WorldWideScience

Sample records for testing materials

  1. Materials Test Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Test Branch resides at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processing laboratory and has a long history of supporting NASA programs from Mercury to the recently retired Space Shuttle. The Materials Test Branch supports its customers by supplying materials testing expertise in a wide range of applications. The Materials Test Branch is divided into three Teams, The Chemistry Team, The Tribology Team and the Mechanical Test Team. Our mission and goal is to provide world-class engineering excellence in materials testing with a special emphasis on customer service.

  2. Materials Test Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — When completed, the Materials Test Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will meet mission need. MTS will provide the only fast-reactor-like irradiation...

  3. MECHANICAL TESTING OF SINTERED MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina IONICI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Alloying elements have an important affect upon the mechanical properties of the Sintered Materials.Compression tests show that the cupper based material obtains high results in cryogenic environments.Testsreveal the weak resistance of materials that contain 0,8% C, due to a poor classification and a inhomogenousmetallographycal structure.

  4. Materials Testing - Digital Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Wiley

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Access to credible building product performance information throughout the design and construction process is critical to enable project development, vet product selections, ensure as-built quality, and successfully complete construction. This is common knowledge and part of common practice for nearly all parties involved in design and construction. The sources of such information can range from vernacular to formal – from common practice to special reference. The focus of this paper is one of the more formal or specialized information sources, performance testing, as well as how such performance testing information can be better used. This paper’s goals are to familiarize the reader with performance testing and to depict a new kind of valuable informational tool (digital ecology. Reference to pertinent nomenclature, description of a real world example, and detailed description of such an informational tool’s values will be provided.The major content of this paper was developed during project-based work and firm-funded internal research at point b design, ltd. over approximately the previous 4 years. The phrase ‘digital ecology’ as herein used is a new concept proposed by the author. The analysis contained in this paper could be applied to the field of operations and maintenance as it is herein applied to design and construction; however, operations and maintenance is beyond the scope of this paper and may be addressed in future papers. It is my hope that this paper will contribute to tangible and real improvements of the built environment via continued, positive development within academic and professional practice.

  5. Developing test materials for dyscalculia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenskov, Lena; Bent, Lindhardt,

    Aims, requirements and context for the development of test materials for dyscalculia are analyzed. The test materials are to be used for Grade 4 pupils in Danish primary schools. Preliminary results are presented from focus group interview with adolescents and adults, who see themselves as being...

  6. Testing Requirements for Refractory Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W,; Montgomery, Eliza M.

    2012-01-01

    Launch Pads 39A and 39B currently use refractory material (Fondu Fyre) in the flame trenches. This material was initially approved for the Saturn program. This material had a lifetime of 10years according to the manufacturer, and it has been used for over 40 years. As a consequence, the Fondu Fyre at Launch Complex 39 requires repair subsequent to almost every launch. A review of the literature indicates that the gunned Fondu Fyre refractory product (WA-1 G) was never tested prior to use. With the recent severe damage to the flame trenches, a new refractory material is sought to replace Fondu Fyre. In order to replace Fondu Fyre, a methodology to test and evaluate refractory products was developed. This paper outlines this methodology and discusses current testing requirements, as well as the laboratory testing that might be required. Furthermore, this report points out the necessity for subscale testing, the locations where this testing can be performed, and the parameters that will be necessary to qualify a product. The goal is to identify a more durable refractory material that has physical, chemical, and thermal properties suitable to withstand the harsh environment of the launch pads at KSC.

  7. Environmental testing techniques for electronics and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dummer, Geoffrey W A; Fry, D W; Higinbotham, W

    2013-01-01

    Environmental Testing Techniques for Electronics and Materials reviews environmental testing techniques for evaluating the performance of electronic equipment, components, and materials. Environmental test planning, test methods, and instrumentation are described, along with the general environmental conditions under which equipment must operate. This book is comprised of 15 chapters and begins by explaining why environmental testing is necessary and describing the environment in which electronics must operate. The next chapter considers how an environmental test plan is designed; the methods

  8. Thermophysical tests of buffer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H. [ITC, Tokyo (Japan); Taniguchi, Wataru

    1999-03-01

    Thermodynamic properties of buffer materials were measured for putting in order thermodynamic constants to be used in the near-field thermal analysis. The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were measured as functions of the water content and temperature to deduce the specific heat. The thermal conductivity and specific heat varied significantly as the water content changed. Obtained values of the specific heat agreed well the expected values calculated based on the constituents of the buffer material. Temperature dependence of the thermodynamic constants was found small below 90degC. From the findings, the thermal conductivity and specific heat of the buffer material were formulated as functions of the water content. Thermodynamic study of powdery bentonite was carried out as well with a purpose of use for filling apertures in the artificial barrier. (H. Baba)

  9. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  10. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, T.R.; Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  11. Nanowear Testing of Composite Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, R.; Suchý, Tomáš; Šepitka, J.; Lukeš, J.; Sochor, M.; Balík, Karel; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Beneš, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 106, S3 (2012), s.519-s520 ISSN 0009-2770. [Local Mechanical Properties 2011. Olomouc, 09.11.2011-11.11.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1457 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : nanoindentation * wear * mechanical properties Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.453, year: 2012 http://www.chemicke-listy.cz/docs/full/2012_s3_s495-s522.pdf

  12. Analytical Ultrasonics in Materials Research and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.

    1986-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properites, and dynamic response.

