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Sample records for testing monolithic ceramics

  1. Fibrous monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, D.; King, B.H.; Trice, R.W.; Halloran, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Fibrous monolithic ceramics are an example of a laminate in which a controlled, three-dimensional structure has been introduced on a submillimeter scale. This unique structure allows this all-ceramic material to fail in a nonbrittle manner. Materials have been fabricated and tested with a variety of architectures. The influence on mechanical properties at room temperature and at high temperature of the structure of the constituent phases and the architecture in which they are arranged are discussed. The elastic properties of these materials can be effectively predicted using existing models. These models also can be extended to predict the strength of fibrous monoliths with an arbitrary orientation and architecture. However, the mechanisms that govern the energy absorption capacity of fibrous monoliths are unique, and experimental results do not follow existing models. Energy dissipation occurs through two dominant mechanisms--delamination of the weak interphases and then frictional sliding after cracking occurs. The properties of the constituent phases that maximize energy absorption are discussed. In this article, the authors examine the structure of Si 3 N 4 -BN fibrous monoliths from the submillimeter scale of the crack-deflecting cell-cell boundary features to the nanometer scale of the BN cell boundaries

  2. Monolithic Integrated Ceramic Waveguide Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, IC; Sandhu, MY

    2014-01-01

    Design techniques for a new class of integrated monolithic high permittivity ceramic waveguide filters are presented. These filters enable a size reduction of 50% compared to air-filled TEM filters with the same unloaded Q-Factor. Designs for both chebyshev and asymmetric generalized chebyshev filter are presented, with experimental results for an 1800 MHz chebyshev filter showing excellent agreement with theory.

  3. Translucent zirconia in the ceramic scenario for monolithic restorations: A flexural strength and translucency comparison test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrabba, Michele; Keeling, Andrew J; Aziz, Aziz; Vichi, Alessandro; Fabian Fonzar, Riccardo; Wood, David; Ferrari, Marco

    2017-05-01

    To compare three different compositions of Yttria-Tetragonal Zirconia Polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramic and a lithium disilicate ceramic in terms of flexural strength and translucency. Three zirconia materials of different composition and translucency, Aadva ST [ST], Aadva EI [EI] and Aadva NT [NT](GC Tech, Leuven, Belgium) were cut with a slow speed diamond saw into beams and tabs in order to obtain, after sintering, dimensions of 1.2×4.0×15.0mm and 15.0×15.0×1.0mm respectively. Blocks of IPS e.max CAD LT were cut and crystallized in the same shapes and dimensions and used as a reference group [LD]. Beams (n=15) were tested in a universal testing machine for three-point bending strength. Critical fracture load was recorded in N, flexural strength (σ in MPa), Weibull modulus (m) and Weibull characteristic strength (σ 0 in MPa) were then calculated. Tabs (n=10) were measured with a spectrophotometer equipped with an integrating sphere. Contrast Ratios were calculated as CR=Yb/Yw. SEM of thermally etched samples coupled with lineal line analysis (n=6) was used to measure the tested zirconia grain size. Data were statistically analyzed. Differences in translucency, flexural strength and grain size were found to be statistically significant. CR increased and flexural strength decreased in the following order ST(σ 1215±190MPa, CR 0.74±0.01)>EI(σ 983±182MPa, CR 0.69±0.01)>NT(σ 539±66MPa, CR 0.65±0.01)>LD (σ 377±39Mpa, CR 0.56±0.02). The average grain size was different for the three zirconia samples with NT(558±38nm)>ST(445±34nm)>EI(284±11nm). The zirconia composition heavily influenced both the flexural strength and the translucency. Different percentages of Yittria and Alumina result in new materials with intermediate properties in between the conventional zirconia and lithium disilicate. Clinical indications for Zirconia Aadva NT should be limited up to three-unit span bridges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Optical properties of pre-colored dental monolithic zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2016-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the optical properties of recently marketed pre-colored monolithic zirconia ceramics and to compare with those of veneered zirconia and lithium disilicate glass ceramics. Various shades of pre-colored monolithic zirconia, veneered zirconia, and lithium disilicate glass ceramic specimens were tested (17.0×17.0×1.5mm, n=5). CIELab color coordinates were obtained against white, black, and grey backgrounds with a spectrophotometer. Color differences of the specimen pairs were calculated by using the CIEDE2000 (ΔE 00 ) formula. The translucency parameter (TP) was derived from ΔE 00 of the specimen against a white and a black background. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the crystalline phases of monolithic zirconia specimens. Data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, Scheffé post hoc, and Pearson correlation testing (α=0.05). For different shades of the same ceramic brand, there were significant differences in L * , a * , b * , and TP values in most ceramic brands. With the same nominal shade (A2), statistically significant differences were observed in L * , a * , b * , and TP values among different ceramic brands and systems (Pceramics of the corresponding nominal shades ranged beyond the acceptability threshold. Due to the high L * values and low a * and b * values, pre-colored monolithic zirconia ceramics can be used with additional staining to match neighboring restorations or natural teeth. Due to their high value and low chroma, unacceptable color mismatch with adjacent ceramic restorations might be expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Constitutive Theory Developed for Monolithic Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1998-01-01

    with these service conditions by developing a multiaxial viscoplastic constitutive model that accounts for time-dependent hereditary material deformation (such as creep and stress relaxation) in monolithic structural ceramics. Using continuum principles of engineering mechanics, we derived the complete viscoplastic theory from a scalar dissipative potential function.

  6. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  7. Viscoplastic Constitutive Theory Demonstrated for Monolithic Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1999-01-01

    Development of accurate three-dimensional (multiaxial) inelastic stress-strain models is critical in utilizing advanced ceramics for challenging 21st century high-temperature structural applications. The current state of the art uses elastic stress fields as a basis for both subcritical crack growth and creep life prediction efforts aimed at predicting the time dependent reliability response of ceramic components subjected to elevated service temperatures. However, to successfully design components that will meet tomorrow's challenging requirements, design engineers must recognize that elastic predictions are inaccurate for these materials when subjected to high-temperature service conditions such as those encountered in advanced heat engine components. Analytical life prediction methodologies developed for advanced ceramics and other brittle materials must employ accurate constitutive models that capture the inelastic response exhibited by these materials at elevated service temperatures. A constitutive model recently developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center helps address this issue by accounting for the time-dependent (inelastic) material deformation phenomena (e.g., creep, rate sensitivity, and stress relaxation) exhibited by monolithic ceramics exposed to high-temperature service conditions. In addition, the proposed formulation is based on a threshold function that is sensitive to hydrostatic stress and allows different behavior in tension and compression, reflecting experimental observations obtained for these material systems.

  8. Wear of human enamel opposing monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, and composite resin: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripetchdanond, Jeerapa; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2014-11-01

    Demand is increasing for ceramic and composite resin posterior restorations. However, ceramics are recognized for their high abrasiveness to opposing dental structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear of enamel as opposed to dental ceramics and composite resin. Twenty-four test specimens (antagonists), 6 each of monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, composite resin, and enamel, were prepared into cylindrical rods. Enamel specimens were prepared from 24 extracted human permanent molar teeth. Enamel specimens were abraded against each type of antagonist with a pin-on-disk wear tester under a constant load of 25 N at 20 rpm for 4800 cycles. The maximum depth of wear (Dmax), mean depth of wear (Da), and mean surface roughness (Ra) of the enamel specimens were measured with a profilometer. All data were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA, followed by the Tukey test (α=.05). A paired t test was used to compare the Ra of enamel at baseline and after testing. The wear of both the enamel and antagonists was evaluated qualitatively with scanning electron microscopic images. No significant differences were found in enamel wear depth (Dmax, Da) between monolithic zirconia (2.17 ±0.80, 1.83 ±0.75 μm) and composite resin (1.70 ±0.92, 1.37 ±0.81 μm) or between glass ceramic (8.54 ±2.31, 7.32 ±2.06 μm) and enamel (10.72 ±6.31, 8.81 ±5.16 μm). Significant differences were found when the enamel wear depth caused by monolithic zirconia and composite resin was compared with that of glass ceramic and enamel (Pglass ceramic, and enamel (Pglass ceramic and enamel. All test materials except composite resin similarly increased the enamel surface roughness after wear testing. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparative study of progressive wear of four dental monolithic, veneered glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Xuesong; Guo, Jiawen; Li, Ding; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the wear performance and wear mechanisms of four dental glass-ceramics, based on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the progressive wear process. Bar (N = 40, n = 10) and disk (N = 32, n = 8) specimens were prepared from (A) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (LD), (B) leucite reinforced glass-ceramic (LEU), (C) feldspathic glass-ceramic (FEL), and (D) fluorapatite glass-ceramic (FLU). The bar specimens were tested for three-point flexural strength, hardness, fracture toughness and elastic modulus. The disk specimens paired with steatite antagonists were tested in a pin-on-disk tribometer with 10N up to 1000,000 wear cycles. The wear analysis of glass-ceramics was performed using a 3D profilometer after every 200,000 wear cycles. Wear loss of steatite antagonists was calculated by measuring the weight and density using sensitive balance and Archimedes' method. Wear morphologies and microstructures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline phase compositions were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data. Multiple pair-wise comparison of means was performed by Tukey's post-hoc test. LD showed the highest fracture toughness, flexural strength, elastic modulus and crystallinity, followed by LEU and FEL, and FLU showed the lowest. However, the hardness of LD was lower than all the other three types of ceramics. For steatite antagonists, LD produced the least wear loss of antagonist, followed by LEU and FEL, and FLU had the most wear loss. For glass-ceramic materials, LD exhibited similar wear loss as LEU, but more than FLU and FEL did. Moreover, fracture occurred on the wear surface of FLU. In the progressive wear process, veneering porcelains showed better wear resistance but fluorapatite veneering porcelains appeared fracture surface. Monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramics with higher mechanical properties showed more wear loss, however

  10. Test of the TRAPPISTe monolithic detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soung Yee, L.; Álvarez, P.; Martin, E.; Cortina, E.; Ferrer, C.

    2013-12-01

    A monolithic pixel detector named TRAPPISTe-2 has been developed in Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology. A p-n junction is implanted in the bottom handle wafer and connected to readout electronics integrated in the top active layer. The two parts are insulated from each other by a buried oxide layer resulting in a monolithic detector. Two small pixel matrices have been fabricated: one containing a 3-transistor readout and a second containing a charge sensitive amplifier readout. These two readout structures have been characterized and the pixel matrices were tested with an infrared laser source. The readout circuits are adversely affected by the backgate effect, which limits the voltage that can be applied to the metal back plane to deplete the sensor, thus narrowing the depletion width of the sensor. Despite the low depletion voltages, the integrated pixel matrices were able to respond to and track a laser source.

  11. Marginal Vertical Discrepancies of Monolithic and Veneered Zirconia and Metal-Ceramic Three-Unit Posterior Fixed Dental Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Suarez, Carlos; Gonzalo, Esther; Pelaez, Jesus; Serrano, Benjamin; Suarez, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the marginal fit of posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) made of monolithic and veneered computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) zirconia ceramic with metal-ceramic posterior FDPs. Thirty standardized steel dies were prepared to receive posterior three-unit FDPs. Specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10): (1) metal-ceramic (control group), (2) veneered zirconia, and (3) monolithic zirconia. All FDPs were cemented using a glass-ionomer cement. The specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (5°C to 55°C). A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a magnification of ×500 was used for measurements. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and paired t test. Both zirconia groups showed similar vertical marginal discrepancies, and no significant differences (P = .661) in marginal adaptation were observed among the groups. No differences were observed in either group in marginal discrepancies between surfaces or abutments. Monolithic zirconia posterior FDPs exhibit similar vertical marginal discrepancies to veneered zirconia posterior FDPs. No influence of localization measurements was observed.

  12. Production of perovskite catalysts on ceramic monoliths with nanoparticles for dual fuel system automobiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanfekr, A.; Arzani, K.; Nemati, A.; Hosseini, M.

    2009-01-01

    (Lanthanum, Cerium)(Iron, Manganese, Cobalt, Palladium)(Oxygen) 3 ,-Perovskite catalyst was prepared by the citrate route and deposited on ceramic monoliths via dip coating procedure. The catalyst was applied on a car with X U 7 motors and the amount of emission was monitored with vehicle emission test systems in Sapco company. The results were compared with the imported catalyst with noble metals such as Palladium, Platinum and Rhodium by Iran Khodro company based on the Euro III standards. The catalysts were characterized by specific surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, line scan and map. In the results, obtained in the home made sample, the amount of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons were lower than imported catalyst with Iran Khodro company with nobel metals. The illustration shows nano particles size on coat. The microstructure evaluation showed that the improved properties can be related to the existence of nano particles on coating

  13. Effects of surface treatments on the translucency, opalescence, and surface texture of dental monolithic zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Ha, Seung-Ryong

    2016-06-01

    Surface polishing or glazing may increase the appearance of depth of monolithic zirconia restorations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effects of surface treatments on the translucency, opalescence, and surface texture of dental monolithic zirconia ceramics. Forty-five monolithic zirconia specimens (16.3×16.4×2.0 mm) were divided into groups I to V, according to the number of colorings each received. Each group was then divided into 3 subgroups (n=3) according to the surface treatment: N=no treatment; P=polished; and G=glazed. CIElab color coordinates were obtained relative to D65 on a reflection spectrophotometer. The translucency parameter (TP) and opalescence parameter (OP) were calculated. One specimen per subgroups I and V was selected for evaluation of surface roughness (Ra) and was examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and pairwise comparisons (α=.05). Statistical powers were verified to evaluate results (α=.05). The interaction effects of surface treatments combined with the number of colorings were significant for TP, OP, and Ra (P.05), whereas glazing significantly decreased OP and Ra in most groups. SEM images demonstrated that surface treatments affected the surface texture of monolithic zirconia ceramics. Surface treatments combined with coloring strongly affect the surface texture of dental monolithic zirconia ceramics. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Behavior of micro-particles in monolith ceramic membrane filtration with pre-coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekawa, H; Tomita, Y; Watanabe, Y

    2004-01-01

    This paper is intended to clarify the characteristics unique to monolith ceramic membranes with pre-coagulation by referring to the behavior of micro-particles. Flow analysis and experiments have proved that monolith ceramic membranes show a unique flow pattern in the channels within the element, causing extremely rapid flocculation in the channel during dead-end filtration. It was assumed that charge-neutralized micro-particles concentrated near the membrane surface grow in size due to flocculation, and as a result, coarse micro-particles were taken up by the shearing force to flow out. As the dead end points of flow in all the channels are located near the end of the channels with higher filterability, most of the flocculated coarse particles are formed to a columnar cake intensively at the dead end point. Therefore cake layer forming on the membrane other than around the dead end point is alleviated. This behavior of particle flocculation and cake formation at the dead end point within the channels are unique characteristics of monolith ceramic membranes. This is why all monolith ceramic membrane water purification systems operating in Japan do not have pretreatment equipment for flocculation and sedimentation.

  15. High-temperature nanoporous ceramic monolith prepared from a polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brad H; Lodge, Timothy P

    2009-02-11

    Nanoporous ceramic with a unique pore structure was derived from an all-hydrocarbon polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BmuE). The BmuE was designed to allow facile removal of one phase, resulting in a nanoporous polymer monolith with BmuE-like structure. The pores were filled with a commercially available, polymeric precursor to nonoxide, Si-based ceramics. Pyrolysis resulted in a monolith of nanoporous ceramic, stable to at least 1000 degrees C, with a BmuE-like pore structure. The pore structure is disordered and 3-D continuous. Microscopy and gas sorption measurements suggest a well-defined pore size distribution spanning roughly 60-100 nm, sizes previously unattainable through related techniques.

  16. Acquisition of a Scanning Ultrasound Analyzer for Gelation and Drying Studies in Sol-Gel Ceramic Coatings and Monoliths

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Archer, Lynden

    1997-01-01

    The overall goal of this research project was to develop a fundamental understanding of how colloid chemistry influences structure and properties of ceramic monoliths fabricated by sol-gel synthesis...

  17. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Moore, C.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Woods, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation of irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD β-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination

  18. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Moore, C.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Woods, J.J.

    1997-05-01

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation after irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD β-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination

  19. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  20. Experimental and in silico investigations of organic phosphates and phosphonates sorption on polymer-ceramic monolithic materials and hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyńska, Monika; Zembrzuska, Joanna; Tomczak, Rafał; Mikołajczyk, Jakub; Rusińska-Roszak, Danuta; Voelkel, Adam; Buchwald, Tomasz; Jampílek, Josef; Lukáč, Miloš; Devínsky, Ferdinand

    2016-10-10

    A method based on experimental and in silico evaluations for investigating interactions of organic phosphates and phosphonates with hydroxyapatite was developed. This quick and easy method is used for determination of differences among organophosphorus compounds of various structures in their mineral binding affinities. Empirical sorption evaluation was carried out using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry or UV-VIS spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm sorption of organic phosphates and phosphonates on hydroxyapatite. Polymer-ceramic monolithic material and bulk hydroxyapatite were applied as sorbent materials. Furthermore, a Polymer-ceramic Monolithic In-Needle Extraction device was used to investigate both sorption and desorption steps. Binding energies were computed from the fully optimised structures utilising Density Functional Theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Potential pharmacologic and toxic effects of the tested compounds were estimated by the Prediction of the Activity Spectra of Substances using GeneXplain software. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Monolithic Ceramics and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings for Diesel Engine Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swab, Jeffrey J

    2001-01-01

    The Metals and Ceramics Research Branch (MCRB) of the Weapons and Materials Research Directorate is providing ceramic material characterization and evaluation to the Tank Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC...

  2. Evaluation of unencapsulated ceramic monolithic and MOS thin-film capacitors (25 to 3000C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nance, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Several commercial monolithic ceramic and thin-film MOS chip capacitors were evaluated for use in high temperature (300 0 C) geothermal instrumentation. Characteristics of the commonly used dielectric materials (NPO, X7R, BX) and temperature dependence of the insulation resistance are briefly discussed. Some ceramic capacitors with NPO dielectric materials had insulation resistances above 10 megohms at 300 0 C and less than 2% change in capacitance from 25 0 C to 300 0 C, while the X7R and BX dielectric materials exhibited insulation resistances below 10 megohm and changes in capacitance greater then 50%. The thin-film capacitors showed good stability at 300 0 C. However, during aging, bonds and bond pads presented a problem causing intermittently open circuits for some of the devices

  3. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  4. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  5. Influence of Abutment Design on Stiffness, Strength, and Failure of Implant-Supported Monolithic Resin Nano Ceramic (RNC) Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joda, Tim; Huber, Samuel; Bürki, Alexander; Zysset, Philippe; Brägger, Urs

    2015-12-01

    Recent technical development allows the digital manufacturing of monolithic reconstructions with high-performance materials. For implant-supported crowns, the fixation requires an abutment design onto which the reconstruction can be bonded. The aim of this laboratory investigation was to analyze stiffness, strength, and failure modes of implant-supported, computer-assisted design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-generated resin nano ceramic (RNC) crowns bonded to three different titanium abutments. Eighteen monolithic RNC crowns were produced and loaded in a universal testing machine under quasi-static condition according to DIN ISO 14801. With regard to the type of titanium abutment, three groups were defined: (1) prefabricated cementable standard; (2) CAD/CAM-constructed individualized; and (3) novel prefabricated bonding base. Stiffness and strength were measured and analyzed statistically with Wilcoxon rank sum test. Sections of the specimens were examined microscopically. Stiffness demonstrated high stability for all specimens loaded in the physiological loading range with means and standard deviations of 1,579 ± 120 N/mm (group A), 1,733 ± 89 N/mm (group B), and 1,704 ± 162 N/mm (group C). Mean strength of the novel prefabricated bonding base (group C) was 17% lower than of the two other groups. Plastic deformations were detectable for all implant-abutment crown connections. Monolithic implant crowns made of RNC seem to represent a feasible and stable prosthetic construction under laboratory testing conditions with strength higher than the average occlusal force, independent of the different abutment designs used in this investigation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of Two Polishing Systems on Surface Roughness, Topography, and Flexural Strength of a Monolithic Lithium Disilicate Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadibassir, Mahshid; Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Golzari, Hossein; Moravej Salehi, Elham; Fahimi, Mohammad Amin; Kharazi Fard, Mohammad Javad

    2017-03-08

    To evaluate the effect of overglazing and two polishing procedures on flexural strength and quality and quantity of surface roughness of a monolithic lithium disilicate ceramic computer-aided design (CAD) after grinding. This in vitro study was conducted on 52 partially crystalized bar-shaped specimens (16 × 4 × 1.6 mm) of monolithic lithium disilicate ceramic. The specimens were wet polished with 600-, 800-, and 1200-grit silicon carbide papers for 15 seconds using a grinding/polishing machine at a speed of 300 rpm. Then, the specimens were crystalized and glaze-fired in one step simultaneously and randomly divided into four groups of 13: (I) Glazing group (control); (II) Grinding-glazing group, subjected to grinding with red band finishing diamond bur (46 μm) followed by glazing; (III) Grinding-D+Z group, subjected to grinding and then polishing by coarse, medium, and fine diamond rubber points (D+Z); and (IV) Grinding-OptraFine group, subjected to grinding and then polishing with a two-step diamond rubber polishing system followed by a final polishing step with an OptraFine HP brush and diamond polishing paste. The surface roughness (Ra and Rz) values (μm) were measured by a profilometer, and the mean values were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane's test (post hoc comparison). One specimen of each group was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for surface topography. The three-point flexural strength values of the bars were measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed and recorded. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane's test (α = 0.05). Statistically significant differences were noted among the experimental groups for Ra, Rz (p SEM analysis of polished surfaces revealed regular morphology with some striations. The OptraFine system created smoother and more uniform surfaces in terms of quantity (p < 0.03 for Ra, p < 0.01 for Rz) and quality of roughness compared to glazing. The flexural

  7. Mechanical behavior of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic restorations: effect of grinding and low-temperature aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Silvestri, T.; Camargo, R.; Rippe, M.P.; Amaral, M.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of grinding with diamond burs and low-temperature aging on the mechanical behavior (biaxial flexural strength and structural reliability), surface topography, and phase transformation of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic dental restorations. Disc-shaped

  8. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, Y. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States)

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  9. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, Y. (Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States))

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  10. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lanigan, David C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    This revision to the original report adds two longer term leach sets of data to the report and provides more discussion and graphics on how to interpret the results from long-term laboratory leach tests. The leach tests were performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams.

  11. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.

  12. An investigation of penetrant techniques for detection of machining-induced surface-breaking cracks on monolithic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, G.A.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this effort was to evaluate penetrant methods for their ability to detect surface-breaking cracks in monolithic ceramic materials with an emphasis on detection of cracks generated by machining. There are two basic penetrant types, visible and fluorescent. The visible penetrant method is usually augmented by powder developers and cracks detected can be seen in visible light. Cracks detected by fluorescent penetrant are visible only under ultraviolet light used with or without a developer. The developer is basically a powder that wicks up penetrant from a crack to make it more observable. Although fluorescent penetrants were recommended in the literature survey conducted early in this effort, visible penetrants and two non-standard techniques, a capillary gaseous diffusion method under development at the institute of Chemical Physics in Moscow, and the {open_quotes}statiflux{close_quotes} method which involves use of electrically charged particles, were also investigated. SiAlON ring specimens (1 in. diameter, 3/4 in. wide) which had been subjected to different thermal-shock cycles were used for these tests. The capillary gaseous diffusion method is based on ammonia; the detector is a specially impregnated paper much like litmus paper. As expected, visible dye penetrants offered no detection sensitivity for tight, surface-breaking cracks in ceramics. Although the non-standard statiflux method showed promise on high-crack-density specimens, it was ineffective on limited-crack-density specimens. The fluorescent penetrant method was superior for surface-breaking crack detection, but successful application of this procedure depends greatly on the skill of the user. Two presently available high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrants were then evaluated for detection of microcracks on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC from different suppliers. Although 50X optical magnification may be sufficient for many applications, 200X magnification provides excellent delectability.

  13. Characterization and testing of monolithic RERTR fuel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, D.D.; Jue, J.F.; Burkes, D.E. [Idaho National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Monolithic fuel plates are being developed as a LEU (low enrichment uranium) fuel for application in research reactors throughout the world. These fuel plates are comprised of a U-Mo alloy foil encased in aluminum alloy cladding. Three different fabrication techniques have been looked at for producing monolithic fuel plates: hot isostatic pressing (HIP), transient liquid phase bonding (TLPB), and friction stir welding (FSW). Of these three techniques, HIP and FSW are currently being emphasized. As part of the development of these fabrication techniques, fuel plates are characterized and tested to determine properties like hardness and the bond strength at the interface between the fuel and cladding. Testing of HIP-made samples indicates that the foil/cladding interaction behavior depends on the Mo content in the UMo foil, the measured hardness values are quite different for the fuel, cladding, and interaction zone phase and Ti, Zr and Nb are the most effective diffusion barriers. For FSW samples, there is a dependence of the bond strength at the foil/cladding interface on the type of tool that is employed for performing the actual FSW process. (authors)

  14. Standard test method for static leaching of monolithic waste forms for disposal of radioactive waste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a measure of the chemical durability of a simulated or radioactive monolithic waste form, such as a glass, ceramic, cement (grout), or cermet, in a test solution at temperatures <100°C under low specimen surface- area-to-leachant volume (S/V) ratio conditions. 1.2 This test method can be used to characterize the dissolution or leaching behaviors of various simulated or radioactive waste forms in various leachants under the specific conditions of the test based on analysis of the test solution. Data from this test are used to calculate normalized elemental mass loss values from specimens exposed to aqueous solutions at temperatures <100°C. 1.3 The test is conducted under static conditions in a constant solution volume and at a constant temperature. The reactivity of the test specimen is determined from the amounts of components released and accumulated in the solution over the test duration. A wide range of test conditions can be used to study material behavior, includin...

  15. Dissolution of Ceramic Monolith of Spent Catalytic Converters by Using Hydrometallurgical Methods / Rozpuszczanie Monolitu Ceramicznego Zużytych Katalizatorów Na Drodze Hydrometalurgicznej

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willner J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic converters contain the catalytic substance in their structure, which is a mixture of Platinum Group Metals (PGMs: platinum, palladium and rhodium. The prices of these metals and a growing demand for them in the market, make it necessary to recycle spent catalytic converters and recovery of PGMs. The ceramic monolith of catalytic converters is still a predominant material in its construction among of multitude of catalytic converters which are in circulation. In this work attempts were made to leach additional metals (excluding Pt from comminuted ceramic monolith. Classic leachant oxidizing media 10M H2SO4, HCl and H3PO4 were used considering the possibility of dissolution of the ceramic monolith.

  16. Testing Consent Order on Refractory Ceramic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This notice announces that EPA has signed signed an enforceable testing consent order under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), 15 U.S.C. section 2601 at seq., with three of the primary producers of refractory ceramic fibers (RCF).

  17. Ultimate Tensile Strength as a Function of Test Rate for Various Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength of five different continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/BSAS (2D 2 types), SiC/MAS-5 (2D), SiC/SiC (2D enhanced), and C/SiC(2D) was determined as a function of test rate at I 100 to 1200 'C in air. All five composite materials exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate strength on test rate such that the ultimate strength decreased with decreasing test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress rate) to another (constant stress loading) for SiC/BSAS suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics.

  18. Effective Diffusivities and Pore-Transport Characteristics of Washcoated Ceramic Monolith for Automotive Catalytic Converter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starý, T.; Šolcová, Olga; Schneider, Petr; Marek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 18 (2006), s. 5934-5943 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/2616; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : effective diffusivity * monolith catalyst * chromatography Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.629, year: 2006

  19. Mechanical behavior of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic restorations: effect of grinding and low-temperature aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, G K R; Silvestri, T; Camargo, R; Rippe, M P; Amaral, M; Kleverlaan, C J; Valandro, L F

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of grinding with diamond burs and low-temperature aging on the mechanical behavior (biaxial flexural strength and structural reliability), surface topography, and phase transformation of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic dental restorations. Disc-shaped specimens (Zirlux FC, Ivoclar Vivadent) were manufactured according to ISO 6872 (2008) and divided in accordance with two factors: "grinding - 3 levels" and "LTD - 2 levels". Grinding was performed using a contra-angle handpiece under constant water-cooling with different grit-sizes (extra-fine and coarse diamond burs). LTD was simulated in an autoclave at 134°C, under a pressure of 2 bar, over a period of 20h. Surface topography analysis showed an increase in roughness based on surface treatment grit-size (Coarse>Xfine>Ctrl), LTD did not influence roughness values. Both grinding and LTD promoted an increase in the amount of m-phase, although different susceptibilities to degradation were observed. According to existing literature the increase of m-phase content is a direct indicative of Y-TZP degradation. Weibull analysis showed an increase in characteristic strength after grinding (Coarse=Xfine>Ctrl), while for LTD, distinct effects were observed (Ctrlgrinding showed not to be detrimental to the mechanical properties of Zirlux FC Y-TZP ceramic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrated Design Software Predicts the Creep Life of Monolithic Ceramic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Significant improvements in propulsion and power generation for the next century will require revolutionary advances in high-temperature materials and structural design. Advanced ceramics are candidate materials for these elevated-temperature applications. As design protocols emerge for these material systems, designers must be aware of several innate features, including the degrading ability of ceramics to carry sustained load. Usually, time-dependent failure in ceramics occurs because of two different, delayedfailure mechanisms: slow crack growth and creep rupture. Slow crack growth initiates at a preexisting flaw and continues until a critical crack length is reached, causing catastrophic failure. Creep rupture, on the other hand, occurs because of bulk damage in the material: void nucleation and coalescence that eventually leads to macrocracks which then propagate to failure. Successful application of advanced ceramics depends on proper characterization of material behavior and the use of an appropriate design methodology. The life of a ceramic component can be predicted with the NASA Lewis Research Center's Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES) integrated design programs. CARES/CREEP determines the expected life of a component under creep conditions, and CARES/LIFE predicts the component life due to fast fracture and subcritical crack growth. The previously developed CARES/LIFE program has been used in numerous industrial and Government applications.

  1. Identification of Technological Parameters of Ni-Alloys When Machining by Monolithic Ceramic Milling Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czán, Andrej; Kubala, Ondrej; Danis, Igor; Czánová, Tatiana; Holubják, Jozef; Mikloš, Matej

    2017-12-01

    The ever-increasing production and the usage of hard-to-machine progressive materials are the main cause of continual finding of new ways and methods of machining. One of these ways is the ceramic milling tool, which combines the pros of conventional ceramic cutting materials and pros of conventional coating steel-based insert. These properties allow to improve cutting conditions and so increase the productivity with preserved quality known from conventional tools usage. In this paper, there is made the identification of properties and possibilities of this tool when machining of hard-to-machine materials such as nickel alloys using in airplanes engines. This article is focused on the analysis and evaluation ordinary technological parameters and surface quality, mainly roughness of surface and quality of machined surface and tool wearing.

  2. Edge chipping and flexural resistance of monolithic ceramics☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Lee, James J.-W.; Srikanth, Ramanathan; Lawn, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that monolithic ceramics can be developed with combined esthetics and superior fracture resistance to circumvent processing and performance drawbacks of traditional all-ceramic crowns and fixed-dental-prostheses consisting of a hard and strong core with an esthetic porcelain veneer. Specifically, to demonstrate that monolithic prostheses can be produced with a much reduced susceptibility to fracture. Methods Protocols were applied for quantifying resistance to chipping as well as resistance to flexural failure in two classes of dental ceramic, microstructurally-modified zirconias and lithium disilicate glass–ceramics. A sharp indenter was used to induce chips near the edges of flat-layer specimens, and the results compared with predictions from a critical load equation. The critical loads required to produce cementation surface failure in monolithic specimens bonded to dentin were computed from established flexural strength relations and the predictions validated with experimental data. Results Monolithic zirconias have superior chipping and flexural fracture resistance relative to their veneered counterparts. While they have superior esthetics, glass–ceramics exhibit lower strength but higher chip fracture resistance relative to porcelain-veneered zirconias. Significance The study suggests a promising future for new and improved monolithic ceramic restorations, with combined durability and acceptable esthetics. PMID:24139756

  3. Firing: the proof test for ceramic processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingery, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    The object of ceramic processing is to form ware having certain shapes and properties. Thus, one test of the success of processing procedures must be in terms of the resulting structure and characteristics of a material after firing. During the firing process some few variations resulting from processing may be evened out, but the great majority of variation tends to be amplified. Examination of a few cases illustrates the nature of the defect amplification process. (U.S.)

  4. Comparison of Reactive and Non-Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering Routes for the Fabrication of Monolithic and Composite Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Orrù

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A wider utilization of ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC materials strongly depends on the availability of efficient techniques for their fabrication as dense bodies. Based on recent results reported in the literature, it is possible to state that Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS technology offers a useful contribution in this direction. Along these lines, the use of two different SPS-based processing routes for the preparation of massive UHTCs is examined in this work. One method, the so-called reactive SPS (R-SPS, consists of the synthesis and densification of the material in a single step. Alternatively, the ceramic powders are first synthesized by Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS and then sintered by SPS. The obtained results evidenced that R-SPS method is preferable for the preparation of dense monolithic products, while the sintering of SHS powders requires relatively milder conditions when considering binary composites. The different kinetic mechanisms involved during R-SPS of the monolithic and composite systems, i.e., combustion-like or gradual solid-diffusion, respectively, provides a possible explanation. An important role is also played by the SHS process, particularly for the preparation of composite powders, since stronger interfaces are established between the ceramic constituents formed in situ, thus favoring diffusion processes during the subsequent SPS step.

  5. Testing protocols for evaluating monolithic waste forms containing mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Sams, T.L.; Pitt, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    Test protocols have been presented which can be used as a guide in cement-based grout formulation development studies. Based on experience at ORNL, these six tests are generally sufficient to develop a grout product which will meet all applicable DOE, NRC, and EPA performance criteria. As such, these tests can be used to minimize the time required to tailor a grout to be compatible with both the waste stream and the process disposal scenario. 9 refs

  6. Test beam results of a depleted monolithic active pixel sensor (DMAPS) prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obermann, Theresa; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Bonn Univ. (Germany); Schwenker, Benjamin [Goettingen Univ. (Germany); Collaboration: ATLAS Pixel-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    New monolithic detector concepts are currently being explored for future particle physics experiments, in particular for the upgrade of the ATLAS detector. Common to monolithic pixel detectors is the integration of the front-end circuitry and the sensor on the same silicon substrate. The DMAPS concept makes use of high resistive silicon as substrate. It enables the application of a high bias voltage to create a drift field for the charge collection in the sensor part as well as the full usage of CMOS logic in the same piece of silicon. DMAPS prototypes from several foundries are available since three years and have been extensively characterized in the lab. In this talk, results of test beam campaigns, with neutron irradiated prototypes implemented in the ESPROS process, are presented.

  7. Determination of elastic modulus of ceramics using ultrasonic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmita, Firmansyah; Wibisono, Gatot; Judawisastra, Hermawan; Priambodo, Toni Agung

    2018-04-01

    Elastic modulus is important material property on structural ceramics application. However, bending test as a common method for determining this property require particular specimen preparation. Furthermore, elastic modulus of ceramics could vary because it depends on porosity content. For structural ceramics industry, such as ceramic tiles, this property is very important. This drives the development of new method to improve effectivity or verification method as well. In this research, ultrasonic testing was conducted to determine elastic modulus of soda lime glass and ceramic tiles. The experiment parameter was frequency of probe (1, 2, 4 MHz). Characterization of density and porosity were also done for analysis. Results from ultrasonic testing were compared with elastic modulus resulted from bending test. Elastic modulus of soda-lime glass based on ultrasonic testing showed excellent result with error 2.69% for 2 MHz probe relative to bending test result. Testing on red and white ceramic tiles were still contained error up to 41% and 158%, respectively. The results for red ceramic tile showed trend that 1 MHz probe gave better accuracy in determining elastic modulus. However, testing on white ceramic tile showed different trend. It was due to the presence of porosity and near field effect.

  8. Michelson Interferometer for Global High-Resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI): Monolithic Interferometer Design and Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlander, John M.; Englert, Christoph R.; Brown, Charles M.; Marr, Kenneth D.; Miller, Ian J.; Zastera, Vaz; Bach, Bernhard W.; Mende, Stephen B.

    2017-10-01

    The design and laboratory tests of the interferometers for the Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI) instrument which measures thermospheric wind and temperature for the NASA-sponsored Ionospheric Connection (ICON) Explorer mission are described. The monolithic interferometers use the Doppler Asymmetric Spatial Heterodyne (DASH) Spectroscopy technique for wind measurements and a multi-element photometer approach to measure thermospheric temperatures. The DASH technique and overall optical design of the MIGHTI instrument are described in an overview followed by details on the design, element fabrication, assembly, laboratory tests and thermal control of the interferometers that are the heart of MIGHTI.

  9. Proof test diagrams for Zerodur glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Proof test diagrams for Zerodur glass-ceramics are calculated from available fracture mechanics data. It is shown that the environment has a large effect on minimum time-to-failure as predicted by proof test diagrams.

  10. Structural response testing of thermal barrier load bearing ceramic pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, J.L.; Black, W.E.; Luci, R.K.; Oland, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    A load-bearing insulating structure for use in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) was investigated. The structure was composed of dense ceramic materials in the form of circular pads arranged in a stack. Specifically, the test program was structured to investigate the isolation effectiveness of interface materials placed between the ceramic pads to reduce the effectiveness of mechanically induced loads. The tests were conducted at room temperature using tapered loading platens on single ceramic pads. Seventeen alumina specimens, representing two types of material and two thicknesses, were tested. Three interface material thicknesses were introduced using silica cloth and graphite foil. Pre- and post-test nondestructive examinations were conducted in an effort to identify potential damage-inducing anomalies in the ceramic pads. A total of 62 tests was conducted with all specimens eventually loaded to failure

  11. Cyclic mechanical fatigue in ceramic-ceramic composites: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D. III

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to cyclic mechanical fatigue effects in a number of ceramics and ceramic composites, including several monolithic ceramics in which significant residual stresses should be present as a result of thermal expansion mismatches and anisotropy. Fatigue is also noted in several BN-containing ceramic matrix-particulate composites and in SiC fiber-ceramic matrix composites. These results suggest that fatigue testing is imperative for ceramics and ceramic composites that are to be used in applications subject to cyclic loading. Fatigue process models are proposed which provide a rationale for fatigue effect observations, but do not as yet provide quantitative results. Fiber composite fatigue damage models indicate that design stresses in these materials may have to be maintained below the level at which fiber pullout occurs

  12. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Test Methods on the Flexural Strength Results of Monolithic Zirconia Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Christine; Strickstrock, Monika; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Zylla, Isabella-Maria; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-03-09

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of specimen preparation and test method on the flexural strength results of monolithic zirconia. Different monolithic zirconia materials (Ceramill Zolid (Amann Girrbach, Koblach, Austria), Zenostar ZrTranslucent (Wieland Dental, Pforzheim, Germany), and DD Bio zx² (Dental Direkt, Spenge, Germany)) were tested with three different methods: 3-point, 4-point, and biaxial flexural strength. Additionally, different specimen preparation methods were applied: either dry polishing before sintering or wet polishing after sintering. Each subgroup included 40 specimens. The surface roughness was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a profilometer whereas monoclinic phase transformation was investigated with X-ray diffraction. The data were analyzed using a three-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) with respect to the three factors: zirconia, specimen preparation, and test method. One-way ANOVA was conducted for the test method and zirconia factors within the combination of two other factors. A 2-parameter Weibull distribution assumption was applied to analyze the reliability under different testing conditions. In general, values measured using the 4-point test method presented the lowest flexural strength values. The flexural strength findings can be grouped in the following order: 4-point strength values than prepared before sintering. The Weibull moduli ranged from 5.1 to 16.5. Specimens polished before sintering showed higher surface roughness values than specimens polished after sintering. In contrast, no strong impact of the polishing procedures on the monoclinic surface layer was observed. No impact of zirconia material on flexural strength was found. The test method and the preparation method significantly influenced the flexural strength values.

  13. Pilot tests of a PET detector using the TOF-PET ASIC based on monolithic crystals and SiPMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, A.; González-Montoro, A.; González, A.J.; Hernández, L.; Monzó, J.M.; Benlloch, J.M.; Bugalho, R.; Ferramacho, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we show pilot tests of PET detector blocks using the TOF-PET ASIC, coupled to SiPM detector arrays and different crystal configurations. We have characterized the main ASIC features running calibration processes to compensate the time dispersion among the different ASIC/SiPM paths as well as for the time walk on the arrival of optical photons. The aim of this work is to use of LYSO monolithic crystals and explore their photon Depth of Interaction (DOI) capabilities, keeping good energy and spatial resolutions. First tests have been carried out with crystal arrays. Here we made it possible to reach a coincidence resolving times (CRT) of 370 ps FWHM, with energy resolutions better than 20% and resolving well 2 mm sized crystal elements. When using monolithic crystals, a single-pixel LYSO reference crystal helped to explore the CRT performance. We studied different strategies to provide the best timestamp determination in the monolithic scintillator. Times around 1 ns FWHM have been achieved in these pilot studies. In terms of spatial and energy resolution, values of about 3 mm and better than 30% were found, respectively. We have also demonstrated the capability of this system (monolithic and ASIC) to return accurate DOI information.

  14. Testing of neutron-irradiated ceramic-to-metal seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Lopez, M.R.; Martinez, H.; Romero, T.J.; Cook, J.H.; Barr, H.N.; Hittman, F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on ceramic-to-metal seals prepared by sputtering a titanium metallizing layer onto ceramic disks and then brazing to metal tubes. The ceramics used were alumina, MACOR, spinel, AlON, and a mixture of Al 2 O 3 and Si 3 N 4 . Except for the MACOR, which was brazed to a titanium tube, the ceramics were brazed to niobium tubes. The seals were leak tested and then sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory, where they were irradiated using the spallation neutron source at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Following irradiation for ∼ 90 days to a fluence of 2.8 x 10 23 n/m 2 , the samples were moved to hot cells and again leak tested. Only the MACOR samples showed any measurable leaks. One set of samples was then pressurized to 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) and subsequently leak tested. No leaks were found. Bursting the seals required hydrostatic pressures of at least 34 MPa (5000 psi). The high seal strength and few leaks indicate that ceramic-to-metal seals can resist radiation-induced degradation

  15. A high temperature testing system for ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, John

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic composites are presently being developed for high temperature use in heat engine and space power system applications. The operating temperature range is expected to be 1090 to 1650 C (2000 F to 3000 F). Very little material data is available at these temperatures and, therefore, it is desirable to thoroughly characterize the basic unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic composite. This includes testing mainly for mechanical material properties at high temperatures. The proper conduct of such characterization tests requires the development of a tensile testing system includes unique gripping, heating, and strain measuring devices which require special considerations. The system also requires an optimized specimen shape. The purpose of this paper is to review various techniques for measuring displacements or strains, preferably at elevated temperatures. Due to current equipment limitations it is assumed that the specimen is to be tested at a temperature of 1430 C (2600F) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For the most part, previous high temperature material characterization tests, such as flexure and tensile tests, have been performed in inert atmospheres. Due to the harsh environment in which the ceramic specimen is to be tested, many conventional strain measuring techniques can not be applied. Initially a brief description of the more commonly used mechanical strain measuring techniques is given. Major advantages and disadvantages with their application to high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites are discussed. Next, a general overview is given for various optical techniques. Advantages and disadvantages which are common to these techniques are noted. The optical methods for measuring strain or displacement are categorized into two sections. These include real-time techniques. Finally, an optical technique which offers optimum performance with the high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites is recommended.

  16. The monolithic multicell: a tool for testing material components in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, H.; Gruszecki, T. [IVF Industrial Research and Development Corporation, Moelndal (Sweden); Bernhard, R. [IVF Industrial Research and Development Corporation, Moelndal (Sweden); The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Center of Molcular Devices, Department of Chemistry; Haeggman, L.; Gorlov, M.; Boschloo, G.; Edvinsson, T.; Kloo, L.; Hagfeldt, A. [The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Center of Molcular Devices, Department of Chemistry

    2006-07-01

    A multicell is presented as a tool for testing material components in encapsulated dye-sensitized solar cells. The multicell is based on a four-layer monolithic cell structure and an industrial process technology. Each multicell plate includes 24 individual well-encapsulated cells. A sulfur lamp corrected to the solar spectrum has been used to characterize the cells. Efficiencies up to 6.8% at a light-intensity of 1000 W/m{sup su2} (up to 7.5% at 250 W/m{sup 2}) have been obtained with an electrolyte solution based on {upsilon}-butyrolactone. Additionally, a promising long-term stability at cell efficiencies close to 5% at 1000 W/m{sup 2} has been obtained with an electrolyte based on glutaronitrile. The reproducibility of the cell performance before and after exposure to accelerated testing has been high. This means that the multicell can be used as an efficient tool for comparative performance and stability tests. (author)

  17. Laser Soldering and Thermal Cycling Tests of Monolithic Silicon Pixel Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Strand, Frode Sneve

    2015-01-01

    An ALPIDE-1 monolithic silicon pixel sensor prototype has been laser soldered to a flex printed circuit using a novel interconnection technique using lasers. This technique is to be optimised to ensure stable, good quality connections between the sensor chips and the FPCs. To test the long-term stability of the connections, as well as study the effects on hit thresholds and noise in the sensor, it was thermally cycled in a climate chamber 1200 times. The soldered connections showed good qualities like even melting and good adhesion on pad/flex surfaces, and the chip remained in working condition for 1080 cycles. After this, a few connections failed, having cracks in the soldering tin, rendering the chip unusable. Threshold and noise characteristics seemed stable, except for the noise levels of sector 2 in the chip, for 1000 cycles in a temperature interval of "10^{\\circ}" and "50^{\\circ}" C. Still, further testing with wider temperature ranges and more cycles is needed to test the limitations of the chi...

  18. Standard Test Method for Impact Resistance of Monolithic Polycarbonate Sheet by Means of a Falling Weight

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the energy required to initiate failure in monolithic polycarbonate sheet material under specified conditions of impact using a free falling weight. 1.2 Two specimen types are defined as follows: 1.2.1 Type A consists of a flat plate test specimen and employs a clamped ring support. 1.2.2 Type B consists of a simply supported three-point loaded beam specimen (Fig. 1) and is recommended for use with material which can not be failed using the Type A specimen. For a maximum drop height of 6.096 m (20 ft) and a maximum drop weight of 22.68 kg (50 lb), virgin polycarbonate greater than 12.70 mm (1/2 in.) thick will probably require use of the Type B specimen. Note 1 - See also ASTM Methods: D 1709, D 2444 and D 3029. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of reg...

  19. Performance test of a ceramic turbo-viscous pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tetsuya; Hiroki, Seiji; Murakami, Yoshio; Shiraishi, Shigeyuki; Totoura, Sadayuki; Ohtaki, Takashi.

    1994-01-01

    In the special fields of nuclear fusion facilities and semiconductor production installation, the development of new vacuum pumps which can cope with strong magnetic fields, high temperature gas and corrosive gas is demanded. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. has advanced the development of ceramic turbo-molecular pumps and ceramic turbo-viscous pumps, which use ceramic rotors and gas bearings since 1985. The evaluation test of the ceramic turbo-viscous vacuum pump CT-3000H which can evacuate from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum with one pump was carried out, and the experimental results on the performance and the reliability were obtained, therefore, those are reported in this paper. The structure, specification and features of the CT-3000H are shown. The exhaust performance test of the pump was carried out in conformity with the standard of the Vacuum Society of Japan, JVIS 005 'Method of performance test for turbo-molecular pumps'. The gases used were nitrogen and helium. The results are shown. The exhaust test from atmospheric pressure was carried out by two methods, and the results are shown. (K.I.)

  20. Fabrication and testing of U–7Mo monolithic plate fuel with Zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualini, E.E. [Laboratorio de Nanotecnología Nuclear, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martín, Prov. Buenos Aires (Argentina); Robinson, A.B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Porter, D.L., E-mail: Douglas.Porter@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Wachs, D.M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Finlay, M.R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear fuel designs are being developed to replace highly enriched fuel used in research and test reactors with fuels of low enrichment. In the most challenging cases, U–(7–10 wt%)Mo monolithic plate fuels are proposed. One of the considered designs includes aluminum-alloy cladding, which provides some challenges in fabrication and fuel/cladding interaction during service. Zircaloy cladding, specifically Zry–4, was investigated as an alternative cladding, and development of a fabrication method was performed by researchers with the Comisión Nacionalde Energia Atómica (CNEA) in Argentina, resulting in test fuel plates (Zry–4 clad U–7Mo) which were subsequently tested in the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Because Zry–4 and U–(7–10)Mo have similar high-temperature mechanical properties, fabrication was simplified in that the fuel foil and cladding could be co-rolled and bonded. The challenge was to prevent a thermal-expansion mismatch, which could destroy the fuel/cladding bond before complete bonding was achieved; the solution was to prevent the composites from cooling significantly during or between roll passes. The final product performed very well in-reactor, showing good bonding, very little fuel/cladding interaction—either from fabrication or in-reactor testing—and little swelling, especially no detectable heterogeneous bubble formation at the fuel/cladding interface tested to a fission density of up to 2.7E+21 (average) fissions/cm{sup 3}, 3.8E+21 (peak).

  1. First tests of a novel radiation hard CMOS sensor process for Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernegger, H.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Dalla, M.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Kugathasan, T.; Maneuski, D.; Musa, L.; Riedler, P.; Riegel, C.; Sbarra, C.; Schaefer, D.; Schioppa, E. J.; Snoeys, W.

    2017-06-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS [1] tracking detector for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN requires novel radiation hard silicon sensor technologies. Significant effort has been put into the development of monolithic CMOS sensors but it has been a challenge to combine a low capacitance of the sensing node with full depletion of the sensitive layer. Low capacitance brings low analog power. Depletion of the sensitive layer causes the signal charge to be collected by drift sufficiently fast to separate hits from consecutive bunch crossings (25 ns at the LHC) and to avoid losing the charge by trapping. This paper focuses on the characterization of charge collection properties and detection efficiency of prototype sensors originally designed in the framework of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade [2]. The prototypes are fabricated both in the standard TowerJazz 180nm CMOS imager process [3] and in an innovative modification of this process developed in collaboration with the foundry, aimed to fully deplete the sensitive epitaxial layer and enhance the tolerance to non-ionizing energy loss. Sensors fabricated in standard and modified process variants were characterized using radioactive sources, focused X-ray beam and test beams before and after irradiation. Contrary to sensors manufactured in the standard process, sensors from the modified process remain fully functional even after a dose of 1015neq/cm2, which is the the expected NIEL radiation fluence for the outer pixel layers in the future ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) [4].

