in treatment decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan, Akila; Dennis, Martin; Mead, Gillian; Whiteley, William N; Lawton, Julia; Doubal, Fergus Neil

    2017-12-01

    People who are well may regard survival with disability as being worse than death. However, this is often not the case when those surviving with disability (e.g. stroke survivors) are asked the same question. Many routine treatments provided after an acute stroke (e.g. feeding via a tube) increase survival, but with disability. Therefore, clinicians need to support patients and families in making informed decisions about the use of these treatments, in a process termed shared decision making. This is challenging after acute stroke: there is prognostic uncertainty, patients are often too unwell to participate in decision making, and proxies may not know the patients' expressed wishes (i.e. values). Patients' values also change over time and in different situations. There is limited evidence on successful methods to facilitate this process. Changes targeted at components of shared decision making (e.g. decision aids to provide information and discussing patient values) increase patient satisfaction. How this influences decision making is unclear. Presumably, a "shared decision-making tool" that introduces effective changes at various stages in this process might be helpful after acute stroke. For example, by complementing professional judgement with predictions from prognostic models, clinicians could provide information that is more accurate. Decision aids that are personalized may be helpful. Further qualitative research can provide clinicians with a better understanding of patient values and factors influencing this at different time points after a stroke. The evaluation of this tool in its success to achieve outcomes consistent with patients' values may require more than one clinical trial.

  16. An entertainment-education colorectal cancer screening decision aid for African American patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Aubri S; Lowenstein, Lisa M; Kamath, Geetanjali R; Housten, Ashley J; Leal, Viola B; Linder, Suzanne K; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L; Raju, Gottumukkala S; Volk, Robert J

    2017-04-15

    Colorectal cancer screening rates for African American patients remain suboptimal. Patient decision aids designed with an entertainment-education approach have been shown to improve saliency and foster informed decision making. The purpose of this study was to assess whether an entertainment-education decision aid tailored for African American patients improved patients' decision making, attitudes, intentions, or colorectal cancer screening behavior. Eighty-nine participants were randomized to view 1) a patient decision aid video containing culturally tailored information about colorectal cancer screening options and theory-based support in decision making presented in an entertainment-education format or 2) an attention control video about hypertension that contained similarly detailed information. Participants met with their clinician and then completed follow-up questionnaires assessing their knowledge, decisional conflict, self-advocacy, attitudes, perceived social norms, and intentions. At 3 months, completion of screening was assessed by chart review. Viewing the culturally tailored decision aid significantly increased African American patients' knowledge of colorectal cancer screening recommendations and options. It also significantly reduced their decisional conflict and improved their self-advocacy. No significant differences were observed in participants' attitudes, norms, or intentions. At three months, 23% of all patients had completed a colonoscopy. Designing targeted, engaging patient decision aids for groups that receive suboptimal screening holds promise for improving patient decision making and self-advocacy. Additional research is warranted to investigate the effectiveness of such aids in clinical practices with suboptimal screening rates and on downstream behaviors (such as repeat testing). Cancer 2017;123:1401-1408. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  17. Shared Decision Making and Effective Physician-Patient Communication: The Quintessence of Patient-Centered Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Ming Lim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM 2001 landmark report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, identified patient-centeredness as one of the fundamental attributes of quality health care, alongside safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. The IOM defined patient-centeredness as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” This concept of patient-centered care represents a paradigm shift from the traditional disease-oriented and physician-centered care, grounding health care in the subjective experience of illness and the needs and preferences of individual patients rather than the evaluation and treatment of diseases which emphasizes on leveraging clinical expertise and evidence derived from population-based studies. Regrettably, despite the ubiquitous talk about patient-centered care in modern health care, shared decision-making and effective physician-patient communication—the two cruxes of patient-centered care—are yet to become the norms. Strategies to promote and enhance shared decision-making and effective communication between clinicians and patients should be rigorously implemented to establish a health care system that truly values patients as individuals and turn the rhetoric of patient-centered care into reality.

  18. Patients' need for information provision and perceived participation in decision making in doctor-patient consultation: Micro-cultural differences between French- and Italian-speaking Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerini, Anne-Linda; Schulz, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    To explore micro-cultural differences in patients' need for information provision, perceived participation in decision making, and related concepts during the doctor-patient consultation between French- and Italian-speaking patients in Switzerland. In 2012, 153 French- and 120 Italian-speaking patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) were surveyed on their need for information provision, perceived participation in decision making, cLBP knowledge, psychological empowerment, and trust in their doctor. T-tests and regression analyses with interaction terms were performed. Results show that French- and Italian-speaking patients significantly differed in their participation in decision making, with French-speaking patients reporting higher involvement. Need for information provision was related to empowerment among French- and to trust among Italian-speaking patients. For participation in decision making, trust was the only related concept among French-, and cLBP knowledge among Italian-speaking patients. Significant interaction terms indicate a moderation of micro-cultural background. Findings point towards differences in the relationships between individual patient characteristics (i.e. knowledge, empowerment) and relational doctor-patient characteristics (i.e. trust) and patients' need for information provision and participation in decision making between French- and Italian-speaking patients in Switzerland. Doctors should be aware of these differences when dealing with patients of different micro-cultural backgrounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Predicting the probability of mortality of gastric cancer patients using decision tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, F; Noorkojuri, H; Pourhoseingholi, M A; Saadat, S; Baghestani, A R

    2015-06-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. This reason motivated us to investigate and introduce gastric cancer risk factors utilizing statistical methods. The aim of this study was to identify the most important factors influencing the mortality of patients who suffer from gastric cancer disease and to introduce a classification approach according to decision tree model for predicting the probability of mortality from this disease. Data on 216 patients with gastric cancer, who were registered in Taleghani hospital in Tehran,Iran, were analyzed. At first, patients were divided into two groups: the dead and alive. Then, to fit decision tree model to our data, we randomly selected 20% of dataset to the test sample and remaining dataset considered as the training sample. Finally, the validity of the model examined with sensitivity, specificity, diagnosis accuracy and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The CART version 6.0 and SPSS version 19.0 softwares were used for the analysis of the data. Diabetes, ethnicity, tobacco, tumor size, surgery, pathologic stage, age at diagnosis, exposure to chemical weapons and alcohol consumption were determined as effective factors on mortality of gastric cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of decision tree were 0.72, 0.75 and 0.74 respectively. The indices of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy represented that the decision tree model has acceptable accuracy to prediction the probability of mortality in gastric cancer patients. So a simple decision tree consisted of factors affecting on mortality of gastric cancer may help clinicians as a reliable and practical tool to predict the probability of mortality in these patients.

  20. ′Cuff Sign′ a new maneuver for decision-making in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Basiri

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Considering the fact that cooperation of the patients is not necessary and the double effects of direct pressure and ischemia over the proximal parts of the median nerve leads to prolonged latencies, this test is a useful method for decision-making in patients with severe symptoms of CTS, despite the mild electrodiagnostic findings.

  1. Decision-Making in Audiology: Balancing Evidence-Based Practice and Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Isabelle; Clemesha, Jennifer; Lundmark, Erik; Crome, Erica; Barr, Caitlin; McMahon, Catherine M

    2017-01-01

    Health-care service delivery models have evolved from a practitioner-centered approach toward a patient-centered ideal. Concurrently, increasing emphasis has been placed on the use of empirical evidence in decision-making to increase clinical accountability. The way in which clinicians use empirical evidence and client preferences to inform decision-making provides an insight into health-care delivery models utilized in clinical practice. The present study aimed to investigate the sources of information audiologists use when discussing rehabilitation choices with clients, and discuss the findings within the context of evidence-based practice and patient-centered care. To assess the changes that may have occurred over time, this study uses a questionnaire based on one of the few studies of decision-making behavior in audiologists, published in 1989. The present questionnaire was completed by 96 audiologists who attended the World Congress of Audiology in 2014. The responses were analyzed using qualitative and quantitative approaches. Results suggest that audiologists rank clinical test results and client preferences as the most important factors for decision-making. Discussion with colleagues or experts was also frequently reported as an important source influencing decision-making. Approximately 20% of audiologists mentioned utilizing research evidence to inform decision-making when no clear solution was available. Information shared at conferences was ranked low in terms of importance and reliability. This study highlights an increase in awareness of concepts associated with evidence-based practice and patient-centered care within audiology settings, consistent with current research-to-practice dissemination pathways. It also highlights that these pathways may not be sufficient for an effective clinical implementation of these practices.

  2. Factors influencing and modifying the decision to pursue genetic testing for skin cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Alexander L; Jaju, Prajakta D; Li, Shufeng; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie; Tang, Jean Y; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2017-05-01

    Across cancers, the decision to pursue genetic testing is influenced more by subjective than objective factors. However, skin cancer, which is more prevalent, visual, and multifactorial than many other malignancies, may offer different motivations for pursuing such testing. The primary objective was to determine factors influencing the decision to receive genetic testing for skin cancer risk. A secondary objective was to assess the impact of priming with health questions on the decision to receive testing. We distributed anonymous online surveys through ResearchMatch.org to assess participant health, demographics, motivations, and interest in pursuing genetic testing for skin cancer risk. Two surveys with identical questions but different question ordering were used to assess the secondary objective. We received 3783 responses (64% response rate), and 85.8% desired testing. Subjective factors, including curiosity, perceptions of skin cancer, and anxiety, were the most statistically significant determinants of the decision to pursue testing (P skin cancer (odds ratio 0.5, P = .01). Age and family history of skin cancer did not influence this decision. Participants increasingly chose testing if first queried about health behaviors (P skin cancer is primarily determined by subjective factors, such as anxiety and curiosity. Health factors, including skin cancer history, also influenced decision-making. Priming with consideration of objective health factors can increase the desire to pursue testing. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Validity and reliability testing of the Swedish version of Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Ulf; Hajdarević, Senada; Jutterström, Lena; Hörnsten, Åsa

    2014-06-01

    The Melbourne Decision-Making Questionnaire (MDMQ) is an attempt to capture and measure coping strategies that people use. The instrument had not previously been translated into Swedish. The aim of this study was to evaluate validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the MDMQ. A Swedish translation was performed and back-translated. A group of five pilot readers evaluated content validity. The translated questionnaire was tested among 735 patients, healthcare workers, healthcare students and teachers. A parallel analysis (PA), exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed. An initial EFA with a four-factor solution showed a low concordance with the original 22-item four-factor model with a very low Cronbach's alpha in one of the dimensions. However, a second EFA with a three-factor solution showed a good model fit for the Swedish translation of the Melbourne Decision-Making Questionnaire (MDMQ-S) with a satisfactory Cronbach's alpha. A CFA showed a goodness of fit after deleting six items. After testing the MDMQ-S, we found support for validity and reliability of the instrument. We found the 16-item version of MDMQ-S to be satisfactory concerning the subscales vigilance, procrastination and buck-passing. However, we found no support that the hypervigilance dimension could be measured by the MDMQ-S. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  4. Test Length and Decision Quality in Personnel Selection: When Is Short Too Short?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyen, Peter M.; Emons, Wilco H. M.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Personnel selection shows an enduring need for short stand-alone tests consisting of, say, 5 to 15 items. Despite their efficiency, short tests are more vulnerable to measurement error than longer test versions. Consequently, the question arises to what extent reducing test length deteriorates decision quality due to increased impact of…

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis of chemical testing for decision-support: How to include animal welfare?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabbert, S.G.M.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2010-01-01

    Toxicity testing for regulatory purposes raises the question of test selection for a particular endpoint. Given the public's concern for animal welfare, test selection is a multi-objective decision problem that requires balancing information outcome, animal welfare loss, and monetary testing costs.

  6. Assessing decision quality in patient-centred care requires a preference-sensitive measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Cunich, Michelle; Salkeld, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    (expressed as importance weights) and their ratings of the decision just taken on each of these criteria (expressed as performance rates). It thus provides an index of decision quality that encompasses both these aspects. It also provides patients with help in prioritizing quality criteria for future......A theory-based instrument for measuring the quality of decisions made using any form of decision technology, including both decision-aided and unaided clinical consultations is required to enable person- and patient-centred care and to respond positively to individual heterogeneity in the value...... aspects of decision making. Current instruments using the term 'decision quality' have adopted a decision- and thus condition-specific approach. We argue that patient-centred care requires decision quality to be regarded as both preference-sensitive across multiple relevant criteria and generic across all...

  7. Difficulties in Surgical Decision Making and Associated Factors Among Elective Surgical Patients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mei-Ling; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2017-12-01

    Respect for the autonomy of patients is essential in life-threatening medical decisions such as surgery. Even if a patient has the competency to make decisions, many obstacles exist that may influence his or her willingness to participate in the surgical decision-making process. The aim of this study was to explore the perceived difficulties in surgical decision making and related factors among elective surgical patients. This was a cross-sectional correlational study. A convenience sampling method was used to recruit patients from a medical center in southern Taiwan. Patients who had received elective surgery, were older than 20 years old, and were competent to make medical decisions were invited to participate. A structured questionnaire was developed by the researchers to collect demographic data, decision patterns, and perceived difficulties in surgical decision making. Acceptable validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed before data collection. Over 80% of the participants made the surgical decision by themselves or in collaboration with their family or physician. Less than 15% expected to make the surgical decision by themselves. Illness-related suffering was the greatest difficulty that participants faced. The patients who tended toward passive decision making faced greater difficulties in the dimensions of "do not understand information," "physician's lack of concern," and "difficulty in freely communicating with the physician" than their active decision-making peers. Male participants reported having more difficulty in communicating with their physician than their female peers. Age, education, and marital status were not significantly associated with perceived difficulties in surgical decision making. Family participation in the medical decision-making process is expected by most patients. Although less than 20% of the participants in this study were categorized as passive decision makers, this group reported more difficulties than the

  8. Difficulties in Surgical Decision Making and Associated Factors Among Elective Surgical Patients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mei-Ling; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2017-06-01

    Respect for the autonomy of patients is essential in life-threatening medical decisions such as surgery. Even if a patient has the competency to make decisions, many obstacles exist that may influence his or her willingness to participate in the surgical decision-making process. The aim of this study was to explore the perceived difficulties in surgical decision making and related factors among elective surgical patients. This was a cross-sectional correlational study. A convenience sampling method was used to recruit patients from a medical center in southern Taiwan. Patients who had received elective surgery, were older than 20 years old, and were competent to make medical decisions were invited to participate. A structured questionnaire was developed by the researchers to collect demographic data, decision patterns, and perceived difficulties in surgical decision making. Acceptable validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed before data collection. Over 80% of the participants made the surgical decision by themselves or in collaboration with their family or physician. Less than 15% expected to make the surgical decision by themselves. Illness-related suffering was the greatest difficulty that participants faced. The patients who tended toward passive decision making faced greater difficulties in the dimensions of "do not understand information," "physician's lack of concern," and "difficulty in freely communicating with the physician" than their active decision-making peers. Male participants reported having more difficulty in communicating with their physician than their female peers. Age, education, and marital status were not significantly associated with perceived difficulties in surgical decision making. Family participation in the medical decision-making process is expected by most patients. Although less than 20% of the participants in this study were categorized as passive decision makers, this group reported more difficulties than the

  9. "Think aloud" and "Near live" usability testing of two complex clinical decision support tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Safiya; Mishuris, Rebecca; O'Connell, Alexander; Feldstein, David; Hess, Rachel; Smith, Paul; McCullagh, Lauren; McGinn, Thomas; Mann, Devin

    2017-10-01

    Low provider adoption continues to be a significant barrier to realizing the potential of clinical decision support. "Think Aloud" and "Near Live" usability testing were conducted on two clinical decision support tools. Each was composed of an alert, a clinical prediction rule which estimated risk of either group A Streptococcus pharyngitis or pneumonia and an automatic order set based on risk. The objective of this study was to further understanding of the facilitators of usability and to evaluate the types of additional information gained from proceeding to "Near Live" testing after completing "Think Aloud". This was a qualitative observational study conducted at a large academic health care system with 12 primary care providers. During "Think Aloud" testing, participants were provided with written clinical scenarios and asked to verbalize their thought process while interacting with the tool. During "Near Live" testing participants interacted with a mock patient. Morae usability software was used to record full screen capture and audio during every session. Participant comments were placed into coding categories and analyzed for generalizable themes. Themes were compared across usability methods. "Think Aloud" and "Near Live" usability testing generated similar themes under the coding categories visibility, workflow, content, understand-ability and navigation. However, they generated significantly different themes under the coding categories usability, practical usefulness and medical usefulness. During both types of testing participants found the tool easier to use when important text was distinct in its appearance, alerts were passive and appropriately timed, content was up to date, language was clear and simple, and each component of the tool included obvious indicators of next steps. Participant comments reflected higher expectations for usability and usefulness during "Near Live" testing. For example, visit aids, such as automatically generated order sets

  10. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA): testing a proposed MCDA framework for orphan drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schey, C; Krabbe, P F M; Postma, M J; Connolly, M P

    2017-01-17

    Since the introduction of the orphan drugs legislation in Europe, it has been suggested that the general method of assessing drugs for reimbursement is not necessarily suitable for orphan drugs. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence indicated that several criteria other than cost and efficacy could be considered in reimbursement decisions for orphan drugs. This study sought to explore the multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) framework proposed by (Orphanet J Rare Dis 7:74, 2012) to a range of orphan drugs, with a view to comparing the aggregate scores to the average annual cost per patient for each product, and thus establishing the merit of MCDA as a tool for assessing the value of orphan drugs in relation to their pricings. An MCDA framework was developed using the nine criteria proposed by (Orphanet J Rare Dis 7:74, 2012) for the evaluation of orphan drugs, using the suggested numerical scoring system on a scale of 1 to 3 for each criterion. Correlations between the average annual cost of the drugs and aggregate MCDA scores were tested and plotted graphically. Different weightings for each of the attributes were also tested. A further analysis was conducted to test the impact of including the drug cost as an attribute in the aggregate index scores. In the drugs studied, the R (2), that statistically measures how close the data are to the fitted regression line was 0.79 suggesting a strong correlation between the drug scores and the average annual cost per patient. Despite several limitations of the proposed model, this quantitative study provided insight into using MCDA and its relationship to the average annual costs of the products.

  11. Robustness of person-fit decisions in computerized adaptive testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.R.

    Person-fit statistics test whether or not the likelihood of a respondent’s complete vector of item scores on a test is low given the hypothesized item response theory (IRT) model. This binary information may be insufficient for diagnosing the cause of a misfitting item-score vector. This paper

  12. Decision-making in research tasks with sequential testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pfeiffer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a recent controversial essay, published by JPA Ioannidis in PLoS Medicine, it has been argued that in some research fields, most of the published findings are false. Based on theoretical reasoning it can be shown that small effect sizes, error-prone tests, low priors of the tested hypotheses and biases in the evaluation and publication of research findings increase the fraction of false positives. These findings raise concerns about the reliability of research. However, they are based on a very simple scenario of scientific research, where single tests are used to evaluate independent hypotheses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we present computer simulations and experimental approaches for analyzing more realistic scenarios. In these scenarios, research tasks are solved sequentially, i.e. subsequent tests can be chosen depending on previous results. We investigate simple sequential testing and scenarios where only a selected subset of results can be published and used for future rounds of test choice. Results from computer simulations indicate that for the tasks analyzed in this study, the fraction of false among the positive findings declines over several rounds of testing if the most informative tests are performed. Our experiments show that human subjects frequently perform the most informative tests, leading to a decline of false positives as expected from the simulations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For the research tasks studied here, findings tend to become more reliable over time. We also find that the performance in those experimental settings where not all performed tests could be published turned out to be surprisingly inefficient. Our results may help optimize existing procedures used in the practice of scientific research and provide guidance for the development of novel forms of scholarly communication.

  13. Decision-Making of Patients With Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators at End of Life: Family Members' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei Ching; Sulmasy, Daniel P; Gallo, Joseph; Kub, Joan; Hughes, Mark T; Russell, Stuart; Kellogg, Anela; Owens, Sharon G; Terry, Peter; Nolan, Marie T

    2017-07-01

    Many patients with advanced heart failure (HF) experience the life-extending benefits of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), but at the end stage of HF, patients may experience shocks with increasing frequency and change the plan for end-of-life (EOL) care including the deactivation of the ICD. This report describes family members' experiences of patients with ICD making decisions at EOL. Understanding the decision-making of patients with ICD at EOL can promote informed decision-making and improve the quality of EOL care. This pilot study used a mixed methods approach to test the effects of a nurse-guided discussion in decision-making about ICD deactivation (turning off the defibrillation function) at the EOL. Interviews were conducted, audiotaped, and transcribed in 2012 to 2013 with 6 family members of patients with advanced HF and ICDs. Three researchers coded the data and identified themes in 2014. Three main themes described family members' experiences related to patients having HF with ICDs making health-care decision at EOL: decision-making preferences, patients' perception on ICD deactivation, and communication methods. Health-care providers need to have knowledge of patients' decision-making preferences. Preferences for decision-making include the allowing of appropriate people to involve and encourages direct conversation with family members even when advance directives is completed. Information of ICD function and the option of deactivation need to be clearly delivered to patients and family members. Education and guidelines will facilitate the communication of the preferences of EOL care.

  14. The development of a personalized patient education tool for decision making for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiligsmann, M; Ronda, G; van der Weijden, T; Boonen, A

    2016-08-01

    A personalized patient education tool for decision making (PET) for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis was developed by means of a systematic development approach. A prototype was constructed and refined by involving various professionals and patients. Professionals and patients expressed a positive attitude towards the use of the PET. The purpose was to systematically develop a paper-based personalized PET to assist postmenopausal women with osteoporosis in selecting a treatment in line with their personal values and preferences. The development of the PET was based on a systematic process including scope, design, development of a prototype, and alpha testing among professionals and patients by semi-structured interviews. The design and development resulted in a four-page PET prototype together with a one-page fact sheet of the different drug options. The prototype PET provided the personal risk factors, the estimated individualized risk for a future major osteoporotic fracture and potential reduction with drugs, and a summary of advantages and disadvantages whether or not to start drugs. The drug fact sheet presents five attributes of seven drugs in a tabular format. The alpha testing with professionals resulted in some adaptations, e.g., inclusion of the possibility to calculate fracture risk based on various individual risk scoring methods. Important results from the alpha testing with patients were differences in the fracture risk percentage which was seen as worthwhile to start drugs, the importance of an overview of side effects, and of the timing of the PET into the patient pathway. All women indicated that the PET could be helpful for their decision to select a treatment. Physicians and patients expressed a positive attitude towards the use of the proposed PET. Further research would be needed to test the effects of the PET on feasibility in clinical workflow and on patient outcomes.

  15. Multi-test decision tree and its application to microarray data classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, Marcin; Grześ, Marek; Kretowski, Marek

    2014-05-01

    The desirable property of tools used to investigate biological data is easy to understand models and predictive decisions. Decision trees are particularly promising in this regard due to their comprehensible nature that resembles the hierarchical process of human decision making. However, existing algorithms for learning decision trees have tendency to underfit gene expression data. The main aim of this work is to improve the performance and stability of decision trees with only a small increase in their complexity. We propose a multi-test decision tree (MTDT); our main contribution is the application of several univariate tests in each non-terminal node of the decision tree. We also search for alternative, lower-ranked features in order to obtain more stable and reliable predictions. Experimental validation was performed on several real-life gene expression datasets. Comparison results with eight classifiers show that MTDT has a statistically significantly higher accuracy than popular decision tree classifiers, and it was highly competitive with ensemble learning algorithms. The proposed solution managed to outperform its baseline algorithm on 14 datasets by an average 6%. A study performed on one of the datasets showed that the discovered genes used in the MTDT classification model are supported by biological evidence in the literature. This paper introduces a new type of decision tree which is more suitable for solving biological problems. MTDTs are relatively easy to analyze and much more powerful in modeling high dimensional microarray data than their popular counterparts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Consumers' use of web-based information and their decisions about multiplex genetic susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphingst, Kimberly A; McBride, Colleen M; Wade, Christopher; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Brody, Lawrence C; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2010-09-29

    Few data exist to inform concerns raised by online direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic susceptibility tests, such as those offered by commercial entities like 23andme, Navigenics, and DNA Direct. The Multiplex Initiative, a population-based study of healthy adults, provides the first opportunity to evaluate how use of a Web-based decision tool that conveyed information about a genetic susceptibility test influenced individuals' test decisions. To inform the ongoing debate over whether individuals offered genetic susceptibility testing without the involvement of a health care provider (eg, through direct-to-consumer testing) can make informed decisions about testing when guided by online decision aids. Participants were 526 members of a large health maintenance organization aged 25 to 40 years old who visited a study website. Multivariate logistic regression models were tested to examine the association of website usage with downstream test decisions. Participants viewed an average of 2.9 of the 4 pages introducing the multiplex test, 2.2 of the 8 pages describing the health conditions, and 3.2 of the 15 pages describing the genes. For each page viewed, participants were more likely to describe their decision-making as easy (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.07) and to decide to be tested (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.05-1.11). Healthy adults in this study perceived Web-based genomic information presented using evidence-based communications approaches to be helpful in supporting both decisions to test and not to test. Continued research is needed to ensure that these results generalize to target groups with lower literacy and less Internet savvy.

  17. Configural frequency analysis as a method of determining patients' preferred decision-making roles in dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loeffert Sabine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies examined factors in promoting a patient preference for active participation in treatment decision making with only modest success. The purpose of this study was to identify types of patients wishing to participate in treatment decisions as well as those wishing to play a completely active or passive role based on a Germany-wide survey of dialysis patients; using a prediction typal analysis method that defines types as configurations of categories belonging to different attributes and takes particularly higher order interactions between variables into account. Methods After randomly splitting the original patient sample into two halves, an exploratory prediction configural frequency analysis (CFA was performed on one-half of the sample (n = 1969 and the identified types were considered as hypotheses for an inferential prediction CFA for the second half (n = 1914. 144 possible prediction types were tested by using five predictor variables and control preferences as criterion. An α-adjustment (0.05 for multiple testing was performed by the Holm procedure. Results 21 possible prediction types were identified as hypotheses in the exploratory prediction CFA; four patient types were confirmed in the confirmatory prediction CFA: patients preferring a passive role show low information seeking preference, above average trust in their physician, perceive their physician's participatory decision-making (PDM-style positive, have a lower educational level, and are 56-75 years old (Type 1; p 76 years old (Type 2; p p p Conclusions The method prediction configural frequency analysis was newly introduced to the research field of patient participation and could demonstrate how a particular control preference role is determined by an association of five variables.

  18. Revisiting Parole Decision Making: Testing for the Punitive Hypothesis in a Large U.S. Jurisdiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vîlcică, E Rely

    2016-09-15

    The decision to grant conditional release from prison (aka the parole decision) has been largely neglected in the contemporary criminological literature, despite its critical implications. The current study, conducted in Pennsylvania, United States, tests for punitive themes in parole decision making by examining the impact of several measures reflective of punishment satisfaction on the decision to grant release to eligible parole candidates. The results indicate that the amount of time served in relation to the original punishment does not predict parole decisions but the nature of the original offense does. Moreover, inmates eligible for parole have to experience at least one parole denial to increase their chances of release, suggesting that parole decision makers use the parole process as a punitive means. The implications of the findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Decision outcomes in women offered noninvasive prenatal test (NIPT) for positive Down screening results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tsz-Kin; Chan, Kelvin Yuen-Kwong; Kan, Anita Sik-Yau; So, Po-Lam; Kong, Choi-Wah; Mak, Shui-Lam; Lee, Chung-Nin

    2017-09-19

    In this first Asian study, the decision outcomes (decision conflict, decision regret, and anxiety) of 262 pregnant women offered noninvasive prenatal test (NIPT) for high-risk Down screening results were assessed. Decision conflict was experienced by 3.5% and level of decisional regret low (mean score 15.7, 95%CI 13.2-18.3). All 13 cases of decisional regret were NIPT acceptors. Elevated anxiety was experienced by 55.9% at the time of decision making about NIPT and persistent in 30.3%. Insufficient knowledge about NIPT was associated with elevated anxiety at decision making (p = .011) and with decisional regret (p = .016). Decisional regret was associated with prolonged anxiety (p = .010).

  20. Formal Process Modeling to Improve Human Decision-Making in Test and Evaluation Acoustic Range Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    INTRODUCTION The purpose of this chapter is to present problems faced by undersea test ranges in the area of human decision-making and the lack of pre-test...noted that Range Officer training focuses on recognizing and understanding normal and expected conditions for the particular test and on using...These factors place increased burden on the test facility to conduct accurate and successful tests that produce the intended test conditions , which

  1. Integrated corridor management initiative : demonstration phase evaluation, San Diego decision support system analysis test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This report presents the test plan for conducting the Decision Support System Analysis for the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) evaluation of the San Diego Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) Initiative Demonstration. The ICM pr...

  2. Integrated corridor management initiative : demonstration phase evaluation - Dallas decision support system analysis test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This report presents the test plan for conducting the Decision Support System (DSS) Analysis for the : United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) evaluation of the Dallas U.S. 75 Integrated : Corridor Management (ICM) Initiative Demonstrat...

  3. Decision support system for determining the contact lens for refractive errors patients with classification ID3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situmorang, B. H.; Setiawan, M. P.; Tosida, E. T.

    2017-01-01

    Refractive errors are abnormalities of the refraction of light so that the shadows do not focus precisely on the retina resulting in blurred vision [1]. Refractive errors causing the patient should wear glasses or contact lenses in order eyesight returned to normal. The use of glasses or contact lenses in a person will be different from others, it is influenced by patient age, the amount of tear production, vision prescription, and astigmatic. Because the eye is one organ of the human body is very important to see, then the accuracy in determining glasses or contact lenses which will be used is required. This research aims to develop a decision support system that can produce output on the right contact lenses for refractive errors patients with a value of 100% accuracy. Iterative Dichotomize Three (ID3) classification methods will generate gain and entropy values of attributes that include code sample data, age of the patient, astigmatic, the ratio of tear production, vision prescription, and classes that will affect the outcome of the decision tree. The eye specialist test result for the training data obtained the accuracy rate of 96.7% and an error rate of 3.3%, the result test using confusion matrix obtained the accuracy rate of 96.1% and an error rate of 3.1%; for the data testing obtained accuracy rate of 100% and an error rate of 0.

  4. Shared Decision Making in Transplantation : How Patients See Their Role in the Decision Process of Accepting a Donor Liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Dries, Sanna; Annema-de Jong, Coby; van den Berg, Aad P.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Porte, Robert J.

    At the time of the organ offer for transplantation, donor-related risks such as disease transmission and graft failure are weighed against the patient's risk of remaining on the waiting list. The patient's commonly inactive role in decision making and the timing and extent of donor-specific risk

  5. Health innovations in patient decision support: Bridging the gaps and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirk Jenn Ng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Patient decision aids (PDAs help to support patients in making an informed and value-based decision. Despite advancement in decision support technologies over the past 30 years, most PDAs are still inaccessible and few address individual needs. Health innovation may provide a solution to bridge these gaps. Information and computer technology provide a platform to incorporate individual profiles and needs into PDAs, making the decision support more personalised. Health innovation may enhance accessibility by using mobile, tablet and Internet technologies; make risk communication more interactive; and identify patient values more effectively. In addition, using databases to capture patient data and the usage of PDAs can help: developers to improve PDAs’ design; clinicians to facilitate the decisionmaking process more effectively; and policy makers to make shared decision making more feasible and cost-effective. Health innovation may hold the key to advancing PDAs by creating a more personalised and effective decision support tool for patients making healthcare decisions.

  6. Are there racial differences in patients' shared decision-making preferences and behaviors among patients with diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Monica E; Tang, Hui; Cargill, Algernon; Chin, Marshall H

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, African Americans are more likely to experience lower quality patient/provider communication and less shared decision making (SDM) than whites, which may be an important contributor to racial health disparities. Patient factors have not been fully explored as a potential contributor to communication disparities. The authors analyzed cross-sectional data from a survey of 974 patients with diabetes seen at 34 community health centers (HC) in 17 midwestern and west-central states. They used ordinal and logistic regression models to investigate racial differences in patients' preferences for SDM and in patients' behaviors that may facilitate SDM (initiating discussions about diabetes care). The response rate was 67%. In bivariate and multivariate analyses, race was not associated with patient preference for a shared role in the 3 measured SDM domains: agenda setting (odds ratio [OR]: 1.13 [0.86, 1.49]), information sharing (OR: 1.26 [0.97, 1.64]), or decision making (OR: 1.16 [0.85, 1.59]). African Americans were more likely to report initiating discussions with their physicians about 4 of 6 areas of diabetes care-blood pressure measurement (66% v. 52%, P foot examination (54% v. 47%, P = 0.04), eye examination (57% v. 46%, P = 0.002), and microalbumin testing (38% v. 29%, P = 0.01)-but not HbA1c testing (39% v. 43%, P = 0.31) or cholesterol testing (53% v. 51%, P = 0.52). In multivariate analysis, African Americans were still more likely to report initiating conversations about diabetes care (OR: 1.78 [1.10, 2.89]). The authors found that African Americans in this study preferred shared decision making as much as whites and were more likely to report initiating more discussions with their doctors about their diabetes care. This research suggests that, among diabetes patients receiving care at community health centers, patient preference or patient behaviors may be an unlikely cause of racial differences in shared decision making.

  7. Evidence-Based Clinical Decision: Key to Improved Patients Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    religious acts of the prehistoric era to empirical-rational decisions of the Egyptian civilization, to modern day evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine requires that clinical decisions and health policies on the prevention, diagnosis and ...