  13. Irradiation test of high density Si material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Lee, Chul Yong; Yang, Seong Woo; Shim, Kyue Taek; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The feasibility of irradiation test for the high-density Si material entrusted by Guju Inc. was reviewed. The high density Si material is used for a sealing of the penetration holes of piping at the nuclear power plants. The irradiation test was performed and the density changes between before and after irradiation test were measured. The irradiation tests were performed 2 times for 1 day and 20 days at IP 4 hole of HANARO. The 3 Si specimens irradiated were without flaws and the density changes after irradiation were successfully measured. The result satisfies the requirement of the design specification.

  14. Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  15. Improved cytotoxicity testing of magnesium materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Janine, E-mail: janine.fischer@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Proefrock, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Department for Marine Bioanalytical Chemistry, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Hort, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Magnesium Processing, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2011-06-25

    Metallic magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are highly suitable for medical applications as biocompatible and biodegradable implant materials. Magnesium has mechanical properties similar to bone, stimulates bone regeneration, is an essential non-toxic element for the human body and degrades completely within the body environment. In consequence, magnesium is a promising candidate as implant material for orthopaedic applications. Protocols using the guideline of current ISO standards should be carefully evaluated when applying them for the characterization of the cytotoxic potential of degradable magnesium materials. For as-cast material we recommend using 10 times more extraction medium than recommended by the ISO standards to obtain reasonable results for reliable cytotoxicity rankings of degradable materials in vitro. In addition primary isolated human osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells should be used to test magnesium materials.

  16. Small crack test program for helicopter materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annigeri, Bal; Schneider, George

    1994-01-01

    Crack propagation tests were conducted to determine crack growth behavior in five helicopter materials for surface cracks between 0.005 to 0.020 inches in depth. Constant amplitude tests were conducted at stress ratios R equals 0.1 and 0.5, and emphasis was placed on near threshold data (i.e., 10-8 to 10-6 inches/cycle). Spectrum tests were conducted using a helicopter spectrum. The test specimen was an unnotched tension specimen, and cracks were initiated from a small EDM notch. An optical/video system was used to monitor crack growth. The material for the test specimens was obtained from helicopter part forgings. Testing was conducted at stresses below yield to reflect actual stresses in helicopter parts.

  17. Europa Propulsion Valve Seat Material Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addona, Brad M.

    2017-01-01

    The Europa mission and spacecraft design presented unique challenges for selection of valve seat materials that met the fluid compatibility requirements, and combined fluid compatibility and high radiation exposure level requirements. The Europa spacecraft pressurization system valves will be exposed to fully saturated propellant vapor for the duration of the mission. The effects of Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) and Monomethylhydrazine (MMH) propellant vapors on heritage valve seat materials, such as Vespel SP-1 and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE), were evaluated to determine if an alternate material is required. In liquid system applications, Teflon is the only available compatible valve seat material. Radiation exposure data for Teflon in an air or vacuum environment has been previously documented. Radiation exposure data for Teflon in an oxidizer environment such as NTO, was not available, and it was unknown whether the effects would be similar to those on air-exposed samples. Material testing was conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to determine the effects of propellant vapor on heritage seat materials for pressurization valve applications, and the effects of combined radiation and NTO propellant exposure on Teflon. The results indicated that changes in heritage pressurization valve seat materials' properties rendered them unsuitable for the Europa application. The combined radiation and NTO exposure testing of Teflon produced results equivalent to combined radiation and air exposure results.

  18. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Neil A.; Hudgins, Richard J.; McBain, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite liquid oxygen LO2 tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW), which is possible due to the 25%-40% reduction in weight that composite materials could provide over current aluminum technology. Although a composite LO2 tank makes these weight savings feasible, composite materials have not historically been viewed as "LO2 compatible." To be considered LO2 compatible, materials must be selected that will resist any type of detrimental, combustible reaction when exposed to usage environments. This is traditionally evaluated using a standard set of tests. However, materials that do not pass the standard tests can be shown to be safe for a particular application. This paper documents the approach and results of a joint NASA/Lockheed Martin program to select and verify LO2 compatible composite materials for liquid oxygen fuel tanks. The test approach developed included tests such as mechanical impact, particle impact, puncture, electrostatic discharge, friction, and pyrotechnic shock. These tests showed that composite liquid oxygen tanks are indeed feasible for future launch vehicles.

  19. Test Plan for Composite Hydrogen Getter Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, R.R.

    2000-11-09

    The intent of this test plan is to provide details of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) effort to evaluate composite getter materials for eventual use in expanding the wattage limits for transportation of contact-handled transuranic waste (CH-TRU). This effort is funded by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) under Technical Task Plan (TTP) SR-1-9-MW-45 and is the result of a competitive process initiated by a MWFA request for proposals. In response to this request, SRTC presented data on several composite getter materials that demonstrated good potential for application in transportation of transuranic wastes. The tests outlined in the SRTC proposal for composite getter materials should demonstrate compliance with functional requirements provided by the MWFA in a Statement of Work (SOW) which accompanied the request for proposals. Completion of Phase 1 testing, as defined in the TTP, should provide sufficient data to determine if composite getters should progress to Phase s 2 and 3. These test results will provide support for future safety reviews as part of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) certification process to utilize getter technology. This test plan provides details of the test descriptions, test objectives, required measurements, data quality objectives, data analysis, and schedule information relevant to Phase 1 of the TTP. The results of these tests are expected to help identify any potential weaknesses in the use of composite getter for transportation of CH-TRU wastes. Where a potential weakness is identified, this will be addressed as part of Phase 2 of the proposed effort. It is also important to recognize that these tests are focused on the individual composite getter materials and not the engineered system that would eventually be used in a TRUPACT-II. However, these test results will be very helpful in establishing the requirements for the design of a TRUPACT-II getter system that is included as part of the propo sed Phase

  20. Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, T.