  2. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  3. Rotating Beam Fatigue Testing and Hybrid Ceramic Bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Runout and Fast Fracture ......... 20 FIG.7 Stress-life Plots of Rotating Beam Fatigue Testing ............. 23 FIG.8 Fractograph of Rotating Beam...Chand-Kare Engineering Ceramics, Worcester, MA. Diamond wheels of 600 grits were used with longitudinal grinding applied for the final finishing of...stress in the range of 600-850 MPa. Three test completion modes were encountered, i.e. fast fracture at setup, fatigue fracture and runout (no failure

  4. Design, Development and Hotfire Testing of Monolithic Copper and Bimetallic Additively Manufactured Combustion Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul; Barnett, Greg; Brandsmeier, Will; Greene, Sandy Elam; Protz, Chris

    2016-01-01

    NASA and industry partners are working towards fabrication process development to reduce costs and schedules associated with manufacturing liquid rocket engine components with the goal of reducing overall mission costs. One such technique being evaluated is powder-bed fusion or selective laser melting (SLM) otherwise commonly referred to as additive manufacturing. The NASA Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) program was designed to develop processes and material characterization for the GRCop-84 copper-alloy commensurate with powder bed additive manufacturing, evaluate bimetallic deposition and complete testing of a full scale combustion chamber. As part of this development, the process has been transferred to industry partners to enable a long-term supply chain of monolithic copper combustion chambers. As a direct spin off of this program, NASA is working with industry partners to further develop the printing process for the GRCop-84 material in addition to the C-18150 (CuCrZr) material. To advance the process further and allow for optimization with multiple materials, NASA is also investigating the feasibility of bimetallic additively manufactured chambers. A 1.2k sized thrust-chamber was designed and developed to compare the printing process of the GRCop-84 and C-18150 SLM materials. A series of similar MCC liners also completed development with an Inconel 625 jacket bonded to the GRcop-84 liner evaluating direct metal deposition (DMD) laser and arc-based techniques. This paper describes the design, development, manufacturing and testing of these combustion chambers and associated lessons learned throughout the design and development process.

  5. First tests of a novel radiation hard CMOS sensor process for Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernegger, H.; Hoorne, J.W. van; Kugathasan, T.; Musa, L.; Riedler, P.; Riegel, C.; Schaefer, D.; Schioppa, E.J.; Snoeys, W.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Maneuski, D.; Dalla, M.; Sbarra, C.

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS [1] tracking detector for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN requires novel radiation hard silicon sensor technologies. Significant effort has been put into the development of monolithic CMOS sensors but it has been a challenge to combine a low capacitance of the sensing node with full depletion of the sensitive layer. Low capacitance brings low analog power. Depletion of the sensitive layer causes the signal charge to be collected by drift sufficiently fast to separate hits from consecutive bunch crossings (25 ns at the LHC) and to avoid losing the charge by trapping. This paper focuses on the characterization of charge collection properties and detection efficiency of prototype sensors originally designed in the framework of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade [2]. The prototypes are fabricated both in the standard TowerJazz 180nm CMOS imager process [3] and in an innovative modification of this process developed in collaboration with the foundry, aimed to fully deplete the sensitive epitaxial layer and enhance the tolerance to non-ionizing energy loss. Sensors fabricated in standard and modified process variants were characterized using radioactive sources, focused X-ray beam and test beams before and after irradiation. Contrary to sensors manufactured in the standard process, sensors from the modified process remain fully functional even after a dose of 10"1"5 n _e_q/cm"2, which is the the expected NIEL radiation fluence for the outer pixel layers in the future ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) [4].

  6. Effect of testing methods on the bond strength of resin to zirconia-alumina ceramic : microtensile versus shear test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, Luiz F.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Amaral, Regina; Vanderlei, Aleska; Bottino, Marco A.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested the bond strength of a resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-alumina ceramic after three conditioning methods and using two test methods (shear-SBS versus microtensile-MTBS). Ceramic blocks for MTBS and ceramic disks for SBS were fabricated. Three surface conditioning (SC)

  7. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  8. ADM guidance-Ceramics: Fracture toughness testing and method selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Della Bona, Alvaro; Scherrer, Susanne S; Tholey, Michael; van Noort, Richard; Vichi, Alessandro; Kelly, Robert; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-06-01

    The objective is within the scope of the Academy of Dental Materials Guidance Project, which is to provide dental materials researchers with a critical analysis of fracture toughness (FT) tests such that the assessment of the FT of dental ceramics is conducted in a reliable, repeatable and reproducible way. Fracture mechanics theory and FT methodologies were critically reviewed to introduce basic fracture principles and determine the main advantages and disadvantages of existing FT methods from the standpoint of the dental researcher. The recommended methods for FT determination of dental ceramics were the Single Edge "V" Notch Beam (SEVNB), Single Edge Precracked Beam (SEPB), Chevron Notch Beam (CNB), and Surface Crack in Flexure (SCF). SEVNB's main advantage is the ease of producing the notch via a cutting disk, SEPB allows for production of an atomically sharp crack generated by a specific precracking device, CNB is technically difficult, but based on solid fracture mechanics solutions, and SCF involves fracture from a clinically sized precrack. The IF test should be avoided due to heavy criticism that has arisen in the engineering field regarding the empirical nature of the calculations used for FT determination. Dental researchers interested in FT measurement of dental ceramics should start with a broad review of fracture mechanics theory to understand the underlying principles involved in fast fracture of ceramics. The choice of FT methodology should be based on the pros and cons of each test, as described in this literature review. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Updated FY12 Ceramic Fuels Irradiation Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is currently devoting resources to study of numerous fuel types with the aim of furthering understanding applicable to a range of reactors and fuel cycles. In FY11, effort within the ceramic fuels campaign focused on planning and preparation for a series of rabbit irradiations to be conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The emphasis of these planned tests was to study the evolution of thermal conductivity in uranium dioxide and derivative compositions as a function of damage induced by neutron damage. Current fiscal realities have resulted in a scenario where completion of the planned rabbit irradiations is unlikely. Possibilities for execution of irradiation testing within the ceramic fuels campaign in the next several years will thus likely be restricted to avenues where strong synergies exist both within and outside the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. Opportunities to augment the interests and needs of modeling, advanced characterization, and other campaigns present the most likely avenues for further work. These possibilities will be pursued with the hope of securing future funding. Utilization of synthetic microstructures prepared to better understand the most relevant actors encountered during irradiation of ceramic fuels thus represents the ceramic fuel campaign's most efficient means to enhance understanding of fuel response to burnup. This approach offers many of the favorable attributes embraced by the Separate Effects Testing paradigm, namely production of samples suitable to study specific, isolated phenomena. The recent success of xenon-imbedded thick films is representative of this approach. In the coming years, this strategy will be expanded to address a wider range of problems in conjunction with use of national user facilities novel characterization techniques to best utilize programmatic resources to support a science-based research program.

  10. Comparison of two bond strength testing methodologies for bilayered all-ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dundar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gokce, Bulent; Comlekoglu, Erhan; Leite, Fabiola; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    Objectives. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) and microtensile (MTBS) testing methodologies for core and veneering ceramics in four types of all-ceramic systems. Methods. Four different ceramic veneer/core combinations, three of which were feldspathic and the other a fluor-apatite to

  11. Monolithic spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Egert, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kahl, William K. (Knoxville, TN); Snyder, Jr., William B. (Knoxville, TN); Evans, III, Boyd M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlar, Troy A. (Knoxville, TN); Cunningham, Joseph P. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  12. Humidity Testing of PME and BME Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.; Herzberger, Jaemi

    2014-01-01

    Cracks in ceramic capacitors are one of the major causes of failures during operation of electronic systems. Humidity testing has been successfully used for many years to verify the absence of cracks and assure quality of military grade capacitors. Traditionally, only precious metal electrode (PME) capacitors were used in high reliability applications and the existing requirements for humidity testing were developed for this type of parts. With the advance of base metal electrode (BME) capacitors, there is a need for assessment of the applicability of the existing techniques for the new technology capacitors. In this work, variety of different PME and BME capacitors with introduced cracks were tested in humid environments at different voltages and temperatures. Analysis of the test results indicates differences in the behavior and failure mechanisms for BME and PME capacitors and the need for different testing conditions.

  13. Dynamic fatigue testing of Zerodur glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    1988-01-01

    The inherent brittleness of glass invariably leads to a large variability in strength data and a time dependence in strength. Leading rate plays a large role in strength values. Glass is found to be weaker when supporting loads over long periods of time as compared to glass which undergoes rapid leading. These properties complicate the structural design allowables for the utilization of glass components in an application such as Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The test methodology to obtain parameters which can be used to predict the reliability and life time of Zerodur glass-ceramic which is to be used for the mirrors in the AXAF is described.

  14. Observed Changes in As-Fabricated U-10Mo Monolithic Fuel Microstructures After Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Madden, James

    2017-12-01

    A low-enriched uranium U-10Mo monolithic nuclear fuel is being developed by the Material Management and Minimization Program, earlier known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, for utilization in research and test reactors around the world that currently use high-enriched uranium fuels. As part of this program, reactor experiments are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor. It must be demonstrated that this fuel type exhibits mechanical integrity, geometric stability, and predictable behavior to high powers and high fission densities in order for it to be a viable fuel for qualification. This paper provides an overview of the microstructures observed at different regions of interest in fuel plates before and after irradiation for fuel samples that have been tested. These fuel plates were fabricated using laboratory-scale fabrication methods. Observations regarding how microstructural changes during irradiation may impact fuel performance are discussed.

  15. Comparison of two bond strength testing methodologies for bilayered all-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoğlu, Erhan; Leite, Fabiola; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2007-05-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) and microtensile (MTBS) testing methodologies for core and veneering ceramics in four types of all-ceramic systems. Four different ceramic veneer/core combinations, three of which were feldspathic and the other a fluor-apatite to their respectively corresponding cores, namely leucite-reinforced ceramic ((IPS)Empress, Ivoclar), low leucite-reinforced ceramic (Finesse, Ceramco), glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina, Vita) and lithium disilicate ((IPS)Empress 2, Ivoclar) were used for SBS and MTBS tests. Ceramic cores (N=40, n=10/group for SBS test method, N=5 blocks/group for MTBS test method) were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (for SBS: thickness, 3mm; diameter, 5mm and for MTBS: 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm) and ultrasonically cleaned. The veneering ceramics (thickness: 2mm) were vibrated and condensed in stainless steel moulds and fired onto the core ceramic materials. After trying the specimens in the mould for minor adjustments, they were again ultrasonically cleaned and embedded in PMMA. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week and bond strength tests were performed in universal testing machines (cross-head speed: 1mm/min). The bond strengths (MPa+/-S.D.) and modes of failures were recorded. Significant difference between the two test methods and all-ceramic types were observed (P<0.05) (2-way ANOVA, Tukey's test and Bonferroni). The mean SBS values for veneering ceramic to lithium disilicate was significantly higher (41+/-8 MPa) than those to low leucite (28+/-4 MPa), glass-infiltrated (26+/-4 MPa) and leucite-reinforced (23+/-3 MPa) ceramics, while the mean MTBS for low leucite ceramic was significantly higher (15+/-2 MPa) than those of leucite (12+/-2 MPa), glass-infiltrated (9+/-1 MPa) and lithium disilicate ceramic (9+/-1 MPa) (ANOVA, P<0.05). Both the testing methodology and the differences in chemical compositions of the core and veneering ceramics

  16. Compatibility tests between Solar Salt and thermal storage ceramics from inorganic industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motte, Fabrice; Falcoz, Quentin; Veron, Emmanuel; Py, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ESEM and XRD characterizations have been performed. • Compatibility of these ceramics with the conventional binary Solar Salt is tested at 500 °C. • Tested ceramics have relevant properties to store thermal energy up to 1000 °C. • Feasibility of using ceramics as filler materials in thermocline is demonstrated. - Abstract: This paper demonstrates the feasibility of using several post-industrial ceramics as filler materials in a direct thermocline storage configuration. The tested ceramics, coming from several industrial processes (asbestos containing waste treatment, coal fired power plants or metallurgic furnaces) demonstrate relevant properties to store thermal energy by sensible heat up to 1000 °C. Thus, they represent at low-cost a promising, efficient and sustainable approach for thermal energy storage. In the present study, the thermo-chemical compatibility of these ceramics with the conventional binary Solar Salt is tested at medium temperature (500 °C) under steady state. In order to determine the feasibility of using such ceramics as filler material, Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) characterizations have been performed to check for their chemical and structural evolution during corrosion tests. The final objective is to develop a molten salt thermocline direct storage system using low-cost shaped ceramic as structured filler material. Most of the tested ceramics present an excellent corrosion resistance in molten Solar Salt and should significantly decrease the current cost of concentrated solar thermal energy storage system

  17. Wear properties of alumina/zirconia composite ceramics for joint prostheses measured with an end-face apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yusuke; Nakata, Kenichi; Kim, Yoon-Ho; Sekino, Tohru; Niihara, Koichi; Ikeuchi, Ken

    2004-01-01

    While only alumina is applied to all-ceramic joint prostheses at present, a stronger ceramic is required to prevent fracture and chipping due to impingement and stress concentration. Zirconia could be a potential substitute for alumina because it has high strength and fracture toughness. However, the wear of zirconia/zirconia combination is too high for clinical use. Although some investigations on composite ceramics revealed that mixing of different ceramics was able to improve the mechanical properties of ceramics, there are few reports about wear properties of composite ceramics for joint prosthesis. Since acetabular cup and femoral head of artificial hip joint are finished precisely, they indicate high geometric conformity. Therefore, wear test under flat contact was carried out with an end-face wear testing apparatus for four kinds of ceramics: alumina monolith, zirconia monolith, alumina-based composite ceramic, and zirconia based composite ceramic. Mean contact pressure was 10 MPa and sliding velocity was 40 mm/s. The wear test continued for 72 hours and total sliding distance was 10 km. After the test, the wear factor was calculated. Worn surfaces were observed with a scanning electron micrograph (SEM). The results of this wear test show that the wear factors of the both composite ceramics are similarly low and their mechanical properties are much better than those of the alumina monolith and the zirconia monolith. According to these results, it is predicted that joint prostheses of the composite ceramics are safer against break down and have longer lifetime compared with alumina/alumina joint prostheses.

  18. Test beam measurement of the first prototype of the fast silicon pixel monolithic detector for the TT-PET project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolozzi, L.; Bandi, Y.; Benoit, M.; Cardarelli, R.; Débieux, S.; Forshaw, D.; Hayakawa, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Kaynak, M.; Miucci, A.; Nessi, M.; Ratib, O.; Ripiccini, E.; Rücker, H.; Valerio, P.; Weber, M.

    2018-04-01

    The TT-PET collaboration is developing a PET scanner for small animals with 30 ps time-of-flight resolution and sub-millimetre 3D detection granularity. The sensitive element of the scanner is a monolithic silicon pixel detector based on state-of-the-art SiGe BiCMOS technology. The first ASIC prototype for the TT-PET was produced and tested in the laboratory and with minimum ionizing particles. The electronics exhibit an equivalent noise charge below 600 e‑ RMS and a pulse rise time of less than 2 ns , in accordance with the simulations. The pixels with a capacitance of 0.8 pF were measured to have a detection efficiency greater than 99% and, although in the absence of the post-processing, a time resolution of approximately 200 ps .

  19. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  20. A novel photocatalytic monolith reactor for multiphase heterogeneous photocatalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, P.; Carneiro, J.T.; Moulijn, J.A.; Mul, Guido

    2008-01-01

    A novel reactor for multi-phase photocatalysis is presented, the so-called internally illuminated monolith reactor (IIMR). In the concept of the IIMR, side light emitting fibers are placed inside the channels of a ceramic monolith, equipped with a TiO2 photocatalyst coated on the wall of each

  1. A Monolithic Perovskite Structure for Use as a Magnetic Regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Clemens, Frank; Menon, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A La0.67Ca0.26Sr0.07Mn1.05O3 (LCSM) perovskite was prepared for the first time as a ceramic monolithic regenerator used in a regenerative magnetic refrigeration device. The parameters influencing the extrusion process and the performance of the regenerator, such as the nature of the monolith paste...

  2. Thermal shock testing of ceramics with pulsed laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, R.; Naoumidis, A.; Nickel, H.

    1986-04-01

    Arguments are presented showing that the resistance to thermal stressing (''thermal shock'') under pulsed thermal energy deposition by various kinds of beam irradiations is approximately proportional to Φ a √tp, where Φ a is the absorbed power density and tp is the pulse length, under conditions of diffusivity controlled spreading of heat. In practical beam irradiation testing, incident power density, Φ, is reported. To evaluate the usefulness of Φ√tp as an approximation to Φ a √tp, damage threshold values are reviewed for different kinds of beams (electron, proton, and laser) for a range of tp values 5x10 -6 to 2 s. Ruby laser beam irradiation tests were made on the following ceramics: AlN, BN, graphite, αSiC, β-SiC coated graphites, (α+β)Si 3 N 4 , CVD (chemical vapor deposition) TiC coated graphite, CVD TiC coated Mo, and CVD TiN coated IN 625. The identified failure mechanisms are: 1. plastic flow followed by tensile and bend fracturing, 2. chemical decomposition, 3. melting, and 4. loss by thermal spallation. In view of the theoretical approximations and the neglect of reflection losses there is reasonable accord between the damage threshold Φ√tp values from the laser, electron, and proton beam tests. (orig./IHOE)

  3. Construction and Testing of a 21 GHz Ceramic Based Power Extractor

    CERN Document Server

    Newsham, D; Carron, G; Döbert, Steffen; Gai, W; Konecny, R; Liu, W; Smirnov, A Yu; Thorndahl, L; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter; Yu, D

    2003-01-01

    A ceramic based power extractor [1] operating at 21 GHz was built by DULY Research Inc. and tested at CTF2, the CERN Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility. The structure includes a ceramic extractor section, a 2-output-port, circular-to-rectangular waveguide coupler, and a 3-port rectangular waveguide combiner that provides for a single output waveguide. Results of cold tests and full beam tests are presented and compared with theoretical and numerical models.

  4. Hydroxylated ceramic waste forms and the absurdity of leach tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R; Odoj, R; Merz, E [eds.

    1981-06-01

    The repository pressure and temperature conditions during the thermal period projected in US repositories have been drastically lowered in the last year or two to new values of say 175 +- 50/sup 0/K. Using the argument that the evidence from natural models indicates the most stable mineral (= ceramic) hosts for radionuclides, one finds that under these new repository conditions such crystalline assemblages would be micas, clays, zeolites and other hydrated minerals, plus the tetravalent anhydrous oxide families. A waste form consisting of specific hydroxylated candidate phases can be made via a simple in-can technology (demonstrated by Oak Ridge) by reacting liquid wastes with precursor gels or phyllo or tektosilicates at <200/sup 0/C under modest pressure within the final disposal canister. The data on the rate of reaction of typical oxide materials to yield hydroxylated phases under these conditions show that the typical leach test (at 25 to 100/sup 0/C in deionized water) does not provide a simulation of the reactions which will occur. Hence such tests are not only totally meaningless with respect to qualifying a waste form for its role in a repository, they can be downright misleading.

  5. Hydroxylated ceramic waste forms and the absurdity of 'leach tests'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R; Odoj, R; Merz, E [eds.

    1981-06-01

    The repository pressure and temperature conditions during the thermal period projected in U.S. repositories have been drastically lowered in the last year or two to new values of say 175 +- 50 K. Using the argument that the evidence from natural models indicates the most stable mineral (= ceramic) hosts for radionuclides, one finds that under these new repository conditions such crystalline assemblages would be micas, clays, zeolites, and other hydrated minerals, plus the tetravalent anhydrous oxide families. A waste form consisting of specific hydroxylated candidate phase can be made via a simple in-can technology (demonstrated by Oak Ridge) by reacting liquid wastes with precursor gels or phyllo or tektosilicates at <200/sup 0/C under modest pressure within the final disposal canister. The data on the rate of reaction of typical oxide materials to yield hydroxylated phases under these conditions show that the typical leach test (at 25-100/sup 0/C in deionized water) does not provide a simulation of the reactions which will occur. Hence such tests are not only totally meaningless with respect to qualifying a waste form for its role in a repository, they can be downright misleading.

  6. Transmission of Er:YAG laser through different dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Tugrul; Tuncel, Ilkin; Usumez, Aslihan; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser transmission ratio through different dental ceramics with different thicknesses. Laser debonding procedure of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations is based on the transmission of laser energy through the ceramic and the ablation of resin cement, because of the transmitted laser energy. Five different dental ceramics were evaluated in this study: sintered zirconium-oxide core ceramic, monolithic zirconium-oxide ceramic, feldspathic ceramic, leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, and lithium disilicate-reinforced glass ceramic. Two ceramic discs with different thicknesses (0.5 and 1 mm) were fabricated for each group. Ceramic discs were placed between the sensor membrane of the laser power meter and the tip of the contact handpiece of an Er:YAG laser device with the aid of a custom- made acrylic holder. The transmission ratio of Er:YAG laser energy (500 mJ, 2 Hz, 1 W, 1000 μs) through different ceramic discs was measured with the power meter. Ten measurements were made for each group and the results were analyzed with two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) tests. The highest transmission ratio was determined for lithium disilicate-reinforced ceramic with 0.5 mm thickness (88%) and the lowest was determined for feldspathic ceramic with 1 mm thickness (44%). The differences among the different ceramics and between the different thicknesses were significant (pCeramic type and thickness should be taken into consideration to adjust the laser irradiation parameters during laser debonding of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations.

  7. Computer-aided, single-specimen controlled bending test for fracture-kinetics measurement in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovik, V.G.; Chushko, V.M.; Kovalev, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    Fracture testing of ceramics by using controlled crack growth is proposed to allow study of crack-kinetics behavior under a given loading history. A computer-aided, real-time data acquisition system improves the quality of crack-growth parameters obtained in a simple, single-specimen bend test. Several ceramic materials were tested in the present study: aluminum nitride as a linear-elastic material; and alumina and yttria-stabilized zirconia, both representative of ceramics with microstructure-dependent nonlinear fracture properties. Ambiguities in the crack-growth diagrams are discussed to show the importance of accounting for crack-growth history in correctly describing nonequilibrium fracture behavior

  8. Analysis of test beam data of ALPIDE, the final Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) prototype for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Emriskova, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE collaboration is currently preparing a major upgrade of its apparatus, planned for installation during the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider in 2019-20. The main pillar of the upgrade is the replacement of the current Inner Tracking System (ITS) with a new, low-material, high resolution silicon pixel detector, made of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This technology, combining front-end circuitry and sensitive layer in a single device, will lead to a higher granularity of the detector and therefore a better pointing resolution. The silicon pixel chips, called ALPIDEs, developed specifically for the new ITS, are currently characterized using test beams. A part of this characterization is presented in this work. The project involves the very first analysis of test beam data with inclined tracks. The tested ALPIDE is rotated with respect to the beam, hence the particles cross the chip with an inclined incidence angle. The influence of these rotations on the efficiency profile...

  9. Modern Nondestructive Test Methods for Army Ceramic Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strand, Douglas J

    2008-01-01

    .... Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are potentially good high-temperature structural materials because of their low density, high elastic moduli, high strength, and for those with weak interfaces, surprisingly good damage tolerance...

  10. The development and testing of ceramic components in piston engines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEntire, B.J. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.; Willis, R.W.; Southam, R.E. [TRW, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Within the past 10--15 years, ceramic hardware has been fabricated and tested in a number of piston engine applications including valves, piston pins, roller followers, tappet shims, and other wear components. It has been shown that, with proper design and installation, ceramics improve performance, fuel economy, and wear and corrosion resistance. These results have been obtained using rig and road tests on both stock and race engines. Selected summaries of these tests are presented in this review paper.

  11. Structural response testing of thermal barrier load-bearing ceramic pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.E.; Luci, R.K.; Pickering, J.L.; Oland, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    A load bearing insulating structure for use in a HTGR was investigated. The structure was composed of dense ceramic materials in the form of circular pads arranged in a stack. Specifically, the test program was structured to investigate the isolation effectiveness of interface materials placed between the ceramic pads to reduce the effectiveness of mechanically induced loads. The tests were conducted at room temperature using tapered loading platens on single ceramic pads. Seventeen alumina specimens, representing two types of material and two thicknesses, were tested. Three interface material thicknesses were introduced using silica cloth and graphite foil. Pre and post test nondestructive examinations were conducted in an effort to identify potential damage-inducing anomalies in the ceramic pads. A total of 62 tests was conducted with all specimens eventually loaded to failure. (orig./HP)

  12. Considerations on Dop (Depth Of Penetration) Test for Evaluation of Ceramics Materials Used in Ballistic Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Ioan-Dan; Dobriţa, Florin

    2017-12-01

    Tremendous amount of funds and other resorces were invested in studying the response of ceramic materials under ballistic impact, the main goal being to find a way to increase the protection of soldiers and the vehicles used in the modern battlespace. Using of ceramic materials especially carbon based (carbides), nitrogen based (nitrides) and oxygen based (oxides) ceramics in order to increase the protection level of ballistic equipment could be, sometimes, a big challenge when trying to use the proper test in order to evaluate and compare their performances. The role of the tests is to provide a better understanding of their response in different situations and, as a consequence, to make them more efficient as armour components through future improvements. The paper presents shortly the main tests which are used and eventually standardised for evaluating the ballistic behaviour of the ceramics and other armour components, with a special focus to DOP (Depth of Penetration) Tests.

  13. Tests with ceramic waste form materials made by pressureless consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Hash, M. C.; Hebden, A. S.; Ebert, W. L.

    2002-01-01

    A multiphase waste form referred to as the ceramic waste form (CWF) will be used to immobilize radioactively contaminated salt wastes recovered after the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel. The CWF is made by first occluding salt in zeolite and then encapsulating the zeolite in a borosilicate binder glass. A variety of surrogate CWF materials were made using pressureless consolidation (PC) methods for comparison with CWF consolidated using a hot isostatic press (HIP) method and to study the effects of glass/zeolite batching ratio and processing conditions on the physical and chemical properties of the resulting materials. The data summarized in this report will also be used to support qualification of the PC CWF for disposal in the proposed federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The phase composition and microstructure of HIP CWF and PC CWF are essentially identical: both are composed of about 70% sodalite, 25% binder glass, and a 5% total of inclusion phases (halite, nepheline, and various oxides and silicates). The primary difference is that PC CWF materials have higher porosities than HIP CWFs. The product consistency test (PCT) that was initially developed to monitor homogeneous glass waste forms was used to measure the chemical durabilities of the CWF materials. Series of replicate tests with several PC CWF materials indicate that the PCT can be conducted with the same precision with CWF materials as with borosilicate glasses. Short-term (7-day) PCTs were used to evaluate the repeatability of making the PC CWF and the effects of the glass/zeolite mass ratio, process temperature, and processing time on the chemical durability. Long-term (up to 1 year) PCTs were used to compare the durabilities of HIP and PC CWFs and to estimate the apparent solubility limit for the PC CWF that is needed for modeling. The PC and HIP CWF materials had similar disabilities, based on the release of silicon in long

  14. Accuracy of data processing in ceramics bend tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grushevskij, Ya.L.

    1979-01-01

    Described is the approximation and differentiation technique for loading-deformation charts being used to determine the bending strength of ceramics with provision for the nonlinearity of the deformation charts and differences in mechanical behaviuor of material during tension and compression. A relation between the strength calculation accuracy and experimental data reading errors has been established for such ceramic mateirals as Al 2 O 3 +15 % ZrSiO 4 , Y 2 O 3 +2.8% Al, etc. The negligence of the found aspects of mechanical material behaviuor was shown to result in errors two or three times higher than those introduced by the experiment results processing method

  15. Standardization Efforts for Mechanical Testing and Design of Advanced Ceramic Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems occasionally require the use of very brittle materials such as sapphire and ultra-high temperature ceramics. Although great progress has been made in the development of methods and standards for machining, testing and design of component from these materials, additional development and dissemination of standard practices is needed. ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics and ISO TC 206 have taken a lead role in the standardization of testing for ceramics, and recent efforts and needs in standards development by Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics will be summarized. In some cases, the engineers, etc. involved are unaware of the latest developments, and traditional approaches applicable to other material systems are applied. Two examples of flight hardware failures that might have been prevented via education and standardization will be presented.

  16. Small-scale Specimen Testing of Monolithic U-Mo Fuel Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Douglas E. Burkes; James I. Cole; Indrajit Charit; Daniel M. Wachs

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a shear punch testing (SPT) procedure and standardize it to evaluate the mechanical properties of irradiated fuels in a hot-cell so that the tensile behavior can be predicted using small volumes of material and at greatly reduced irradiation costs. This is highly important in the development of low-enriched uranium fuels for nuclear research and test reactors. The load-displacement data obtained using SPT can be interpreted in terms of and correlated with uniaxial mechanical properties. In order to establish a correlation between SPT and tensile data, sub-size tensile and microhardness testing were performed on U-Mo alloys. In addition, efforts are ongoing to understand the effect of test parameters (such as specimen thickness, surface finish, punch-die clearance, crosshead velocity and carbon content) on the measured mechanical properties, in order to rationalize the technique, prior to employing it on a material of unknown strength.

  17. Small-scale Specimen Testing of Monolithic U-Mo Fuel Foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Douglas E. Burkes; James I. Cole; Indrajit Charit; Daniel M. Wachs

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a shear punch testing (SPT) procedure and standardize it to evaluate the mechanical properties of irradiated fuels in a hot-cell so that the tensile behavior can be predicted using small volumes of material and at greatly reduced irradiation costs. This is highly important in the development of low-enriched uranium fuels for nuclear research and test reactors. The load-displacement data obtained using SPT can be interpreted in terms of and correlated with uniaxial mechanical properties. In order to establish a correlation between SPT and tensile data, sub-size tensile and microhardness testing were performed on U-Mo alloys. In addition, efforts are ongoing to understand the effect of test parameters (such as specimen thickness, surface finish, punch-die clearance, crosshead velocity and carbon content) on the measured mechanical properties, in order to rationalize the technique, prior to employing it on a material of unknown strength

  18. Numerical simulations of tests masonry walls from ceramic block using a detailed finite element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Salajka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with an analysis of the behaviour of brick ceramic walls. The behaviour of the walls was analysed experimentally in order to obtain their bearing capacity under static loading and their seismic resistance. Simultaneously, numerical simulations of the experiments were carried out in order to obtain additional information on the behaviour of masonry walls made of ceramic blocks. The results of the geometrically and materially nonlinear computations were compared to the results of the performed tests.

  19. Characterization and durability testing of a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S. G.

    1998-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a glass bonded ceramic waste form for encapsulating the fission products and transuranics from the conditioning of metallic reactor fuel. This waste form is currently being scaled to the multi-kilogram size for encapsulation of actual high level waste. This paper will present characterization and durability testing of the ceramic waste form. An emphasis on results from application of glass durability tests such as the Product Consistency Test and characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The information presented is based on a suite of tests utilized for assessing product quality during scale-up and parametric testing

  20. Quality assurance in ceramic materials and components. High-resolution non-destructive testing especially of ceramic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, H.; Hoffmann, B.; Morsch, A.; Arnold, W.; Schneider, E.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the influence of defects on the failure behavior of ceramic materials under four-point bending stress. In this connection various Si 3 N 4 and SiC materials with and without artificially introduced defect particles (Fe, WC, Si, pores) were examined by the following non-destructive test methods: photoacoustic microscopy, scanning laser acoustic microscopy, microfocus roentgenoscopy and ultrasound transit-time measurements. Finally, a four-point bending test and a fracture-mechanical evaluation of the fracture-incuding defects were carried out at the Institute for reliability and failure studies in mechanical engineering of the University of Karlsruhe. According to the type of stress the samples predominantly failed in the case of defects in the surface zone of the side in tension. Among the ndt methods applied the photoacoustic microscopy as a typical surface testing method could predict most of the fracture-inducing defects (30-50 %) without causing destruction. In this connection a different detection sensitivity which corresponds to the thermal reflection factors became apparent according to the type of defect. Furthermore the reports describes the results of some preliminary tests on ndt of green ceramics. In these investigations both the microfocus roentgenoscopy test and the roentgen computed tomography showed a high potential of detecting inhomogeneities and defects in green Si 3 N 4 and SiC components. (orig.) [de

  1. IDENTIFYING FRACTURE ORIGIN IN CERAMICS BY COMBINATION OF NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING AND DISCRETE ELEMENT ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senapati, Rajeev; Zhang Jianmei

    2010-01-01

    Advanced ceramic materials have been extensively applied in aerospace, automobile and other industries. However, the reliability of the advanced ceramics is a major concern because of the brittle nature of the materials. In this paper, combination of nondestructive testing and numerical modeling Discrete Element Method is proposed to identify the fracture origin in ceramics. The nondestructive testing--laser scattering technology is first performed on the ceramic components to reveal the machining-induced damage such as cracks and the material-inherent flaws such as voids, then followed by the four point bending test. Discrete Element software package PFC 2D is used to simulate the four point bending test and try to identify where the fractures start. The numerical representation of the ceramic materials is done by generating a densely packed particle system using the specimen genesis procedure and then applying the suitable microparameters to the particle system. Simulation of four point bending test is performed on materials having no defects, materials having manufacturing-induced defects like cracks, and materials having material-inherent flaws like voids. The initiation and propagation of defects is modeled and the mean contact force on the loading ball is also plotted. The simulation prediction results are well in accordance with the nondestructive testing results.

  2. An evaluation of arsenic release from monolithic solids using a modified semi-dynamic leaching test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermatas, Dimitris; Moon, Deok Hyun; Menounou, Nektaria; Meng, Xiaoguang; Hires, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Quicklime and quicklime-fly ash-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) effectiveness was evaluated by performing semi-dynamic leaching tests (American Nuclear Society 16.1). Artificial soil samples, contaminated with arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ) as well as field soil samples contaminated with arsenic (As) were tested. The artificial soils were prepared by mixing amounts of kaolinite or montmorillonite with fine quartz sand. The S/S effectiveness was evaluated by measuring effective diffusion coefficients (D e ) and leachability indices (LX). Treatment was most effective in kaolinite-based artificial soils treated with quicklime and in quicklime-fly ash treated field soils. The experimental results indicate that D e values were lowered as a result of S/S treatment. Upon treatment LX values were higher than 9, suggesting that S/S treated soils are acceptable for 'controlled utilization'. Based on a model developed by de Groot and van der Sloot [G.J. de Groot, H.A. van der Sloot, in: T.M. Gilliam, C.C. Wiles (Eds.), Stabilization and Solidification of Hazardous, Radioactive, and Mixed Wastes, vol. 2, ASTM STP 1123, ASTM, PA, 1992, p. 149], the leaching mechanism for all of the treated soils was found to be controlled by diffusion. The effect of soluble silica (Si) on As leachability was also evaluated. When soluble Si concentration was less than 1 ppm, As leachability was the lowest. The controlling mechanism of As immobilization whether sorption, precipitation, or inclusion was also evaluated. It was determined that precipitation was the dominant mechanism

  3. Large ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, W.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development. Ceramic-to-ceramic sealing has applications for several technologies that require large and/or complex vacuum-tight ceramic shapes. Information is provided concerning the assembly of complex monolithic ceramic shapes by bonding of subassemblies at temperatures ranging from 450 to 1500 0 C. Future applications and fabrication techniques for various materials are presented

  4. The history of ceramic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, S

    2000-01-01

    The history of ceramic filters is surveyed. Included is the history of piezoelectric ceramics. Ceramic filters were developed using technology similar to that of quartz crystal and electro-mechanical filters. However, the key to this development involved the theoretical analysis of vibration modes and material improvements of piezoelectric ceramics. The primary application of ceramic filters has been for consumer-market use. Accordingly, a major emphasis has involved mass production technology, leading to low-priced devices. A typical ceramic filter includes monolithic resonators and capacitors packaged in unique configurations.

  5. An investigation of high-temperature irradiation test program of new ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori; Terai, Takayuki; Oku, Tatsuo

    1999-08-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute entrusted the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with an investigation into the trend of irradiation processing/damage research on new ceramic materials. The present report describes the result of the investigation, which was aimed at effective execution of irradiation programs using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) by examining preferential research subjects and their concrete research methods. Objects of the investigation were currently on-going preliminary tests of functional materials (high-temperature oxide superconductor and high-temperature semiconductor) and structural materials (carbon/carbon and SiC/SiC composite materials), together with newly proposed subjects of, e.g., radiation effects on ceramics-coated materials and super-plastic ceramic materials as well as microscopic computer simulation of deformation and fracture of ceramics. These works have revealed 1) the background of each research subject, 2) its objective and significance from viewpoints of science and engineering, 3) research methodology in stages from preliminary tests to real HTTR irradiation, and 4) concrete HTTR-irradiation methods which include main specifications of test specimens, irradiation facilities and post-irradiation examination facilities and apparatuses. The present efforts have constructed the important fundamentals in the new ceramic materials field for further planning and execution of the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  6. Do sanitary ceramic workers have a worse presentation of chest radiographs or pulmonary function tests than other ceramic workers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chung Tsao

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: In this study, we found that sanitary ceramic workers were at a similar risk to other ceramic workers for moderate to severe silicosis when older age and longer working duration were accounted for.

  7. Monoliths in Bioprocess Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh Rajamanickam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic columns are a special type of chromatography column, which can be used for the purification of different biomolecules. They have become popular due to their high mass transfer properties and short purification times. Several articles have already discussed monolith manufacturing, as well as monolith characteristics. In contrast, this review focuses on the applied aspect of monoliths and discusses the most relevant biomolecules that can be successfully purified by them. We describe success stories for viruses, nucleic acids and proteins and compare them to conventional purification methods. Furthermore, the advantages of monolithic columns over particle-based resins, as well as the limitations of monoliths are discussed. With a compilation of commercially available monolithic columns, this review aims at serving as a ‘yellow pages’ for bioprocess engineers who face the challenge of purifying a certain biomolecule using monoliths.

  8. Acoustic emission as a screening tool for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Goberman, Dan; Holowczak, John

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are composite materials with ceramic fibers in a high temperature matrix of ceramic or glass-ceramic. This emerging class of materials is viewed as enabling for efficiency improvements in many energy conversion systems. The key controlling property of ceramic matrix composites is a relatively weak interface between the matrix and the fiber that aids crack deflection and fiber pullout resulting in greatly increased toughness over monolithic ceramics. United Technologies Research Center has been investigating glass-ceramic composite systems as a tool to understand processing effects on material performance related to the performance of the weak interface. Changes in the interface have been shown to affect the mechanical performance observed in flexural testing and subsequent microstructural investigations have confirmed the performance (or lack thereof) of the interface coating. Recently, the addition of acoustic emission testing during flexural testing has aided the understanding of the characteristics of the interface and its performance. The acoustic emission onset stress changes with strength and toughness and this could be a quality tool in screening the material before further development and use. The results of testing and analysis will be shown and additional material from other ceramic matrix composite systems may be included to show trends.

  9. FY 1992 Research and development of ceramic gas turbines. Reliability demonstration tests for ceramic members; 1992 nendo ceramic gas turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Ceramic buzai no shinraisei kakusho shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-05-01

    The creep rupture demonstration testing methods and non-destructive testing technologies are investigated for ceramic members, to promote development of ceramic gas turbines (CGT's), and the FY 1992 results are reported. For creep rupture demonstration testing methods, 3 types of silicon nitride as the CGT rotor materials are tested for tensile creep rupture at a rated temperature level (1200 degrees C) in the operating atmosphere (in the air), and applicability of the Larson-Miller method to ceramic members is investigated. It is found that Larson-Miller index, determined for each test temperature, is useful for explaining the test results, and analysis of the data by the Larson-Miller method is applicable to prediction of creep rupture life for specific members. For the non-destructive testing technologies to be applied to CGT members, the studied items include determination of white X-ray absorption coefficient by the film method and optimization of X-ray photographing, and the good results are produced. (NEDO)

  10. Effects of Polarization on Mechanical Properties of Lead Zirconate Titanate Ceramics Evaluated by Modified Small Punch Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qihuang; Fan, Yuchi; Wang, Lianjun; Xiong, Zhi; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang; Zhang, Qinghong; Kawasaki, Akira; Jiang, Wan

    2012-01-01

    Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) ceramics were prepared by the conventional mixed oxide method, and the strength of the resultant PZT ceramics was evaluated using modified small punch (MSP) tests. Load-displacement curve test results showed that the crack-initiation and fracture strengths of PZT ceramics decreased after polarization. The effect of the polarization accelerated the fatigue properties of PZT ceramics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that microcracks were formed before the maximum load in the MSP test, and the first load drop corresponded to crack initiation.

  11. Non-destructive testing of ceramic materials using mid-infrared ultrashort-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S. C.; Qi, Hong; An, X. Y.; Ren, Y. T.; Qiao, Y. B.; Ruan, Liming M.

    2018-04-01

    The non-destructive testing (NDT) of ceramic materials using mid-infrared ultrashort-pulse laser is investigated in this study. The discrete ordinate method is applied to solve the transient radiative transfer equation in 2D semitransparent medium and the emerging radiative intensity on boundary serves as input for the inverse analysis. The sequential quadratic programming algorithm is employed as the inverse technique to optimize objective function, in which the gradient of objective function with respect to reconstruction parameters is calculated using the adjoint model. Two reticulated porous ceramics including partially stabilized zirconia and oxide-bonded silicon carbide are tested. The retrieval results show that the main characteristics of defects such as optical properties, geometric shapes and positions can be accurately reconstructed by the present model. The proposed technique is effective and robust in NDT of ceramics even with measurement errors.

  12. The ceramics industry and lead poisoning. Long-term testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, E; Rossi, A; Toffolo, D; Brighenti, F; Rosa, A; Caroldi, S

    1980-12-01

    The investigation evaluates the efficiency attributed to some measures (improvements in environment, individual health habits) in reducing the risk of lead poisoning in the ceramics industry. The evaluation of the average levels of lead in the blood of 154 exposed workers was carried out in four plants at a time interval of six to eight months. The study considers the variations in relation to possible measures brought about during the interval. A reduction of environmental risk was in effect shown by a clear improvement in the blood lead levels, which still, however, exceeded the internationally recommended limits in many of the subjects. It was concluded that further improvements can only be made by reducing the lead content of the glazes used.

  13. Comparative study of flexural strength test methods on CAD/CAM Y-TZP dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongxiang; Han, Jianmin; Lin, Hong; An, Linan

    2015-12-01

    Clinically, fractures are the main cause of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) 3 mol%-yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) all-ceramic dental restorations failure because of repetitive occlusal loading. The goal of this work is to study the effect of test methods and specimen's size on the flexural strength of five ceramic products. Both bi-axial flexure test (BI) and uni-axial flexure tests (UNI), including three-point flexure test (3PF) and four-point flexure test (4PF), are used in this study. For all five products, the flexural strength is as follows: BI > 3PF > 4PF. Furthermore, specimens with smaller size (3PF-s) have higher values than the bigger ones (3PF). The difference between BI and UNI resulted from the edge flaws in ceramic specimens. The relationship between different UNI (including 3PF-s, 3PF and 4PF) can be explained according to Weibull statistical fracture theory. BI is recommended to evaluate the flexural strength of CAD/CAM Y-TZP dental ceramics.

  14. Comparative study of flexural strength test methods on CAD/CAM Y-TZP dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongxiang; Han, Jianmin; Lin, Hong; An, Linan

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, fractures are the main cause of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) 3 mol%-yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) all-ceramic dental restorations failure because of repetitive occlusal loading. The goal of this work is to study the effect of test methods and specimen’s size on the flexural strength of five ceramic products. Both bi-axial flexure test (BI) and uni-axial flexure tests (UNI), including three-point flexure test (3PF) and four-point flexure test (4PF), are used in this study. For all five products, the flexural strength is as follows: BI > 3PF > 4PF. Furthermore, specimens with smaller size (3PF-s) have higher values than the bigger ones (3PF). The difference between BI and UNI resulted from the edge flaws in ceramic specimens. The relationship between different UNI (including 3PF-s, 3PF and 4PF) can be explained according to Weibull statistical fracture theory. BI is recommended to evaluate the flexural strength of CAD/CAM Y-TZP dental ceramics. PMID:26816646

  15. Standard test method for measuring waste glass or glass ceramic durability by vapor hydration test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 The vapor hydration test method can be used to study the corrosion of a waste forms such as glasses and glass ceramics upon exposure to water vapor at elevated temperatures. In addition, the alteration phases that form can be used as indicators of those phases that may form under repository conditions. These tests; which allow altering of glass at high surface area to solution volume ratio; provide useful information regarding the alteration phases that are formed, the disposition of radioactive and hazardous components, and the alteration kinetics under the specific test conditions. This information may be used in performance assessment (McGrail et al, 2002 (1) for example). 1.2 This test method must be performed in accordance with all quality assurance requirements for acceptance of the data. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practice...

  16. Testing and Modeling Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic (UHTC) Materials For Hypersonic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    Ridge, D. G. Fletcher, C. O. Asma , O. Chazot, and J. Thömel, “Oxidation of ZrB2-SiC Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composites in Dissociated Air...Fletcher, C. O. Asma , “Characterization of ZrB2-SiC Ceramics Tested by Plasma Stream Oxidation,” poster, 32 th International Conference...Fahrenholtz, W.G., Hilmas, G.E., Zhu, S.M., Ridge, J., Fletcher, D.G., Asma , C.O., and Thomel, J., "Oxidation of ZrB2-SiC Ultrahigh-Temperature

  17. Homogeneity test of the ceramic reference materials for non-destructive quantitative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Fong Songlin; Zhu Jihao; Feng Xiangqian; Xie Guoxi; Yan Lingtong

    2010-01-01

    In order to study elemental composition of ancient porcelain samples, we developed a set of ceramic reference materials for non-destructive quantitative analysis. In this paper,homogeneity of Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe contents in the ceramic reference materials is investigated by EDXRF. The F test and the relative standard deviation are used to treat the normalized net counts by SPSS. The results show that apart from the DY2 and JDZ4 reference materials, to which further investigation would be needed, homogeneity of the DH, DY3, JDZ3, JDZ6, GY1, RY1, LQ4, YJ1, YY2 and JY2 meets the requirements of ceramic reference materials for non-destructive quantitative analysis. (authors)

  18. Accelerated life testing and reliability of high K multilayer ceramic capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minford, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The reliability of one lot of high K multilayer ceramic capacitors was evaluated using accelerated life testing. The degradation in insulation resistance was characterized as a function of voltage and temperature. The times to failure at a voltage-temperature stress conformed to a lognormal distribution with a standard deviation approximately 0.5.

  19. Field testing of polymeric mesh and ash-based ceramic membranes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the initial findings of field testing of 2 low-cost membrane filters, viz. 30 ìm polymeric mesh and 2–6 ìm macroporous waste-ash based ceramic filter, in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) employing batch anoxic and aerobic conditions. The influent was raw wastewater from a residential complex ...

  20. Analysis of test beam data of ALPIDE, the Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Lazareva, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE experiment has scheduled a major upgrade of its experimen- tal apparatus for the Long Shutdown 2 of LHC in 2019-2020. Within this enterprise, CERN is strongly involved in the development of a novel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The ITS will be based on Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), a cutting-edge technology that will allow to improve the detector performance signicantly. The nal sensor, called ALPIDE, is in production since December 2016. This project is focused on the characterization of irradiated ALPIDE sensors.

  1. Piezoelectric displacement in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This Good Practice Guide is intended to aid a user to perform displacement measurements on piezoelectric ceramic materials such as PZT (lead zirconium titanate) in either monolithic or multilayer form. The various measurement issues that the user must consider are addressed, and good measurement practise is described for the four most suitable methods. (author)

  2. An investigation of neutron irradiation test on superplastic zirconia-ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Ishihara, Masahiro; Baba, Shinichi; Hayashi, Kimio

    2000-05-01

    A neutron irradiation test on superplastic ceramic materials at high temperature has been proposed as an innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). For the effective execution of the test, we reviewed the superplastic deformation mechanism of ceramic materials and discussed neutron irradiation effects on the superplastic deformation process of stabilized Tetragonal Zirconia Polycrystal (TZP), which is a representative superplastic ceramic material. As a result, we pointed out that the decrease in the activation energy for superplastic deformation is expected by the radiation-enhanced diffusion. We selected a fast neutron fluence of 5x10 20 n/cm 2 and an irradiation temperature of about 600degC as test conditions for the first irradiation test on TZP and decided to perform a preliminary irradiation test by the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). Moreover, we estimated the radioactivity of irradiated TZP and indicated that it is in the order of 10 10 Bq/g (about 0.3 Ci/g) immediately after irradiation to a thermal neutron fluence of 3x10 20 n/cm 2 and that it decays to about 1/100 in a year. (author)

  3. Three-Point Bending Tests of Zirconia Core/Veneer Ceramics for Dental Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Marrelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The mechanical strength and the surface hardness of commercially available yttrium-doped zirconia were investigated. Furthermore, a comparative study of eight different ceramic veneers, to be used for the production of two-layered all-ceramic restorative systems, was carried out. Materials and Methods. Four types of zirconia specimens were analyzed, according to a standard ISO procedure (ISO 6872. Besides, two-layered zirconia-veneer specimens were prepared for three-point bending tests. Results. A strong effect of the surface roughness on the mechanical strength of zirconia specimens was observed. Finally, a comparative study of eight commercially available veneering ceramics shows different modes of failure between the selected veneers. Conclusion. The results indicate that close attention should be paid to the preparation of zirconia-based crowns and bridges by CAD/CAM process, because surface roughness has an important effect on the mechanical strength of the material. Finally, the results of the mechanical tests on two-layered specimens represent an important support to the choice of the veneering ceramic.

  4. Beam test results of a monolithic pixel sensor in the 0.18 μm tower-jazz technology with high resistivity epitaxial layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattiazzo, S., E-mail: serena.mattiazzo@pd.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova IT 35131 (Italy); Aimo, I. [Politecnico di Torino and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Torino, Torino IT 10129 (Italy); Baudot, J. [Universitè de Strasbourg, IPHC, Strasbourg F67037 (France); CNRS, MMR7178, Strasbourg F67037 (France); Bedda, C. [Politecnico di Torino and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Torino, Torino IT 10129 (Italy); La Rocca, P. [Università di Catania and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Catania, Catania IT 95123 (Italy); Perez, A. [Universitè de Strasbourg, IPHC, Strasbourg F67037 (France); CNRS, MMR7178, Strasbourg F67037 (France); Riggi, F. [Università di Catania and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Catania, Catania IT 95123 (Italy); Spiriti, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati and Sezione di Roma 3, Roma IT 00146 (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN will undergo a major upgrade in the second Long LHC Shutdown in the years 2018–2019; this upgrade includes the full replacement of the Inner Tracking System (ITS), deploying seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). For the development of the new ALICE ITS, the Tower-Jazz 0.18 μm CMOS imaging sensor process has been chosen as it is possible to use full CMOS in the pixel and different silicon wafers (including high resistivity epitaxial layers). A large test campaign has been carried out on several small prototype chips, designed to optimize the pixel sensor layout and the front-end electronics. Results match the target requirements both in terms of performance and of radiation hardness. Following this development, the first full scale chips have been designed, submitted and are currently under test, with promising results. A telescope composed of 4 planes of Mimosa-28 and 2 planes of Mimosa-18 chips is under development at the DAFNE Beam Test Facility (BTF) at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) in Italy with the final goal to perform a comparative test of the full scale prototypes. The telescope has been recently used to test a Mimosa-22THRb chip (a monolithic pixel sensor built in the 0.18 μm Tower-Jazz process) and we foresee to perform tests on the full scale chips for the ALICE ITS upgrade at the beginning of 2015. In this contribution we will describe some first measurements of spatial resolution, fake hit rate and detection efficiency of the Mimosa-22THRb chip obtained at the BTF facility in June 2014 with an electron beam of 500 MeV.