  8. Effective Rating Scale Development for Speaking Tests: Performance Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred; Kemp, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Rating scale design and development for testing speaking is generally conducted using one of two approaches: the measurement-driven approach or the performance data-driven approach. The measurement-driven approach prioritizes the ordering of descriptors onto a single scale. Meaning is derived from the scaling methodology and the agreement of…

  9. Exploring Indian women's reproductive decision-making regarding prenatal testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Pregnant women in large cities and small towns of India are increasingly undergoing prenatal testing (PNT) on the advice of medical practitioners to ensure foetal health and to prevent the birth of disabled children. In the last two decades, several studies have been conducted in India to determine

  10. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alley W

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available William Alley, Simon A Mahler Department of Emergency Medicine, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT; Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT; North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR; and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. Keywords: chest pain, decision aid, risk score, acute coronary syndrome

  11. The Decision-Making Process in Language Program Placement: Test and Nontest Factors Interacting in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakans, Lia; Burke, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    The use of tests has been targeted as a critical point in validity, which suggests that contexts for test use warrant closer investigation. This article describes a study of decision making during test use in the context of a university intensive English language program. Over a period of 2 1/2 years, data were collected by audio-recording…

  12. The development of a personalized patient education tool for decision making for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiligsmann, M.; Ronda, G.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Boonen, A.

    2016-01-01

    A personalized patient education tool for decision making (PET) for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis was developed by means of a systematic development approach. A prototype was constructed and refined by involving various professionals and patients. Professionals and patients expressed a

  13. Psychological Factors Associated with Genetic Test Decision-Making among Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Richman, Alice R.

    2015-01-01

    Making decisions to undergo Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) genetic testing can be challenging. It is important to understand how the perceptions of affected individuals might influence testing decision-making. Although evidence has shown that psychological factors are important in predicting testing decisions, affect-type variables have been…

  14. Patients' perceptions and attitudes on recurrent prostate cancer and hormone therapy: Qualitative comparison between decision-aid and control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; O'Muircheartaigh, Siobhan; Mohile, Supriya; Dale, William

    2017-09-01

    To compare patients' attitudes towards recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) and starting hormone therapy (HT) treatment in two groups-Decision-Aid (DA) (intervention) and Standard-of-care (SoC) (Control). The present research was conducted at three academic clinics-two in the Midwest and one in the Northeast U.S. Patients with biochemical recurrence of PCa (n=26) and follow-up oncology visits meeting inclusion criteria were randomized to either the SoC or DA intervention group prior to their consultation. Analysts were blinded to group assignment. Semi-structured phone interviews with patients were conducted 1-week post consultation. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Qualitative analytic techniques were used to extract salient themes and conduct a comparative analysis of the two groups. Four salient themes emerged-1) knowledge acquisition, 2) decision-making style, 3) decision-making about timing of HT, and 4) anxiety-coping mechanisms. A comparative analysis showed that patients receiving the DA intervention had a better comprehension of Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), an improved understanding of HT treatment implications, an external locus-of-control, participation in shared decision-making and, support-seeking for anxiety reduction. In contrast, SoC patients displayed worse comprehension of PSA testing and HT treatment implications, internal locus-of-control, unilateral involvement in knowledge-seeking and decision-making, and no support-seeking for anxiety-coping. The DA was more effective than the SoC group in helping PCa patients understand the full implications of PSA testing and treatment; motivating shared decision-making, and support-seeking for anxiety relief. DA DVD interventions can be a useful patient education tool for bringing higher quality decision-making to prostate cancer care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An Intelligent Hierarchical Decision Architecture for Operational Test and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    following properties: (EPi1) e(D)=O0, VDe 4= fX); (EP2) e( = max A, ,e(A); (EP3) VA, Be Y=- e(A) 2!e(B) , if PIB (X) ! YA(W when YLAWx - and IB (X...Sensitivity Runs were made by Dr. Sam Baty at The BDM Corporation, 1801 Randolph Ave., SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico ; 20 Nov 95 - 3 Dec 95. Results were...George B. Harrison and Dr. Marion L. Williams, Headquarters, Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico , 4 March 1996

  16. [From interpretation of cardiopulmonary exercise testing to medical decision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilaniu, B; Wallaert, B

    2013-06-01

    Exercise is a situation that involves cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic responses simultaneously. Thus, interpretating the results of the cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) requires an integrated understanding of the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance which may result from lung, heart, pulmonary or peripheral circulation, muscles disturbances, or a combination of these functional disorders. In this paper, we offer a systematic method to assist clinicians in developing a pathophysiological reasoning from the functional competency of each component measured during incremental exercise. We propose to go through four steps: descriptive analysis, prioritization of the functional disorders, mechanistic proposals and diagnostic and/or therapeutic suggestions. The descriptive analysis step should answer seven key physiological questions, the prioritization step is based on the magnitude of the functional disorders and their relevance to the primary symptoms causing exercise intolerance, the mechanistic proposals step aims at suggesting different mechanisms and etiologies compatible with the scale of observed functional abnormalities, which will finally be tested by exploring specific diagnostic or therapeutic suggestions. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of physicians' reactions to uncertainty on patients' decision satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Mary C; Clark, Melissa A; Ombao, Hernando; Légaré, France

    2011-08-01

    Patients' and physicians' response to uncertainty may affect decision outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of patients' and physicians' reactions to uncertainty on patients' satisfaction with breast health decisions. Seventy-five women facing breast cancer prevention or treatment decisions and five surgeons were recruited from a breast health centre. Patients' and physicians' anxiety from uncertainty was assessed using the Physicians' Reactions to Uncertainty Scale; wording was slightly modified for patients to ensure the scale was applicable. Patients' decision satisfaction was assessed 1-2 weeks after their appointment. A mixed-effects logistic regression model was used to assess associations between patients' and providers' anxiety from uncertainty and patients' decision satisfaction. A provider-specific random effects term was included in the model to account for correlation among patients treated by the same provider. Patients' decision satisfaction was associated with physicians' anxiety from uncertainty (beta = 0.92, P uncertainty (beta = -0.18, P > 0.27). This study suggests that physicians' reactions to uncertainty may have an effect on decision satisfaction in patients. More research is needed to confirm this relationship and to determine how to help patient-provider dyads to manage the uncertainty that is inherent in most cancer decisions. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. [A model for shared decision-making with frail older patients: consensus reached using Delphi technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, M.H.J. van de; Fluit, C.R.M.G.; Lagro, J.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a model for shared decision-making with frail older patients. DESIGN: Online Delphi forum. METHOD: We used a three-round Delphi technique to reach consensus on the structure of a model for shared decision-making with older patients. The expert panel consisted of 16 patients

  19. The Use of Art in the Medical Decision-Making Process of Oncology Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of written informed consent in the 1970s created expectations of shared decision making between doctors and patients that has led to decisional conflict for some patients. This study utilized a collaborative, intrinsic case study approach to the decision-making process of oncology patients who participated in an open art therapy…

  20. Why do patients want to have their blood tested? A qualitative study of patient expectations in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bokhoven, Marloes A; Pleunis-van Empel, Marjolein C H; Koch, Hèlen; Grol, Richard P T M; Dinant, Geert-Jan; van der Weijden, Trudy

    2006-12-13

    General practitioners often take their impression of patients' expectations into account in their decision to have blood tests done. It is commonly recommended to involve patients in decision-making during consultations. The study aimed to obtain detailed information on patients' expectations about blood tests. Qualitative study among patients in waiting rooms of general practices. Each patient was presented with a short questionnaire about their preferences in terms of diagnostics. Patients who would like blood tests to be done were interviewed. Fifty-seven (26%) of the 224 respondents wanted blood tests. Twenty-two were interviewed. Patients overestimated the qualities of blood tests. Favourable test results were regarded as proof of good health. Patients regarded blood tests as a useful instrument to screen for serious disorders, and were confirmed in this belief by people in their social environment and by the media. Many patients expected their GP to take an active test ordering approach, though some indicated that they might be convinced if their GP proposed a wait-and-see policy. GPs' perceptions about patient expectations seem justified: patients appear to have high hopes for testing as a diagnostic tool. They expect diagnostic certainty without mistakes and a proof of good health. The question is whether it would be desirable to remove patients' misconceptions, allowing them to participate in policy decisions on the basis of sound information, or whether it would be better to leave the misconceptions uncontested, in order to retain the 'magic' of additional tests and reassure patients. We expect that clarifying the precise nature of patients' expectations by the GP may be helpful in creating a diagnostic strategy that satisfies both patients and GPs. GPs will have to balance the benefits of reassuring their patients by means of blood tests which may be unnecessary against the benefits of avoiding unnecessary tests. Further research is needed into the

  1. The Role of Emotion in Decision-Making: Evidence from Neurological Patients with Orbitofrontal Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechara, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    Most theories of choice assume that decisions derive from an assessment of the future outcomes of various options and alternatives through some type of cost-benefit analyses. The influence of emotions on decision-making is largely ignored. The studies of decision-making in neurological patients who can no longer process emotional information…

  2. Engagement in decision-making and patient satisfaction: a qualitative study of older patients' perceptions of dialysis initiation and modality decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladin, Keren; Lin, Naomi; Hahn, Emily; Zhang, Gregory; Koch-Weser, Susan; Weiner, Daniel E

    2017-08-01

    Although shared decision-making (SDM) can better align patient preferences with treatment, barriers remain incompletely understood and the impact on patient satisfaction is unknown. This is a qualitative study with semistructured interviews. A purposive sample of prevalent dialysis patients ≥65 years of age at two facilities in Greater Boston were selected for diversity in time from initiation, race, modality and vintage. A codebook was developed and interrater reliability was 89%. Codes were discussed and organized into themes. A total of 31 interviews with 23 in-center hemodialysis patients, 1 home hemodialysis patient and 7 peritoneal dialysis patients were completed. The mean age was 76 ± 9 years. Two dominant themes (with related subthemes) emerged: decision-making experiences and satisfaction, and barriers to SDM. Subthemes included negative versus positive decision-making experiences, struggling for autonomy, being a 'good patient' and lack of choice. In spite of believing that dialysis initiation should be the patient's choice, no patients perceived that they had made a choice. Patients explained that this is due to the perception of imminent death or that the decision to start dialysis belonged to physicians. Clinicians and family frequently overrode patient preferences, with patient autonomy honored mostly to select dialysis modality. Poor decision-making experiences were associated with low treatment satisfaction. Despite recommendations for SDM, many older patients were unaware that dialysis initiation was voluntary, held mistaken beliefs about their prognosis and were not engaged in decision-making, resulting in poor satisfaction. Patients desired greater information, specifically focusing on the acuity of their choice, prognosis and goals of care.

  3. Implementation of shared decision making in anaesthesia and its influence on patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flierler, W J; Nübling, M; Kasper, J; Heidegger, T

    2013-07-01

    There is a lack of data about the implementation of shared decision making in anaesthesia. To assess patients' preference to be involved in medical decision making and its influence on patient satisfaction, we studied 197 matched pairs (patients and anaesthetists) using two previously validated questionnaires. Before surgery, patients had to decide between general vs regional anaesthesia and, where appropriate, between conventional postoperative pain therapy vs catheter techniques. One hundred and eighty-six patients (94%) wished to be involved in shared decision making. One hundred and twenty-two patients (62%) experienced the exact amount of shared decision making that they wanted; 44 (22%) were slightly more involved and 20 (10%) slightly less involved in shared decision making than they desired. Preferences regarding involvement in shared decision making were similar between patients and anaesthetists with mean (SD) points of 54.1 (16.2) vs 56.4 (27.6) (p=0.244), respectively on a 0-100 scale; however, patients were found to have a stronger preference for a totally balanced shared decision-making process (65% vs 32%). Overall patient satisfaction was high: 88% were very satisfied and 12% satisfied with a mean (SD) value of 96.1 (10.6) on a 0-100 scale. Shared decision making is important for providing high levels of patient satisfaction. Anaesthesia © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Beyond Correlations: Usefulness of High School GPA and Test Scores in Making College Admissions Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Correlational evidence suggests that high school GPA is better than admission test scores in predicting first-year college GPA, although test scores have incremental predictive validity. The usefulness of a selection variable in making admission decisions depends in part on its predictive validity, but also on institutions' selectivity and…

  5. Patient involvement in treatment decision-making: the case for a broader conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwistle, Vikki A; Watt, Ian S

    2006-11-01

    To consider the conceptualisation of patient involvement in treatment decision-making. Conceptual review. Current models and measures of patient involvement in treatment decision-making tend to focus on communication within consultations and/or on the patient's use of information to consider the selection of one treatment option from a well-defined set. These narrowly focused models and measures may obscure the relevance of patient involvement in decision-making for some health care contexts and limit investigations of the relationships between patient involvement in decision-making and health care outcomes. We outline a broader conceptual framework that reflects more of the complexity of the concept of involvement. It acknowledges that patients can be involved not only because of what they say and do to influence a decision, but also by virtue of what they think and feel about their roles, efforts and contributions to decision-making and their relationships with their clinicians. The framework encompasses the full range of activities associated with decision-making. The proposed conceptual framework may broaden the relevance of patient involvement in decision-making and encourage a more comprehensive characterisation that may facilitate more sophisticated investigations of the relationships between patient involvement in decision-making and health care outcomes. Clinicians who aspire to facilitate patient involvement in decision-making need to look beyond the way they discuss health care options with patients. They should also consider how they might enable patients to engage in the full range of decision-making activities and to develop a positive sense of involvement in these activities and with their clinicians.

  6. To Fear Is to Gain? The Role of Fear Recognition in Risky Decision Making in TBI Patients and Healthy Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie C Visser-Keizer

    Full Text Available Fear is an important emotional reaction that guides decision making in situations of ambiguity or uncertainty. Both recognition of facial expressions of fear and decision making ability can be impaired after traumatic brain injury (TBI, in particular when the frontal lobe is damaged. So far, it has not been investigated how recognition of fear influences risk behavior in healthy subjects and TBI patients. The ability to recognize fear is thought to be related to the ability to experience fear and to use it as a warning signal to guide decision making. We hypothesized that a better ability to recognize fear would be related to a better regulation of risk behavior, with healthy controls outperforming TBI patients. To investigate this, 59 healthy subjects and 49 TBI patients were assessed with a test for emotion recognition (Facial Expression of Emotion: Stimuli and Tests and a gambling task (Iowa Gambling Task (IGT. The results showed that, regardless of post traumatic amnesia duration or the presence of frontal lesions, patients were more impaired than healthy controls on both fear recognition and decision making. In both groups, a significant relationship was found between better fear recognition, the development of an advantageous strategy across the IGT and less risk behavior in the last blocks of the IGT. Educational level moderated this relationship in the final block of the IGT. This study has important clinical implications, indicating that impaired decision making and risk behavior after TBI can be preceded by deficits in the processing of fear.

  7. To Fear Is to Gain? The Role of Fear Recognition in Risky Decision Making in TBI Patients and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-Keizer, Annemarie C; Westerhof-Evers, Herma J; Gerritsen, Marleen J J; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M

    2016-01-01

    Fear is an important emotional reaction that guides decision making in situations of ambiguity or uncertainty. Both recognition of facial expressions of fear and decision making ability can be impaired after traumatic brain injury (TBI), in particular when the frontal lobe is damaged. So far, it has not been investigated how recognition of fear influences risk behavior in healthy subjects and TBI patients. The ability to recognize fear is thought to be related to the ability to experience fear and to use it as a warning signal to guide decision making. We hypothesized that a better ability to recognize fear would be related to a better regulation of risk behavior, with healthy controls outperforming TBI patients. To investigate this, 59 healthy subjects and 49 TBI patients were assessed with a test for emotion recognition (Facial Expression of Emotion: Stimuli and Tests) and a gambling task (Iowa Gambling Task (IGT)). The results showed that, regardless of post traumatic amnesia duration or the presence of frontal lesions, patients were more impaired than healthy controls on both fear recognition and decision making. In both groups, a significant relationship was found between better fear recognition, the development of an advantageous strategy across the IGT and less risk behavior in the last blocks of the IGT. Educational level moderated this relationship in the final block of the IGT. This study has important clinical implications, indicating that impaired decision making and risk behavior after TBI can be preceded by deficits in the processing of fear.

  8. Impact of nonintrusive clinical decision support systems on laboratory test utilization in a large academic centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Kevin P; Chida, Natasha; Apfel, Ariella; Feldman, Leonard; Greenbaum, Adena; Tuddenham, Susan; Kendall, Emily A; Pahwa, Amit

    2018-02-15

    The near-universal prevalence of electronic health records (EHRs) has made the utilization of clinical decision support systems (CDSS) an integral strategy for improving the value of laboratory ordering. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of nonintrusive CDSS on inpatient laboratory utilization in large academic centres. Red blood cell folate, hepatitis C virus viral loads and genotypes, and type and screens were selected for study. We incorporated the appropriate indications for these labs into text that accompanied the laboratory orders in our hospital's EHR. Providers could proceed with the order without additional clicks. An interrupted time-series analysis was performed, and the primary outcome was the rate of tests ordered on all inpatient medicine floors. The rate of folate tests ordered per monthly admissions showed no significant level change at the time of the intervention with only a slight decrease in rate of 0.0109 (P = .07). There was a 43% decrease in the rate of hepatitis C virus tests per monthly admissions immediately after the intervention with a decrease of 0.0135 tests per monthly admissions (P = .02). The rate of type and screens orders per patient days each month had a significant downward trend by 0.114 before the intervention (P = .04) but no significant level change at the time of the intervention or significant change in rate after the intervention. Our study suggests that nonintrusive CDSS should be evaluated for individual laboratory tests to ensure only effective alerts continue to be used so as to avoid increasing EHR fatigue. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Decision-making among patients and their family in ALS care: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Geraldine; Hynes, Geralyn

    2017-08-11

    Practice guidelines in ALS care emphasise the role of the patient and their family in the decision-making process. We aimed to examine the ALS patient/family relationship in the decision-making process and to ascertain how patients and their family can shape one another's decisions pertaining to care. We conducted a review of peer-reviewed empirical research, published in full and in English between January 2007 and January 2017, relating to care decision-making among ALS patients and their family. Database sources included: Medline; CINAHL; AMED; PsycINFO; PsycARTICLES; and Social Sciences Full Text. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Forty-seven studies from the empirical literature were extracted. The family viewpoint was captured primarily from family members with direct care-giving duties. Patients' cognitive status was not routinely assessed. The findings revealed that the decision-making process in ALS care can be contoured by patients' and family caregivers' perceived responsibilities to one another and to the wider family. Greater attention to family member roles beyond the primary caregiver role is needed. Strategies that integrate cognitively-impaired patients into the family decision-making process require investigation. Identification of the domains in which ALS patients and their family members support one another in the decision-making process could facilitate the development of patient/family decision-making tools in ALS care.

  10. Effects of computerized clinical decision support systems on practitioner performance and patient outcomes: methods of a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, R Brian; Wilczynski, Nancy L

    2010-02-05

    Computerized clinical decision support systems are information technology-based systems designed to improve clinical decision-making. As with any healthcare intervention with claims to improve process of care or patient outcomes, decision support systems should be rigorously evaluated before widespread dissemination into clinical practice. Engaging healthcare providers and managers in the review process may facilitate knowledge translation and uptake. The objective of this research was to form a partnership of healthcare providers, managers, and researchers to review randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of computerized decision support for six clinical application areas: primary preventive care, therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing, drug prescribing, chronic disease management, diagnostic test ordering and interpretation, and acute care management; and to identify study characteristics that predict benefit. The review was undertaken by the Health Information Research Unit, McMaster University, in partnership with Hamilton Health Sciences, the Hamilton, Niagara, Haldimand, and Brant Local Health Integration Network, and pertinent healthcare service teams. Following agreement on information needs and interests with decision-makers, our earlier systematic review was updated by searching Medline, EMBASE, EBM Review databases, and Inspec, and reviewing reference lists through 6 January 2010. Data extraction items were expanded according to input from decision-makers. Authors of primary studies were contacted to confirm data and to provide additional information. Eligible trials were organized according to clinical area of application. We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect on practitioner performance or patient outcomes of patient care provided with a computerized clinical decision support system compared with patient care without such a system. Data will be summarized using descriptive summary measures, including proportions

  11. Effects of computerized clinical decision support systems on practitioner performance and patient outcomes: Methods of a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilczynski Nancy L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computerized clinical decision support systems are information technology-based systems designed to improve clinical decision-making. As with any healthcare intervention with claims to improve process of care or patient outcomes, decision support systems should be rigorously evaluated before widespread dissemination into clinical practice. Engaging healthcare providers and managers in the review process may facilitate knowledge translation and uptake. The objective of this research was to form a partnership of healthcare providers, managers, and researchers to review randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of computerized decision support for six clinical application areas: primary preventive care, therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing, drug prescribing, chronic disease management, diagnostic test ordering and interpretation, and acute care management; and to identify study characteristics that predict benefit. Methods The review was undertaken by the Health Information Research Unit, McMaster University, in partnership with Hamilton Health Sciences, the Hamilton, Niagara, Haldimand, and Brant Local Health Integration Network, and pertinent healthcare service teams. Following agreement on information needs and interests with decision-makers, our earlier systematic review was updated by searching Medline, EMBASE, EBM Review databases, and Inspec, and reviewing reference lists through 6 January 2010. Data extraction items were expanded according to input from decision-makers. Authors of primary studies were contacted to confirm data and to provide additional information. Eligible trials were organized according to clinical area of application. We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect on practitioner performance or patient outcomes of patient care provided with a computerized clinical decision support system compared with patient care without such a system. Results Data will be summarized

  12. Non-invasive Mechanical Ventilation Enhances Patient Autonomy in Decision-Making Regarding Chronic Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviri, S; Linton, D M; van Heerden, P V

    2005-06-01

    Patients with respiratory failure due to progressive muscle weakness often require chronic ventilatory support, but many do not make decisions regarding ventilation prior to a crisis. We studied the use of non-invasive ventilation as a tool to enable communication and facilitate decision-making regarding chronic ventilation. Patients with profound muscle weakness and acute respiratory failure, were supported or weaned by non-invasive positive or negative pressure ventilation. The patients were then interviewed and their informed autonomous decisions were used to plan their future management. Non-invasive ventilation could be used safely to support patients with acute respiratory failure until decisions regarding chronic ventilation are made and as an alternative means of ventilation for those who refuse tracheostomy. Non-invasive ventilation may be used in patients with profound muscle weakness, as a means of enhancing patient autonomy by improving communication and maintaining ventilation until decisions about ongoing care are made.

  13. Effectiveness of decision aids on smoking cessation in adult patients: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Fernea; Archibald, Ella; Slyer, Jason T

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of the use of decision aids in a shared decision-making encounter between any healthcare provider and adult patients who smoke, compared to standard education on smoking cessation, in any healthcare setting.Specifically, the review questions are: What is the effectiveness of the use of decision aids in a shared decision-making encounter in any healthcare setting between the healthcare provider and adult patients who smoke compared to standard education, based on the patient's.

  14. Characterizing the orthodontic patient's purchase decision: A novel approach using netnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Joseph W; Bennett, M Elizabeth; Koroluk, Lorne D; Robinson, Stacey G; Phillips, Ceib L

    2017-06-01

    A deeper and more thorough characterization of why patients do or do not seek orthodontic treatment is needed for effective shared decision making about receiving treatment. Previous orthodontic qualitative research has identified important dimensions that influence treatment decisions, but our understanding of patients' decisions and how they interpret benefits and barriers of treatment are lacking. The objectives of this study were to expand our current list of decision-making dimensions and to create a conceptual framework to describe the decision-making process. Discussion boards, rich in orthodontic decision-making data, were identified and analyzed with qualitative methods. An iterative process of data collection, dimension identification, and dimension refinement were performed to saturation. A conceptual framework was created to describe the decision-making process. Fifty-four dimensions captured the ideas discussed in regard to a patient's decision to receive orthodontic treatment. Ten domains were identified: function, esthetics, psychosocial benefits, diagnosis, finances, inconveniences, risks of treatment, individual aspects, societal attitudes, and child-specific influences, each containing specific descriptive and conceptual dimensions. A person's desires, self-perceptions, and viewpoints, the public's views on esthetics and orthodontics, and parenting philosophies impacted perceptions of benefits and barriers associated with orthodontic treatment. We identified an expanded list of dimensions, created a conceptual framework describing the orthodontic patient's decision-making process, and identified dimensions associated with yes and no decisions, giving doctors a better understanding of patient attitudes and expectations. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, William; Mahler, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT); Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT); North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR); and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART) score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. PMID:27147894

  16. The role of rapid testing and clinical decision in the diagnosis of human influenza A H1N1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BinSaeed, Abdulaziz A; Siddiqui, Amna R; Mandil, Ahmed M; Torchyan, Armen A; Tayel, Salwa A; Shaikh, Shaffi A; Habib, Hanan A; Al-Khattaf, Abdulaziz S

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the role of the rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT) and clinical decision in the diagnosis of H1N1. In November 2009, 290 suspected influenza patients were examined for H1N1 during an outbreak in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Nasopharyngeal swabs were analyzed using Directigen EZ Flu A+B kit. Monoclonal anti-human influenza A/B and reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used. Positive and negative controls were used in each run of specimens. Validity indices were calculated for RIDT and clinical diagnostic criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of RIDT were 40.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.0-48.5), and 94.5% (95% CI: 88.6-97.6). The sensitivity of clinical decision was 66.3% (95% CI: 58.4-73.4), and the specificity was 65.4% (95% CI: 56.3-73.4). The sensitivity of clinical decision was higher in early presenters (79.2%; 95% CI: 57.3-92.1). The RIDT sensitivity was higher in younger patients (48.4%; 95% CI: 35.7-61.3). The positive predictive value (PPV) was 90.4% (95% CI: 80.7-95.7) for RIDT, and 71.1% (95% CI: 63.1-78.0) for clinical decision. The PPV for RIDT was greater for older (94.7%; 95% CI: 80.9-99.1) and late (90.7%; 95% CI: 76.9-97.0) presenters. The adjusted odds ratio for clinical decision was significant for cough, headache, and fatigue. The RIDT can be useful in epidemics and high prevalence areas, whereas clinical decision, and RT-PCR complement the diagnosis of H1N1 in any setting.

  17. What influences patient decision-making in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis multidisciplinary care? A study of patient perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogden, Anne; Greenfield, David; Nugus, Peter; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2012-01-01

    Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are required to make decisions concerning quality of life and symptom management over the course of their disease. Clinicians perceive that patients' ability to engage in timely decision-making is extremely challenging. However, we lack patient perspectives on this issue. This study aimed to explore patient experiences of ALS, and to identify factors influencing their decision-making in the specialized multidisciplinary care of ALS. An exploratory study was conducted. Fourteen patients from two specialized ALS multidisciplinary clinics participated in semistructured interviews that were audio recorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed for emergent themes. Decision-making was influenced by three levels of factors, ie, structural, interactional, and personal. The structural factor was the decision-making environment of specialized multidisciplinary ALS clinics, which supported decision-making by providing patients with disease-specific information and specialized care planning. Interactional factors were the patient experiences of ALS, including patients' reaction to the diagnosis, response to deterioration, and engagement with the multidisciplinary ALS team. Personal factors were patients' personal philosophies, including their outlook on life, perceptions of control, and planning for the future. Patient approaches to decision-making reflected a focus on the present, rather than anticipating future progression of the disease and potential care needs. Decision-making for symptom management and quality of life in ALS care is enhanced when the patient's personal philosophy is supported by collaborative relationships between the patient and the multidisciplinary ALS team. Patients valued the support provided by the multidisciplinary team; however, their focus on living in the present diverged from the efforts of health professionals to prepare patients and their carers for the future. The challenge facing health

  18. Discrepancies in end-of-life decisions between elderly patients and their named surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Aaron S C; Lee, Tze Wee; Soh, Chai Rick

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to determine the attitudes of Asian elderly patients towards invasive life support measures, the degree of patient-surrogate concordance in end-of-life decision making, the extent to which patients desire autonomy over end-of-life medical decisions, the reasons behind patients' and surrogates' decisions, and the main factors influencing patients' and surrogates' decision-making processes. We hypothesize that there is significant patient-surrogate discordance in end-of-life decision making in our community. The patient and surrogate were presented with a hypothetical scenario in which the patient experienced gradual functional decline in the community before being admitted for life-threatening pneumonia. It was explained that the outcome was likely to be poor even with intensive care and each patient-surrogate pair was subsequently interviewed separately on their opinions of extraordinary life support using a standardised questionnaire. Both parties were blinded to each other's replies. In total, 30 patients and their surrogate decision-makers were interviewed. Twenty-eight (93.3%) patients and 20 (66.7%) surrogates rejected intensive care. Patient-surrogate concurrence was found in 20 pairs (66.7%). Twenty-four (80.0%) patients desired autonomy over their decision. The patients' and surrogates' top reasons for rejecting intensive treatment were treatment-related discomfort, poor prognosis and financial cost. Surrogates' top reasons for selecting intensive treatment were the hope of recovery, the need to complete final tasks and the sanctity of life. The majority of patients desire autonomy over critical care issues. Relying on the surrogates' decisions to initiate treatment may result in treatment against patients' wishes in up to one-third of critically ill elderly patients.

  19. Does physician communication style impact patient report of decision quality for breast cancer treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Kathryn A; Resnicow, Ken; Williams, Geoffrey C; Silva, Marlene; Abrahamse, Paul; Shumway, Dean A; Wallner, Lauren P; Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T

    2016-12-01

    Provider communication that supports patient autonomy has been associated with numerous positive patient outcomes. However, to date, no research has examined the relationship between perceived provider communication style and patient-assessed decision quality in breast cancer. Using a population-based sample of women with localized breast cancer, we assessed patient perceptions of autonomy-supportive communication from their surgeons and medical oncologists, as well as patient-reported decision quality. We used multivariable linear regression to examine the association between autonomy-supportive communication and subjective decision quality for surgery and chemotherapy decisions, controlling for sociodemographic and clinical factors, as well as patient-reported communication preference (non-directive or directive). Among the 1690 women included in the overall sample, patient-reported decision quality scores were positively associated with higher levels of perceived autonomy-supportive communication from surgeons (β=0.30; pcommunication style preference moderated the association between physician communication style received and perceived decision quality. Autonomy-supportive communication by physicians was associated with higher subjective decision quality among women with localized breast cancer. These results support future efforts to design interventions that enhance autonomy-supportive communication. Autonomy-supportive communication by cancer doctors can improve patients' perceived decision quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A New Voice in Science : Patient participation in decision-making on biomedical research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caron-Flinterman, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    End-users are increasingly involved in decision-making concerning science and technology. This dissertation focuses on a specific kind of end-user participation: patient participation in decision-making on bio-medical research. Since patients can be considered relevant experts and stakeholders

  1. Can promoting patient decision making be exclusionary? Moral expectations and cultural difference in the narratives of UK maternity clinicians.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, M.; Elwyn, G.; Papadopoulos, I.; Fleming, L.; Williams, G.

    2009-01-01

    Patient autonomy in health care decision making is increasingly advocated as a means of promoting patients' 'responsibilities' for treatments and costs. However, little is known with regard to clinicians' understanding of patients' potential responsibilities in decision making. We explore how

  2. Decision making about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic test strategies. Paper 2: a review of methodological and practical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Reem A; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Cheung, Adrienne; Prediger, Barbara; Brozek, Jan; Bossuyt, Patrick; Garg, Amit X; Lelgemann, Monika; Büehler, Diedrich; Schünemann, Holger J

    2017-12-01

    In this first of a series of five articles, we provide an overview of how and why healthcare-related tests and diagnostic strategies are currently applied. We also describe how our findings can be integrated with existing frameworks for making decisions that guide the use of healthcare-related tests and diagnostic strategies. We searched MEDLINE, references of identified articles, chapters in relevant textbooks, and identified articles citing classic literature on this topic. We provide updated frameworks for the potential roles and applications of tests with suggested definitions and practical examples. We also discuss study designs that are commonly used to assess tests' performance and the effects of tests on people's health. These designs include diagnostic randomized controlled trials and retrospective validation. We describe the utility of these and other currently suggested designs, which questions they can answer and which ones they cannot. In addition, we summarize the challenges unique to decision-making resulting from the use of tests. This overview highlights current challenges in the application of tests in decision-making in healthcare, provides clarifications, and informs the proposed solutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards generic online multicriteria decision support in patient-centred health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowie, Jack; Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Salkeld, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce a new online generic decision support system based on multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA), implemented in practical and user-friendly software (Annalisa©). BACKGROUND: All parties in health care lack a simple and generic way to picture and process the decisions to be made...... in pursuit of improved decision making and more informed choice within an overall philosophy of person- and patient-centred care. METHODS: The MCDA-based system generates patient-specific clinical guidance in the form of an opinion as to the merits of the alternative options in a decision, which are all......-off practicality (including resource constraints) with normative rigour and empirical complexity, in both their development and delivery, is emphasized. CONCLUSION: The MCDA-/Annalisa-based decision support system represents a prescriptive addition to the portfolio of decision-aiding tools available online...