    1986-11-01

    The Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility (PMITF), recently designed and constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma system with densities around 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ and electron temperatures of 10-20 eV. The device consists of a mirror cell with high-field-side microwave injection and a heating power of up to 0.8 kW(cw) at 2.45 GHz. The facility will be used for studies of plasma-materials interactions and of particle physics in pump limiters and for development and testing of plasma edge diagnostics.

  1. Testing fireproof materials in a combustion chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulhavy Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with a prototype concept, real experiment and numerical simulation of a combustion chamber, designed for testing fire resistance some new insulating composite materials. This concept of a device used for testing various materials, providing possibility of monitoring temperatures during controlled gas combustion. As a fuel for the combustion process propane butane mixture has been used and also several kinds of burners with various conditions of inlet air (forced, free and fuel flows were tested. The tested samples were layered sandwich materials based on various materials or foams, used as fillers in fire shutters. The temperature distribution was measured by using thermocouples. A simulation of whole concept of experimental chamber has been carried out as the non-premixed combustion process in the commercial final volume sw Pyrosim. The result was to design chamber with a construction suitable, according to the international standards, achieve the required values (temperature in time. Model of the combustion based on a stoichiometric defined mixture of gas and the tested layered samples showed good conformity with experimental results – i.e. thermal distribution inside and heat release rate that has gone through the sample.

  2. Testing fireproof materials in a combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhavy, Petr; Martinec, Tomas; Novak, Ondrej; Petru, Michal; Srb, Pavel

    This article deals with a prototype concept, real experiment and numerical simulation of a combustion chamber, designed for testing fire resistance some new insulating composite materials. This concept of a device used for testing various materials, providing possibility of monitoring temperatures during controlled gas combustion. As a fuel for the combustion process propane butane mixture has been used and also several kinds of burners with various conditions of inlet air (forced, free) and fuel flows were tested. The tested samples were layered sandwich materials based on various materials or foams, used as fillers in fire shutters. The temperature distribution was measured by using thermocouples. A simulation of whole concept of experimental chamber has been carried out as the non-premixed combustion process in the commercial final volume sw Pyrosim. The result was to design chamber with a construction suitable, according to the international standards, achieve the required values (temperature in time). Model of the combustion based on a stoichiometric defined mixture of gas and the tested layered samples showed good conformity with experimental results - i.e. thermal distribution inside and heat release rate that has gone through the sample.

  3. Impact testing of textile composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portanova, Marc

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate the impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of a variety of textile composite materials. Static indentation and impact tests were performed on the stitched and unstitched uniweave composites constructed from AS4/3501-6 Carbon/Epoxy with a fiberglass yarn woven in to hold the fibers together while being stitched. Compression and tension were measured after the tests to determine the damage resistance, residual strength and the damage tolerance of the specimens.

  4. Field Test of Lifejacket Flotation Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    5 5 1.6 19.19 0.13 Statistical analysis of this data indicates that 3.7 percentage points of arq individual cushion’s percent change in buoyancy might...Test (Accelerated Ag.ng Sequence). After the initial tesis , each material sample will be subjected to the Schedule I accelerated aging sequence with the... tesis . A-6 APPENDIX B Foam Manufacturers Participating in the Field Test Cellu Products Company Rubatex Corporation Post Office Box 98 Railroad Ave

  5. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  6. American Society for Testing and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    ASTM is a not-for-profit organization that provides a forum for the development and publication of voluntary consensus standards for materials, products, systems and services. ASTM develops standard test methods, specifications, practices, guides, classifications, and terminology in 130 areas covering subjects such as metals, paints, plastics, textiles, petroleum, construction, energy, the environment, computerized systems, consumer products, electronics, and many others.

  7. Nuclear materials testing in the loops of the NRU research reactor using material test bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, T.C.; Walters, L. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The NRU research reactor has been used to obtain data to understand and quantify the effects of irradiation on nuclear reactor components through their in-service lives and to develop improved designs and components. Apart from the Mark-4 and Mark-7 fast neutron rod material testing facilities in NRU, the high-pressure/high-temperature experimental loops provide an environment similar to the CANDU reactor core, where test materials are subjected to simulated power reactor conditions. Nuclear materials are tested in the loops using Material Test Bundles (MTB). This paper describes how the MTB is designed to operate in the NRU loops. It also describes the physics calculation of the 89-energy-group neutron spectrum in the MTB and its comparison with the spectrum in CANDU power reactors. The predictions of spectral effects on nuclear material behaviour, such as material damage and helium generation are summarized. (author)

  8. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilat Amos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available New techniques for dynamic characterization of materials that have been developed in the last three years (since the last DYMAT conference in 2012, and results from recent dynamic testing of Inconel 718 are presented. The first development is a dynamic punch test in which three dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to measure the deformation of the rear surface of a specimen as it being penetrated. The second experimental technique that is under development is a dynamic tension experiment in which full-field strain measurement with DIC and full-field temperature measurement are done simultaneously during the test.