  5. Beam test results of a monolithic pixel sensor in the 0.18 μm tower-jazz technology with high resistivity epitaxial layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattiazzo, S.; Aimo, I.; Baudot, J.; Bedda, C.; La Rocca, P.; Perez, A.; Riggi, F.; Spiriti, E.

    2015-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN will undergo a major upgrade in the second Long LHC Shutdown in the years 2018–2019; this upgrade includes the full replacement of the Inner Tracking System (ITS), deploying seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). For the development of the new ALICE ITS, the Tower-Jazz 0.18 μm CMOS imaging sensor process has been chosen as it is possible to use full CMOS in the pixel and different silicon wafers (including high resistivity epitaxial layers). A large test campaign has been carried out on several small prototype chips, designed to optimize the pixel sensor layout and the front-end electronics. Results match the target requirements both in terms of performance and of radiation hardness. Following this development, the first full scale chips have been designed, submitted and are currently under test, with promising results. A telescope composed of 4 planes of Mimosa-28 and 2 planes of Mimosa-18 chips is under development at the DAFNE Beam Test Facility (BTF) at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) in Italy with the final goal to perform a comparative test of the full scale prototypes. The telescope has been recently used to test a Mimosa-22THRb chip (a monolithic pixel sensor built in the 0.18 μm Tower-Jazz process) and we foresee to perform tests on the full scale chips for the ALICE ITS upgrade at the beginning of 2015. In this contribution we will describe some first measurements of spatial resolution, fake hit rate and detection efficiency of the Mimosa-22THRb chip obtained at the BTF facility in June 2014 with an electron beam of 500 MeV

  6. Beam test results of a monolithic pixel sensor in the 0.18 μm tower-jazz technology with high resistivity epitaxial layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiazzo, S.; Aimo, I.; Baudot, J.; Bedda, C.; La Rocca, P.; Perez, A.; Riggi, F.; Spiriti, E.

    2015-10-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN will undergo a major upgrade in the second Long LHC Shutdown in the years 2018-2019; this upgrade includes the full replacement of the Inner Tracking System (ITS), deploying seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). For the development of the new ALICE ITS, the Tower-Jazz 0.18 μm CMOS imaging sensor process has been chosen as it is possible to use full CMOS in the pixel and different silicon wafers (including high resistivity epitaxial layers). A large test campaign has been carried out on several small prototype chips, designed to optimize the pixel sensor layout and the front-end electronics. Results match the target requirements both in terms of performance and of radiation hardness. Following this development, the first full scale chips have been designed, submitted and are currently under test, with promising results. A telescope composed of 4 planes of Mimosa-28 and 2 planes of Mimosa-18 chips is under development at the DAFNE Beam Test Facility (BTF) at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) in Italy with the final goal to perform a comparative test of the full scale prototypes. The telescope has been recently used to test a Mimosa-22THRb chip (a monolithic pixel sensor built in the 0.18 μm Tower-Jazz process) and we foresee to perform tests on the full scale chips for the ALICE ITS upgrade at the beginning of 2015. In this contribution we will describe some first measurements of spatial resolution, fake hit rate and detection efficiency of the Mimosa-22THRb chip obtained at the BTF facility in June 2014 with an electron beam of 500 MeV.

  7. Development and testing of matrices for the encapsulation of glass and ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, J.W.; Brite, D.W.; Gurwell, W.E.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; Bunnell, L.R.; Gray, W.J.; Blair, H.T.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    This report details the results of research on the matrix encapsulation of high level wastes at PML over the past few years. The demonstrations and tests described were designed to illustrate how the waste materials are effected when encapsulated in an inert matrix. Candidate materials evaluated for potential use as matrices for encapslation of pelletized ceramics or glass marbles were categorized into four groups: metals, glasses, ceramics, and graphite. Two processing techniques, casting and hot pressing, were investigated as the most promising methods of formation or densification of the matrices. The major results reported deal with the development aspects. However, chemical durability tests (leach tests) of the matrix materials themselves and matrix-waste form composites are also reported. Matrix waste forms can provide a low porosity, waste-free barrier resulting in increased leach protection, higher impact strength and improved thermal conductivity compared to unencapsulated glass or ceramic waste materials. Glass marbles encapsulated in a lead matrix offer the most significant improvement in waste form stability of all combinations evaluated. This form represents a readily demonstrable process that provides high thermal conductivity, mechanical shock resistance, radiation shielding and increased chemical durability through both a chemical passivation mechanism and as a physical barrier. Other durable matrix waste forms evaluated, applicable primarily to ceramic pellets, involved hot-pressed titanium or TiO 2 materials. In the processing of these forms, near 100% dense matrices were obtained. The matrix materials had excellent compatibility with the waste materials and superior potential chemical durability. Cracking of the hot-pressed ceramic matrix forms, in general, prevented the realization of their optimum properties

  8. FY 1993 Research and development of ceramic gas turbines. Development of methods of testing and evaluating ceramic member bonding techniques; 1993 nendo ceramic gas turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Ceramic buzai setsugo gijutsu no shiken hyoka hoho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-01

    Studies are conducted to establish the methods of testing and evaluating applicability of ceramic-metal bonding for ceramic gas turbines, and the FY 1993 results are reported. The program involves measurement of residual stress by the X-ray method and durability tests for the joints of silicon nitride and austenitic stainless steel with copper as the intermediate layer, and analysis and classification of the strength/durability test results obtained until the previous fiscal year by the finite element method, to evaluate applicability of the joining. For the strength characteristics at high temperature, the test pieces tend to lose strength at 400 degrees C and higher, and high-temperature strength as cross-head displacement speed increases. The upper limit of bending strength at room temperature decreases as number of thermal cycles increases. The test pieces subjected to thermal cycles have a higher bending strength at high temperature than at room temperature. The results of the two-dimensional plasticity analysis of the residual stress in the joint by the finite element method are in good agreement with the results by the X-ray method. (NEDO)

  9. Experiments on a ceramic electrolysis cell and a palladium diffuser at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ohno, Hideo; Naruse, Yuji; Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.; Binning, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    A ceramic electrolysis cell and a palladium diffuser are developed in Japan and is tested with tritium in Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, in order to confirm the feasibility as possible upgrades for the fuel cleanup system (PCU). The ceramic electrolysis cell made of stabilized zirconia was operated at 630 0 C for an extended period with a mixture of 3% T 2 O in He carrier gas in the circulation system with oxidizing catalyst bed. The palladium diffuser was tested with circulated pure tritium gas at 280 0 C to verify the compatibility of the alloy with tritium, since the 3 He produced in the metal could cause a degradation. The isotopic effects were also measured for both devices

  10. Methacrylate monolithic columns functionalized with epinephrine for capillary electrochromatography applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Correa, Enrique Javier; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel

    2013-07-12

    Epinephrine-bonded polymeric monoliths for capillary electrochromatography (CEC) were developed by nucleophilic substitution reaction of epoxide groups of poly(glycidyl-methacrylate-co-ethylenedimethacrylate) (poly(GMA-co-EDMA)) monoliths using epinephrine as nucleophilic reagent. The ring opening reaction under dynamic conditions was optimized. Successful chemical modification of the monolith surface was ascertained by in situ Raman spectroscopy characterization. In addition, the amount of epinephrine groups that was bound to the monolith surface was evaluated by oxidation of the catechol groups with Ce(IV), followed by spectrophotometric measurement of unreacted Ce(IV). About 9% of all theoretical epoxide groups of the parent monolith were bonded to epinephrine. The chromatographic behavior of the epinephrine-bonded monolith in CEC conditions was assessed with test mixtures of alkyl benzenes, aniline derivatives and substituted phenols. In comparison to the poly(GMA-co-EDMA) monoliths, the epinephrine-bonded monoliths exhibited a much higher retention and slight differences in selectivity. The epinephrine-bonded monolith was further modified by oxidation with a Ce(IV) solution and compared with the epinephrine-bonded monoliths. The resulting monolithic stationary phases were evaluated in terms of reproducibility, giving RSD values below 9% in the parameters investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of Ceramic Material Produced From a Cold Crucible Induction Melter Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-30

    This report summarizes the results from characterization of samples from a melt processed surrogate ceramic waste form. Completed in October of 2014, the first scaled proof of principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test was conducted to process a Fe-hollandite-rich titanate ceramic for treatment of high level nuclear waste. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the CCIM material produced. Core samples at various radial locations from the center of the CCIM were taken. These samples were also sectioned and analyzed vertically. Together, the various samples were intended to provide an indication of the homogeneity throughout the CCIM with respect to phase assemblage, chemical composition, and chemical durability. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Hollandite and zirconolite were identified in addition to possible highly-substituted pyrochlore and perovskite. Minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs were also identified. Remarkably only minor differences were observed vertically or radially in the CCIM material with respect to chemical composition, phase assemblage, and durability. This recent CCIM test and the resulting characterization in conjunction with demonstrated compositional improvements support continuation of CCIM testing with an improved feed composition and improved melter system.

  12. Failure analysis of glass-ceramic insulators of shock tested vacuum (neutron) tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Eight investigative techniques were used to examine the glass-ceramic insulators in vacuum (neutron) tubes. The insulators were extracted from units that had been subjected to low temperature mechanical shock tests. Two of the three units showed reduced neutron output after these tests and an insulator on one of these two was cracked completely through which probably occurred during shock testing. The objective of this study was to determine if any major differences existed between the insulators of these tubes. After eight analyses, it was concluded that no appreciable differences existed. It appeared that cracking of the one glass-ceramic sample was initiated at inner-sleeve interface voids. For this sample, the interface void density was much higher than is presently acceptable. All insulators were made with glass-ceramic having a Na 2 O content of 4.6 wt%. An increased Na 2 O content will cause an increase in the coefficient of expansion and will reduce the residual stress level since the molybdenum has a higher coefficient of thermal expansion than the insulator. Thus, it is believed that a decrease in interface voids and an increase in Na 2 O should aid in reduced cracking of the insulator during these tests

  13. Standard Test Method for Bond Strength of Ceramic Tile to Portland Cement Paste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the ability of glazed ceramic wall tile, ceramic mosaic tile, quarry tile, and pavers to be bonded to portland cement paste. This test method includes both face-mounted and back-mounted tile. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Cold crucible induction melter test for crystalline ceramic waste form fabrication: A feasibility assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, Jake W., E-mail: jake.amoroso@srnl.doe.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Marra, James; Dandeneau, Christopher S. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brinkman, Kyle; Xu, Yun [Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Maio, Vince [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Webb, Samuel M. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94086 (United States); Chiu, Wilson K.S. [University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3139 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The first scaled proof-of-principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test to process a multiphase ceramic waste form from a simulated combined (Cs/Sr, lanthanide and transition metal fission products) commercial used nuclear fuel waste stream was recently conducted in the United States. X-ray diffraction, 2-D X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the fabricated CCIM material. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with a desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Primary hollandite, pyrochlore/zirconolite, and perovskite phases were identified in addition to minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs. The material produced in the CCIM was chemically homogeneous and displayed a uniform phase assemblage with acceptable aqueous chemical durability.

  15. Applicability study on a ceramic filter with hot-test conducted in a BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Shirai, T.; Wada, M.; Nakamizo, H.

    1991-01-01

    Radioactive crud removal and filtration performance recovery by backwashing were examined with a BWR plant pool water using a ceramic filter element, 0.1 micron in nominal pore size and 0.2m 2 in filtration area. Totally 1114 hours filter operation were accumulated. Ten backwashings were accomplished during the test period. The following results were obtained. (1) Radioactive crud concentration in the filter effluent remained below 10 5 Bq/m 3 . (2) Both pressure loss through the filter and dose rate at the filter vessel surface were recovered to the initial level by each backwashing. The surface dose rate after backwashing was approximately 0.01mSv/h. According to these test results, it is confirmed that the ceramic filter is appropriate for the treatment of highly crud concentrated radioactive liquid, which is generated in nuclear facilities, such as spent fuel reprocessing plants. (author)

  16. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  17. Achievement report for fiscal 1998. Research and development of ceramic gas turbine (Reliability verification test for ceramic members); 1998 nendo ceramic gas turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Ceramic buzai no shinraisei kakusho shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    For a ceramic gas turbine to achieve efficiency of 42%, materials capable of withstanding approximately 1300 degrees C are required. In fiscal 1998, the mechanism of creep deformation and life prediction are studied, with specimens exposed to a short-term high-stress conditions equivalent to a time to fracture of 1000h. It is known after studies in the past that, under a stress of approximately 240Mpa, the logarithmic values of the load stress and time to fracture may be described by two differently inclined straight lines. Strain is accurately measured by use of a CCD camera for the determination of a creep curve, and then stress indexes are worked out. It is then found that the stress indexes are 4 on the lower stress side of 260MPa and 11 on the higher stress side of the same. This enables the extrapolation of short-term creep fracture data for the prediction of long-term life. No large-scale reduction in resistance to creep due to changes in the crystal phase is not predicted. Longitudinal sound wave speeds are measured, and the result manifestly describes how the longitudinal sound wave speed slows down with the progress of creepage in the material. Reference is also made to international reports about the study of ceramics performance tests and evaluation methods, international joint studies about mechanical properties tests, and the international round robin test of material powder. (NEDO)

  18. Standard test method for determination of breaking strength of ceramic tiles by three-point loading

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of breaking strength of ceramic tiles by three-point loading. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  19. It's about time? Testing the Dawson ceramic seriation using luminescence dating, Southern Nasca Region, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn, KJ; Eerkens, JW; Lipo, C; Sakai, S; Schreiber, K

    2014-01-01

    Copyright © 2014 by the Society for American Archaeology. The Dawson seriation of Nasca ceramics has long been assumed to be an accurate marker of temporal changes in the pre-hispanic south coast of Peru. We test this assumption by directly dating a sample of sherds using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL). Our results suggest that while some phases of the seriation are valid chronological markers, others appear to be the result of factors other than time. We discuss the implications of ...

  20. Dynamic Brazilian Test for Mechanical Characterization of Ceramic Ballistic Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Scapin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to identify the tensile strength of alumina (Corbit98, by performing Brazilian tests at different loading rate. In this kind of test, generally used for brittle material in static loading conditions, a cylindrical specimen is diametrically compressed and failure is generated in the middle of the component as a consequence of a positive tensile stress. In this work, this experimental technique was applied also in dynamic loading conditions by using a setup based on the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. Due to the properties of the investigated material, among which are high hardness, high compressive strength, and brittle behaviour, some precautions were needed to assure the validity of the tests. Digital Image Correlation techniques were applied for the analysis of high framerate videos.

  1. arXiv Test beam measurement of the first prototype of the fast silicon pixel monolithic detector for the TT-PET project

    CERN Document Server

    Paolozzi, L.; Benoit, M.; Cardarelli, R.; Débieux, S.; Forshaw, D.; Hayakawa, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Kaynak, M.; Miucci, A.; Nessi, M.; Ratib, O.; Ripiccini, E.; Rücker, H.; Valerio, P.; Weber, M.

    2018-04-12

    The TT-PET collaboration is developing a PET scanner for small animals with  30 ps  time-of-flight resolution and sub-millimetre 3D detection granularity. The sensitive element of the scanner is a monolithic silicon pixel detector based on state-of-the-art SiGe BiCMOS technology. The first ASIC prototype for the TT-PET was produced and tested in the laboratory and with minimum ionizing particles. The electronics exhibit an equivalent noise charge below  600 e− RMS  and a pulse rise time of less than  2 ns , in accordance with the simulations. The pixels with a capacitance of  0.8 pF  were measured to have a detection efficiency greater than  99%  and, although in the absence of the post-processing, a time resolution of approximately  200 ps .

  2. Immobilization of transuranic sludge in glass-ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.M.; Schuman, R.P.; Flinn, J.E.

    1982-03-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effectiveness of glass-ceramic waste forms, particularly iron-enriched basalt, for immobilizing transuranic waste sludges from the Rocky Flats plant operations. Two sludges were used in the study - one was nonradioactive and the other contained approx. 2200 dps/mg of 241 Am. The glass-ceramic waste forms were produced from laboratory-scale melting operations with subsequent controlled cooling. The waste forms were examined to assess the microstructures which resulted from systematically varied compositions and controlled cooling sequences. Leach tests in deionized water were performed on small monolithic specimens of the various glass-ceramic materials. The test results showed a rather strong temperature dependence for leach rates. Also, for some of these materials, marked differences in the 241 Am leaching behavior were seen in measurements obtained on acidified versus neutral aliquots of the spent leachates. 8 figures, 12 tables

  3. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  4. Comparison of shear test methods for evaluating the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chae, Soyeon; Lee, Yunhee; Han, Geum-Jun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-11-01

    This study compared the sensitivity of three shear test methods for measuring the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic and evaluated the effects of surface treatment methods on the bonding. Polished zirconia ceramic (Cercon base, DeguDent) discs were randomly divided into four surface treatment groups: no treatment (C), airborne-particle abrasion (A), conditioning with Alloy primer (Kuraray Medical Co.) (P) and conditioning with Alloy primer after airborne-particle abrasion (AP). The bond strengths of the resin cement (Multilink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) to the zirconia specimens of each surface treatment group were determined by three SBS test methods: the conventional SBS test with direct filling of the mold (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) with resin cement (Method 1), the conventional SBS test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) using resin cement (Method 2) and the microshear bond strength (μSBS) test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 0.8 mm × 1 mm) using resin cement (Method 3). Both the test method and the surface treatment significantly influenced the SBS values. In Method 3, as the SBS values increased, the coefficients of variation decreased and the Weibull parameters increased. The AP groups showed the highest SBS in all of the test methods. Only in Method 3 did the P group show a higher SBS than the A group. The μSBS test was more sensitive to differentiating the effects of surface treatment methods than the conventional SBS tests. Primer conditioning was a stronger contributing factor for the resin bond to zirconia ceramic than was airborne-particle abrasion.

  5. Cytotoxicity of dental alloys, metals, and ceramics assessed by millipore filter, agar overlay, and MTT tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, G; Sletten, G; Dahl, J E

    2000-08-01

    Biocompatibility of dental materials is dependent on the release of elements from the materials. In addition, the composition, pretreatment, and handling of the materials influence the element release. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of dental alloys, metals, and ceramics, with specific emphasis on the effects of altering the composition and the pretreatment. By using cells from a mouse fibroblast cell line and the agar overlay test, Millipore filter test, and MTT test, cytotoxicity of various metals, metal alloys, and ceramics for dental restoration were studied. Effects of altering the composition of a high noble gold alloy and of pretreatment of a ceramic-bonding alloy were also studied. In addition, the release of elements into the cell culture medium by the materials studied was measured using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometer. The results of the MTT test were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Scheffé test at a significance level of P filter tests. For the MTT test, no significant differences were observed between these materials and controls, with the exception of JS C-gold and unalloyed titanium. The modified materials were ranked from "mildly cytotoxic" to "moderately cytotoxic" in the agar overlay and Millipore filter tests and from "noncytotoxic" to "moderately cytotoxic" in the MTT test. Thus, cytotoxicity was related to the alloy composition and treatment. The release of Cu and Zn seemed to be important for the cytotoxic effect. Alterations in the composition and the pretreatment can greatly influence the cytotoxicity, and the results stress the importance of carefully following the manufacturers' instructions when handling dental materials.

  6. Fission Product Release from Molten Pool: ceramic melt tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Yu.B.; Lopukh, D.B.; Petchenkov, A.Yu. [AO ' NP Sintez' , St. Petersburg (RU)] [and others

    1999-07-01

    Experimental results are presented on the volatilisation of UO{sub 2{+-}}{sub x}, SrO, BaO, CeO{sub 2} from corium melts. Corium melts were generated by high frequency induction melting in a cold crucible. The surface temperature of the melts was in the range from 1753 to 3023 K. Some results of the tests are discussed and a comparison with published data is made. (author)

  7. Secondary waste form testing: ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Ganga, R.; Gaviria, J.; Yusufoglu, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The cleanup activities of the Hanford tank wastes require stabilization and solidification of the secondary waste streams generated from the processing of the tank wastes. The treatment of these tank wastes to produce glass waste forms will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. Liquid wastes may include process condensates and scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids from the thermal waste treatment. The current baseline for solidification of the secondary wastes is a cement-based waste form. However, alternative secondary waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the secondary wastes. The Ceramicrete process has been demonstrated on four secondary waste formulations: baseline, cluster 1, cluster 2, and mixed waste streams. Based on the recipes provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the four waste simulants were prepared in-house. Waste forms were fabricated with three filler materials: Class C fly ash, CaSiO 3 , and Class C fly ash + slag. Optimum waste loadings were as high as 20 wt.% for the fly ash and CaSiO 3 , and 15 wt.% for fly ash + slag filler. Waste forms for physical characterizations were fabricated with no additives, hazardous contaminants, and radionuclide surrogates. Physical property characterizations (density, compressive strength, and 90-day water immersion test) showed that the waste forms were stable and durable. Compressive strengths were >2,500 psi, and the strengths remained high after the 90-day water immersion test. Fly ash and CaSiO 3 filler waste forms appeared to be superior to the waste forms with fly ash + slag as a filler. Waste form weight loss was ∼5-14 wt.% over the 90-day immersion test. The majority of the weight loss occurred during the initial phase of the immersion test, indicative of washing off of residual unreacted binder components from

  8. Secondary waste form testing : ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Ganga, R.; Gaviria, J.; Yusufoglu, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( ES)

    2011-06-21

    The cleanup activities of the Hanford tank wastes require stabilization and solidification of the secondary waste streams generated from the processing of the tank wastes. The treatment of these tank wastes to produce glass waste forms will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. Liquid wastes may include process condensates and scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids from the thermal waste treatment. The current baseline for solidification of the secondary wastes is a cement-based waste form. However, alternative secondary waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the secondary wastes. The Ceramicrete process has been demonstrated on four secondary waste formulations: baseline, cluster 1, cluster 2, and mixed waste streams. Based on the recipes provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the four waste simulants were prepared in-house. Waste forms were fabricated with three filler materials: Class C fly ash, CaSiO{sub 3}, and Class C fly ash + slag. Optimum waste loadings were as high as 20 wt.% for the fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3}, and 15 wt.% for fly ash + slag filler. Waste forms for physical characterizations were fabricated with no additives, hazardous contaminants, and radionuclide surrogates. Physical property characterizations (density, compressive strength, and 90-day water immersion test) showed that the waste forms were stable and durable. Compressive strengths were >2,500 psi, and the strengths remained high after the 90-day water immersion test. Fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3} filler waste forms appeared to be superior to the waste forms with fly ash + slag as a filler. Waste form weight loss was {approx}5-14 wt.% over the 90-day immersion test. The majority of the weight loss occurred during the initial phase of the immersion test, indicative of washing off of residual unreacted

  9. Authenticity test in ceramics and archaeological figures by thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez L, A.; Schaaf, P.; Filloy, L.

    1999-01-01

    At present exists quite a lot of false archaeological pieces which provokes doubts about the legitimacy of the pieces. In this work it is presented the Authenticity test by Thermoluminescence realized at the urn of the goddess 13 serpent of the zapotec culture of Oaxaca which is exposed in Mexico City. The original piece contains crystalline structures which present hardly the thermoluminescence phenomena by the presence of 238 U, 232 Th, and 40 K getting with this the form and intensity of the natural thermoluminescence curve of an archaeological piece which shows a Tl peak and allows to know so if it was made recently or not. (Author)

  10. Nondestructive Testing of Ceramic Hip Joint Implants with Laser Spot Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roemer J.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an application of laser spot thermography for damage detection in ceramic samples with surface breaking cracks. The measurement technique is an active thermographic approach based on an external heat delivery to a test sample, by means of a laser pulse, and signal acquisition by an infrared camera. Damage detection is based on the analysis of surface temperature distribution near the exciting laser spot. The technique is nondestructive, non-contact and allows for full-field measurements. Surface breaking cracks are a very common type of damage in ceramic materials that are introduced in the manufacturing process or during the service period. This paper briefly discusses theoretical background of laser spot thermography, describes the experimental test rig and signal processing methods involved. Damage detection results obtained with laser spot thermography are compared with reference measurements obtained with vibrothermography. This is a different modality of active thermography, that has been previously proven effective for this type of damage. We demonstrate that both measurement techniques can be effectively used for damage detection and quality control applications of ceramic materials.

  11. Structural integrity testing of glass-ceramic/molybdenum vacuum tube frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    In this study, vacuum tube subassemblies made of glass-ceramic insulators sealed to inner and outer molybdenum frames were loaded in compression to failure with a tensile test machine. Several factors were varied in processing these subassemblies. These factors included etching and nonetching of molybdenum piece parts, annealing and nonannealing of subassemblies, and vapor and non-vapor honing of insulators after sealing. After failure, the subassemblies were examined for fracture patterns. In most cases, fracture started at points near the lower portion of the inner sleeve-insulator interface. More load was carried by subassemblies having molybdenum piece parts that were acid etched. No difference appeared between the strength of subassemblies having annealed and nonannealed glass-ceramic insulators. Parts with vapor-honed insulators failed at substantially lower loads

  12. Accelerated Testing Methodology for the Determination of Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1997-01-01

    Constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing has been used for several decades to characterize slow crack growth behavior of glass and ceramics at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The advantage of constant stress-rate testing over other methods lies in its simplicity: Strengths are measured in a routine manner at four or more stress rates by applying a constant crosshead speed or constant loading rate. The slow crack growth parameters (n and A) required for design can be estimated from a relationship between strength and stress rate. With the proper use of preloading in constant stress-rate testing, an appreciable saving of test time can be achieved. If a preload corresponding to 50 % of the strength is applied to the specimen prior to testing, 50 % of the test time can be saved as long as the strength remains unchanged regardless of the applied preload. In fact, it has been a common, empirical practice in strength testing of ceramics or optical fibers to apply some preloading (less then 40%). The purpose of this work is to study the effect of preloading on the strength to lay a theoretical foundation on such an empirical practice. For this purpose, analytical and numerical solutions of strength as a function of preloading were developed. To verify the solution, constant stress-rate testing using glass and alumina at room temperature and alumina silicon nitride, and silicon carbide at elevated temperatures was conducted in a range of preloadings from O to 90 %.

  13. Accelerated Testing Methodology Developed for Determining the Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    Constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") testing has been used for several decades to characterize the slow crack growth behavior of glass and structural ceramics at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The advantage of such testing over other methods lies in its simplicity: strengths are measured in a routine manner at four or more stress rates by applying a constant displacement or loading rate. The slow crack growth parameters required for component design can be estimated from a relationship between strength and stress rate. With the proper use of preloading in constant stress-rate testing, test time can be reduced appreciably. If a preload corresponding to 50 percent of the strength is applied to the specimen prior to testing, 50 percent of the test time can be saved as long as the applied preload does not change the strength. In fact, it has been a common, empirical practice in the strength testing of ceramics or optical fibers to apply some preloading (<40 percent). The purpose of this work at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to study the effect of preloading on measured strength in order to add a theoretical foundation to the empirical practice.

  14. Characterization and testing of a 238Pu loaded ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S. G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will describe the preparation and progress of the effort at Argonne National Laboratory-West to produce ceramic waste forms loaded with 238 Pu. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent of damage, if any, that alpha decay events will play over time to the ceramic waste form under development at Argonne. The ceramic waste form is glass-bonded sodalite. The sodalite is utilized to encapsulate the fission products and transuranics which are present in a chloride salt matrix which results from a spent fuel conditioning process. 238 Pu possesses approximately 250 times the specific activity of 239 Pu and thus allows for a much shorter time frame to address the issue. In preparation for production of 238 Pu loaded waste forms 239 Pu loaded samples were produced. Data is presented for samples produced with typical reactor grade plutonium. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron micrographs and durability test results will be presented. The ramifications for the production of the 238 Pu loaded samples will be discussed

  15. Removal of bacteriophages with different surface charges by diverse ceramic membrane materials in pilot spiking tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambsch, B; Bösl, M; Eberhagen, I; Müller, U

    2012-01-01

    This study examines mechanisms for removal of bacteriophages (MS2 and phiX174) by ceramic membranes without application of flocculants. The ceramic membranes considered included ultra- and microfiltration membranes of different materials. Phages were spiked into the feed water in pilot scale tests in a waterworks. The membranes with pore sizes of 10 nm provided a 2.5-4.0 log removal of the phages. For pore sizes of 50 nm, the log removal dropped to 0.96-1.8. The membrane with a pore size of 200 nm did not remove phages. So, the removal of both MS2- and phiX174-phages depended on the pore size of the membranes. But apart from pore size also other factors influence the removal of phages. Removal was 0.5-0.9 log higher for MS2-phages compared with phiX174-phages. Size exclusion seems to be the major but not the only mechanism which influences the efficiency of phage removal by ceramic membranes.

  16. Field testing of a ceramic heat exchanger for heat recovery application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, M. S.

    1988-06-01

    AiResearch Company, Torrance, California, developed a 5 MMBtu/hr ceramic-metallic hybrid High Temperature Burner-Duct-Recuperator (HTBDR) system to recover energy from hot (up to 2500 F), dirty, and corrosive glue gas streams and preheat combustion air up to 2000 F. To reduce the cost and size of the ceramic recuperator, ceramic tubes with internal cruciform baffles were developed. The HTBDR system was tested on a 20 MMBtu/hr rotary forging furnace for about 2000 hours. To facilitate tube replacements, final design configuration uses horizontally mounted tubes. A maximum air preheat temperature of about 1916 F was achieved with a flue gas temperature of 2122 F. This represents fuel savings of about 30 to 50 percent (depending upon the amount of excess air) compared with an unrecuperated furnace. The overall design and operation of the recuperator proved to be successful up to the time of material failure. X ray diffraction of some failed components indicated that there was some residual Silicon in the interior regions and complete nitriding did not occur during the fabrication process. Degradation of failed components was probably caused by oxidation of residual silicon and by the stresses caused due to different coefficient of thermal expansion of various compounds during thermal cycling. A combination of severe and numerous thermal cycling coupled with incomplete nitriding was the most likely cause of material failure.

  17. Wear and Reactivity Studies of Melt infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, David C.; Ojard, Greg; Brewer, David N.

    2013-01-01

    As interest grows in the use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for critical gas turbine engine components, the effects of the CMCs interaction with the adjoining structure needs to be understood. A series of CMC/material couples were wear tested in a custom elevated temperature test rig and tested as diffusion couples, to identify interactions. Specifically, melt infiltrated silicon carbide/silicon carbide (MI SiC/SiC) CMC was tested in combination with a nickel-based super alloy, Waspaloy, a thermal barrier coating, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a monolithic ceramic, silicon nitride (Si3N4). To make the tests more representative of actual hardware, the surface of the CMC was kept in the as-received state (not machined) with the full surface features/roughness present. Test results include: scanning electron microscope characterization of the surfaces, micro-structural characterization, and microprobe analysis.

  18. Evaluation of the fracture resistance of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing monolithic crowns prepared in different cement thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagsoz, N Polat; Yanıkoglu, N

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) crowns that are prepared with different cement thickness. For this investigation, a human maxillary premolar tooth was selected. Master model preparation was performed with a demand bur under water spray. Master die was taken to fabricate 105 epoxy resin replicas. The crowns were milled using a CEREC 4 CAD/CAM system (Software Version, 4.2.0.57192). CAD/CAM crowns were made using resin nanoceramic, feldspathic glass ceramic, lithium disilicate, and leucite-reinforced ceramics. Each group was subdivided into three groups in accordance with three different cement thicknesses (30, 90, and 150 μm). Crowns milled out. Then RelyX ™ U200 was used as a luting agent to bond the crowns to the prepared samples. After one hour cementations, the specimens were stored in water bath at 37°C for 1 week before testing. Seven unprepared and unrestored teeth were kept and tested as a control group. A universal test machine was used to assume the fracture resistance of all specimens. The compressive load (N) that caused fracture was recorded for each specimen. Fracture resistance data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and two-factor interaction modeling test (α = 0.001). There are statistically significant differences between fracture resistances of CAD/CAM monolithic crown materials (P cement thickness is not statistically significant for fracture resistance of CAD/CAM monolithic crowns (P > 0.001). CAD/CAM monolithic crown materials affected fracture resistance. Cement thickness (30, 90, and 150 μm) was not effective on fracture resistance of CAD/CAM monolithic crowns.

  19. Solution exchange corrosion testing with the glass-zeolite ceramic waste form in demineralized water at 900C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    A ceramic waste form of glass-bonded zeolite is being developed for the long-term disposition of fission products and transuranic elements in wastes from the U.S. Department of Energy's spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. Solution exchange corrosion tests were performed on the ceramic waste form and its potential base constituents of glass, zeolite 5A, and sodalite as part of an effort to qualify the ceramic waste form for acceptance into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. Solution exchange tests were performed at 90 C by replacing 80 to 90% of the leachate with fresh demineralized water after set time intervals. The results from these tests provide information about corrosion mechanisms and the ability of the ceramic waste form and its constituent materials to retain waste components. The results from solution exchange tests indicate that radionuclides will be preferentially retained in the zeolites without the glass matrix and in the ceramic waste form, with respect to cations like Li, K, and Na. Release results have been compared for simulated waste from candidate ceramic waste forms with zeolite 5A and its constituent materials to determine the corrosion behavior of each component

  20. Achievement report for fiscal 1991. Research and development of ceramic gas turbine (Verification test on reliability of ceramic members); 1991 nendo ceramic gas turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Ceramic buzai no shinraisei kakusho shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-05-01

    Development has been advanced on a test method to verify reliability of ceramics members being the basic material. Specifically, discussions were given on 1) the creep fracture verification test method, and 2) non-destructive test methods applied to different parts of the CGT. In Item 1, tension creep rupture tests were given on three kinds of candidate materials (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) used in the rotors in the atmosphere and the rated temperature zone. The fatigue resistance coefficient and the stress coefficient from several hours to 1,000 hours were calculated from the analysis of rupture time relative to temperatures and load stresses and elongation of the test pieces. It was verified that the test results can be put into order by using coefficients derived by test temperatures. The temperature was centered around 1,200 degrees C, and the load stress was varied from several ten to several hundred MPa. In Item 2, development was made on a theory to quantify the ultrasonic effective beam diameter by using the reflective echo heights, making it possible to make the ultrasonic flaw detection method into a theorem. Defects with sizes from 70 to 200 {mu} m can be estimated with error rates from 10 to 20%. (NEDO)

  1. Non destructive evaluation of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.E. Jr

    1992-01-01

    While monolithic and composite ceramics have been successfully manufactured, inconsistencies in processing and the unpredictable nature of their failure have limited their use as engineering materials. The optimization of the processing and properties of ceramics and the structures, devices and systems made from them demand the innovative application of modern nondestructive materials characterization techniques to monitor and control as many stages of the production process as possible. This paper will describe the state-of-the-art of nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterization of monolithic ceramics and ceramic composites. Among the techniques to be discussed are laser ultrasonics, acoustic microscopy, thermography, microfocus and x-ray tomography, and micro-photoelasticity. Application of these and other nondestructive evaluation techniques for more effective and efficient real-time process control will result in improved product quality and reliability. 27 refs

  2. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  3. Testing of ceramic gas turbine components under service-like conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebmanns, W [Motoren- und Turbinen-Union G.m.b.H., Muenchen (Germany, F.R.)

    1978-08-01

    If all gas turbine components which are in contact with hot gas are manufactured from special ceramics (silicon nitride, silicon carbide), cycle and component temperatures can be increased up to 1600/sup 0/K. MTU is developing various components, such as combustor and turbine wheel, step by step until they are ready for service. At present, combustors are surviving comprehensive service-like cyclic tests in hot gas at atmospheric pressure (1000 h, 1000 starts per component) without damage. Tests above atmospheric pressure (5 bar) are underway. At MTU, a rotor wheel variant consisting of a metallic hub with inserted single blades is being constructed. The step to aerodynamically contoured airfoils will follow, as soon as the stress problems encountered in connection with the blade root are fully under control. The program will be completed in 1980 with a test run of a prototype turbine made from ceramic components developed by various companies under the leadership of the DFVLR (Aerospace Research and Testing Institute).

  4. Implementation Challenges for Sintered Silicon Carbide Fiber Bonded Ceramic Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, a number of fiber reinforced ceramic composites have been developed and tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. In addition to continuous fiber reinforced composites, other innovative materials have been developed including the fibrous monoliths and sintered fiber bonded ceramics. The sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics have been fabricated by the hot pressing and sintering of silicon carbide fibers. However, in this system reliable property database as well as various issues related to thermomechanical performance, integration, and fabrication of large and complex shape components has yet to be addressed. In this presentation, thermomechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics (as fabricated and joined) will be presented. In addition, critical need for manufacturing and integration technologies in successful implementation of these materials will be discussed.

  5. Development of piezoelectric ceramics driven fatigue testing machine for small specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Onishi, Y.; Nishino, T.

    2002-01-01

    A new fatigue testing machine with piezoelectric ceramics actuators was developed and a prototype was manufactured for high-cycle fatigue tests with small specimens. The machine has a simple mechanism and is compact. These features make it easy to set up and to maintain the machine in a hot cell. The excitation of the actuator can be transmitted to the specimen using a lever-type testing jig. More than 100 μm of displacement could be prescribed precisely to the specimen at a frequency of 50 Hz. This was sufficient performance for high-cycle bend fatigue tests on specimens irradiated at the SINQ target in Paul Scherrer Institute. The relationship of a displacement applied to the specimen and the strain of the necking part were obtained by experimental methods and by finite element method (FEM) calculations. Both results showed good agreement. This fact makes it possible to evaluate the strain of irradiated specimens by FEM simulations

  6. Damage Characterization of EBC-SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Imposed Thermal Gradient Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high temperature capabilities, Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components are being developed for use in hot-section aerospace engine applications. Harsh engine environments have led to the development of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for silicon-based CMCs to further increase thermal and environmental capabilities. This study aims at understanding the damage mechanisms associated with these materials under simulated operating conditions. A high heat-flux laser testing rig capable of imposing large through-thickness thermal gradients by means of controlled laser beam heating and back-side air cooling is used. Tests are performed on uncoated composites, as well as CMC substrates that have been coated with state-of-the-art ceramic EBC systems. Results show that the use of the EBCs may help increase temperature capability and creep resistance by reducing the effects of stressed oxidation and environmental degradation. Also, the ability of electrical resistance (ER) and acoustic emission (AE) measurements to monitor material condition and damage state during high temperature testing is shown; suggesting their usefulness as a valuable health monitoring technique. Micromechanics models are used to describe the localized stress state of the composite system, which is utilized along with ER modeling concepts to develop an electromechanical model capable of characterizing material behavior.

  7. Cyclic loading tests on ceramic breeder pebble bed by discrete element modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Guo, Haibing; Shi, Tao [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ye, Minyou [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Huang, Hongwen, E-mail: hhw@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Zhenghong, E-mail: inpcnyb@sina.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Methods of cyclic loading tests on the pebble beds were developed in DEM. • Size distribution and sphericity of the pebbles were considered for the specimen. • Mechanical responses of the pebble beds under cyclic loading tests were assessed. - Abstract: Complex mechanics and packing instability can be induced by loading operation on ceramic breeder pebble bed for its discrete nature. A numerical approach using discrete element method (DEM) is applied to study the mechanical performance of the ceramic breeder pebble bed under quasi-static and cyclic loads. A preloaded specimen can be made with servo-control mechanism, the quasi-static and dynamic stress-strain performances are studied during the tests. It is found that the normalized normal contact forces under quasi-static loads have the similar distributions, and increase with increasing loads. Furthermore, the relatively low volumetric strain can be absorbed by pebble bed after several loading and unloading cycles, but the peak normal contact force can be extremely high during the first cycle. Cyclic loading with target pressure is recommended for densely packing, irreversible volume reduction gradually increase with cycles, and the normal contact forces decrease with cycles.

  8. Cyclic loading tests on ceramic breeder pebble bed by discrete element modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hao; Guo, Haibing; Shi, Tao; Ye, Minyou; Huang, Hongwen; Li, Zhenghong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Methods of cyclic loading tests on the pebble beds were developed in DEM. • Size distribution and sphericity of the pebbles were considered for the specimen. • Mechanical responses of the pebble beds under cyclic loading tests were assessed. - Abstract: Complex mechanics and packing instability can be induced by loading operation on ceramic breeder pebble bed for its discrete nature. A numerical approach using discrete element method (DEM) is applied to study the mechanical performance of the ceramic breeder pebble bed under quasi-static and cyclic loads. A preloaded specimen can be made with servo-control mechanism, the quasi-static and dynamic stress-strain performances are studied during the tests. It is found that the normalized normal contact forces under quasi-static loads have the similar distributions, and increase with increasing loads. Furthermore, the relatively low volumetric strain can be absorbed by pebble bed after several loading and unloading cycles, but the peak normal contact force can be extremely high during the first cycle. Cyclic loading with target pressure is recommended for densely packing, irreversible volume reduction gradually increase with cycles, and the normal contact forces decrease with cycles.

  9. Fire resistance of prefabricated monolithic slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravit Marina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A prefabricated monolithic slab (PMS has a number of valuable advantages, they allow to significantly decrease the weight of construction keeping the necessary structural-load capacity, to speed up and cheapen work conduction, to increase the heat isolating properties of an enclosure structure [1]. In order to create a design method of prefabricated monolithic slab fire-resistance, it's necessary to perform a series of PMS testing, one of which is being described in this article. Subjected to the test is a fragment of prefabricated monolithic slab with polystyrene concrete inserts along the beams with bent metal profile 250 mm thick, with a 2.7 m span loaded with evenly spread load equal to 600 kg/m2. After 3 hour testing for fire-resistance [2] no signs of construction ultimate behavior were detected.

  10. Mechanical behavior of a ceramic matrix composite material. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Paul P.; Duke, John C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic ceramic materials have been used in industry for hundreds of years. These materials have proven their usefulness in many applications, yet, their potential for critical structural applications is limited. The existence of an imperfection in a monolithic ceramic on the order of several microns in size may be critical, resulting in catastrophic failure. To overcome this extreme sensitivity to small material imperfections, reinforced ceramic materials were developed. A ceramic matrix which has been reinforced with continuous fibers is not only less sensitive to microscopic flaws, but is also able to sustain significant damage without suffering catastrophic failure. A borosilicate glass reinforced with several layers of plain weave silicon carbide cloth (Nicalon) was studied. The mechanical testing which was performed included both flexural and tensile loading configurations. This testing was done not only to determine the material properties, but also to initiate a controlled amount of damage within each specimen. Several nondestructive testing techniques, including acousto-ultrasonics (AU), were performed on the specimens periodically during testing. The AU signals were monitored through the use of an IBM compatible personal computer with a high speed data acquisition board. Software was written which manipulates the AU signals in both the time and frequency domains, resulting in quantitative measures of the mechanical response of the material. The measured AU parameters are compared to both the mechanical test results and data from other nondestructive methods including ultrasonic C-scans and penetrant enhanced x ray radiography.

  11. Microindentation test for determining mechanical properties of corroded layers of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakui, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Tanabe, Yuji; Eto, Motokuni

    1999-01-01

    Microindentation tests on ceramics (Si-SiC, SiC, Al 2 O 3 and Si 3 N 4 ) immersed in boiling 95 wt% sulfuric acid for 100 or 1000 hours were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of their corroded layers. The thickness (T) of corroded layer on ceramics was evaluated in terms of characteristic depth (d) which was determined from the point of inflection on the Depth-Load/Depth curve by the microindentation test. The relationship between T and d was found to be given as T nearly equal 10d. Finite element analyses were performed to validate the relationship and to clarify the effects of mechanical properties of corroded layer and the indenter tip radius on the relationship as well. The mechanical properties [Young's modulus (E f ) and yield stress (σ yf )] of corroded layers of Al 2 O 3 and Si 3 N 4 were identified by fitting the predicted Depth-Load/Depth curve to the experimental data. (author)

  12. Monolitni katalizatori i reaktori: osnovne značajke, priprava i primjena (Monolith catalysts and reactors: preparation and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašić, V.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic (honeycomb catalysts are continuous unitary structures containing many narrow, parallel and usually straight channels (or passages. Catalytically active components are dispersed uniformly over the whole porous ceramic monolith structure (so-called incorporated monolithic catalysts or are in a layer of porous material that is deposited on the walls of channels in the monolith's structure (washcoated monolithic catalysts. The material of the main monolithic construction is not limited to ceramics but includes metals, as well. Monolithic catalysts are commonly used in gas phase catalytic processes, such as treatment of automotive exhaust gases, selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides, catalytic removal of volatile organic compounds from industrial processes, etc. Monoliths continue to be the preferred support for environmental applications due to their high geometric surface area, different design options, low pressure drop, high temperature durability, mechanical strength, ease of orientation in a reactor and effectiveness as a support for a catalytic washcoat. As known, monolithic catalysts belong to the class of the structured catalysts and/or reactors (in some cases the distinction between "catalyst" and "reactor" has vanished. Structured catalysts can greatly intensify chemical processes, resulting in smaller, safer, cleaner and more energy efficient technologies. Monolith reactors can be considered as multifunctional reactors, in which chemical conversion is advantageously integrated with another unit operation, such as separation, heat exchange, a secondary reaction, etc. Finally, structured catalysts and/or reactors appear to be one of the most significant and promising developments in the field of heterogeneous catalysis and chemical engineering of the recent years. This paper gives a description of the background and perspectives for application and development of monolithic materials. Different methods and techniques

  13. Comparing Titanium Release from Ceramic Tiles using a waste material characterization test - Influence of Calcium and Organic Matter concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heggelund, Laura Roverskov; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are beneficial in the building industry to enhance or add certain features to commonly used materials. One example is the use of nano-titanium dioxide in the surface coating of ceramic tiles, to make the tiles surface self-cleaning. At the end of life stage, ceramic tiles might...... to assess if nano-titanium dioxide coated ceramic tiles are suitable for depositing in a landfill or not. Specifically, we used compliance batch test method, which is a simple test evaluating the release from a solid material to an aqueous media during 24 hrs. If nano-Ti particles are released from solid...... immediately after the 24 hrs. test using single particle ICPMS and Transmission Electron Microscopy imaging. The preliminary results suggest that nanoparticulate titanium is released from both tiles – with and without nano-titanium dioxide coating. The size distributions of the released particles are similar...

  14. An overview of monolithic zirconia in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Malkondu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia restorations have been used successfully for years in dentistry owing to their biocompatibility and good mechanical properties. Because of their lack of translucency, zirconia cores are generally veneered with porcelain, which makes restorations weaker due to failure of the adhesion between the two materials. In recent years, all-ceramic zirconia restorations have been introduced in the dental sector with the intent to solve this problem. Besides the elimination of chipping, the reduced occlusal space requirement seems to be a clear advantage of monolithic zirconia restorations. However, scientific evidence is needed to recommend this relatively new application for clinical use. This mini-review discusses the current scientific literature on monolithic zirconia restorations. The results of in vitro studies suggested that monolithic zirconia may be the best choice for posterior fixed partial dentures in the presence of high occlusal loads and minimal occlusal restoration space. The results should be supported with much more in vitro and particularly in vivo studies to obtain a final conclusion.

  15. A monolithic silicon detector telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardella, G.; Amorini, F.; Cabibbo, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Fallica, G.; Franzo, G.; Figuera, P.; Papa, M.; Pappalardo, G.; Percolla, G.; Priolo, F.; Privitera, V.; Rizzo, F.; Tudisco, S.

    1996-01-01

    An ultrathin silicon detector (1 μm) thick implanted on a standard 400 μm Si-detector has been built to realize a monolithic telescope detector for simultaneous charge and energy determination of charged particles. The performances of the telescope have been tested using standard alpha sources and fragments emitted in nuclear reactions with different projectile-target colliding systems. An excellent charge resolution has been obtained for low energy (less than 5 MeV) light nuclei. A multi-array lay-out of such detectors is under construction to charge identify the particles emitted in reactions induced by low energy radioactive beams. (orig.)

  16. Imaging monolithic silicon detector telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorini, F.; Sipala, V.; Cardella, G.; Boiano, C.; Carbone, B.; Cosentino, L.; Costa, E.; Di Pietro, A.; Emanuele, U.; Fallica, G.; Figuera, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; La Guidara, E.; Marchetta, C.; Pappalardo, A.; Piazza, A.; Randazzo, N.; Rizzo, F.; Russo, G.V.; Russotto, P.

    2008-01-01

    We show the results of some test beams performed on a new monolithic strip silicon detector telescope developed in collaboration with the INFN and ST-microelectronics. Using an appropriate design, the induction on the ΔE stages, generated by the charge released in the E stage, was used to obtain the position of the detected particle. The position measurement, together with the low threshold for particle charge identification, allows the new detector to be used for a large variety of applications due to its sensitivity of only a few microns measured in both directions

  17. Study of Mechanical Characterization of Ceramic Specimens from a Brazilian Test Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iglesias, I.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Test is easy to perform and its result is the tensile strength of the material provided certain ratios are fulfilled between the diameter of the sample, the load bearing width and the characteristic length of the material. In this paper we present experimental results obtained from 8 mm-thick ceramic cylinders whose diameter was 40 mm in length. The cylinders were obtained from a standard type of clay by pressing and subsequent baking at 900 ºC. We made a complete mechanical characterization of the material, which included obtaining fracture properties, and a numerical simulation of the Brazilian test based on the cohesive crack model. Numerical results confirm that the size and boundary conditions chosen for the test are adequate to get the actual tensile strength of construction ceramics, which prove that this type of test is useful to compare the strength of several types of construction ceramics in a simple and convenient way. Besides, it requires a very small amount of material to prepare the specimen

    El ensayo de compresión diametral (ensayo Brasileño es un ensayo fácil de realizar que da como resultado la resistencia a tracción del material siempre que se cumplan una serie de proporciones entre el diámetro de la probeta, el ancho de reparto de la carga y la longitud característica del material. En este artículo presentamos unos resultados sobre probetas cerámicas cilíndricas de 40 mm de diámetro y 8 mm de espesor, elaboradas por prensado a partir de arcillas comunes y cocidas a 900 ºC. Se ha realizado una caracterización mecánica de dichas probetas, que incluye sus propiedades en fractura, y una simulación numérica del ensayo brasileño basada en el modelo de fisura cohesiva. Los resultados numéricos confirman que el tamaño y condiciones de contorno elegidos para el ensayo son apropiados para obtener la resistencia a tracción de este tipo de material cerámico con lo que este ensayo se convierte en

  18. Composite Laser Ceramics by Advanced Bonding Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin; Kamimura, Tomosumi; Honda, Sawao; Iwamoto, Yuji

    2018-02-09

    Composites obtained by bonding materials with the same crystal structure and different chemical compositions can create new functions that do not exist in conventional concepts. We have succeeded in bonding polycrystalline YAG and Nd:YAG ceramics without any interstices at the bonding interface, and the bonding state of this composite was at the atomic level, similar to the grain boundary structure in ceramics. The mechanical strength of the bonded composite reached 278 MPa, which was not less than the strength of each host material (269 and 255 MPa). Thermal conductivity of the composite was 12.3 W/mK (theoretical value) which is intermediate between the thermal conductivities of YAG and Nd:YAG (14.1 and 10.2 W/mK, respectively). Light scattering cannot be detected at the bonding interface of the ceramic composite by laser tomography. Since the scattering coefficients of the monolithic material and the composite material formed by bonding up to 15 layers of the same materials were both 0.10%/cm, there was no occurrence of light scattering due to the bonding. In addition, it was not detected that the optical distortion and non-uniformity of the refractive index variation were caused by the bonding. An excitation light source (LD = 808 nm) was collimated to 200 μm and irradiated into a commercial 1% Nd:YAG single crystal, but fracture damage occurred at a low damage threshold of 80 kW/cm². On the other hand, the same test was conducted on the bonded interface of 1% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics fabricated in this study, but it was not damaged until the excitation density reached 127 kW/cm². 0.6% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics showed high damage resistance (up to 223 kW/cm²). It was concluded that composites formed by bonding polycrystalline ceramics are ideal in terms of thermo-mechanical and optical properties.