  4. Development and pilot testing of PHARAO-a decision support system for pharmacological risk assessment in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttiger, Ylva; Laine, Kari; Korhonen, Tuomas; Lähdesmäki, Janne; Shemeikka, Tero; Julander, Margaretha; Edlert, Maria; Andersson, Marine L

    2017-12-02

    The aims of this study are to describe the development of PHARAO (Pharmacological Risk Assessment Online), a decision support system providing a risk profile for adverse events, associated with combined effects of multiple medicines, and to present data from a pilot study, testing the use, functionality, and acceptance of the PHARAO system in a clinical setting. About 1400 substances were scored in relation to their risk to cause any of nine common and/or serious adverse effects. Algorithms for each adverse effect score were developed to create individual risk profiles from the patient's list of medication. The system was tested and integrated to the electronic medical record, during a 4-month period in two geriatric wards and three primary healthcare centers, and a questionnaire was answered by the users before and after the test period. A total of 732 substances were tagged with one or more of the nine risks, most commonly with the risk of sedation or seizures. During the pilot, the system was used 933 times in 871 patients. The most common signals generated by PHARAO in these patients were related to the risks of constipation, sedation, and bleeding. A majority of responders considered PHARAO easy to use and that it gives useful support in performing medication reviews. The PHARAO decision support system, designed as a complement to a database on drug-drug interactions used nationally, worked as intended and was appreciated by the users during a 4-month test period. Integration aspects need to be improved to minimize unnecessary signaling.

  5. Multi-criteria clinical decision support: A primer on the use of multiple criteria decision making methods to promote evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G

    2010-01-01

    Current models of healthcare quality recommend that patient management decisions be evidence-based and patient-centered. Evidence-based decisions require a thorough understanding of current information regarding the natural history of disease and the anticipated outcomes of different management options. Patient-centered decisions incorporate patient preferences, values, and unique personal circumstances into the decision making process and actively involve both patients along with health care providers as much as possible. Fundamentally, therefore, evidence-based, patient-centered decisions are multi-dimensional and typically involve multiple decision makers.Advances in the decision sciences have led to the development of a number of multiple criteria decision making methods. These multi-criteria methods are designed to help people make better choices when faced with complex decisions involving several dimensions. They are especially helpful when there is a need to combine "hard data" with subjective preferences, to make trade-offs between desired outcomes, and to involve multiple decision makers. Evidence-based, patient-centered clinical decision making has all of these characteristics. This close match suggests that clinical decision support systems based on multi-criteria decision making techniques have the potential to enable patients and providers to carry out the tasks required to implement evidence-based, patient-centered care effectively and efficiently in clinical settings.The goal of this paper is to give readers a general introduction to the range of multi-criteria methods available and show how they could be used to support clinical decision-making. Methods discussed include the balance sheet, the even swap method, ordinal ranking methods, direct weighting methods, multi-attribute decision analysis, and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP).

  6. Audio-video decision support for patients: the documentary genre as a basis for decision aids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volandes, A.E.; Barry, M.J.; Wood, F.; Elwyn, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Decision support tools are increasingly using audio-visual materials. However, disagreement exists about the use of audio-visual materials as they may be subjective and biased. Methods This is a literature review of the major texts for documentary film studies to extrapolate issues of

  7. Perceived genetic knowledge, attitudes toward genetic testing, and the relationship between these among patients with a chronic disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Baanders, A.N.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genetics increasingly permeate everyday medicine. When patients want to make informed decisions about genetic testing, they require genetic knowledge. This study examined the genetic knowledge and attitudes of patients with chronic diseases, and the relationship between both. In addition,

  8. Perceived genetic knowledge, attitudes towards genetic testing, and the relationship between these among patients with a chronic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Baanders, A.N.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Genetics increasingly permeate everyday medicine. When patients want to make informed decisions about genetic testing, they require genetic knowledge. This study examined the genetic knowledge and attitudes of patients with chronic diseases, and the relationship between both. In addition,

  9. A patient recall program to enhance decisions about prostate cancer screening: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denberg Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of time and competing demands limit the ability of patients and providers to engage in informed decision-making discussions about prostate cancer screening during primary care visits. We evaluated a patient recall invervention to mitigate these challenges. Methods Using mail and telephone outreach we invited men age 50-74 years without a PSA test in the prior 12 months to make appointments with their primary care providers in order to discuss the pros and cons of PSA-based prostate cancer screening. We assessed patient responsiveness to the program, provider documentation of screening discussions, orders for PSA laboratories, and provider attitudes. Results Out of 80 eligible patients, 37 (46% scheduled and 28 (35% completed a recall appointment. A large majority (91% of patients eligible for PSA screening received an order for this test. Providers documented PSA discussions more often for these patients than for a recent sample of their other patients who received traditional care (47.8% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.009. Twelve of 14 participating providers felt the program improved their ability to impart information about the risks and benefits of screening, but were uncertain whether it influenced their patients' preexisting preferences for screening. Some expressed doubts about the advisability of PSA-specific appointments. Conclusion To a limited extent, this pilot recall intervention enhanced opportunities for discussions of prostate cancer screening between patients and their primary care providers. As currently configured, however, this program was not found to be feasible for this purpose. A future version should promote screening discussions in the context of a broader range of health maintenance concerns and include more detailed, low-literacy information to educate patients in advance of clinic visits.

  10. Supporting informed decision making online in 20 minutes: an observational web-log study of a PSA test decision aid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joseph-Williams, N.; Evans, R.; Edwards, A.; Newcombe, R.G.; Wright, P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Elwyn, G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Web-based decision aids are known to have an effect on knowledge, attitude, and behavior; important components of informed decision making. We know what decision aids achieve in randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but we still know very little about how they are used and how this

  11. Epilepsy surgery: factors that affect patient decision-making in choosing or deferring a procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher Todd; Noble, Eva; Mani, Ram; Lawler, Kathy; Pollard, John R

    2013-01-01

    Surgical resection for well-selected patients with refractory epilepsy provides seizure freedom approximately two-thirds of the time. Despite this, many good candidates for surgery, after a presurgical workup, ultimately do not consent to a procedure. The reasons why patients decline potentially effective surgery are not completely understood. We explored the socio cultural, medical, personal, and psychological differences between candidates who chose (n = 23) and those who declined surgical intervention (n = 9). We created a novel questionnaire addressing a range of possible factors important in patient decision making. We found that patients who declined surgery were less bothered by their epilepsy (despite comparable severity), more anxious about surgery, and less likely to listen to their doctors (and others) and had more comorbid psychiatric disease. Patients who chose surgery were more embarrassed by their seizures, more interested in being "seizure-free", and less anxious about specific aspects of surgery. Patient attitudes, beliefs, and anxiety serve as barriers to ideal care. These results can provide opportunities for education, treatment, and intervention. Additionally, patients who fit a profile of someone who is likely to defer surgery may not be appropriate for risky and expensive presurgical testing.

  12. Epilepsy Surgery: Factors That Affect Patient Decision-Making in Choosing or Deferring a Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Todd Anderson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection for well-selected patients with refractory epilepsy provides seizure freedom approximately two-thirds of the time. Despite this, many good candidates for surgery, after a presurgical workup, ultimately do not consent to a procedure. The reasons why patients decline potentially effective surgery are not completely understood. We explored the socio cultural, medical, personal, and psychological differences between candidates who chose (n = 23 and those who declined surgical intervention (n = 9. We created a novel questionnaire addressing a range of possible factors important in patient decision making. We found that patients who declined surgery were less bothered by their epilepsy (despite comparable severity, more anxious about surgery, and less likely to listen to their doctors (and others and had more comorbid psychiatric disease. Patients who chose surgery were more embarrassed by their seizures, more interested in being “seizure-free”, and less anxious about specific aspects of surgery. Patient attitudes, beliefs, and anxiety serve as barriers to ideal care. These results can provide opportunities for education, treatment, and intervention. Additionally, patients who fit a profile of someone who is likely to defer surgery may not be appropriate for risky and expensive presurgical testing.

  13. The Functional Test for Agility Performance is a Reliable Quick Decision-Making Test for Skilled Water Polo Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucher, Guilherme; de Souza Castro, Flávio Antônio; da Silva, António José Rocha Martins; Garrido, Nuno Domingos

    2015-06-27

    The reliability of the Functional Test for Agility Performance has only been evaluated in water polo players in a small group of novice athletes. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the Functional Test for Agility Performance in skilled water polo players. Forty-two athletes (17.81 ± 3.24 years old) with a minimum of 5 years of competitive experience (7.05 ± 2.84 years) and playing at the national or international level were evaluated. The Functional Test for Agility Performance is characterized as a specific open decision-making test where a tested player moves as quickly as possible in accordance to a pass made by another player. The time spent in the test was measured by two experienced coaches. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), 95% limit of agreement (LOA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurements (SEM) were used for data analysis. Athletes completed the Functional Test for Agility Performance in 4.15 0.47 s. The ICC value was 0.87 (95% IC = 0.80-0.92). The SEM varied between 0.24 and 0.38 s. The LOA was 1.20 s and the CV average considering each individual trial was 6%. The Functional Test for Agility Performance was shown to be a reliable quick decision-making test for skilled water polo players.

  14. The Functional Test for Agility Performance is a Reliable Quick Decision-Making Test for Skilled Water Polo Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucher Guilherme

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of the Functional Test for Agility Performance has only been evaluated in water polo players in a small group of novice athletes. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the Functional Test for Agility Performance in skilled water polo players. Forty-two athletes (17.81 ± 3.24 years old with a minimum of 5 years of competitive experience (7.05 ± 2.84 years and playing at the national or international level were evaluated. The Functional Test for Agility Performance is characterized as a specific open decision-making test where a tested player moves as quickly as possible in accordance to a pass made by another player. The time spent in the test was measured by two experienced coaches. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA, 95% limit of agreement (LOA, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and standard error of measurements (SEM were used for data analysis. Athletes completed the Functional Test for Agility Performance in 4.15 0.47 s. The ICC value was 0.87 (95% IC = 0.80-0.92. The SEM varied between 0.24 and 0.38 s. The LOA was 1.20 s and the CV average considering each individual trial was 6%. The Functional Test for Agility Performance was shown to be a reliable quick decision-making test for skilled water polo players.

  15. Delivering patient decision aids on the Internet: definitions, theories, current evidence, and emerging research areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Aubri S; Volk, Robert J; Saarimaki, Anton; Stirling, Christine; Li, Linda C; Härter, Martin; Kamath, Geetanjali R; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration identified twelve quality dimensions to guide assessment of patient decision aids. One dimension-the delivery of patient decision aids on the Internet-is relevant when the Internet is used to provide some or all components of a patient decision aid. Building on the original background chapter, this paper provides an updated definition for this dimension, outlines a theoretical rationale, describes current evidence, and discusses emerging research areas. An international, multidisciplinary panel of authors examined the relevant theoretical literature and empirical evidence through 2012. The updated definition distinguishes Internet-delivery of patient decision aids from online health information and clinical practice guidelines. Theories in cognitive psychology, decision psychology, communication, and education support the value of Internet features for providing interactive information and deliberative support. Dissemination and implementation theories support Internet-delivery for providing the right information (rapidly updated), to the right person (tailored), at the right time (the appropriate point in the decision making process). Additional efforts are needed to integrate the theoretical rationale and empirical evidence from health technology perspectives, such as consumer health informatics, user experience design, and human-computer interaction. As of 2012, the updated theoretical rationale and emerging evidence suggest potential benefits to delivering patient decision aids on the Internet. However, additional research is needed to identify best practices and quality metrics for Internet-based development, evaluation, and dissemination, particularly in the areas of interactivity, multimedia components, socially-generated information, and implementation strategies.

  16. [Barriers and facilitators to implementing shared decision-making in oncology: Patient perceptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Moreno, M; Padilla-Garrido, N; Huelva-López, L; Aguado-Correa, F; Bayo-Calero, J; Bayo-Lozano, E

    To determine, from the point of view of the oncological patient, who made the decision about their treatment, as well as the major barriers and facilitators that enabled Shared Decision Making to be implemented. A cross-sectional, descriptive, sand association study using a self-report questionnaire to selected cancer patients, with casual sampling in different oncology clinics and random time periods. A total of 108 patients provided analysable data. The information was collected on sociodemographic and clinical variables, who made the decision about treatment, and level of agreement or disagreement with various barriers and facilitators. More than one-third (38.1%) of patients claimed to have participated in shared decision making with their doctor. Barriers such as, time, the difficulty of understanding, the paternalism, lack of fluid communication, and having preliminary and often erroneous information influenced the involvement in decision-making. However, to have or not have sufficient tools to aid decision making or the patient's interest to participate had no effect. As regards facilitators, physician motivation, their perception of improvement, and the interest of the patient had a positive influence. The exception was the possibility of financial incentives to doctors. The little, or no participation perceived by cancer patients in decisions about their health makes it necessary to introduce improvements in the health care model to overcome barriers and promote a more participatory attitude in the patient. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors influencing patients' preferences and perceived involvement in shared decision-making in mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliacin, Johanne; Salyers, Michelle P; Kukla, Marina; Matthias, Marianne S

    2015-02-01

    Although research has suggested that patients desire to participate in shared decision-making, recent studies show that most patients take a passive role in their treatment decisions. The discrepancy between patients' expressed desire and actual behaviors underscores the need to better understand how patients perceive shared decision-making and what factors influence their participation. To investigate patients' preferences and appraisals of their involvement in treatment decisions. Fifty-four qualitative interviews were conducted with veterans receiving outpatient mental health care at a U.S. Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. Participants outlined several factors that influence their preferences and involvement in treatment decisions. These include the patient-provider relationship, fear of being judged, perceived inadequacy, and a history of substance abuse. Patients' preferences and willingness to engage in shared decision-making fluctuate over time and are context dependent. A better understanding of these factors and a strong patient-provider relationship will facilitate better measurement and implementation of shared decision-making.

  18. Clinical decision making in dermatology: observation of consultations and the patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaj, F M; Salek, M S; Basra, M K A; Finlay, A Y

    2010-01-01

    Clinical decision making is a complex process and might be influenced by a wide range of clinical and non-clinical factors. Little is known about this process in dermatology. The aim of this study was to explore the different types of management decisions made in dermatology and to identify factors influencing those decisions from observation of consultations and interviews with the patients. 61 patient consultations were observed by a physician with experience in dermatology. The patients were interviewed immediately after each consultation. Consultations and interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and their content analysed using thematic content analysis. The most common management decisions made during the consultations included: follow-up, carrying out laboratory investigation, starting new topical treatment, renewal of systemic treatment, renewal of topical treatment, discharging patients and starting new systemic treatment. Common influences on those decisions included: clinical factors such as ineffectiveness of previous therapy, adherence to prescribing guidelines, side-effects of medications, previous experience with the treatment, deterioration or improvement in the skin condition, and chronicity of skin condition. Non-clinical factors included: patient's quality of life, patient's friends or relatives, patient's time commitment, travel or transportation difficulties, treatment-related costs, availability of consultant, and availability of treatment. The study has shown that patients are aware that management decisions in dermatology are influenced by a wide range of clinical and non-clinical factors. Education programmes should be developed to improve the quality of decision making. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Patient and family involvement in decision making for management of cancer patients at a centre in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jia An; Quah, Yan Ling; Yang, Grace Meijuan; Menon, Sumytra; Radha Krishna, Lalit Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The practice of patient autonomy within the prevailing bioethical framework in the West appears increasingly at odds with the prominent influence of the family in medical decision making in the Asian culture. The actual extent of involvement of patient versus the family in the decision making process for cancer management in clinical practice is largely unknown in Asia. (1) To describe patient and family involvement in healthcare decision making in actual practice, and to determine whether those practices are consistent with Singapore law; and (2) to act as a pilot for a larger prospective study examining the preferences of cancer patients on the decision making process, and the reasons for excluding patients from that process. A retrospective review of patients who died in an oncology ward in Singapore General Hospital from February to April 2011. Patient and family involvement in discussions on (1) disclosure of diagnosis, (2) initial treatment decisions and (3) initiation of a 'maximum ward management' order was evaluated by reviewing case notes completed by healthcare professionals. Data were collected for 55 patients. Involvement of patients and families at first disclosure of diagnosis was noted in 61% and 64% of cases, respectively. In 12% of cases, the family requested withholding of the diagnosis from the patient. 86% of patients were involved in the initial treatment decisions, and their family was involved in 65% of cases. Only 9% of the 32 alert patients were consulted in end of life decisions. Factors associated with lower patient involvement were advanced age and inability to speak English. While most cancer patients are involved in the healthcare decision making process during the early phase, familial involvement gains prominence as the disease progresses. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Shared decision making and patient choice for growth hormone therapy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George B

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Belinda George, Vageesh Ayyar Department of Endocrinology, St. John’s Medical College Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Growth hormone has now been available in medical practice for close to 50 years. Its use has provided dramatic results in patients with growth hormone deficiency and it is associated with an overall favorable safety profile. Over the years, the utility of growth hormone has expanded to include treatment for short stature associated with conditions other than growth hormone deficiency, and this situation warrants greater involvement of the child and parents in the shared decision-making process. Shared decision making is in good conformance to the principle of informed consent, and it also improves the compliance and adherence to therapy as the patient fully understands the benefit and safety of the treatment. In the pediatric-care setting, the decision-making interactions usually occur between the health care provider, patient, and parents. The process may range from an autonomous decision-making pattern, where the patient or parents are fully responsible for the decision taken, to the paternalistic decision-making pattern, where the health care provider assumes full responsibility for the decision taken. However, the ideal situation is one where a truly shared decision-making process happens, in which the doctor and patient/parents work together to choose an evidence-based option, in line with the patient’s preferences and wishes. The limited data available on shared decision making with regard to growth hormone replacement, however, is not very encouraging and suggests that the actual involvement of the parents as perceived by them is less than optimal. Introduction of a simple structured model for a shared decision-making process that can be easily incorporated into clinical practice and familiarization of health care providers with the same is essential to improve our shared decision-making practices

  1. The Experience of Surrogate Decision Makers on Being Approached for Consent for Patient Participation in Research. A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Karen E A; Prats, Clara Juando; Maione, Maria; Lanceta, Mary; Zubrinich, Celia; Jeffs, Lianne; Smith, Orla M

    2017-02-01

    Recruitment in critical care research differs from other contexts in important ways: patients lack decision-making capacity, uncertainty exists regarding patient prognosis, and critical illnesses are often associated with appreciable morbidity and mortality. We aimed to describe the experiences of surrogate decision makers (SDMs) in being approached for consent for critically ill patients to participate in research. A multicenter, qualitative study involving semistructured interviews with 26 SDMs, who provided or declined surrogate consent for research participation, at 5 Canadian centers nested within a multicenter observational study of research recruitment practices. Transcripts were reviewed by three qualitative researchers, and data were analyzed using grounded theory and a narrative critical analysis. SDMs were guided by an overarching desire for the patient to live. Surrogate research decision-making involved three sequential stages: (1) being approached; (2) reflecting on participation; and (3) making a decision. In stage 1, SDMs identified factors (their expectations, how they were approached, the attributes of the person approaching, and study risks and benefits) that characterized their consent encounter and affirmed a preference to be approached in person. If SDMs perceived the risk of participation to be too high or felt patients may not benefit from participation, they did not contemplate further. In stage 2, SDMs who knew the patient's wishes or had a deeper understanding of research prioritized the patient's wishes and the perceived benefits of participation. Without this information, SDMs prioritized obtaining more and better care for the patient, considered what was in their mutual best interests, and valued healthcare professional's knowledge. Trust in healthcare professionals was essential to proceeding further. In stage 3, SDMs considered six factors in rendering decisions. SDMs engaged in three sequential stages and considered six factors in

  2. Testing the Intercultural Model of Ethical Decision Making with Counselor Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Melissa; Goodrich, Kristopher M.; Gilbride, Dennis D.

    2013-01-01

    A training intervention using the Intercultural Model of Ethical Decision Making was tested with a sample of 48 counselor trainees enrolled in 3 counseling courses across 2 universities. Postintervention data indicated students' scores increased significantly on 5 of 6 evaluation criteria as well as on the overall total score. Although…

  3. The Bigelow Junior High School Field Test. Information System for Vocational Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Patricia; Madoff, Marjorie

    All aspects of a five-week field test of the Information System for Vocational Decisions (ISVD) are reported. Sixteen students were involved; each averaged 3.5 sessions with the system. Results indicate that the most frequently accessed script was the Occupational Preference Script. Nearly half of the students (seven) accessed three data files,…

  4. The Decisions of Elementary School Principals: A Test of Ideal Type Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, John T.

    Interviews with 25 Georgia elementary school principals provided data that could be used to test an application of Max Weber's ideal type methodology to decision-making. Alfred Schuetz's model of the rational act, based on one of Weber's ideal types, was analyzed and translated into describable acts and behaviors. Interview procedures were…

  5. Patient decision aids in routine maternity care: Benefits, barriers, and new opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Gabrielle; Thompson, Rachel; Watson, Bernadette; Miller, Yvette D

    2016-02-01

    Participation in decision-making, supported by comprehensive and quality information provision, is increasingly emphasised as a priority for women in maternity care. Patient decision aids are tools that can offer women greater access to information and guidance to participate in maternity care decision-making. Relative to their evaluation in controlled settings, the implementation of patient decision aids in routine maternity care has received little attention and our understanding of which approaches may be effective is limited. This paper critically discusses the application of patient decision aids in routine maternity care and explores viable solutions for promoting their successful uptake. A range of patient decision aids have been developed for use within maternity care, and controlled trials have highlighted their positive impact on the decision-making process for women. Nevertheless, evidence of successful patient decision aid implementation in real world health care settings is lacking due to practical and ideological barriers that exist. Patient-directed social marketing campaigns are a relatively novel approach to patient decision aid delivery that may facilitate their adoption in maternity care, at least in the short-term, by overcoming common implementation barriers. Social marketing may also be particularly well suited to maternity care, given the unique characteristics of this health context. The potential of social marketing campaigns to facilitate patient decision aid adoption in maternity care highlights the need for pragmatic trials to evaluate their effectiveness. Identifying which sub-groups of women are more or less likely to respond to these strategies will further direct implementation. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Patch testing experience with 1000 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajaj A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patch testing is a definitive tool for diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis (ACD. It reveals the prevalence and trends of contact sensitization in the community, thereby paving the way for better standard series. There is paucity of large series of patch-tested patients from India. Aim: To report the 9-year patch-test data from a single general dermatology centre in North India. Methods: Consecutive patients presenting with signs/symptoms of suspected ACD were patch tested from May 1997 to April 2006. The Indian Standard Series was used. Parthenium was tested only in selected patients and cetrimide and chloroxylenol were added to the series. Results: In total, records of 1000 patients (566 male, 434 female were analyzed, yielding 1155 positive reactions in 590 (59% patients. Footwear dermatitis was the commonest suspected diagnosis, followed by ACD to medicaments, cosmetic dermatitis and plant dermatitis. Out of the allergens that were tested in all the patients, positivity to nickel was the commonest (12.9%, followed by potassium dichromate (11.1% neomycin (7%, mercaptobenzthiazole (6.6%, nitrofurazone (6%, colophony (5.7%, fragrance mix (5.5% and cobalt chloride (5.4%. However, parthenium was the commonest allergen based on the proportion of patients tested with it (14.5%. In men, potassium dichromate (30% was the commonest sensitizer and in women, nickel (43% was the commonest to show patch-test positivity. Conclusion: Our study revealed higher prevalence of footwear and medicament dermatitis in comparison to existing data. Allergy to antiseptics is significant in our patients. Further collaborative studies involving patients from other parts of India are required to have an overall view of ACD in India.

  7. Use of a patient decision aid for prenatal screening for Down syndrome: what do pregnant women say?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portocarrero, M.E.; Giguere, A.M.; Lepine, J.; Garvelink, M.M.; Robitaille, H.; Delanoe, A.; Levesque, I.; Wilson, B.J.; Rousseau, F.; Legare, F.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient decision aids (PtDAs) help people make difficult, values-sensitive decisions. Prenatal screening for assessing the risk of genetic conditions in the fetus is one such decision and patient decision aids are rarely used in this clinical context. We sought to identify factors

  8. A Clinical Decision Support System for Monitoring Post-Colonoscopy Patient Follow-Up and Scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadia, Roxanne; Shifman, Mark; Levin, Forrest L; Marenco, Luis; Brandt, Cynthia A; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Taddei, Tamar; Krauthammer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a natural language processing (NLP)-based clinical decision support (CDS) system that is geared towards colon cancer care coordinators as the end users. The system is implemented using a metadata- driven Structured Query Language (SQL) function (discriminant function). For our pilot study, we have developed a training corpus consisting of 2,085 pathology reports from the VA Connecticut Health Care System (VACHS). We categorized reports as "actionable"- requiring close follow up, or "non-actionable"- requiring standard or no follow up. We then used 600 distinct pathology reports from 6 different VA sites as our test corpus. Analysis of our test corpus shows that our NLP approach yields 98.5% accuracy in identifying cases that required close clinical follow up. By integrating this into our cancer care tracking system, our goal is to ensure that patients with worrisome pathology receive appropriate and timely follow-up and care.

  9. Multidisciplinary decisions in breast cancer: does the patient receive what the team has recommended?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, S; Foreman, J; Wallis, M G; Caldas, C; Britton, P

    2013-01-01

    Background: A multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to breast cancer management is the gold standard. The aim is to evaluate MDT decision making in a modern breast unit. Methods: All referrals to the breast MDT where breast cancer was diagnosed from 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2011 were included. Multidisciplinary team decisions were compared with subsequent patient management and classified as concordant or discordant. Results: Over the study period, there were 3230 MDT decisions relating to 705 patients. Overall, 91.5% (2956 out of 3230) of decisions were concordant, 4.5% (146 out of 3230), were discordant and 4% (128 out of 3230) had no MDT decision. Of 146 discordant decisions, 26 (17.8%) were considered ‘unjustifiable' as there was no additional information available after the MDT to account for the change in management. The remaining 120 discordant MDT decisions were considered ‘justifiable', as management was altered due to patient choice (n=61), additional information available after MDT (n=54) or MDT error (n=5). Conclusion: The vast majority of MDT decisions are implemented. Management alteration was most often due to patient choice or additional information available after the MDT. A minority of management alterations were ‘unjustifiable' and the authors recommend that any patient whose treatment is subsequently changed should have MDT rediscussion prior to treatment. PMID:23736032

  10. A preliminary evaluation of trust and shared decision making among intensive care patients' family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Elizabeth G; Wolfe, Katherine

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to preliminarily evaluate ICU family members' trust and shared decision making using modified versions of the Wake Forest Trust Survey and the Shared Decision Making-9 Survey. Using a descriptive approach, the perceptions of family members of ICU patients (n=69) of trust and shared decision making were measured using the Wake Forest Trust Survey and the 9-item Shared Decision Making (SDM-9) Questionnaire. Both surveys were modified slightly to apply to family members of ICU patients and to include perceptions of nurses as well as physicians. Overall, family members reported high levels of trust and inclusion in decision making. Family members who lived with the patient had higher levels of trust than those who did not. Family members who reported strong agreement among other family about treatment decisions had higher levels of trust and higher SDM-9 scores than those who reported less family agreement. The modified surveys may be useful in evaluating family members' trust and shared decision making in ICU settings. Future studies should include development of a comprehensive patient-centered care framework that focuses on its central goal of maintaining provider-patient/family partnerships as an avenue toward effective shared decision making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Emergency Physicians' Perceptions and Decision-making Processes Regarding Patients Presenting with Palpitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Marc A; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Hoffman, Jerome R; Mower, William R; Moheimani, Roya S; Sun, Benjamin C; Quigley, Denise D

    2015-08-01

    Palpitations are a common emergency department (ED) complaint, yet relatively little research exists on this topic from an emergency care perspective. We sought to describe the perceptions and clinical decision-making processes of emergency physicians (EP) surrounding patients with palpitations. We conducted 21 semistructured interviews with a convenience sample of EPs. We recruited participants from academic and community practice settings from four regions of the United States. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using a combination of structural coding and grounded theory approaches with ATLAS.ti, a qualitative data analysis software program (version 7; Atlas.ti Scientific Software Development GmbH, Berlin, Germany). EPs perceive palpitations to be a common but generally benign chief complaint. EPs' clinical approach to palpitations, with regards to testing, treatment, and ED management, can be classified as relating to one or more of the following themes: (1) risk stratification, (2) diagnostic categorization, (3) algorithmic management, and (4) case-specific gestalt. With regard to disposition decisions, four main themes emerged: (1) presence of a serious diagnosis, (2) perceived need for further cardiac testing/monitoring, (3) presence of key associated symptoms, (4) request of other physician or patient desire. The interrater reliability exercise yielded a Fleiss' kappa measure of 0.69, indicating substantial agreement between coders. EPs perceive palpitations to be a common but generally benign chief complaint. EPs rely on one or more of four main clinical approaches to manage these patients. These findings could help guide future efforts at developing risk-stratification tools and clinical algorithms for patients with palpitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Preoperative genetic testing impacts surgical decision making in BRCA mutation carriers with breast cancer: a retrospective cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Siddhartha; Reeves, Ashley; Campian, Sarah; Sufka, Amy; Zakalik, Dana

    2017-01-01

    The impact of timing of genetic testing on surgical decision making in women with breast cancer and BRCA mutation is not well known. Women who were found to carry a deleterious BRCA mutation and had been diagnosed with breast cancer were identified from a database at Beaumont Health. Women who had received BRCA positive results at least a day prior to their index surgery were considered to be aware of their mutation status prior to surgery. Baseline characteristics and surgical choices were compared between women who were aware of their mutation status prior to surgery and those who were not. Fischer's exact test was used for categorical variables and Mann-Whitney U-Test was used for continuous variables. A total of 220 patients were included in the final analysis, 208 (94.5%) with unilateral breast cancer and 12 (5.5%) with bilateral breast cancer. Out of the 208 patients with unilateral breast cancer, 106 (51.0%) patients were aware of their mutation status prior to index surgery while 102 (49%) were not. A significantly (p < 0.05) higher proportion of women underwent contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in the group that was aware of their mutation status prior to index surgery compared to the group that was not (76.4% vs 14.7%). Our study demonstrates that knowledge of BRCA mutation status impacts surgical decision making in favor of bilateral mastectomy in patients who are aware of their results prior to index surgery. This finding supports the practice of preoperative genetic testing in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer.

  13. Advance directives: cancer patients' preferences and family-based decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan-Fang; Lin, Jin-Xiang; Li, Xing; Lin, Qu; Ma, Xiao-Kun; Chen, Jie; Wu, Dong-Hao; Wei, Li; Yin, Liang-Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yuan

    2017-07-11

    Advance directives are a sensitive issue among traditional Chinese people, who usually refrain from mentioning this topic until it is imperative. Medical decisions for cancer patients are made by their families, and these decisions might violate patients' personal will. This study aimed to examine the acceptance of advance directives among Chinese cancer patients and their families and patient participation in this procedure and, finally, to analyze the moral risk involved. While 246 patients and their family members refused official discussion of an advance directive, the remaining 166 patients and their families accepted the concept of an advance directive and signed a document agreeing to give up invasive treatment when the anti-cancer treatment was terminated. Of these, only 24 patients participated in the decision making. For 101 patients, anti-cancer therapy was ended prematurely with as many as 37 patients not told about their potential loss of health interests. Participants were 412 adult cancer patients from 9 leading hospitals across China. An advance directive was introduced to the main decision makers for each patient; if they wished to sign it, the advance directive would be systematically discussed. A questionnaire was given to the oncologists in charge of each patient to evaluate the interaction between families and patients, patients' awareness of their disease, and participation in an advance directive. Advance directives were not widely accepted among Chinese cancer patients unless anti-cancer therapy was terminated. Most cancer patients were excluded from the discussion of an advance directive.

  14. Challenges, Dilemmas and Factors Involved in PGD Decision-Making: Providers' and Patients' Views, Experiences and Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzman, Robert

    2017-12-16

    Providers and patients are considering and pursuing PGD for ever-more conditions, but questions arise concerning how they make, view and experience these decisions, and what challenges they may face. Thirty-seven in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted (with 27 IVF providers and 10 patients). Patients and providers struggled with challenges and dilemmas about whether to pursue PGD in specific cases, and how to decide. Respondents varied in how they viewed, experienced and made these choices, and for which conditions to pursue PGD (from lethal, childhood-onset conditions to milder, treatable, or adult-onset disorders). Several factors were involved, including differences in gene penetrance, predictability, and phenotypic expression, and disease severity, age of onset, treatability, stigma and degree of disability. Providers and patients face questions regarding possibilities of screening for more than one condition in one set of embryos, and limitations of PGD (e.g., inaccurate results). Characteristics of providers (e.g., amount of PGD experience, understandings of genetics, and use of genetic counselors), and of patients (e.g., related to broader moral and social attitudes) can also affect these decisions. These data, the first to examine several key questions concerning PGD, suggest that providers and patients confront several dilemmas. These findings have critical implications for future practice, guidelines, education and research.

  15. Nonverbal dichotic test in patients with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Zazo Ortiz

    Full Text Available Abstract Auditory processing during childhood may be altered if there is any predisposing factor during the course of development. Neurological disorders are among the risk factors for auditory processing disorders. Some studies have shown verbal auditory processing disorder in children with epilepsy. Objective: To verify the performance of children with epilepsy on a nonverbal dichotic test. Methods: Thirty-eight subjects, 23 female and 15 male, ranging from 7 to 16 years of age with neurological diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy, without clinical or imaging evidence of cerebral lesion were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups: 23 patients diagnosed with partial seizures and 15 patients with generalized seizures. Illiterate children, children with hearing thresholds exceeding the normal range and with brain lesions confirmed either clinically or by imaging tests were excluded from the study group. Results: Analysis of the performance of epileptic patients with partial and generalized seizures on the Nonverbal Dichotic Test revealed that the majority of patients with epilepsy showed impairments in the test, with no significant differences related to seizure type, generalized or partial. Although patients with partial and generalized seizures performed similarly, all the epileptic patients showed different performance to a normal population. Conclusions: This study revealed a high prevalence of impairments among epileptic patients in relation to nonverbal processing in a dichotic paradigm.