  9. Ablative Material Testing at Lewis Rocket Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The increasing demand for a low-cost, reliable way to launch commercial payloads to low- Earth orbit has led to the need for inexpensive, expendable propulsion systems for new launch vehicles. This, in turn, has renewed interest in less complex, uncooled rocket engines that have combustion chambers and exhaust nozzles fabricated from ablative materials. A number of aerospace propulsion system manufacturers have utilized NASA Lewis Research Center's test facilities with a high degree of success to evaluate candidate materials for application to new propulsion devices.

  10. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  11. Test System for Thermoelectric Modules and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Švejda, V.; Horna, P.; Sikora, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a design for a complex measuring device that enables its user to assess the parameters of power-generating thermoelectric modules (TEMs) (or bulk thermoelectric materials) under a wide range of temperatures ( T cold = 25°C to 90°C, T hot thermocouple array connected to a data acquisition computer, and (iv) a thermostatic water-based cooling system with electronically controlled flow rate and temperature of cooling water. Our testing setup represents a useful tool able to assess, e.g., the thermoelectric parameters of newly developed TEMs and materials or to evaluate the thermoelectric parameters of commercially available modules and materials for comparison with values declared by the manufacturer.

  12. Mechanics of Granular Materials Test Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown from all three sides by its video camera during STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  13. Material Testing for Robotic Omnidirectional Anchor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkoe, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    To successfully explore near-Earth Asteroids the question of mobility emerges as the key issue for any robotic mission. When small bodies have extremely low escape velocities, traditional methods, such as wheels, would send the robot hurtling off of the asteroid's surface. To solve this problem, JPL has developed an omni-directional anchoring mechanism for use in microgravity that utilizes microspine technology. These microspines are placed in circular arrays with 16 independent carriages biasing the surface of the rock. The asperities in the surface allow the gripper to hold nearly 150N in all directions. While the gripper has been proven successful on consolidated rocks, it had yet to be tested on a variety of other surfaces that are suspected to separate the large boulders on an asteroid. Since asteroid surfaces vary widely, from friable rocks to lose ponds of regolith, the gripper was tested in a large variety of materials such as, bonded pumice, sand, gravel, and loose rocks. The forces are applied tangent, at 45 degrees, and normal to the surface of the material. The immediate results from this experiment will give insight into the gripper's effectiveness across the wide spectrum of materials found on asteroids.

  14. Material characterization models and test methods for historic building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tessa Kvist; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Møller, Eva B.

    2017-01-01

    Predictions of long term hygrothermal performance can be assessed by dynamic hygrothermal simulations, in which material parameters are crucial input. Material parameters for especially historic materials are often unknown; therefore, there is a need to determine important parameters, and simple...

  15. Materials screening chamber for testing materials resistance to atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, H. G.; Carruth, Ralph

    1989-01-01

    A unique test chamber for exposing material to a known flux of oxygen atoms is described. The capabilities and operating parameters of the apparatus include production of an oxygen atom flux in excess of 5 x 10 to the 16th atoms/sq cm-sec, controlled heating of the sample specimen, RF circuitry to contain the plasma within a small volume, and long exposure times. Flux measurement capabilities include a calorimetric probe and a light titration system. Accuracy and limitations of these techniques are discussed. An extension to the main chamber to allow simultaneous ultraviolet and atomic oxygen exposure is discussed. The oxygen atoms produced are at thermal energies. Sample specimens are maintained at any selected temperature between ambient and 200 C, to within + or - 2 C. A representative example of measurements made using the chamber is presented.

  16. Nondestructive Testing of Materials and Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Akkaya, Yılmaz

    2013-01-01

    Condition assessment and characterization of materials and structures by means of nondestructive testing (NDT) methods is a priority need around the world to meet the challenges associated with the durability, maintenance, rehabilitation, retrofitting, renewal and health monitoring of new and existing infrastructures including historic monuments. Numerous NDT methods that make use of certain components of the electromagnetic and acoustic spectra are currently in use to this effect with various levels of success and there is an intensive worldwide research effort aimed at improving the existing methods and developing new ones. The knowledge and information compiled in this book captures the current state-of-the-art in NDT methods and their application to civil and other engineering materials and structures. Critical reviews and advanced interdisciplinary discussions by world-renowned researchers point to the capabilities and limitations of the currently used NDT methods and shed light on current and future res...

  17. Materials Testing for PV Module Encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S.; Pern, J.; McMahon, T.

    2003-05-01

    Important physical properties of materials used in PV module packaging are presented. High-moisture-barrier, high-resistivity, adhesion-promoting coatings on polyethyl-ene terephthalate (PET) films have been fabricated and characterized for use in PV module application and com-pared to standard polymer backsheet materials. Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and an encapsulant replacement for EVA are studied for their water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) and adhesion properties. WVTR, at test conditions up to 85C/100% relative humidity (RH), and adhesion val-ues are measured before and after filtered xenon arc lamp ultraviolet (UV) exposure and damp heat exposure at 85C/85% RH. Water ingress is quantified by weight gain and embedded humidity sensors.

  18. Integrated Performance Testing Workshop - Supplemental Materials (Scripts and Procedures)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Gregory A.