  19. A Comprehensive Investigation of Facility Effects on the Testing of High-Power Monolithic and Clustered Hall Thruster Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallimore, Alec D; Walker, Mitchell M; Beal, Brian E; Smith, Timothy B

    2006-01-01

    .... It is difficult for researchers to make adequate comparisons between data sets because of both differences in instrumentation and back pressures due to the wide range of facilities used in Hall thruster testing...

  20. First tests of CHERWELL, a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor: A CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) using 180 nm technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mylroie-Smith, James, E-mail: j.mylroie-smith@qmul.ac.uk [Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Kolya, Scott; Velthuis, Jaap [University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Bevan, Adrian; Inguglia, Gianluca [Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Headspith, Jon; Lazarus, Ian; Lemon, Roy [Daresbury Laboratory, STFC (United Kingdom); Crooks, Jamie; Turchetta, Renato; Wilson, Fergus [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-11

    The Cherwell is a 4T CMOS sensor in 180 nm technology developed for the detection of charged particles. Here, the different test structures on the sensor will be described and first results from tests on the reference pixel variant are shown. The sensors were shown to have a noise of 12 e{sup −} and a signal to noise up to 150 in {sup 55}Fe.

  1. Selective oxidation of cyclohexene through gold functionalized silica monolith microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed T.; Taylor, Martin J.; Liu, Dan; Beaumont, Simon K.; Kyriakou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Two simple, reproducible methods of preparing evenly distributed Au nanoparticle containing mesoporous silica monoliths are investigated. These Au nanoparticle containing monoliths are subsequently investigated as flow reactors for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene. In the first strategy, the silica monolith was directly impregnated with Au nanoparticles during the formation of the monolith. The second approach was to pre-functionalize the monolith with thiol groups tethered within the silica mesostructure. These can act as evenly distributed anchors for the Au nanoparticles to be incorporated by flowing a Au nanoparticle solution through the thiol functionalized monolith. Both methods led to successfully achieving even distribution of Au nanoparticles along the length of the monolith as demonstrated by ICP-OES. However, the impregnation method led to strong agglomeration of the Au nanoparticles during subsequent heating steps while the thiol anchoring procedure maintained the nanoparticles in the range of 6.8 ± 1.4 nm. Both Au nanoparticle containing monoliths as well as samples with no Au incorporated were tested for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene under constant flow at 30 °C. The Au free materials were found to be catalytically inactive with Au being the minimum necessary requirement for the reaction to proceed. The impregnated Au-containing monolith was found to be less active than the thiol functionalized Au-containing material, attributable to the low metal surface area of the Au nanoparticles. The reaction on the thiol functionalized Au-containing monolith was found to depend strongly on the type of oxidant used: tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) was more active than H2O2, likely due to the thiol induced hydrophobicity in the monolith.

  2. Monolithic JFET preamplifier for ionization chamber calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Manfredi, P.F.; Speziali, V.

    1990-10-01

    A monolithic charge sensitive preamplifier using exclusively n-channel diffused JFETs has been designed and is now being fabricated by INTERFET Corp. by means of a dielectrically isolated process which allows preserving as much as possible the technology upon which discrete JFETs are based. A first prototype built by means of junction isolated process has been delivered. The characteristics of monolithically integrated JFETs compare favorably with discrete devices. First results of tests of a preamplifier which uses these devices are reported. 4 refs

  3. Standard test method for static leaching of monolithic waste forms for disposal of radioactive waste. ASTM standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycles and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C26.07 on Waste Materials. The current edition was approved July 10, 1998, and published in October 1998. It was originally published as C 1220-92. The last previous edition was C 1220-92

  4. Effects of different etching methods and bonding procedures on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different CAD/CAM ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, S Kutalmış; Kucukekenci, Ahmet Serkan

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different types of ceramic surfaces treated with different etching procedures and bonding agents. Monolithic CAD/CAM ceramic specimens (N = 120; n = 40 each group) of feldspathic ceramic Vita Mark II, resin nanoceramic Lava Ultimate, and hybrid ceramic Vita Enamic were fabricated (14 × 12 × 3 mm). Ceramic specimens were separated into four subgroups (n = 10) according to type of surface treatment and bonding onto the ceramic surface. Within each group, four subgroups were prepared by phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, Transbond XT primer, and Clearfill Ceramic primer. Mandibular central incisor metal brackets were bonded with light-cure composite. The SBS data were analyzed using three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The highest SBS was found in the Vita Enamic group, which is a hybrid ceramic, etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Transbond XT Adhesive primer (7.28 ± 2.49 MPa). The lowest SBS was found in the Lava Ultimate group, which is a resin nano-ceramic etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Clearfill ceramic primer (2.20 ± 1.21 MPa). CAD/CAM material types and bonding procedures affected bond strength ( P .05). The use of Transbond XT as a primer bonding agent resulted in higher SBS.

  5. Development and characterization of methacrylate-based hydrazide monoliths for oriented immobilization of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brne, P; Lim, Y-P; Podgornik, A; Barut, M; Pihlar, B; Strancar, A

    2009-03-27

    Convective interaction media (CIM; BIA Separations) monoliths are attractive stationary phases for use in affinity chromatography because they enable fast affinity binding, which is a consequence of convectively enhanced mass transport. This work focuses on the development of novel CIM hydrazide (HZ) monoliths for the oriented immobilization of antibodies. Adipic acid dihydrazide (AADH) was covalently bound to CIM epoxy monoliths to gain hydrazide groups on the monolith surface. Two different antibodies were afterwards immobilized to hydrazide functionalized monolithic columns and prepared columns were tested for their selectivity. One column was further tested for the dynamic binding capacity.

  6. Accuracy, precision, usability, and cost of portable silver test methods for ceramic filter factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Rhiana D; Murray, Anna L; Mittelman, Anjuliee M; Rayner, Justine; Lantagne, Daniele S

    2017-02-01

    Locally manufactured ceramic water filters are one effective household drinking water treatment technology. During manufacturing, silver nanoparticles or silver nitrate are applied to prevent microbiological growth within the filter and increase bacterial removal efficacy. Currently, there is no recommendation for manufacturers to test silver concentrations of application solutions or filtered water. We identified six commercially available silver test strips, kits, and meters, and evaluated them by: (1) measuring in quintuplicate six samples from 100 to 1,000 mg/L (application range) and six samples from 0.0 to 1.0 mg/L (effluent range) of silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate to determine accuracy and precision; (2) conducting volunteer testing to assess ease-of-use; and (3) comparing costs. We found no method accurately detected silver nanoparticles, and accuracy ranged from 4 to 91% measurement error for silver nitrate samples. Most methods were precise, but only one method could test both application and effluent concentration ranges of silver nitrate. Volunteers considered test strip methods easiest. The cost for 100 tests ranged from 36 to 1,600 USD. We found no currently available method accurately and precisely measured both silver types at reasonable cost and ease-of-use, thus these methods are not recommended to manufacturers. We recommend development of field-appropriate methods that accurately and precisely measure silver nanoparticle and silver nitrate concentrations.

  7. Cyclic Fiber Push-In Test Monitors Evolution of Interfacial Behavior in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    SiC fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites are being developed for high-temperature advanced jet engine applications. Obtaining a strong, tough composite material depends critically on optimizing the mechanical coupling between the reinforcing fibers and the surrounding matrix material. This has usually been accomplished by applying a thin C or BN coating onto the surface of the reinforcing fibers. The performance of these fiber coatings, however, may degrade under cyclic loading conditions or exposure to different environments. Degradation of the coating-controlled interfacial behavior will strongly affect the useful service lifetime of the composite material. Cyclic fiber push-in testing was applied to monitor the evolution of fiber sliding behavior in both C- and BN-coated small-diameter (15-mm) SiC-fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites. The cyclic fiber push-in tests were performed using a desktop fiber push-out apparatus. At the beginning of each test, the fiber to be tested was aligned underneath a 10- mm-diameter diamond punch; then, the applied load was cycled between selected maximum and minimum loads. From the measured response, the fiber sliding distance and frictional sliding stresses were determined for each cycle. Tests were performed in both room air and nitrogen. Cyclic fiber push-in tests of C-coated, SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC showed progressive increases in fiber sliding distances along with decreases in frictional sliding stresses for continued cycling in room air. This rapid degradation in interfacial response was not observed for cycling in nitrogen, indicating that moisture exposure had a large effect in immediately lowering the frictional sliding stresses of C-coated fibers. These results indicate that matrix cracks bridged by C-coated fibers will not be stable, but will rapidly grow in moisture-containing environments. In contrast, cyclic fiber push-in tests of both BN-coated, SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC and BNcoated, Si

  8. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO 2 and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N 2 . The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO 4 , I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the 2 durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form

  9. Failure analysis of various monolithic posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porojan, Liliana; Topală, Florin

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of material stiffness and load on the biomechanical performance of the monolithic full-coverage posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element analysis. Three restorative materials for monolithic dental crowns were selected for the study: zirconia; lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, and resin-based composite. Stresses were calculated in the crowns for all materials and in the teeth structures, under different load values. The experiments show that dental crowns made from all this new aesthetic materials processed by CAD/CAM technologies would be indicated as monolithic dental crowns for posterior areas.

  10. Manufacture and Test of a Small Ceramic-Insulated Nb$_{3}$Sn Split Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Bordini, B; Rossi, L; Tommasini, D

    2008-01-01

    A small split solenoid wound with high-Jc Nb$_{3}$Sn conductor, constituted by a 0.8 mm Rod Re-stack Process (RRP®) strand, was built and tested at CERN in order to study the applicability of: 1) ceramic wet glass braid insulation without epoxy impregnation of the magnet; 2) a new heat treatment devised at CERN and particularly suitable for reacting RRP® Nb$_{3}$Sn strands. This paper briefly describes the solenoid and the experimental results obtained during 4.4 K and 1.9 K tests. The split solenoid consists of two coils (25 mm inner diameter, 51.1 mm outer diameter, 12.9 mm height). The coils were initially separately tested, in an iron mirror configuration, and then tested together in split solenoid configuration. In all the tests at 4.4 K the coils reached a current higher than 95 % of their short sample limits at the first quench; in split solenoid configuration the maximum field values in the coils and in the aperture were respectively 10.7 T and 12.5 T. At 1.9 K the coils had premature quenches due ...

  11. Reliability Estimation for Single-unit Ceramic Crown Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekesiz, H.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of a survival prediction method for the assessment of ceramic dental restorations. For this purpose, fast-fracture and fatigue reliabilities for 2 bilayer (metal ceramic alloy core veneered with fluorapatite leucite glass-ceramic, d.Sign/d.Sign-67, by Ivoclar; glass-infiltrated alumina core veneered with feldspathic porcelain, VM7/In-Ceram Alumina, by Vita) and 3 monolithic (leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, Empress, and ProCAD, by Ivoclar; lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic, Empress 2, by Ivoclar) single posterior crown restorations were predicted, and fatigue predictions were compared with the long-term clinical data presented in the literature. Both perfectly bonded and completely debonded cases were analyzed for evaluation of the influence of the adhesive/restoration bonding quality on estimations. Material constants and stress distributions required for predictions were calculated from biaxial tests and finite element analysis, respectively. Based on the predictions, In-Ceram Alumina presents the best fast-fracture resistance, and ProCAD presents a comparable resistance for perfect bonding; however, ProCAD shows a significant reduction of resistance in case of complete debonding. Nevertheless, it is still better than Empress and comparable with Empress 2. In-Ceram Alumina and d.Sign have the highest long-term reliability, with almost 100% survivability even after 10 years. When compared with clinical failure rates reported in the literature, predictions show a promising match with clinical data, and this indicates the soundness of the settings used in the proposed predictions. PMID:25048249

  12. Effect of Control Mode and Test Rate on the Measured Fracture Toughness of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of control mode and test rate on the measured fracture toughness of ceramics were evaluated by using chevron-notched flexure specimens in accordance with ASTM C1421. The use of stroke control gave consistent results with about 2% (statistically insignificant) variation in measured fracture toughness for a very wide range of rates (0.005 to 0.5 mm/min). Use of strain or crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) control gave approx. 5% (statistically significant) variation over a very wide range of rates (1 to 80 µm/m/s), with the measurements being a function of rate. However, the rate effect was eliminated by use of dry nitrogen, implying a stress corrosion effect rather than a stability effect. With the use of a nitrogen environment during strain controlled tests, fracture toughness values were within about 1% over a wide range of rates (1 to 80 micons/m/s). CMOD or strain control did allow stable crack extension well past maximum force, and thus is preferred for energy calculations. The effort is being used to confirm recommendations in ASTM Test Method C1421 on fracture toughness measurement.

  13. Monolith electroplating process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarrwal, Rajev R.

    2001-01-01

    An electroplating process for preparing a monolith metal layer over a polycrystalline base metal and the plated monolith product. A monolith layer has a variable thickness of one crystal. The process is typically carried in molten salts electrolytes, such as the halide salts under an inert atmosphere at an elevated temperature, and over deposition time periods and film thickness sufficient to sinter and recrystallize completely the nucleating metal particles into one single crystal or crystals having very large grains. In the process, a close-packed film of submicron particle (20) is formed on a suitable substrate at an elevated temperature. The temperature has the significance of annealing particles as they are formed, and substrates on which the particles can populate are desirable. As the packed bed thickens, the submicron particles develop necks (21) and as they merge into each other shrinkage (22) occurs. Then as micropores also close (23) by surface tension, metal density is reached and the film consists of unstable metal grain (24) that at high enough temperature recrystallize (25) and recrystallized grains grow into an annealed single crystal over the electroplating time span. While cadmium was used in the experimental work, other soft metals may be used.

  14. Stress and Reliability Analysis of a Metal-Ceramic Dental Crown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Sokolowski, Todd M.; Hojjatie, Barry; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of mechanical and thermal stresses with the flaws and microcracks within the ceramic region of metal-ceramic dental crowns can result in catastrophic or delayed failure of these restorations. The objective of this study was to determine the combined influence of induced functional stresses and pre-existing flaws and microcracks on the time-dependent probability of failure of a metal-ceramic molar crown. A three-dimensional finite element model of a porcelain fused-to-metal (PFM) molar crown was developed using the ANSYS finite element program. The crown consisted of a body porcelain, opaque porcelain, and a metal substrate. The model had a 300 Newton load applied perpendicular to one cusp, a load of 30ON applied at 30 degrees from the perpendicular load case, directed toward the center, and a 600 Newton vertical load. Ceramic specimens were subjected to a biaxial flexure test and the load-to-failure of each specimen was measured. The results of the finite element stress analysis and the flexure tests were incorporated in the NASA developed CARES/LIFE program to determine the Weibull and fatigue parameters and time-dependent fracture reliability of the PFM crown. CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/Or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program.

  15. Testing of ceramic filter materials at the PCFB test facility; Keraamisten suodinmateriaalien testaus PCFB-koelaitoksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R; Eriksson, T; Lehtonen, P; Tiensuu, J [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula, Finland since 1986. In 1989, a 10 MW PCFB test facility was constructed. The test facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1994 for obtaining data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The main objective of the project Y53 was to evaluate advanced candle filter materials for the Hot Gas Clean-up Unit (HGCU) to be used in a commercial PCFB Demonstration Project. To achieve this goal, the selected candle materials were exposed to actual high temperature, high pressure coal combustion flue gases for a period of 1000-1500 h during the PCFB test runs. The test runs were carried out in three test segments in Foster Wheeler`s PCFB test facility at the Karhula R and D Center. An extensive inspection and sampling program was carried out after the second test segment. Selected sample candles were analyzed by the filter supplier and the preliminary results were encouraging. The material strength had decreased only within expected range. Slight elongation of the silicon carbide candles was observed, but at this phase the elongation can not be addressed to creep, unlike in the candles tested in 1993-94. The third and last test segment was completed successfully in October 1996. The filter system was inspected and several sample candles were selected for material characterization. The results will be available in February - March 1997. (orig.)

  16. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  17. Revisiting the blocking force test on ferroelectric ceramics using high energy x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, L., E-mail: laurent.daniel@u-psud.fr [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); GeePs (CNRS UMR8507, CentraleSupelec, UPMC, Univ Paris-Sud), 91192 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Hall, D. A.; Withers, P. J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Koruza, J.; Webber, K. G. [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); King, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue J. Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-05-07

    The blocking force test is a standard test to characterise the properties of piezoelectric actuators. The aim of this study is to understand the various contributions to the macroscopic behaviour observed during this experiment that involves the intrinsic piezoelectric effect, ferroelectric domain switching, and internal stress development. For this purpose, a high energy diffraction experiment is performed in-situ during a blocking force test on a tetragonal lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic (Pb{sub 0.98}Ba{sub 0.01}(Zr{sub 0.51}Ti{sub 0.49}){sub 0.98}Nb{sub 0.02}O{sub 3}). It is shown that the usual macroscopic linear interpretation of the test can also be performed at the single crystal scale, allowing the identification of local apparent piezoelectric and elastic properties. It is also shown that despite this apparent linearity, the blocking force test involves significant non-linear behaviour mostly due to domain switching under electric field and stress. Although affecting a limited volume fraction of the material, domain switching is responsible for a large part of the macroscopic strain and explains the high level of inter- and intra-granular stresses observed during the course of the experiment. The study shows that if apparent piezoelectric and elastic properties can be identified for PZT single crystals from blocking stress curves, they may be very different from the actual properties of polycrystalline materials due to the multiplicity of the physical mechanisms involved. These apparent properties can be used for macroscopic modelling purposes but should be considered with caution if a local analysis is aimed at.

  18. Microwave processing for ceramic materials in microsystem technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, S.

    2002-11-01

    In this study, the applicability of microwaves for sintering of monolithic ceramics and ceramic microcomponents was investigated. Experiments with 2.45 GHz and 30 GHz microwaves were conducted and contrasted to conventional thermal processing. The advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing were then assessed. Nanoscale zirconia and sub-micron lead-zirconate-titanate electroceramics were selected for the evaluation. (orig.)

  19. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm-3 respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm-1, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  20. Damage law identification of a quasi brittle ceramic from a b ending test using digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meille S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The quasi brittle ceramics show a non linear mechanical behaviour resulting most of the time in a dissymetry between their tensile and compressive stress-strain laws. The characterization of their fracture strengths might be biased if elastic linear formulae are used to analyze classical tests like bending tests. Based on Digital Image Correlation (DIC, a methodology is proposed to characterize materials with dissymmetric behaviours. Applying specific DIC decomposition functions for bending, compressive and tensile tests, a stress-strain model and its damage law are identified for aluminium titanate, a damageable micro cracked ceramic. This identification method using DIC can obviously be applied to other quasi brittle materials.

  1. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  2. Ceramic Seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  3. High temperature (salt melt) corrosion tests with ceramic-coated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, Adelheid [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Günthner, Martin; Motz, Günter [University Bayreuth, Ceramic Materials Engineering, L.-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Greißl, Oliver [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Schelmenwasenstraße 13-15, D-70567 Stuttgart (Germany); Glatzel, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.glatzel@uni-bayreuth.de [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Thermal recycling of refuse in waste-to-energy plants reduces the problems connected to waste disposal, and is an alternative source of electric energy. However, the combustion process in waste incinerators results in a fast degradation of the steam-carrying superheater steel tubes by corrosive attack and abrasive wear. Higher firing temperatures are used to increase their efficiency but lead to higher corrosion rates. It is more economical to apply protective coatings on the superheater steel tubes than to replace the base material. In-situ tests were conducted in a waste-to-energy plant first in order to identify and quantify all involved corrosive elements. Laboratory scale experiments with salt melts were developed accordingly. The unprotected low-alloyed steel displayed substantial local corrosion. Corrosion was predominant along the grain boundaries of α-ferrite. The corrosion rate was further increased by FeCl{sub 3} and a mixture of HCL and FeCl{sub 3}. Coatings based on pre-ceramic polymers with specific filler particles were engineered to protect superheater tubes. Tests proved their suitability to protect low-alloYed steel tubes from corrosive attack under conditions typical for superheaterS in waste incinerators, rendering higher firing temperatures in waste-to-energy plants possible. - Highlights: • Corrosion wall thickness losses of 400 μm/2 weeks occurred in a waste incinerator. • Abrasion is a major problem on superheater tubes in waste incinerators. • Laboratory salt melt tests can simulate metal corrosion in waste incinerators. • Corrosion protection coatings for steel (temperature: max. 530 °C) were developed. • Higher steam temperatures are possible in WIs with the developed coatings.

  4. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  5. Standard test method for linear thermal expansion of glaze frits and ceramic whiteware materials by the interferometric method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the interferometric determination of linear thermal expansion of premelted glaze frits and fired ceramic whiteware materials at temperatures lower than 1000°C (1830°F). 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  7. Survey report on high temperature irradiation experiment programs for new ceramic materials in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor). 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    A survey research on status of research activities on new ceramic materials in Japan was carried out under contract between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The purpose of the survey is to provide information to prioritize prospective experiments and tests in the HTTR. The HTTR as a high temperature gas cooled reactor has a unique and superior capability to irradiate large-volumed specimen at high temperature up to approximately 800degC. The survey was focused on mainly the activities of functional ceramics and heat resisting ceramics as a kind of structural ceramics. As the result, the report recommends that the irradiation experiment of functional ceramics is feasible to date. (K. Itami)

  8. Electromagnetic analysis of the Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngmin; Ku, Duck Young; Lee, Dong Won; Ahn, Mu-Young; Park, Yi-Hyun; Cho, Seungyon

    2016-01-01

    Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module set (TBM-set) will be installed at equatorial port #18 of Vacuum Vessel in ITER in order to test the breeding blanket performance for forthcoming fusion power plant. Since ITER tokamak has a set of electromagnetic coils (Central Solenoid, Poloidal Field and Toroidal Field coil set) around Vacuum Vessel, the HCCR TBM-set, the TBM and associated shield, is greatly influenced by magnetic field generated by these coils. In the case of fast transient electromagnetic events such as major disruption, vertical displacement event or magnet fast discharge, magnetic field and induced eddy current results in huge electromagnetic load, known as Lorentz load, on the HCCR TBM-set. In addition, the TBM-set experiences electromagnetic load due to magnetization of the structural material not only during the fast transient events but also during normal operation since the HCCR TBM adopts Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel as a structural material. This is known as Maxwell load which includes Lorentz load as well as load due to magnetization of structure material. This paper presents electromagnetic analysis results for the HCCR TBM-set. For analysis, a 20° sector finite model was constructed considering ITER configuration such as Vacuum Vessel, ITER shield blankets, Central Solenoid, Poloidal Field, Toroidal Field coil set as well as the HCCR TBM-set. Three major disruptions (operational event, likely event and highly unlikely event) were selected for analysis based on the load specifications. ANSYS-EMAG was used as a calculation tool. The results of EM analysis will be used as input data for the structural analysis.

  9. Electromagnetic analysis of the Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngmin, E-mail: ymlee@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Duck Young [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu-Young; Park, Yi-Hyun; Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module set (TBM-set) will be installed at equatorial port #18 of Vacuum Vessel in ITER in order to test the breeding blanket performance for forthcoming fusion power plant. Since ITER tokamak has a set of electromagnetic coils (Central Solenoid, Poloidal Field and Toroidal Field coil set) around Vacuum Vessel, the HCCR TBM-set, the TBM and associated shield, is greatly influenced by magnetic field generated by these coils. In the case of fast transient electromagnetic events such as major disruption, vertical displacement event or magnet fast discharge, magnetic field and induced eddy current results in huge electromagnetic load, known as Lorentz load, on the HCCR TBM-set. In addition, the TBM-set experiences electromagnetic load due to magnetization of the structural material not only during the fast transient events but also during normal operation since the HCCR TBM adopts Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel as a structural material. This is known as Maxwell load which includes Lorentz load as well as load due to magnetization of structure material. This paper presents electromagnetic analysis results for the HCCR TBM-set. For analysis, a 20° sector finite model was constructed considering ITER configuration such as Vacuum Vessel, ITER shield blankets, Central Solenoid, Poloidal Field, Toroidal Field coil set as well as the HCCR TBM-set. Three major disruptions (operational event, likely event and highly unlikely event) were selected for analysis based on the load specifications. ANSYS-EMAG was used as a calculation tool. The results of EM analysis will be used as input data for the structural analysis.

  10. Porous polymer monolithic col

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Terborg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A new approach has been developed for the preparation of mixed-mode stationary phases to separate proteins. The pore surface of monolithic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate capillary columns was functionalized with thiols and coated with gold nanoparticles. The final mixed mode surface chemistry was formed by attaching, in a single step, alkanethiols, mercaptoalkanoic acids, and their mixtures on the free surface of attached gold nanoparticles. Use of these mixtures allowed fine tuning of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance. The amount of attached gold nanoparticles according to thermal gravimetric analysis was 44.8 wt.%. This value together with results of frontal elution enabled calculation of surface coverage with the alkanethiol and mercaptoalkanoic acid ligands. Interestingly, alkanethiols coverage in a range of 4.46–4.51 molecules/nm2 significantly exceeded that of mercaptoalkanoic acids with 2.39–2.45 molecules/nm2. The mixed mode character of these monolithic stationary phases was for the first time demonstrated in the separations of proteins that could be achieved in the same column using gradient elution conditions typical of reverse phase (using gradient of acetonitrile in water and ion exchange chromatographic modes (applying gradient of salt in water, respectively.

  11. Film Cooled Recession of SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Test Development, CFD Modeling and Experimental Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Sakowski, Barbara A.; Fisher, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. However, the environmental stability of Si-based ceramics in high pressure, high velocity turbine engine combustion environment is of major concern. The water vapor containing combustion gas leads to accelerated oxidation and corrosion of the SiC based ceramics due to the water vapor reactions with silica (SiO2) scales forming non-protective volatile hydroxide species, resulting in recession of the ceramic components. Although environmental barrier coatings are being developed to help protect the CMC components, there is a need to better understand the fundamental recession behavior of in more realistic cooled engine component environments.In this paper, we describe a comprehensive film cooled high pressure burner rig based testing approach, by using standardized film cooled SiCSiC disc test specimen configurations. The SiCSiC specimens were designed for implementing the burner rig testing in turbine engine relevant combustion environments, obtaining generic film cooled recession rate data under the combustion water vapor conditions, and helping developing the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) film cooled models and performing model validation. Factors affecting the film cooled recession such as temperature, water vapor concentration, combustion gas velocity, and pressure are particularly investigated and modeled, and compared with impingement cooling only recession data in similar combustion flow environments. The experimental and modeling work will help predict the SiCSiC CMC recession behavior, and developing durable CMC systems in complex turbine engine operating conditions.

  12. [Wear intensity and surface roughness of microhybrid composite and ceramic occlusal veneers on premolars after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Y; Jiang, T; Cheng, M X; Zhang, Y W

    2018-02-18

    To evaluate the wear intensity and surface roughness of occlusal veneers on premolars made of microhybrid composite resin or two kinds of ceramics in vitro after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests. In the study,24 fresh extracted human premolars without root canal treatment were prepared (cusps reduction of 1.5 mm in thickness to simulate middle to severe tooth wear, the inclinations of cusps were 20°). The prepared teeth were restored with occlusal veneers made of three different materials: microhybrid composite, heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) lithium disilicate ceramic in the thickness of 1.5 mm. The occlusal veneers were cemented with resin cement. The specimens were fatigued using the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests after being stored in water for 72 h. The wear of specimens was measured using gypsum replicas and 3D laser scanner before and after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests and the mean lost distance (mm) was used to indicate the level of wear. The surfaces of occlusal contact area were observed and the surface roughness was recorded using 3D laser scanning confocal microscope before and after the fatigue test. Differences between the groups were compared using ONE-way ANOVA(Pcomposite group, heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic group, and CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic group was (-0.13±0.03) mm, (-0.05±0.01) mm and (-0.05±0.01) mm, the wear of microhybrid composite was significantly higher than the two ceramic groups(Pcomposite was significantly higher than the two ceramic groups(Pcomposite(P=0.005) and CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic (P=0.010). From the view of wear speed, microhybrid composite was significantly higher than the two kinds of ceramics, but it was similar to enamel when the opposing tooth was natural. The surface roughness before the themocycling and cyclic mechanical loading test of microhybrid

  13. Corrosion tests with uranium- and plutonium-loaded ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morss, L. R.; Johnson, S. G.; Ebert, W. L.; DiSanto, T.; Frank, S. M.; Holly, J. L.; Kropf, A. J.; Mertz, C. J.; O'Holleran, T. P.; Richmann, M. K.; Sinkler, W.; Tsai, Y.; Warren, A. R.; Noy, M.

    2003-01-01

    Tests were conducted with ceramic waste form (CWF) materials that contained small amounts of uranium and plutonium to study their release behavior as the CWF corroded. Materials made using the hot isostatic press (HIP) and pressureless consolidation (PC) methods were examined and tested. Four different materials were made using the HIP method with two salts having different U:Pu mole ratios and two zeolite reagents having different residual water contents. Tests with the four HIP U,Pu-loaded CWF materials were conducted at 90 and 120 C, at CWF-to-water mass ratios of 1:10 and 1:20, and for durations between 7 and 365 days. Materials made using two PC processing conditions were also tested. Tests with the two PC U,Pu-loaded CWF materials were conducted at 90 and 120 C, at a CWF-to-water mass ratio of 1:10, and for durations between 7 and 182 days. The releases of matrix elements, U, and Pu in tests conducted under different test conditions and with different materials are compared to evaluate the effects of composition and processing conditions on the release behavior of U and Pu and the chemical durabilities of the different materials. The distributions of released elements among the fractions that were dissolved, in colloidal form in the solution, and fixed to test vessel walls were measured and compared. Characterization of Pu-bearing colloidal particles recovered from the test solutions using solids analysis techniques are also reported. The principal findings from this study are: (1) The release of U and Pu is about 10X less than the release of Si and 50X less than the release of B under all test conditions. This implies that U and Pu are in a phase that is less soluble than the sodalite and binder glass matrix. (2) Almost all of the plutonium that is released from U,Pu-loaded CWF is present either as colloidal-sized particles in the size range between 5 and 100 nm in the test solution (about 15% of the total) or becomes fixed on stainless steel test vessel

  14. Comparison between PIII superficial treatment and ceramic coating in creep test of Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, D.A.P.; Moura Neto, C.; Silva, M.M.; Ueda, M.; Oliveira, V.S.; Couto, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was evaluating the creep resistance of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy with superficial treatment of PIII superficial treatment and ceramic coating in creep test of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. It was used Ti-6Al-4V alloy as cylindrical bars under forged and annealing of 190 deg C by 6 hours condition and cooled by air. The Ti-6Al-4V alloy after the superficial treatment of PIII and ceramic coating was submitted to creep tests at 600°C and 250 and 319 MPa under constant load mode. In the PIII treatment the samples was put in a vacuum reactor (76 x 10 -3 Pa) and implanted by nitrogen ions in time intervals between 15 and 120 minutes. Yttria (8 wt.%) stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with a CoNiCrAlY bond coat was atmospherically plasma sprayed on Ti-6Al-4V substrates by Sulzer Metco Type 9 MB. The obtained results suggest the ceramic coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy improved its creep resistance. (author)

  15. FLEXURAL TESTING MACHINE AS AN OFF-LINE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR QUALITY MONITORING IN THE PRODUCTION OF BENDED CERAMIC TILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Fragassa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The capability to bend in a controlled manner Gres Porcelain stoneware tiles passing by a very exclusive process of pyroplastic deformation opens up entirely new opportunities in utilisation of this important family of ceramics. A bended tile can be exploited in innovative applications, such as stairs, shelves, benches and even radiators, turning this element from a simple piece of furnishing in a modern functional component. But this change in functionality also requires a different approach in the quality control, both at the product and process levels, that can no longer be limited to the use of tests specified in the regulations for traditional ceramics (e.g. colour, porosity, hygroscopic .... This article describes the first device so far devised for the verification of resistance to bending of curved tiles, discussing the correct way of use. The adoption of this particular equipment as an off-line control device can represent a valid strategy for monitoring the product and process quality.

  16. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Fatih; Secilmis, Asli; Simsek, Irfan; Ozsevik, Semih

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (Pcomposite material and monolithic zirconia.

  17. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C

    2006-12-22

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form.

  18. Construction and testing of a system for the electrical characterization of ceramic thermistors at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. S. Luz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A high-precision and low cost system was built for the electrical characterization of ceramic thermistors at low temperatures, using components readily available in materials research laboratories. The system presented excellent reproducibility in the electrical characterization of NTC ceramic sensors from -75 ºC (195 K to 23 ºC (296 K. The behavior of the NTC sensor was comparable to that of commercial thermistors only below room temperature (α = -3.2%/K, demonstrating the importance of fully characterizing these materials at both low and high temperatures.

  19. Standard test methods for determining chemical durability of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed waste glasses and multiphase glass ceramics: The product consistency test (PCT)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 These product consistency test methods A and B evaluate the chemical durability of homogeneous glasses, phase separated glasses, devitrified glasses, glass ceramics, and/or multiphase glass ceramic waste forms hereafter collectively referred to as “glass waste forms” by measuring the concentrations of the chemical species released to a test solution. 1.1.1 Test Method A is a seven-day chemical durability test performed at 90 ± 2°C in a leachant of ASTM-Type I water. The test method is static and conducted in stainless steel vessels. Test Method A can specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed glass waste forms have been consistently controlled during production. This test method is applicable to radioactive and simulated glass waste forms as defined above. 1.1.2 Test Method B is a durability test that allows testing at various test durations, test temperatures, mesh size, mass of sample, leachant volume, a...

  20. The Structural Ceramics Database: Technical Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, R. G.; Hwang, F. Y.; Hubbard, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a computerized database on advanced structural ceramics can play a critical role in fostering the widespread use of ceramics in industry and in advanced technologies. A computerized database may be the most effective means of accelerating technology development by enabling new materials to be incorporated into designs far more rapidly than would have been possible with traditional information transfer processes. Faster, more efficient access to critical data is the basis for creating this technological advantage. Further, a computerized database provides the means for a more consistent treatment of data, greater quality control and product reliability, and improved continuity of research and development programs. A preliminary system has been completed as phase one of an ongoing program to establish the Structural Ceramics Database system. The system is designed to be used on personal computers. Developed in a modular design, the preliminary system is focused on the thermal properties of monolithic ceramics. The initial modules consist of materials specification, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, thermal shock resistance, and a bibliography of data references. Query and output programs also have been developed for use with these modules. The latter program elements, along with the database modules, will be subjected to several stages of testing and refinement in the second phase of this effort. The goal of the refinement process will be the establishment of this system as a user-friendly prototype. Three primary considerations provide the guidelines to the system’s development: (1) The user’s needs; (2) The nature of materials properties; and (3) The requirements of the programming language. The present report discusses the manner and rationale by which each of these considerations leads to specific features in the design of the system. PMID:28053397

  1. Antagonist wear of monolithic zirconia crowns after 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbauer, Ulrich; Reich, Sven

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of wear on the antagonist occlusal surfaces of clinically placed monolithic zirconia premolar and molar crowns (LAVA Plus, 3M ESPE). Fourteen in situ monolithic zirconia crowns and their opposing antagonists (n = 26) are the subject of an ongoing clinical trial and have been clinically examined at baseline and after 24 months. Silicone impressions were taken and epoxy replicas produced for qualitative SEM analysis and quantitative analysis using optical profilometry. Based on the baseline replicas, the follow-up situation has been scanned and digitally matched with the initial topography in order to calculate the mean volume loss (in mm 3 ) as well as the mean maximum vertical loss (in mm) after 2 years in service. The mean volume loss for enamel antagonist contacts (n = 7) was measured to 0.361 mm 3 and the mean of the maximum vertical loss to 0.204 mm. The mean volume loss for pure ceramic contacts (n = 10) was measured to 0.333 mm 3 and the mean of the maximum vertical loss to 0.145 mm. The wear rates on enamel contacts were not significantly different from those measured on ceramic antagonists. Based on the limitations of this study, it can be concluded for the monolithic zirconia material LAVA Plus that the measured wear rates are in consensus with other in vivo studies on ceramic restorations. Further, that no significant difference was found between natural enamel antagonists and ceramic restorations as antagonists. The monolithic zirconia restorations do not seem to be affected by wear within the first 2 years. The monolithic zirconia crowns (LAVA Plus) show acceptable antagonist wear rates after 2 years in situ, regardless of natural enamel or ceramics as antagonist materials.

  2. Achievement report for fiscal 1989. Research and development of ceramic gas turbine (Development of test and evaluation methods for ceramic member bonding technology); 1989 nendo ceramic gas turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Ceramic buzai setsugo gijutsu no shiken hyoka hoho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-05-01

    Development of test and evaluation methods has been performed on a technology to bond ceramics with metals as a support to develop a ceramic gas turbine (CGT), from the viewpoint that what governs bonding is residual stress. Activities were made in the following three fields: 1) investigative studies, 2) tests and researches, and 3) analytical studies. In Item 1, literatures were investigated, and research plans were established with regard to residual stress. Selections were made on Si3N4 as the ceramics, ordinary steel (S45C) as the metal, butt joint bonding of flat plates with each other as the bonding method, X-ray stress measuring method and IF method (semi-destructive test) as the residual stress measuring methods, and the finite element method as the analytical method. In Item 2, bonded test pieces were made, and the residual stress measuring test was performed to discuss the test and evaluation methods in relation with the bonding patterns and adaptability of the bonding. In Item 3, basic discussions were given on applicability of the residual stress analysis method using the finite element method, and on analysis of the affecting factors and modeling. (NEDO)

  3. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  4. Wet Slurry Abrasion Tests of Ceramic Coatings Deposited by Water-Stabilized Plasma Spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nohava, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 2 (2003), s. 203-214 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/01/0094 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma spraying, wear resistence, ceramic coating Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  5. Monolithic translucent BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphors for laser-driven solid state lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Cozzan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With high power light emitting diodes and laser diodes being explored for white light generation and visible light communication, thermally robust encapsulation schemes for color-converting inorganic phosphors are essential. In the current work, the canonical blue-emitting phosphor, high purity Eu-doped BaMgAl10O17, has been prepared using microwave-assisted heating (25 min and densified into translucent ceramic phosphor monoliths using spark plasma sintering (30 min. The resulting translucent ceramic monoliths convert UV laser light to blue light with the same efficiency as the starting powder and provide superior thermal management in comparison with silicone encapsulation.

  6. The influence of water saturation on mechanical properties of ceramic bricks – tests on 19th- century and contemporary bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matysek, P.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents test results concerning ceramic bricks produced in 1880’s. Bricks were obtained from a building erected as part of Archduke Rudolf barracks in Krakow. The tests helped to specify changes in brick compressive strength and hardness, caused by water saturation in the ceramic material. For comparison purposes, tests were also carried out on contemporary bricks. Tests showed that mechanical properties of the ceramic bricks in the water saturation state were worse than in the dry state. The impact of strong brick moisture on changes of mechanical parameters is essential in terms of safety assessment for brick structures.En el artículo se presentan los resultados del estudio de los ladrillos cerámicos producidos en los años 80 del siglo XIX. Los ladrillos se obtuvieron del edificio que forma parte de un conjunto de cuarteles del archiduque Rudolfo en Cracovia en Polonia. En los estudios se han determinado los cambios de la resistencia a la compresión y la dureza de los ladrillos, por efecto de la saturación de agua del material cerámico. A efectos comparativos, se han realizado también estudios de ladrillos producidos en la actualidad. Se ha comprobado que la saturación de agua de los ladrillos cerámicos lleva consigo una considerable disminución de las propiedades mecánicas. Por lo tanto, el impacto de la alta humedad de los ladrillos sobre el cambio de las propiedades mecánicas constituye un factor significativo en la evaluación de la seguridad en las construcciones de ladrillo.

  7. Making ceramics used for compound environment into multi-composite and evaluation of their multi-dimensional system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Takefumi

    1996-01-01

    In order to advance current nuclear power technology greatly, the development of the boundary materials suitable to between the environments with largely different properties is indispensable. In the research of first period, the ceramic having the corrosion resistance in liquid sodium which is far superior to metals was found. As boundary material, in addition, thermal, mechanical and radiation resistant properties are required. In the project of second period, it is aimed at to establish the basic technology for the synthesis techniques for multi-composite materials that possess the combination of the excellent characteristics of individual monolithic system ceramics. The liquid sodium immersion test of various ceramics in the research of first period is reported. The diffusion of sodium in ceramics was also examined. As the simplified quick evaluation technique, the corrosion test in KOH solution was carried out. As for ceramic multi-composites, Y ions were implanted in the surface of alumina, and the changes of structure and corrosion resistance were examined. The surface condition of ceramics and the adsorption of alkali metals were investigated. (K.I.)

  8. Achievement report for fiscal 1990. Research and development of ceramic gas turbine (Development of test and evaluation methods for ceramic member bonding technology); 1990 nendo ceramic gas turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Ceramic buzai setsugo gijutsu no shiken hyoka hoho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-05-01

    Development of test and evaluation methods has been performed on a technology to bond ceramics with metals from the viewpoint that what governs bonding is residual stress. Activities were made in the following three fields: 1) tests and researches, 2) analytical studies, and 3) studies on correlation of residual stress with strength characteristics. In Item 1, selections were made on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as the ceramics, ordinary steel as the metal, and the brazing process in vacuum using Ti-based active metal as the bonding method. Discussions were given on processing of test pieces and the procedure thereof, an X-ray stress measuring method, a non-destructive inspection method, and a strength testing method. In Item 2, discussions were given on analysis of the bonding method and the residual stress in the bonding material due to brazing of ceramics with metal, for example, and the effects of the cutting process on the residual stress. In Item 3, discussions were given on mechanical strength evaluation on the bonding materials including the processing defects, for example, with regard to the correlation of the bonding residual stress with the mechanical strength characteristics, and on the effects of the residual stress on the tensile strength. (NEDO)

  9. Characterization of SOI monolithic detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Rengifo, P. L.; Soung Yee, L.; Martin, E.; Cortina, E.; Ferrer, C.

    2013-12-01

    A monolithic active pixel sensor for charged particle tracking was developed. This research is performed within the framework of an R&D project called TRAPPISTe (Tracking Particles for Physics Instrumentation in SOI Technology) whose aim is to evaluate the feasibility of developing a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) with Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology. Two chips were fabricated: TRAPPISTe-1 and TRAPPISTe-2. TRAPPISTe-1 was produced at the WINFAB facility at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Belgium, in a 2 μm fully depleted (FD-SOI) CMOS process. TRAPPISTe-2 was fabricated with the LAPIS 0.2 μm FD-SOI CMOS process. The electrical characterization on single transistor test structures and of the electronic readout for the TRAPPISTe series of monolithic pixel detectors was carried out. The behavior of the prototypes’ electronics as a function of the back voltage was studied. Results showed that both readout circuits exhibited sensitivity to the back voltage. Despite this unwanted secondary effect, the responses of TRAPPISTe-2 amplifiers can be improved by a variation in the circuit parameters.

  10. Fracture-resistant monolithic dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-03-01

    To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self-consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  11. The chemical composition and compression strengths of refractory ceramics, tested for 3 curing temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Khairuddin bin Wan Ali

    1994-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine and compile the mechanical strength of a refractory ceramic made of ground fire bricks and refractory fire mortar. Three different compositions were studied for the compression strength and it was found that the composition with 50% fire bricks and 50% fire mortar gives the best mechanical strength. With this composition the maximum failure compression stress is 3.2 MPa. and the Young Modulus is 403.5 MPa. The investigation also shows that the curing temperatures and the composition percentages play an important role in determining the strength of the ceramic. The trend obtained from the investigation shows that there is the possibility that an optimum value of composition percentage exist

  12. Fabrication and testing of ceramic UO2 fuel - I-III. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.

    1961-12-01

    The task described consists of the following: fabrication of UO 2 with different granulation from uranyl nitrate by ammonia diuranate; determination of size and shape distributions of metal and ceramic powders; fabrication of sintered pressed samples UO 2 ; investigating the properties of sintered uranium dioxide dependent on the fabrication process; producing a vibrator for compacting UO 2 powder. This volume includes reports on the first two tasks

  13. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Composite Laser Ceramics by Advanced Bonding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Tomosumi; Honda, Sawao

    2018-01-01

    Composites obtained by bonding materials with the same crystal structure and different chemical compositions can create new functions that do not exist in conventional concepts. We have succeeded in bonding polycrystalline YAG and Nd:YAG ceramics without any interstices at the bonding interface, and the bonding state of this composite was at the atomic level, similar to the grain boundary structure in ceramics. The mechanical strength of the bonded composite reached 278 MPa, which was not less than the strength of each host material (269 and 255 MPa). Thermal conductivity of the composite was 12.3 W/mK (theoretical value) which is intermediate between the thermal conductivities of YAG and Nd:YAG (14.1 and 10.2 W/mK, respectively). Light scattering cannot be detected at the bonding interface of the ceramic composite by laser tomography. Since the scattering coefficients of the monolithic material and the composite material formed by bonding up to 15 layers of the same materials were both 0.10%/cm, there was no occurrence of light scattering due to the bonding. In addition, it was not detected that the optical distortion and non-uniformity of the refractive index variation were caused by the bonding. An excitation light source (LD = 808 nm) was collimated to 200 μm and irradiated into a commercial 1% Nd:YAG single crystal, but fracture damage occurred at a low damage threshold of 80 kW/cm2. On the other hand, the same test was conducted on the bonded interface of 1% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics fabricated in this study, but it was not damaged until the excitation density reached 127 kW/cm2. 0.6% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics showed high damage resistance (up to 223 kW/cm2). It was concluded that composites formed by bonding polycrystalline ceramics are ideal in terms of thermo-mechanical and optical properties. PMID:29425152

  15. Fatigue resistance and microleakage of CAD/CAM ceramic and composite molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Amr S; Atta, Osama; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine effect of compressive cyclic loading on fatigue resistance and microleakage of monolithic CAD/CAM molar ceramic and composite crowns. Thirty-two extracted molars were prepared to receive CEREC crowns according to manufacturer's guidelines using a special paralleling device (Parallel-A-Prep). Sixteen feldspathic ceramic crowns (VITABLOCS Mark II) (VMII) and 16 resin-composite crowns (Paradigm-MZ100 blocks) (PMZ) were milled using a CEREC-3D machine. Eight crowns of each group were cemented to their respective teeth using self-etching resin cement (Panavia-F-2.0) (PAN), and eight were cemented using self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX-Unicem-Clicker) (RXU). Following storage for 1 week in water, specimens were subjected to uniaxial compressive cyclic loading in an Instron testing machine at 12 Hz for 1,000,000 cycles. Load was applied at the central fossa, and the cycle range was 60-600 N. Specimens were then subjected to microleakage testing. Data were statistically analyzed using factorial ANOVA and Post Hoc (Tukey HSD) tests. All composite crowns survived compressive cyclic loading without fracture, while three ceramic crowns from the subgroup cemented with RXU developed surface cracks at the center of occlusal surfaces, extending laterally. Microleakage scores of ceramic crowns cemented with PAN were significantly lower than those of the other three subgroups (p < 0.05). After 1,000,000 cycles of compressive cyclic loading, PMZ composite molar crowns were more fatigue-resistant than VMII ceramic crowns. Cement type had a significant effect on fatigue resistance of the ceramic crowns but not the composite ones. Microleakage scores of ceramic crowns cemented with PAN were significantly lower than those of the other subgroups (p < 0.05). © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. preparation, characterization and formulation of nano-ceramic materials to be used for the separation of some heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    the synthesis of asymmetric composite and monolithic ceramic filters, with high performance quality, to be used in heavy metals separation is the aim of this study. asymmetric composite ceramic filter consisted of a macroporous or mesoporous substrate coated with several layers having lower pore size than the substrate usually microporous film. on the other hand, asymmetric monolithic ceramic filter is monolithic system having dual pore size distribution. ceramic filters synthesis was performed using polymeric sol-gel process. the optimization of synthesis parameters as well as the characterization was achieved to obtain ceramic filters with high separative properties. the synthesized ceramic filters were characterized using mercury porosimeter for pore size distribution analysis, BET method for specific surface areas measurements and BJH pore size distribution analysis, XRD analysis for crystalline phase identification and SEM for microstructure and morphology studies

  17. Development of aircraft brake materials. [evaluation of metal and ceramic materials in sliding tests simulation of aircraft braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, T. L.; Peterson, M. B.

    1974-01-01

    The requirements of brake materials were outlined and a survey made to select materials to meet the needs of high temperature brakes. A number of metals and ceramic materials were selected and evaluated in sliding tests which simulated aircraft braking. Nickel, molybdenum tungsten, Zr02, high temperature cements and carbons were tested. Additives were then incorporated into these materials to optimize their wear or strength behavior with particular emphasis on nickel and molybdenum base materials and a high temperature potassium silicate cement. Optimum materials were developed which improved wear behavior over conventional brake materials in the simulated test. The best materials are a nickel, aluminum oxide, lead tungstate composition containing graphite or molybdenum disulphite; a molybdenum base material containing LPA100 (an intermetallic compound of cobalt, molybdenum, and silicon); and a carbon material (P5).

  18. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musich, Mark; Swanson, Michael; Dunham, Grant; Stanislowski, Joshua

    2010-10-05

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most

  19. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine

  20. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Although progress has been made in developing reliable structural ceramics, further work is needed to reduce cost. The work described in this report is organized according to the following work breakdown structure project elements: Materials and processing (monolithics [Si nitride, carbide], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining, cost effective ceramic machining), materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts), data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, nondestructive evaluation development), and technology transfer.