  16. Age and Graphomotor Decision Making Assessed with the Digital Clock Drawing Test: The Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piers, Ryan J; Devlin, Kathryn N; Ning, Boting; Liu, Yulin; Wasserman, Ben; Massaro, Joseph M; Lamar, Melissa; Price, Catherine C; Swenson, Rod; Davis, Randall; Penney, Dana L; Au, Rhoda; Libon, David J

    2017-10-08

    Digital Clock Drawing Test (dCDT) technology enables the examination of detailed neurocognitive behavior as behavior unfolds in in real time; a capability that cannot be obtained using a traditional pen and paper testing format. Parameters obtained from the dCDT were used to investigate neurocognitive constructs related to higher-order neurocognitive decision-making and information processing speed. The current research sought to determine the effect of age as related to combined motor and non-motor components of drawing, and higher-order, decision-making latencies. A large group of stroke- and dementia- free Framingham Heart Study participants were administered the dCDT to command and copy with hands set for "10 after 11". Six age groups (age range 28-98) were constructed. Differences between age groups were found for total time to completion, total pen stroke count and higher-order, decision-making latencies in both command and copy test conditions. Longer age-related decision-making latencies may reflect a greater need for working memory and increased self-monitoring in older subjects. These latency measures have potential to serve as neurocognitive biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease and other insidious neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Management of the single liver nodule in a cirrhotic patient: a decision analysis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Serag, Hashem B; Mallat, Damien B; Rabeneck, Linda

    2005-02-01

    The widespread use of liver imaging in patients with cirrhosis results in the discovery of small (decision analysis model using a decision tree and Markov model. We assumed that all patients undergo an initial "diagnostic phase" consisting of an imaging study and serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Patients with a "positive initial diagnostic phase" for HCC are referred for either imaging-guided biopsy (IGB) or surgical resection or orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) without preceding IGB. IGB, if positive for HCC, was followed by OLT, surgical resection, or local therapy. Patients with a "negative initial diagnostic phase" undergo either repeat diagnostic testing (imaging, AFP) every 4 months or are referred for either OLT, surgical resection, or IGB followed by interventions. Probability assumptions were estimated from the published literature. The outcomes compared were 3-year overall survival and recurrence-free survival. When the initial diagnostic phase is positive for HCC, OLT it is associated with the longest survival. In the sensitivity analysis, when the 3-year overall survival for patients referred to OLT is <54%, surgical resection or IGB preceding therapy become more favorable strategies. This 3-year overall survival (<54%) associated with OLT is reached after a waiting time of 4 months on the transplant list, if a 4% monthly dropout rate is assumed. When the initial diagnostic phase is negative for HCC, then performing IGB, before proceeding to therapeutic intervention, is associated with the longest 3-year overall survival. If the IGB is positive, subsequent OLT is associated with the longest survival. The higher the predictive value of the initial diagnostic phase for HCC, the more favorable is OLT (for the "positive results" arm), and follow-up testing (for the "negative results" arm). In conclusion, given a high pretest likelihood of HCC in a single liver nodule detected during surveillance in patients with cirrhosis, IGB may not be required in the

  18. Testing with fine fragrances in eczema patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Frosch, Peter J; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra

    2001-01-01

    The frequencies of contact allergic reactions to 2 fine fragrances were studied by patch testing. Further, a comparison was made of test results before and after evaporation of the solvent. A total of 480 consecutive eczema patients were included, 100 in the Dortmund clinic and 380 in the Gentoft...

  19. Influential factors on treatment decision making among patients with colorectal cancer: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranley, Nicole M; Curbow, Barbara; George, Thomas J; Christie, Juliette

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, a greater emphasis has been placed on shared decision-making (SDM) techniques between providers and patients with the goal of helping patients make informed decisions about their care and subsequently to improve patient health outcomes. Previous research has shown variability in treatment decision-making among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), and there is little comprehensive information available to help explain this variability. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the current state of the literature on factors that are influential in treatment decision-making among patients with CRC. A priori search terms using Boolean connectors were used to examine PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, and MEDLINE for relevant studies. Eligibility criteria for inclusion in the study included patients with CRC and examination of influences on CRC treatment decision-making. All relevant data were extracted including, author, title and year, study methodology, and study results. Findings (n = 13) yielded influences in four areas: informational, patient treatment goals, patient role preferences, and relationship with provider. Quality of life and trust in physician were rated a high priority among patients when making decisions between different therapeutic options. Several studies found that patients wanted to be informed and involved but did not necessarily want to make autonomous treatment choices, with many preferring a more passive role. Providers who initiate a dialog to better understand their patients' treatment goals can establish rapport, increase patient understanding of treatment options, and help patients assume their desired role in their decision-making. Overall, there were a small number of studies that met all inclusion criteria with most used a cross-sectional design.

  20. Danish Translation and Cultural Adaption of the 9-Item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) patient version

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulbæk, Mette; Jørgensen, Marianne Johansson; Primdahl, Jette

    2017-01-01

    Danish Translation and Cultural Adaption of the 9-Item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) patient version.......Danish Translation and Cultural Adaption of the 9-Item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) patient version....

  1. Residents' end-of-life decision making with adult hospitalized patients: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Todd E; Ahern, Stéphane P; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Skrobik, Yoanna

    2005-07-01

    The authors performed a structured literature review to understand residents' experiences with end-of-life (EOL) decision making with adult hospitalized patients, specifically regarding decisions to withhold or withdraw advanced life-support measures. An Ovid-based strategy was used to search Medline, ERIC, PsychINFO, and CINHAL databases for articles published between 1966 and February 2005, combining the domains of "resuscitation orders," "decision making," and "internship and residency." All quantitative and qualitative studies examining residents' EOL decision making with adult hospitalized patients were included. The authors developed and applied a scoring system for relevance and quality, performed data abstraction and quality assessment independently and in duplicate, then met to collate findings and identify factors in residents' EOL decision making. The searches yielded 884 articles, of which 26 were included. Variable methodologies precluded meta-analysis. In these studies, residents felt unprepared to handle patient EOL decision making, although exposure to EOL discussions helped them gain confidence. Residents' attitudes, skills, and knowledge were key determinants of whether EOL decisions were addressed. Many misinterpreted the terms "DNR" and "futility." Residents' understanding of the patient EOL decision-making process could be extremely variable, and their do-not-resuscitate discussions suboptimal. Residents' lived practice experience of the patient EOL decision-making process was often at odds with what they were taught in formal curricula. Educational strategies aimed at changing residents' knowledge, skills and attitude should address the hidden curriculum for the patient EOL decision-making process that is part of the experienced culture of every day practice. Future studies of this experienced culture would inform specific educational interventions.

  2. Decision-making capacity of elderly patients assessed through the vignette method: imagination or reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, A.; Smit, J.H.; Leeuwen, van E.; Tilburg, van W.; Jonker, C.

    2005-01-01

    This article evaluates whether providing hypothetical or realistic information influences the assessment of decision-making capacity in elderly patients with (and without) cognitive impairment. Decision-making capacity was assessed by means of a clinical vignette that presented a choice about

  3. Getting on the same page: Communication, patient involvement and shared understanding of "decisions" in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leppin, Aaron L.; Kunneman, Marleen; Hathaway, Julie; Fernandez, Cara; Montori, Victor M.; Tilburt, Jon C.

    2018-01-01

    BackgroundPatients and clinicians do not often agree on whether a decision has been made about cancer care. This could be explained by factors related to communication quality and/or the type of decision being made. MethodsWe used a self-developed coding scheme to code a random sample of 128

  4. A quality-of-data aware mobile decision support system for patients with chronic illnesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larburu Rubio, Nekane; van Schooten, B.W.; Shalom, Erez; Fung, L.S.N.; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Jones, Valerie M.; Riano, David; Lenz, Richard; Miksch, Silvia; Peleg, Mor; Reichert, M.U.; ten Teije, Annette

    2015-01-01

    We present a mobile decision support system (mDSS) which runs on a patient Body Area Network consisting of a smartphone and a set of biosensors. Quality-of-Data (QoD) awareness in decision making is achieved by means of a component known as the Quality-of-Data Broker, which also runs on the

  5. The design of patient decision support interventions: addressing the theory-practice gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwyn, G.; Stiel, M.; Durand, M.A.; Boivin, J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although an increasing number of decision support interventions for patients (including decision aids) are produced, few make explicit use of theory. We argue the importance of using theory to guide design. The aim of this work was to address this theory-practice gap and to examine how a

  6. Towards client-centered counseling: development and testing of the WHO Decision-Making Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah L; Kim, Young Mi; Church, Kathryn

    2010-12-01

    To describe development and testing of a counseling tool intended to inform family planning clients while helping the family planning provider facilitate the client's decision-making process; and to discuss challenges and requisites for shifting to shared decision-making from the extremes of decision-making dominated by the provider, on one hand, or unaided by the provider, on the other. DEVELOPMENT OF THE TOOL: The WHO Decision-Making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers is derived from evidence-based principles of client-centered care and counseling. This article discusses how these principles are manifested in the Tool and how the Tool aids both provider and client in improving counseling. Development of the Tool involved formative workshops with providers in Indonesia, Mexico, South Africa and Trinidad and Tobago and observational evaluation research in Indonesia, Mexico, and Nicaragua. Analysis of videotaped counseling sessions quantitatively assessed client-provider communication and decision-making. Also, focus-group discussions, interviews, and a questionnaire collected qualitative data from providers and clients. In general, use of the Tool improved providers' counseling performance: they engaged clients more and gave more and better tailored information. For clients, the Tool increased their communication and involvement. Both the Nicaraguan and Mexican studies found marked shifts toward the client in the locus of decision-making after introduction of the Tool. Use of the tool improves the performance of both providers and clients in family planning counseling and decision-making. There are challenges, however, at the levels of both the provider and the organization in sustaining these changes and scaling up such initiatives in quality of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development and validation of a musculoskeletal physical examination decision-making test for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Julie Y; Awan, Hisham M; Rowley, David M; Nagel, Rollin W

    2013-01-01

    Despite a renewed emphasis among educators, musculoskeletal education is still lacking in medical school and residency training programs. We created a musculoskeletal multiple-choice physical examination decision-making test to assess competency and physical examination knowledge of our trainees. We developed a 20-question test in musculoskeletal physical examination decision-making test with content that most medical students and orthopedic residents should know. All questions were reviewed by ratings of US orthopedic chairmen. It was administered to postgraduate year 2 to 5 orthopedic residents and 2 groups of medical students: 1 group immediately after their 3-week musculoskeletal course and the other 1 year after the musculoskeletal course completion. We hypothesized that residents would score highest, medical students 1 year post-musculoskeletal training lowest, and students immediately post-musculoskeletal training midrange. We administered an established cognitive knowledge test to compare student knowledge base as we expected the scores to correlate. Academic medical center in the Midwestern United States. Orthopedic residents, chairmen, and medical students. Fifty-four orthopedic chairmen (54 of 110 or 49%) responded to our survey, rating a mean overall question importance of 7.12 (0 = Not Important; 5 = Important; 10 = Very Important). Mean physical examination decision-making scores were 89% for residents, 77% for immediate post-musculoskeletal trained medical students, and 59% 1 year post-musculoskeletal trained medical students (F = 42.07, p<0.001). The physical examination decision-making test was found to be internally consistent (Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 = 0.69). The musculoskeletal cognitive knowledge test was 78% for immediate post-musculoskeletal trained students and 71% for the 1 year post-musculoskeletal trained students. The student physical examination and cognitive knowledge scores were correlated (r = 0.54, p<0.001), but were not

  8. Cancer patient decision making related to clinical trial participation: an integrative review with implications for patients' relational autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jennifer A H; Balneaves, Lynda G

    2015-04-01

    Oncology clinical trials are necessary for the improvement of patient care as they have the ability to confirm the efficacy and safety of novel cancer treatments and in so doing, contribute to a solid evidence base on which practitioners and patients can make informed treatment decisions. However, only 3-5 % of adult cancer patients enroll in clinical trials. Lack of participation compromises the success of clinical trials and squanders an opportunity for improving patient outcomes. This literature review summarizes the factors and contexts that influence cancer patient decision making related to clinical trial participation. An integrative review was undertaken within PubMed, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases for articles written between 1995 and 2012 and archived under relevant keywords. Articles selected were data-based, written in English, and limited to adult cancer patients. In the 51 articles reviewed, three main types of factors were identified that influence cancer patients' decision making about participation in clinical trials: personal, social, and system factors. Subthemes included patients' trust in their physician and the research process, undue influence within the patient-physician relationship, and systemic social inequalities. How these factors interact and influence patients' decision-making process and relational autonomy, however, is insufficiently understood. Future research is needed to further elucidate the sociopolitical barriers and facilitators of clinical trial participation and to enhance ethical practice within clinical trial enrolment. This research will inform targeted education and support interventions to foster patients' relational autonomy in the decision-making process and potentially improve clinical trial participation rates.

  9. Decision-making about complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients: integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Laura; Balneaves, Lynda G; Paterson, Charlotte; Verhoef, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cancer consistently report conflict and anxiety when making decisions about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment. To design evidence-informed decision-support strategies, a better understanding is needed of how the decision-making process unfolds for these patients during their experience with cancer. We undertook this study to review the research literature regarding CAM-related decision-making by patients with cancer within the context of treatment, survivorship, and palliation. We also aimed to summarize emergent concepts within a preliminary conceptual framework. We conducted an integrative literature review, searching 12 electronic databases for articles published in English that described studies of the process, context, or outcomes of CAM-related decision-making. We summarized descriptive data using frequencies and used a descriptive constant comparative method to analyze statements about original qualitative results, with the goal of identifying distinct concepts pertaining to CAM-related decision-making by patients with cancer and the relationships among these concepts. Of 425 articles initially identified, 35 met our inclusion criteria. Seven unique concepts related to CAM and cancer decision-making emerged: decision-making phases, information-seeking and evaluation, decision-making roles, beliefs, contextual factors, decision-making outcomes, and the relationship between CAM and conventional medical decision-making. CAM decision-making begins with the diagnosis of cancer and encompasses 3 distinct phases (early, mid, and late), each marked by unique aims for CAM treatment and distinct patterns of information-seeking and evaluation. Phase transitions correspond to changes in health status or other milestones within the cancer trajectory. An emergent conceptual framework illustrating relationships among the 7 central concepts is presented. CAM-related decision-making by patients with cancer occurs as a nonlinear, complex

  10. Effectiveness and Safety of a Clinical Decision Rule to Reduce Repeat Ionized Calcium Testing: A Pre/Post Test Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Momina; Pike, Donna Comins; Wu, Rong; Oncken, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act authorizes the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to reimburse hospitals that demonstrate meaningful use of certified electronic health record technology. We sought to demonstrate meaningful use by developing and implementing one clinical decision support rule in the computerized physician order entry system that targets clinician-ordered repeat ionized calcium measurement at the University of Connecticut Health Center. The rule consists of a pop-up computer reminder that is triggered by ordering a second ionized calcium test within 72 hours after an initial normal test, with no clear indication for repeat testing. We implemented the rule on December 14, 2010, and have reviewed all data collected through December 2014. We found that the number of repeat tests decreased from 46% to 14% with no significant increase in the number of serious adverse events. We conclude that computerized reminders can decrease unnecessary repeat testing in the inpatient setting.

  11. Depressive symptoms and decision-making preferences in patients with comorbid illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Nathalie; Ye, Siqin; Alcántara, Carmela; Davidson, Karina W; Kronish, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is increasingly promoted in the primary care setting, but depressive symptoms, which are associated with cognitive changes, may influence decision-making preferences. We sought to assess whether elevated depressive symptoms are associated with decision-making preference in patients with comorbid chronic illness. We enrolled 195 patients ≥18years old with uncontrolled hypertension from two urban, academic primary care clinics. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 8-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Clinician-directed decision-making preference was assessed according to the Control Preference Scale. The impact of depressive symptoms on decision-making preference was assessed using generalized linear mixed models adjusted for age, gender, race, ethnicity, education, Medicaid status, Charlson Comorbidity Index, partner status, and clustering within clinicians. The mean age was 64.2years; 72% were women, 77% Hispanic, 38% Black, and 33% had elevated depressive symptoms. Overall, 35% of patients preferred clinician-directed decision-making, 19% mostly clinician-directed, 39% shared, and 7% some or little clinician-input. Patients with (vs. without) elevated depressive symptoms were more likely to prefer clinician-directed decision-making (46% versus 29%; p=0.02; AOR 2.51, 95% CI 1.30-4.85, p=0.005). Remitted depressive symptoms (vs. never depressed) were not associated with preference. Elevated depressive symptoms are associated with preference for clinician-directed decision-making. We suggest that clinicians should be aware of this effect when incorporating preference into their communication styles and take an active role in eliciting patient values and exchanging information about treatment choice, all important components of shared decision-making, particularly when patients are depressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patients' preferences for receiving laboratory test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabahi, Azam; Ahmadian, Leila; Mirzaee, Moghadameh; Khajouei, Reza

    2017-04-01

    The laboratory, as a diagnostic department in the hospital, plays an important role in the treatment and prevention of diseases. Paying attention to patients' preferences for communication of test results may provide a better and more responsive system for delivering these results. This study aimed to identify patient preferences regarding receiving their laboratory test results electronically and to identify the reasons behind their choice. Descriptive-analytical study. This study was carried out in 2015 with 200 patients who had access to the internet and had been referred at least once previously to the hospital laboratory department to receive their test results. Data were collected through an expert-validated questionnaire, and its reliability was confirmed by test-retest (P = .8). Data were analyzed using χ2 and marginal independence SPSS and R software. Ninety-eight percent of participants preferred to be notified by short message service when their test results were ready. All participants preferred to receive their test results online, and 82.5% (n = 165) preferred to receive both normal and abnormal test results this way. The main reason for receiving results online was time savings, which was reported by 77% of participants, followed by lowering the chance of missing the results (31%). About 40% of participants thought e-mail notification was more secure than accessing the results through a hospital website. Findings showed that although patients wanted to benefit from online services for receiving their test results, they were concerned about confidentiality and security. Before using online technologies, security measures necessary to protect patient privacy and to gain the trust of patients should be defined.

  13. What factors impact upon a woman’s decision to undertake genetic cancer testing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Anne Quinlivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The advent of human genome project has lead to genetic tests that identify high-risk states for certain cancers. Many are privately marketed on the Internet. Despite the availability of tests, limited data has evaluated factors that lead to test uptake. The aim of the present study was to explore the attitudes of a cohort of new mothers towards uptake of a genetic cancer test with a 50% predictive value of cancer.Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken. The project targeted women who had recently given birth at an Australian tertiary referral hospital. Women were asked about a theoretical blood test that detected an increased risk for the development of cancer. Attitudes and knowledge questionnaires were completed. Results: Of 232 consecutive women approached, 32 declined, giving a response rate of 86.2%. Only 63 (31.5% women stated they would have the test. Absence of religious belief, higher level of education, better knowledge of terms used in genetics, an absence of concern over emotional, employment and insurance discrimination and previous acceptance of Down syndrome screening in pregnancy were each associated with significantly higher rate of test uptake in univariate analysis (all pConclusion: Concern over discrimination and having made a prior decision to have genetic testing were the principal factors associated with decision-making.

  14. Not all patients want to participate in decision making. A national study of public preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Wendy; Kao, Audiey; Kuby, Alma; Thisted, Ronald A

    2005-06-01

    The Institute of Medicine calls for physicians to engage patients in making clinical decisions, but not every patient may want the same level of participation. 1) To assess public preferences for participation in decision making in a representative sample of the U.S. population. 2) To understand how demographic variables and health status influence people's preferences for participation in decision making. A population-based survey of a fully representative sample of English-speaking adults was conducted in concert with the 2002 General Social Survey (N= 2,765). Respondents expressed preferences ranging from patient-directed to physician-directed styles on each of 3 aspects of decision making (seeking information, discussing options, making the final decision). Logistic regression was used to assess the relationships of demographic variables and health status to preferences. Nearly all respondents (96%) preferred to be offered choices and to be asked their opinions. In contrast, half of the respondents (52%) preferred to leave final decisions to their physicians and 44% preferred to rely on physicians for medical knowledge rather than seeking out information themselves. Women, more educated, and healthier people were more likely to prefer an active role in decision making. African-American and Hispanic respondents were more likely to prefer that physicians make the decisions. Preferences for an active role increased with age up to 45 years, but then declined. This population-based study demonstrates that people vary substantially in their preferences for participation in decision making. Physicians and health care organizations should not assume that patients wish to participate in clinical decision making, but must assess individual patient preferences and tailor care accordingly.

  15. Involving patients in treatment decisions – a delicate balancing act for Swedish dentists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Röing, Marta; Holmström, Inger Knutsson

    2014-01-01

    .... Little is known how dentists in Sweden have adapted to this change. Objective  This study explores how dentists in Sweden perceive and experience involving patients in dental treatment decisions. Design...

  16. Partnering with Patients to Drive Shared Decisions, Better Value, and Care Improvement: workshop proceedings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Institute of Medicine; Roundtable on Value and Science-Driven Health Care

    2014-01-01

    "The Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care held a workshop, titled Partnering with Patients to Drive Shared Decisions, Better Value, and Care Improvement, on February 25 and 26, 2013...

  17. Patient factors that influence clinicians' decision making in self-management support: A clinical vignette study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene D; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; van der Wulp, Ineke; Schuurmans, Marieke J; de Wit, Niek J

    2017-01-01

    Self-management support is an integral part of current chronic care guidelines. The success of self-management interventions varies between individual patients, suggesting a need for tailored self-management support. Understanding the role of patient factors in the current decision making of health professionals can support future tailoring of self-management interventions. The aim of this study is to identify the relative importance of patient factors in health professionals' decision making regarding self-management support. A factorial survey was presented to primary care physicians and nurses. The survey consisted of clinical vignettes (case descriptions), in which 11 patient factors were systematically varied. Each care provider received a set of 12 vignettes. For each vignette, they decided whether they would give this patient self-management support and whether they expected this support to be successful. The associations between respondent decisions and patient factors were explored using ordered logit regression. The survey was completed by 60 general practitioners and 80 nurses. Self-management support was unlikely to be provided in a third of the vignettes. The most important patient factor in the decision to provide self-management support as well as in the expectation that self-management support would be successful was motivation, followed by patient-provider relationship and illness perception. Other factors, such as depression or anxiety, education level, self-efficacy and social support, had a small impact on decisions. Disease, disease severity, knowledge of disease, and age were relatively unimportant factors. This is the first study to explore the relative importance of patient factors in decision making and the expectations regarding the provision of self-management support to chronic disease patients. By far, the most important factor considered was patient's motivation; unmotivated patients were less likely to receive self-management support

  18. Examining chronic care patient preferences for involvement in health-care decision making: the case of Parkinson's disease patients in a patient-centred clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzo, Natalie; Bell, Emily; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Racine, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Patient-centred care is a recommended model of care for Parkinson's disease (PD). It aims to provide care that is respectful and responsive to patient preferences, values and perspectives. Provision of patient-centred care should entail considering how patients want to be involved in their care. To understand the participation preferences of patients with PD from a patient-centred care clinic in health-care decision-making processes. Mixed-methods study with early-stage Parkinson's disease patients from a patient-centred care clinic. Study involved a modified Autonomy Preference Index survey (N=65) and qualitative, semi-structured in-depth interviews, analysed using thematic qualitative content analysis (N=20, purposefully selected from survey participants). Interviews examined (i) the patient preferences for involvement in health-care decision making; (ii) patient perspectives on the patient-physician relationship; and (iii) patient preferences for communication of information relevant to decision making. Preferences for participation in decision making varied between individuals and also within individuals depending on decision type, relational and contextual factors. Patients had high preferences for communication of information, but with acknowledged limits. The importance of communication in the patient-physician relationship was emphasized. Patient preferences for involvement in decision making are dynamic and support shared decision making. Relational autonomy corresponds to how patients envision their participation in decision making. Clinicians may need to assess patient preferences on an on-going basis. Our results highlight the complexities of decision-making processes. Improved understanding of individual preferences could enhance respect for persons and make for patient-centred care that is truly respectful of individual patients' wants, needs and values. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Decision-making criteria among European patients: exploring patient preferences for primary care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinelli, Michela; Nikoloski, Zlatko; Kumpunen, Stephanie; Knai, Cécile; Pribakovic Brinovec, Radivoje; Warren, Emily; Wittgens, Katharina; Dickmann, Petra

    2015-02-01

    Health economics preference-based techniques, such as discrete choice experiments (DCEs), are often used to inform public health policy on patients' priorities when choosing health care. Although there is general evidence about patients' satisfaction with general-practice (GP) care in Europe, to our knowledge no comparisons are available that measure patients' preferences in different European countries, and use patients' priorities to propose policy changes. A DCE was designed and used to capture patients' preferences for GP care in Germany, England and Slovenia. In the three countries, 841 eligible patients were identified across nine GP practices. The DCE questions compared multiple health-care practices (including their 'current GP practice'), described by the following attributes: 'information' received from the GP, 'booking time', 'waiting time' in the GP practice, 'listened to', as well as being able to receive the 'best care' available for their condition. Results were compared across countries looking at the attributes' importance and rankings, patients' willingness-to-wait for unit changes to the attributes' levels and changes in policy. A total of 692 respondents (75% response rate) returned questionnaires suitable for analysis. In England and Slovenia, patients were satisfied with their 'current practice', but they valued changes to alternative practices. All attributes influenced decision-making, and 'best care' or 'information' were more valued than others. In Germany, almost all respondents constantly preferred their 'current practice', and other factors did not change their preference. European patients have strong preference for their 'status quo', but alternative GP practices could compensate for it and offer more valued care. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  20. Involving patients in treatment decisions – a delicate balancing act for Swedish dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röing, Marta; Holmström, Inger Knutsson

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  This study focuses on patients’ participation in treatment decisions related to the delivery of oral health care in the social welfare state of Sweden. In 1985, the National Dental Service Act gave dental patients the right to take an active role in decisions regarding their treatment and, in doing so, strengthened them as consumers. Little is known how dentists in Sweden have adapted to this change. Objective  This study explores how dentists in Sweden perceive and experience involving patients in dental treatment decisions. Design  Data were collected from open‐ended interviews with nineteen dentists, and an inductive qualitative content analysis was chosen to analyse the transcribed interviews. Findings  Involving patients in treatment decisions appeared to be delicate balancing acts between the ideals of patient involvement and the reality of how it is practised in Sweden. These balancing acts in turn revealed obstacles to patient involvement and the role that economy can play on the decisions of some patients regarding their treatment. Conclusions  This study has given insight into a relationship in which some dentists in Sweden find it hard to adapt to and change their professional role with patients who appear to act more as consumers. For these dentists, better practice of patient involvement may require adoption of a more consumerist approach. However, in situations where economy influences patients’ treatment choices, the ideals of patient involvement may remain unattainable. PMID:22512804

  1. Priorities in Fertility Decisions for Reproductive-Aged Cancer Patients: Fertility Attitudes and Cancer Treatment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flink, Dina M; Kondapalli, Laxmi A; Kellar-Guenther, Yvonne

    2017-09-01

    The Fertility Attitudes and Cancer Treatment Study (FACTS) aims at better understanding the reasons and priorities of young adult cancer patients making decisions for fertility preservation (FP). Identifying the factors that center around a patient's fertility decisions will support the development of educational tools for providers and improve clinical care to meet patients' reproductive needs. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted of 27 newly diagnosed male and female cancer patients who had presented for an oncofertility consultation. Interviews lasted ∼30 minutes and were transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis was conducted to explore the factors driving decisions for future fertility. Themes were grouped to address the following topics: reasons for/against FP, patient priorities, informational needs, support, wellness, and satisfaction with information. Strength of the theme was determined by examining the frequency of a response. Patients who chose FP versus those who did not choose FP and men versus women proved to be more similar than different in their reasoning, priorities, and informational needs for FP decisions. Patients who chose FP identified a "concern for future fertility" as a top reason to do so and "parenthood" as a top priority. For those who did not choose FP, "cancer treatment" was identified as their top priority. For patients identifying financial barriers, 50% of them were able to overcome this to pursue FP. Reproductive-aged patients diagnosed with a new cancer should be referred to a reproductive specialist and provided the opportunity to come to a fertility decision on their own before initiating cancer treatment.

  2. Using patient and physician perspectives to develop a shared decision-making framework for colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi Anna

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of death from cancer worldwide with over 900,000 diagnoses and 639,000 deaths each year. Although shared decision making is broadly advocated as a mechanism by which to achieve patient-centred care, there has been little investigation of patient and physician shared decision-making preferences and practices or the outcomes associated with shared decision making in the context of colorectal cancer. Aim The aim of this study is to determine patient and physician attitudes towards the use of shared decision making in the setting of colorectal cancer. Methods Standard principles of qualitative research will be used to sample and interview 20 colorectal cancer patients in each of three tertiary care hospitals (n = 60 and 15 surgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists (n = 45 affiliated with cancer centres. The interview questions will be guided by a conceptual framework defining patient and physician factors that influence the shared decision-making process and associated outcomes in the setting of colorectal cancer. An inductive, grounded approach will be used by two investigators to independently analyze the interview transcripts. These investigators will meet to compare and achieve consensus on themes that will be tabulated to compare barriers, enablers, and outcomes of shared decision making by patient, physician, and contextual factors. Discussion This study is the first to examine both patient and physician perspectives on the use of shared decision making for colorectal cancer in North America or elsewhere. It will provide a framework that can be used to describe the shared decision-making process and its outcomes, and evaluate strategies to facilitate this process for patients with colorectal cancer.

  3. Towards generic online multicriteria decision support in patient-centred health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowie, Jack; Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Salkeld, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce a new online generic decision support system based on multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA), implemented in practical and user-friendly software (Annalisa©). BACKGROUND: All parties in health care lack a simple and generic way to picture and process the decisions to be made...... scored and ranked. The scores for each option combine, in a simple expected value calculation, the best estimates available now for the performance of those options on patient-determined criteria, with the individual patient's preferences, expressed as importance weightings for those criteria. The survey......-off practicality (including resource constraints) with normative rigour and empirical complexity, in both their development and delivery, is emphasized. CONCLUSION: The MCDA-/Annalisa-based decision support system represents a prescriptive addition to the portfolio of decision-aiding tools available online...

  4. Elbow Room for Best Practice? Montgomery, Patients' values, and Balanced Decision-Making in Person-Centred Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Jonathan; Fulford, Kmw; Dunn, Michael; Handa, Ashoki

    2017-11-01

    The UK Supreme Court Montgomery judgment marks a decisive shift in the legal test of duty of care in the context of consent to treatment, from the perspective of the clinician (as represented by Bolam rules) to that of the patient. A majority of commentators on Montgomery have focused on the implications of the judgment for disclosure of risk. In this article, we set risk disclosure in context with three further elements of the judgment: benefits, options, and dialogue. These elements, we argue, taken together with risk disclosure, reflect the origins of the Montgomery ruling in a model of consent based on autonomy of patient choice through shared decision-making with their doctor. This model reflects recent developments in both law and medicine and is widely regarded (by the General Medical Council and others) as representing best practice in contemporary person-centred medicine. So understood, we suggest, the shift marked by Montgomery in the basis of duty of care is a shift in underpinning values: it is a shift from the clinician's interpretation about what would be best for patients to the values of (to what is significant or matters from the perspective of) the particular patient concerned in the decision in question. But the values of the particular patient do not thereby become paramount. The Montgomery test of duty of care requires the values of the particular patient to be balanced alongside the values of a reasonable person in the patient's position. We illustrate some of the practical challenges arising from the balance of considerations required by Montgomery with examples from surgical care. These examples show the extent to which Montgomery, in mirroring the realities of clinical decision-making, provides elbowroom for best practice in person-centred clinical care. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing: User Motivations, Decision Making, and Perceived Utility of Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J Scott; Gornick, Michele C; Carere, Deanna Alexis; Uhlmann, Wendy R; Ruffin, Mack T; Green, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    To describe the interests, decision making, and responses of consumers of direct-to-consumer personal genomic testing (DTC-PGT) services. Prior to 2013 regulatory restrictions on DTC-PGT services, 1,648 consumers from 2 leading companies completed Web surveys before and after receiving test results. Prior to testing, DTC-PGT consumers were as interested in ancestry (74% very interested) and trait information (72%) as they were in disease risks (72%). Among disease risks, heart disease (68% very interested), breast cancer (67%), and Alzheimer disease (66%) were of greatest interest prior to testing. Interest in disease risks was associated with female gender and poorer self-reported health (p < 0.01). Many consumers (38%) did not consider the possibility of unwanted information before purchasing services; this group was more likely to be older, male, and less educated (p < 0.05). After receiving results, 59% of respondents said test information would influence management of their health; 2% reported regret about seeking testing and 1% reported harm from results. DTC-PGT has attracted controversy because of the health-related information it provides, but nonmedical information is of equal or greater interest to consumers. Although many consumers did not fully consider potential risks prior to testing, DTC-PGT was generally perceived as useful in informing future health decisions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Enhancing Shared Decision Making Through Carefully Designed Interventions That Target Patient And Provider Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tai-Seale, M.; Elwyn, G.; Wilson, C.J.; Stults, C.; Dillon, E.C.; Li, M.; Chuang, J.; Meehan, A.; Frosch, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-provider communication and shared decision making are essential for primary care delivery and are vital contributors to patient experience and health outcomes. To alleviate communication shortfalls, we designed a novel, multidimensional intervention aimed at nudging both patients and primary

  7. Trends in End-of-Life Decision Making in Patients With and Without Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pardon, K.; Chambaere, K.; Pasman, H.R.W.; Deschepper, R.; Rietjens, J.; Deliens, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Because of cancer's high symptom burden and specific disease course, patients with cancer are more likely than other patients to face end-of-life decisions that have possible or certain life-shortening effects (ELDs). This study examines the incidence of ELDs in patients with cancer

  8. Dentist-Patient Interactions in Treatment Decision-Making: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redford, Maryann; Gift, Helen C.