    2014-02-01

    A variety of performance tests are described relating to: Material Transfers; Emergency Evacuation; Alarm Response Assessment; and an Enhanced Limited Scope Performance Test (ELSPT). Procedures are given for: nuclear material physical inventory and discrepancy; material transfers; and emergency evacuation.

  19. Testing reliability of MEMS materials in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Thomas P.; Ali, S. Mubassar; Mantell, Susan C.; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2007-01-01

    MEMS are increasingly being considered for applications that involve immersion in liquids. However, there are very little reliability data for MEMS structures in liquids environments. In this study, an apparatus was developed which enables the investigation of fatigue failure of MEMS in liquids. MEMS cantilever beams were mounted on a PZT piezoelectric actuator and immersed in a liquid. A laser is reflected off the tip of the vibrating cantilever and onto a position-sensing photo-diode device (PSD) to obtain position data. From this data resonance frequency can be extracted for long-term monitoring. Cantilevers are resonated for at least 10 8 cycles. This apparatus allows for the testing of many combinations of materials and environments. For this study, the fatigue performance in liquid of silicon nitride cantilever beams was evaluated and compared to single crystal silicon cantilever beams. Tests were conducted in deionized water and a saline solution. Silicon nitride exhibited no long-term degradation of resonance frequency within measurement limits in air, DI water, and saline environments. Silicon exhibited a steady decrease in resonance. Results showed that this method could be extended to conduct reliability studies on other MEMS materials.

  20. Aerothermal Testing of Woven TPS Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Feldman, Jay; Olson, Michael; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2012-01-01

    Woven Thermal Protection Systems (WTPS) is a new TPS concept that is funded by NASAs Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) Game Changing Division. The WTPS project demonstrates the potential for manufacturing a variety of TPS materials capable of wide ranging performances demanded by a spectrum of solar system exploration missions. Currently, missions anticipated to encounter heat fluxes in the range of 1500 4000 Watts per square centimeter are limited to using one proven material fully dense Carbon Phenolic. However, fully dense carbon phenolic is only mass efficient at heat fluxes greater than 4000 Watts per square centimeter, and current mission designs suffer this mass inefficiency for lack of an alternative mid-density TPS. WTPS not only bridges this gap but also offers a replacement for carbon phenolic, which itself requires a significant and costly redevelopment effort to re-establish its capability for use in the high heat flux missions recently prioritized in the NRC Decadal survey, including probe missions to Venus, Saturn and Neptune. This poster will summarize some recent arc jet testing to evaluate the performance of WTPS. Both mid density and fully dense WTPS test results will be presented and results compared to heritage carbon phenolic where applicable.

  1. Thermal-Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teate, Anthony A.

    1997-01-01

    Since its inception and successful implementation in 1997 at James Madison University, the Thermal Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory (T-SaMTL) funded by the NASA Langley Research Center is evolving into one of the University's premier and exemplary efforts to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten (10) students and faculty directly and almost fifty (50) students indirectly, T-SAMTL, through its recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring program, tutorial services and its research and computational laboratories has marked the completion of the first year with support from NASA totaling $ 100,000. Beginning as an innovative academic research and mentoring program for underrepresented minority science and mathematics students, the program now boasts a constituency which consists of 50% graduating seniors in the spring of 1998 with 50% planning to go to graduate school. The program's intent is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive doctoral degrees in the sciences by initiating an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self actualization skills of undergraduate students with the potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The program provides financial assistance, academic enrichment, and professional and personal development support for minority students who demonstrate the potential and strong desire to pursue careers in the sciences and mathematics. James Madison University was awarded the first $100,000, in April 1997, by The NASA Langley Research Center for establishment and support of its Thermal Structures and Materials Testing

  2. Material Nondestructive Evalution by Eddy Current Testing Material Nondestructive Evalution by Eddy Current Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Marek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Eddy current method is one of many methods of nondestructive testing. The aim of nondestructive testing is prevention of equipment breakdown without any impact on equipment operation. Especially breakdowns coused by hidden material defect from witch is equipment or part of equipment made. This paper explains the basic principles of method and present its functionality by simulation.
    Eddy current method is one of many methods of nondestructive testing. The aim of nondestructive testing is prevention of equipment breakdown without any impact on equipment operation. Especially breakdowns coused by hidden material defect from witch is equipment or part of equipment made. This paper explains the basic principles of method and present its functionality by simulation.

  3. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  4. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  5. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  6. SRM propellant and polymer materials structural test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The SRM propellant and polymer materials structural test program has potentially wide application to the testing and structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. The test program will provide a basis for characterization of the dynamic failure criteria for Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellant, insulation, inhibitor and liners. This experimental investigation will also endeavor to obtain a consistent complete set of materials test data. This test will be used to improve and revise the presently used theoretical math models for SRM propellant, insulators, inhibitor, liners, and O-ring seals.

  7. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  8. Bibliography of Testing and Evaluation Reference Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    Operational Test and Evaluation Center (AFOTEC) Software Evaluation Manager (SEM) and Deputy for Software Evaluation ( DSE ). It describes the numerous...Army87] Overview: The Software Test and Evaluation Manual is a three volume reference set that provides checklists and guidance to Department of...test plan). The content definition of a standardized test * 271 August 9, 1989 document can serve as a completeness checklist for the associated

  9. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wiffen, F.W. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Fusion Energy

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  10. Advanced Mechanical Testing of Sandwich Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayman, Brian; Berggreen, Christian; Jenstrup, Claus

    2008-01-01

    An advanced digital optical system has been used to measure surface strains on sandwich face and core specimens tested in a project concerned with improved criteria for designing sandwich X-joints. The face sheet specimens were of glass reinforced polyester and were tested in tension. The core sp...