  1. Fracture strength of three all-ceramic systems: Top-Ceram compared with IPS-Empress and In-Ceram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quran, Firas Al; Haj-Ali, Reem

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fracture loads and mode of failure of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using Top-Ceram and compare it with all-ceramic crowns fabricated from well-established systems: IPS-Empress II, In-Ceram. Thirty all-ceramic crowns were fabricated; 10 IPS-Empress II, 10 In-Ceram alumina and 10 Top-Ceram. Instron testing machine was used to measure the loads required to introduce fracture of each crown. Mean fracture load for In-Ceram alumina [941.8 (± 221.66) N] was significantly (p > 0.05) higher than those of Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II. There was no statistically significant difference between Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II mean fracture loads; 696.20 (+222.20) and 534 (+110.84) N respectively. Core fracture pattern was highest seen in Top- Ceram specimens.

  2. Acoustic of monolithic dome structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Refat Ismail

    2018-03-01

    The interior of monolithic domes have perfect, concave shapes to ensure that sound travels through the dome and perfectly collected at different vocal points. These dome structures are utilized for domestic use because the scale allows the focal points to be positioned across daily life activities, thereby affecting the sonic comfort of the internal space. This study examines the various acoustic treatments and parametric configurations of monolithic dome sizes. A geometric relationship of acoustic treatment and dome radius is established to provide architects guidelines on the correct selection of absorption needed to maintain the acoustic comfort of these special spaces.

  3. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm −3 respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm −1 , linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively

  4. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang, E-mail: bambang-ariwahjoedi@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar (Malaysia); Ginta, Turnad Lenggo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tro (Malaysia); Parman, Setyamartana [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad [Kebabangan Petroleum Operating Company Sdn Bhd, Lvl. 52, Tower 2, PETRONAS Twin Towers, KLCC, 50088 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm{sup −3} respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm{sup −1}, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  5. Fatigue limit of polycrystalline zirconium oxide ceramics: effect of grinding and low-temperature aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Silvestri, T.; Amaral, M.; Rippe, M.P.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    The following study aimed to evaluate the effect of grinding and low-temperature aging on the fatigue limit of Y-TZP ceramics for frameworks and monolithic restorations. Disc specimens from each ceramic material, Lava Frame (3M ESPE) and Zirlux FC (Ivoclar Vivadent) were manufactured according to

  6. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project: Semiannual progress report, October 1986-March 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This report contains four subelements: (1) Monolithics, (2) Ceramic Composites, (3) Thermal and Wear Coatings, and (4) Joining. Ceramic research conducted within the Monolithics subelement currently includes work activities on green state ceramic fabrication, characterization, and densification and on structural, mechanical, and physical properties of these ceramics. Research conducted within the Ceramic Composites subelement currently includes silicon carbide and oxide-based composites, which, in addition to the work activities cited for Monolithics, include fiber synthesis and characterization. Research conducted in the Thermal and Wear Coatings subelement is currently limited to oxide-base coatings and involves coating synthesis, characterization, and determination of the mechanical and physical properties of the coatings. Research conducted in the Joining subelement currently includes studies of processes to produce strong stable joints between zirconia ceramics and iron-base alloys. A major objective of the research in the Materials and Processing project element is to systematically advance the understanding of the relationships between ceramic raw materials such as powders and reactant gases, the processing variables involved in producing the ceramic materials, and the resultant microstructures and physical and mechanical properties of the ceramic materials. Success in meeting this objective will provide US companies with new or improved ways for producing economical highly reliable ceramic components for advanced heat engines.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL PROPERTIES AND BOND STRENGTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D E Burkes; D D Keiser; D M Wachs; J S Larson; M D Chapple

    2007-01-01

    Understanding fuel foil mechanical properties, and fuel/cladding bond quality and strength in monolithic plates is an important area of investigation and quantification. Specifically, what constitutes an acceptable monolithic fuel--cladding bond, how are the properties of the bond measured and determined, and what is the impact of fabrication process or change in parameters on the level of bonding? Currently, non-bond areas are quantified employing ultrasonic determinations that are challenging to interpret and understand in terms of irradiation impact. Thus, determining mechanical properties of the fuel foil and what constitutes fuel/cladding non-bonds is essential to successful qualification of monolithic fuel plates. Capabilities and tests related to determination of these properties have been implemented at the INL and are discussed, along with preliminary results

  8. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Dynamics in a Monolithic Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Yamamoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As for the measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC is used for PAH identification and densitometry. However, when a solvent containing a substance to be identified passes through a column of UPLC, a dedicated high-pressure-proof device is required. Recently, a liquid chromatography instrument using a monolithic column technology has been proposed to reduce the pressure of UPLC. The present study tested five types of monolithic columns produced in experiments. To simulate the flow field, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM was used. The velocity profile was discussed to decrease the pressure drop in the ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC system.

  10. Protective Skins for Aerogel Monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Meador, Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of imparting relatively hard protective outer skins to aerogel monoliths has been developed. Even more than aerogel beads, aerogel monoliths are attractive as thermal-insulation materials, but the commercial utilization of aerogel monoliths in thermal-insulation panels has been inhibited by their fragility and the consequent difficulty of handling them. Therefore, there is a need to afford sufficient protection to aerogel monoliths to facilitate handling, without compromising the attractive bulk properties (low density, high porosity, low thermal conductivity, high surface area, and low permittivity) of aerogel materials. The present method was devised to satisfy this need. The essence of the present method is to coat an aerogel monolith with an outer polymeric skin, by painting or spraying. Apparently, the reason spraying and painting were not attempted until now is that it is well known in the aerogel industry that aerogels collapse in contact with liquids. In the present method, one prevents such collapse through the proper choice of coating liquid and process conditions: In particular, one uses a viscous polymer precursor liquid and (a) carefully controls the amount of liquid applied and/or (b) causes the liquid to become cured to the desired hard polymeric layer rapidly enough that there is not sufficient time for the liquid to percolate into the aerogel bulk. The method has been demonstrated by use of isocyanates, which, upon exposure to atmospheric moisture, become cured to polyurethane/polyurea-type coats. The method has also been demonstrated by use of commercial epoxy resins. The method could also be implemented by use of a variety of other resins, including polyimide precursors (for forming high-temperature-resistant protective skins) or perfluorinated monomers (for forming coats that impart hydrophobicity and some increase in strength).

  11. Comparison of monolithic silica and polymethacrylate capillary columns for LC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravcová, D.; Jandera, P.; Urban, J.; Planeta, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 27, 10-11 (2004), s. 789-800 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/0023 Keywords : monolithic column s * capillary HPLC * column testing Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.927, year: 2004

  12. Characterization of polymer monolithic stationary phases for capillary HPLC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravcová, D.; Jandera, P.; Urban, J.; Planeta, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 11 (2003), s. 1005-1016 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/0023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919; CEZ:MSM 253100002 Keywords : monolithic column s * capillary HPLC * column testing Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.108, year: 2003

  13. Study of monolithic prestressed reinforced concrete overhead road.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya.I. Kovalchyk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of inspection and testing of monolithic prestressed reinforced concrete road trestle built in Kyiv are considered. The analysis of the gained results has shown that parametres correspond to the requirements of current standards on design of bridges.

  14. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  15. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  16. Durability Evaluation of a Thin Film Sensor System With Enhanced Lead Wire Attachments on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Kiser, J. Douglas; Singh, Mrityunjay; Cuy, Mike; Blaha, Charles A.; Androjna, Drago

    2000-01-01

    An advanced thin film sensor system instrumented on silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix ceramic matrix composites (SiC/SiC CMCs), was evaluated in a Mach 0.3 burner rig in order to determine its durability to monitor material/component surface temperature in harsh environments. The sensor system included thermocouples in a thin film form (5 microns thick), fine lead wires (75 microns diameter), and the bonds between these wires and the thin films. Other critical components of the overall system were the heavy, swaged lead wire cable (500 microns diameter) that contained the fine lead wires and was connected to the temperature readout, and ceramic attachments which were bonded onto the CMCs for the purpose of securing the lead wire cables, The newly developed ceramic attachment features a combination of hoops made of monolithic SiC or SiC/SiC CMC (which are joined to the test article) and high temperature ceramic cement. Two instrumented CMC panels were tested in a burner rig for a total of 40 cycles to 1150 C (2100 F). A cycle consisted of rapid heating to 1150 C (2100 F), a 5 minute hold at 1150 C (2100 F), and then cooling down to room temperature in 2 minutes. The thin film sensor systems provided repeatable temperature measurements for a maximum of 25 thermal cycles. Two of the monolithic SiC hoops debonded during the sensor fabrication process and two of the SiC/SiC CMC hoops failed during testing. The hoops filled with ceramic cement, however, showed no sign of detachment after 40 thermal cycle test. The primary failure mechanism of this sensor system was the loss of the fine lead wire-to-thin film connection, which either due to detachment of the fine lead wires from the thin film thermocouples or breakage of the fine wire.

  17. Standard test method for measurement of light reflectance value and small color differences between pieces of ceramic tile

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of Light Reflectance Value (LRV) and visually small color difference between pieces of glazed or unglazed ceramic tile, using any spectrophotometer that meets the requirements specified in the test method. LRV and the magnitude and direction of the color difference are expressed numerically, with sufficient accuracy for use in product specification. 1.2 LRV may be measured for either solid-colored tile or tile having a multicolored, speckled, or textured surface. For tile that are not solid-colored, an average reading should be obtained from multiple measurements taken in a pattern representative of the overall sample as described in 9.2 of this test method. Small color difference between tiles should only be measured for solid-color tiles. Small color difference between tile that have a multicolored, speckled, or textured surface, are not valid. 1.3 For solid colored tile, a comparison of the test specimen and reference specimen should be made under incandescent, f...

  18. Initiating the Validation of CCIM Processability for Multi-phase all Ceramic (SYNROC) HLW Form: Plan for Test BFY14CCIM-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, Vince [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This plan covers test BFY14CCIM-C which will be a first–of–its-kind demonstration for the complete non-radioactive surrogate production of multi-phase ceramic (SYNROC) High Level Waste Forms (HLW) using Cold Crucible Induction Melting (CCIM) Technology. The test will occur in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) CCIM Pilot Plant and is tentatively scheduled for the week of September 15, 2014. The purpose of the test is to begin collecting qualitative data for validating the ceramic HLW form processability advantages using CCIM technology- as opposed to existing ceramic–lined Joule Heated Melters (JHM) currently producing BSG HLW forms. The major objectives of BFY14CCIM-C are to complete crystalline melt initiation with a new joule-heated resistive starter ring, sustain inductive melting at temperatures between 1600 to 1700°C for two different relatively high conductive materials representative of the SYNROC ceramic formation inclusive of a HLW surrogate, complete melter tapping and pouring of molten ceramic material in to a preheated 4 inch graphite canister and a similar canister at room temperature. Other goals include assessing the performance of a new crucible specially designed to accommodate the tapping and pouring of pure crystalline forms in contrast to less recalcitrant amorphous glass, assessing the overall operational effectiveness of melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a dedicated power source, and observing the tapped molten flow and subsequent relatively quick crystallization behavior in pans with areas identical to standard HLW disposal canisters. Surrogate waste compositions with ceramic SYNROC forming additives and their measured properties for inductive melting, testing parameters, pre-test conditions and modifications, data collection requirements, and sampling/post-demonstration analysis requirements for the produced forms are provided and defined.

  19. Durability and Design Issues of Thermal/environmental Barrier Coatings on Sic/sic Ceramic Matrix Composites Under 1650 C Test Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Currently, advanced T/EBC systems, which typically include a high temperature capable zirconia- (or hahia-) based oxide top coat (thermal barrier) on a less temperature capable mullite/barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS)/Si inner coat (environmental barrier), are being developed and tested for higher temperature capability Sic combustor applications. In this paper, durability of several thermal/environmental barrier coating systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites was investigated under laser simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic, and 1650 C (3000 F) test conditions. The coating cracking and delamination processes were monitored and evaluated. The effects of temperature gradients and coating configurations on the ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation were analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA) models based on the observed failure mechanisms, in conjunction with mechanical testing results. The environmental effects on the coating durability will be discussed. The coating design approach will also be presented.

  20. Structural studies of spinel manganite ceramics with positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klym, H; Shpotyuk, O; Hadzaman, I; Ingram, A; Filipecki, J

    2011-01-01

    The new transition-metal manganite Cu 0.1 Ni 0.8 Co 0.2 Mn 1.9 O 4 ceramics for temperature sensors with improved functional reliability are first proposed. It is established that the amount of additional NiO phase in these ceramics extracted during sintering play a decisive role. This effect is well revealed only in ceramics having a character fine-grain microstructure, while the monolithization of ceramics caused by great amount of transferred thermal energy reveals an opposite influence. The process of monolitization from the position of evolution of grain-pore structure was studied in these ceramics using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

  1. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report for October 1991--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work is organized into the following elements: materials and processing (monolithics [SiC, SiN], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining), materials design methodology, data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE), and technology transfer. Individual abstracts were prepared for the individual contributions.

  2. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas Hian da; Lima, Erick de; Miranda, Ranulfo Benedito de Paula; Favero, Stéphanie Soares; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2017-08-28

    The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I) monolithic zirconia restorations; II) multilayered dental prostheses; III) new glass-ceramics; IV) polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V) novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  3. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Hian da SILVA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I monolithic zirconia restorations; II multilayered dental prostheses; III new glass-ceramics; IV polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  4. Evaluation of the Long-Term Performance of Titanate Ceramics for Immobilization of Excess Weapons Plutonium: Results from Pressurized Unsaturated Flow and Single Pass Flow-Through Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BP McGrail; HT Schaef; JP Icenhower; PF Martin; RD Orr; VL Legore

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes our findings from pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) and single-pass flow-through (SPFT) experiments to date. Results from the PUF test of a Pu-bearing ceramic with enclosing surrogate high-level waste glass show that the glass reacts rapidly to alteration products. Glass reaction causes variations in the solution pH in contact with the ceramic materials. We also document variable concentrations of Pu in solution, primarily in colloidal form, which appear to be related to secular variations in solution composition. The apparent dissolution rate of the ceramic waste form, based on Ba concentrations in the effluent, is estimated at le 10 -5 g/(m 2 · d). Pu-bearing colloids were recovered in the size range of 0.2 to 2 microm, but it is not clear that such entities would be transported in a system that is not advective-flow dominated. Results from SPFT experiments give information on the corrosion resistance of two surrogate Pu-ceramics (Ce-pyrochlore and Ce-zirconolite) at 90 C over a pH range of 2 to 12. The two ceramics were doped with minor quantities (approximately0.1 mass%) of MoO 3 , so that concentrations of Mo in the effluent solution could be used to monitor the reaction behavior of the materials. The data obtained thus far from experiments with durations up to 150 d do not conclusively prove that the solid-aqueous solution systems have reached steady-state conditions. Therefore, the dissolution mechanism cannot be determined. Apparent dissolution rates of the two ceramic materials based on Ce, Gd, and Mo concentrations in the effluent solutions from the SPFT are nearly identical and vary between 1.1 to 8.5 x 10 -4 g/(m 2 · d). In addition, the data reveal a slightly amphoteric dissolution behavior, with a minimum apparent rate at pH = 7 to 8, over the pH range examined. Results from two related ceramic samples suggest that radiation damage can have a measurable effect on the dissolution of titanium-based ceramics. The rare earth

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring of damage in ceramic matrix composites: Effects of weaves and feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Mordasky, Matt; Kumar, Rajesh

    2018-04-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are a class of high temperature materials with better damage tolerance properties compared to monolithic ceramics. The improved toughness is attributed to weak interface coating between the fiber and the matrix that allows for crack deflection and fiber pull-out. Thus, CMCs have gained consideration over monolithic materials for high temperature applications such as in gas turbines. The current standard fiber architecture for CMCs is a harness satin (HS) balanced weave (5HS and 8HS); however, other architectures such as uni-weave materials (tape layup) are now being considered due to fiber placement control and higher fiber volume fraction in the tensile loading direction. Engineering components require additional features in the CMC laminates, such as holes for attachments. Past work has shown that acoustic emission could differentiate the effect of changing interface conditions due to heat treatment effects. The focus of the present work is to investigate the effects of different weaves and the presence of a feature on damage behavior of CMCs as observed via acoustic emission technique. The results of the tensile testing with acoustic emission monitoring will be presented and discussed.

  6. Effect of ceramic thickness, grinding, and aging on the mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Diniz PRADO

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monolithic restorations of Y-TZP have been recommended as a restorative alternative on prosthetic dentistry as it allows a substantial reduction of ceramic thickness, which means a greater preservation of tooth structure. However, the influence of grinding and aging when using a thinner layer of the material is unclear. This investigation aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of ceramic thickness (0.5 mm and 1.0 mm, grinding and aging (low-temperature degradation on the mechanical behavior and surface characteristics of a full-contour Y-TZP ceramic. Y-TZP disc-shaped specimens (15 mm diameter were manufactured with both thicknesses and randomly assigned into 4 groups considering the factors ‘grinding with diamond bur’ and ‘aging in autoclave’. Surface topography (roughness, 3D profilometry and SEM, phase transformation, flexural strength and structural reliability (Weibull analyses were executed. Grinding affected the surface topography, while aging did not promote any effect. An increase in m-phase content was observed after grinding and aging, although different susceptibilities were observed. Regardless of zirconia’s thickness, no deleterious effect of grinding or aging on the mechanical properties was observed. Thus, in our testing assembly, reducing the thickness of the Y-TZP ceramic did not alter its response to grinding and low temperature degradation and did not impair its mechanical performance.

  7. Effect of ceramic thickness, grinding, and aging on the mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Rodrigo Diniz; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Melo, Renata Marques de; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2017-11-06

    Monolithic restorations of Y-TZP have been recommended as a restorative alternative on prosthetic dentistry as it allows a substantial reduction of ceramic thickness, which means a greater preservation of tooth structure. However, the influence of grinding and aging when using a thinner layer of the material is unclear. This investigation aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of ceramic thickness (0.5 mm and 1.0 mm), grinding and aging (low-temperature degradation) on the mechanical behavior and surface characteristics of a full-contour Y-TZP ceramic. Y-TZP disc-shaped specimens (15 mm diameter) were manufactured with both thicknesses and randomly assigned into 4 groups considering the factors 'grinding with diamond bur' and 'aging in autoclave'. Surface topography (roughness, 3D profilometry and SEM), phase transformation, flexural strength and structural reliability (Weibull) analyses were executed. Grinding affected the surface topography, while aging did not promote any effect. An increase in m-phase content was observed after grinding and aging, although different susceptibilities were observed. Regardless of zirconia's thickness, no deleterious effect of grinding or aging on the mechanical properties was observed. Thus, in our testing assembly, reducing the thickness of the Y-TZP ceramic did not alter its response to grinding and low temperature degradation and did not impair its mechanical performance.

  8. Combined CO/CH4 oxidation tests over Pd/Co3O4 monolithic catalyst. Effects of high reaction temperature and SO2 exposure on the deactivation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liotta, L.F.; Venezia, A.M.; Di Carlo, G.; Pantaleo, G.; Deganello, G.; Merlone Borla, E.; Pidria, M.

    2007-01-01

    CO and CH 4 combined oxidation tests were performed over a Pd (70 g/ft 3 )/Co 3 O 4 monolithic catalyst in conditions of GHSV = 100,000 h -1 and feed composition close to that of emission from bi-fuel vehicles. The effect of SO 2 (5 ppm) on CO and CH 4 oxidation activity under lean condition (λ 2) was investigated. The presence of sulphur strongly deactivated the catalyst towards methane oxidation, while the poisoning effect was less drastic in the oxidation of CO. Saturation of the Pd/Co 3 O 4 catalytic sites via chemisorbed SO 3 and/or sulphates occurred upon exposure to SO 2 . A treatment of regeneration to remove sulphate species was attempted by performing a heating/cooling cycle up to 900 C in oxidizing atmosphere. Decomposition of PdO and Co 3 O 4 phases at high temperature, above 750 C, was observed. Moreover, sintering of Pd 0 and PdO particles along with of CoO crystallites takes place. (author)

  9. Improved methods for testing bond and intrinsic strength and fatigue of thermally sprayed metallic and ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, K.K.; Ziehl, M.H.; Schwaminger, C.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional bond strength tests for thermally sprayed coatings represent only a rough means of obtaining overall strength values, with no differentiation between adhesion at the interface and intrinsic coating properties. In order to obtain information about the influence of substrate surface preparation on the adhesion of a Tribaloy T700 coating, tensile bond strength and modified crack-opening displacement (COD) specimens were tested by deliberate crack initiation at the interface. Crack initiation was achieved by weakening of the interface at the outer diameter in the case of bond strength specimens or at the notch root in the case of COD specimens. This made it possible to look at the influence of surface roughness and grit contamination on the coating adhesion separately. Modified COD specimens with the notch in the centre of the coating were used to determine crack-opening energies and critical stress intensity factors of atmospheric plasma-sprayed NiAl and low pressure plasma-sprayed CoNiCrAlY bond coatings and a ZrO 2 7Y 2 O 3 thermal barrier coating (TBC). Additionally, bond strength specimens were stressed dynamically, and it could be demonstrated that Woehler (S/N) diagrams can be established for a metallic NiAl bond coating and even for a ceramic ZrO 2 7Y 2 O 3 TBC. (orig.)

  10. Standard test methods for chemical analysis of ceramic whiteware materials using wavelength dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of ten major elements (SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O, TiO2, P2O5, MnO, and LOI in ceramic whitewares clays and minerals using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF). The sample is first ignited, then fused with lithium tetraborate and the resultant glass disc is introduced into a wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The disc is irradiated with X-rays from an X-ray tube. X-ray photons emitted by the elements in the samples are counted and concentrations determined using previously prepared calibration standards. (1) In addition to 10 major elements, the method provides a gravimetric loss-on-ignition. Note 1—Much of the text of this test method is derived directly from Major element analysis by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, included in Ref (1). 1.2 Interferences, with analysis by WDXRF, may result from mineralogical or other structural effects, line overlaps, and matrix effects. The structure of the...

  11. Prototype development and testing of ultrafine grain NZP ceramics. Final report, July 28, 1995--April 27, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.J.

    1997-08-04

    The goal of this project was to demonstrate that a new low-expanding ceramic (Ca{sub 0.6},Mg{sub 0.4})Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}, hereafter referred to as CMZP, could be used as an exhaust manifold liner in off-road diesel engines and provide improved engine efficiency (by permitting higher engine operating temperature). This study has successfully demonstrated this improvement and further engine testing (and possible manufacturing) is presently underway at Caterpillar Inc. Laboratories. Basically this program involved two subcontracts: one to Virginia Tech to develop sintering procedures for CMZP, and one to Caterpillar, Inc. to develop slip casting procedures for CMZP. Nearly 100kg of CMZP were prepared by MATVA, Inc. and Virginia Tech for use by Caterpillar. Virginia Tech developed detailed sintering procedures for CMZP and Caterpillar developed slip casting procedures and manufactured several exhaust manifold elbows. These elbows have been cast into prototype cylinder heads and have been shown to be acceptable replacements for metal manifolds. (Caterpillar advises that a new component may require up to 6 years of testing and qualification before acceptance as standard diesel engine part).

  12. Advanced ceramic matrix composite materials for current and future propulsion technology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S.; Beyer, S.; Knabe, H.; Immich, H.; Meistring, R.; Gessler, A.

    2004-08-01

    Current rocket engines, due to their method of construction, the materials used and the extreme loads to which they are subjected, feature a limited number of load cycles. Various technology programmes in Europe are concerned, besides developing reliable and rugged, low cost, throwaway equipment, with preparing for future reusable propulsion technologies. One of the key roles for realizing reusable engine components is the use of modern and innovative materials. One of the key technologies which concern various engine manufacturers worldwide is the development of fibre-reinforced ceramics—ceramic matrix composites. The advantages for the developers are obvious—the low specific weight, the high specific strength over a large temperature range, and their great damage tolerance compared to monolithic ceramics make this material class extremely interesting as a construction material. Over the past years, the Astrium company (formerly DASA) has, together with various partners, worked intensively on developing components for hypersonic engines and liquid rocket propulsion systems. In the year 2000, various hot-firing tests with subscale (scale 1:5) and full-scale nozzle extensions were conducted. In this year, a further decisive milestone was achieved in the sector of small thrusters, and long-term tests served to demonstrate the extraordinary stability of the C/SiC material. Besides developing and testing radiation-cooled nozzle components and small-thruster combustion chambers, Astrium worked on the preliminary development of actively cooled structures for future reusable propulsion systems. In order to get one step nearer to this objective, the development of a new fibre composite was commenced within the framework of a regionally sponsored programme. The objective here is to create multidirectional (3D) textile structures combined with a cost-effective infiltration process. Besides material and process development, the project also encompasses the development of

  13. Changes in the flexural strength of engineering ceramics after high temperature sodium corrosion test. Influence after sodium exposure for 1000 hours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Tachi, Yoshiaki; Kano, Shigeki; Hirakawa, Yasushi; Komine, Ryuji; Yoshida, Eiichi

    1998-02-01

    Engineering ceramics have excellent properties such as high strength, high hardness and high heat resistance compared with metallic materials. To apply the ceramic in fast reactor environment, it is necessary to evaluate the sodium compatibility and the influence of sodium on the mechanical properties of ceramics. In this study, the influence of high temperature sodium on the mechanical properties of sintered ceramics of conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 , SiC, SiAlON, AlN and unidirectional solidified ceramics of Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite were investigated by means of flexure tests. Test specimens were exposed in liquid sodium at 823K and 923K for 3.6Ms. There were no changes in the flexural strength of the conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 , AlN and Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite after the sodium exposure at 823K. On the contrary, the decrease in the flexural strength was observed in SiC and SiAlON. After the sodium exposure at 923K, there were also no changes in the flexural strength of AlN and Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite. In the conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 and SiC, the flexural strength decreased and signs of grain boundary corrosion were detected by surface observation. The flexural strength of SiAlON after the sodium exposure at 923K increased instead of severe corrosion. In the specimens those showed no changes in the flexural strength, further exposure in sodium is needed to verify whether the mechanical properties degrade or not. For SiAlON, it is necessary to clarify the reason for the increased strength after the sodium exposure at 923K. (author)

  14. Environmentally Benign Production of Stretchable and Robust Superhydrophobic Silicone Monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alexander; Surdo, Salvatore; Caputo, Gianvito; Bayer, Ilker S; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2018-01-24

    Superhydrophobic materials hold an enormous potential in sectors as important as aerospace, food industries, or biomedicine. Despite this great promise, the lack of environmentally friendly production methods and limited robustness remain the two most pertinent barriers to the scalability, large-area production, and widespread use of superhydrophobic materials. In this work, highly robust superhydrophobic silicone monoliths are produced through a scalable and environmentally friendly emulsion technique. It is first found that stable and surfactantless water-in-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) emulsions can be formed through mechanical mixing. Increasing the internal phase fraction of the precursor emulsion is found to increase porosity and microtexture of the final monoliths, rendering them superhydrophobic. Silica nanoparticles can also be dispersed in the aqueous internal phase to create micro/nanotextured monoliths, giving further improvements in superhydrophobicity. Due to the elastomeric nature of PDMS, superhydrophobicity can be maintained even while the material is mechanically strained or compressed. In addition, because of their self-similarity, the monoliths show outstanding robustness to knife-scratch, tape-peel, and finger-wipe tests, as well as rigorous sandpaper abrasion. Superhydrophobicity was also unchanged when exposed to adverse environmental conditions including corrosive solutions, UV light, extreme temperatures, and high-energy droplet impact. Finally, important properties for eventual adoption in real-world applications including self-cleaning, stain-repellence, and blood-repellence are demonstrated.

  15. Durability of feldspathic veneering ceramic on glass-infiltrated alumina ceramics after long-term thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, A M M; Ozcan, M; Souza, R O A; Kojima, A N; Nishioka, R S; Kimpara, E T; Bottino, M A

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength durability of a feldspathic veneering ceramic to glass-infiltrated reinforced ceramics in dry and aged conditions. Disc shaped (thickness: 4 mm, diameter: 4 mm) of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina) and glass-infiltrated alumina reinforced by zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) core ceramic specimens (N=48, N=12 per groups) were constructed according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Veneering ceramic (VITA VM7) was fired onto the core ceramics using a mold. The core-veneering ceramic assemblies were randomly divided into two conditions and tested either immediately after specimen preparation (Dry) or following 30000 thermocycling (5-55 ºC±1; dwell time: 30 seconds). Shear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (cross-head speed: 1 mm/min). Failure modes were analyzed using optical microscope (x20). The bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Thermocycling did not decrease the bond strength results for both In-Ceram Alumina (30.6±8.2 MPa; P=0.2053) and In-Ceram zirconia (32.6±9 MPa; P=0.3987) core ceramic-feldspathic veneering ceramic combinations when compared to non-aged conditions (28.1±6.4 MPa, 29.7±7.3 MPa, respectively). There were also no significant differences between adhesion of the veneering ceramic to either In-Ceram Alumina or In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (P=0.3289). Failure types were predominantly a mixture of adhesive failure between the veneering and the core ceramic together with cohesive fracture of the veneering ceramic. Long-term thermocycling aging conditions did not impair the adhesion of the veneering ceramic to the glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramics tested.

  16. Progress of R&D on water cooled ceramic breeder for ITER test blanket system and DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Yoshinori, E-mail: kawamura.yoshinori@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hisashi; Hirose, Takanori; Enoeda, Mikio [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Sato, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ochiai, Kentaro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Konno, Chikara; Edao, Yuki; Hayashi, Takumi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Nakamichi, Masaru; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Nishi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ezato, Koichiro; Seki, Yohji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Yamanishi, Toshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Thermo-hydraulic calculation in the TBM at the water ingress event has been done. • Shielding calculations for the ITER equatorial port #18 were conducted by using C-lite model. • Prototypic pebbles of Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} and Be{sub 12}V had a good oxidation property similar to Be{sub 12}Ti pebble. • Li rich Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles were successfully fabricated using the emulsion method by controlling sintering atmosphere. • New tritium production/recovery experiments at FNS have been started by using ionization chamber as on-line gas monitor. - Abstract: The development of a water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) test blanket module (TBM) is being performed as one of the most important steps toward DEMO blanket in Japan. For the TBM testing and development of DEMO blanket, R&D has been performed on the module fabrication technology, breeder and multiplier pebble fabrication technology, tritium production rate evaluation, as well as structural and safety design activities. The fabrication of full-scale first wall, side walls, breeder pebble bed box and back wall was completed, and assembly of TBM with box structure was successfully achieved. Development of advanced breeder and multiplier pebbles for higher chemical stability was continued for future DEMO blanket application. From the view point of TBM test result evaluation and DEMO blanket performance design, the development of the blanket tritium transport simulation technology, investigation of the TBM neutron measurement technology and the evaluation of the tritium production and recovery test using D-T neutron in the fusion neutron source (FNS) facility has been performed. This paper provides an overview of the recent achievements of the development of the WCCB Blanket in Japan.

  17. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  18. Sensitive Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive Ceramics is showing an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics. The experiment is working on two levels. One which has to do with designing compositions and patterns in a virtual 3d universe based on a digital dynamic system that responds on ...... with realizing the modules in ceramics by 3d printing directly in porcelain with a RapMan printer that coils up the 3d shape in layers. Finally the ceramic modules are mounted in a laser cut board that reflects the captured composition of the movement of the hands....

  19. Ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. Alumina composites for oxide/oxide fibrous monoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Polzin, B. J.; Picciolo, J. J.; Singh, D.; Tsaliagos, R. N.; Goretta, K. C.

    2000-01-01

    Most work on ceramic fibrous monoliths (FMs) has focused on the Si 3 N 4 /BN system. In an effort to develop oxidation-resistant FMs, several oxide systems have recently been examined. Zirconia-toughened alumina and alumina/mullite appear to be good candidates for the cell phase of FMs. These composites offer higher strength and toughness than pure alumina and good high-temperature stability. By combining these oxides, possibly with a weaker high-temperature oxide as the cell-boundary phase, it should be possible to product a strong, resilient FM that exhibits graceful failure. Several material combinations have been examined. Results on FM fabrication and microstructural development are presented

  1. Determining leach rates of monolithic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Dole, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The ANS 16.1 Leach Procedure provides a conservative means of predicting long-term release from monolithic waste forms, offering a simple and relatively quick means of determining effective solid diffusion coefficients. As presented here, these coefficients can be used in a simple model to predict maximum release rates or be used in more complex site-specific models to predict actual site performance. For waste forms that pass the structural integrity test, this model also allows the prediction of EP-Tox leachate concentrations from these coefficients. Thus, the results of the ANS 16.1 Leach Procedure provide a powerful tool that can be used to predict the waste concentration limits in order to comply with the EP-Toxicity criteria for characteristically nonhazardous waste. 12 refs., 3 figs

  2. Achievement report for fiscal 1991. Research and development of ceramic gas turbine (Development of test and evaluation method for ceramic member bonding technology); 1991 nendo ceramic gas turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Ceramic buzai setsugo gijutsu no shiken hyoka hoho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-05-01

    Development has been made on the test and evaluation method for a technology of bonding ceramics with metals from a viewpoint that what governs the bonding is residual stress. Activities were made on 1) test researches, 2) analysis researches, and 3) researches on the correlation of residual stress with mechanical strength characteristics. In Item 1, tests on the bonding residual stress and mechanical strength characteristics, tests on high temperature mechanical strength characteristics, X-ray stress measurement, IF method measurement, and mechanical strength test were performed. In Item 2), researches were made on three-dimensional stress analysis of interface bonded with different materials, high temperature mechanical strength of bonded bodies, and heat cycle fatigue strength. In Item 3, destruction dynamic discussions were given on the effects of the residual stress on the tension rupture strength, and cracks on bonded interface. Specifically speaking, residual stress in four kinds of bonded bodies with various sizes (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Cu/steel), for example, was measured, the bonded bodies were subjected to a cutting process, and considerations were given on the effects imposed on re-distribution of the residual stress due to the cutting and on the bonding strength. (NEDO)

  3. Test-element assembly and loading parameters for the in-pile test of HCPB ceramic pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, J.G. van der E-mail: vanderlaan@nrg-nl.com; Boccaccini, L.V.; Conrad, R.; Fokkens, J.H.; Jong, M.; Magielsen, A.J.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Reimann, J.; Stijkel, M.P.; Malang, S

    2002-11-01

    In the framework of developing the helium cooled pebble-bed (HCPB) blanket an irradiation test of pebble-bed assemblies is prepared at the HFR Petten. The test objective is to concentrate on the effect of neutron irradiation on the thermal-mechanical behaviour of the HCPB breeder pebble-bed at DEMO representative levels of temperature and defined thermal-mechanical loads. The paper reports on the project status, and presents the results of pre-tests, material characteristics, the manufacturing of the pebble-bed assemblies, and the nuclear and thermo-mechanical loading parameters.

  4. Dynamic test of the ITER blanket key and ceramic insulated pad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomyakov, S.; Sysoev, G.; Strebkov, Yu.; Kucherov, A.; Ioki, K.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic testing of the blanket module's key integrated into ITER vacuum vessel portion has been performed in 2008 to investigate its capability to react the electro-magnetic (EM) loads. The preliminary analysis showed the large dynamic amplification factor (DAF) of the reactions because of technological gaps between the blanket module and key. Shock load may yield the bronze pads, which protect the blanket electrical insulation from damage. However the dynamic analysis of such particularly non-linear system needs an experimental ground and confirmation. Toward this end, as well as demonstration of the key reliability, the special test facility has been made, and the full-scale mock-up of the inboard intermodular key was tested. So as not to scale non-linear dynamic parameters, 1-ton mass was built on the single flexible support. The key was welded in a 60-mm thick steel plate modeled with a fragment of the VV. The different gaps were set in between the bronze pad of the key and the mass shock worker. This system (supplemented with some additional constraints) has natural oscillations like as the 4-ton module built on four flexible supports. Thus the most critical radial torque might be modeled with a straight force. The objectives of the test were as follows: dynamic response, DAF and damping factor determination; measurement of the strain oscillations in the key's base and in the weld seam; comparison of the measured data with computation results. The paper will present the analytical grounds of the testing conditions, test facility description, analytical adaptation of the facility, experimental results, its comparison with analysis and discussion, and guidelines for the next experimental phase.

  5. Test of piezo-ceramic motor technology in ITER relevant high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.monti@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Besi Vetrella, Ugo; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Neri, Carlo; Rossi, Paolo; Viola, Rosario [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Dubus, Gregory; Damiani, Carlo [Fusion for Energy, c/ Josep Pla, 2 Torres Diagonal Litoral, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    In the framework of a Fusion for Energy (F4E) grant, a test campaign started in 2012 in order to assess the performance of the in-vessel viewing system (IVVS) probe concept and to verify its compatibility when exposed to ITER typical working conditions. ENEA laboratories went through with several tests simulating high magnetic fields, high temperature, high vacuum, gamma radiation and neutron radiation. A customized motor has been adopted to study the performances of ultrasonic piezo motors technology in high magnetic field conditions. This paper reports on the testing activity performed on the motor in a multi Tesla magnetic field. The job was carried out in a test facility of ENEA laboratories able to achieve 14 T. A maximum field of 10 T, fully compliant with ITER requirements (8 T), was applied. A specific mechanical assembly has been designed and manufactured to hold the motor in the region with high homogeneity of the field. Results obtained so far indicate that the motor is compatible with high magnetic fields, and are presented in the paper.

  6. Compatibility tests of materials for a prototype ceramic melter for defense glass-waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1979-01-01

    Objective is to evaluate the corrosion/erosion resistance of melter materials. Materials tested were Monofrox K3 and E, Serv, Inconel 690, Pt, and SnO. Results show that Inconel 690 is the leading electrode material and Monofrox K3 the leading refractory candidate. Melter lifetime is estimated to be 2 to 5 years for defense waste

  7. Product consistency test and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure results of the ceramic waste form from the electrometallurgical treatment process for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S. G.; Adamic, M. L.: DiSanto, T.; Warren, A. R.; Cummings, D. G.; Foulkrod, L.; Goff, K. M.

    1999-01-01

    The ceramic waste form produced from the electrometallurgical treatment of sodium bonded spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II was tested using two immersion tests with separate and distinct purposes. The product consistency test is used to assess the consistency of the waste forms produced and thus is an indicator of a well-controlled process. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure is used to determine whether a substance is to be considered hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency. The proposed high level waste repository will not be licensed to receive hazardous waste, thus any waste forms destined to be placed there cannot be of a hazardous nature as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Results are presented from the first four fully radioactive ceramic waste forms produced and from seven ceramic waste forms produced from cold surrogate materials. The fully radioactive waste forms are approximately 2 kg in weight and were produced with salt used to treat 100 driver subassemblies of spent fuel

  8. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  9. Assessment of tritiated activities in the radwaste generated from ITER Chinese helium cooled ceramic breeding test blanket module system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chang An, E-mail: chenchangan@caep.cn; Liu, Lingbo; Wang, Bo; Xiang, Xin; Yao, Yong; Song, Jiangfeng

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Approaches were developed for calculation/evaluation of tritium activities in the materials and components of a TBM system, with tritium permeation being considered for the first time. • Almost all tritiated materials and components were considered in CNHCCB TBM system including the TBM set, connection pipes, and the ancillary tritium handling systems. • Tritium activity data in HCCB TBM system were updated. Some of which in directly tritium contacted components are to be 2 or 4 magnitudes higher than the original neutron transmutation calculations. • The radwaste amount from both operation and decommission of HCCB TBM system was evaluated. - Abstract: Chinese Helium Cooled Ceramic Breeding Test blanket Module (CNHCCB TBM) will be tested in the ITER machine for the feasibility of in pile tritium production for a future magnetic confinement fusion reactor. The tritium inventories/retentions in the material/components were evaluated and updated mainly based on the tritium diffusion/permeation theory and the analysis of some reported data. Tritiated activities rank from less than 10 Bq g{sup −1} to 10{sup 9} Bq g{sup −1} for the different materials or components, which are generally higher than those from the previous neutron transmutation calculation. The amounts of tritiated radwaste were also estimated according to the operation, decommission, maintenance and replacement strategies, which vary from several tens of kilograms to tons in the different operation phases. The data can be used both for the tritium radiological safety evaluation and radwaste management of CNHCCB TBM set and its ancillary systems.

  10. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  11. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  12. Biaxial (Tension-Torsion) Testing of an Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    11 3.1 NextelTM 720/AS Dogbone and Straightsided Specimen Layups . . . . . . . . 15 3.2 Prepreg processing steps of NextelTM 720/AS composite...the laminate in the test section, used for producing circum- ferential or axial stresses, should be minimized to avoid adding a high radial stress...provided fabrication process in Figure 3.2. The process followed the fabric, prepreg , and layup process versus the fiber tow and filament winding

  13. TECHNOLOGICAL TESTS USING QUARTZITE RESIDUES AS COMPONENT OF CERAMIC MASS AT THE PORCELAIN STONEWARE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcondes Mendes Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to evaluate through technological tests the use of quartzite residues as component at the the production of porcelain stoneware. Were collected five samples of quartzites called of green quartzite, black quartzite, pink quartzite, goldy quartzite, white quartzite. After, the raw materials were milled, passed by a sieve with a Mesh of 200# (Mesh and characterized by chemical analysis in fluorescence of x-rays and also analysis of the crystalline phases by diffraction of x-rays. The porcelain tiles mass is composed of five formulations containing 57% of feldspar, 37% of clay and 6% of residues of quartzite with different coloration. For the preparation of the specimens, it was used uniaxial pressing, which afterwards were synthesized at 1150°C, 1200°C and 1250°C. After the sintering, the specimens were submit for tests of technological characterization like: water absorption, linear shrinkage, apparently porosity, density and flexural strain at three points. The results presented in the fluorescence of x-rays showed a high-content of iron oxide on black quartzite that is why it was discarded the utilization of it in porcelain stoneware. All quartzite formulations had low water absorption achieved when synthesized at 1200°C, getting 0.1 to 0.36% without having gone through the atomization process. At the tests of flexural strain, all the quartzite had in acceptance limits, according to the European norm EN 100, overcoming 27 MPA at 1200°C

  14. In situ observation of mechanical damage within a SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saucedo-Mora, L.; Lowe, T.; Zhao, S.; Lee, P.D.; Mummery, P.M.; Marrow, T.J.

    2016-01-01

    SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites are candidate materials for fuel cladding in Generation IV nuclear fission reactors and as accident tolerant fuel clad in current generation plant. Experimental methods are needed that can detect and quantify the development of mechanical damage, to support modelling and qualification tests for these critical components. In situ observations of damage development have been obtained of tensile and C-ring mechanical test specimens of a braided nuclear grade SiC-SiC ceramic composite tube, using a combination of ex situ and in situ computed X-ray tomography observation and digital volume correlation analysis. The gradual development of damage by matrix cracking and also the influence of non-uniform loading are examined. - Highlights: • X-ray tomography with digital volume correlation measures 3D deformation in situ. • Cracking and damage in the microstructure can be detected using the strain field. • Fracture can initiate from the monolithic coating of a SiC-SiC ceramic composite.

  15. In situ observation of mechanical damage within a SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saucedo-Mora, L. [Institute Eduardo Torroja for Construction Sciences-CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Department of Materials, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Lowe, T. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Zhao, S. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Lee, P.D. [Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (United Kingdom); Mummery, P.M. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Marrow, T.J., E-mail: james.marrow@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-01

    SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites are candidate materials for fuel cladding in Generation IV nuclear fission reactors and as accident tolerant fuel clad in current generation plant. Experimental methods are needed that can detect and quantify the development of mechanical damage, to support modelling and qualification tests for these critical components. In situ observations of damage development have been obtained of tensile and C-ring mechanical test specimens of a braided nuclear grade SiC-SiC ceramic composite tube, using a combination of ex situ and in situ computed X-ray tomography observation and digital volume correlation analysis. The gradual development of damage by matrix cracking and also the influence of non-uniform loading are examined. - Highlights: • X-ray tomography with digital volume correlation measures 3D deformation in situ. • Cracking and damage in the microstructure can be detected using the strain field. • Fracture can initiate from the monolithic coating of a SiC-SiC ceramic composite.

  16. Evaluation of the ICET Test Stand to Assess the Performance of a Range of Ceramic Media Filter Elements in Support of ASME AG-1 Subsection FO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schemmel, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-26

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are defined as extended-medium, dry-type filters with: (1) a minimum particle removal efficiency of no less than 99.97 percent for 0.3 micrometer particles, (2) a maximum, clean resistance of 1.0 inch water column (in. WC) when operated at 1,000 cubic feet per minute (CFM), and (3) a rigid casing that extends the full depth of the medium. Specifically, ceramic media HEPA filters provide better performance at elevated temperatures, are moisture resistant and nonflammable, can perform their function if wetted and exposed to greater pressures, and can be cleaned and reused. This paper describes the modification and design of a large scale test stand which properly evaluates the filtration characteristics of a range of ceramic media filters challenged with a nuclear aerosol agent in order to develop Section FO of ASME AG-1.

  17. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  18. Electron beam test of an iron/gas calorimeter based on ceramic parallel plate chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arefiev, A.; Bencze, Gy.L.; Bizzeti, A.; Choumilov, E.; Civinini, C; Dalla Santa, F.; D'Alessandro, R.; Ferrando, A.; Fouz, M.C.; Herve, A.; Iglesias, A.; Ivochkin, V.; Josa, M.I.; Maggi, F.; Malinin, A.; Meschini, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Radermacher, E.; Salicio, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The baseline option for the very forward calorimetry in the CMS experiment is an iron/gas calorimeter based on parallel plate chambers. A small prototype module of such a calorimeter, has been tested using electrons of 5 to 100 GeV/c momentum with various high voltages and two gases: CO2 (100%) and CF4/CO2 (80/20), at atmospheric pressure. The collected charge has been measured as a function of the high voltage and of the electron energy. The energy resolution has also been measured. Comparisons have been made with Monte-Carlo predictions. Agreement between data an simulation allows to make and estimation of the expected performance of a full size calorimeter. (Author) 23 refs

  19. Electron beam test of an iron/gas calorimeter based on ceramic parallel plate chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arefiev, A.; Bencze, G.L.; Bizzeti, A.; choumilov, E.; Civinini, C.; Dalla Santa, F.; D'Alessandro, R.; Ferrando, A.; Fouz, M.C.; Herve, A.; Iglesias, A.; Ivochkin, V.; Josa, M.I.; Maggi, F.; Malininin, A.; Meschini, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Radermacher, E.; Salicio, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    The baseline option for the very forward calorimetry in the CMS experiment is an iron/gas calorimeter based on parallel plate chambers. A small prototype module of such a calorimeter, has been tested using electrons of 5 to 100 GeV/c momentum with various high voltages and two gases: CO 2 (100%) and CF 4 /CO 2 (80/20), at atmospheric pressure. The collected charge has been measured as a function of the high voltage and of the electron energy. The energy resolution has also been measured. Comparisons have been made with Monte-Carlo predictions. Agreement between data an simulation allows to make and estimation of the expected performance of a full size calorimeter. (Author)

  20. A simple surrogate test method to rank the wear performance of prospective ceramic materials under hip prosthesis edge-loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Anthony P; Brannon, Rebecca M

    2014-02-01

    This research has developed a novel test method for evaluating the wear resistance of ceramic materials under severe contact stresses simulating edge loading in prosthetic hip bearings. Simply shaped test specimens - a cylinder and a spheroid - were designed as surrogates for an edge-loaded, head/liner implant pair. Equivalency of the simpler specimens was assured in the sense that their theoretical contact dimensions and pressures were identical, according to Hertzian contact theory, to those of the head/liner pair. The surrogates were fabricated in three ceramic materials: Al2 O3 , zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA), and ZrO2 . They were mated in three different material pairs and reciprocated under a 200 N normal contact force for 1000-2000 cycles, which created small (material pairs were ranked by their wear resistance, quantified by the volume of abraded material measured using an interferometer. Similar tests were performed on edge-loaded hip implants in the same material pairs. The surrogates replicated the wear rankings of their full-scale implant counterparts and mimicked their friction force trends. The results show that a proxy test using simple test specimens can validly rank the wear performance of ceramic materials under severe, edge-loading contact stresses, while replicating the beginning stage of edge-loading wear. This simple wear test is therefore potentially useful for screening and ranking new, prospective materials early in their development, to produce optimized candidates for more complicated full-scale hip simulator wear tests. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Improved monolithic reinforced concrete construction for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, P.; Fischer, K.

    1983-01-01

    Experience has shown that in applying monolithic reinforced concrete in nuclear power plant construction the following auxiliary means are useful: measuring sheets in assembling, welding gauges for reaching high tolerance accuracies of prefabricated reinforced concrete members, suitable lining materials, formwork anchorage and formwork release agents, concrete workability agents, mechanized procedures for finishing and assembling. These means were successfully tested in constructing the Greifswald nuclear power station

  2. Ion implantation and fracture toughness of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.; Pollock, J.T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramics generally lack toughness which is largely determined by the ceramic surface where stresses likely to cause failure are usually highest. Ion implantation has the capacity to improve the surface fracture toughness of ceramics. Significantly reduced ion size and reactivity restrictions exist compared with traditional methods of surface toughening. We are studying the effect of ion implantation on ceramic fracture toughness using indentation testing as the principal tool of analysis

  3. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

    2014-04-22

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  4. Oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  5. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  6. Experimental programme in support of the development of the European ceramic-breeder-inside-tube test-blanket: present status and future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust, E.; Roux, N.; Flament, T.; Anzidei, L.; ENEA, Frascati; Casadio, S.; Dell'orco, G.

    1992-01-01

    Four DEMO blanket classes are under investigation within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme. One of them is featured by the use of lithium ceramic breeder pellets contained inside externally helium cooled tubes. This paper summarizes the main achievements to date of the experimental programme supporting the development of this class of blanket. It also gives an outline of the areas of the breeder material, beryllium, tritium control, and thermomechanical tests, the future work envisaged for the 92-94 period. 53 refs

  7. Participation in IAEA proficiency test exercise on major, minor and trace elements in ancient Chinese ceramic (IAEA-CU-2006-06) using low power research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, S.; Siddique, N.; Zaidi, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    A proficiency test (PT) exercise was offered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for major, minor and trace elements in Chinese ceramic reference material (IAEA-CU-2006-06). Neutron activation analysis (NAA) laboratory at PINSTECH, Pakistan participated in the exercise and submitted the results for 28 elements. The aim of participation was to develop a suitable methodology for accurate measurement of as many elements as possible in ceramic material using a low power reactor (PARR-2) as this would help future investigation in a project on the authenticity of art objects, for provenance, conservation and management of ancient cultural heritage of the country. After receiving the final report of the PT exercise, a critical review of our data and final scoring of each element is made to check the suitability of our methodology and reliability of the acquired data. Most of the reported results passed different statistical evaluation criterion such as relative bias, z-score and u-scores and ratio of our results and IAEA target values. One element (Yb) falls in the unacceptable range of relative bias and z-scores. Hf and Tb showed slightly high z-scores within the questionable range. Ho, Mo and Sn were determined during this study but their results were not submitted to the IAEA. The confidence of accuracy observed for most of the elements in ceramic material has made it mandatory to report their results as information values. (author)

  8. ASTM Committee C28: International Standards for Properties and Performance of Advanced Ceramics-Three Decades of High-Quality, Technically-Rigorous Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Physical and mechanical properties and performance of advanced ceramics and glasses are difficult to measure correctly without the proper techniques. For over three decades, ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics, has developed high-quality, technically-rigorous, full-consensus standards (e.g., test methods, practices, guides, terminology) to measure properties and performance of monolithic and composite ceramics that may be applied to glasses in some cases. These standards contain testing particulars for many mechanical, physical, thermal, properties and performance of these materials. As a result these standards are used to generate accurate, reliable, repeatable and complete data. Within Committee C28, users, producers, researchers, designers, academicians, etc. have written, continually updated, and validated through round-robin test programs, 50 standards since the Committee's founding in 1986. This paper provides a detailed retrospective of the 30 years of ASTM Committee C28 including a graphical pictogram listing of C28 standards along with examples of the tangible benefits of standards for advanced ceramics to demonstrate their practical applications.