    1997-01-01

    A University of North Carolina study using focus groups of dentists and patients found dentist-patient interactions play an important role in treatment decision-making, and are predicated on non-clinical factors, including dentists' intuition and judgment and patient impressions of dentists' examination styles, personalities, and interpersonal…

  9. End-of-life decisions for people with intellectual disabilities, an interview study with patient representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, Annemieke M A; Van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny M J; Proot, Ireen M; Metsemakers, Job; Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Curfs, Leopold M G

    2013-09-01

    Not much is known about the process of end-of-life decision-making for people with intellectual disabilities. To clarify the process of end-of-life decision-making for people with intellectual disabilities from the perspective of patient representatives. A qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews, recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using Grounded Theory procedures. We interviewed 16 patient representatives after the deaths of 10 people with intellectual disabilities in the Netherlands. The core category 'Deciding for someone else' describes the context in which patient representatives took end-of-life decisions. The patient representatives felt highly responsible for the outcomes. They had not involved the patients in the end-of-life decision-making process, nor any professionals other than the doctor. The categories of 'Motives' and 'Support' were connected to the core category of 'Deciding for someone else'. 'Motives' refers to the patient representatives' ideas about quality of life, prevention from suffering, patients who cannot understand the burden of interventions and emotional reasons reported by patient representatives. 'Support' refers to the support that patient representatives wanted the doctors to give to them in the decision-making process. From the perspective of the patient representatives, the process of end-of-life decision-making can be improved by ensuring clear roles and an explicit description of the tasks and responsibilities of all participants. Regular discussion between everyone involved including people with intellectual disabilities themselves can improve knowledge about each other's motives for end-of-decisions and can clarify expectations towards each other.

  10. Adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: age differences in factors influencing patients' treatment decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgensen ML

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mikaela L Jorgensen,1,2 Jane M Young,1,2 Michael J Solomon1,31Surgical Outcomes Research Centre (SOuRCe, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health District, NSW, Australia; 2Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: Older colorectal cancer patients are significantly less likely than younger patients to receive guideline-recommended adjuvant chemotherapy. Previous research has indicated that patient refusal of treatment is a contributing factor. This study aimed to identify potential barriers to adjuvant chemotherapy use in older patients by examining the associations between patient age, factors influencing chemotherapy treatment decisions, and preferences for information and decision-making involvement.Patients and methods: Sixty-eight patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer in Sydney, Australia, within the previous 24 months completed a self-administered survey.Results: Fear of dying, health status, age, quality of life, and understanding treatment procedures and effects were significantly more important to older patients (aged ≥65 years than younger patients in deciding whether to accept chemotherapy (all P < 0.05. Reducing the risk of cancer returning and physician trust were important factors for all patients. Practical barriers such as traveling for treatment and cost were rated lowest. Older patients preferred less information and involvement in treatment decision making than younger patients. However, 60% of the older group wanted detailed information about chemotherapy, and 83% wanted some involvement in decision making. Those preferring less information and involvement still rated many factors as important in their decision making, including understanding treatment procedures and effects.Conclusion: A range of factors appears to influence

  11. A Markov decision process approach to multi-category patient scheduling in a diagnostic facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocgun, Yasin; Bresnahan, Brian W; Ghate, Archis; Gunn, Martin L

    2011-10-01

    To develop a mathematical model for multi-category patient scheduling decisions in computed tomography (CT), and to investigate associated tradeoffs from economic and operational perspectives. We modeled this decision-problem as a finite-horizon Markov decision process (MDP) with expected net CT revenue as the performance metric. The performance of optimal policies was compared with five heuristics using data from an urban hospital. In addition to net revenue, other patient-throughput and service-quality metrics were also used in this comparative analysis. The optimal policy had a threshold structure in the two-scanner case - it prioritized one type of patient when the queue-length for that type exceeded a threshold. The net revenue gap between the optimal policy and the heuristics ranged from 5% to 12%. This gap was 4% higher in the more congested, single-scanner system than in the two-scanner system. The performance of the net revenue maximizing policy was similar to the heuristics, when compared with respect to the alternative performance metrics in the two-scanner case. Under the optimal policy, the average number of patients that were not scanned by the end of the day, and the average patient waiting-time, were both nearly 80% smaller in the two-scanner case than in the single-scanner case. The net revenue gap between the optimal policy and the priority-based heuristics was nearly 2% smaller as compared to the first-come-first-served and random selection schemes. Net revenue was most sensitive to inpatient (IP) penalty costs in the single-scanner system, whereas to IP and outpatient revenues in the two-scanner case. The performance of the optimal policy is competitive with the operational and economic metrics considered in this paper. Such a policy can be implemented relatively easily and could be tested in practice in the future. The priority-based heuristics are next-best to the optimal policy and are much easier to implement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B

  12. Theory-informed design of values clarification methods: a cognitive psychological perspective on patient health-related decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, Arwen H; de Vries, Marieke; Kunneman, Marleen; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Feldman-Stewart, Deb

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare decisions, particularly those involving weighing benefits and harms that may significantly affect quality and/or length of life, should reflect patients' preferences. To support patients in making choices, patient decision aids and values clarification methods (VCM) in particular have been developed. VCM intend to help patients to determine the aspects of the choices that are important to their selection of a preferred option. Several types of VCM exist. However, they are often designed without clear reference to theory, which makes it difficult for their development to be systematic and internally coherent. Our goal was to provide theory-informed recommendations for the design of VCM. Process theories of decision making specify components of decision processes, thus, identify particular processes that VCM could aim to facilitate. We conducted a review of the MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases and of references to theories included in retrieved papers, to identify process theories of decision making. We selected a theory if (a) it fulfilled criteria for a process theory; (b) provided a coherent description of the whole process of decision making; and (c) empirical evidence supports at least some of its postulates. Four theories met our criteria: Image Theory, Differentiation and Consolidation theory, Parallel Constraint Satisfaction theory, and Fuzzy-trace Theory. Based on these, we propose that VCM should: help optimize mental representations; encourage considering all potentially appropriate options; delay selection of an initially favoured option; facilitate the retrieval of relevant values from memory; facilitate the comparison of options and their attributes; and offer time to decide. In conclusion, our theory-based design recommendations are explicit and transparent, providing an opportunity to test each in a systematic manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of Bayesian decision-making to laboratory testing for Lyme disease and comparison with testing for HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook MJ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Cook,1 Basant K Puri2 1Independent Researcher, Highcliffe, 2Department of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: In this study, Bayes’ theorem was used to determine the probability of a patient having Lyme disease (LD, given a positive test result obtained using commercial test kits in clinically diagnosed patients. In addition, an algorithm was developed to extend the theorem to the two-tier test methodology. Using a disease prevalence of 5%–75% in samples sent for testing by clinicians, evaluated with a C6 peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, the probability of infection given a positive test ranged from 26.4% when the disease was present in 5% of referrals to 95.3% when disease was present in 75%. When applied in the case of a C6 ELISA followed by a Western blot, the algorithm developed for the two-tier test demonstrated an improvement with the probability of disease given a positive test ranging between 67.2% and 96.6%. Using an algorithm to determine false-positive results, the C6 ELISA generated 73.6% false positives with 5% prevalence and 4.7% false positives with 75% prevalence. Corresponding data for a group of test kits used to diagnose HIV generated false-positive rates from 5.4% down to 0.1% indicating that the LD tests produce up to 46 times more false positives. False-negative test results can also influence patient treatment and outcomes. The probability of a false-negative test for LD with a single test for early-stage disease was high at 66.8%, increasing to 74.9% for two-tier testing. With the least sensitive HIV test used in the two-stage test, the false-negative rate was 1.3%, indicating that the LD test generates ~60 times as many false-negative results. For late-stage LD, the two-tier test generated 16.7% false negatives compared with 0.095% false negatives generated by a two-step HIV test, which is over a 170-fold difference. Using clinically representative

  14. Exploring patient involvement in healthcare decision making across different education and functional health literacy groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sian K; Dixon, Ann; Trevena, Lyndal; Nutbeam, Don; McCaffery, Kirsten J

    2009-12-01

    Education and health literacy potentially limit a person's ability to be involved in decisions about their health. Few studies, however, have explored understandings and experiences of involvement in decision making among patients varying in education and health literacy. This paper reports on a qualitative interview study of 73 men and women living in Sydney, Australia, with varying education and functional health literacy levels. Participants were recruited from a community sample with lower educational attainment, plus an educated sample of University of Sydney alumni. The transcripts were analysed using the 'Framework' approach, a matrix-based method of thematic analysis. We found that participants with different education conceptualised their involvement in decision making in diverse ways. Participants with higher education appeared to conceive their involvement as sharing the responsibility with the doctor throughout the decision-making process. This entailed verifying the credibility of the information and exploring options beyond those presented in the consultation. They also viewed themselves as helping others in their health decisions and acting as information resources. In contrast, participants with lower education appeared to conceive their involvement in terms of consenting to an option recommended by the doctor, and having responsibility for the ultimate decision, to agree or disagree with the recommendation. They also described how relatives and friends sought information on their behalf and played a key role in their decisions. Both education groups described how aspects of the patient-practitioner relationship (e.g. continuity, negotiation, trust) and the practitioner's interpersonal communication skills influenced their involvement. Health information served a variety of needs for all groups (e.g. supporting psychosocial, practical and decision support needs). These findings have practical implications for how to involve patients with different

  15. Towards generic online multicriteria decision support in patient-centred health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowie, Jack; Kjer Kaltoft, Mette; Salkeld, Glenn; Cunich, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    To introduce a new online generic decision support system based on multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA), implemented in practical and user-friendly software (Annalisa©). All parties in health care lack a simple and generic way to picture and process the decisions to be made in pursuit of improved decision making and more informed choice within an overall philosophy of person- and patient-centred care. The MCDA-based system generates patient-specific clinical guidance in the form of an opinion as to the merits of the alternative options in a decision, which are all scored and ranked. The scores for each option combine, in a simple expected value calculation, the best estimates available now for the performance of those options on patient-determined criteria, with the individual patient's preferences, expressed as importance weightings for those criteria. The survey software within which the Annalisa file is embedded (Elicia©) customizes and personalizes the presentation and inputs. Principles relevant to the development of such decision-specific MCDA-based aids are noted and comparisons with alternative implementations presented. The necessity to trade-off practicality (including resource constraints) with normative rigour and empirical complexity, in both their development and delivery, is emphasized. The MCDA-/Annalisa-based decision support system represents a prescriptive addition to the portfolio of decision-aiding tools available online to individuals and clinicians interested in pursuing shared decision making and informed choice within a commitment to transparency in relation to both the evidence and preference bases of decisions. Some empirical data establishing its usability are provided. © 2013 The Authors. Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Extensions to decision curve analysis, a novel method for evaluating diagnostic tests, prediction models and molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonen Mithat

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision curve analysis is a novel method for evaluating diagnostic tests, prediction models and molecular markers. It combines the mathematical simplicity of accuracy measures, such as sensitivity and specificity, with the clinical applicability of decision analytic approaches. Most critically, decision curve analysis can be applied directly to a data set, and does not require the sort of external data on costs, benefits and preferences typically required by traditional decision analytic techniques. Methods In this paper we present several extensions to decision curve analysis including correction for overfit, confidence intervals, application to censored data (including competing risk and calculation of decision curves directly from predicted probabilities. All of these extensions are based on straightforward methods that have previously been described in the literature for application to analogous statistical techniques. Results Simulation studies showed that repeated 10-fold crossvalidation provided the best method for correcting a decision curve for overfit. The method for applying decision curves to censored data had little bias and coverage was excellent; for competing risk, decision curves were appropriately affected by the incidence of the competing risk and the association between the competing risk and the predictor of interest. Calculation of decision curves directly from predicted probabilities led to a smoothing of the decision curve. Conclusion Decision curve analysis can be easily extended to many of the applications common to performance measures for prediction models. Software to implement decision curve analysis is provided.

  17. Decision making about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic test strategies. Paper 5: a qualitative study with experts suggests that test accuracy data alone is rarely sufficient for decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Reem A; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Ventresca, Matthew; Brozek, Jan; Schünemann, Holger J

    2017-12-01

    The objective of the study was to identify the critical factors that determine recommendations and other decisions about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic strategies (HCTDS). We used a qualitative descriptive approach and conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with 24 international experts (informants) in evidence and decisions about HCTDS. Although test accuracy (TA) was the factor most commonly considered by organizations when developing recommendations about HCTDS, informants agreed that TA is necessary but rarely, if ever, sufficient and may be misleading when solely considered. The informants identified factors that are important for developing recommendations about HCTDS. Informants largely agreed that laying out the potential care pathways based on the test result is an essential early step but is rarely done in developing recommendations about HCTDS. Most informants also agreed that decision analysis could be useful for organizing the clinical, cost, and preference data relevant to the use of tests in the absence of direct evidence. However, they noted that using models is limited by the lack of resources and expertise required. Developing guidelines about HCTDS requires consideration of factors beyond TA, but implementing this may be challenging. Further development and testing of "frameworks" that can guide this process is a priority for decision makers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Supporting informed decision making online in 20 minutes: an observational web-log study of a PSA test decision aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph-Williams, Natalie; Evans, Rhodri; Edwards, Adrian; Newcombe, Robert G; Wright, Patricia; Grol, Richard; Elwyn, Glyn

    2010-05-26

    Web-based decision aids are known to have an effect on knowledge, attitude, and behavior; important components of informed decision making. We know what decision aids achieve in randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but we still know very little about how they are used and how this relates to the informed decision making outcome measures. To examine men's use of an online decision aid for prostate cancer screening using website transaction log files (web-logs), and to examine associations between usage and components of informed decision making. We conducted an observational web-log analysis of users of an online decision aid, Prosdex. Men between 50 and 75 years of age were recruited for an associated RCT from 26 general practices across South Wales, United Kingdom. Men allocated to one arm of the RCT were included in the current study. Time and usage data were derived from website log files. Components of informed decision making were measured by an online questionnaire. Available for analysis were 82 web-logs. Overall, there was large variation in the use of Prosdex. The mean total time spent on the site was 20 minutes. The mean number of pages accessed was 32 (SD 21) out of a possible 60 pages. Significant associations were found between increased usage and increased knowledge (Spearman rank correlation [rho] = 0.69, P limitation in mind. We recommend that web-log analysis should be an integral part of online decision aid development and analysis. ISRCTN48473735; http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN48473735 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/5pqeF89tS).

  19. Geriatric consultation can aid in complex treatment decisions for elderly cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiphorst, A H W; Ten Bokkel Huinink, D; Breumelhof, R; Burgmans, J P J; Pronk, A; Hamaker, M E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment decisions for elderly cancer patients can be challenging. A geriatric assessment may identify unknown medical conditions, give insight on patients' ability to tolerate treatment and guide treatment decisions. Our aim was to study the value of a geriatric consultation in oncological decision-making. Data on cancer patients referred for geriatric consultation for clinical optimisation or due to uncertainty regarding their optimal treatment strategy were prospectively analysed. Outcome of geriatric evaluations, non-oncological interventions and suggested adaptations of oncological treatment proposals were evaluated. Seventy-two patients were referred for consultation, over half of which in a curative treatment setting. Prevalence of geriatric syndromes was 93%, previously undiagnosed conditions were identified in 49% of patients and non-oncological interventions were initiated in 56%. Time was spent discussing patients' priorities (53% of consultations), expectations on treatment (50%) and advance care planning (14%). For 82% of patients, suggestions were made regarding the optimal treatment decision: a more intensive treatment was recommended in 39%, a less intensive therapy for 42% and in 19% only supportive care was suggested. The results demonstrate that a geriatric consultation can aid in complex treatment decisions and may allow for a reduction in over- and undertreatment of elderly cancer patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Incorporating patients' preference diagnosis in implantable cardioverter defibrillator decision-making: a review of recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Krystina B; Carroll, Sandra L; Birnie, David; Stacey, Dawn; Matlock, Daniel D

    2018-01-01

    Strong recommendations exist for implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) in appropriately selected patients. Yet, patient preferences are not often incorporated when decisions about ICD therapy are made. Literature published since 2016 was reviewed aiming to discuss current advances and ongoing challenges with ICD decision-making in adults, discuss shared decision-making (SDM) as a strategy to incorporate preference diagnoses, summarize current evidence on effective interventions to facilitate SDM, and identify opportunities for research and practice. Advances in risk stratification can identify patients who will most and least likely benefit from the ICD. Interventions to support SDM are emerging. These interventions present options, the risks, and the benefits of each option, and elicit patients' values and preferences regarding possible outcomes. Appropriate patient selection for initial or continued ICD therapy is multifactorial. It requires accurate clinical diagnosis using careful risk stratification and accurate preference diagnosis based upon the patient's preferences. SDM aims to unite the elements that constitute these two equally important diagnoses. High-quality decision-making will be difficult to achieve if patients lack or misunderstand information, and if evolving patient preferences are not incorporated when making decisions.

  1. What influences patient decision-making in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis multidisciplinary care? A study of patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogden A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Anne Hogden,1 David Greenfield,1 Peter Nugus,1 Matthew C Kiernan21Centre for Clinical Governance Research, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, University of New South Wales, 2Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales, and Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, AustraliaBackground: Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are required to make decisions concerning quality of life and symptom management over the course of their disease. Clinicians perceive that patients’ ability to engage in timely decision-making is extremely challenging. However, we lack patient perspectives on this issue. This study aimed to explore patient experiences of ALS, and to identify factors influencing their decision-making in the specialized multidisciplinary care of ALS.Methods: An exploratory study was conducted. Fourteen patients from two specialized ALS multidisciplinary clinics participated in semistructured interviews that were audio recorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed for emergent themes.Results: Decision-making was influenced by three levels of factors, ie, structural, interactional, and personal. The structural factor was the decision-making environment of specialized multidisciplinary ALS clinics, which supported decision-making by providing patients with disease-specific information and specialized care planning. Interactional factors were the patient experiences of ALS, including patients’ reaction to the diagnosis, response to deterioration, and engagement with the multidisciplinary ALS team. Personal factors were patients’ personal philosophies, including their outlook on life, perceptions of control, and planning for the future. Patient approaches to decision-making reflected a focus on the present, rather than anticipating future progression of the disease and potential care needs.Conclusion: Decision-making for symptom management and quality of life in ALS care is enhanced when the

  2. The Effect of A Geriatric Assessment on Treatment Decisions for Patients with Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulkes, Karlijn J G; Souwer, Esteban T D; Hamaker, Marije E; Codrington, Henk; van der Sar-van der Brugge, Simone; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Portielje, Johanneke E A; van Elden, Leontine J R; van den Bos, Frederiek

    2017-04-01

    Decision-making for older patients with lung cancer can be complex and challenging. A geriatric assessment (GA) may be helpful and is increasingly being used since 2005 when SIOG advised to incorporate this in standard work-up for the elderly with cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the value of a geriatric assessment in decision-making for patients with lung cancer. Between January 2014 and April 2016, data on patients with lung cancer from two teaching hospitals in the Netherlands were entered in a prospective database. Outcome of geriatric assessment, non-oncologic interventions, and suggested adaptations of oncologic treatment proposals were evaluated. 83 patients (median age 79 years) were analyzed with a geriatric assessment, of which 59% were treated with a curative intent. Half of the patients were classified as ECOG PS 0 or 1. The majority of the patients (78%) suffered from geriatric impairments and 43% (n = 35) of the patients suffered from three or more geriatric impairments (out of eight analyzed domains). Nutritional status was most frequently impaired (52%). Previously undiagnosed impairments were identified in 58% of the patients, and non-oncologic interventions were advised for 43%. For 33% of patients, adaptations of the oncologic treatment were proposed. Patients with higher number of geriatric impairments more often were advised a reduced or less intensive treatment (p geriatric assessment uncovers previously unknown health impairments and provides important guidance for tailored treatment decisions in patients with lung cancer. More research on GA-stratified treatment decisions is needed.

  3. Toward Optimal Decision Making among Vulnerable Patients Referred for Cardiac Surgery: A Qualitative Analysis of Patient and Provider Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Ryan A; Curran, Janet; Buth, Karen J; David, Jennie G; Légaré, Jean-Francois; Hirsch, Gregory M

    2017-07-01

    Comprehension of risks, benefits, and alternative treatment options has been shown to be poor among patients referred for cardiac interventions. Patients' values and preferences are rarely explicitly sought. An increasing proportion of frail and older patients are undergoing complex cardiac surgical procedures with increased risk of both mortality and prolonged institutional care. We sought input from patients and caregivers to determine the optimal approach to decision making in this vulnerable patient population. Focus groups were held with both providers and former patients. Three focus groups were convened for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG), Valve, or CABG +Valve patients ≥ 70 y old (2-y post-op, ≤ 8-wk post-op, complicated post-op course) (n = 15). Three focus groups were convened for Intermediate Medical Care Unit (IMCU) nurses, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses, surgeons, anesthesiologists and cardiac intensivists (n = 20). We used a semi-structured interview format to ask questions surrounding the informed consent process. Transcribed audio data was analyzed to develop consistent and comprehensive themes. We identified 5 main themes that influence the decision making process: educational barriers, educational facilitators, patient autonomy and perceived autonomy, patient and family expectations of care, and decision making advocates. All themes were influenced by time constraints experienced in the current consent process. Patient groups expressed a desire to receive information earlier in their care to allow time to identify personal values and preferences in developing plans for treatment. Both groups strongly supported a formal approach for shared decision making with a decisional coach to provide information and facilitate communication with the care team. Identifying the barriers and facilitators to patient and caretaker engagement in decision making is a key step in the development of a structured, patient-centered SDM approach. Intervention

  4. Entertainment education for informed breast cancer treatment decisions in low-literate women: development and initial evaluation of a patient decision aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L; Volk, Robert J; Granch, Thomas S; Nefe, Nancy E; Spann, Stephen J; Aoki, Noriaki; Robinson, Emily K; Freidman, Lois C; Beck, J Robert

    2006-01-01

    We report on the development and initial evaluation of a novel computerized decision support system (CDSS) that utilizes concepts from entertainment education (edutainment) to assist low-literate, multiethnic women in making initial surgical treatment decisions. We randomly assigned 51 patients diagnosed with early stage breast cancer to use the decision aid. Patients who viewed the CDSS improved their knowledge of breast cancer treatment; found the application easy to use and understand, informative, and enjoyable; and were less worried about treatment. The system clearly reached its intended objectives to create a usable decision aid for low-literate, novice computer users.

  5. A universal decision support system. Addressing the decision-making needs of patients, families, and clinicians in the setting of critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher E; White, Douglas B; Abernethy, Amy P

    2014-08-15

    In the setting of a complex critical illness, preference-sensitive decision making-choosing between two or more reasonable treatment options-can be difficult for patients, families, and clinicians alike. A common challenge to making high-quality decisions in this setting is a lack of critical information access and sharing among participants. Decision aids-brochures, web applications, and videos-are a major focus of current research because mounting evidence suggests they can improve decision-making quality and enhance collaborative shared decision making. However, many decision aids have important limitations, including a relatively narrow capacity for personalization, an inability to gather and generate clinical data, a focus on only a single disease or treatment, and high developmental costs. To address these issues and to help guide future research, we propose a model of "universal" electronic decision support that can be easily adapted by clinicians and patients/families for whatever decision is at hand. In this scalable web-based platform, a general shared decision-making core structure would accommodate simple, interchangeable disease and treatment information modules. The format and content of the system could be adapted to decisional participants' unique characteristics, abilities, and needs. Universal decision support can better standardize a decisional approach and also allow a unique degree of personalization within a framework of shared decision making. We also discuss potential criticisms of this approach as well as strategies that can overcome them in a critical illness setting.

  6. A Universal Decision Support System. Addressing the Decision-Making Needs of Patients, Families, and Clinicians in the Setting of Critical Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Douglas B.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2014-01-01

    In the setting of a complex critical illness, preference-sensitive decision making—choosing between two or more reasonable treatment options—can be difficult for patients, families, and clinicians alike. A common challenge to making high-quality decisions in this setting is a lack of critical information access and sharing among participants. Decision aids—brochures, web applications, and videos—are a major focus of current research because mounting evidence suggests they can improve decision-making quality and enhance collaborative shared decision making. However, many decision aids have important limitations, including a relatively narrow capacity for personalization, an inability to gather and generate clinical data, a focus on only a single disease or treatment, and high developmental costs. To address these issues and to help guide future research, we propose a model of “universal” electronic decision support that can be easily adapted by clinicians and patients/families for whatever decision is at hand. In this scalable web-based platform, a general shared decision-making core structure would accommodate simple, interchangeable disease and treatment information modules. The format and content of the system could be adapted to decisional participants’ unique characteristics, abilities, and needs. Universal decision support can better standardize a decisional approach and also allow a unique degree of personalization within a framework of shared decision making. We also discuss potential criticisms of this approach as well as strategies that can overcome them in a critical illness setting. PMID:25019639

  7. Patients' decision making in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, T; Griffin, D; Barlow, D; Realpe, A

    2015-10-01

    A patient-centred approach, usually achieved through shared decision making, has the potential to help improve decision making around knee arthroplasty surgery. However, such an approach requires an understanding of the factors involved in patient decision making. This review's objective is to systematically examine the qualitative literature surrounding patients' decision making in knee arthroplasty. A systematic literature review using Medline and Embase was conducted to identify qualitative studies that examined patients' decision making around knee arthroplasty. An aggregated account of what is known about patients' decision making in knee arthroplasties is provided. Seven studies with 234 participants in interviews or focus groups are included. Ten themes are replicated across studies, namely: expectations of surgery; coping mechanisms; relationship with clinician; fear; pain; function; psychological implications; social network; previous experience of surgery; and conflict in opinions. This review is helpful in not only directing future research to areas that are not understood, or require confirmation, but also in highlighting areas that future interventions could address. These include those aimed at delivering information, which are likely to affect the satisfaction rate, demand, and use of knee arthroplasties. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4;163-169. ©2015 Griffin.

  8. Helping patients make better decisions: how to apply behavioral economics in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney MR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maureen Reni Courtney,1 Christy Spivey,2 Kathy M Daniel1 1College of Nursing, 2College of Business, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, USA  Abstract: Clinicians are committed to effectively educating patients and helping them to make sound decisions concerning their own health care. However, how do clinicians determine what is effective education? How do they present information clearly and in a manner that patients understand and can use to make informed decisions? Behavioral economics (BE is a subfield of economics that can assist clinicians to better understand how individuals actually make decisions. BE research can help guide interactions with patients so that information is presented and discussed in a more deliberate and impactful way. We can be more effective providers of care when we understand the factors that influence how our patients make decisions, factors of which we may have been largely unaware. BE research that focuses on health care and medical decision making is becoming more widely known, and what has been reported suggests that BE interventions can be effective in the medical realm. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an overview of BE decision science and derived practice strategies to promote more effective behavior change in patients.Keywords: nursing, message framing, defaults, incentives, social norms, commitment devices, health care

  9. Implementation of shared decision making in physical therapy: observed level of involvement and patient preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckx, Katreine; Deveugele, Myriam; Roosen, Philip; Devisch, Ignaas

    2013-10-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) reduces the asymmetrical power between the therapist and the patient. Patient involvement improves patient satisfaction, adherence, and health outcomes and is a prerequisite for good clinical practice. The opportunities for using SDM in physical therapy have been previously considered. The objective of this study was to examine the status of SDM in physical therapy, patients' preferred levels of involvement, and the agreement between therapist perception and patient preferred level of involvement. This was an observational study of real consultations in physical therapy. In total, 237 consultations, undertaken by 13 physical therapists, were audiorecorded, and 210 records were analyzed using the Observing Patient Involvement (OPTION) instrument. Before the consultation, the patient and therapist completed the Control Preference Scale (CPS). Multilevel analysis was used to study the association between individual variables and the level of SDM. Agreement on preferences was calculated using kappa coefficients. The mean OPTION score was 5.2 (SD=6.8), out of a total score of 100. Female therapists achieved a higher OPTION score (b=-0.86, P=0.01). In total, 36.7% of the patients wanted to share decisions, and 36.2% preferred to give their opinion before delegating the decisions. In the majority of cases, therapists believed that they had to decide. The kappa coefficient for agreement was poor at .062 (95% confidence interval=-.018 to .144). Only 13 out of 125 therapists who were personally contacted agreed to participate. Shared decision making was not applied; although patients preferred to share decisions or at least provide their opinion about the treatment, physical therapists did not often recognize this factor. The participating physical therapists were more likely to make decisions in the best interest of their patients; that is, these therapists tended to apply a paternalistic approach rather than involving the patient.

  10. Decision-Making about Healthcare Related Tests and Diagnostic Strategies: User Testing of GRADE Evidence Tables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mustafa, Reem A.; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Santesso, Nancy; Cheung, Adrienne; Prediger, Barbara; Baldeh, Tejan; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Neumann, Ignacio; Bossuyt, Patrick; Garg, Amit X.; Lelgemann, Monika; Bühler, Diedrich; Brozek, Jan; Schünemann, Holger J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop guidance on what information to include and how to present it in tables summarizing the evidence from systematic reviews of test accuracy following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Methods To design and refine the evidence

  11. Citizen participation in patient prioritization policy decisions: an empirical and experimental study on patients' characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Adele; Swait, Joffre; Wirsik, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Health systems worldwide are grappling with the need to control costs to maintain system viability. With the combination of worsening economic conditions, an aging population and reductions in tax revenues, the pressures to make structural changes are expected to continue growing. Common cost control mechanisms, e.g. curtailment of patient access and treatment prioritization, are likely to be adversely viewed by citizens. It seems therefore wise to include them in the decision making processes that lead up to policy changes. In the context of a multilevel iterative mixed-method design a quantitative survey representative of the German population (N = 2031) was conducted to probe the acceptance of priority setting in medicine and to explore the practicability of direct public involvement. Here we focus on preferences for patients' characteristics (medical aspects, lifestyle and socio-economic status) as possible criteria for prioritizing medical services. A questionnaire with closed response options was fielded to gain insight into attitudes toward broad prioritization criteria of patient groups. Furthermore, a discrete choice experiment was used as a rigorous approach to investigate citizens' preferences toward specific criteria level in context of other criteria. Both the questionnaire and the discrete choice experiment were performed with the same sample. The citizens' own health and social situation are included as explanatory variables. Data were evaluated using corresponding analysis, contingency analysis, logistic regression and a multinomial exploded logit model. The results show that some medical criteria are highly accepted for prioritizing patients whereas socio-economic criteria are rejected.

  12. The effect of high-fidelity patient simulation on the critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills of new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneval, Rhonda; Fowler, Kimberly A; Kays, John A; Boyd, Tiffany M; Shuey, Jennifer; Harne-Britner, Sarah; Mastrine, Cynthia

    2012-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of high-fidelity patient simulation to new nurse orientation enhanced critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills. A pretest-posttest design was used to assess critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills in two groups of graduate nurses. Compared with the control group, the high-fidelity patient simulation group did not show significant improvement in mean critical thinking or clinical decision-making scores. When mean scores were analyzed, both groups showed an increase in critical thinking scores from pretest to posttest, with the high-fidelity patient simulation group showing greater gains in overall scores. However, neither group showed a statistically significant increase in mean test scores. The effect of high-fidelity patient simulation on critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills remains unclear. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Staggered spondaic word test in epileptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Zazo Ortiz

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Auditory processing during childhood may be altered if there is any predisposing factor during the course of development. Neurological disorders are among the risk factors for auditory processing impairment. From this perspective, epileptic children present such a risk factor and could present auditory processing dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate central auditory processing in epileptic patients using the Staggered Spondaic Word Test (SSW in order to verify whether these patients presented auditory disorders and whether the type of crisis partial or generalized played a role in the occurrence and type of disorder. SETTING: Tertiary care hospital. SAMPLE: Thirty-eight children and adolescents, ranging from 7 to 16 years old, with a diagnosis of epilepsy divided into two groups: 23 patients with partial crisis and 15 patients with generalized crisis. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Performance in the Staggered Spondaic Word Test versus epileptic crisis type (partial or generalized. RESULTS: The majority of epileptic patients showed central auditory processing disorders. There were no differences in relation to crisis type. Both groups showed similar performance, although the results observed for these patients differ from what is obtained with normal populations. With regard to response bias, there were also no differences in performance between subjects with partial or generalized seizures. All possible disorders were found in both groups, without the prevalence of one specific disorder over the other. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed a high prevalence of disorders among epileptic patients in relation to processing partially overlapped verbal sounds in a dichotic paradigm.