  11. Material test data of SUS304 welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asayama, Tai [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Kawakami, Tomohiro [Nuclear Energy System Incorporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    This report summarizes the material test data of SUS304 welded joints. Numbers of the data are as follows: Tensile tests 71 (Post-irradiation: 39, Others: 32), Creep tests 77 (Post-irradiation: 20, Others: 57), Fatigue tests 50 (Post-irradiation: 0), Creep-fatigue tests 14 (Post-irradiation: 0). This report consists of the printouts from 'the structural material data processing system'. (author)

  12. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidt J.D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Three new testing configurations that have been developed since the last DYMAT conference in 2009 are presented. The first is high strain rate testing of Kevlar cloth and Kevlar yarn in a tensile Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB apparatus. The Kevlar cloth/yarn is attached to the bars by specially designed adaptors that keep the impedance constant. In addition to determining the specimen’s stress and strain from the recorded waves in the bars the deformations are also measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC. The second testing configuration is a high strain rate shear test for sheet metal. The experiment is done by using a flat notched specimen in a tensile SHB apparatus. The shear strain is measured using DIC within the notch and on the boundary. The third development is a compression apparatus for testing at intermediate strain rates ranging from 20 s−1 to 200 s−1. The apparatus is a combination of a hydraulic actuator and a compression SHB. The stress in the specimen is determined from the stress wave in a very long transmitter bar and the strain and strain rate is determined by using DIC. The results show clean stress strain curves (no ringing.

  13. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

  14. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Test cells comprise specimen sand contained in a latex membrane (with a grid pattern for CCD cameras) between metal end plates and housed in a water-filled Lexan jacket. Experiment flown on STS-79 and STS-89. Principal Investigator: Dr. Stein Sture.

  15. Shock Tube Test for Energy Absorbing Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    including application in helmet liners (8). Zorbium™ is the viscoelastic polyurethane foam used in military helmet suspension system pads (9). 8... viscoelastic polyurethane foam which shows strain rate dependent behavior when compressed. This is displayed by the significant difference in response...strain rate dependence of the viscoelastic polyurethane foam , the stress vs. strain results for these tests were also very similar. For the Zorbium 110i

  16. Impact sensitivity test of liquid energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiutiaev, A.; Dolzhikov, A.; Zvereva, I.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents new experimental method for sensitivity evaluation at the impact. A large number of researches shown that the probability of explosion initiating of liquid explosives by impact depends on the chemical nature and the various external characteristics. But the sensitivity of liquid explosive in the presence of gas bubbles increases many times as compared with the liquid without gas bubbles. In this case local chemical reaction focus are formed as a result of compression and heating of the gas inside the bubbles. In the liquid as a result of convection, wave motion, shock, etc. gas bubbles are easily generated, it is necessary to develop methods for determining sensitivity of liquid explosives to impact and to research the explosives ignition with bubbles. For the experimental investigation, the well-known impact machine and the so-called appliance 1 were used. Instead of the metal cup in the standard method in this paper polyurethane foam cylindrical container with liquid explosive was used. Polyurethane foam cylindrical container is easily deforms by impact. A large number of tests with different liquid explosives were made. It was found that the test liquid explosive to impact in appliance 1 with polyurethane foam to a large extent reflect the real mechanical sensitivity due to the small loss of impact energy on the deformation of the metal cup, as well as the best differentiation liquid explosive sensitivity due to the higher resolution method.

  17. Fatigue testing of materials under extremal conditions by acoustic method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baranov, VM; Bibilashvili, YK; Karasevich, VA; Sarychev, GA

    2004-01-01

    Increasing fuel cycle time requires fatigue testing of the fuel clad materials for nuclear reactors. The standard high-temperature fatigue tests are complicated and tedious. Solving this task is facilitated by the proposed acoustic method, which ensures observation of the material damage dynamics,

  18. Flammability tests for regulation of building and construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Sumathipala

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of building materials and products for flammability is critical to ensure the safety of occupants in buildings and other structures. The involvement of exposed building materials and products in fires resulting in the loss of human life often spurs an increase in regulation and new test methods to address the problem. Flammability tests range from those...

  19. Thermal cyclic durability testing of ceramic materials for turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal cyclic durability of commercial ceramic materials for turbine engines was under evaluation since 1978. Ceramic materials are exposed to cyclic diesel-fired burner exhaust at either 1204 or 1371 C (2200 or 2500 F) for up to 3500 hours. The test conditions are selected to simulate the environment experienced by the hot flow path components in an automotive gas turbine engine. The silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials tested are the same ceramic materials currently used on the AGT100 and AGT101 ceramic turbine engine program.