  9. ASTM Committee C28: International Standards for Properties and Performance of Advanced Ceramics, Three Decades of High-quality, Technically-rigorous Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Physical and mechanical properties and performance of advanced ceramics and glasses are difficult to measure correctly without the proper techniques. For over three decades, ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics, has developed high quality, rigorous, full-consensus standards (e.g., test methods, practices, guides, terminology) to measure properties and performance of monolithic and composite ceramics that may be applied to glasses in some cases. These standards testing particulars for many mechanical, physical, thermal, properties and performance of these materials. As a result these standards provide accurate, reliable, repeatable and complete data. Within Committee C28 users, producers, researchers, designers, academicians, etc. have written, continually updated, and validated through round-robin test programs, nearly 50 standards since the Committees founding in 1986. This paper provides a retrospective review of the 30 years of ASTM Committee C28 including a graphical pictogram listing of C28 standards along with examples of the tangible benefits of advanced ceramics standards to demonstrate their practical applications.

  10. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  11. Processing and characterization of ceramic superconductor/polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kander, R.G.; Namboodri, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    One way to more easily process a brittle high-temperature ceramic superconductor into a useful structure is to combine it with a polymer to form a composite material. Processing of polymer-based composites into complex shapes is well established and relatively easy when compared with traditional ceramic processing unit operations. In addition, incorporating a ceramic superconductor into a polymer matrix can improve mechanical performance as compared with a monolithic ceramic. Finally, because ceramic superconductors are susceptible to attack by moisture, a polymer-based composite structure can also provide protection from deleterious environmental effects. This paper focuses on the processing and subsequent characterization of ceramic superconductor/polymer composites designed primarily for electromagnetic shielding and diamagnetic applications. YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x [YBCO] ceramic superconductor is combined with poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] to form novel composite structures. Composite structures have been molded with both a discontinuous superconducting phase (i.e., ceramic particulate reinforced polymers) and with a continuous superconducting phase (i.e., polymer infiltrated porous ceramics). Characterization of these composite structures includes the determination of diamagnetic strength, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, mechanical performance, and environmental resistance. The goal of this program is to produce a composite structure with increased mechanical integrity and environmental resistance at liquid nitrogen temperatures without compromising the electromagnetic shielding and diamagnetic properties of the superconducting phase. Composites structures of this type are potentially useful in numerous magnetic applications including electromagnetic shielding, magnetic sensors, energy storage, magnetic levitation, and motor windings

  12. Development and set-up of a test system for non-destructive acoustic and ultrasonic testing of silicon nitride ceramics valves; Entwicklung und Aufbau eines Pruefsystems zur zerstoerungsfreien Klang- und Ultraschallpruefung von Ventilen aus Siliciumnitrid-Keramik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, H.A.; Caspers, B.; Hennicke, J.; Feuer, H.; Petzenhauser, I. [Cremer Forschungsinstitut GmbH und Co. KG, Roedental (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Valves made of silicon nitrice ceramics have advantages over metal valves owing to their low density, high wear resistance, low thermal conductivity and high termperature resistance. Reciprocating piston engines with ceramic valves have a lower fuel consumption, lower noise, and lower exhaust emissions. On the other hand, ceramic materials have the disadvantage of being brittele, i.e. mechanical stress concentrations at crack tips cannot be removed by plastic deformation. In order to ensure safe application in piston engines, all ceramic valves must therefore be tested by nondestructive methods in order to detect and replace defective valves. [German] Ventile aus Siliciumnitrid-Keramik haben infolge ihrer geringen Dichte, hohen Verschleissfestigkeit, niedrigen Waermeleitfaehigkeit und hohen Temperaturfestigkeit gegenueber Ventilen aus metallischen Werkstoffen ganz entscheidende Vorteile. So haben Hubkolbenmotoren mit Keramikventilen einen deutlich geringeren Treibstoffbedarf und zeigen bei einem erheblich reduzierten Geraeuschpegel eine schadstoffaermere Abgasentwicklung. Diesen Vorteilen steht die allen keramischen Werkstoffen gemeinsame Eigenschaft der Sproedigkeit gegenueber. So koennen mechanische Spannungskonzentrationen an Rissspitzen nicht durch plastische Verformung abgebaut werden. Fuer den sicheren Einsatz im Hubkolbenmotor muessen daher die Keramikventile einer zerstoerungsfreien Bewertung unterzogen werden, um fehlerhafte Ventile zu erkennen und auszuscheiden. (orig.)

  13. A novel surface modification technique for forming porous polymer monoliths in poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jeffrey M; Smela, Elisabeth

    2012-03-01

    A new method of surface modification is described for enabling the in situ formation of homogenous porous polymer monoliths (PPMs) within poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic channels that uses 365 nm UV illumination for polymerization. Porous polymer monolith formation in PDMS can be challenging because PDMS readily absorbs the monomers and solvents, changing the final monolith morphology, and because PDMS absorbs oxygen, which inhibits free-radical polymerization. The new approach is based on sequentially absorbing a non-hydrogen-abstracting photoinitiator and the monomers methyl methacrylate and ethylene diacrylate within the walls of the microchannel, and then polymerizing the surface treatment polymer within the PDMS, entangled with it but not covalently bound. Four different monolith compositions were tested, all of which yielded monoliths that were securely anchored and could withstand pressures exceeding the bonding strength of PDMS (40 psi) without dislodging. One was a recipe that was optimized to give a larger average pore size, required for low back pressure. This monolith was used to concentrate and subsequently mechanical lyse B lymphocytes.

  14. Monolithic solid-state lasers for spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Stephen, Mark A.; Merritt, Scott; Glebov, Leonid; Glebova, Larissa; Ryasnyanskiy, Aleksandr; Smirnov, Vadim; Mu, Xiaodong; Meissner, Stephanie; Meissner, Helmuth

    2015-02-01

    A new solution for building high power, solid state lasers for space flight is to fabricate the whole laser resonator in a single (monolithic) structure or alternatively to build a contiguous diffusion bonded or welded structure. Monolithic lasers provide numerous advantages for space flight solid-state lasers by minimizing misalignment concerns. The closed cavity is immune to contamination. The number of components is minimized thus increasing reliability. Bragg mirrors serve as the high reflector and output coupler thus minimizing optical coatings and coating damage. The Bragg mirrors also provide spectral and spatial mode selection for high fidelity. The monolithic structure allows short cavities resulting in short pulses. Passive saturable absorber Q-switches provide a soft aperture for spatial mode filtering and improved pointing stability. We will review our recent commercial and in-house developments toward fully monolithic solid-state lasers.

  15. Monolithically integrated 8-channel WDM reflective modulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopinski, S.T.; Malinowski, M.; Piramidowicz, R.; Smit, M.K.; Leijtens, X.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the design and characterization of a monolithically integrated photonic circuit acting as a reflective modulator for eight WDM channels is presented. The chip was designed and fabricated in a generic integration technology

  16. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojing [Daly City, CA; Yang, Peidong [Kensington, CA; Kim, Woong [Seoul, KR; Fan, Rong [Pasadena, CA

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  17. Decomposition of monolithic web application to microservices

    OpenAIRE

    Zaymus, Mikulas

    2017-01-01

    Solteq Oyj has an internal Wellbeing project for massage reservations. The task of this thesis was to transform the monolithic architecture of this application to microservices. The thesis starts with a detailed comparison between microservices and monolithic application. It points out the benefits and disadvantages microservice architecture can bring to the project. Next, it describes the theory and possible strategies that can be used in the process of decomposition of an existing monoli...

  18. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Activated Carbon Fiber Monoliths as Supercapacitor Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelines Moreno-Fernandez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon fibers (ACF are interesting candidates for electrodes in electrochemical energy storage devices; however, one major drawback for practical application is their low density. In the present work, monoliths were synthesized from two different ACFs, reaching 3 times higher densities than the original ACFs’ apparent densities. The porosity of the monoliths was only slightly decreased with respect to the pristine ACFs, the employed PVDC binder developing additional porosity upon carbonization. The ACF monoliths are essentially microporous and reach BET surface areas of up to 1838 m2 g−1. SEM analysis reveals that the ACFs are well embedded into the monolith structure and that their length was significantly reduced due to the monolith preparation process. The carbonized monoliths were studied as supercapacitor electrodes in two- and three-electrode cells having 2 M H2SO4 as electrolyte. Maximum capacitances of around 200 F g−1 were reached. The results confirm that the capacitance of the bisulfate anions essentially originates from the double layer, while hydronium cations contribute with a mixture of both, double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance.

  20. Properties of glass-bonded zeolite monoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F.; Murphy, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that mineral waste forms can be used to immobilize waste salt generated during the pyrochemical processing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Solid, leach resistant monoliths were formed by hot-pressing mixtures of salt-occluded zeolite A powders and glass frit at 990 K and 28 MPa. Additional samples have now been fabricated and tested. Normalized release rates for all elements, including iodide and chloride, were less than 1 g/m 2 d in 28-day tests in deionized water and in brine at 363 K (90 degrees C). Preliminary results indicate that these rates fall with time with both leachants and that the zeolite phase in the glass-bonded zeolite does not function as an ion exchanger. Some material properties were measured. The Poisson ratio and Young's modulus were slightly smaller in glass-bonded zeolite than in borosilicate glass. Density depended on zeolite fraction. The glass-bonded zeolite represents a promising mineral waste form for IFR salt

  1. Application of monolithic polycapillary focusing optics in MXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, N.; Ponomarev, I.; Xiao, Q.F.; Gibson, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    A monolithic polycapillary focusing optic, consisting of hundreds of thousands of small tapered glass capillaries, can collect a large solid angle of x rays from a point source and guide them through the capillaries by multiple total reflections to form an intense focused beam. Such a focused beam has many applications in microbeam x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) analysis. Two monolithic polycapillary focusing optics were tested and characterized in a MXRF set-up using a microfocusing x-ray source (50microm x 10microm). For the Cu K α line, the measured focal spot sizes of these optics were 105microm and 43microm Full-Width-Half-Maximum (FWHM), respectively. When the source was operated at 16W, the average Cu K α intensities over the focal spots were measured to be 2.4 x 10 4 photons/s/microm 2 and 8.9 x 10 4 photons/s/microm 2 , respectively. When the authors compared the monolithic optics to straight monocapillary optics (single channel capillary) with approximately the same output beam sizes, intensity gains of 16 and 44 were obtained. The optics were applied to the MXRF set-up to analyze trace elements in various samples and a Minimum Detection Limit (MDL) of about 2 pg was achieved for the transition elements (V, Cr, Mn, and Fe). The optics were also used to map the distributions of trace elements in various samples

  2. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  3. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with volume 8, constitutes the proceedings of an international symposium on the fracture mechanics of ceramics. The topics discussed in this volume include the toughening of ceramics by whisker reinforcement; the mechanical properties of SiCwhisker-reinforced TZP; the fracture of brittle rock and oil shale under dynamic explosive loading; impact damage models of ceramic coatings used in gas turbine and diesel engines; the use of exploratory data analysis for the safety evaluation of structural ceramics; and proof testing methods for the reliability of structural ceramics used in gas turbines

  4. Time-dependent fracture probability of bilayer, lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Esquivel–Upshaw, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports on bilayer ceramic crown prostheses suggest that fractures of the veneering ceramic represent the most common reason for prosthesis failure. Objective The aims of this study were to test the hypotheses that: (1) an increase in core ceramic/veneer ceramic thickness ratio for a crown thickness of 1.6 mm reduces the time-dependent fracture probability (Pf) of bilayer crowns with a lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic core, and (2) oblique loading, within the central fossa, increases Pf for 1.6-mm-thick crowns compared with vertical loading. Materials and methods Time-dependent fracture probabilities were calculated for 1.6-mm-thick, veneered lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation in the central fossa area. Time-dependent fracture probability analyses were computed by CARES/Life software and finite element analysis, using dynamic fatigue strength data for monolithic discs of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic core (Empress 2), and ceramic veneer (Empress 2 Veneer Ceramic). Results Predicted fracture probabilities (Pf) for centrally-loaded 1,6-mm-thick bilayer crowns over periods of 1, 5, and 10 years are 1.2%, 2.7%, and 3.5%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 1.0 (0.8 mm/0.8 mm), and 2.5%, 5.1%, and 7.0%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 0.33 (0.4 mm/1.2 mm). Conclusion CARES/Life results support the proposed crown design and load orientation hypotheses. Significance The application of dynamic fatigue data, finite element stress analysis, and CARES/Life analysis represent an optimal approach to optimize fixed dental prosthesis designs produced from dental ceramics and to predict time-dependent fracture probabilities of ceramic-based fixed dental prostheses that can minimize the risk for clinical failures. PMID:24060349

  5. Time-dependent fracture probability of bilayer, lithium-disilicate-based, glass-ceramic, molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Jadaan, Osama M; Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F

    2013-11-01

    Recent reports on bilayer ceramic crown prostheses suggest that fractures of the veneering ceramic represent the most common reason for prosthesis failure. The aims of this study were to test the hypotheses that: (1) an increase in core ceramic/veneer ceramic thickness ratio for a crown thickness of 1.6mm reduces the time-dependent fracture probability (Pf) of bilayer crowns with a lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic core, and (2) oblique loading, within the central fossa, increases Pf for 1.6-mm-thick crowns compared with vertical loading. Time-dependent fracture probabilities were calculated for 1.6-mm-thick, veneered lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation in the central fossa area. Time-dependent fracture probability analyses were computed by CARES/Life software and finite element analysis, using dynamic fatigue strength data for monolithic discs of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic core (Empress 2), and ceramic veneer (Empress 2 Veneer Ceramic). Predicted fracture probabilities (Pf) for centrally loaded 1.6-mm-thick bilayer crowns over periods of 1, 5, and 10 years are 1.2%, 2.7%, and 3.5%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 1.0 (0.8mm/0.8mm), and 2.5%, 5.1%, and 7.0%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 0.33 (0.4mm/1.2mm). CARES/Life results support the proposed crown design and load orientation hypotheses. The application of dynamic fatigue data, finite element stress analysis, and CARES/Life analysis represent an optimal approach to optimize fixed dental prosthesis designs produced from dental ceramics and to predict time-dependent fracture probabilities of ceramic-based fixed dental prostheses that can minimize the risk for clinical failures. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermal shock behavior of rare earth modified alumina ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junlong; Liu, Changxia [Ludong Univ., Yantai (China). School of Transportation

    2017-05-15

    Alumina matrix ceramic composites toughened by AlTiC master alloys, diopside and rare earths were fabricated by hot-pressing and their thermal shock behavior was investigated and compared with that of monolithic alumina. Results showed that the critical thermal shock temperature (ΔT) of monolithic alumina was 400 C. However, it decreased to 300 C for alumina incorporating only AlTiC master alloys, and increased with further addition of diopside and rare earths. Improvement of thermal shock resistance was obtained for alumina ceramic composites containing 9.5 wt.% AlTiC master alloys and 0.5 wt.% rare earth additions, which was mainly attributed to the formation of elongated grains in the composites.

  7. The effect of charged groups on hydrophilic monolithic stationary phases on their chromatographic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibin; Liu, Chusheng; Wang, Qiqin; Zhou, Haibo; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2016-10-21

    In order to investigate the effect of charged groups present in hydrophilic monolithic stationary phases on their chromatographic properties, three charged hydrophilic monomers, i.e. N,N-dimethyl-N-acryloyloxyethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl)ammonium betaine (SPDA), [2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (AETA), and 3-sulfopropyl acrylate potassium salt (SPA) were co-polymerized with the crosslinker N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA), respectively. The physicochemical properties of the three resulting charged hydrophilic monolithic columns were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, ζ-potential analysis and micro-HPLC. High column efficiency was obtained on the three monolithic columns at a linear velocity of 1mm/s using thiourea as test compound. Comparative characterization of the three charged HILIC phases was then carried out using a set of model compounds, including nucleobases, nucleosides, benzoic acid derivatives, phenols, β-blockers and small peptides. Depending on the combination of stationary phase/mobile phase/solute, both hydrophilic interaction and other potential secondary interactions, including electrostatic interaction, hydrogen-bonding interaction, molecular shape selectivity, could contribute to the over-all retention of the analytes. Because of the strong electrostatic interaction provided by the quaternary ammonium groups in the poly (AETA-co-MBA) monolith, this cationic HILIC monolith exhibited the strongest retention for benzoic acid derivatives and small peptides with distorted peak shapes and the weakest retention for basic β-blockers. The sulfonyl groups on the poly (SPA-co-MBA) hydrophilic monolith could provide strong electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding for positively charged analytes and hydrogen-donor/acceptor containing analytes, respectively. Therefore, basic drugs, nucleobases and nucleotides exhibited the strongest retention on this anionic monolith. Because of the weak but distinct cation exchange properties of

  8. Uncooled monolithic ferroelectric IRFPA technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, James F.; Hanson, Charles M.; Beratan, Howard R.; Udayakumar, K. R.; Soch, Kevin L.

    1998-10-01

    Once relegated to expensive military platforms, occasionally to civilian platforms, and envisioned for individual soldiers, uncooled thermal imaging affords cost-effective solutions for police cars, commercial surveillance, driving aids, and a variety of other industrial and consumer applications. System prices are continuing to drop, and swelling production volume will soon drive prices substantially lower. The impetus for further development is to improve performance. Hybrid barium strontium titanate (BST) detectors currently in production are relatively inexpensive, but have limited potential for improved performance. The MTF at high frequencies is limited by thermal conduction through the optical coating. Microbolometer arrays in development at Raytheon have recently demonstrated performance superior to hybrid detectors. However, microbolometer technology lacks a mature, low-cost system technology and an abundance of upgradable, deployable system implementations. Thin-film ferroelectric (TFFE) detectors have all the performance potential of microbolometers. They are also compatible with numerous fielded and planned system implementations. Like the resistive microbolometer, the TFFE detector is monolithic; i.e., the detector material is deposited directly on the readout IC rather than being bump bonded to it. Imaging arrays of 240 X 320 pixels have been produced, demonstrating the feasibility of the technology.

  9. Preparation and characterization of Au/CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawel, Bartlomiej; Lambrechts, Kalle [Ugelstad Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Oye, Gisle, E-mail: gisle.oye@chemeng.ntnu.no [Ugelstad Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A facile method for preparing Au/CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} monoliths with hierarchical porosity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Continuous-flow testing of the monoliths in liquid-phase oxidation of glucose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased catalytic activity in the presence of cerium oxide (stirred-batch tests). - Abstract: Porous CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} monoliths with hierarchical pore structure were prepared by mixing boehmite particles with solutions containing different amounts of cerium chloride and aluminum nitrate. The monoliths were functionalized with gold nanoparticles using the incipient wetness method. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, mercury porosimetry, UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The catalysts were tested in liquid phase glucose oxidation, comparing continuously stirred batch reactor and continuous-flow fix-bed reactor setups.

  10. Incorporation of gypsum waste in ceramic block production: Proposal for a minimal battery of tests to evaluate technical and environmental viability of this recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Testolin, Renan C; Janke, Leandro; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-01-01

    Civil engineering-related construction and demolition debris is an important source of waste disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. After clay materials, gypsum waste is the second largest contributor to the residential construction waste stream. As demand for sustainable building practices grows, interest in recovering gypsum waste from construction and demolition debris is increasing, but there is a lack of standardized tests to evaluate the technical and environmental viability of this solid waste recycling process. By recycling gypsum waste, natural deposits of gypsum might be conserved and high amounts of the waste by-product could be reused in the civil construction industry. In this context, this paper investigates a physical property (i.e., resistance to axial compression), the chemical composition and the ecotoxicological potential of ceramic blocks constructed with different proportions of clay, cement and gypsum waste, and assesses the feasibility of using a minimal battery of tests to evaluate the viability of this recycling process. Consideration of the results for the resistance to axial compression tests together with production costs revealed that the best formulation was 35% of plastic clay, 35% of non-plastic clay, 10% of Portland cement and 20% of gypsum waste, which showed a mean resistance of 4.64MPa. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed calcium and sulfur to be the main elements, while quartz, gypsum, ettringite and nacrite were the main crystalline compounds found in this formulation. Ecotoxicity tests showed that leachate from this formulation is weakly toxic toward daphnids and bacteria (EC(20%)=69.0 and 75.0, respectively), while for algae and fish the leachate samples were not toxic at the EC(50%) level. Overall, these results show that the addition of 20% of gypsum waste to the ceramic blocks could provide a viable substitute for clay in the ceramics industry and the tests applied in this study proved to be a useful tool

  11. Comparison between pulsed Nd:YAG laser superficial treatment and ceramic coating in creep test of Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, A.G.; Reis, D.A.P.; Moura Neto, C.; Oliveira, H.S.; Couto, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was evaluating the creep resistance of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy with superficial treatment of pulsed Nd:YAG laser and ceramic coating in creep test of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. It was used Ti-6Al-4V alloy as cylindrical bars under forged and annealing of 190 deg C by 6 hours condition and cooled by air. The Ti-6Al-4V alloy after the superficial treatment of pulsed Nd:YAG laser and ceramic coating was submitted to creep tests at 600°C and 125 at 319 MPa, under constant load mode. In the Nd:YAG pulsed laser treatment was used an environment of 40 % N and 60 % Ar, with 2.1 W of power and 10 m/s of speed. Yttria (8 wt.%) stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with a CoNiCrAlY bond coat was atmospherically plasma sprayed on Ti-6Al-4V substrates by Sulzer Metco Type 9 MB. The obtained results suggest the laser treatment on Ti-6Al-4V alloy improved its creep resistance. (author)

  12. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie Lynn; van Roode, Mark; Kashyap, Tania; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are increasingly being considered as structural materials for advanced power generation equipment. Broadly speaking the two classes of materials are oxide-based CMCs and non-oxide based CMCs. The non-oxide CMCs are primarily silicon-based. Under conditions prevalent in the gas turbine hot section the water vapor formed in the combustion of gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons reacts with the surface-SiO2 to form volatile products. Progressive surface recession of the SiC-SiC CMC component, strength loss as a result of wall thinning and chemical changes in the component occur, which leads to the loss of structural integrity and mechanical strength and becomes life limiting to the equipment in service. The solutions pursued to improve the life of SiC-SiC CMCs include the incorporation of an external barrier coating to provide surface protection to the CMC substrate. The coating system has become known as an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC). The relevant early coatings work was focused on coatings for corrosion protection of silicon-based monolithic ceramics operating under severely corrosive conditions. The development of EBCs for gas turbine hot section components was built on the early work for silicon-based monolithics. The first generation EBC is a three-layer coating, which in its simplest configuration consists of a silicon (Si) base coat applied on top of the CMC, a barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS) surface coat resistant to water vapor attack, and a mullite-based intermediate coating layer between the Si base coat and BSAS top coat. This system can be represented as Si-Mullite-BSAS. While this baseline EBC presented a significant improvement over the uncoated SiC-SiC CMC, for the very long durations of 3-4 years or more expected for industrial operation further improvements in coating durability are desirable. Also, for very demanding applications with higher component temperatures but shorter service lives more rugged EBCs

  13. Preparation of epoxy-based macroporous monolithic columns for the fast and efficient immunofiltration of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Sonja; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Macroporous epoxy-based monolithic columns were used for immunofiltration of bacteria. The prepared monolithic polymer support is hydrophilic and has large pore sizes of 21 μm without mesopores. A surface chemistry usually applied for immobilization of antibodies on glass slides is successfully transferred to monolithic columns. Step-by-step, the surface of the epoxy-based monolith is hydrolyzed, silanized, coated with poly(ethylene glycol diamine) and activated with the homobifunctional crosslinker di(N-succinimidyl)carbonate for immobilization of antibodies on the monolithic columns. The functionalization steps are characterized to ensure the coating of each monolayer. The prepared antibody-immobilized monolithic column is optimized for immunofiltration to enrich Staphylococcus aureus as an important food contaminant. Different kinds of geometries of monolithic columns, flow rates and elution buffers are tested with the goal to get high recoveries in the shortest enrichment time as possible. An effective capture of S. aureus was achieved at a flow rate of 7.0 mL/min with low backpressures of 20.1±5.4 mbar enabling a volumetric enrichment of 1000 within 145 min. The bacteria were quantified by flow cytometry using a double-labeling approach. After immunofiltration the sensitivity was significantly increased and a detection limit of the total system of 42 S. aureus/mL was reached. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders: a comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Dolores R R; Bottino, Marco C; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H A

    2008-12-01

    (1) To synthesize 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. A coprecipitation route was used to synthesize a 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic processed by uniaxial compaction and pressureless sintering. Commercially available alumina or alumina/zirconia ceramics, namely Procera AllCeram (PA), In-Ceram Zirconia Block (CAZ) and In-Ceram Zirconia (IZ) were chosen for comparison. All specimens (6mmx5mmx5mm) were polished and ultrasonically cleaned. Qualitative phase analysis was performed by XRD and apparent densities were measured on the basis of Archimedes principle. Ceramics were also characterized using SEM, TEM and EDS. The hardness measurements were made employing Vickers hardness test. Fracture toughness (K(IC)) was calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). ANOVA revealed that the Vickers hardness (pceramic materials composition. It was confirmed that the PA ceramic was constituted of a rhombohedral alumina matrix, so-called alpha-alumina. Both CAZ and IZ ceramics presented tetragonal zirconia and alpha-alumina mixture of phases. The SEM/EDS analysis confirmed the presence of aluminum in PA ceramic. In the IZ and CAZ ceramics aluminum, zirconium and cerium in grains involved by a second phase containing aluminum, silicon and lanthanum were identified. PA showed significantly higher mean Vickers hardness values (H(V)) (18.4+/-0.5GPa) compared to vitreous CAZ (10.3+/-0.2GPa) and IZ (10.6+/-0.4GPa) ceramics. Experimental Y-TZP showed significantly lower results than that of the other monophased ceramic (PA) (pceramics (pceramic processing conditions led to ceramics with mechanical properties comparable to commercially available reinforced ceramic materials.

  15. Surface characteristics and antibacterial activity of a silver-doped carbon monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Vukčević et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A carbon monolith with a silver coating was prepared and its antimicrobial behaviour in a flow system was examined. The functional groups on the surface of the carbon monolith were determined by temperature-programmed desorption and Boehm's method, and the point of zero charge was determined by mass titration. The specific surface area was examined by N2 adsorption using the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET method. As a test for the surface activity, the deposition of silver from an aqueous solution of a silver salt was used. The morphology and structure of the silver coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The resistance to the attrition of the silver deposited on the carbon monolith was tested. The antimicrobial activity of the carbon monolith with a silver coating was determined using standard microbiological methods. Carbon monolith samples with a silver coating showed good antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, and are therefore suitable for water purification, particularly as personal disposable water filters with a limited capacity.

  16. Impact of Gastric Acid Induced Surface Changes on Mechanical Behavior and Optical Characteristics of Dental Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Aditi; Rothrock, James; Thompson, Jeffery

    2018-01-14

    To test the impact of exposure to artificial gastric acid combined with toothbrush abrasion on the properties of dental ceramics. Earlier research has indicated that immersion in artificial gastric acid has caused increased surface roughness of dental ceramics; however, the combined effects of acid immersion and toothbrush abrasion and the impact of increased surface roughness on mechanical strength and optical properties have not been studied. Three commercially available ceramics were chosen for this study: feldspathic porcelain, lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, and monolithic zirconium oxide. The specimens (10 × 1 mm discs) were cut, thermally treated as required, and polished. Each material was divided into four groups (n = 8 per group): control (no exposure), acid only, brush only, acid + brush. The specimens were immersed in artificial gastric acid (50 ml of 0.2% [w/v] sodium chloride in 0.7% [v/v] hydrochloric acid mixed with 0.16 g of pepsin powder, pH = 2) for 2 minutes and rinsed with deionized water for 2 minutes. The procedure was repeated 6 times/day × 9 days, and specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C. Toothbrush abrasion was performed using an ISO/ADA design brushing machine for 100 cycles/day × 9 days. The acid + brush group received both treatments. Specimens were examined under SEM and an optical microscope for morphological changes. Color and translucency were measured using spectrophotometer CIELAB coordinates (L*, a*, b*). Surface gloss was measured using a gloss meter. Surface roughness was measured using a stylus profilometer. Biaxial flexural strength was measured using a mechanical testing machine. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD post hoc test (p gloss, and surface roughness for porcelain and e.max specimens. No statistically significant changes were found for any properties of zirconia specimens. The acid treatment affected the surface roughness, color, and gloss of porcelain and e

  17. Fatigue failure load of two resin-bonded zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramics: Effect of ceramic thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Jaiane Bandoli; Riquieri, Hilton; Prochnow, Catina; Guilardi, Luís Felipe; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; de Melo, Renata Marques; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of ceramic thickness on the fatigue failure load of two zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) glass-ceramics, adhesively cemented to a dentin analogue material. Disc-shaped specimens were allocated into 8 groups (n=25) considering two study factors: ZLS ceramic type (Vita Suprinity - VS; and Celtra Duo - CD), and ceramic thickness (1.0; 1.5; 2.0; and 2.5mm). A trilayer assembly (ϕ=10mm; thickness=3.5mm) was designed to mimic a bonded monolithic restoration. The ceramic discs were etched, silanized and luted (Variolink N) into a dentin analogue material. Fatigue failure load was determined using the Staircase method (100,000 cycles at 20Hz; initial fatigue load ∼60% of the mean monotonic load-to-failure; step size ∼5% of the initial fatigue load). A stainless-steel piston (ϕ=40mm) applied the load into the center of the specimens submerged in water. Fractographic analysis and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) were also performed. The ceramic thickness influenced the fatigue failure load for both ZLS materials: Suprinity (716N up to 1119N); Celtra (404N up to 1126N). FEA showed that decreasing ceramic thickness led to higher stress concentration on the cementing interface. Different ZLS glass-ceramic thicknesses influenced the fatigue failure load of the bonded system (i.e. the thicker the glass ceramic is, the higher the fatigue failure load will be). Different microstructures of the ZLS glass-ceramics might affect the fatigue behavior. FEA showed that the thicker the glass ceramic is, the lower the stress concentration at the tensile surface will be. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; van Roode, Mark; Kashyap, Tania; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are increasingly being considered as structural materials for advanced power generation equipment because of their light weight, higher temperature capability, and oxidation resistance. Limitations of SiC/SiC CMCs include surface recession and component cracking and associated chemical changes in the CMC. The solutions pursued to improve the life of SiC/SiC CMCs include the incorporation of coating systems that provide surface protection, which has become known as an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC). The development of EBCs for the protection of gas turbine hot section CMC components was a continuation of coating development work for corrosion protection of silicon-based monolithics. Work on EBC development for SiC/SiC CMCs has been ongoing at several national laboratories and the original gas turbine equipment manufacturers. The work includes extensive laboratory, rig and engine testing, including testing of EBC coated SiC/SiC CMCs in actual field applications. Another EBC degradation issue which is especially critical for CMC components used in aircraft engines is the degradation from glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) with other minor oxides. This paper addresses the need for and properties of external coatings on SiC/SiC CMCs to extend their useful life in service and the retention of their properties.

  19. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James; Klett, Lynn; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  20. Technology development for SOI monolithic pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczewski, J.; Domanski, K.; Grabiec, P.; Grodner, M.; Jaroszewicz, B.; Kociubinski, A.; Kucharski, K.; Tomaszewski, D.; Caccia, M.; Kucewicz, W.; Niemiec, H.

    2006-01-01

    A monolithic detector of ionizing radiation has been manufactured using silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers with a high-resistivity substrate. In our paper the integration of a standard 3 μm CMOS technology, originally designed for bulk devices, with fabrication of pixels in the bottom wafer of a SOI substrate is described. Both technological sequences have been merged minimizing thermal budget and providing suitable properties of all the technological layers. The achieved performance proves that fully depleted monolithic active pixel matrix might be a viable option for a wide spectrum of future applications

  1. Mineral-modeled ceramics for long-term storage of high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    Over the past ten years, Penn State's Materials Research Laboratory has done extensive work on mineral-modeled ceramics for high-level nuclear waste storage. These ceramics are composed of several mineral analogues that form a monolithic polycrystalline aggregate. Mineral-modeling can be made in a similar fashion to nuclear waste glasses, and their naturally occurring analogues are known to last millions, and even billions, of years in hot, wet conditions. It is believed that such ceramics could reduce dispersal of radionuclides by leaching to a minimum

  2. Elasticity and inelasticity of silicon nitride/boron nitride fibrous monoliths.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, B. I.; Burenkov, Yu. A.; Kardashev, B. K.; Singh, D.; Goretta, K. C.; de Arellano-Lopez, A. R.; Energy Technology; Russian Academy of Sciences; Univer. de Sevilla

    2001-01-01

    A study is reported on the effect of temperature and elastic vibration amplitude on Young's modulus E and internal friction in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and BN ceramic samples and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN monoliths obtained by hot pressing of BN-coated Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers. The fibers were arranged along, across, or both along and across the specimen axis. The E measurements were carried out under thermal cycling within the 20-600 C range. It was found that high-modulus silicon-nitride specimens possess a high thermal stability; the E(T) dependences obtained under heating and cooling coincide well with one another. The low-modulus BN ceramic exhibits a considerable hysteresis, thus indicating evolution of the defect structure under the action of thermoelastic (internal) stresses. Monoliths demonstrate a qualitatively similar behavior (with hysteresis). This behavior of the elastic modulus is possible under microplastic deformation initiated by internal stresses. The presence of microplastic shear in all the materials studied is supported by the character of the amplitude dependences of internal friction and the Young's modulus. The experimental data obtained are discussed in terms of a model in which the temperature dependences of the elastic modulus and their features are accounted for by both microplastic deformation and nonlinear lattice-atom vibrations, which depend on internal stresses.

  3. Development of the multiwavelength monolithic integrated fiber optics terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, C. R.; Bryan, D. A.; Powers, J. K.; Rice, R. R.; Nettle, V. H.; Dalke, E. A.; Reed, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Multiwavelength Monolithic Integrated Fiber Optic Terminal (MMIFOT) for the NASA Johnson Space Center. The program objective is to utilize guided wave optical technology to develop wavelength-multiplexing and -demultiplexing units, using a single mode optical fiber for transmission between terminals. Intensity modulated injection laser diodes, chirped diffraction gratings and thin film lenses are used to achieve the wavelength-multiplexing and -demultiplexing. The video and audio data transmission test of an integrated optical unit with a Luneburg collimation lens, waveguide diffraction grating and step index condensing lens is described.

  4. Application of a Fast Separation Method for Anti-diabetics in Pharmaceuticals Using Monolithic Column: Comparative Study With Silica Based C-18 Particle Packed Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdan, A; Abdel-Aziz, Omar

    2018-04-01

    Run time is a predominant factor in HPLC for quality control laboratories especially if there is large number of samples have to be analyzed. Working at high flow rates cannot be attained with silica based particle packed column due to elevated backpressure issues. The use of monolithic column as an alternative to traditional C-18 column was tested for fast separation of pharmaceuticals, where the results were very competitive. The performance comparison of both columns was tested for separation of anti-diabetic combination containing Metformin, Pioglitazone and Glimepiride using Gliclazide as an internal standard. Working at high flow rates with less significant backpressure was obtained with the monolithic column where the run time was reduced from 6 min in traditional column to only 1 min in monolithic column with accepted resolution. The structure of the monolith contains many pores which can adapt the high flow rate of the mobile phase. Moreover, peak symmetry and equilibration time were more efficient with monolithic column.

  5. Effect of pore size on performance of monolithic tube chromatography of large biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornik, Ales; Hamachi, Masataka; Isakari, Yu; Yoshimoto, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2017-11-01

    Effect of pore size on the performance of ion-exchange monolith tube chromatography of large biomolecules was investigated. Radial flow 1 mL polymer based monolith tubes of different pore sizes (1.5, 2, and 6 μm) were tested with model samples such as 20 mer poly T-DNA, basic proteins, and acidic proteins (molecular weight 14 000-670 000). Pressure drop, pH transient, the number of binding site, dynamic binding capacity, and peak width were examined. Pressure drop-flow rate curves and dynamic binding capacity values were well correlated with the nominal pore size. While duration of the pH transient curves depends on the pore size, it was found that pH duration normalized on estimated surface area was constant, indicating that the ligand density is the same. This was also confirmed by the constant number of binding site values being independent of pore size. The peak width values were similar to those for axial flow monolith chromatography. These results showed that it is easy to scale up axial flow monolith chromatography to radial flow monolith tube chromatography by choosing the right pore size in terms of the pressure drop and capacity. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Influence of the preparation design and artificial aging on the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitov, Gergo; Anastassova-Yoshida, Yana; Nothdurft, Frank Phillip; von See, Constantin; Pospiech, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and fracture behavior of monolithic zirconia crowns in accordance with the preparation design and aging simulation method. An upper first molar was prepared sequentially with three different preparation designs: shoulderless preparation, 0.4 mm chamfer and 0.8 mm chamfer preparation. For each preparation design, 30 monolithic zirconia crowns were fabricated. After cementation on Cr-Co alloy dies, the following artificial aging procedures were performed: (1) thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML): 5000 cycles of thermal cycling 5℃-55℃ and chewing simulation (1,200,000 cycles, 50 N); (2) Low Temperature Degradation simulation (LTD): autoclave treatment at 137℃, 2 bar for 3 hours and chewing simulation; and (3) no pre-treatment (control group). After artificial aging, the crowns were loaded until fracture. The mean values of fracture resistance varied between 3414 N (LTD; 0.8 mm chamfer preparation) and 5712 N (control group; shoulderless preparation). Two-way ANOVA analysis showed a significantly higher fracture loads for the shoulderless preparation, whereas no difference was found between the chamfer preparations. In contrast to TCML, after LTD simulation the fracture strength of monolithic zirconia crowns decreased significantly. The monolithic crowns tested in this study showed generally high fracture load values. Preparation design and LTD simulation had a significant influence on the fracture strength of monolithic zirconia crowns.

  7. Affinity monolith chromatography: A review of principles and recent analytical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; Paulemond, Marie Laura; Dupper, Courtney M.; Hage, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Affinity monolith chromatography (AMC) is a type of liquid chromatography that uses a monolithic support and a biologically-related binding agent as a stationary phase. AMC is a powerful method for the selective separation, analysis or studies of specific target compounds in a sample. This review discusses the basic principles of AMC and recent developments or applications of this method, with particular emphasis being given to work that has appeared in the last five years. Various materials that have been used to prepare columns for AMC are examined, including organic monoliths, silica monoliths, agarose monoliths and cryogels. These supports have been used in AMC for formats that have ranged from traditional columns to disks, microcolumns and capillaries. Many binding agents have also been employed in AMC, such as antibodies, enzymes, proteins, lectins, immobilized metal-ions and dyes. Some applications that have been reported with these binding agents in AMC are bioaffinity chromatography, immunoaffinity chromatography or immunoextraction, immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, dye-ligand affinity chromatography, chiral separations and biointeraction studies. Examples are presented from fields that include analytical chemistry, pharmaceutical analysis, clinical testing and biotechnology. Current trends and possible future directions in AMC are also discussed. PMID:23187827

  8. The effect of core material, veneering porcelain, and fabrication technique on the biaxial flexural strength and weibull analysis of selected dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Ercoli, Carlo; Feng, Changyong; Morton, Dean

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of veneering porcelain (monolithic or bilayer specimens) and core fabrication technique (heat-pressed or CAD/CAM) on the biaxial flexural strength and Weibull modulus of leucite-reinforced and lithium-disilicate glass ceramics. In addition, the effect of veneering technique (heat-pressed or powder/liquid layering) for zirconia ceramics on the biaxial flexural strength and Weibull modulus was studied. Five ceramic core materials (IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max Press, IPS e.max CAD, IPS e.max ZirCAD) and three corresponding veneering porcelains (IPS Empress Esthetic Veneer, IPS e.max Ceram, IPS e.max ZirPress) were selected for this study. Each core material group contained three subgroups based on the core material thickness and the presence of corresponding veneering porcelain as follows: 1.5 mm core material only (subgroup 1.5C), 0.8 mm core material only (subgroup 0.8C), and 1.5 mm core/veneer group: 0.8 mm core with 0.7 mm corresponding veneering porcelain with a powder/liquid layering technique (subgroup 0.8C-0.7VL). The ZirCAD group had one additional 1.5 mm core/veneer subgroup with 0.7 mm heat-pressed veneering porcelain (subgroup 0.8C-0.7VP). The biaxial flexural strengths were compared for each subgroup (n = 10) according to ISO standard 6872:2008 with ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (p≤ 0.05). The reliability of strength was analyzed with the Weibull distribution. For all core materials, the 1.5 mm core/veneer subgroups (0.8C-0.7VL, 0.8C-0.7VP) had significantly lower mean biaxial flexural strengths (p Empress and e.max groups, regardless of core thickness and fabrication techniques. Comparing fabrication techniques, Empress Esthetic/CAD, e.max Press/CAD had similar biaxial flexural strength (p= 0.28 for Empress pair; p= 0.87 for e.max pair); however, e.max CAD/Press groups had significantly higher flexural strength (p Empress Esthetic/CAD groups. Monolithic core

  9. Industrial ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengelle, Ch.

    1999-04-01

    After having given the definition of the term 'ceramics', the author describes the different manufacturing processes of these compounds. These materials are particularly used in the fields of 1)petroleum industry (in primary and secondary reforming units, in carbon black reactors and ethylene furnaces). 2)nuclear industry (for instance UO 2 and PuO 2 as fuels; SiC for encapsulation; boron carbides for control systems..)

  10. Tensile Properties of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 409, - (2009), s. 168-175 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramics /3./. Stará Lesná, 07.09.2008-10.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0724; GA ČR GD106/05/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : tensile test * ceramics foam * open porosity * tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  11. Repair bond strength of resin composite to bilayer dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various surface treatments (ST) on the shear bond strength of resin composite to three bilayer dental ceramics made by CAD/CAM and two veneering ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different bilayer dental ceramics and two different veneering ceramics were used (Group A: IPS e.max CAD+IPS e.max Ceram; Group B: IPS e.max ZirCAD+IPS e.max Ceram, Group C: Vita Suprinity+Vita VM11; Group D: IPS e.max Ceram; Group E: Vita VM11). All groups were divided into eight subgroups according to the ST. Then, all test specimens were repaired with a nano hybrid resin composite. Half of the test specimens were subjected to thermocycling procedure and the other half was stored in distilled water at 37℃. Shear bond strength tests for all test specimens were carried out with a universal testing machine. RESULTS There were statistically significant differences among the tested surface treatments within the all tested fracture types (P.00125). CONCLUSION This study revealed that HF etching for glass ceramics and sandblasting for zirconia ceramics were adequate for repair of all ceramic restorations. The effect of ceramic type exposed on the fracture area was not significant on the repair bond strength of resin composites to different ceramic types. PMID:29713430

  12. Package Holds Five Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Decker, D. Richard; Olson, Hilding M.

    1996-01-01

    Packages protect and hold monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) chips while providing dc and radio-frequency (RF) electrical connections for chips undergoing development. Required to be compact, lightweight, and rugged. Designed to minimize undesired resonances, reflections, losses, and impedance mismatches.

  13. The Effect of Chlorides on the Correlation of Accelerated Laboratory Corrosion Tests to Out-Door Exposure Tests for Ceramics-Aluminum Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    approximately 2000 psi. (G-10 fiber glass) (G-10 fiber glass) Ceramic Coupon *Courtesy : George Hawthorn of Hawaii Corrosion Lab Outdoor Exposure Procedures...agricultural, and arid). • Hawaii’s climate is one of the most spatially diverse on Earth. Kahuku* Coconut Island* – Marine environment – Marine...T6 Al Kilauea Kahuku Coconut Island Manoa Campbell Waipahu Ewanui Mauna Loa C o rr o s io n r a te s a t th e i n te rf a c e r e g io n ( g m d

  14. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  15. Fracture Strength of Aged Monolithic and Bilayer Zirconia-Based Crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Pacheco Lameira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and surface finishing on fracture strength of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP crowns in monolithic (1.5 mm thickness and bilayer (0.8 mm zirconia coping and 0.7 mm porcelain veneer configuration after artificial aging. Bovine incisors received crown preparation and Y-TZP crowns were manufactured using CAD/CAM technique, according to the following groups (n=10: Polished monolithic zirconia crowns (PM; Glazed monolithic zirconia crowns (GM; Bi-layer crowns (BL. Crowns were cemented with resin cement, submitted to artificial aging in a chewing simulator (2.5 million cycles/80 N/artificial saliva/37°C, and tested for fracture strength. Two remaining crowns referring to PM and GM groups were submitted to a chemical composition analysis to measure the level of yttrium after aging. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P=.05 indicated that monolithic zirconia crowns presented similar fracture strength (PM=3476.2 N ± 791.7; GM=3561.5 N ± 991.6, which was higher than bilayer crowns (2060.4 N ± 810.6. There was no difference in the yttrium content among the three surfaces evaluated in the monolithic crowns. Thus, monolithic zirconia crowns present higher fracture strength than bilayer veneered zirconia after artificial aging and surface finishing does not affect their fracture strength.

  16. Numerical simulation of diametral compression tests for the evaluation of porous ceramic disks; Simulacion numerica de ensayos de compresion diametral para la evaluacion de discos ceramicos porosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, M. L.; Tomba Martinez, A. G.; Camerucci, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    The mechanical behavior of porous cordierite materials was studied by diametral compression tests. The analytical solution allowing the indirect measuring of the tensile mechanical strength in this load configuration is formulated under certain assumption which may be not satisfied in practice. With the aim to analyze deviations of the ideal conditions, the test was simulated using computational techniques. Porous cordierite disks were prepared by firing (650 degree centigrade, 2h) and reaction-sintering (1330 degree centigrade, 4h) of green disks shaped by thermo gelling the aqueous suspensions of a cordierite precursor mixture (kaolin, talc and alumina) with native potato starch as a consolidator/binder of ceramic particles and a pore former by burn-out at high temperature. The mechanical tests were carried out in displacement control (0.2 mm/min) using a servo hydraulic testing machine. From the apparent stress-strain ratio, the following parameters were determined: mechanical strength, apparent Young modulus and yield stress. Fracture features of tested disks were also analyzed. The influence of the geometrical deviations more usually identified in practice (deviation of the circularity and no parallelism between the plane surfaces of the disk) on the stress distribution was studied by means of the simulation by finite element method, considering the Hertzs equation for contact problems as reference. (Author) 20 refs.

  17. Advanced SiC/SiC Ceramic Composites For Gas-Turbine Engine Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.; Easler, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing a variety of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composite (ASC) systems that allow these materials to operate for hundreds of hours under stress in air at temperatures approaching 2700 F. These SiC/SiC composite systems are lightweight (approximately 30% metal density) and, in comparison to monolithic ceramics and carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, are able to reliably retain their structural properties for long times under aggressive gas-turbine engine environments. The key for the ASC systems is related first to the NASA development of the Sylramic-iBN Sic fiber, which displays higher thermal stability than any other SiC- based ceramic fibers and possesses an in-situ grown BN surface layer for higher environmental durability. This fiber is simply derived from Sylramic Sic fiber type that is currently produced at ATK COI Ceramics (COIC). Further capability is then derived by using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and/or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) to form a Sic-based matrix with high creep and rupture resistance as well as high thermal conductivity. The objectives of this study were (1) to optimize the constituents and processing parameters for a Sylramic-iBN fiber reinforced ceramic composite system in which the Sic-based matrix is formed at COIC almost entirely by PIP (full PIP approach), (2) to evaluate the properties of this system in comparison to other 2700 F Sylramic-iBN systems in which the matrix is formed by full CVI and CVI + PIP, and (3) to examine the pros and cons of the full PIP approach for fabricating hot-section engine components. A key goal is the development of a composite system with low porosity, thereby providing high modulus, high matrix cracking strength, high interlaminar strength, and high thermal conductivity, a major property requirement for engine components that will experience high thermal gradients during service. Other key composite property goals are demonstration at

  18. Stabilization Using Phosphate Bonded Ceramics. Salt Containing Mixed Waste Treatment. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference No. 117

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex there are large inventories of homogeneous mixed waste solids, such as wastewater treatment residues, fly ashes, and sludges that contain relatively high concentrations (greater than 15% by weight) of salts. The inherent solubility of salts (e.g., nitrates, chlorides, and sulfates) makes traditional treatment of these waste streams difficult, expensive, and challenging. One alternative is low-temperature stabilization by chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). The process involves reacting magnesium oxide with monopotassium phosphate with the salt waste to produce a dense monolith. The ceramic makes a strong environmental barrier, and the metals are converted to insoluble, low-leaching phosphate salts. The process has been tested on a variety of surrogates and actual mixed waste streams, including soils, wastewater, flyashes, and crushed debris. It has also been demonstrated at scales ranging from 5 to 55 gallons. In some applications, the CBPC technology provides higher waste loadings and a more durable salt waste form than the baseline method of cementitious grouting. Waste form test specimens were subjected to a variety of performance tests. Results of waste form performance testing concluded that CBPC forms made with salt wastes meet or exceed both RCRA and recommended Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) low-level waste (LLW) disposal criteria. Application of a polymer coating to the CBPC may decrease the leaching of salt anions, but continued waste form evaluations are needed to fully assess the deteriorating effects of this leaching, if any, over time.

  19. Performances of multi-channel ceramic photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.; Karolak, M.; Piret, Y.; Mouly, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    Ceramic electron multipliers with real metal dynodes and independent channels ware constructed using multilayer ceramic technology. Tests of these prototypes show their capability to form sensitive detectors such as photomultipliers or light intensifiers. Here, we present results for the photocathode sensitivity, dynode activation, gain, linearity range and dynamic characteristics as well as the effect of 3-year aging of the main operational functions. The advantages provided by the ceramic components are discussed. These results motivate the development of a compact 256 pixel ceramic photomultiplier. (author)

  20. Measurement of Emissivity of Porous Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    BÜYÜKALACA, Orhan

    1998-01-01

    In this study, measurements of spectral and total emissivities of seven different porous ceramic materials and one ceramic fibre material are reported. Measurements were made for wavelength range from 1.2 µm to 20 µm and temperature range from 200 °C to 700 °C. It was found that total emissivity increases with increase of pore size but decreases with increase of temperature. The results showed all the porous ceramic materials tested to be much better than ceramic fibre in terms of total em...