  14. Differences in Simulated Doctor and Patient Medical Decision Making: A Construal Level Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Quanhui; Miao, Danmin; Xiao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients are often confronted with diverse medical decisions. Often lacking relevant medical knowledge, patients fail to independently make medical decisions and instead generally rely on the advice of doctors. Objective This study investigated the characteristics of and differences in doctor–patient medical decision making on the basis of construal level theory. Methods A total of 420 undergraduates majoring in clinical medicine were randomly assigned to six groups. Their decisions to opt for radiotherapy and surgery were investigated, with the choices described in a positive/neutral/negative frame × decision making for self/others. Results Compared with participants giving medical advice to patients, participants deciding for themselves were more likely to select radiotherapy (F1, 404 = 13.92, p = 011). Participants from positive or neutral frames exhibited a higher tendency to choose surgery than did those from negative frames (F2, 404 = 22.53, pframing on independent decision making was nonsignificant (F2, 404 = 1.07, p = 35); however the effect of framing on the provision of advice to patients was significant (F2, 404 = 12.95, pframe (F1, 404 = 8.06, p = 005) and marginally significant in the neutral frame (F2, 404 = 3.31, p = 07) but nonsignificant in the negative frame (F2, 404 = .29, p = 59). Conclusion Both social distance and framing depiction significantly affected medical decision making and exhibited a significant interaction. Differences in medical decision making between doctors and patients need further investigation. PMID:24244445

  15. Why do patients want to have their blood tested? A qualitative study of patient expectations in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinant Geert-Jan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners often take their impression of patients' expectations into account in their decision to have blood tests done. It is commonly recommended to involve patients in decision-making during consultations. The study aimed to obtain detailed information on patients' expectations about blood tests. Methods Qualitative study among patients in waiting rooms of general practices. Each patient was presented with a short questionnaire about their preferences in terms of diagnostics. Patients who would like blood tests to be done were interviewed. Results Fifty-seven (26% of the 224 respondents wanted blood tests. Twenty-two were interviewed. Patients overestimated the qualities of blood tests. Favourable test results were regarded as proof of good health. Patients regarded blood tests as a useful instrument to screen for serious disorders, and were confirmed in this belief by people in their social environment and by the media. Many patients expected their GP to take an active test ordering approach, though some indicated that they might be convinced if their GP proposed a wait-and-see policy. Conclusions GPs' perceptions about patient expectations seem justified: patients appear to have high hopes for testing as a diagnostic tool. They expect diagnostic certainty without mistakes and a proof of good health. The question is whether it would be desirable to remove patients' misconceptions, allowing them to participate in policy decisions on the basis of sound information, or whether it would be better to leave the misconceptions uncontested, in order to retain the 'magic' of additional tests and reassure patients. We expect that clarifying the precise nature of patients' expectations by the GP may be helpful in creating a diagnostic strategy that satisfies both patients and GPs. GPs will have to balance the benefits of reassuring their patients by means of blood tests which may be unnecessary against the benefits of

  16. Complex Feeding Decisions: Perceptions of Staff, Patients, and Their Families in the Inpatient Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Anna; Watt, Tanya; Wong, Wei-Yuen; McHutchison, Louise; Friary, Philippa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Where swallowing difficulties are chronic or progressive, or a patient is palliative, tube feeding is often not deemed appropriate. Instead, patients continue to eat and drink despite the risks of pneumonia and death. There is currently little evidence to guide clinical practice in this field often termed "risk feeding." This qualitative study investigated staff, patient, and family member perceptions of risk feeding practices in one New Zealand hospital. Method: Twenty-nine staff members and six patients and/or their family were interviewed. Results: Thematic analysis revealed four global themes: supporting practice, communication, complexity of feeding decisions, and patient and family-centered care. Staff described limited education and organizational policy around risk feeding decisions. Communication was considered a major factor in the success. Conclusion: Feeding decisions are complex in the hospital environment. The themes identified in this study provide a foundation for hospital guideline development and implementation.

  17. Differences between patient and provider perceptions of informed decision making about epidural analgesia use during childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Holly Bianca; Shorten, Allison

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether differences exist between patient and provider perceptions regarding the decision-making process around use of epidural analgesia during childbirth. The dyadic patient-provider Decisional Conflict Scale was modified to measure first-time mother (n = 35) and maternity care provider (n = 52) perceptions. Providers perceived a greater degree of informed decision making than patients (84.97 vs. 79.41, p = .04) and were more likely to recall they upheld patients' rights to make informed choices than patients were to perceive their rights had been upheld (85.95 vs. 71.73, p < .01). This incongruity highlights the need to align legal principles with practice to create mutual agreement between stakeholder perceptions of informed decision making.

  18. Impact of informed consent on patient decisions regarding third ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: We investigated whether the order in which patients learned about complication risks affected their anxiety about and willingness to undergo the removal of their third molar. Materials and Methods: In total, 171 patients (65 males, 106 females) were included in the study. The distributions of gender and the position ...

  19. Patient participation in collective healthcare decision making: the Dutch model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bovenkamp, H.; Trappenburg, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/111650836; Grit, K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study whether the Dutch participation model is a good model of participation. Background Patient participation is on the agenda, both on the individual and the collective level. In this study, we focus on the latter by looking at the Dutch model in which patient organizations are

  20. Patient participation in collective healthcare decision making: the Dutch model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bovenkamp, H.M.; Trappenburg, M.J.; Grit, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective  To study whether the Dutch participation model is a good model of participation. Background  Patient participation is on the agenda, both on the individual and the collective level. In this study, we focus on the latter by looking at the Dutch model in which patient organizations are

  1. Impact of informed consent on patient decisions regarding third ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-22

    Jun 22, 2015 ... Purpose: We investigated whether the order in which patients learned about complication risks affected their anxiety about and willingness to undergo the removal of their third molar. Materials and Methods: In total, 171 patients (65 males, 106 females) were included in the study. The distributions of.

  2. Pneumonia in Nursing Home Patients With Advanced Dementia: Decisions, Intravenous Rehydration Therapy, and Discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Jenny T; Di Giulio, Paola; Giunco, Fabrizio; Monti, Massimo; Gentile, Simona; Villani, Daniele; Finetti, Silvia; Pettenati, Francesca; Charrier, Lorena; Toscani, Franco

    2018-03-01

    Comfort may be an appropriate goal in advanced dementia. Longitudinal studies on physician decision-making and discomfort assessed by direct observation are rare, and intravenous rehydration therapy is controversial. To assess treatment decisions and discomfort in patients with advanced dementia and pneumonia and to compare by intravenous rehydration therapy, we used data from the observational multicenter Italian End of Life Observatory-Prospective Study On DEmentia patients Care. We analyzed 109 episodes of pneumonia, which involved decisions in 77 nursing home patients with Functional Assessment Staging Tool stage 7. We assessed decisions, decision-making, and treatments every fortnight. Trained observers assessed discomfort with the Discomfort Scale-Dementia Alzheimer Type (DS-DAT). Most decisions referred to treatment with antibiotics (90%; 98 of 109) and intravenous rehydration therapy (53%; 58 of 109), but hospitalization was rare (1%). Selecting decisions with antibiotics, with rehydration therapy, the prognosis was more frequently <15 days (34% vs 5% without rehydration therapy; P = .001), and a goal to reduce symptoms/suffering was more common (96% vs 74%; P = .005) while there was no difference in striving for life prolongation (a minority). With rehydration therapy, the decision was more often discussed with family rather than communicated only. Mean DS-DAT scores over time proximate to the first decision ranged between 9.2 and 10.5. Italian nursing home patients with advanced dementia and pneumonia frequently received invasive rehydration therapy in addition to antibiotics, however, mostly with a palliative intent. Discomfort was high overall and symptom relief may be improved. Relations between invasive rehydration therapy and discomfort need further study.

  3. Physician, patient, and contextual factors affecting treatment decisions in older adults with cancer and models of decision making: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariman, Joseph D; Berry, Donna L; Cochrane, Barbara; Doorenbos, Ardith; Schepp, Karen G

    2012-01-01

    To review physician, patient, and contextual factors that affect treatment decision making in older adults diagnosed with cancer, and to relate those factors to theoretical models of decision making. PubMed (1966 to April 2010), PsycINFO (1967 to April 2010) and CINAHL® (1982 to April 2010) databases were searched to access relevant medical, psychological, and nursing literature. Physician factors in treatment decisions included physician's personal beliefs and values, medical expertise, practice type, perception of lowered life expectancy, medical factors, power, and communication style. Patient factors included personal beliefs and values, ethnicity, decisional control preferences, previous health-related experience, perception of the decision-making process, and personal factors. Contextual factors included availability of caregiver, insurance, financial status, and geographical barrier. A diverse group of factors were identified, which are likely to form a unique framework to understand clinical decision making and plan future investigations in older adult patient populations. Using longitudinal and prospective designs to examine the real-time interplay of patient, physician, and contextual factors will enable a better understanding of how those divergent factors influence actual treatment decisions. Oncology nurses can advocate autonomous (patient-driven), shared, or family-controlled treatment decisions, depending on an older patient's decisional role preference. Nurses can support patient autonomy during treatment decision making by coaching patients to engage in discussion of various evidence-based treatment options and a comprehensive discussion of the probability of success for each option with specialist providers. Oncology nurses may be able to promote treatment decisions that are consistent with a patient's personal preferences and values, with strong consideration of the patient's personal contexts.

  4. A web-based clinical decision tool to support treatment decision-making in psychiatry: a pilot focus group study with clinicians, patients and carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshall, Catherine; Marzano, Lisa; Smith, Katharine; Attenburrow, Mary-Jane; Puntis, Stephen; Zlodre, Jakov; Kelly, Kathleen; Broome, Matthew R; Shaw, Susan; Barrera, Alvaro; Molodynski, Andrew; Reid, Alastair; Geddes, John R; Cipriani, Andrea

    2017-07-21

    Treatment decision tools have been developed in many fields of medicine, including psychiatry, however benefits for patients have not been sustained once the support is withdrawn. We have developed a web-based computerised clinical decision support tool (CDST), which can provide patients and clinicians with continuous, up-to-date, personalised information about the efficacy and tolerability of competing interventions. To test the feasibility and acceptability of the CDST we conducted a focus group study, aimed to explore the views of clinicians, patients and carers. The CDST was developed in Oxford. To tailor treatments at an individual level, the CDST combines the best available evidence from the scientific literature with patient preferences and values, and with patient medical profile to generate personalised clinical recommendations. We conducted three focus groups comprising of three different participant types: consultant psychiatrists, participants with a mental health diagnosis and/or experience of caring for someone with a mental health diagnosis, and primary care practitioners and nurses. Each 1-h focus group started with a short visual demonstration of the CDST. To standardise the discussion during the focus groups, we used the same topic guide that covered themes relating to the acceptability and usability of the CDST. Focus groups were recorded and any identifying participant details were anonymised. Data were analysed thematically and managed using the Framework method and the constant comparative method. The focus groups took place in Oxford between October 2016 and January 2017. Overall 31 participants attended (12 consultants, 11 primary care practitioners and 8 patients or carers). The main themes that emerged related to CDST applications in clinical practice, communication, conflicting priorities, record keeping and data management. CDST was considered a useful clinical decision support, with recognised value in promoting clinician-patient

  5. Decision making by parents and healthcare professionals when considering continued care for pediatric patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, P S; Oakes, L; Furman, W; Foppiano, P; Olson, M S; Quargnenti, A; Gattuso, J; Powell, B; Srivastava, D K; Jayawardene, D; Sandlund, J T; Strong, C

    1997-10-01

    To better define the treatment-related decisions considered most difficult by parents of pediatric patients with cancer and the factors that influenced their final decisions. Retrospective-descriptive design. Pediatric oncology institution in the mid-southern region on the United States. 39 parents representing 37 of 83 eligible families, 16 attending physicians, three nurses, and two chaplains. Parent participants responded by telephone to six open-ended interview questions and a 15-item questionnaire about factors that were important when making the decision to continue care. Healthcare professionals were interviewed face-to-face. Most difficult treatment-related decisions; factors influencing decision making. Parents reported 15 types of difficult decisions, the majority of which were made late in the course of treatment. Deciding between a phase I drug study or no further treatment (n = 14), maintaining or withdrawing life support (n = 11), and giving more chemotherapy or giving no further treatment (n = 8) were the most frequently reported difficult decisions. Parents rated "recommendations received from healthcare professionals" as the questionnaire factor most important in their decision making, and healthcare professionals rated "discussion with the family of the patient" as the most important factor. Parents of children or adolescents with cancer and their healthcare providers face difficult treatment-related decisions, many of which occur late in the course of treatment. Parents and healthcare professionals cite similar factors in their decision making but differ in their ratings of the factors' importance. For parents, the information and recommendations they receive from healthcare professionals figure most frequently and most importantly in their decision making. For healthcare professionals, the certainty that the patient will not get better and discussions with the patient's family figure most importantly in their decision making. Once parents

  6. The influence of body image on surgical decisions in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Paulo Alvim; Carvalho, José Thomé de; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the severity of deformities in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis contributes to patients' decision regarding whether to undergo an operation. We evaluated body image factors in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. We evaluated the magnitude of the main scoliotic curve, gibbosity (magnitude and location), shoulder height asymmetry and patient's age. We analyzed the correlation of these data with the number of years the patient was willing to trade for surgery, as measured by the time-trade-off method. A total of 52 patients were studied. We did not find a correlation between any of the parameters that were studied and the number of years that the patient would trade for the surgery. The magnitude of body deformities in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis does not interfere with the decision to undertake surgical treatment.

  7. Test and Evaluation Metrics of Crew Decision-Making And Aircraft Attitude and Energy State Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Ellis, Kyle K. E.; Stephens, Chad L.

    2013-01-01

    NASA has established a technical challenge, under the Aviation Safety Program, Vehicle Systems Safety Technologies project, to improve crew decision-making and response in complex situations. The specific objective of this challenge is to develop data and technologies which may increase a pilot's (crew's) ability to avoid, detect, and recover from adverse events that could otherwise result in accidents/incidents. Within this technical challenge, a cooperative industry-government research program has been established to develop innovative flight deck-based counter-measures that can improve the crew's ability to avoid, detect, mitigate, and recover from unsafe loss-of-aircraft state awareness - specifically, the loss of attitude awareness (i.e., Spatial Disorientation, SD) or the loss-of-energy state awareness (LESA). A critical component of this research is to develop specific and quantifiable metrics which identify decision-making and the decision-making influences during simulation and flight testing. This paper reviews existing metrics and methods for SD testing and criteria for establishing visual dominance. The development of Crew State Monitoring technologies - eye tracking and other psychophysiological - are also discussed as well as emerging new metrics for identifying channelized attention and excessive pilot workload, both of which have been shown to contribute to SD/LESA accidents or incidents.

  8. Decisions, Decisions!

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, F. Lee

    1975-01-01

    A self-instructional program on decision making was used in conjunction with workshops to introduce the staff of an instructional materials company to the decision tree process as they used it to study their own film production problem. (Author/MS)

  9. Providing Quantitative Information and a Nudge to Undergo Stool Testing in a Colorectal Cancer Screening Decision Aid: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Peter H; Perkins, Susan M; Schmidt, Karen K; Muriello, Paul F; Althouse, Sandra; Rawl, Susan M

    2017-08-01

    Guidelines recommend that patient decision aids should provide quantitative information about probabilities of potential outcomes, but the impact of this information is unknown. Behavioral economics suggests that patients confused by quantitative information could benefit from a "nudge" towards one option. We conducted a pilot randomized trial to estimate the effect sizes of presenting quantitative information and a nudge. Primary care patients (n = 213) eligible for colorectal cancer screening viewed basic screening information and were randomized to view (a) quantitative information (quantitative module), (b) a nudge towards stool testing with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) (nudge module), (c) neither a nor b, or (d) both a and b. Outcome measures were perceived colorectal cancer risk, screening intent, preferred test, and decision conflict, measured before and after viewing the decision aid, and screening behavior at 6 months. Patients viewing the quantitative module were more likely to be screened than those who did not ( P = 0.012). Patients viewing the nudge module had a greater increase in perceived colorectal cancer risk than those who did not ( P = 0.041). Those viewing the quantitative module had a smaller increase in perceived risk than those who did not ( P = 0.046), and the effect was moderated by numeracy. Among patients with high numeracy who did not view the nudge module, those who viewed the quantitative module had a greater increase in intent to undergo FIT ( P = 0.028) than did those who did not. The limitations of this study were the limited sample size and single healthcare system. Adding quantitative information to a decision aid increased uptake of colorectal cancer screening, while adding a nudge to undergo FIT did not increase uptake. Further research on quantitative information in decision aids is warranted.

  10. Treacle and Smallpox: Two Tests for Multicriteria Decision Analysis Models in Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Alec

    2017-03-01

    Multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) is rightly receiving increasing attention in health technology assessment. Nevertheless, a distinguishing feature of the health domain is that technologies must actually improve health, and good performance on other criteria cannot compensate for failure to do so. We argue for two reasonable tests for MCDA models: the treacle test (can a winning intervention be incompletely ineffective?) and the smallpox test (can a winning intervention be for a disease that no one suffers from?). We explore why models might fail such tests (as the models of some existing published studies would do) and offer some suggestions as to how practice should be improved. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 76 FR 6694 - Disclosure of Medical Information to the Surrogate of a Patient Who Lacks Decision-Making Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... Lacks Decision-Making Capacity AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This..., otherwise protected medical information with the representative of a patient who lacks decision-making... follows: ``To a representative of a patient who lacks decision-making capacity, when a practitioner deems...

  12. A survey of breast cancer physicians regarding patient involvement in breast cancer treatment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Hershman, Dawn L; Kushi, Lawrence H; Lamerato, Lois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Rana, Sargam; Neugut, Alfred I

    2013-08-01

    Shared breast cancer treatment decision-making between patients and physicians increases patient treatment satisfaction and compliance and is influenced by physician-related factors. Attitudes and behaviors about patient involvement in breast cancer treatment decisions and treatment-related communication were assessed by specialty among breast cancer physicians of women enrolled in the Breast Cancer Quality of Care Study (BQUAL). Of 275 BQUAL physicians identified, 50.0% responded to the survey. Most physicians spend 46-60 min with the patient during the initial consult visit and 51.5% report that the treatment decision is made in one visit. Oncologists spend more time with new breast cancer patients during the initial consult (p = 0.021), and find it more difficult to handle their own feelings than breast surgeons (p = <0.001). Breast surgeons and oncologists share similar attitudes and behaviors related to patient involvement in treatment decision-making, yet oncologists report more difficulty managing their own feelings during the decision-making process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of perceived intimacy on social decision-making in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunyoung ePark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Social dysfunctions including emotional perception and social decision-making are common in patients with schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to determine the level of intimacy formation and the effect of intimacy on social decision in patients with schizophrenia using virtual reality tasks which simulate complicated social situations. Twenty-seven patients with schizophrenia and 30 healthy controls performed the two virtual social tasks: the intimacy task and the social decision task. The first one was to estimate repeatedly how intimate participants felt with each avatar after listening to what avatars said. The second one was to decide whether or not participants accepted the requests of easy, medium or hard difficulty by the intimate or distant avatars. During the intimacy task, the intimacy rating scores for intimate avatars were not significantly different between groups, but those for distant avatars were significantly higher in patients than in controls. During the social decision task, the difference in the acceptance rate between intimate and distant avatars was significantly smaller in patients than in controls. In detail, a significant group difference in the acceptance rate was found only for the hard requests, but not for the easy and medium difficulty requests. These results suggest that patients with schizophrenia have a deficit in emotional perception and social decision-making. Various factors such as a peculiarity of emotional deficits, motivational deficits, concreteness, and paranoid tendency may contribute to these abnormalities.

  14. Effect of perceived intimacy on social decision-making in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunyoung; Shin, Jung Eun; Han, Kiwan; Shin, Yu-Bin; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Social dysfunctions including emotional perception and social decision-making are common in patients with schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to determine the level of intimacy formation and the effect of intimacy on social decision in patients with schizophrenia using virtual reality tasks, which simulate complicated social situations. Twenty-seven patients with schizophrenia and 30 healthy controls performed the 2 virtual social tasks: the intimacy task and the social decision task. The first one was to estimate repeatedly how intimate participants felt with each avatar after listening to what avatars said. The second one was to decide whether or not participants accepted the requests of easy, medium, or hard difficulty by the intimate or distant avatars. During the intimacy task, the intimacy rating scores for intimate avatars were not significantly different between groups, but those for distant avatars were significantly higher in patients than in controls. During the social decision task, the difference in the acceptance rate between intimate and distant avatars was significantly smaller in patients than in controls. In detail, a significant group difference in the acceptance rate was found only for the hard requests, but not for the easy and medium difficulty requests. These results suggest that patients with schizophrenia have a deficit in emotional perception and social decision-making. Various factors such as a peculiarity of emotional deficits, motivational deficits, concreteness, and paranoid tendency may contribute to these abnormalities.

  15. Proof-of-concept study of a Web-based methotrexate decision aid for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linda C; Adam, Paul M; Backman, Catherine L; Lineker, Sydney; Jones, C Allyson; Lacaille, Diane; Townsend, Anne F; Yacyshyn, Elaine; Yousefi, Charlene; Tugwell, Peter; Leese, Jenny; Stacey, Dawn

    2014-10-01

    To assess the extent to which an online patient decision aid reduced decisional conflict and improved self-management knowledge/skills in patients who were considering methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We used a mixed-methods pre-post study design. Eligible participants had a diagnosis of RA, had been prescribed methotrexate but were unsure about starting it, and had access to the internet. Outcome included the Decisional Conflict Scale, the Methotrexate in RA Knowledge Test, and the Effective Consumer Scale. Paired t-tests were used to assess changes before and after the intervention. Randomly selected participants were interviewed at the end of the study about their experiences with the decision aid. Of 30 participants, 23 were women. Mean ± SD age was 54.9 ± 14.9 years and the median disease duration was 1 year (interquartile range 0.3-5.0 years). Mean ± SD decisional conflict changed from 49.50 ± 23.17 preintervention to 21.83 ± 24.12 postintervention (change -27.67 [95% confidence interval -39.89, -15.44]; P consumer attributes (mean ± SD 68.24 ± 12.46 preintervention and 72.94 ± 12.74 postintervention; P = 0.15). Three themes emerged from interviews of 11 participants: seeking confirmation of one's own knowledge of methotrexate, amplifying reluctance when they encountered information contradicting their own experiences, and clarifying thoughts about the next step during the process. Patients' decisional conflict and knowledge improved after using the patient decision aid. Interview findings further highlighted the power of patients' prior knowledge and experiences with RA on how they approach the information presented in a decision aid. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Elder Abuse Decision Support System: Field test outcomes, abuse measure validation, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Kendon J; Iris, Madelyn; Liu, Pi-Ju

    2017-03-01

    The Elder Abuse Decision Support System was designed to meet the critical need for improved methods for assessment and substantiation of elder mistreatment, using a web-based system with standardized measures. Six Illinois agencies participated in the field test. One-year pre/post analyses assessed substantiation results, using Illinois' standard investigation procedure as a comparison. Pre/post acceptability was assessed with caseworkers in focus groups with adult protective service staff. Validity of measures was assessed using Cronbach's alpha and receiver operator characteristic curve analyses with final substantiation decision as a criterion. Increased substantiation of abuse was found. Regarding acceptability, the two systems were found to have differing strengths and weaknesses. Outcome measures had high validity estimates, while focus groups indicated directions for improvement. This study was a successful proof of concept that data collected in the field would be useful for clinical purposes as well as for research.

  17. Delivering patient decision aids on the Internet: definitions, theories, current evidence, and emerging research areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2005, the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration identified twelve quality dimensions to guide assessment of patient decision aids. One dimension—the delivery of patient decision aids on the Internet—is relevant when the Internet is used to provide some or all components of a patient decision aid. Building on the original background chapter, this paper provides an updated definition for this dimension, outlines a theoretical rationale, describes current evidence, and discusses emerging research areas. Methods An international, multidisciplinary panel of authors examined the relevant theoretical literature and empirical evidence through 2012. Results The updated definition distinguishes Internet-delivery of patient decision aids from online health information and clinical practice guidelines. Theories in cognitive psychology, decision psychology, communication, and education support the value of Internet features for providing interactive information and deliberative support. Dissemination and implementation theories support Internet-delivery for providing the right information (rapidly updated), to the right person (tailored), at the right time (the appropriate point in the decision making process). Additional efforts are needed to integrate the theoretical rationale and empirical evidence from health technology perspectives, such as consumer health informatics, user experience design, and human-computer interaction. Despite Internet usage ranging from 74% to 85% in developed countries and 80% of users searching for health information, it is unknown how many individuals specifically seek patient decision aids on the Internet. Among the 86 randomized controlled trials in the 2011 Cochrane Collaboration’s review of patient decision aids, only four studies focused on Internet-delivery. Given the limited number of published studies, this paper particularly focused on identifying gaps in the empirical evidence base and

  18. Impact of the emergency department streaming decision on patients' outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S W; Horwood, C; Li, J Y; Hakendorf, P H; Teubner, D J O; Thompson, C H

    2015-12-01

    Streaming occurs in emergency department (ED) to reduce crowding, but misallocation of patients may impact patients' outcome. The study aims to determine the outcomes of patients misallocated by the ED process of streaming into likely admission or discharge. This is a retrospective cohort study, at an Australian, urban, tertiary referral hospital's ED between January 2010 and March 2012, using propensity score matching for comparison. Total and partitioned ED lengths of stay, inpatient length of stay, in-hospital mortality and 7- and 28-day unplanned readmission rate were compared between patients who were streamed to be admitted against those streamed to be discharged. Total ED length of stay did not differ significantly for admitted patients if allocated to the wrong stream (median 7.6 h, interquartile range 5.7-10.6, cf. 7.5 h, 5.3-11.2; P = 0.34). The median inpatient length of stay was shorter for those initially misallocated to the discharge stream (1.8 days, 1.1-3.0, cf. 2.4 days, 1.4-3.9; P stream stayed in the ED longer than those appropriately allocated (5.2 h, 3.7-7.3, cf. 4.6 h, 3.3-6.4; P streaming process. Patients' discharge from the ED was slower if they had been allocated to the admission stream. Streaming carries few risks for patients misallocated by such a process. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  19. Development and acceptability testing of decision trees for self-management of prosthetic socket fit in adults with lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel Joseph; Veneri, Diana A

    2018-05-01

    The most common complaint lower limb prosthesis users report is inadequacy of a proper socket fit. Adjustments to the residual limb-socket interface can be made by the prosthesis user without consultation of a clinician in many scenarios through skilled self-management. Decision trees guide prosthesis wearers through the self-management process, empowering them to rectify fit issues, or referring them to a clinician when necessary. This study examines the development and acceptability testing of patient-centered decision trees for lower limb prosthesis users. Decision trees underwent a four-stage process: literature review and expert consultation, designing, two-rounds of expert panel review and revisions, and target audience testing. Fifteen lower limb prosthesis users (average age 61 years) reviewed the decision trees and completed an acceptability questionnaire. Participants reported agreement of 80% or above in five of the eight questions related to acceptability of the decision trees. Disagreement was related to the level of experience of the respondent. Decision trees were found to be easy to use, illustrate correct solutions to common issues, and have terminology consistent with that of a new prosthesis user. Some users with greater than 1.5 years of experience would not use the decision trees based on their own self-management skills. Implications for Rehabilitation Discomfort of the residual limb-prosthetic socket interface is the most common reason for clinician visits. Prosthesis users can use decision trees to guide them through the process of obtaining a proper socket fit independently. Newer users may benefit from using the decision trees more than experienced users.

  20. Application of Bayesian decision-making to laboratory testing for Lyme disease and comparison with testing for HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Michael J; Puri, Basant K

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Bayes' theorem was used to determine the probability of a patient having Lyme disease (LD), given a positive test result obtained using commercial test kits in clinically diagnosed patients. In addition, an algorithm was developed to extend the theorem to the two-tier test methodology. Using a disease prevalence of 5%-75% in samples sent for testing by clinicians, evaluated with a C6 peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the probability of infection given a positive test ranged from 26.4% when the disease was present in 5% of referrals to 95.3% when disease was present in 75%. When applied in the case of a C6 ELISA followed by a Western blot, the algorithm developed for the two-tier test demonstrated an improvement with the probability of disease given a positive test ranging between 67.2% and 96.6%. Using an algorithm to determine false-positive results, the C6 ELISA generated 73.6% false positives with 5% prevalence and 4.7% false positives with 75% prevalence. Corresponding data for a group of test kits used to diagnose HIV generated false-positive rates from 5.4% down to 0.1% indicating that the LD tests produce up to 46 times more false positives. False-negative test results can also influence patient treatment and outcomes. The probability of a false-negative test for LD with a single test for early-stage disease was high at 66.8%, increasing to 74.9% for two-tier testing. With the least sensitive HIV test used in the two-stage test, the false-negative rate was 1.3%, indicating that the LD test generates ~60 times as many false-negative results. For late-stage LD, the two-tier test generated 16.7% false negatives compared with 0.095% false negatives generated by a two-step HIV test, which is over a 170-fold difference. Using clinically representative LD test sensitivities, the two-tier test generated over 500 times more false-negative results than two-stage HIV testing.

  1. Applying the theory of planned behaviour to multiple sclerosis patients' decisions on disease modifying therapy--questionnaire concept and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Jürgen; Köpke, Sascha; Fischer, Korbinian; Schäffler, Nina; Backhus, Imke; Solari, Alessandra; Heesen, Christoph

    2012-07-02

    Patients making important medical decisions need to evaluate complex information in the light of their own beliefs, attitudes and priorities. The process can be considered in terms of the theory of planned behaviour. Decision support technologies aim at helping patients making informed treatment choices. Instruments assessing informed choices need to include risk knowledge, attitude (towards therapy) and actual uptake. However, mechanisms by which decision support achieves its goals are poorly understood.Our aim was therefore to develop and validate an instrument modeling the process of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients' decision making about whether to undergo disease modifying (immuno-)therapies (DMT). We constructed a 30-item patient administered questionnaire to access the elaboration of decisions about DMT in MS according to the theory of planned behaviour. MS-patients' belief composites regarding immunotherapy were classified according to the domains "attitude", "subjective social norm" and "control beliefs" and within each domain to either "expectations" or "values" yielding 6 sub-domains. A randomized controlled trial (n = 192) evaluating an evidence based educational intervention tested the instrument's predictive power regarding intention to use immunotherapy and its sensitivity to the intervention. The psychometric properties of the questionnaire were satisfactory (mean item difficulty 62, mean SD 0.9, range 0-3). Responses explain up to 68% of the variability in the intention to use DMT was explained by up to 68% in the total sample. Four weeks after an educational intervention, predictive power was higher in the intervention (IG) compared to the control group (CG) (intention estimate: CG 56% / IG 69%, p = .179; three domains CG 56% / IG 74%, p = .047; six sub-domains CG 64% / IG 78%, p = .073). The IG held more critical beliefs towards immunotherapy (p = .002) and were less willing to comply with social norm (p = .012). The

  2. Patients' preferences for involvement in the decision-making process for treating diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marahrens, Lydia; Kern, Raimar; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Fritsche, Andreas; Martus, Peter; Ziemssen, Focke; Roeck, Daniel

    2017-08-09

    To assess factors associated with the preferred role of the attending ophthalmologist in the decision-making processes before treating diabetic retinopathy (DR). Cross-sectional study of 810 adults attending secondary diabetes care centers (NCT02311504). Diabetes patients were classified using a validated questionnaire in an ophthalmologist-dominant decision-making (ODM), shared decision-making (SDM) and patient-dominant decision-making (PDM) style. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine factors associated with the decision-making process. A majority of 74.3% patients preferred SDM between ophthalmologist and patient, 17.4% patients wanted ODM, delegating the decision-making process to the ophthalmologist, 8.3% preferred the autonomous style of PDM. Patients wanting ODM were older (OR = 1.2 per decade, p = 0.013), had a lower level of education (OR = 1.4, p = 0.001) and had a higher frequency of consultations per year (OR = 1.3, p = 0.022). Patients with better basic knowledge in DR and memorizing their HbA1c level showed a higher propensity for SDM (OR = 1.1, p = 0.037). Patients wanting PDM had a significantly higher education (OR = 1.3, p = 0.036) and a greater desire for receiving information from self-help groups (OR = 1.3, p = 0.015). The first evaluation of the general patient wishes for the treatment of DR confirmed the concept of SDM, which was favored by three quarters. In particular, older patients with low educational attainment wanted to delegate the decision-making process to the ophthalmologist. Amelioration of ophthalmologic education in diabetic programs might take up patients' propensity for SDM. Regardless of the decision-making group, nearly all patients wanted the medical and scientific information to be transferred by and shared with the ophthalmologist. The study was registered on www.clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT02311504) on December 4th 2014.

  3. Psychiatric and psychological factors in patient decision making concerning antidepressant use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Jaspers, M.; Van Zwieten, A.

    The observation that the use of antidepressants has strongly increased during the past decade implies that on a micro level doctors and patients more often decide that antidepressants are the appropriate treatment. Therefore, it is important to increase insight into patients' decision making

  4. Patient Perceptions of Illness Identity in Cancer Clinical Trial Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer-Wackerly, Angela L; Dailey, Phokeng M; Krok-Schoen, Jessica L; Rhodes, Nancy D; Krieger, Janice L

    2017-06-16

    When patients are diagnosed with cancer, they begin to negotiate their illness identity in relation to their past and future selves, their relationships, and their group memberships. Thus, how patients view their cancer in relation to their other identities may affect how and why they make particular decisions about treatment options. Using the Communication Theory of Identity (CTI), the current study explores: (1) how and why illness identity is framed across identity layers in relation to one particular cancer treatment: participation in a cancer clinical trial (CT); and (2) how and why patients experience identity conflicts while making their treatment decisions. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were analyzed for 46 cancer patients who were offered a CT. Results of a grounded theory analysis indicated that patients expressed separate identity frames (e.g., personal, relational, and communal), aligned identity frames (e.g., personal and communal), and identity conflicts (e.g., personal-personal). This study theoretically shows how and why patient illness identity relates to cancer treatment decision-making as well as how and why patients relate (and conflict) with the cancer communal identity frame. Practical implications include how healthcare providers and family members can support patient decision-making through awareness of and accommodating to identity shifts.