  20. A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellenstein, J.A. [Ohio Aerospace Inst. Cleveland, Ohio (United States); DellaCorte, C. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

    1994-10-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  1. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  2. Supercritical water loop for in-pile materials testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzickova, M.; Vsolak, R.; Hajek, P.; Zychova, M.; Fukac, R. [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    The Supercritical Water Loop (SCWL) has been designed and built within the HPLWR Phase 2 project, with the objective of testing materials under supercritical water conditions and radiation. The design parameters are set to 25MPa and 600{sup o}C in the testing area, where material samples shall be located. The loop has recently undergone pressure and leakage tests, during which the strength and tightness of the loop were proved. The loop has been also subjected to the first trial operation at nearly maximum operating parameters (temperature 550 {sup o}C was reached); loop operation was steady during several days. Presently, loop operation is envisaged in order to test the loop's long term operation ability. Samples of a material that needs further testing under out- of-pile conditions shall be exposed in the loop; the choice shall be made in agreement with the results of the WP4 - Materials of the HPLWR Phase 2 project. (author)

  3. Standard test method for galling resistance of material couples

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a laboratory test that ranks the galling resistance of material couples using a quantitative measure. Bare metals, alloys, nonmetallic materials, coatings, and surface modified materials may be evaluated by this test method. 1.2 This test method is not designed for evaluating the galling resistance of material couples sliding under lubricated conditions, because galling usually will not occur under lubricated sliding conditions using this test method. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Electrofracturing test system and method of determining material characteristics of electrofractured material samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Glover, Steven F.; Pfeifle, Tom; Su, Jiann-Cherng; Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Broome, Scott Thomas; Gardner, William Payton

    2017-08-01

    A device for electrofracturing a material sample and analyzing the material sample is disclosed. The device simulates an in situ electrofracturing environment so as to obtain electrofractured material characteristics representative of field applications while allowing permeability testing of the fractured sample under in situ conditions.

  5. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  6. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford tank farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  7. Arc Jet Testing of Thermal Protection Materials: 3 Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Conley, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Arc jet testing is used to simulate entry to test thermal protection materials. This paper discusses the usefulness of arc jet testing for 3 cases. Case 1 is MSL and PICA, Case 2 is Advanced TUFROC, and Case 3 is conformable ablators.

  8. Testing techniques for mechanical characterization of rapidly solidified materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical property testing techniques are reviewed for rapidly solidified materials. Mechanical testing of rapidly solidified materials is complicated by the fact that in most cases at least one dimension of the material is very small (less than 100 microns). For some geometries, i.e., powder or thin surface layers, microhardness is the only feasible mechanical test. The ribbon geometry which is obtained by the melt-spinning method, however, has been used for a variety of mechanical property measurements including elastic properties, tensile properties, fracture toughness, creep, and fatigue. These techniques are described with emphasis placed on the precautions required by the restricted geometry of rapidly solidified specimens.

  9. Erosion/corrosion testing of materials for oil sands applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, G.; Wolodko, J.; Alemaskin, K.; Been, J.; Danysh, M. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Erosion and corrosion are common wear mechanisms for components used in oil sands processing facilities. This paper described a slurry jet test apparatus designed to evaluate and assess materials for oil sands service conditions. The jet testing apparatus was designed to mimic the wet erosion phenomena typically found in oil sands applications. Wear- and corrosion-resistant materials tested by the apparatus included carbon steel, tungsten carbide metal matrix composite (WC-MMC) overlays, and a range of polymer and rubber liner materials. Polymeric materials included hydrogenated nitrile rubber (HNBR); polyurethane elastomer; and high density polyethylene (HDPE). Material losses were determined by measuring the mass of the samples before and after testing. Normalized rates of abrasion were calculated by dividing total mass lost in the specimens by the total mass of sand impinged on the sample surface. Samples were also visually assessed and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to determine failure modes. Tests were conducted for a 2-hour period at an impingement angle of 90 degrees. Results of the study showed that the average abrasion rates of the polymeric samples are lower than rates seen with the carbon steel and overlay materials. Future work on the apparatus will include testing the materials under varying slurry jet parameters. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  10. Physical and chemical test results of electrostatic safe flooring materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompf, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This test program was initiated because a need existed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to have this information readily available to the engineer who must make the choice of which electrostatic safe floor to use in a specific application. The information, however, should be of value throughout both the government and private industry in the selection of a floor covering material. Included are the test results of 18 floor covering materials which by test evaluation at KSC are considered electrostatically safe. Tests were done and/or the data compiled in the following areas: electrostatics, flammability, hypergolic compatibility, outgassing, floor type, material thickness, and available colors. Each section contains the test method used to gather the data and the test results.

  11. Testing of DentStat (trademark) and Competing Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    20, 21) Resin modified glass ionomers are well-suited to serve as temporary dental restorations, as they are known for preventing postoperative...ionomer materials. Quintessence Int. 1995;26(5):351-8. 17. Powers J. Craig’s Restorative Dental materials. 12th ed: Mosby; 2006. 18. Wilson AD. Resin ...NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT SAN ANTONIO TESTING OF DENTST AT™ AND COMPETING DENTAL MATERIALS Y OON HWANG PHD, JONATHAN STAHL DDS PHD, WAYNE M. D

  12. Standard Test Method for Testing Nonmetallic Seal Materials by Immersion in a Simulated Geothermal Test Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for a laboratory test for performing an initial evaluation (screening) of nonmetallic seal materials by immersion in a simulated geothermal test fluid. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see Section 6 and 11.7.