  1. Structural studies of spinel manganite ceramics with positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klym, H; Shpotyuk, O; Hadzaman, I [Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, 79031 (Ukraine); Ingram, A [Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska str., Opole, 45370 (Poland); Filipecki, J, E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua, E-mail: klymha@yahoo.com [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 Armii Krajowei, 42201, Czestochowa (Poland)

    2011-04-01

    The new transition-metal manganite Cu{sub 0.1}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 1.9}O{sub 4} ceramics for temperature sensors with improved functional reliability are first proposed. It is established that the amount of additional NiO phase in these ceramics extracted during sintering play a decisive role. This effect is well revealed only in ceramics having a character fine-grain microstructure, while the monolithization of ceramics caused by great amount of transferred thermal energy reveals an opposite influence. The process of monolitization from the position of evolution of grain-pore structure was studied in these ceramics using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

  2. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project. Semiannual progress report, April-September 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with input from private industry. Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: management and coordination; materials and processing (monolithics, ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining); materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts); data base and life prediction (time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE development); and technology transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants.

  3. Identification of a Critical Time with Acoustic Emission Monitoring during Static Fatigue Tests on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Towards Lifetime Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Godin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-oxide fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites are promising candidates for some aeronautic applications that require good thermomechanical behavior over long periods of time. This study focuses on the behavior of a SiCf/[Si-B-C] composite with a self-healing matrix at intermediate temperature under air. Static fatigue experiments were performed below 600 °C and a lifetime diagram is presented. Damage is monitored both by strain measurement and acoustic emission during the static fatigue experiments. Two methods of real-time analysis of associated energy release have been developed. They allow for the identification of a characteristic time that was found to be close to 55% of the measured rupture time. This critical time reflects a critical local energy release assessed by the applicability of the Benioff law. This critical aspect is linked to a damage phase where slow crack growth in fibers is prevailing leading to ultimate fracture of the composite.

  4. Covalent attachment of polymeric monolith to polyether ether ketone (PEEK) tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chunguang; Heiter, Jaana; Haljasorg, Tõiv; Leito, Ivo

    2016-08-17

    A new method of reproducible preparation of vinylic polymeric monolithic columns with a key step of covalently anchoring the monolith to PEEK surface is described. In order to chemically attach the polymer monolith to the tube wall, methacrylate functional groups were introduced onto PEEK surface by a three-step procedure, including surface etching, surface reduction and surface methacryloylation. The chemical state of the modified tubing surface was characterized by attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. It was found that the etching step is the key to successfully modifying the PEEK tubing surface. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) monoliths were in situ synthesized by thermally initiated free radical copolymerization within the confines of surface-vinylized PEEK tubings of dimensions close to ones conventionally used in HPLC and UHPLC (1.6 mm internal diameter, 10.0-12.5 cm length). Adhesion test was done by measuring the operating pressure drop, which the prepared stationary phases can withstand. Good pressure resistance, up to 140 bar/10 cm (flow rate 0.5 mL min(-1), acetonitrile as a mobile phase), indicates strong bonding of monolith to the tubing wall. The monolithic material was proven to have a permeability of 1.7 × 10 (-14) m(2), applying acetonitrile-water 70:30 (v/v) as a mobile phase. The column performance was reproducible from column to column and was evaluated via the isocratic separation of a series of alkylbenzenes in the reversed-phase mode (acetonitrile-water 70:30, v/v). The numbers of plates per meter at optimal flow rate were found to be between 26 000 and 32 000 for the different analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Shade guide optimization--a novel shade arrangement principle for both ceramic and composite shade guides when identifying composite test objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østervemb, Niels; Jørgensen, Jette Nedergaard; Hørsted-Bindslev, Preben

    2011-02-01

    The most widely used shade guide for composite materials is made of ceramic and arranged according to a non-proven method. There is a need for a composite shade guide using a scientifically based arrangement principle. To compare the shade tab arrangement of the Vitapan Classical shade guide and an individually made composite shade guide using both the originally proposed arrangement principle and arranged according to ΔE2000 values with hue group division. An individual composite shade guide made from Filtek Supreme XT body colors was compared to the Vitapan Classical shade guide. Twenty-five students matched color samples made from Filtek Supreme XT body colors using the two shade guides arranged after the two proposed principles--four shade guides in total. Age, sequence, gender, time, and number of correct matches were recorded. The proposed visually optimal composite shade guide was both fastest and had the highest number of correct matches. Gender was significantly associated with time used for color sampling but not regarding the number of correct shade matches. A composite shade guide is superior compared to the ceramic Vitapan Classical guide when using composite test objects. A rearrangement of the shade guide according to hue, subdivided according to ΔE2000, significantly reduces the time needed to take a color sample and increases the number of correct shade matches. Total color difference in relation to the lightest tab with hue group division is recommended as a possible and universally applicable mode of tab arrangement in dental color standards. Moreover, a shade guide made of the composite materials itself is to be preferred as both a faster and more accurate method of determining color. © 2011, COPYRIGHT THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2011, WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  6. Fatigue limit of polycrystalline zirconium oxide ceramics: Effect of grinding and low-temperature aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, G K R; Silvestri, T; Amaral, M; Rippe, M P; Kleverlaan, C J; Valandro, L F

    2016-08-01

    The following study aimed to evaluate the effect of grinding and low-temperature aging on the fatigue limit of Y-TZP ceramics for frameworks and monolithic restorations. Disc specimens from each ceramic material, Lava Frame (3M ESPE) and Zirlux FC (Ivoclar Vivadent) were manufactured according to ISO:6872-2008 and assigned in accordance with two factors: (1) "surface treatment"-without treatment (as-sintered, Ctrl), grinding with coarse diamond bur (181µm; Grinding); and (2) "low-temperature aging (LTD)" - presence and absence. Grinding was performed using a contra-angle handpiece under constant water-cooling. LTD was simulated in an autoclave at 134°C under 2-bar pressure for 20h. Mean flexural fatigue limits (20,000 cycles) were determined under sinusoidal loading using stair case approach. For Lava ceramic, it was observed a statistical increase after grinding procedure and different behavior after LTD stimuli (Ctrltest did not promote increase of m-phase content. Thus, tested grinding and low temperature aging did not damage the fatigue limit values significantly for both materials evaluated, even though those conditions promoted increase in m-phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  8. Influence of the linking spacer length and type on the enantioseparation ability of β-cyclodextrin functionalized monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jialiang; Xiao, Yuan; Lin, Yuanjing; Zhang, Qiaoxuan; Chang, Yiqun; Crommen, Jacques; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2016-05-15

    In order to investigate the effect of the linking spacer on the enantioseparation ability of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) functionalized polymeric monoliths, three β-CD-functionalized organic polymeric monoliths with different spacer lengths were prepared by using three amino-β-CDs, i.e. mono-6-amino-6-deoxy-β-CD, mono-6-ethylenediamine-6-deoxy-β-CD, mono-6-hexamethylenediamine-6-deoxy-β-CD, as starting materials. These amino-β-CDs reacted with glycidyl methacrylate to produce functional monomers which were then copolymerized with ethylene dimethacrylate. The enantioseparation ability of the three monoliths was evaluated using 14 chiral acidic compounds, including mandelic acid derivatives, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, N-derivatized amino acids, and chiral herbicides under optimum chromatographic conditions. Notably, the poly(GMA-NH2-β-CD-co-EDMA) column provides higher enantioresolution and enantioselectivity than the poly(GMA-EDA-β-CD-co-EDMA) and poly(GMA-HDA-β-CD-co-EDMA) columns for most tested chiral analytes. Furthermore, the enantioseparation performance of triazole-linker containing monoliths was compared to that of ethylenediamine-linker containing monoliths. The results indicate that the enantioselectivity of β-CD monolithic columns is strongly related to the length and type of spacer tethering β-CD to the polymeric support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti

  10. Long-term durability testing of ceramic cross-flow filter. Final report, September 29, 1987--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippert, T.E.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    Long term durability testing of the cross flow filter is described. Two high temperature, high pressure test facilities were built and operated. The facilities were designed to simulate dirty gas environments typical of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and coal gasification. Details of the design and operation of the test facilities and filter testing results are described.

  11. Monolithic Active Pixel Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) ASIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Farah F.; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Shenai, Alpana; Yarema, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic Active Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) is a counting ASIC designed for detecting and measuring low energy X-rays from 6-12 keV. Each pixel contains analogue functionality implemented with a charge preamplifier, CR-RC 2 shaper and a baseline restorer. It also contains a window comparator which can be trimmed by 4 bit DACs to remove systematic offsets. The hits are registered by a 12 bit ripple counter which is reconfigured as a shift register to serially output the data from the entire ASIC. Each pixel can be tested individually. Two diverse approaches have been used to prevent coupling between the detector and electronics in MAMBO III and MAMBO IV. MAMBO III is a 3D ASIC, the bottom ASIC consists of diodes which are connected to the top ASIC using μ-bump bonds. The detector is decoupled from the electronics by physically separating them on two tiers and using several metal layers as a shield. MAMBO IV is a monolithic structure which uses a nested well approach to isolate the detector from the electronics. The ASICs are being fabricated using the SOI 0.2 (micro)m OKI process, MAMBO III is 3D bonded at T-Micro and MAMBO IV nested well structure was developed in collaboration between OKI and Fermilab.

  12. Monolithic Active Pixel Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) ASIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, Farah F.; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Shenai, Alpana; Yarema, Raymond J.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Monolithic Active Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) is a counting ASIC designed for detecting and measuring low energy X-rays from 6-12 keV. Each pixel contains analogue functionality implemented with a charge preamplifier, CR-RC{sup 2} shaper and a baseline restorer. It also contains a window comparator which can be trimmed by 4 bit DACs to remove systematic offsets. The hits are registered by a 12 bit ripple counter which is reconfigured as a shift register to serially output the data from the entire ASIC. Each pixel can be tested individually. Two diverse approaches have been used to prevent coupling between the detector and electronics in MAMBO III and MAMBO IV. MAMBO III is a 3D ASIC, the bottom ASIC consists of diodes which are connected to the top ASIC using {mu}-bump bonds. The detector is decoupled from the electronics by physically separating them on two tiers and using several metal layers as a shield. MAMBO IV is a monolithic structure which uses a nested well approach to isolate the detector from the electronics. The ASICs are being fabricated using the SOI 0.2 {micro}m OKI process, MAMBO III is 3D bonded at T-Micro and MAMBO IV nested well structure was developed in collaboration between OKI and Fermilab.

  13. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-20

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10(-6)/°C near 550 nm, which corresponds to ∼800 m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  14. Exceptionally stable and hierarchically porous self-standing zeolite monolith based on a solution-mediated and solid-state transformation synergistic mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Manh Huy [Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Chemical Technology, Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology, 01 Mac Dinh Chi, District 1, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Cheng, Dang-guo, E-mail: dgcheng@zju.edu.cn [College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); Chen, Fengqiu [Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); Zhan, Xiaoli [College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China)

    2015-11-15

    Although many strategies exist for fabricating hierarchical zeolite monolith, it is still challenging to synthesize pure hierarchical zeolite monolith with intracrystalline meso-/macropores and stability suitable for industrial application in a general and efficient process. Here we describe a simple quasi-solid gel crystallization route to prepare hierarchical self-standing ZSM-5 zeolite monolith via the use of Na{sup +} and OH{sup −} as counterions to modify the breaking and remaking of T–O–T (T = Si or Al) bonds. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microcopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), laser scan confocal microscopy (LSCM), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, mercury porosimetry, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and compression mechanical testing were applied to elucidate the structure and mechanical stability of the obtained monolith. The self-standing monolith is composed of self-interconnected meso-/macroporous MFI crystals with tunable intracrystalline meso-/macropores and possesses an unusually mechanical stability with a crushing strength of 5.01 MPa. Combined with controllable structure of the defect-free membrane layer on the monolith top, the self-standing zeolite monolith should widen their potential applications. - Highlights: • Hierarchical self-standing MFI zeolite monoliths were synthesized via a facile method. • Na{sup +} and OH{sup −} are used as counterions for breaking and remaking of T–O–T (T = Si or Al) bonds. • Hierarchical self-standing MFI zeolite monoliths result from zeolite crystal intergrowth. • Self-standing zeolite monolith has an excellent mechanical stability with tunable intracrystalline meso-/macropores.

  15. A monolithic integrated photonic microwave filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandiño, Javier S.; Muñoz, Pascual; Doménech, David; Capmany, José

    2017-02-01

    Meeting the increasing demand for capacity in wireless networks requires the harnessing of higher regions in the radiofrequency spectrum, reducing cell size, as well as more compact, agile and power-efficient base stations that are capable of smoothly interfacing the radio and fibre segments. Fully functional microwave photonic chips are promising candidates in attempts to meet these goals. In recent years, many integrated microwave photonic chips have been reported in different technologies. To the best of our knowledge, none has monolithically integrated all the main active and passive optoelectronic components. Here, we report the first demonstration of a tunable microwave photonics filter that is monolithically integrated into an indium phosphide chip. The reconfigurable radiofrequency photonic filter includes all the necessary elements (for example, lasers, modulators and photodetectors), and its response can be tuned by means of control electric currents. This is an important step in demonstrating the feasibility of integrated and programmable microwave photonic processors.

  16. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  17. Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. This advanced materials technology is being developed in parallel and close coordination with the ongoing DOE and industry proof of concept engine development programs. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. Abstracts prepared for appropriate papers.

  18. Solid State Characterizations of Long-Term Leached Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmussen, Robert M.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Parker, Kent E.; Miller, Brian W.; Lee, Brady D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Washton, Nancy M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Lawter, Amanda R.; McElroy, Erin M.; Serne, R Jeffrey

    2016-09-30

    This report describes the results from the solid phase characterization of six Cast Stone monoliths from the extended leach tests recently reported on (Serne et al. 2016),that were selected for characterization using multiple state-of-the-art approaches. The Cast Stone samples investigated were leached for > 590 d in the EPA Method 1315 test then archived for > 390 d in their final leachate. After reporting the long term leach behavior of the monoliths (containing radioactive 99Tc and stable 127I spikes and for original Westsik et al. 2013 fabricated monoliths, 238U), it was suggested that physical changes to the waste forms and a depleting inventory of contaminants of potential concern may mean that effective diffusivity calculations past 63 d should not be used to accurately represent long-term waste form behavior. These novel investigations, in both length of leaching time and application of solid state techniques, provide an initial arsenal of techniques which can be utilized to perform such Cast Stone solid phase characterization work, which in turn can support upcoming performance assessment maintenance. The work was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to characterize several properties of the long- term leached Cast Stone monolith samples.

  19. Factors affecting the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to different ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S J; Abu AlReesh, Issam A; AlWahadni, Ahed M S

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to two different all-ceramic crowns, IPS Empress 2 and In-Ceram Alumina, to compare the SBS between hydrofluoric acid (HFA), phosphoric acid etched, and sandblasted, non-etched all-ceramic surfaces. Ninety-six all-ceramic crowns were fabricated resembling a maxillary left first premolar. The crowns were divided into eight groups: (1) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (2) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched In-Ceram crowns; (3) ceramic brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (4) ceramic brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched In-Ceram crowns; (5) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 37 per cent phosphoric acid-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (6) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 37 per cent phosphoric acid-etched In-Ceram crowns; (7) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted, non-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; and (8) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted, non-etched In-Ceram crowns. Metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets were bonded using a conventional light polymerizing adhesive resin. An Instron universal testing machine was used to determine the SBS at a crosshead speed of 0.1 mm/minute. Comparison between groups was performed using a univariate general linear model and chi-squared tests. The highest mean SBS was found in group 3 (120.15 +/- 45.05 N) and the lowest in group 8 (57.86 +/- 26.20 N). Of all the variables studied, surface treatment was the only factor that significantly affected SBS (P Empress 2 and In-Ceram groups.

  20. Clinical performance - a reflection of damage accumulation in ceramic dental crowns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekow, D.E. [Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Orthodontics; Thompson, V.P. [Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States). New Jersey Dental School

    2001-07-01

    All-ceramic dental crowns have tremendous appeal for patients - their esthetics nearly match those of natural teeth. Unfortunately, the most esthetic materials are brittle and, consequently, are vulnerable to damage relating to shaping which is exacerbated during cyclic loading during normal chewing. Clinical performance of all-ceramic dental prostheses are directly dependent on damage introduced during fabrication and during fatigue loading associated with function. The accumulation of damage results in unacceptably high failure rates (where failure is defined as a complete fracture requiring replacement of the prosthesis). The relation between shaping damage and fatigue damage on clinical performance of all-ceramic dental crowns was investigated. Materials used commercially for all-ceramic crowns and investigated in this study included a series of different microstructures of machinable glass ceramics (Corning), aluminas and porcelains (Vita Zahnfabrik), and zirconia (Norton). As monolithic materials, strong, tough, fatigue-resistant materials are not sufficiently esthetic for crowns. Crowns fabricated from monolithic esthetic materials have high failure rates. Layering ceramics could provide acceptable strength through management of damage accumulation. (orig.)

  1. Porous polymer monoliths functionalized through copolymerization of a C60 fullerene-containing methacrylate monomer for highly efficient separations of small molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Chambers, Stuart D.; Holcombe, Thomas W.; Švec, František; Frechet, Jean

    2011-01-01

    been prepared and their chromatographic performance have been tested for the separation of small molecules in the reversed phase. While addition of the C60-fullerene monomer to the glycidyl methacrylate-based monolith enhanced column efficiency 18-fold

  2. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  3. Prestresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Feilzer, Albert J; de Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J

    2008-10-01

    A general trend in all ceramic systems is to use veneering ceramics of slightly lower thermal expansion coefficients compared with that of the framework resulting in a positive mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient (+DeltaTEC). The concept behind this TEC mismatch is to generate compressive stresses in the weaker veneering ceramic and thus enhance the overall strength of the restoration. This technique had excellent results with porcelain fused to metal restorations (PFM). However, there are concerns to apply this concept to all-ceramic restorations. The aim of this research was to determine the stresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations due to the mismatch in TEC. Two commercial veneering ceramics with a TEC lower than that of zirconia (+DeltaTEC); NobelRondo zirconiatrade mark and Lava Ceramtrade mark, plus one experimental veneering ceramic with an identical TEC that matches that of zirconia (DeltaTEC = 0) were used to veneer zirconia discs. The specimens were loaded in biaxial flexure test setup with the veneer ceramic in tension. The stresses due to load application and TEC mismatch were calculated using fractography, engineering mathematics, and finite element analysis (FEA). In this study, the highest load at failure (64 N) was obtained with the experimental veneer where the thermal mismatch between zirconia and veneering ceramic was minimal. For the two commercial veneer ceramics the magnitude of the thermal mismatch localized at the zirconia veneer interface (42 MPa) exceeded the bond strength between the two materials and resulted in delamination failure during testing (ca. 50 MPa). For all-ceramic zirconia veneered restorations it is recommended to minimize the thermal mismatch as much as possible. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Research on Durability of Recycled Ceramic Powder Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. C.; Fang, W.; Xu, K. C.; Xie, L.

    2017-06-01

    Ceramic was ground into powder with 325 mesh and used to prepare for concrete. Basic mechanical properties, carbonation and chloride ion penetration of the concrete tests were conducted. In addition, 6-hour electric fluxes of recycled ceramic powder concrete were measured under loading. The results showed that the age strength of ceramics powder concrete is higher than that of the ordinary concrete and the fly ash concrete. The ceramic powder used as admixture would reduce the strength of concrete under no consideration of its impact factor; under consideration of the impact factor for ceramic powder as admixture, the carbonation resistance of ceramic powder concrete was significantly improved, and the 28 day carbonation depth of the ceramic powder concrete was only 31.5% of ordinary concrete. The anti-chloride-permeability of recycled ceramic powder concrete was excellent.

  5. Adjusting dental ceramics: An in vitro evaluation of the ability of various ceramic polishing kits to mimic glazed dental ceramic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, René; Beier, Ulrike S; Heiss-Kisielewsky, Irene; Engelmeier, Robert; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Dhima, Matilda

    2015-06-01

    During the insertion appointment, the practitioner is often faced with the need to adjust ceramic surfaces to fit a restoration to the adjacent or opposing dentition and soft tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess the ceramic surface smoothness achieved with various commercially available ceramic polishing kits on different commonly used ceramic systems. The reliability of the cost of a polishing kit as an indicator of improved surface smoothness was assessed. A total of 350 ceramic surfaces representing 5 commonly available ceramic systems (IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS e.max Press, Cergo Kiss, Vita PM 9, Imagine PressX) were treated with 5 types of ceramic polishing systems (Cerapreshine, 94006C, Ceramiste, Optrafine, Zenostar) by following the manufacturers' guidelines. The surface roughness was measured with a profilometer (Taylor Hobson; Precision Taylor Hobson Ltd). The effects of ceramic systems and polishing kits of interest on surface roughness were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA, paired t test, and Bonferroni corrected significance level. The ceramic systems and polishing kits statistically affected surface roughness (Pceramic surface. No correlation could be established between the high cost of the polishing kit and low surface roughness. None of the commonly used ceramic polishing kits could create a surface smoother than that of glazed ceramic (Pceramic polishing kits is not recommended as a reliable indicator of better performance of ceramic polishing kits (P>.30). Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The production of grain oriented lanthanum titanate (La2Ti2O7) ceramics by uniaxial hot-forging process for improved fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceylan, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The layered-structural ceramics, such as lanthanum titanate (La 2 Ti 2 O 7 ), have been known for their good electrical and optical properties at high frequencies and temperatures. However, few studies have been conducted on the mechanical properties of these ceramics. The interest in ceramic hot-forging (HF) has been greatly increased recently due to the enhancement in fracture toughness via bridging effect of oriented grains. In this study, grain oriented lanthanum titanate was produced by the hot-forging process. The characterizations of the samples were achieved by density measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers indentation and three-point bending test. According to X-ray diffraction patterns, the orientation factor (f) was found to be 0.73 for certain hot-forging conditions resulting an improved fracture toughness. The improved fracture toughness of La 2 Ti 2 O 7 (3.2 MPa m 1/2 ) reached to the value of monolithic alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) between 3 and 4 MPa m 1/2

  7. Improvement of microstructure and mechanical properties of high dense SiC ceramics manufactured by high-speed hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voyevodin, V.; Sayenko, S.; Lobach, K.; Tarasov, R.; Zykova, A.; Svitlychnyi, Ye.; Surkov, A.; Abelentsev, V.; Ghaemi, H.; Szkodo, M.; Gajowiec, G.; Kmiec, M.; Antoszkiewicz, M.

    2017-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics possess high physical-mechanical properties, corrosion and radiation resistance, which can be used as a protective materials for radioactive wastes disposal. The aim of the present study was the manufacturing of high density SiC ceramics with advanced physical and mechanical parameters. The high performance on the properties of produced ceramics was determined by the dense and monolithic structure. The densified silicon carbide samples possessed good mechanical strength, with a high Vickers micro hardness up to 28.5 GPa.

  8. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) PRODUCT: MONOLITH FORMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C

    2006-01-01

    The most important requirement for Hanford's low activity waste (LAW) form for shallow land disposal is the chemical durability of the product. A secondary, but still essential specification, is the compressive strength of the material with regards to the strength of the material under shallow land disposal conditions, e.g. the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations, because the term ''near-surface disposal'' indicates disposal in the uppermost portion, or approximately the top 30 meters, of the earth's surface. The THOR(reg s ign) Treatment Technologies (TTT) mineral waste form for LAW is granular in nature because it is formed by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). As a granular product it has been shown to be as durable as Hanford's LAW glass during testing with ASTM C-1285-02 known as the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and with the Single Pass Flow Through Test (SPFT). Hanford Envelope A and Envelope C simulants both performed well during PCT and SPFT testing and during subsequent performance assessment modeling. This is partially due to the high aluminosilicate content of the mineral product which provides a natural aluminosilicate buffering mechanism that inhibits leaching and is known to occur in naturally occurring aluminosilicate mineral analogs. In order for the TTT Na-Al-Si (NAS) granular mineral product to meet the compressive strength requirements (ASTM C39) for a Hanford waste form, the granular product needs to be made into a monolith or disposed of in High Integrity Containers (HIC's). Additionally, the Hanford intruder scenario for disposal in the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) trench is mitigated as there is reduced intruder exposure when a waste form is in a monolithic form. During the preliminary testing of a monolith binder for TTT's FBSR mineral product, four parameters were monitored: (1) waste loading (not optimized for each waste form tested); (2) density; (3) compressive strength; and (4

  9. Stereolithographic processing of ceramics: Photon diffusion in colloidal dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajeev

    The technique of ceramic stereolithography (CSL) has been developed for fabricating near net shape ceramic objects. In stereolithography, the three-dimensional computer design file of the object is sliced into thin layers. Each layer is physically fabricated by photocuring the surface of a liquid photo-polymerizable resin bath by raster scanning an ultra-violet laser across the surface of the resin. In CSL, the liquid resin is a high concentration colloidal dispersion in a solution of ultraviolet curable polymers. The ceramic green body fabricated by ceramic stereolithography technique is subjected to the post processing steps of drying, binder burnout and sintering to form a dense ceramic object. An aqueous alumina dispersion in photocuring polymers with particle volume fraction greater than 0.5 was formulated for CSL process. Low molecular weight solution polymers were found to be best suited for formulating ceramic resins due to their inherently low viscosity and favorable interactions with the ceramic dispersant. A hydroxyapatite ceramic resin was also developed for the use in the CSL technique. A model is developed to describe the photocuring process in concentrated ceramic dispersion. The curing profile in ceramic dispersion is governed by multiple scattering from the ceramic particles and absorption by the photocuring polymers. Diffusion theory of light transport is used to model the multiple scattering and absorption phenomena. It is found that diffusive transport adequately describes the phenomena of laser pulse propagation in highly concentrated colloidal dispersions. A model was developed to describe the absorption in highly concentrated ceramic dispersion. Various complex-shaped monolithic alumina and hydroxyapatite objects were fabricated by CSL and shown to possess uniform microstructure. The mechanical properties and sintering behavior of the parts fabricated by CSL are shown to be comparable to those fabricated by other ceramic processing technique

  10. Characterization and evaluation of ceramic properties of clay used in structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, A.S.; Oliveira, J.N.; Della-Sagrillo, V.P.; Valenzuela-Diaz, F.R.

    2014-01-01

    The clay used in the manufacture of structural ceramic products must meet quality requirements that are influenced by their chemical, physical, mineralogical and microstructural characteristics, which control the ceramic properties of the final products. This paper aims to characterize the clay used in the manufacture of ceramic roof tiles and bricks. The clay was characterized through XRF, XRD, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Atterberg limits and particle size distribution. Specimens were shaped, dried at 110°C, and burned at 900 deg C in an industrial kiln. After that, they were submitted to tests of water absorption, apparent porosity, bulk density and flexural strength. The results show that the chemical composition of clay has significant amount of silica and alumina and adequate levels of kaolinite for use in structural ceramic. The ceramic properties evaluated in the specimens partially meet the requirements of the Brazilian standard-clays for structural ceramics. (author)

  11. Characterization of ceramics used in mass ceramic industry Goianinha/RN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales Junior, J.C.C.; Nascimento, R.M. do; Andrade, J.C.S.; Saldanha, K.M.; Dutra, R.P.S.

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of the the ceramic mass is one of the most important steps in the manufacture of ceramic products, since the characteristics of the raw materials used, and the proportions that they are added, directly influence the final properties of ceramic products and the operational conditions of processing. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the characterization of a ceramic mass used in the manufacture of sealing blocks by a red ceramic industry of the city of Goianinha / RN. We analyzed the chemical and mineralogical composition; thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis; granulometric analysis; evaluation of plasticity; and determining the technological properties of specimens used in test firing at 700, 900 and 1100 ° C. The results show that the ceramic body studied has characteristics that allow use in the manufacture of sealing blocks when burned at a temperature of 900 ° C. (author)

  12. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. I n order to achieve these objectives, NAC, a leading U.S. advanced ceramics component manufacturer, assembled a multidisciplinary, vertically integrated team. This team included: a major diesel engine builder, Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC); a corporate ceramics research division, SGIC's Northboro R and D Center; intelligent processing system developers, BDM Federal/MATSYS; a furnace equipment company, Centorr/Vacuum Industries; a sintering expert, Wittmer Consultants; a production OEM, Deco-Grand; a wheel manufacturer and grinding operation developer, Norton Company's Higgins Grinding Technology Center (HGTC); a ceramic machine shop, Chand Kare Technical Ceramics; and a manufacturing cost consultant, IBIS Associates. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration

  13. Report on the IAEA-CU-2006-06 proficiency test on the determination of major, minor and trace elements in ancient Chinese ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhashiro, A.; Trinkl, A.; Toervenyi, A.; Zeiller, E.; Benesch, T.; Sansone, U.

    2006-10-01

    ancient Chinese ceramic, to assure that the conclusions of art objects studies are based on reliable and validated nuclear analytical results and to ensure the comparability of the results of different countries. An ancient Chinese ceramic reference material, prepared and characterized for major, minor and trace elements, by the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was used in the proficiency test. The test material was distributed to the participating laboratories in February 2006 and the deadline for receiving the results was set at 7 August 2006. The participating laboratories were requested to analyse the samples employing the methods used in their routine work, so that their performance on the test samples could be directly related to the real performance of the laboratory. Each laboratory was given a confidential code to assure the anonymity of the evaluation results. 24 laboratories from the 37 initially registered reported their results to the IAEA. The analytical results of the participating laboratories were compared with the reference values assigned to the reference material, and a rating system was applied

  14. Fabrication and Test of a Nb$_{3}$Sn Model Magnet With Ceramic Insulation for the Next Generation Undulator of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, N; Dalexandro, N; Giloux, C; Bordini, B; Maccaferri, R

    2010-01-01

    The future run of the Large Hadron Collider with lead ions will require important modifications in the synchrotron radiation profile monitor system, which at present comprises two superconducting undulators wound from Nb-Ti conductor, delivering 5 T in a 60 mm gap, and with a period of 280 mm. Whilst the gap and the nominal field of the future undulators will remain the same, the period shall be 140 mm, which translates to a peak field of over 8 T in the coils and hence requires the use of Nb$_{3}$Sn technology. In this paper the electromagnetic design of the undulator is summarized. We describe the fabrication of a race-track coil wound with a 0.8 mm diameter Nb$_{3}$Sn strand with ceramic insulation. Finally, the results of successful tests made at 4.3 K and 1.9 K in a mirror configuration are presented. 10 T at 4.3 K and 11.5 T at 1.9 K were measured in the yoke gap, thus validating this concept for the future undulator.

  15. Porous polymer monoliths functionalized through copolymerization of a C60 fullerene-containing methacrylate monomer for highly efficient separations of small molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Chambers, Stuart D.

    2011-12-15

    Monolithic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) and poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) capillary columns, which incorporate the new monomer [6,6]-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate ester, have been prepared and their chromatographic performance have been tested for the separation of small molecules in the reversed phase. While addition of the C60-fullerene monomer to the glycidyl methacrylate-based monolith enhanced column efficiency 18-fold, to 85 000 plates/m at a linear velocity of 0.46 mm/s and a retention factor of 2.6, when compared to the parent monolith, the use of butyl methacrylate together with the carbon nanostructured monomer afforded monolithic columns with an efficiency for benzene exceeding 110 000 plates/m at a linear velocity of 0.32 mm/s and a retention factor of 4.2. This high efficiency is unprecedented for separations using porous polymer monoliths operating in an isocratic mode. Optimization of the chromatographic parameters affords near baseline separation of 6 alkylbenzenes in 3 min with an efficiency of 64 000 plates/m. The presence of 1 wt % or more of water in the polymerization mixture has a large effect on both the formation and reproducibility of the monoliths. Other factors such as nitrogen exposure, polymerization conditions, capillary filling method, and sonication parameters were all found to be important in producing highly efficient and reproducible monoliths. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. Fabrication of a novel hemin-based monolithic column and its application in separation of protein from complex bio-matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoya; Zhang, Doudou; Li, Xueying; Wang, Xixi; Bai, Ligai; Liu, Haiyan; Yan, Hongyuan

    2017-05-10

    A novel polymer-based monolithic column was prepared via redox initiation system within the confines of a stainless steel column with 4.6mm i.d. In the processes, hemin and lauryl methacrylate were used as co-monomers; ethylene dimethacrylate as crosslinking agent; n-butyl alcohol, ethanediol, and N, N-dimethylformamide as tri-porogens; benzoyl peroxide and N, N-dimethyl aniline as redox initiation system. The resulting polymer-based monolithic columns were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption instrument, and mercury intrusion porosimeter, respectively. The results illustrated that the improved monolith had relative uniform porous structure, good permeability, and low back pressure. Aromatic compounds were used to test the chromatographic behavior of the monolith, resulting in highest column efficiency of 19 880 plates per meter with reversed-phase mechanism. Furthermore, the homemade monolith was used as the stationary phase of high performance liquid chromatography to separate proteins from complex bio-matrix, including human plasma, egg white, and snailase. The results showed that the monolithic column occupied good separation ability with these complex bio-samples. Excellent specific character of the homemade hemin-based monolith was that it could simultaneously remove high-abundance proteins (including human serum albumin, immunoglobulin G, and human fibrinogen) from human plasma and separate other proteins to different fractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Incorporation of metal-organic framework HKUST-1 into porous polymer monolithic capillary columns to enhance the chromatographic separation of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengchao; Ye, Fanggui; Lv, Qinghui; Zhang, Cong; Shen, Shufen; Zhao, Shulin

    2014-09-19

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 nanoparticles have been incorporated into poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (HKUST-1-poly(GMA-co-EDMA)) monoliths to afford stationary phases with enhanced chromatographic performance of small molecules in the reversed phase capillary liquid chromatography. The effect of HKUST-1 nanoparticles in the polymerization mixture on the performance of the monolithic column was explored in detail. While the bare poly(GMA-co-EDMA) monolith exhibited poor resolution (RsHKUST-1 nanoparticles to the polymerization mixture provide high increased resolution (Rs≥1.3) and high efficiency ranged from 16,300 to 44,300plates/m. Chromatographic performance of HKUST-1-poly(GMA-co-EDMA) monolith was demonstrated by separation of various analytes including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ethylbenzene and styrene, phenols and aromatic acids using a binary polar mobile phase (CH3CN/H2O). The HKUST-1-poly(GMA-co-EDMA) monolith displayed enhanced hydrophobic and π-π interaction characteristics in the reversed phase separation of test analytes compared to the bare poly(GMA-co-EDMA) monolith. The experiment results showed that HKUST-1-poly(GMA-co-EDMA) monoliths are an alternative to enhance the chromatographic separation of small molecules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Inlay-Retained Fixed Dental Prosthesis: A Clinical Option Using Monolithic Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Augusti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different indirect restorations to replace a single missing tooth in the posterior region are available in dentistry: traditional full-coverage fixed dental prostheses (FDPs, implant-supported crowns (ISC, and inlay-retained FDPs (IRFDP. Resin bonded FDPs represent a minimally invasive procedure; preexisting fillings can minimize tooth structure removal and give retention to the IRFDP, transforming it into an ultraconservative option. New high strength zirconia ceramics, with their stiffness and high mechanical properties, could be considered a right choice for an IRFDP rehabilitation. The case report presented describes an IRFDP treatment using a CAD/CAM monolithic zirconia IRFDP; clinical and laboratory steps are illustrated, according to the most recent scientific protocols. Adhesive procedures are focused on the Y-TZP and tooth substrate conditioning methods. Nice esthetic and functional integration of indirect restoration at two-year follow-up confirmed the success of this conservative approach.

  19. Microstructure origin of hot spots in textured laser zone melting Bi-2212 monoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lera, F; Angurel, L A; Rojo, J A; Mora, M; Recuero, S; Arroyo, M P; Andres, N

    2005-01-01

    Hot spots are one of the main limitations in the development of large-scale high-power applications with superconducting materials. The application of digital speckle interferometry to detect inhomogeneous heating on ceramic superconductors allows the determining of a hot spot location in these materials before any damage is caused to the material. The technique detects deformations that are induced in the material due to dilatation, attaining a resolution of 0.45 μm /fringe. In this paper this technique has been applied to analyse the heating generation in Bi-2212 superconducting monoliths at room temperature and in operation conditions. In the first case a homogeneous heating is obtained, leading to a parallel fringe pattern. In the second case, a situation with an inhomogeneous heating origin has been detected. Once the position of this hot spot is determined, microstructure studies have been performed to determine which defects are responsible for hot spot generation

  20. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  1. FY2016 Ceramic Fuels Development Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2016 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY16 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  2. Monolithic growth of partly cured polydimethylsiloxane thin film layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2014-01-01

    at different curing times. The monolithic films are investigated by rheology, scanning electron microscope, mechanical testing, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The morphology, mechanical and dielectric properties, as well...... to enable interlayer crosslinking reactions either by application of an adhesion promoter or by ensuring that there are reactive, complementary sites available on the two surfaces. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used polymer for DEAPs. In this work, two-layered PDMS films are adhered together...... as thermal stabilities of the bilayer elastomer films are observed to change with the curing time of the monolayers before lamination. The objective of this work is to create adhesion of two layers without destroying the original viscoelastic properties of the PDMS films, and hence enable, for example...

  3. Frictional Resistance of Three Types of Ceramic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the static frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface in two recently introduced bracket systems and compare them to conventional ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems. Three variables were considered including the bracket system, archwire type and archwire angulation. Material and Methods: Four bracket systems were tested in vitro: Self ligating ceramic, ceramic with metal slot and module, conventional ceramic with module and conventional metal with module. A specially constructed jig and an Instron testing machine were used to measure the static frictional resistance for 0.014 inches round and 0.018 x 0.025 inches rectangular stainless steel wires at 0° and 7° angulations. Main outcome measures: static frictional force at the bracket/archwire interface; recorded and measured in units of force (Newtons. Results: Self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems generated significantly less static frictional resistance than conventional ceramic bracket systems with the wire at both angulations (P < 0.05. Changing the wire from 0.014 round to 0.018 x 0.025 rectangular wire significantly increased frictional forces for metal slot ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems (P < 0.01. Increasing wire angulation significantly increased frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface for all four types of bracket systems tested (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Compared to conventional ceramic, self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems should give improved clinical performance, matching that of conventional metal brackets.

  4. Dependency of Shear Strength on Test Rate in SiC/BSAS Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Both interlaminar and in-plane shear strengths of a unidirectional Hi-Nicalon(TM) fiber-reinforced barium strontium aluminosilicate (SiC/BSAS) composite were determined at 1100 C in air as a function of test rate using double notch shear test specimens. The composite exhibited a significant effect of test rate on shear strength, regardless of orientation which was either in interlaminar or in in-plane direction, resulting in an appreciable shear-strength degradation of about 50 percent as test rate decreased from 3.3 10(exp -1) mm/s to 3.3 10(exp -5) mm/s. The rate dependency of composite's shear strength was very similar to that of ultimate tensile strength at 1100 C observed in a similar composite (2-D SiC/BSAS) in which tensile strength decreased by about 60 percent when test rate varied from the highest (5 MPa/s) to the lowest (0.005 MPa/s). A phenomenological, power-law slow crack growth formulation was proposed and formulated to account for the rate dependency of shear strength of the composite.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of biomorphic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambo, Carlos Renato

    2001-01-01

    Biotemplating represents a recently developed technology for manufacturing of biomorphous ceramics from naturally grown plant structures. This approach allows the production of ceramic materials with cellular structure, where the microstructural features of the ceramic product are similar to the native plant. After processing, the biomorphic ceramic exhibits directed pore morphology in the micrometer range. Biomorphic SiC fibers were produced from bamboo by carbothermal reduction of SiO 2 originally present in the bamboo structure. Bamboo pieces were heated up to 1500 deg C in argon to promote the reaction between carbon and silica. Biomorphic alumina, mullite and zirconia ceramics were manufactured via the sol-gel route by repeated infiltration of low viscous oxide precursors (sols) into rattan, pine and bamboo structures. The raw samples were pyrolyzed at 800 deg C in nitrogen for 1h and subsequently annealed at 1550 deg C in air. The microstructure and physical properties of the biomorphic ceramics were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high temperature-XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosimetry and picnometry. Thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) was performed on the infiltrated samples in order to evaluate the reactions and the total weight loss during the thermal process. The mechanical properties were evaluated by compressive strength tests. In contrast to conventional processed ceramic foam of similar porosity, the microstructure highly porous biomorphic ceramics shows uniaxial pore morphology with anisotropic properties. These properties are favorable for applications in catalyst support, filters or low-density heat insulation structures, or as biomaterials. (author)

  6. [Comparison of machinability of two types of dental machinable ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhao, Yunfeng; Li, Yong; Fan, Xinping; Li, Yan; Lin, Xuefeng

    2002-11-01

    In terms of the problems of now available dental machinable ceramics, a new type of calcium-mica glass-ceramic, PMC-I ceramic, was developed, and its machinability was compared with that of Vita MKII quantitatively. Moreover, the relationship between the strength and the machinability of PMC-I ceramic was studied. Samples of PMC-I ceramic were divided into four groups according to their nucleation procedures. 600-seconds drilling tests were conducted with high-speed steel tools (Phi = 2.3 mm) to measure the drilling depths of Vita MKII ceramic and PMC-I ceramic, while constant drilling speed of 600 rpm and constant axial load of 39.2 N were used. And the 3-point bending strength of the four groups of PMC-I ceramic were recorded. Drilling depth of Vita MKII was 0.71 mm, while the depths of the four groups of PMC-I ceramic were 0.88 mm, 1.40 mm, 0.40 mm and 0.90 mm, respectively. Group B of PMC-I ceramic showed the largest depth of 1.40 mm and was statistically different from other groups and Vita MKII. And the strength of the four groups of PMC-I ceramic were 137.7, 210.2, 118.0 and 106.0 MPa, respectively. The machinability of the new developed dental machinable ceramic of PMC-I could meet the need of the clinic.

  7. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  8. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  9. Construction of a sputtering reactor for the coating and processing of monolithic U-Mo nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    In the presented thesis sputter deposition was used for the first time to coat monolithic U-Mo nuclear fuel foils with diffusion inhibitive materials. The intention of these coatings is to prevent the formation of an interdiffusion layer between U-Mo and Al cladding during the use of the fuel. A small sputtering reactor was built, in which the method was tested and processing parameters were investigated. In parallel a larger sputtering reactor was constructed, that allows to coat full size monolithic U-Mo nuclear fuel foils and was used to test an industrial application of the technique. As a result a method based on sputter deposition and erosion can be presented, that allows to clean as well as to coat the surface of monolithic U-Mo nuclear fuel foils in excellent quality. It can be included at any time into the manufacturing chain for U-Mo fuel elements, which is currently being developed.

  10. Poly(ethylenimine)-Functionalized Monolithic Alumina Honeycomb Adsorbents for CO2 Capture from Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Yoo, Chun-Jae; Tan, Shuai; Rashidi, Fereshteh; Jones, Christopher W

    2016-07-21

    The development of practical and effective gas-solid contactors is an important area in the development of CO2 capture technologies. Target CO2 capture applications, such as postcombustion carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) from power plant flue gases or CO2 extraction directly from ambient air (DAC), require high flow rates of gas to be processed at low cost. Extruded monolithic honeycomb structures, such as those employed in the catalytic converters of automobiles, have excellent potential as structured contactors for CO2 adsorption applications because of the low pressure drop imposed on fluid moving through the straight channels of such structures. Here, we report the impregnation of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), an effective aminopolymer reported commonly for CO2 separation, into extruded monolithic alumina to form structured CO2 sorbents. These structured sorbents are first prepared on a small scale, characterized thoroughly, and compared with powder sorbents with a similar composition. Despite consistent differences observed in the filling of mesopores with PEI between the monolithic and powder sorbents, their performance in CO2 adsorption is similar across a range of PEI contents. A larger monolithic cylinder (1 inch diameter, 4 inch length) is evaluated under conditions closer to those that might be used in large-scale applications and shows a similar performance to the smaller monoliths and powders tested initially. This larger structure is evaluated over five cycles of CO2 adsorption and steam desorption and demonstrates a volumetric capacity of 350 molCO2  m-3monolith and an equilibration time of 350 min under a 0.4 m s(-1) linear flow velocity through the monolith channels using 400 ppm CO2 in N2 as the adsorption gas at 30 °C. This volumetric capacity surpasses that of a similar technology considered previously, which suggested that CO2 could be removed from air at an operating cost as low as $100 per ton. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag

  11. Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial of Bilayer Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Crown Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Rose, William; Oliveira, Erica; Yang, Mark; Clark, Arthur E.; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Analyzing the clinical performance of restorative materials is important, as there is an expectation that these materials and procedures will restore teeth and do no harm. The objective of this research study was to characterize the clinical performance of metal-ceramic crowns, core ceramic crowns, and core ceramic/veneer ceramic crowns based on 11 clinical criteria. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study. The following three types of full crowns were fabricated: (1) metal-ceramic crown (MC) made from a Pd-Au-Ag-Sn-In alloy (Argedent 62) and a glass-ceramic veneer (IPS d.SIGN veneer); (2) non-veneered (glazed) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC) (IPS e.max Press core and e.max Ceram Glaze); and (3) veneered lithia disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC/V) with glass-ceramic veneer (IPS Empress 2 core and IPS Eris). Single-unit crowns were randomly assigned. Patients were recalled for each of 3 years and were evaluated by two calibrated clinicians. Thirty-six crowns were placed in 31 patients. A total of 12 crowns of each of the three crown types were studied. Eleven criteria were evaluated: tissue health, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, anatomic contour, occlusion, surface texture, cracks/chips (fractures), color match, tooth sensitivity, and wear (of crowns and opposing enamel). Numerical rankings ranged from 1 to 4, with 4 being excellent, and 1 indicating a need for immediate replacement. Statistical analysis of the numerical rankings was performed using a Fisher’s exact test. Results There was no statistically significant difference between performance of the core ceramic crowns and the two veneered crowns at year 1 and year 2 (p > 0.05). All crowns were rated either as excellent or good for each of the clinical criteria; however, between years 2 and 3, gradual roughening of the occlusal surface occurred in some of the ceramic-ceramic crowns

  12. Safety characteristics of the monolithic CFC divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.; Merola, M.; Matera, R.

    1994-01-01

    The main distinguishing feature of the monolithic CFC divertor is the use of a single material, a carbon fibre reinforced carbon, for the protective armour, the heat sink and the cooling channels. This removes joint interface problems which are one of the most important concerns related to the reference solutions of the ITER CDA divertor. An activation analysis of the different coolant options for this concept is presented. It turns out that neither short-term nor long-term activation are a concern for any coolants investigated. Therefore the proposed concept proves to be attractive from a safety stand-point also. ((orig.))

  13. Safety characteristics of the monolithic CFC divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchetti, M.; Merola, M.; Matera, R.

    1994-09-01

    The main distinguishing feature of the monolithic CFC divertor is the use of a single material, a carbon fibre reinforced carbon, for the protective armour, the heat sink and the cooling channels. This removes joint interface problems which are one of the most important concerns related to the reference solutions of the ITER CDA divertor. An activation analysis of the different coolant options for this concept is presented. It turns out that neither short-term nor long-term activation are a concern for any coolants investigated. Therefore the proposed concept proves to be attractive from a safety stand-point also.

  14. Immobilisation of shredded soft waste in cement monolith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.J.; Dalton, M.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-04-01

    A grouting process for the immobilisation of shredded contaminated laboratory waste in a cement monolith is being developed at the Atomic Energy Establishment Winfrith. The objective is to produce a 'monolithic' type package which is acceptable both for sea and land disposal. The work carried out on this project in the period April 1982 - March 1983 is summarised in this report. (author)

  15. Fabrication of mesoporous polymer monolith: a template-free approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Keisuke; Nandi, Mahasweta; Maruyama, Jun; Oka, Tatsuya; Tsujimoto, Takashi; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2011-07-14

    Mesoporous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) monolith has been fabricated by a template-free approach using the unique affinity of PAN towards a water/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) mixture. A newly developed Thermally Induced Phase Separation Technique (TIPS) has been used to obtain the polymer monoliths and their microstructures have been controlled by optimizing the concentration and cooling temperature.

  16. Creating deep soil core monoliths: Beyond the solum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil monoliths serve as useful teaching aids in the study of the Earth’s critical zone where rock, soil, water, air, and organisms interact. Typical monolith preparation has so far been confined to the 1 to 2-m depth of the solum. Critical ecosystem services provided by soils include materials from ...

  17. Fine-grain concrete from mining waste for monolithic construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesovik, R. V.; Ageeva, M. S.; Lesovik, G. A.; Sopin, D. M.; Kazlitina, O. V.; Mitrokhin, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    The technology of a monolithic construction is a well-established practice among most Russian real estate developers. The strong points of the technology are low cost of materials and lower demand for qualified workers. The monolithic construction uses various types of reinforced slabs and foamed concrete, since they are easy to use and highly durable; they also need practically no additional treatment.

  18. Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kanter, J.L.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Summary accompanying the thesis: Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders by Jens de Kanter This thesis presents the investigation of the crush behaviour of both monolithic aluminium cylinders and externally fibre reinforced aluminium cylinders. The research is based

  19. Media Presentation Synchronisation for Non-monolithic Rendering Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Vaishnavi (Ishan); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); B. Gao (Bo)

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractNon-monolithic renderers are physically distributed media playback engines. Non-monolithic renderers may use a number of different underlying network connection types to transmit media items belonging to a presentation. There is therefore a need for a media based and inter-network- type

  20. Standard test method for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of lead and cadmium extracted from ceramic foodware

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS) to quantitatively determine lead and cadmium extracted by acetic acid at room temperature from the food-contact surface of foodware. The method is applicable to food-contact surfaces composed of silicate-based materials (earthenware, glazed ceramicware, decorated ceramicware, decorated glass, and lead crystal glass) and is capable of determining lead concentrations greater than 0.005 to 0.020 g/mL and cadmium concentrations greater than 0.0005 to 0.002 g/mL, depending on instrument design. 1.2 This test method also describes quality control procedures to check for contamination and matrix interference during GFAAS analyses and a specific sequence of analytical measurements that demonstrates proper instrument operation during the time period in which sample solutions are analyzed. 1.3 Cleaning and other contamination control procedures are described in this test method. Users may modify contamination cont...

  1. Synthesis of Porous Carbon Monoliths Using Hard Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepel, Olaf; Danneberg, Nina; Dräger, Matti; Erlitz, Marcel; Taubert, Michael

    2016-03-21

    The preparation of porous carbon monoliths with a defined shape via template-assisted routes is reported. Monoliths made from porous concrete and zeolite were each used as the template. The porous concrete-derived carbon monoliths exhibited high gravimetric specific surface areas up to 2000 m²·g -1 . The pore system comprised macro-, meso-, and micropores. These pores were hierarchically arranged. The pore system was created by the complex interplay of the actions of both the template and the activating agent as well. On the other hand, zeolite-made template shapes allowed for the preparation of microporous carbon monoliths with a high volumetric specific surface area. This feature could be beneficial if carbon monoliths must be integrated into technical systems under space-limited conditions.