  5. Higher preference for participation in treatment decisions is associated with lower medication adherence in asthma patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, A.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Quinzler, R.; Bieber, C.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the interrelations between medication adherence, self-management, preference for involvement in treatment decisions and preference for information in asthma patients in primary care. METHODS: One hundred and eighty-five patients from 43 practices completed a series of

  6. What influences a patient's decision to use custom-made orthopaedic shoes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Postema, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite potential benefits, some patients decide not to use their custom-made orthopaedic shoes (OS). Factors are known in the domains 'usability', 'communication and service', and 'opinion of others' that influence a patient's decision to use OS. However, the interplay between these

  7. Factors influencing the patient with rheumatoid arthritis in their decision to seek podiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, A; Mandy, P J; Stew, G

    2013-12-01

    Despite the level of foot involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the literature to support early assessment of foot care needs, local referral of patients to podiatry has been occurring too late to instigate certain preventative interventions. Preliminary fieldwork has highlighted that the primary responsibility for the instigation of this lies with the patient. The present study describes the factors that influence the patient with RA in their decision to self-report foot problems. A case study research strategy was employed. Nine patients attending the outpatient rheumatology department participated in the study and data were gathered through semi-structured interviews. This information was analysed using a framework approach. The key themes derived from the data suggested that there are a variety of factors influencing the patient's decision to self-report foot concerns. Some will act to encourage the action and others will act to oppose it. Other factors can influence the decision either way, depending on the individual patient (psychological state, previous experience, body image changes). In addition, age, gender, and cultural and social aspects are also significant. Due to the multitude of factors influencing the individual's decision to seek help, the patient cannot be given sole responsibility for their foot health if we wish to achieve timely and appropriate podiatry, as recommended in the literature. Responsibility should be three-way; the patient, the members of the rheumatology team and, once in the podiatry service, the podiatrist should maintain this. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Development of a Decision Support System to Predict Physicians' Rehabilitation Protocols for Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M.; Alshraideh, Mohammad A.; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M.; Salah, Imad K.; Holm, Margo B.; Otom, Ali H.

    2012-01-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee…

  9. Decision-making deficits in patients with chronic schizophrenia: Iowa Gambling Task and Prospect Valence Learning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Sun; Kang, Bit-Na; Lim, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Decision-making is the process of forming preferences for possible options, selecting and executing actions, and evaluating the outcome. This study used the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and the Prospect Valence Learning (PVL) model to investigate deficits in risk-reward related decision-making in patients with chronic schizophrenia, and to identify decision-making processes that contribute to poor IGT performance in these patients. Thirty-nine patients with schizophrenia and 31 healthy controls participated. Decision-making was measured by total net score, block net scores, and the total number of cards selected from each deck of the IGT. PVL parameters were estimated with the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling scheme in OpenBugs and BRugs, its interface to R, and the estimated parameters were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U-test. The schizophrenia group received significantly lower total net scores compared to the control group. In terms of block net scores, an interaction effect of group × block was observed. The block net scores of the schizophrenia group did not differ across the five blocks, whereas those of the control group increased as the blocks progressed. The schizophrenia group obtained significantly lower block net scores in the fourth and fifth blocks of the IGT and selected cards from deck D (advantageous) less frequently than the control group. Additionally, the schizophrenia group had significantly lower values on the utility-shape, loss-aversion, recency, and consistency parameters of the PVL model. These results indicate that patients with schizophrenia experience deficits in decision-making, possibly due to failure in learning the expected value of each deck, and incorporating outcome experiences of previous trials into expectancies about options in the present trial.

  10. Faux Pas Test in schizophrenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Negrão

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study is to validate the adult version of “Faux Pas Recognition Test” created by Stone and colleagues (1998 as a reliable instrument assess and discriminate social cognition among schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Methods This is a cross-sectional study with a total of 196 participants (mean age = 26.45; CI (95% [25.10; 27.83] 51% male. From those, 44 (22.4% patients with schizophrenia and 152 (77.6% healthy controls. The participants answered a short version of the Faux Pas Recognition Test, composed by 10 stories. Results Significant differences were found between both groups regarding their scores on Faux Pas Recognition Test (p = 0.003. Patients with schizophrenia had lower score, compared to healthy controls. Story 14 was the best to distinguish both groups, and Story 16, the worst. Among the questions of Faux Pas stories, the one related to intuition presented the most significant difference between the groups (p = 0.001, followed by the one related to understanding (p = 0.003. Conclusion The Brazilian version of the Faux Pas Recognition Test is a valid test to assess social cognition in schizophrenia and can be an important instrument to be used on the clinical practice.

  11. Multidisciplinary team decision-making in cancer and the absent patient: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D W; Heaven, B; Thomson, R G; Wilson, J A; Exley, C

    2016-07-21

    To critically examine the process of multidisciplinary team (MDT) decision-making with a particular focus on patient involvement. Ethnographic study using direct non-participant observation of 35 MDT meetings and 37 MDT clinics, informal interviews and formal, semistructured interviews with 20 patients and 9 MDT staff members. Three head and neck cancer centres in the north of England. Patients with a diagnosis of new or recurrent head and neck cancer and staff members who attend the head and neck cancer MDT. Individual members of the MDT often have a clear view of which treatment they consider to be 'best' in any clinical situation. When disagreement occurs, the MDT has to manage how it presents this difference of opinion to the patient. First, this is because the MDT members recognise that the clinician selected to present the treatment choice to the patient may 'frame' their description of the treatment options to fit their own view of best. Second, many MDT members feel that any disagreement and difference of opinion in the MDT meeting should be concealed from the patient. This leads to much of the work of decision-making occurring in the MDT meeting, thus excluding the patient. MDT members seek to counteract this by introducing increasing amounts of information about the patient into the MDT meeting, thus creating an 'evidential patient'. Often, only highly selected or very limited information of this type can be available or known and it can easily be selectively reported in order to steer the discussion in a particular direction. The process of MDT decision-making presents significant barriers to effective patient involvement. If patients are to be effectively involved in cancer decision-making, the process of MDT decision-making needs substantial review. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. A Conceptual Model for Nurses' Decision-making with the Aggressive Psychiatric Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Lois Biggin

    2015-08-01

    Violence in the acute care psychiatric setting is an ongoing serious problem. Maintenance of a safe therapeutic environment is a paramount responsibility of nurses practicing in this area. Ethical and legal standards demand that the nurse intervenes in aggressive situations in a manner that employs the least intrusive and restrictive measures necessary to provide safety. Therefore, accurate and effective decision-making in aggressive situations, which can escalate rapidly, is of great importance. This paper discusses a theoretical model for decision-making in selecting interventions with aggressive psychiatric patients. This model may provide a basis for the development of training and education programs for effective decision-making in this area.

  13. An overview of patient involvement in healthcare decision-making: a situational analysis of the Malaysian context

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ng, Chirk-Jenn; Lee, Ping-Yein; Lee, Yew-Kong; Chew, Boon-How; Engkasan, Julia P; Irmi, Zarina-Ismail; Hanafi, Nik-Sherina; Tong, Seng-Fah

    2013-01-01

    ..., and laws with respect to patient engagement in shared decision-making (SDM) in Asia. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive literature review to collect information on healthcare decision-making in Malaysia...

  14. On the suitability of fast and frugal heuristics for designing values clarification methods in patient decision aids: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, Arwen H; de Vries, Marieke

    2013-09-01

    Increasingly, patient decision aids and values clarification methods (VCMs) are being developed to support patients in making preference-sensitive health-care decisions. Many VCMs encourage extensive deliberation about options, without solid theoretical or empirical evidence showing that deliberation is advantageous. Research suggests that simple, fast and frugal heuristic decision strategies sometimes result in better judgments and decisions. Durand et al. have developed two fast and frugal heuristic-based VCMs. To critically analyse the suitability of the 'take the best' (TTB) and 'tallying' fast and frugal heuristics in the context of patient decision making. Analysis of the structural similarities between the environments in which the TTB and tallying heuristics have been proven successful and the context of patient decision making and of the potential of these heuristic decision processes to support patient decision making. The specific nature of patient preference-sensitive decision making does not seem to resemble environments in which the TTB and tallying heuristics have proven successful. Encouraging patients to consider less rather than more relevant information potentially even deteriorates their values clarification process. Values clarification methods promoting the use of more intuitive decision strategies may sometimes be more effective. Nevertheless, we strongly recommend further theoretical thinking about the expected value of such heuristics and of other more intuitive decision strategies in this context, as well as empirical assessments of the mechanisms by which inducing such decision strategies may impact the quality and outcome of values clarification. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Decision-Making in Audiology: Balancing Evidence-Based Practice and Patient-Centered Care

    OpenAIRE

    Boisvert, Isabelle; Clemesha, Jennifer; Lundmark, Erik; Crome, Erica; Barr, Caitlin; McMahon, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    Health-care service delivery models have evolved from a practitioner-centered approach toward a patient-centered ideal. Concurrently, increasing emphasis has been placed on the use of empirical evidence in decision-making to increase clinical accountability. The way in which clinicians use empirical evidence and client preferences to inform decision-making provides an insight into health-care delivery models utilized in clinical practice. The present study aimed to investigate the sources of ...

  16. Development of a patient decision aid for the treatment of localised prostate cancer: a participatory design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Itejawi, Hoda H M; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Vis, André N; Nieuwenhuijzen, Jakko A; Hofstee, Myrna J A; van Moorselaar, Reindert Jeroen A; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2016-04-01

    To develop a patient decision aid and to prepare an overview of requirements for implementation. We developed a decision aid that fits the preferences of patients and health care professionals to ensure adequate uptake in clinical practice. A participatory design approach was used to acquire insight into preferences regarding the content and design of a decision aid and into barriers and aspects of the decision aid that facilitate implementation in clinical practice. Three focus group interviews with patients, their partners and health care professionals were conducted. A prototype of the decision aid was developed and presented to patients (n = 14) and health care professionals (n = 13) in semi-structured interviews. Patients (n = 5) participated in a usability study. Data were analysed by two independent coders. Health care professionals considered medical information on treatments and side effects as the most important aspect to be included in the decision aid. Patients also focused on nonmedical considerations, such as location. Both expected the decision aid to support patients in making a treatment choice. According to health care professionals, the oncology nurse was the most suitable to discuss the decision aid with patients, while some patients preferred to discuss the patient decision aid with the urologist. The main barrier to implementation of the decision aid was said to be the expectation that it is time and money consuming, while the incorporation of the decision aid into clinical guidelines and basing the content on these guidelines, would promote implementation. By using a participatory design approach a patient decision aid was designed to meet patients' and health care professionals' needs. Insight was also gained on requirements for implementation. Wide-scale implementation of decision aids is desirable. An overview is provided of requirements for implementation to successfully incorporate a decision aid into clinical practice. © 2016 John

  17. Systematic biases in group decision-making: implications for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Russell; Thompson, Carl

    2014-12-01

    Key decisions in modern health care systems are often made by groups of people rather than lone individuals. However, group decision-making can be imperfect and result in organizational and clinical errors which may harm patients-a fact highlighted graphically in recent (and historical) health scandals and inquiries such as the recent report by Sir Robert Francis into the serious failures in patient care and safety at Mid Staffordshire Hospitals NHS Trust in the English NHS. In this article, we draw on theories from organization studies and decision science to explore the ways in which patient safety may be undermined or threatened in health care contexts as a result of four systematic biases arising from group decision-making: 'groupthink', 'social loafing', 'group polarization' and 'escalation of commitment'. For each group bias, we describe its antecedents, illustrate how it can impair group decisions with regard to patient safety, outline a range of possible remedial organizational strategies that can be used to attenuate the potential for adverse consequences and look forward at the emerging research agenda in this important but hitherto neglected area of patient safety research. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  18. Nurse or physician: whose recommendation influences the decision to take genetic tests more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoy, Sivia; Levy, Ofra; Bar-Tal, Yoram

    2010-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore factors influencing the decision to take genetic carrier testing. Genetic testing has become a popular means of elucidating the risk of giving birth to a sick/disabled child but what influences prospective parents to take genetic tests or not is unclear. The study was based on a factorial 2 x 2 x 2 within-between subjects design. The questionnaire presented four scenarios, each illustrating a healthcare worker presenting information on a devastating genetic disease. The variables manipulated were: the health care worker's expertise (novice vs. expert), the recommender's role (nurse vs. physician) and type of recommendation (recommendation vs. no recommendation). After each scenario participants were asked their own intention to take the test and their intention to recommend a friend to take the test. Data were collected in 2007. Altogether 156 questionnaires were collected. Expert nurses and expert physicians were accorded the same level of compliance. However, a novice physician's recommendation to take a genetic test was complied with as much as an expert physician's, whereas a novice nurse's recommendation was less accepted than that of an expert nurse. When no recommendation was made, more compliance with the nurse was found (i.e. less intention to take the test). Genetic information should be presented to the public with caution to avoid over-testing. For the public to accept a nurse's recommendation, the nurse has to be perceived as an expert; therefore, expert nurses' proficiency should be made clear.

  19. Clinical decision support systems for patient safety: a focus group needs assessment with Korean ICU nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mona; Choi, Ran; Bae, Young-Ran; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2011-11-01

    An ICU is known as a data-rich environment, and information technology can improve the quality of care by utilizing stored clinical data and providing decision support effectively and in a timely manner to clinicians. The necessity of clinical decision support systems is emphasized now more than ever because patient safety and nursing-sensitive outcomes in the clinical setting have become a critical issue. The purpose of this study was to explore nursing-sensitive outcomes issues related to patient safety in critical care and to understand the types and contents of clinical decision support systems that nurses desire in a clinical practice setting. Focus group interviews were conducted with 37 nurses who worked in one university hospital system in Korea. Our findings are summarized into threats to patient safety, nursing-sensitive outcomes, and the types and contents of clinical decision support systems, which are categorized into the following groups: (1) reminders, notification, alert, and warning systems; (2) point-of-care guidelines; and (3) references for information/guidelines. Nurses consistently stated that clinical decision support systems can help improve nursing outcomes by applying standardized nursing care. Our study is expected to provide a practical suggestion for developing and designing a new clinical decision support system or for refining an existing one.

  20. Patient understanding of the revised USPSTF screening mammogram guidelines: need for development of patient decision aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Summer V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to examine patients’ understanding of the revised screening mammogram guidelines released by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF in 2009 addressing age at initiation and frequency of screening mammography. Methods Patients from the Departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Obstetrics and Gynecology (n = 150 at a tertiary care medical center in the United States completed a survey regarding their understanding of the revised USPSTF guidelines following their release, within four to six months of their scheduled mammogram (March 2010 to May 2010. Results Of the patients surveyed, 97/147 (67% indicated increased confusion regarding the age and frequency of screening mammography, 61/148 (41% reported increased anxiety about mammograms, and 58/146 (40% reported anxiety about their own health status following the release of the revised screening guidelines. Most of the patients surveyed, 111/148 (75%, did not expect to change their timing or frequency of screening mammograms in the future. Conclusion Results from this survey suggested increased confusion and possibly an increase in patients’ anxiety related to screening mammography and their own health status following the release of the revised USPSTF screening mammogram guidelines to the public and subsequent media portrayal of the revised guidelines. Although the study did not specifically address causality for these findings, the results highlight the need for improvements in the communication of guidelines to patients and the public. Development of shared decision-making tools and outcomes should be considered to address the communication challenge.

  1. [Respect for autonomy. How much do patients want to know in order to make decisions?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrelli, Silvia; Colt, Henri G; Lyons, Gustavo; Cohen, Diana

    2008-01-01

    Informed consent should be the expression of active participation of patients in the decision-making process. It is an application of the ethical principle of respect for patient autonomy. However, there are some concerns about the direct extrapolation of the Anglo-saxon concept of autonomy into other societies which could impose an unwanted level of patient participation. The objective of this study was to explore the quantity and quality of information that Argentine patients want to receive before making a decision about a surgical procedure. Among 200 patients possibly scheduled for elective surgery, more than 80% preferred to know all the possible alternatives of treatment and all the advantages and disadvantages of each alternative. Less than 20% considered that the patients themselves should make the decision regarding surgery after learning about all the risks and benefits. Seventy one percent of patients preferred to receive the information with their families in order to make a joint decision with them. Seventeen percent of patients preferred not knowing if there was a possibility they could die during surgery. These results suggest that in the current medical environment, one previously dominated in Argentina by a tendency towards beneficient paternalism on the part of physicians and surgeons, patients want to be extensively informed about risks, benefits, and procedural alternatives before electing to undergo a surgical procedure. Patient preferences regarding how family members should be involved in the decision-making should be elicited. Careful consideration is warranted, however, in the way health care providers might address risks of procedure-related death so that subjects who do not want to know about this risk can be identified.

  2. Why do some patients with schizophrenia want to be engaged in medical decision making and others do not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Johannes; Mendel, Rosmarie; Reiter, Sarah; Cohen, Rudolf; Bühner, Markus; Schebitz, Matthias; Diplich, Stefan; Kissling, Werner; Berthele, Achim

    2011-12-01

    Treatment guidelines for schizophrenia recommend that medical decisions should be shared between patients with schizophrenia and their physicians. Our goal was to determine why some patients want to participate in medical decision making and others do not. To identify determinants of participation preferences in schizophrenia patients (ICD-10 criteria) and in a nonpsychiatric comparison group (multiple sclerosis), we undertook a cross-sectional survey in 4 psychiatric and neurologic hospitals in Germany. Inpatients suffering from schizophrenia or multiple sclerosis (but not both) were consecutively recruited (2007-2008), and 203 patients participated in the study (101 with schizophrenia and 102 with multiple sclerosis). Predictors for patients' participation preferences were identified using a structural equation model. Patients' reports about their participation preferences in medical decisions can be predicted to a considerable extent (52% of the variance). For patients with schizophrenia, poor treatment satisfaction (P decision making skills (P decision making are often dissatisfied with care or are skeptical toward medication. Patients who judge their decisional capacity as poor or who are poorly educated prefer not to participate in decision making. Future implementation strategies for shared decision making must address how dissatisfied patients can be included in decision making and how patients who currently do not want to share decisions can be enabled, empowered, and motivated for shared decision making. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    1998-12-08

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 340, the NTS Pesticide Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 340 is located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites: 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 Pesticide Release Ditch; 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Corrective Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site.

  4. Physician, Patient and Contextual Factors Affecting Treatment Decisions in Older Adults with Cancer: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariman, J. D.; Berry, D. L.; Cochrane, B.; Doorenbos, A.; Schepp, K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review physician, patient, and contextual factors that affect treatment decision-making in older adults diagnosed with cancer and relate these factors to theoretical models of decision-making. Data Sources PubMed (1966-April 2010), PsycINFO (1967-April 2010) and CINAHL (1982-April 2010) databases were searched to access relevant medical, psychological and nursing literature. Data Synthesis Physician factors in treatment decisions include physician personal beliefs and values, expertise, practice type, perception of lowered life expectancy, medical factors, power, and communication style. Patient factors include personal beliefs and values, ethnicity, decisional control preferences, previous health-related experience, perception of the decision-making process, and personal factors. Contextual factors include availability of caregiver, lack of insurance, poor financial status, and geographical barrier. The interplay of physician, patient, and contextual factors are not well understood. Existing models of decision-making are not sufficient to explicate TDM process in older adults diagnosed with cancer. Conclusions Clinical studies in older adult patient population using a longitudinal and prospective design are needed to examine real-time interplay of patient, physician, and contextual factors and to better understand how these divergent factors influenced actual treatment decisions. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses can advocate for a patient’s autonomy during TDM by coaching them to seek evidence-based discussion of various treatment options, benefits and risks assessments, and truthful discussion of the probability of success for each treatment option from their physicians. Oncology nurses must promote an informed treatment decisions that are consistent with a patient’s personal preference and values within the limits of the patient’s personal contexts. PMID:22201670

  5. Physical Activity, Decision-Making Abilities, and Eating Disturbances in Pre- and Postbariatric Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Merle; Langenberg, Svenja; Gruner-Labitzke, Kerstin; Schulze, Mareike; Köhler, Hinrich; Crosby, Ross D; Marschollek, Michael; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2016-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) is considered to have a beneficial influence on executive functioning, including decision-making. Enhanced decision-making after bariatric surgery may strengthen patients' ability to delay gratification, helping to establish appropriate eating behavior. The objectives of this study were to (1) compare a preoperative group with a postoperative group with regard to daily PA, decision-making, and eating disturbances; and (2) investigate the relationship between these variables. The study included 71 bariatric surgery candidates (55 % women, BMI [kg/m(2)] M = 46.9, SD = 6.0) and 73 postoperative patients (57 % women, BMI M = 32.0, SD = 4.1; 89 % Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 11 % sleeve gastrectomy; months postoperative M = 8.2, SD = 3.5; total weight loss [%] M = 33.2, SD = 8.9) who completed SenseWear Pro2 activity monitoring. Decision-making was assessed using a computerized version of the Iowa Gambling Task and eating disorder psychopathology using the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire. The number of patients who were classified as physically inactive was similarly high in the pre- and postoperative groups. No group differences emerged with regard to decision-making, but the postoperative group exhibited less eating disturbances than the preoperative group. No significant associations were found between PA, decision-making, and eating behavior. Patients after bariatric surgery were not more physically active than bariatric surgery candidates, which should be considered in care programs. Additionally, future research is needed to explore the possible link between PA, patients' decision-making abilities, and eating disturbances concerning dose-response questions.

  6. Patient participation in decision-making about cardiovascular preventive drugs - resistance as agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultberg, Josabeth; Rudebeck, Carl Edvard

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and explore patient agency through resistance in decision-making about cardiovascular preventive drugs in primary care. Six general practitioners from the southeast of Sweden audiorecorded 80 consultations. From these, 28 consultations with proposals from GPs for cardiovascular preventive drug treatments were chosen for theme-oriented discourse analysis. The study shows how patients participate in decision-making about cardiovascular preventive drug treatments through resistance in response to treatment proposals. Passive modes of resistance were withheld responses and minimal unmarked acknowledgements. Active modes were to ask questions, contest the address of an inclusive we, present an identity as a non-drugtaker, disclose non-adherence to drug treatments, and to present counterproposals. The active forms were also found in anticipation to treatment proposals from the GPs. Patients and GPs sometimes displayed mutual renouncement of responsibility for decision-making. The decision-making process appeared to expand both beyond a particular phase in the consultations and beyond the single consultation. The recognition of active and passive resistance from patients as one way of exerting agency may prove valuable when working for patient participation in clinical practice, education and research about patient-doctor communication about cardiovascular preventive medication. We propose particular attentiveness to patient agency through anticipatory resistance, patients' disclosures of non-adherence and presentations of themselves as non-drugtakers. The expansion of the decision-making process beyond single encounters points to the importance of continuity of care. KEY POINTS Guidelines recommend shared decision-making about cardiovascular preventive treatment. We need an understanding of how this is accomplished in actual consultations.This paper describes how patient agency in decision-making is displayed through different forms

  7. Evaluation of Clinical Decision Rules for Bone Mineral Density Testing among White Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Anders

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteoporosis is a devastating, insidious disease that causes skeletal fragility. Half of women will suffer osteoporotic fractures during their lifetimes. Many fractures occur needlessly, because of inattentiveness to assessment, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of osteoporosis. Study Purpose. Study Purpose. To evaluate the discriminatory performance of clinical decision rules to determine the need to undergo bone mineral density testing. Methods. A nationally representative sample from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey consisted of 14,060 subjects who completed surveys, physical examinations, laboratory tests, and bone mineral density exams. Multivariable linear regression tested the correlation of covariates that composed the clinical decision rules with bone mineral density. Results. Increased age and decreased weight were variables in the final regression models for each gender and race/ethnicity. Among the indices, the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool, which is composed of age and weight, performed best for White women. Study Implications. These results have implications for the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis. The Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool performed best and is inexpensive and the least time consuming to implement.

  8. Reduction in uptake of PSA tests following decision aids: systematic review of current aids and their evaluations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, R.; Edwards, A.; Brett, J.; Bradburn, M.; Watson, E.; Austoker, J.; Elwyn, G.

    2005-01-01

    A man's decision to have a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test should be an informed one. We undertook a systematic review to identify and appraise PSA decision aids and evaluations. We searched 15 electronic databases and hand-searched key journals. We also contacted key authors and organisations.

  9. Decision making about healthcare-related tests and diagnostic test strategies. Paper 3: a systematic review shows limitations in most tools designed to assess quality and develop recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Reem A; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Falavigna, Maicon; Zhang, Yuan; Ivanova, Liudmila; Arevalo-Rodriguez, Ingrid; Cheung, Adrienne; Prediger, Barbara; Ventresca, Matthew; Brozek, Jan; Santesso, Nancy; Bossuyt, Patrick; Garg, Amit X; Lloyd, Nancy; Lelgemann, Monika; Bühler, Diedrich; Schünemann, Holger J

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and describe critical appraisal tools designed for assessing the quality of evidence (QoE) and/or strength of recommendations (SoRs) related to health care-related tests and diagnostic strategies (HCTDSs). We conducted a systematic review to identify tools applied in guidelines, methodological articles, and systematic reviews to assess HCTDS. We screened 5,534 titles and abstracts, 1,004 full-text articles, and abstracted data from 330 references. We identified 29 tools and 14 modifications of existing tools for assessing QoE and SoR. Twenty-three out of 29 tools acknowledge the importance of assessing the QoE and SoR separately, but in 8, the SoR is based solely on QoE. When making decisions about the use of tests, patient values and preferences and impact on resource utilization were considered in 6 and 8 tools, respectively. There is also confusion about the terminology that describes the various factors that influence the QoE and SoR. Although at least one approach includes all relevant criteria for assessing QoE and determining SoR, more detailed guidance about how to operationalize these assessments and make related judgments will be beneficial. There is a need for a better description of the framework for using evidence to make decisions and develop recommendations about HCTDS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Balance Sheets versus Decision Dashboards to support patient treatment choices: A comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G.; Veazie, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Growing recognition of the importance of involving patients in preference-driven healthcare decisions has highlighted the need to develop practical strategies to implement patient-centered shared decision making. The use of tabular balance sheets to support clinical decision making is well established. More recent evidence suggests that graphic, interactive decision dashboards can help people derive a deeper understanding of information within a specific decision context. We therefore conducted a non-randomized trial comparing the effects of adding an interactive dashboard to a static tabular balance sheet on patient decision-making. Method The study population consisted of members of the ResearchMatch registry who volunteered to participate in a study of medical decision making. Two separate surveys were conducted: one for the control group and one for the intervention group. All participants were instructed to imagine they were newly diagnosed with a chronic illness and asked to choose between three hypothetical drug treatments that varied with regard to effectiveness, side effects, and out-of-pocket cost. Both groups made an initial treatment choice after reviewing a balance sheet. After a brief washout period, members of the control group made a second treatment choice after reviewing the balance sheet again while intervention group members made a second treatment choice after reviewing an interactive decision dashboard containing the same information. After both choices participants rated their degree of confidence in their choice on a 1–10 scale. Results Members of the dashboard intervention group were more likely to change their choice of preferred drug, (10.2% vs. 7.5%, p=0.054) and had a larger increase in decision confidence than the control group: 0.67 vs. 0.075, p<0.03. There were no statistically significant between group differences in decisional conflict or decision aid acceptability. Conclusion These findings suggest that clinical

  11. Would you be surprised if this patient died?: Preliminary exploration of first and second year residents' approach to care decisions in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong John D

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How physicians approach decision-making when caring for critically ill patients is poorly understood. This study aims to explore how residents think about prognosis and approach care decisions when caring for seriously ill, hospitalized patients. Methods Qualitative study where we conducted structured discussions with first and second year internal medicine residents (n = 8 caring for critically ill patients during Medical Intensive Care Unit Ethics and Discharge Planning Rounds. Residents were asked to respond to questions beginning with "Would you be surprised if this patient died?" Results An equal number of residents responded that they would (n = 4 or would not (n = 4 be surprised if their patient died. Reasons for being surprised included the rapid onset of an acute illness, reversible disease, improving clinical course and the patient's prior survival under similar circumstances. Residents reported no surprise with worsening clinical course. Based on the realization that their patient might die, residents cited potential changes in management that included clarifying treatment goals, improving communication with families, spending more time with patients and ordering fewer laboratory tests. Perceived or implied barriers to changes in management included limited time, competing clinical priorities, "not knowing" a patient, limited knowledge and experience, presence of diagnostic or prognostic uncertainty and unclear treatment goals. Conclusions These junior-level residents appear to rely on clinical course, among other factors, when assessing prognosis and the possibility for death in severely ill patients. Further investigation is needed to understand how these factors impact decision-making and whether perceived barriers to changes in patient management influence approaches to care.

  12. Cognitive flexibility in verbal and nonverbal domains and decision making in anorexia nervosa patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzola Enrica

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper aimed to investigate cognitive rigidity and decision making impairments in patients diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa Restrictive type (AN-R, assessing also verbal components. Methods Thirty patients with AN-R were compared with thirty age-matched healthy controls (HC. All participants completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery comprised of the Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Hayling Sentence Completion Task, and the Iowa Gambling Task. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to evaluate depressive symptomatology. The influence of both illness duration and neuropsychological variables was considered. Body Mass Index (BMI, years of education, and depression severity were considered as covariates in statistical analyses. Results The AN-R group showed poorer performance on all neuropsychological tests. There was a positive correlation between illness duration and the Hayling Sentence Completion Task Net score, and number of completion answers in part B. There was a partial effect of years of education and BMI on neuropsychological test performance. Response inhibition processes and verbal fluency impairment were not associated with BMI and years of education, but were associated with depression severity. Conclusions These data provide evidence that patients with AN-R have cognitive rigidity in both verbal and non-verbal domains. The role of the impairment on verbal domains should be considered in treatment. Further research is warranted to better understand the relationship between illness state and cognitive rigidity and impaired decision-making.

  13. Which test is best for Helicobacter pylori? A cost-effectiveness model using decision analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwyn, G.; Taubert, M.; Davies, S.; Brown, G.; Allison, M.; Phillips, C.

    2007-01-01

    GPs face a potential dilemma in deciding which test to use for detection of Helicobacter pylori. For patients with dyspepsia, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) advises primary care practitioners to adopt a 'test and treat' policy before considering a referral for

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly women with breast cancer: patients' perspectives on information giving and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Helena; Ballinger, Rachel; Langridge, Carolyn; Ring, Alistair; Fallowfield, Lesley J

    2013-12-01

    Decisions about adjuvant chemotherapy in older women with early stage breast cancer (EBC) are often challenging. Uncertainty about benefits due to limited data about treatment efficacy and outcomes complicates decision making. This qualitative study explored older patients' experiences and preferences towards information giving and ultimate decisions about adjuvant chemotherapy. Clinicians from 24 UK breast cancer teams reported on adjuvant chemotherapy decisions for women aged ≥70 years with EBC from April 2010 to December 2011. Women who were offered chemotherapy were invited to participate in structured interviews. Self-reported quality of life (QoL) and functional ability were assessed. Qualitative methods were used to identify themes associated with information giving and decision making. A total of 58/95 eligible women (61%) participated. Median age was 73 years (range 70-83). Mean total scores for QoL and functional ability were average. The majority of women preferred to make their treatment decisions collaboratively with a clinician (59%) or on their own (19%). The main reasons influencing decisions to accept chemotherapy were categorised as prevention of recurrence and clinician recommendation. Side effects, length of treatment, impact on QoL, low survival benefits and clinician recommendation influenced decisions to decline chemotherapy. The majority (80%) were satisfied with information provision, the communication with their clinician and explanation of treatment. Older women with EBC preferred to be involved in clinical decision making. Clinician recommendation plays a significant role in either accepting or declining chemotherapy. Well-informed decision making and effective communication between clinicians, older women and their family members are therefore important. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Training patients with schizophrenia to share decisions with their psychiatrists: a randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Johannes; Parchmann, Anna; Sassenberg, Nina; Bronner, Katharina; Albus, Margot; Richter, Alwin; Hoppstock, Sandra; Kissling, Werner

    2017-02-01

    Many patients with schizophrenia have a desire for shared decision-making (SDM). However, in clinical practice SDM often does not take place. One cause might be that many patients behave passively in the medical encounter, therefore not facilitating SDM. It was the aim of the study to evaluate the effects of a patient directed SDM-training on patients' communicative behavior in the consultation, their attitudes towards decision-making and their long-term adherence. Randomized-controlled trial comparing a five-session SDM-training for inpatients with schizophrenia with five sessions of non-specific group training. The SDM-training sessions included motivational (e.g. prospects of participation, patient rights) and behavioral aspects (e.g. role plays) and addressed important aspects of the patient-doctor interaction such as question asking or giving feedback. N = 264 patients were recruited in four psychiatric hospitals in Germany. The SDM-training yielded no group differences regarding the main outcome measure (treatment adherence) at 6 and 12 months after discharge. However, there were short-term effects on patients' participation preferences, their wish to take over more responsibility for medical decisions and (according to their psychiatrists' estimate) their behavior in psychiatric consultations. While there was no effect regarding treatment adherence, the shared decision-making training for inpatients with schizophrenia has been shown to increase patients' active behavior in psychiatric consultations during their inpatient treatment. When implemented it should be combined with complementary SDM interventions (decision support tools and communication training for professionals) to yield maximum effects.