  2. Authenticity test in ceramics and archaeological figures by thermoluminescence; Prueba de Autenticidad en ceramicas y figuras arqueologicas por termoluminiscencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez L, A.; Schaaf, P. [Laboratorio de Termoluminiscencia, Instituto de Geofisica-UNAM (Mexico); Filloy, L. [Museo Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    At present exists quite a lot of false archaeological pieces which provokes doubts about the legitimacy of the pieces. In this work it is presented the Authenticity test by Thermoluminescence realized at the urn of the goddess 13 serpent of the zapotec culture of Oaxaca which is exposed in Mexico City. The original piece contains crystalline structures which present hardly the thermoluminescence phenomena by the presence of {sup 238} U, {sup 232} Th, and {sup 40} K getting with this the form and intensity of the natural thermoluminescence curve of an archaeological piece which shows a Tl peak and allows to know so if it was made recently or not. (Author)

  3. Hanford Waste Vitrification Program process development: Melt testing subtask, pilot-scale ceramic melter experiment, run summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaoka, R.K.; Bates, S.O.; Elmore, M.R.; Goles, R.W.; Perez, J.M.; Scott, P.A.; Westsik, J.H.

    1996-03-01

    Hanford Waste Vitrification Program (HWVP) activities for FY 1985 have included engineering and pilot-scale melter experiments HWVP-11/HBCM-85-1 and HWVP-12/PSCM-22. Major objectives designated by HWVP fo these tests were to evaluate the processing characteristics of the current HWVP melter feed during actual melter operation and establish the product quality of HW-39 borosilicate glass. The current melter feed, defined during FY 85, consists of reference feed (HWVP-RF) and glass-forming chemicals added as frit

  4. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruggs, S.J.; Putman, P.T.; Fang, H.; Alessandrini, M.; Salama, K.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample

  5. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scruggs, S.J. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)]. E-mail: Sscruggs2@uh.edu; Putman, P.T. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Fang, H. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Alessandrini, M. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Salama, K. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample.

  6. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  7. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  8. Ceramic Parts for Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. D.; Carpenter, Harry W.; Tellier, Jim; Rollins, Clark; Stormo, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Abilities of ceramics to serve as turbine blades, stator vanes, and other elements in hot-gas flow of rocket engines discussed in report. Ceramics prime candidates, because of resistance to heat, low density, and tolerance of hostile environments. Ceramics considered in report are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and new generation of such ceramic composites as transformation-toughened zirconia and alumina and particulate- or whisker-reinforced matrices. Report predicts properly designed ceramic components viable in advanced high-temperature rocket engines and recommends future work.

  9. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  10. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  11. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  12. Development of ceramic vacuum pumps for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    To achieve the magnetic field resistance and tritium resistance which are required for vacuum pumps for fusion reactors, a vacuum pump consisting of middle-ceramic turbo molecular pump (TMP), using ceramic rotor and ceramic turbo roughing pump was developed. In colaboration with the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, performance tests on pumping speed, compression ratio of middle-ceramic TMP and both of pumping characteristics were carried out. Sufficient performances were obtained. It was showed that middle-ceramic TMP had pumping speed of more than 500 l/s, and could achieve the pressure below 4 x 10 -7 Pa. Ceramic turbo roughing pump could vacuum from atmospheric pressure. It is concluded that complete oil-free ceramic vacuum pump can be put into practical use (K.S.)

  13. Mechanical properties of resin-ceramic CAD/CAM restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, Abdallah; Nathanson, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The recent development of polymer-based computer-aided design and computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) milling blocks and the limited availability of independent studies on these materials make it pertinent to evaluate their properties and identify potential strengths and limitations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine and compare mechanical properties (flexural strength, flexural modulus, modulus of resilience) and compare the margin edge quality of recently introduced polymer-based CAD/CAM materials with some of their commercially available composite resin and ceramic counterparts. The materials studied were Lava Ultimate Restorative (LVU; 3M ESPE), Enamic (ENA; Vita Zahnfabrik), Cerasmart (CES; GC Dental Products), IPS Empress CAD (EMP; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), Vitablocs Mark II (VM2; Vita Zahnfabrik), and Paradigm MZ100 Block (MZ1; 3M ESPE). Polished 4×1×13.5 mm bars (n=25) were prepared from standard-sized milling blocks of each tested material. The bars were subjected to a 3-point flexural test on a 10-mm span with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. In addition, 42 conventional monolithic crowns (7 per material) were milled. Margin edge quality was observed by means of macrophotography and optical microscopy, providing a qualitative visual assessment and a measurement of existing roughness. The results were analyzed by ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The mean flexural strength of the tested materials ranged from 105 ±9 MPa (VM2) to 219 ±20 MPa (CES). The mean flexural modulus ranged from 8 ±0.25 GPa (CES) to 32 ±1.9 GPa (EMP). The mean modulus of resilience ranged from 0.21 ±0.02 MPa (VM2) to 3.07 ±0.45 MPa (CES). The qualitative assessment of margin edge roughness revealed visible differences among the tested materials, with mean roughness measurements ranging from 60 ±16 μm (CES) to 190 ±15 μm (EMP). The material factor had a significant effect on the mean flexural strength (Pmaterials tested in this study exhibited

  14. Functionally Graded Materials using Plasma Spray with Nano Structured Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioh, E L; Tok, A I Y

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, nano structured FGM was fabricated using DC plasma spray technique. Nano structured and micro structured powder were used as the feeding powder with steel substrate. The spray parameters was optimized and characterisation of nano-ceramic FGM and micro-ceramic FGM were done using bending test and micro-hardness test. Experimental results have shown that the nano-structured FGM exhibit 20% improvement flexure strength and 10% in hardness. A comparison was made between sintered micro ceramic tile and nano ceramic FGM using simple drop test method.

  15. ROMP-Derived cyclooctene-based monolithic polymeric materials reinforced with inorganic nanoparticles for applications in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Weichelt

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous monolithic inorganic/polymeric hybrid materials have been prepared via ring-opening metathesis copolymerization starting from a highly polar monomer, i.e., cis-5-cyclooctene-trans-1,2-diol and a 7-oxanorborn-2-ene-derived cross-linker in the presence of porogenic solvents and two types of inorganic nanoparticles (i.e., CaCO3 and calcium hydroxyapatite, respectively using the third-generation Grubbs initiator RuCl2(Py2(IMesH2(CHPh. The physico-chemical properties of the monolithic materials, such as pore size distribution and microhardness were studied with regard to the nanoparticle type and content. Moreover, the reinforced monoliths were tested for the possible use as scaffold materials in tissue engineering, by carrying out cell cultivation experiments with human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

  16. High-performance ceramics. Fabrication, structure, properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzow, G.; Tobolski, J.; Telle, R.

    1996-01-01

    The program ''Ceramic High-performance Materials'' pursued the objective to understand the chaining of cause and effect in the development of high-performance ceramics. This chain of problems begins with the chemical reactions for the production of powders, comprises the characterization, processing, shaping and compacting of powders, structural optimization, heat treatment, production and finishing, and leads to issues of materials testing and of a design appropriate to the material. The program ''Ceramic High-performance Materials'' has resulted in contributions to the understanding of fundamental interrelationships in terms of materials science, which are summarized in the present volume - broken down into eight special aspects. (orig./RHM)

  17. Clay Ceramic Filter for Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zereffa Enyew Amare

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic water filters were prepared from different proportions of kaolin and soft wood and sintered at 900 °C, 950 °C, and 1000 °C. The flow rate, conductivity, pH of filtered water and removal efficiency (microbial, water hardness agent’s, nitrite and turbidity were analysed. The ceramic filter with 15 % saw dust, 80 % clay and 5 % grog that was fired at temperature of 950 °C or 1000 °C showed the best removal efficiency. Statistical ANOVA tests showed a significant difference between ceramic filters with various compositions in their removal efficiencies.

  18. Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium-Oxide Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    Capt Todd D. Church APPROVED: Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials C~t) Kraig/[ Vandewalle Date...copyrighted material in the thesis/dissertation manuscript entitled: "Translucency arid Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide...Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials manufacturers have developed more translucent monolithic zirconium oxide

  19. Monolithic circuits for barium fluoride detectors used in nuclear physics experiments. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varner, R.L.; Blankenship, J.L.; Beene, J.R.; Todd, R.A.

    1998-02-01

    Custom monolithic electronic circuits have been developed recently for large detector applications in high energy physics where subsystems require tens of thousands of channels of signal processing and data acquisition. In the design and construction of these enormous detectors, it has been found that monolithic circuits offer significant advantages over discrete implementations through increased performance, flexible packaging, lower power and reduced cost per channel. Much of the integrated circuit design for the high energy physics community is directly applicable to intermediate energy heavy-ion and electron physics. This STTR project conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sought to develop a new integrated circuit chip set for barium fluoride (BaF 2 ) detector arrays based upon existing CMOS monolithic circuit designs created for the high energy physics experiments. The work under the STTR Phase 1 demonstrated through the design, simulation, and testing of several prototype chips the feasibility of using custom CMOS integrated circuits for processing signals from BaF 2 detectors. Function blocks including charge-sensitive amplifiers, comparators, one shots, time-to-amplitude converters, analog memory circuits and buffer amplifiers were implemented during Phase 1 effort. Experimental results from bench testing and laboratory testing with sources were documented

  20. Influence of different carbon monolith preparation parameters on pesticide adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukčević Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of carbon monolith for pesticide removal from water, and the mechanism of pesticide interaction with carbon surface were examined. Different carbon monolith samples were obtained by varying the carbonization and activation parameters. In order to examine the role of surface oxygen groups in pesticide adsorption, carbon monolith surface was functionalized by chemical treatment in HNO3, H2O2 and KOH. The surface properties of the obtained samples were investigated by BET surface area, pore size distribution and temperature-programmed desorption. Adsorption of pesticides from aqueous solution onto activated carbon monolith samples was studied by using five pesticides belonging to different chemical groups (acetamiprid, dimethoate, nicosulfuron, carbofuran and atrazine. Presented results show that higher temperature of carbonization and the amount of activating agent allow obtaining microporous carbon monolith with higher amount of surface functional groups. Adsorption properties of the activated carbon monolith were more readily affected by the amount of the surface functional groups than by specific surface area. Results obtained by carbon monolith functionalisation showed that π-π interactions were the main force for adsorption of pesticides with aromatic structure, while acidic groups play an important role in adsorption of pesticides with no aromatic ring in the chemical structure.

  1. Biomimetic small peptide functionalized affinity monoliths for monoclonal antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Xia, Donghai; Han, Hai; Peng, Kun; Zhu, Peijie; Crommen, Jacques; Wang, Qiqin; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2018-08-09

    The rapid development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has necessitated the advancement of mAbs purification technologies. In this study, a biomimetic small peptide ligand 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzoic acid-Arg-Arg-Gly (DAAG) functionalized monolith was fabricated through a metal ion chelation-based multi-step approach. The resulting monolith showed good chromatographic performance. Compared with the Ni 2+ based IMAC monolith, the DAAG functionalized monolith exhibited not only excellent specificity but also higher dynamic binding capacity (DBC). The 10% DBC and 50% DBC for hIgG reached as high values as 26.0 and 34.6 mg/mL, respectively, at a ligand density of 8.8 μmol/mL, due to the high porosity and accessibility of the monolithic matrix. Moreover, the stability of the DAAG functionalized monolith in successive breakthrough experiments indicates that it has a promising potential for long-term use in mAbs purification. Finally, the DAAG functionalized monolith was successfully applied to the purification of trastuzumab or human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) from biological samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Damage Mechanisms and Controlled Crack Propagation in a Hot Pressed Silicon Nitride Ceramic. Ph.D. Thesis - Northwestern Univ., 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony Martin

    1994-01-01

    The subcritical growth of cracks from pre-existing flaws in ceramics can severely affect the structural reliability of a material. The ability to directly observe subcritical crack growth and rigorously analyze its influence on fracture behavior is important for an accurate assessment of material performance. A Mode I fracture specimen and loading method has been developed which permits the observation of stable, subcritical crack extension in monolithic and toughened ceramics. The test specimen and procedure has demonstrated its ability to generate and stably propagate sharp, through-thickness cracks in brittle high modulus materials. Crack growth for an aluminum oxide ceramic was observed to be continuously stable throughout testing. Conversely, the fracture behavior of a silicon nitride ceramic exhibited crack growth as a series of subcritical extensions which are interrupted by dynamic propagation. Dynamic initiation and arrest fracture resistance measurements for the silicon nitride averaged 67 and 48 J/sq m, respectively. The dynamic initiation event was observed to be sudden and explosive. Increments of subcritical crack growth contributed to a 40 percent increase in fracture resistance before dynamic initiation. Subcritical crack growth visibly marked the fracture surface with an increase in surface roughness. Increments of subcritical crack growth loosen ceramic material near the fracture surface and the fracture debris is easily removed by a replication technique. Fracture debris is viewed as evidence that both crack bridging and subsurface microcracking may be some of the mechanisms contributing to the increase in fracture resistance. A Statistical Fracture Mechanics model specifically developed to address subcritical crack growth and fracture reliability is used together with a damaged zone of material at the crack tip to model experimental results. A Monte Carlo simulation of the actual experiments was used to establish a set of modeling input

  3. Fabrication and testing of the sintered ceramic UO2 fuel - I - III, Part III - testing of sintered uranium dioxide properties dependent on the fabrication procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.; Ristic, M.M.

    1961-12-01

    The objective of this task was testing the influence of some parameters on the properties of sintered UO 2 . The influence of parameters tested were as follows: adhesives; pressure in the pressing procedure; temperature of sintering of the UO 2 powder. Other parameters were chosen according to the theoretical study. Sintering was done in argon atmosphere. Characterization of the UO 2 powder was performed meaning determining the needed chemical, physical and physico-chemical properties. Some new methods were developed within this task: SET method for measuring the specific surfaces, DTA, TGA, high-temperature torsion

  4. Tensile Behaviour of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehořek, Lukáš; Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2009), s. 237-241 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821; GA ČR GD106/09/H035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Tensile test * Ceramics foam * Open porosity * Tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.649, year: 2009

  5. Tensile properties of open cell ceramic foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bertolla, Luca; Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2013), s. 106-113 ISSN 1338-1660. [FRACTOGRAPHY 2012. Stará Lesná, 21.10.2012-24.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/1821 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 - GLACERCO Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : tension test * cellular materials * ceramics Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  6. Natural Radioactivity in Ceramic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Khadra, S.A.; Kamel, N.H.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics are one of the most important types of the industrial building materials. The raw materials of the ceramic are made of a mixture of clay, feldspar, silica, talc kaolin minerals together with zirconium silicates (ZrSiO4).The ceramic raw materials and the final products contain naturally occurring radionuclide mainly U-238 and, Th-232 series, and the radioactive isotope of potassium K-40. Six raw ceramic samples were obtained from the Aracemco Company at Egypt together with a floor tile sample (final product) for measuring radioactive concentration levels., The activity of the naturally U-238, Th-232, and K-40 were determined as (Bq/kg) using gamma spectroscopy (Hyperactive pure germanium detector). Concentration of U and Th were determined in (ppm) using spectrophotometer technique by Arsenazo 111 and Piridy l-Azo -Resorcinol (PAR) indicators. Sequential extraction tests were carried out in order to determine the quantity of the radionuclide associated with various fractions as exchangeable, carbonate, acid soluble and in the residue. The results evaluated were compared to the associated activity indices (AI) that were defined by former USSR and West Germany

  7. Silver deposition on chemically treated carbon monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Zoran M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monolith was treated with HNO3, KOH and H2O2. Effects of these treatments on the surface functional groups and on the amount of silver deposited on the CM surface were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. As a result of chemical treatment there was an increase in the amount of surface oxygen complexes. The increase in the amount of silver deposit is proportional to the amount of surface groups that produce CO under decomposition. However, the high amount of CO groups, decomposing above 600°C, induces the smaller Ag crystallite size. Therefore, the high temperature CO evolving oxides are, most likely, the initial centers for Ag deposition.

  8. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit water vapor radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukamto, L. M.; Cooley, T. W.; Janssen, M. A.; Parks, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR) is under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). WVR's are used to remotely sense water vapor and cloud liquid water in the atmosphere and are valuable for meteorological applications as well as for determination of signal path delays due to water vapor in the atmosphere. The high cost and large size of existing WVR instruments motivate the development of miniature MMIC WVR's, which have great potential for low cost mass production. The miniaturization of WVR components allows large scale deployment of WVR's for Earth environment and meteorological applications. Small WVR's can also result in improved thermal stability, resulting in improved calibration stability. Described here is the design and fabrication of a 31.4 GHz MMIC radiometer as one channel of a thermally stable WVR as a means of assessing MMIC technology feasibility.

  9. Present status of the MONOLITH project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    MONOLITH is a proposed massive (34 kt) magnetized tracking calorimeter at the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy, optimized for the detection of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The main goal is to establish (or reject) the neutrino oscillation hypothesis through an explicit observation of the full first oscillation swing. The Δm 2 sensitivity range for this measurement comfortably covers the complete Super-Kamiokande allowed region. Other measurements include studies of matter effects, the NC up/down ratio, ν bar / ν ratio, the study of cosmic ray muons in the multi-TeV range, and auxiliary measurements from the CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam. Depending on approval, data taking with the part of the detector could start towards the end of 2004

  10. Monolithic fuel injector and related manufacturing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve [Greenville, SC; Johnson, Thomas Edward [Greenville, SC; Lacy, Benjamin [Greenville, SC; York, William David [Greenville, SC; Stevenson, Christian Xavier [Greenville, SC

    2012-05-22

    A monolithic fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle includes a substantially hollow vesicle body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween, an internal baffle plate extending radially outwardly from a downstream end of the bore, terminating short of the peripheral wall, thereby defining upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body, in fluid communication by way of a radial gap between the baffle plate and the peripheral wall. A plurality of integral pre-mix tubes extend axially through the upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body and through the baffle plate, with at least one fuel injection hole extending between each of the pre-mix tubes and the upstream fuel plenum, thereby enabling fuel in the upstream plenum to be injected into the plurality of pre-mix tubes. The fuel injection head is formed by direct metal laser sintering.

  11. Bioinspired Synthesis of Monolithic and Layered Aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Hassan, Khalil T; Harvey, Alan; Kulijer, Dejan; Oila, Adrian; Hunt, Michael R C; Šiller, Lidija

    2018-04-25

    Aerogels are the least dense and most porous materials known to man, with potential applications from lightweight superinsulators to smart energy materials. To date their use has been seriously hampered by their synthesis methods, which are laborious and expensive. Taking inspiration from the life cycle of the damselfly, a novel ambient pressure-drying approach is demonstrated in which instead of employing low-surface-tension organic solvents to prevent pore collapse during drying, sodium bicarbonate solution is used to generate pore-supporting carbon dioxide in situ, significantly reducing energy, time, and cost in aerogel production. The generic applicability of this readily scalable new approach is demonstrated through the production of granules, monoliths, and layered solids with a number of precursor materials. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Ceramic transactions: Environmental and waste management issues in the ceramic industry. Volume 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, G.B.

    1994-01-01

    A symposium on environmental and waste management issues in the ceramic industry took place in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 19-22, 1993. The symposium was held in conjunction with the 95th Annual Meeting of the American Ceramic Society and was sponsored by the Ceramic Manufacturing Council, Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Committee with the Glass and Optical Materials, Basic Science, Cements, Nuclear, Refractory Ceramics, Structural Clay Products, Whitewares, Design, Electronics, Engineering Ceramics, and Materials and Equipment Divisions. This volume documents several of the papers that were presented at the symposium. Papers presented in this volume are categorized under the following headings: vitrification of hazardous and mixed wastes; waste glass properties and microstructure; processing of nuclear waste disposal glasses; waste form qualification; glass dissolution: modeling and mechanisms; systems and field testing of waste forms

  13. Evaluation of the reuse of glass and ceramic blocks in the development of a ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.A.; Silva, L.A.; Martins, B.E.D.B.S.; Felippe, C.E.C.; Almeida, V.C.

    2010-01-01

    The ceramic industry has enormous potential to absorb wastes. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing leftovers ceramic blocks, from construction and, with shards of glass in the development of a ceramic product. The ceramic pieces were prepared with different compositions of glass by the method of pressing conformation and heating at 1000 and 1100 deg C. The conformed pieces were tested for linear shrinkage, water absorption, porosity, and tensile strength. The techniques for characterization were X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, the results show that the ceramic material produced has a high flexural strength and low values of water absorption. (author)

  14. Progress In Developing an Impermeable, High Temperature Ceramic Composite for Advanced Reactor Clad And Structural Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, Herbert; Hao, Bernard; Fehrenbacher, Larry; Patterson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Most Advanced Reactors for Energy and Space Applications require higher temperature materials for fuel cladding and core internal structures. For temperatures above 500 deg. C, metal alloys do not retain sufficient strength or long term corrosion resistance for use in either water, liquid metal or gas cooled systems. In the case of water cooled systems, such metals react exo-thermically with water during core overheating accidents, thus requiring extensive and expensive emergency systems to protect against major releases. Past efforts to apply ceramic composites (oxide, carbide or nitride based) having passive safety characteristics, good strength properties at high temperatures, and reasonable resistance to crack growth, have not been successful, either because of irradiation induced effects, or lack of impermeability to fission gases. Under a Phase 1 SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) project sponsored by DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, the authors have developed a new material system that may solve these problems. A hybrid tubular structure (0.6 inches in outside diameter) consisting of an inner layer of monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) and outer layers of SiC-SiC composite, bonded to the inner layer, has been fabricated in small lengths. Room temperature permeability tests demonstrate zero gas leakage at pressures up to 120 psig internal pressure. Four point flexural bending tests on these hybrid tubular specimens demonstrate a 'graceful' failure mode: i.e. - the outer composite structure sustains a failure mode under stress that is similar to the yield vs. stress characteristics of metal structures. (authors)

  15. The monolithic carbon aerogels and aerogel composites for electronics and thermal protection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng; Guo, Hui; Zhou, Yugui; Liu, Yuanyuan; Jin, Zhaoguo; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Yingmin

    2017-09-01

    Monolithic carbon aerogels have been prepared by condensation polymerization and high temperature pyrolysis. The morphology of carbon aerogels are characterized by SEM. The pore structure is characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption technique. Monolithic carbon aerogels are mesoporous nanomaterials. Carbon fiber reinforced carbon aerogel composites are prepared by in-situ sol-gel process. Fiber reinforced carbon aerogel composites are of high mechanical strength. The thermal response of the fiber reinforced aerogel composite samples are tested in an arc plasma wind tunnel. Carbon aerogel composites show good thermal insulation capability and high temperature resistance in inert atmosphere even at ultrahigh temperature up to 1800 °C. The results show that they are suitable for applications in electrodes for supercapacitors/ Lithium-ion batteries and aerospace thermal protection area.

  16. A Monolithic CMOS Magnetic Hall Sensor with High Sensitivity and Linearity Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiyun; Wang, Dejun; Xu, Yue

    2015-10-27

    This paper presents a fully integrated linear Hall sensor by means of 0.8 μm high voltage complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This monolithic Hall sensor chip features a highly sensitive horizontal switched Hall plate and an efficient signal conditioner using dynamic offset cancellation technique. An improved cross-like Hall plate achieves high magnetic sensitivity and low offset. A new spinning current modulator stabilizes the quiescent output voltage and improves the reliability of the signal conditioner. The tested results show that at the 5 V supply voltage, the maximum Hall output voltage of the monolithic Hall sensor microsystem, is up to ±2.1 V and the linearity of Hall output voltage is higher than 99% in the magnetic flux density range from ±5 mT to ±175 mT. The output equivalent residual offset is 0.48 mT and the static power consumption is 20 mW.

  17. Peculiarities of forming diffusion bimetallic joints of aluminum foam with a monolithic magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khokhlov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The work is carried out to determine an optimal method to obtain the welded bimetallic joints of monolithic Mg-alloy with porous Al-alloy using gallium as chemical activator and heating up to 300 °C by two different methods: long-term in vacuum oven and short-term without vacuum by passing of low voltage current. There is no microstructure change in Al-foam but indentation test records the negligible reduction of the mechanical properties. SEM showed the crystallization of two types of Mg5Ga2 and Mg2Ga inter-metallic phases in the wavy uneven diffusion zone on Mg-alloy side with significant increase of micro-hardness and Young's modulus. The narrow depth of the diffusion zone takes place in joints by short-term heating, so this method is more applicable for welding of monolithic and porous alloys at chemical activation using gallium.

  18. Ceramic High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Final Report CRADA No. TC02160.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-25

    The technical objective of this project was to develop a ceramic HEPA filter technology, by initially producing and testing coupon ceramics, small scale prototypes, and full scale prototype HEPA filters, and to address relevant manufacturing and commercialization technical issues.

  19. Small recuperated ceramic microturbine demonstrator concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Colin F.; Rodgers, Colin

    2008-01-01

    It has been about a decade since microturbines first entered service in the distributed generation market, and the efficiencies of these turbogenerators rated in the 30-100 kW power range have remained essentially on the order of 30%. In this time frame the cost of fuel (natural gas and oil) has increased substantially, and efforts are now underway to increase the efficiency of microturbines to 40% or higher. Various near-term means of achieving this are underway by utilizing established gas turbine technology, but now based on more complex thermodynamic cycles. A longer-term approach of improving efficiency is proposed in this paper based on the retention of the basic recuperated Brayton cycle, but now operating at significantly higher levels of turbine inlet temperature. However, in small low pressure ratio recuperated microturbines embodying radial flow turbomachinery this necessitates the use of ceramic components, including the turbine, recuperator and combustor. A development approach is proposed to design, fabricate and test a 7.5 kW ceramic microturbine demonstrator concept, which for the first time would involve the coupling of a ceramic radial flow turbine, a ceramic combustor, and a compact ceramic fixed-boundary high effectiveness recuperator. In a period of some three years, the major objectives of the proposed small ceramic microturbine R and D effort would be to establish a technology base involving thermal and stress analysis, design methodology, ceramic component fabrication techniques, and component development, these culminating in the assembly and testing to demonstrate engine structural integrity, and to verify performance. This would provide a benchmark for more confidently advancing to increased size ceramic-based turbogenerators with the potential for efficiencies of over 40%. In addition, the power size of the tested prototype could possibly emerge as a viable product, namely as a natural gas-fired turbogenerator with the capability of

  20. Machinability of IPS Empress 2 framework ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C; Weigl, P

    2000-01-01

    Using ceramic materials for an automatic production of ceramic dentures by CAD/CAM is a challenge, because many technological, medical, and optical demands must be considered. The IPS Empress 2 framework ceramic meets most of them. This study shows the possibilities for machining this ceramic with economical parameters. The long life-time requirement for ceramic dentures requires a ductile machined surface to avoid the well-known subsurface damages of brittle materials caused by machining. Slow and rapid damage propagation begins at break outs and cracks, and limits life-time significantly. Therefore, ductile machined surfaces are an important demand for machine dental ceramics. The machining tests were performed with various parameters such as tool grain size and feed speed. Denture ceramics were machined by jig grinding on a 5-axis CNC milling machine (Maho HGF 500) with a high-speed spindle up to 120,000 rpm. The results of the wear test indicate low tool wear. With one tool, you can machine eight occlusal surfaces including roughing and finishing. One occlusal surface takes about 60 min machining time. Recommended parameters for roughing are middle diamond grain size (D107), cutting speed v(c) = 4.7 m/s, feed speed v(ft) = 1000 mm/min, depth of cut a(e) = 0.06 mm, width of contact a(p) = 0.8 mm, and for finishing ultra fine diamond grain size (D46), cutting speed v(c) = 4.7 m/s, feed speed v(ft) = 100 mm/min, depth of cut a(e) = 0.02 mm, width of contact a(p) = 0.8 mm. The results of the machining tests give a reference for using IPS Empress(R) 2 framework ceramic in CAD/CAM systems. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Monolithic integration of a micromachined piezoresistive flow sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Tao; Yang, Zhenchuan; Zhang, Dacheng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a monolithic integrated piezoresistive flow sensor is presented, which was fabricated with an intermediate CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) MEMS (micro electro mechanical system) process compatible with integrated pressure sensors. Four symmetrically arranged silicon diaphragms with piezoresistors on them were used to sense the drag force induced by the input gas flow. A signal conditioning CMOS circuit with a temperature compensation module was designed and fabricated simultaneously on the same chip with an increase of the total chip area by only 35%. An extra step of boron implantation and annealing was inserted into the standard CMOS process to form the piezoresistors. KOH anisotropic etching from the backside and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) from the front side were combined to realize the silicon diaphragms. The integrated flow sensor was packaged and tested. The testing results indicated that the addition of piezoresistor formation and structure releasing did not significantly change any of the circuitry characteristics. The measured sensor output has a quadratic relation with the input flow rate of the fluid as predicted. The tested resolution of the sensor is less than 0.1 L min −1 with a measurement range of 0.1–5 L min −1 and the sensitivity is better than 40 mV per (L min −1 ) with a measurement range of 4–5 L min −1 . The measured noise floor of the sensor is 21.7 µV rtHz −1 .

  2. Irradiation performance of U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M. K.; Gan, J.; Jue, J. F.; Keiser, D. D.; Perez, E.; Robinson, A.; Wachs, D. M.; Woolstenhulme, N. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.S.; Hofman, G. L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont (United States)

    2014-04-15

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. U-Mo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

  3. IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF U-Mo MONOLITHIC FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. MEYER

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. UMo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

  4. Observations in the Sequence of UMo Monolithic Miniplates Preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Marisol; Gonzalez, Alfredo; Taboada, Horacio [Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, CAC, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA (Argentina)

    2011-07-01

    According with the works that the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) has being deploying in the frame of the reactor core conversion from HEU to LEU fuel, specially working with UMo monolithic core with Zyrcalloy based cladding concept, we put in sequence and give explanation to the observations recorded during our fabrication development tests. To that aim we performed several tests with different parameters conditions and we list all the observations and the possible causes of presence of undesirable phases, shapes or errors appeared during the fabrication tests of those miniplates. The binding techniques of materials employed in our fabrication include the process in solid state without fusion, but that requires pressure or temperature. The principal method employed in this work is a union process of continues rolling at temperature which is called co-rolling in order to produce a union of the surfaces in touch where it can be observed a new structure, and dog bone presence depending on the fabrication conditions. (author)

  5. Processing and properties of pressable ceramic with non-uniform reinforcement for selective-toughening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Wei [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); School of Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Hu, Xiaozhi, E-mail: xiao.zhi.hu@uwa.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Ichim, Paul [School of Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Sun, Xudong [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Brittle low-strength and low-toughness pressable dental ceramic can be reinforced by ductile elongated gold-particles (GP). A customized crown structure can be adequately strengthened by distributing GP only in critical sections of the crown, where high tensile stresses are experienced. In the present study, a non-uniformly structured ceramic-matrix composite with excellent interfacial bonding, twofold fracture toughness and strength at desired locations, is fabricated using pressable dental ceramic and GP. The layout pattern and sequence of different GP/ceramic powder mixtures, high-temperature flow properties of these mixtures during hot-pressing and the sample mold geometry are used to control the distribution and locations of GP for selective toughening and strengthening. Nano-crystalline structures of the pressable ceramic-matrix and the nano-scaled interfacial region around GP have been revealed by high-magnification field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Toughening and strengthening mechanisms of the elongated GP including residual stresses from composite processing and ductile fracture of GP are discussed together with SEM observations. Bulk flexural strength and local micro-indentation fracture and deformation characteristics of the selective-toughened ceramic/metal composite have been compared to those of the monolithic pressable ceramic to validate the toughening and strengthening mechanisms.

  6. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabloff, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  7. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Advanced Ceramics: Structural Ceramics and Glasses. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 4-11 ...

  8. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  9. Advanced Ceramics for NASA's Current and Future Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    2006-01-01

    Ceramic composites and monolithics are widely recognized by NASA as enabling materials for a variety of aerospace applications. Compared to traditional materials, ceramic materials offer higher specific strength which can enable lighter weight vehicle and engine concepts, increased payloads, and increased operational margins. Additionally, the higher temperature capabilities of these materials allows for increased operating temperatures within the engine and on the vehicle surfaces which can lead to improved engine efficiency and vehicle performance. To meet the requirements of the next generation of both rocket and air-breathing engines, NASA is actively pursuing the development and maturation of a variety of ceramic materials. Anticipated applications for carbide, nitride and oxide-based ceramics will be presented. The current status of these materials and needs for future goals will be outlined. NASA also understands the importance of teaming with other government agencies and industry to optimize these materials and advance them to the level of maturation needed for eventual vehicle and engine demonstrations. A number of successful partnering efforts with NASA and industry will be highlighted.

  10. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  11. [Ceramic inlays and onlays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, A W; de Kloet, H J; van der Kuy, P

    1996-11-01

    Large direct composite restorations can induce shrinkage related postoperative sensitivity. Indirect resin-bonded (tooth colored) restorations may perhaps prevent these complaints. Indirect bonded ceramics are especially attractive because of their biocompatibility and esthetic performance. Several procedures and techniques are currently available for the fabrication of ceramic restorations: firing, casting, heat-pressing and milling. In this article the different systems are described. Advantages, disadvantages and clinical performance of ceramic inlays are compared and discussed.

  12. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  13. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    PZT ), ceramics have attracted natural abundance. much attention for use in nonvolatile semiconductor mem- We attribute the observed spectra in Fig. I to...near a crack tip in piezoelectric ceramics of lead zirconate titanate ( PZT ) and barium titanate. They reasoned that the poling of ferroelectric... Texture in Ferroelastic Tetragonal Zirconia," J. Am. Ceram . Soc., 73 (1990) no. 6: 1777-1779. 27. J. F. Jue and A. Virkar, "Fabrication, Microstructural

  14. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  15. Piezo-electrostrictive ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Gi; Shin, Byeong Cheol

    1991-09-01

    This book deals with principle and the case of application of piezo-electrostrictive ceramics, which includes definition of piezoelectric materials and production and development of piezoelectric materials, coexistence of Pb(zr, Ti)O 3 ceramics on cause of coexistence in MPB PZT ceramics, electrostrictive effect of oxide type perovskite, practical piezo-electrostrictive materials, and breaking strength, evaluation technique of piezoelectric characteristic, and piezoelectric accelerometer sensor like printer head, ink jet and piezoelectric relay.

  16. Catalytic Oxidation of Cyanogen Chloride over a Monolithic Oxidation Catalyst

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of cyanogen chloride was evaluated over a monolithic oxidation catalyst at temperatures between 200 and 300 deg C in air employing feed concentrations between 100 and 10,000 ppm...

  17. Effect of accelerated aging on translucency of monolithic zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Abdelbary

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Thickness of zirconia has significant effect on translucency. Aging has significant effect on thinner sections of zirconia. More research is required on zirconia towards making the material more translucent for its potential use as esthetic monolithic restoration.

  18. Microchip-based monolithic column for high performance liquid chromatography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed microchip based monolithic columns that can be used for liquid chromatography of small organic molecules, as well as, macromolecules such as...

  19. Monolithic Perovskite Silicon Tandem Solar Cells with Advanced Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Jan C.; Bett, Alexander J.; Bivour, Martin; Blasi, Benedikt; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Kohlstadt, Markus; Lee, Seunghun; Mastroianni, Simone; Mundt, Laura; Mundus, Markus; Ndione, Paul; Reichel, Christian; Schubert, Martin; Schulze, Patricia S.; Tucher, Nico; Veit, Clemens; Veurman, Welmoed; Wienands, Karl; Winkler, Kristina; Wurfel, Uli; Glunz, Stefan W.; Hermle, Martin

    2016-11-14

    For high efficiency monolithic perovskite silicon tandem solar cells, we develop low-temperature processes for the perovskite top cell, rear-side light trapping, optimized perovskite growth, transparent contacts and adapted characterization methods.

  20. Reliability Analysis and Optimal Design of Monolithic Vertical Wall Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Burcharth, Hans F.; Christiani, E.

    1994-01-01

    Reliability analysis and reliability-based design of monolithic vertical wall breakwaters are considered. Probabilistic models of the most important failure modes, sliding failure, failure of the foundation and overturning failure are described . Relevant design variables are identified...

  1. Plant oil-based shape memory polymer using acrylic monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsujimoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the synthesis of a plant oil-based material using acrylic monolith. An acrylic monolith bearing oxirane groups was prepared via simple technique that involved the dissolution of poly(glycidyl methacrylate-comethyl methacrylate (PGMA in ethanolic – aqueous solution by heating and subsequent cooling. The PGMA monolith had topologically porous structure, which was attributed to the phase separation of the polymer solution. The PGMA monolith was impregnated by epoxidized soybean oil (ESO containing thermally-latent catalyst, and the subsequent curing produced a crosslinked material with relatively good transparency. The Young’s modulus and the tensile strength of polyESO/PGMA increased compared with the ESO homopolymer. The strain at break of polyESO/PGMA was larger than that of the ESO homopolymer and crosslinked PGMA. Furthermore, polyESO/PGMA exhibited good shape memory-recovery behavior.

  2. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  3. Research into properties of wear resistant ceramic metal plasma coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancivsky, V. V.; Skeeba, V. Yu; Zverev, E. A.; Vakhrushev, N. V.; Parts, K. A.

    2018-03-01

    The study considers one of the promising ways to improve the quality of wear resistant plasma ceramic coatings by implementing various powder mixtures. The authors present the study results of the nickel-ceramic and cobalt-ceramic coating properties and describe the specific character of the investigated coatings composition. The paper presents the results of the coating microhardness, chemical and adhesive strength studies. The authors conducted wear resistance tests of composite coatings in comparison with the plasma coatings of initial powder components.

  4. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  5. Ceramic piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic piezoelectric materials conert reversibility electric energy into mechanical energy. In the presence of electric field piezoelectric materials exhibit deformations up to 0.15% (for single crystals up to 1.7%). The deformation energy is in the range of 10 2 - 10 3 J/m 3 and working frequency can reach 10 5 Hz. Ceramic piezoelectric materials find applications in many modern disciplines such as: automatics, micromanipulation, measuring techniques, medical diagnostics and many others. Among the variety of ceramic piezoelectric materials the most important appear to be ferroelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate so called PZT ceramics. Ceramic piezoelectric materials can be processed by methods widely applied for standard ceramics, i.e. starting from simple precursors e.g. oxides. Application of sol-gel method has also been reported. Substantial drawback for many applications of piezoelectric ceramics is their brittleness, thus much effort is currently being put in the development of piezoelectric composite materials. Other important research directions in the field of ceramic piezoelectric materials composite development of lead free materials, which can exhibit properties similar to the PZT ceramics. Among other directions one has to state processing of single crystals and materials having texture or gradient structure. (author)

  6. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  7. Metallizing of machinable glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigal, P.K.

    1976-02-01

    A satisfactory technique has been developed for metallizing Corning (Code 9658) machinable glass ceramic for brazing. Analyses of several bonding materials suitable for metallizing were made using microprobe analysis, optical metallography, and tensile strength tests. The effect of different cleaning techniques on the microstructure and the effect of various firing temperatures on the bonding interface were also investigated. A nickel paste, used for thick-film application, has been applied to obtain braze joints with strength in excess of 2000 psi

  8. Towards a Technique for Extracting Microservices from Monolithic Enterprise Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Levcovitz, Alessandra; Terra, Ricardo; Valente, Marco Tulio

    2016-01-01

    The idea behind microservices architecture is to develop a single large, complex application as a suite of small, cohesive, independent services. On the other way, monolithic systems get larger over the time, deviating from the intended architecture, and becoming risky and expensive to evolve. This paper describes a technique to identify and define microservices on monolithic enterprise systems. As the major contribution, our evaluation shows that our approach was able to identify relevant ca...

  9. Translucency and Strength of High Translucency Monolithic Zirconium Oxide Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Zirconium -Oxide Materials presented at/published to the Journal of General Dentistry with MDWI 41-108, and has been assigned local file #16208. 2...Zirconia-Oxide Materials 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide...OBSOLETE 48. DATE Page 3 of 3 Pages Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials

  10. Microwaves integrated circuits: hybrids and monolithics - fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Pinto, J.K. da

    1983-01-01

    Several types of microwave integrated circuits are presented together with comments about technologies and fabrication processes; advantages and disadvantages in their utilization are analysed. Basic structures, propagation modes, materials used and major steps in the construction of hybrid thin film and monolithic microwave integrated circuits are described. Important technological applications are revised and main activities of the microelectronics lab. of the University of Sao Paulo (Brazil) in the field of hybrid and monolithic microwave integrated circuits are summarized. (C.L.B.) [pt

  11. Ceramics in Restorative and Prosthetic DENTISTRY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. Robert

    1997-08-01

    This review is intended to provide the ceramic engineer with information about the history and current use of ceramics in dentistry, contemporary research topics, and potential research agenda. Background material includes intra-oral design considerations, descriptions of ceramic dental components, and the origin, composition, and microstructure of current dental ceramics. Attention is paid to efforts involving net-shape processing, machining as a forming method, and the analysis of clinical failure. A rationale is presented for the further development of all-ceramic restorative systems. Current research topics receiving attention include microstructure/processing/property relationships, clinical failure mechanisms and in vitro testing, wear damage and wear testing, surface treatments, and microstructural modifications. The status of the field is critically reviewed with an eye toward future work. Significant improvements seem possible in the clinical use of ceramics based on engineering solutions derived from the study of clinically failed restorations, on the incorporation of higher levels of "biomimicry" in new systems, and on the synergistic developments in dental cements and adhesive dentin bonding.

  12. Mechanical energy dissipation in natural ceramic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, George

    2017-12-01

    Ceramics and glasses, in their monolithic forms, typically exhibit low fracture toughness values, but rigid natural marine ceramic and glass composites have shown remarkable resistance to mechanical failure. This has been observed in load-extension behavior by recognizing that the total area under the curve, notably the part beyond the yield point, often conveys substantial capacity to carry mechanical load. The mechanisms underlying the latter observations are proposed as defining factors for toughness that provide resistance to failure, or capability to dissipate energy, rather than fracture toughness. Such behavior is exhibited in the spicules of glass sponges and in mollusk shells. There are a number of similarities in the manner in which energy dissipation takes place in both sponges and mollusks. It was observed that crack diversion, a new form of crack bridging, creation of new surface area, and other important energy-dissipating mechanisms occur and aid in "toughening". Crack tolerance, key to energy dissipation in these natural composite materials, is assisted by promoting energy distribution over large volumes of loaded specimens by minor components of organic constituents that also serve important roles as adhesives. Viscoelastic deformation was a notable characteristic of the organic component. Some of these energy-dissipating modes and characteristics were found to be quite different from the toughening mechanisms that are utilized for more conventional structural composites. Complementary to those mechanisms found in rigid natural ceramic/organic composites, layered architectures and very thin organic layers played major roles in energy dissipation in these structures. It has been demonstrated in rigid natural marine composites that not only architecture, but also the mechanical behavior of the individual constituents, the nature of the interfaces, and interfacial bonding play important roles in energy dissipation. Additionally, the controlling

  13. First Results from Cherwell, a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nooney, Tamsin; Borri, Marcello; Crooks, Jamie; Headspith, Jon; Inguglia, Gianluca; Kolya, Scott; Lazarus, Ian; Lemmon, Roy; Mylroie-Smith, James; Turchetta, Renato; Velthuis, Jaap; Wilson, Fergus

    2014-01-01

    Cherwell is a CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) developed for digital calorimetry and charged particle tracking applications. Here, we outline the initial tests carried out to charac- terise the performance of Cherwell, give details of the test beam carried out at CERN and include the first results from this analysis. Three variations of the chip were tested; Type A, a high re- sistivity, low noise sensor, Type B, a standard resisivity, low noise sensor and Type C, a standard resistivity, standard noise sensor. The sensors yield an average RMS noise value per pixel of 9.6 e

  14. Ceramic Integration Technologies for Advanced Energy Systems: Critical Needs, Technical Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2010-01-01

    Advanced ceramic integration technologies dramatically impact the energy landscape due to wide scale application of ceramics in all aspects of alternative energy production, storage, distribution, conservation, and efficiency. Examples include fuel cells, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, gas turbine propulsion systems, distribution and transmission systems based on superconductors, nuclear power generation and waste disposal. Ceramic integration technologies play a key role in fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts with multifunctional properties. However, the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance requires the understanding of many thermochemical and thermomechanical factors, particularly for high temperature applications. In this presentation, various needs, challenges, and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic metal) material www.nasa.gov 45 ceramic-ceramic-systems have been discussed. Experimental results for bonding and integration of SiC based Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) LDI fuel injector and advanced ceramics and composites for gas turbine applications are presented.

  15. Nano-Doped Monolithic Materials for Molecular Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Acquah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoliths are continuous adsorbents that can easily be synthesised to possess tuneable meso-/macropores, convective fluid transport, and a plethora of chemistries for ligand immobilisation. They are grouped into three main classes: organic, inorganic, and hybrid, based on their chemical composition. These classes may also be differentiated by their unique morphological and physicochemical properties which are significantly relevant to their specific separation applications. The potential applications of monoliths for molecular separation have created the need to enhance their characteristic properties including mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and chemical and thermal stability. An effective approach towards monolith enhancement has been the doping and/or hybridization with miniaturized molecular species of desirable functionalities and characteristics. Nanoparticles are usually preferred as dopants due to their high solid phase dispersion features which are associated with improved intermolecular adsorptive interactions. Examples of such nanomaterials include, but are not limited to, carbon-based, silica-based, gold-based, and alumina nanoparticles. The incorporation of these nanoparticles into monoliths via in situ polymerisation and/or post-modification enhances surface adsorption for activation and ligand immobilisation. Herein, insights into the performance enhancement of monoliths as chromatographic supports by nanoparticles doping are presented. In addition, the potential and characteristics of less common nanoparticle materials such as hydroxyapatite, ceria, hafnia, and germania are discussed. The advantages and challenges of nanoparticle doping of monoliths are also discussed.

  16. Mechanically stable, hierarchically porous Cu3(btc)2 (HKUST-1) monoliths via direct conversion of copper(II) hydroxide-based monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Nirmalya; Fukumoto, Shotaro; Reboul, Julien; Sumida, Kenji; Zhu, Yang; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu; Kanamori, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-28

    The synthesis of highly crystalline macro-meso-microporous monolithic Cu3(btc)2 (HKUST-1; btc(3-) = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) is demonstrated by direct conversion of Cu(OH)2-based monoliths while preserving the characteristic macroporous structure. The high mechanical strength of the monoliths is promising for possible applications to continuous flow reactors.

  17. In vivo biofilm formation on different dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Felicia; Grade, Sebastian; Kohorst, Philipp; Stiesch, Meike

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the formation of oral biofilm on various dental ceramics in vivo. Five different ceramic materials were included: a veneering glass- ceramic, a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, a yttrium-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP), a hot isostatically pressed (HIP) Y-TZP ceramic, and an HIP Y-TZP ceramic with 25% alumina. Test specimens were attached to individually designed acrylic appliances; five volunteers wore these appliances for 24 hours in the maxillary arch. After intraoral exposure, the samples were removed from the appliances and the adhering biofilms vitally stained. Then, the two-dimensional surface coating and thickness of the adhering biofilm were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA with the level of significance set at .05. Significant differences (P ceramic materials. The lowest surface coating (19.0%) and biofilm thickness (1.9 Μm) were determined on the HIP Y-TZP ceramic; the highest mean values were identified with the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (46.8%, 12.6 Μm). Biofilm formation on various types of dental ceramics differed significantly; in particular, zirconia exhibited low plaque accumulation. In addition to its high strength, low plaque accumulation makes zirconia a promising material for various indications (including implant abutments and telescopic crowns) that previously were met only with metal-based materials.

  18. Influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nogawa, Hiroshi; Hiraba, Haruto; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of rounded rod specimens. Plate specimens were fabricated from zirconia (ZrO2), feldspathic porcelain, and lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDG ceramics). Plate surfaces were either ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens with a 2.0-mm-diameter were fabricated from type 4 gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics (HP ceramics). Wear testing was performed by means of a wear testing apparatus under 5,000 reciprocal strokes of the rod specimen with 5.9 N vertical loading. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The gold alloy showed the maximal height loss (90.0 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground porcelain, whereas the HP ceramics exhibited maximal height loss (49.8 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground zirconia. There was a strong correlation between height loss of the rod and surface roughness of the underlying plates, for both the gold alloy and HP ceramics.

  19. Effect of various intermediate ceramic layers on the interfacial stability of zirconia core and veneering ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Yeo, In-Sung; Yi, Yang-Jin; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effects of intermediate ceramics on the adhesion between the zirconia core and veneer ceramics. The polished surfaces of fully sintered Y-TZP blocks received three different treatments: (1) connector (C), (2) liner (L) or (3) wash layer (W). All the treated zirconia blocks were veneered with either (a) fluorapatite glass-ceramic (E) or (b) feldspathic porcelain (V) and divided into four groups (CE, CV, LE and WV). For the control group, the testing surfaces of metal blocks were veneered with feldspathic porcelain (VM). A half of the samples in each group (n = 21) were exposed to thermocycling, while the other half of the specimens were stored at room temperature under dry conditions. All specimens were subjected to the shear test and the failed surfaces were microscopically examined. The elemental distribution at the zirconia core/veneer interface was analyzed. The specimens in Groups CE and CV exhibited significantly greater mean bond strength values than those in Groups LE and WV, respectively (p ceramic substances into the zirconia surface. A glass-ceramic based connector is significantly more favorable to core/veneer adhesion than the other intermediate ceramics evaluated in the study. However, thermal cycling affected the bond strength at the core/veneer interface differently according to the intermediate ceramics.

  20. Report on results 1998. Standardization of test measuring method of fine ceramics for communication equipment; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Tsushin kikiyo fine ceramics no shiken hyoka hoho no hyojunka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Technological development is in progress at present for the intelligent transport system for example that uses a microwave frequency range of 60GHz or 90GHz toward the practical use, with a demand increasing for measuring the electrical properties of fine ceramics (FC) to be used in the communication equipment of the system. The measuring method in the microwave frequency range of 30GHz or less is about to be standardized in IEC TC49/WG10; however, the method above 30GHz has not yet been examined for the standardization internationally. The subject research is intended to establish the method of measuring electrical properties such as the dielectric constant of FC for a high-frequency/ultra high-frequency wave range, dielectric loss and surface resistivity, to standardize the principle of their measuring methods, measuring tools, adjusting method of samples, procedures of measurement, etc., and to aim at the international standardization. This year, investigation and examination were carried out on various measuring methods including overseas examinations in the U.S., extracting the Fabry-Perot resonator method and a conductive cylindrical dielectric cavity resonator perturbation method for example, and evaluating the specifications of standard reference materials. In addition, a morphological technique was established for measuring sample surfaces affecting measurements, by means of an accurate measuring instrument for thin film surfaces. (NEDO)