  16. Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Decisions of the BRCA-Positive Patient: An Observational Study at a Single Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Dana; Agarwal, Jay; Anderson, Layla; Ying, Jian; Kohlmann, Wendy

    2017-06-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations carry with them a 50%-80% risk of developing breast cancer. The best choice for managing breast cancer risk in patients with a BRCA1/2 mutation is a highly personal decision. Options for risk management include surveillance with multiple modalities or prophylactic surgical intervention. The goal of this study was to gain a better understanding of contributing factors affecting the decision for managing breast cancer risk made by patients who are BRCA mutation positive and cancer free. A retrospective chart review of patients, who tested positive for BRCA1/2 gene mutation between 2003 and 2013 without history of breast cancer, was performed. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association between preselected risk factors and the decision of the patient to undergo prophylactic mastectomy versus surveillance. Of the 106 patients who were cancer free and BRCA positive, seventy (66%) opted for surveillance, whereas 36 (34%) chose prophylactic mastectomy. Three preselected risk factors were found to significantly affect a patient's likelihood of choosing surgery: having a family member with breast cancer before the age of 50 (OR: 4.67 [95% CI: 1.86-11.68]), p = 0.001), cancer-related death of a relative younger than 50 years old (OR: 2.26 [95% CI: 0.92-5.55], p = 0.07), and prophylactic oophorectomy before planned mastectomy (OR: 3.72 [95% CI: 1.49-9.31], p = 0.005). Patient age less than 30 was found to be significantly associated with the decision to proceed with surveillance (OR: 0.2 [95% CI: 0.05-0.75], p = 0.02). Risk-reducing strategy is a very personal decision for the patient with positive BRCA mutation, and many factors go into choosing which options are best for each individual. We found that age of patient, relative with breast cancer or death of a relative before age 50, and prophylactic oophorectomy all play significant roles in which risk reduction strategy is chosen.

  17. A qualitative exploration of patient and family views and experiences of treatment decision-making in bipolar II disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Alana; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Sharpe, Louise; Laidsaar-Powell, Rebekah; Juraskova, Ilona

    2017-01-13

    Treatment decision-making in bipolar II disorder (BPII) is challenging, yet the decision support needs of patients and family remain unknown. To explore patient and family perspectives of treatment decision-making in BPII. Semistructured, qualitative interviews were conducted with 28 patients with BPII-diagnosis and 13 family members with experience in treatment decision-making in the outpatient setting. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically using framework methods. Participant demographics, clinical characteristics and preferences for patient decision-making involvement were assessed. Four inter-related themes emerged: (1) Attitudes and response to diagnosis and treatment; (2) Influences on decision-making; (3) The nature and flow of decision-making; (4) Decision support and challenges. Views differed according to patient involvement preferences, time since diagnosis and patients' current mood symptoms. This is the first known study to provide in-depth patient and family insights into the key factors influencing BPII treatment decision-making, and potential improvements and challenges to this process. Findings will inform the development of BPII treatment decision-making resources that better meet the informational and decision-support priorities of end users. This research was partly funded by a Postgraduate Research Grant awarded to the first author by the University of Sydney. No conflicts of interest declared.

  18. Patient factors that influence clinicians' decision making in self-management support: A clinical vignette study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene D Bos-Touwen

    Full Text Available Self-management support is an integral part of current chronic care guidelines. The success of self-management interventions varies between individual patients, suggesting a need for tailored self-management support. Understanding the role of patient factors in the current decision making of health professionals can support future tailoring of self-management interventions. The aim of this study is to identify the relative importance of patient factors in health professionals' decision making regarding self-management support.A factorial survey was presented to primary care physicians and nurses. The survey consisted of clinical vignettes (case descriptions, in which 11 patient factors were systematically varied. Each care provider received a set of 12 vignettes. For each vignette, they decided whether they would give this patient self-management support and whether they expected this support to be successful. The associations between respondent decisions and patient factors were explored using ordered logit regression.The survey was completed by 60 general practitioners and 80 nurses. Self-management support was unlikely to be provided in a third of the vignettes. The most important patient factor in the decision to provide self-management support as well as in the expectation that self-management support would be successful was motivation, followed by patient-provider relationship and illness perception. Other factors, such as depression or anxiety, education level, self-efficacy and social support, had a small impact on decisions. Disease, disease severity, knowledge of disease, and age were relatively unimportant factors.This is the first study to explore the relative importance of patient factors in decision making and the expectations regarding the provision of self-management support to chronic disease patients. By far, the most important factor considered was patient's motivation; unmotivated patients were less likely to receive self

  19. Effects of Anterior Capsulotomy on Decision Making in Patients with Refractory Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chencheng Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite various lines of evidence implicating impaired decision-making ability in individuals with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD, neuropsychological investigation has generated inconsistent findings. Although the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC circuitry has been suggested, the involvement of the cortex has not yet been fully demonstrated. Moreover, it is unknown whether surgical intervention on the CSTC circuitry results in a predicted improvement of decision-making ability of OCD. Here we present a study of decision making based on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT to investigate decision making in a large sample of individuals with treatment-resistant OCD with and without anterior capsulotomy (AC. Task performance was evaluated in healthy subjects, individuals with OCD that had not undergone surgery, and postsurgical OCD patients with AC. The latter group was further divided into a short-term postsurgical group and a long-term postsurgical group. We found that the OCD patients without surgery performed significantly worse than the healthy controls on the IGT. There were no significant differences in decision-making between the presurgical OCD patients and those at the short-term postsurgical follow-up. Decision-making ability of the long-term postsurgical OCD patients was improved to the level comparable to that of healthy controls. All clinical symptoms (OCD, depression, and anxiety assessed by psychiatric rating scales were significantly alleviated post-surgically, but exhibited no correlation with their IGT task performance. Our findings provide strong evidence that OCD is linked to impairments in decision-making ability; that impaired CSTC circuitry function is directly involved in the manifestation of OCD; and that AC related improvements in cognitive functions are caused by long-term plasticity in the brain circuitry.

  20. Effects of Anterior Capsulotomy on Decision Making in Patients with Refractory Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chencheng; Chen, Yilin; Tian, Shuaiwei; Wang, Tao; Xie, Yile; Jin, Haiyan; Lin, Guozhen; Gong, Hengfen; Zeljic, Kristina; Sun, Bomin; Yang, Tianming; Zhan, Shikun

    2017-01-01

    Despite various lines of evidence implicating impaired decision-making ability in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), neuropsychological investigation has generated inconsistent findings. Although the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuitry has been suggested, the involvement of the cortex has not yet been fully demonstrated. Moreover, it is unknown whether surgical intervention on the CSTC circuitry results in a predicted improvement of decision-making ability of OCD. Here we present a study of decision making based on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to investigate decision making in a large sample of individuals with treatment-resistant OCD with and without anterior capsulotomy (AC). Task performance was evaluated in healthy subjects, individuals with OCD that had not undergone surgery, and postsurgical OCD patients with AC. The latter group was further divided into a short-term postsurgical group and a long-term postsurgical group. We found that the OCD patients without surgery performed significantly worse than the healthy controls on the IGT. There were no significant differences in decision-making between the presurgical OCD patients and those at the short-term postsurgical follow-up. Decision-making ability of the long-term postsurgical OCD patients was improved to the level comparable to that of healthy controls. All clinical symptoms (OCD, depression, and anxiety) assessed by psychiatric rating scales were significantly alleviated post-surgically, but exhibited no correlation with their IGT task performance. Our findings provide strong evidence that OCD is linked to impairments in decision-making ability; that impaired CSTC circuitry function is directly involved in the manifestation of OCD; and that AC related improvements in cognitive functions are caused by long-term plasticity in the brain circuitry.

  1. A qualitative study of systemic influences on paramedic decision making: care transitions and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Rachel; Johnson, Maxine; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Weyman, Andrew; Turner, Janette; Shaw, Deborah; Mortimer, Peter; Newman, Chris; Hirst, Enid; Storey, Matthew; Mason, Suzanne; Quinn, Tom; Shewan, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Paramedics routinely make critical decisions about the most appropriate care to deliver in a complex system characterized by significant variation in patient case-mix, care pathways and linked service providers. There has been little research carried out in the ambulance service to identify areas of risk associated with decisions about patient care. The aim of this study was to explore systemic influences on decision making by paramedics relating to care transitions to identify potential risk factors. An exploratory multi-method qualitative study was conducted in three English National Health Service (NHS) Ambulance Service Trusts, focusing on decision making by paramedic and specialist paramedic staff. Researchers observed 57 staff across 34 shifts. Ten staff completed digital diaries and three focus groups were conducted with 21 staff. Nine types of decision were identified, ranging from emergency department conveyance and specialist emergency pathways to non-conveyance. Seven overarching systemic influences and risk factors potentially influencing decision making were identified: demand; performance priorities; access to care options; risk tolerance; training and development; communication and feedback and resources. Use of multiple methods provided a consistent picture of key systemic influences and potential risk factors. The study highlighted the increased complexity of paramedic decisions and multi-level system influences that may exacerbate risk. The findings have implications at the level of individual NHS Ambulance Service Trusts (e.g. ensuring an appropriately skilled workforce to manage diverse patient needs and reduce emergency department conveyance) and at the wider prehospital emergency care system level (e.g. ensuring access to appropriate patient care options as alternatives to the emergency department). © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Patient-related factors and circumstances surrounding decisions to forego life-sustaining treatment, including intensive care unit admission refusal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reignier, Jean; Dumont, Romain; Katsahian, Sandrine; Martin-Lefevre, Laurent; Renard, Benoit; Fiancette, Maud; Lebert, Christine; Clementi, Eva; Bontemps, Frederic

    2008-07-01

    To assess decisions to forego life-sustaining treatment (LST) in patients too sick for intensive care unit (ICU) admission, comparatively to patients admitted to the ICU. Prospective observational cohort study. A medical-surgical ICU. Consecutive patients referred to the ICU during a one-yr period. None. Of 898 triaged patients, 147 were deemed too well to benefit from ICU admission. Decisions to forego LST were made in 148 of 666 (22.2%) admitted patients and in all 85 patients deemed too sick for ICU admission. Independent predictors of decisions to forego LST at ICU refusal rather than after ICU admission were: age; underlying disease; living in an institution; preexisting cognitive impairment; admission for medical reasons; and acute cardiac failure, acute central neurologic illness, or sepsis. Hospital mortality after decisions to forego LST was not significantly different in refused and admitted patients (77.5% vs. 86.5%; p = .1). Decisions to forego LST were made via telephone in 58.8% of refused patients and none of the admitted patients. Nurses caring for the patient had no direct contact with the ICU physicians for 62.3% of the decisions in refused patients, whereas meetings between nurses and physicians occurred in 70.3% of decisions to forego LST in the ICU. Patients or relatives were involved in 28.2% of decisions to forego LST at ICU refusal compared with 78.4% of decisions to forego LST in ICU patients (p refused patients (vs. none of admitted patients) and were associated with less involvement of nurses and relatives compared with decisions in admitted patients. Further work is needed to improve decisions to forego LST made under the distinctive circumstances of triage.

  3. The effect of a geriatric evaluation on treatment decisions for older patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, N M; Souwer, E T D; Schiphorst, A H W; Maas, H A; Portielje, J E A; Pronk, A; van den Bos, F; Hamaker, M E

    2017-11-01

    Treating elderly colorectal cancer patients can be challenging. It is very important to carefully weigh the risks and benefits of potential treatments in individual patients. This treatment decision making can be guided by geriatric consultation. Our aim was to assess the effect of a geriatric evaluation on treatment decisions for older patients with colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer patients who were referred for a geriatric consultation between 2013 and 2015 in three Dutch teaching hospitals were included in a prospective database. The outcome of geriatric assessment, non-oncological interventions and geriatricians' treatment recommendations were evaluated. The total number of included referrals was 168. The median age was 81 years (range 60-94). Most patients (71%) had colon cancer and 49% had tumour stage III disease. The reason for geriatric consultation was uncertainty regarding the optimal oncologic treatment in 139 patients (83%). Overall 93% of patients suffered from geriatric impairments; non-oncological interventions that followed after geriatric consultation was mostly aimed at malnutrition. The geriatrician recommended the 'more intensive treatment' option in 69% and the 'less intensive treatment' option in 31% of which 63% 'supportive care only'. Geriatric consultation can be useful in treatment decision making in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. It may lead to changes in the treatment plan for individual cases and may result in an additional optimisation of patient's health status prior to treatment.

  4. The burden of knowing: balancing benefits and barriers in HIV testing decisions. a qualitative study from Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgensen Marte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Client-initiated HIV counselling and testing has been scaled up in many African countries, in the form of voluntary counselling and testing (VCT. Test rates have remained low, with HIV-related stigma being an important barrier to HIV testing. This study explored HIV testing decisions in one rural and one urban district in Zambia with high HIV prevalence and available antiretroviral treatment. Methods Data were collected through 17 in-depth interviews and two focus group discussions with individuals and 10 in-depth interviews with counsellors. Interpretive description methodology was employed to analyse the data. Results 'To know your status' was found to be a highly charged concept yielding strong barriers against HIV testing. VCT was perceived as a diagnostic device and a gateway to treatment for the severely ill. Known benefits of prevention and early treatment were outweighed by a perceived burden of knowing your HIV status related to stigma and fear. The manner in which the VCT services were organised added to this burden. Conclusions This study draws on social stigma theory to enhance the understanding of the continuity of HIV related stigma in the presence of ART, and argues that the burden of knowing an HIV status and the related reluctance to get HIV tested can be understood both as a form of label-avoidance and as strong expressions of the still powerful embodied memories of suffering and death among non-curable AIDS patients over the last decades. Hope lies in the emerging signs of a reduction in HIV related stigma experienced by those who had been tested for HIV. Further research into innovative HIV testing service designs that do not add to the burden of knowing is needed.

  5. Testing the robustness of management decisions to uncertainty: Everglades restoration scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Michael M; Gross, Louis J; Duke-Sylvester, Scott M; Palmer, Mark

    2008-04-01

    To effectively manage large natural reserves, resource managers must prepare for future contingencies while balancing the often conflicting priorities of different stakeholders. To deal with these issues, managers routinely employ models to project the response of ecosystems to different scenarios that represent alternative management plans or environmental forecasts. Scenario analysis is often used to rank such alternatives to aid the decision making process. However, model projections are subject to uncertainty in assumptions about model structure, parameter values, environmental inputs, and subcomponent interactions. We introduce an approach for testing the robustness of model-based management decisions to the uncertainty inherent in complex ecological models and their inputs. We use relative assessment to quantify the relative impacts of uncertainty on scenario ranking. To illustrate our approach we consider uncertainty in parameter values and uncertainty in input data, with specific examples drawn from the Florida Everglades restoration project. Our examples focus on two alternative 30-year hydrologic management plans that were ranked according to their overall impacts on wildlife habitat potential. We tested the assumption that varying the parameter settings and inputs of habitat index models does not change the rank order of the hydrologic plans. We compared the average projected index of habitat potential for four endemic species and two wading-bird guilds to rank the plans, accounting for variations in parameter settings and water level inputs associated with hypothetical future climates. Indices of habitat potential were based on projections from spatially explicit models that are closely tied to hydrology. For the American alligator, the rank order of the hydrologic plans was unaffected by substantial variation in model parameters. By contrast, simulated major shifts in water levels led to reversals in the ranks of the hydrologic plans in 24.1-30.6% of

  6. Views of general practice staff about the use of a patient-oriented treatment decision aid in shared decision making for patients with type 2 diabetes : A mixed-methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildeboer, Anita; du Pon, Esther; Schuling, Jan; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Denig, Petra

    BACKGROUND: Decision aids can be used to support shared decision making (SDM). A patient-oriented treatment decision aid (DA) was developed for type 2 diabetes but its use by general practice staff appeared to be limited. OBJECTIVES: To explore views of practice staff towards SDM and the DA. DESIGN:

  7. How Do Patients and Health Workers Interact around Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Testing, and How Are the Tests Experienced by Patients in Practice? A Qualitative Study in Western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaras, Robin; Nuwa, Anthony; Agaba, Bosco; Streat, Elizabeth; Tibenderana, James K; Martin, Sandrine; Strachan, Clare E

    2016-01-01

    Successful scale-up in the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) requires that patients accept testing and treatment based on RDT results and that healthcare providers treat according to test results. Patient-provider communication is a key component of quality care, and leads to improved patient satisfaction, higher adherence to treatment and better health outcomes. Voiced or perceived patient expectations are also known to influence treatment decision-making among healthcare providers. While there has been a growth in literature on provider practices around rapid testing for malaria, there has been little analysis of inter-personal communication around the testing process. We investigated how healthcare providers and patients interact and engage throughout the diagnostic and treatment process, and how the testing service is experienced by patients in practice. This research was conducted alongside a larger study which explored determinants of provider treatment decision-making following negative RDT results in a rural district (Kibaale) in mid-western Uganda, ten months after RDT introduction. Fifty-five patients presenting with fever were observed during routine outpatient visits at 12 low-level public health facilities. Observation captured communication practices relating to test purpose, results, diagnosis and treatment. All observed patients or caregivers were immediately followed up with in-depth interview. Analysis followed the 'framework' approach. A summative approach was also used to analyse observation data. Providers failed to consistently communicate the reasons for carrying out the test, and particularly to RDT-negative patients, a diagnostic outcome or the meaning of test results, also leading to confusion over what the test can detect. Patients appeared to value testing, but were frustrated by the lack of communication on outcomes. RDT-negative patients were dissatisfied by the absence of information on an alternative diagnosis and

  8. How Do Patients and Health Workers Interact around Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Testing, and How Are the Tests Experienced by Patients in Practice? A Qualitative Study in Western Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Altaras

    Full Text Available Successful scale-up in the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs requires that patients accept testing and treatment based on RDT results and that healthcare providers treat according to test results. Patient-provider communication is a key component of quality care, and leads to improved patient satisfaction, higher adherence to treatment and better health outcomes. Voiced or perceived patient expectations are also known to influence treatment decision-making among healthcare providers. While there has been a growth in literature on provider practices around rapid testing for malaria, there has been little analysis of inter-personal communication around the testing process. We investigated how healthcare providers and patients interact and engage throughout the diagnostic and treatment process, and how the testing service is experienced by patients in practice.This research was conducted alongside a larger study which explored determinants of provider treatment decision-making following negative RDT results in a rural district (Kibaale in mid-western Uganda, ten months after RDT introduction. Fifty-five patients presenting with fever were observed during routine outpatient visits at 12 low-level public health facilities. Observation captured communication practices relating to test purpose, results, diagnosis and treatment. All observed patients or caregivers were immediately followed up with in-depth interview. Analysis followed the 'framework' approach. A summative approach was also used to analyse observation data.Providers failed to consistently communicate the reasons for carrying out the test, and particularly to RDT-negative patients, a diagnostic outcome or the meaning of test results, also leading to confusion over what the test can detect. Patients appeared to value testing, but were frustrated by the lack of communication on outcomes. RDT-negative patients were dissatisfied by the absence of information on an alternative

  9. ANALYSIS OF STUDENTS’ DECISION MAKING TO SOLVE SCIENCE REASONING TEST OF TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE STUDY (TIMSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Novianawati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine students’ decision making strategy to answer TIMSS science reasoning test in cognitive reasoning domain. This research is quantitative descriptive research. The result shows that students tend to use compensatory strategy for decision making in solving multiple-choice questions and use rational category to answer essay questions. The result shows that more than half of students have been able to answer the questions TIMSS science tests correctly.

  10. Association of Liability Concerns with Decisions to Order Echocardiography and Cardiac Stress Tests with Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kini, Vinay; Weiner, Rory B; McCarthy, Fenton H; Wiegers, Susan E; Kirkpatrick, James N

    2016-12-01

    Professional societies have made efforts to curb overuse of cardiac imaging and decrease practice variation by publishing appropriate use criteria. However, little is known about the impact of physician-level determinants such as liability concerns and risk aversion on decisions to order testing. A web-based survey was administered to cardiologists and general practice physicians affiliated with two academic institutions. The survey consisted of four clinical scenarios in which appropriate use criteria rated echocardiography or stress testing as "may be appropriate." Respondents' degree of liability concerns and risk aversion were measured using validated tools. The primary outcome variable was tendency to order imaging, calculated as the average likelihood to order an imaging test across the clinical scenarios (1 = very unlikely, 6 = very likely). Linear regression models were used to evaluate the association between tendency to order imaging and physician characteristics. From 420 physicians invited to participate, 108 complete responses were obtained (26% response rate, 54% cardiologists). There was no difference in tendency to order imaging between cardiologists and general practice physicians (3.46 [95% CI, 3.12-3.81] vs 3.15 [95% CI, 2.79-3.51], P = .22). On multivariate analysis, a higher degree of liability concerns was the only significant predictor of decisions to order imaging (mean difference in tendency to order imaging, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.09-0.62; P = .01). In clinical situations in which performance of cardiac imaging is rated as "may be appropriate" by appropriate use criteria, physicians with higher liability concerns ordered significantly more testing than physicians with lower concerns. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Failure to utilize feedback during explicit decision-making task in alcohol-dependent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B N Roopesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients who are diagnosed with alcohol-dependent syndrome (ADS are shown to have neuropsychological deficits, especially executive function (EF deficits. Among the EFs, decision-making is one such function which has consistently been shown to be impaired in people who are dependent on alcohol, compared to controls. Decision-making in this population is usually assessed with gambling-type tasks. However, some of these tasks are ambiguous, work on chance factors, rarely match with real-life gambling situations, and/or involve nonconscious mechanisms. Materials and Methods: The current study compared 26 male patients with ADS (P-ADS with equal number of their nonalcohol-dependent male siblings on sensation seeking and explicit gambling task (EGT. EGT is similar to the Iowa gambling task in administration, but varies from it as it involves a single outcome and provides unambiguous, explicit, and continuous feedback for the participants. Results and Conclusion: The results did not show any significant relationship between decision-making variables and sensation seeking. However, despite unambiguous, explicit, and continuous feedback, patients showed significantly poor decision-making as compared to the siblings of the P-ADS group. This study throws light on why people who are addicted to alcohol have difficulties in decision-making, despite knowing the adverse effects.

  12. Quality of online information to support patient decision-making in breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Jordan G; Tucholka, Jennifer L; Steffens, Nicole M; Neuman, Heather B

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer patients commonly use the internet as an information resource. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of online information available to support patients facing a decision for breast surgery. Breast cancer surgery-related queries were performed (Google and Bing), and reviewed for content pertinent to breast cancer surgery. The DISCERN instrument was used to evaluate websites' structural components that influence publication reliability and ability of information to support treatment decision-making. Scores of 4/5 were considered "good." 45 unique websites were identified. Websites satisfied a median 5/9 content questions. Commonly omitted topics included: having a choice between breast conservation and mastectomy (67%) and potential for 2nd surgery to obtain negative margins after breast conservation (60%). Websites had a median DISCERN score of 2.9 (range 2.0-4.5). Websites achieved higher scores on structural criteria (median 3.6 [2.1-4.7]), with 24% rated as "good." Scores on supporting decision-making questions were lower (2.6 [1.3-4.4]), with only 7% scoring "good." Although numerous breast cancer-related websites exist, most do a poor job providing women with essential information necessary to actively participate in decision-making for breast cancer surgery. Providing easily- accessible, high-quality online information has the potential to significantly improve patients' experiences with decision-making. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Transforming Patient-Centered Care: Development of the Evidence Informed Decision Making through Engagement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jennifer E; Titler, Marita G; Kane Low, Lisa; Dalton, Vanessa K; Sampselle, Carolyn M

    2015-01-01

    In response to the passage of the Affordable Care Act in the United States, clinicians and researchers are critically evaluating methods to engage patients in implementing evidence-based care to improve health outcomes. However, most models on implementation only target clinicians or health systems as the adopters of evidence. Patients are largely ignored in these models. A new implementation model that captures the complex but important role of patients in the uptake of evidence may be a critical missing link. Through a process of theory evaluation and development, we explore patient-centered concepts (patient activation and shared decision making) within an implementation model by mapping qualitative data from an elective induction of labor study to assess the model's ability to capture these key concepts. The process demonstrated that a new, patient-centered model for implementation is needed. In response, the Evidence Informed Decision Making through Engagement Model is presented. We conclude that, by fully integrating women into an implementation model, outcomes that are important to both the clinician and patient will improve. In the interest of providing evidence-based care to women during pregnancy and childbirth, it is essential that care is patient centered. The inclusion of concepts discussed in this article has the potential to extend beyond maternity care and influence other clinical areas. Utilizing the newly developed Evidence Informed Decision Making through Engagement Model provides a framework for utilizing evidence and translating it into practice while acknowledging the important role that women have in the process. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Tipping point: factors influencing a patient's decision to proceed with bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Donna W; Neil, Janice A; Pories, Mary Lisa; Rose, Mary Ann

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that bariatric surgery is the most effective intervention for morbid obesity, only a fraction of obese patients, even after undergoing evaluation for surgery, decide to undergo the surgery. Opting out by patients is fairly common yet little is known about factors that lead a patient to decide to undergo surgery. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify factors that "tipped the scales" in the patient's experience leading to a decision to move ahead with surgery. The study was carried out in the bariatric surgical clinic of a southeastern regional medical center. This qualitative descriptive study utilized semistructured interviews with patients (n = 24) at the time of their "decision visit" to determine the factors related to their positive decision to move forward. A modification of Colaizzi's procedural steps of analysis was used to extract, organize, and analyze data for central themes. Two main factors leading participants to decide to move ahead with bariatric surgery were their own worsening health issues and low energy levels that limited their activities. Participants also noted additional factors that impacted their "tipping point" such as financial considerations and family influences. The decision to move ahead with bariatric surgery is influenced by many factors to which this research provides additional insight. Further research is warranted to fully understand this phenomenon and develop appropriate outreach and educational approaches. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Authoritarian physicians and patients' fear of being labeled 'difficult' among key obstacles to shared decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, Dominick L; May, Suepattra G; Rendle, Katharine A S; Tietbohl, Caroline; Elwyn, Glyn

    2012-05-01

    Relatively little is known about why some patients are reluctant to engage in a collaborative discussion with physicians about their choices in health care. To explore this issue further, we conducted six focus-group sessions with forty-eight people in the San Francisco Bay Area. In the focus groups, we found that participants voiced a strong desire to engage in shared decision making about treatment options with their physicians. However, several obstacles inhibit those discussions. These include the fact that even relatively affluent and well-educated patients feel compelled to conform to socially sanctioned roles and defer to physicians during clinical consultations; that physicians can be authoritarian; and that the fear of being categorized as "difficult" prevents patients from participating more fully in their own health care. We argue that physicians may not be aware of a need to create a safe environment for open communication to facilitate shared decision making. Rigorous measures of patient engagement, and of the degree to which health care decisions truly reflect patient preferences, are needed to advance shared decision making in clinical practice.

  16. Cannabis abuse is associated with decision-making impairment among first-episode patients with schizophrenia-spectrum psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, I; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J M; Pelayo-Terán, J M; Pérez-Iglesias, R; González-Blanch, C; Ramírez-Bonilla, M; Martínez-García, O; Vázquez-Barquero, J L; Crespo-Facorro, B

    2008-09-01

    Cannabis use appears to be a risk factor for schizophrenia. Moreover, cannabis abusers show impaired decision-making capacities, linked to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Although there is substantial evidence that first-episode schizophrenia patients show impairments in cognitive tasks associated with the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), it is not clear whether decision making is impaired at schizophrenia onset. In this study, we examined the association between antecedents of cannabis abuse and cognitive impairment in cognitive tasks associated with the DLPFC and the OFC in a sample of first-episode patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. One hundred and thirty-two patients experiencing their first episode of a schizophrenia-spectrum psychosis were assessed with a cognitive battery including DLPFC-related tasks [backward digits, verbal fluency (FAS) and the Trail Making Test (TMT)] and an OFC-related task [the Iowa Gambling Task (GT)]. Performance on these tasks was compared between patients who had and had not abused cannabis before their psychosis onset. No differences were observed between the two groups on the performance of any of the DLPFC-related tasks. However, patients who had abused cannabis before their psychosis onset showed a poorer total performance on the gambling task and a lower improvement on the performance of the task compared to no-abusers. Pre-psychotic cannabis abuse is associated with decision-making impairment, but not working memory and executive function impairment, among first-episode patients with a schizophrenia-spectrum psychosis. Further studies are needed to examine the direction of causality of this impairment; that is, does the impairment make the patients abuse cannabis, or does cannabis abuse cause the impairment?

  17. Theory-informed design of values clarification methods : A cognitive psychological perspective on patient health-related decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, A.H.; de Vries, M.; Kunneman, M.; Stiggelbout, A.M.; Feldman-Stewart, D.

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare decisions, particularly those involving weighing benefits and harms that may significantly affect quality and/or length of life, should reflect patients' preferences. To support patients in making choices, patient decision aids and values clarification methods (VCM) in particular have

  18. What influences a patient's decision to use custom-made orthopaedic shoes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, Jaap J; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Geertzen, Jan H B; Postema, Klaas

    2012-06-08

    Despite potential benefits, some patients decide not to use their custom-made orthopaedic shoes (OS). Factors are known in the domains 'usability', 'communication and service', and 'opinion of others' that influence a patient's decision to use OS. However, the interplay between these factors has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to explore the interplay between factors concerning OS, and the influences thereof on a patient's decision to use OS. A mixed-methods design was used, combining qualitative and quantitative data by means of sequential data analysis and triangulation. Priority was given to the qualitative part. Qualitative data was gathered with a semi-structured interview covering the three domains. Data was analysed using the framework approach. Quantitative data concerned the interplay between factors and determining a rank-order for the importance of factors of 'usability'. A patient's decision to use OS was influenced by various factors indicated as being important and by acceptance of their OS. Factors of 'usability' were more important than factors of 'communication'; the 'opinion of others' was of limited importance. An improvement of walking was indicated as the most important factor of 'usability'. The importance of other factors (cosmetic appearance and ease of use) was determined by reaching a compromise between these factors and an improvement of walking. A patient's decision to use OS is influenced by various factors indicated as being important and by acceptance of their OS. An improvement of walking is the most important factor of 'usability', the importance of other factors (cosmetic appearance and ease of use) is determined by reaching compromises between these factors and an improvement of walking. Communication is essential to gain insight in a patient's acceptance and in the compromises they are willing to reach. This makes communication the key for clinicians to influence a patient's decision to use OS.

  19. The providing resources to enhance African American patients' readiness to make decisions about kidney disease (PREPARED) study: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephraim, Patti L; Powe, Neil R; Rabb, Hamid; Ameling, Jessica; Auguste, Priscilla; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia; Greer, Raquel C; Crews, Deidra C; Purnell, Tanjala S; Jaar, Bernard G; DePasquale, Nicole; Boulware, L Ebony

    2012-10-12

    Living related kidney transplantation (LRT) is underutilized, particularly among African Americans. The effectiveness of informational and financial interventions to enhance informed decision-making among African Americans with end stage renal disease (ESRD) and improve rates of LRT is unknown. We report the protocol of the Providing Resources to Enhance African American Patients' Readiness to Make Decisions about Kidney Disease (PREPARED) Study, a two-phase study utilizing qualitative and quantitative research methods to design and test the effectiveness of informational (focused on shared decision-making) and financial interventions to overcome barriers to pursuit of LRT among African American patients and their families. Study Phase I involved the evidence-based development of informational materials as well as a financial intervention to enhance African American patients' and families' proficiency in shared decision-making regarding LRT. In Study Phase 2, we are currently conducting a randomized controlled trial in which patients with new-onset ESRD receive 1) usual dialysis care by their nephrologists, 2) the informational intervention (educational video and handbook), or 3) the informational intervention in addition to the option of participating in a live kidney donor financial assistance program. The primary outcome of the randomized controlled trial will include patients' self-reported rates of consideration of LRT (including family discussions of LRT, patient-physician discussions of LRT, and identification of a LRT donor). Results from the PREPARED study will provide needed evidence on ways to enhance the decision to pursue LRT among African American patients with ESRD.

  20. Toward patient-centered, personalized and personal decision support and knowledge management: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, T-Y

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent trends and highlights the challenges and opportunities in decision support and knowledge management for patient-centered, personalized, and personal health care. The discussions are based on a broad survey of related references, focusing on the most recent publications. Major advances are examined in the areas of i) shared decision making paradigms, ii) continuity of care infrastructures and architectures, iii) human factors and system design approaches, iv) knowledge management innovations, and v) practical deployment and change considerations. Many important initiatives, projects, and plans with promising results have been identified. The common themes focus on supporting the individual patients who are playing an increasing central role in their own care decision processes. New collaborative decision making paradigms and information infrastructures are required to ensure effective continuity of care. Human factors and usability are crucial for the successful development and deployment of the relevant systems, tools, and aids. Advances in personalized medicine can be achieved through integrating genomic, phenotypic and other biological, individual, and population level information, and gaining useful insights from building and analyzing biological and other models at multiple levels of abstraction. Therefore, new Information and Communication Technologies and evaluation approaches are needed to effectively manage the scale and complexity of biomedical and health information, and adapt to the changing nature of clinical decision support. Recent research in decision support and knowledge management combines heterogeneous information and personal data to provide cost-effective, calibrated, personalized support in shared decision making at the point of care. Current and emerging efforts concentrate on developing or extending conventional paradigms, techniques, systems, and architectures for the new predictive, preemptive, and