  13. Progress and Strategies for Testing of Materials for Solar Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2017-04-25

    Accelerated testing is key to confident launch of a new product. However, for new products like solar panels, the best approach is not always clear. The challenge for materials manufacturers is that test times can be long. Also, small-coupon testing may not predict the behavior in the full-size module, but testing of the full-size module is too expensive. As a result, solar panel test standards like IEC 61215 are useful, but are not sufficient. Material manufacturers have needed to define their own test protocols. This presentation will review some historical data (e.g., data show that manufacturers are making great progress toward reducing encapsulant discoloration) and describe advances in material testing (for example, new techniques are being demonstrated on how to more quantitatively assess adhesion, detect tendency for delamination, and understand how encapsulant properties affect other properties like cracking of cells). The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force has been researching climate-specific weathering tests toward the goal of defining international standards that would simplify qualification and quality assurance testing for materials. The status of these tests and the strategies for how to organize these standards to best meet the needs of the industry will be discussed.

  14. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules.

  15. The concept verification testing of materials science payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griner, C. S.; Johnston, M. H.; Whitaker, A.

    1976-01-01

    The concept Verification Testing (CVT) project at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, is a developmental activity that supports Shuttle Payload Projects such as Spacelab. It provides an operational 1-g environment for testing NASA and other agency experiment and support systems concepts that may be used in shuttle. A dedicated Materials Science Payload was tested in the General Purpose Laboratory to assess the requirements of a space processing payload on a Spacelab type facility. Physical and functional integration of the experiments into the facility was studied, and the impact of the experiments on the facility (and vice versa) was evaluated. A follow-up test designated CVT Test IVA was also held. The purpose of this test was to repeat Test IV experiments with a crew composed of selected and trained scientists. These personnel were not required to have prior knowledge of the materials science disciplines, but were required to have a basic knowledge of science and the scientific method.

  16. Testing the protective performance of clothing materials against aerosols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinman, I.L.; Ort, G.

    2010-01-01

    In AEP 38, skin protection against aerosol particles offered by CBRN protective equipment is recognized as an important issue that has to be verified. The work presented here focuses on material (i.e. swatch) tests, as opposed to whole system tests that use mannequins or human volunteers and which

  17. 40 CFR 59.208 - Charcoal lighter material testing protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... velocity traverse ports. (iii) Fan—25-centimeter (10-inch) diameter axial fan (duct fan) capable of... rheostat for controlling voltage to the fan. (3) Test equipment and materials. The following test equipment... monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and non-methane organic carbon are analyzed by the TCA and TCA/Flame...

  18. Reprint of: Improved cytotoxicity testing of magnesium materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Janine, E-mail: janine.fischer@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Proefrock, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Department for Marine Bioanalytical Chemistry, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Hort, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Magnesium Processing, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Metallic magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are highly suitable for medical applications as biocompatible and biodegradable implant materials. Magnesium has mechanical properties similar to bone, stimulates bone regeneration, is an essential non-toxic element for the human body and degrades completely within the body environment. In consequence, magnesium is a promising candidate as implant material for orthopaedic applications. Protocols using the guideline of current ISO standards should be carefully evaluated when applying them for the characterization of the cytotoxic potential of degradable magnesium materials. For as-cast material we recommend using 10 times more extraction medium than recommended by the ISO standards to obtain reasonable results for reliable cytotoxicity rankings of degradable materials in vitro. In addition primary isolated human osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells should be used to test magnesium materials.

  19. Strip specimen tests for pipeline materials and girth welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, William C. [Edison Welding Institute (EWI), Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Strip specimen testing of pipeline materials has been widely applied as a method of getting data relevant to the performance of pipelines under axial direction loading. Comparisons of strip specimen against smaller standard tests (round tensile bar, fracture toughness specimens, polished round bars) and against full-scale or large-scale testing will be explored. Data from early-generation pipe welds from the 1920's to the 1940's to the most recent materials for offshore reeled pipe will be used for examples. Strip samples can provide full thickness information to take account of varying material properties or imperfection distribution through the thickness. Strip samples can also accommodate measurement of effects of the original surface finish or weld surface shape. Strip samples have more design flexibility than standard tests, but must be designed to limit stress concentrations and effects of local bending. (author)

  20. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  1. Ultraviolet Testing of Space Suit Materials for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristine; Fries, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may require radical changes in the approach to extra-vehicular (EVA) suit design. A major challenge is the balance of building a suit robust enough to complete multiple EVAs under intense ultraviolet (UV) light exposure without losing mechanical strength or compromising the suit's mobility. To study how the materials degrade on Mars in-situ, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) invited the Advanced Space Suit team at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) to place space suit materials on the Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument's calibration target of the Mars 2020 rover. In order to select materials for the rover and understand the effects from Mars equivalent UV exposure, JSC conducted ground testing on both current and new space suit materials when exposed to 2500 hours of Mars mission equivalent UV. To complete this testing, JSC partnered with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to utilize their UV vacuum chambers. Materials tested were Orthofabric, polycarbonate, Teflon, Dacron, Vectran, spectra, bladder, nGimat coated Teflon, and nGimat coated Orthofabric. All samples were measured for mass, tensile strength, and chemical composition before and after radiation. Mass loss was insignificant (less than 0.5%) among the materials. Most materials loss tensile strength after radiation and became more brittle with a loss of elongation. Changes in chemical composition were seen in all radiated materials through Spectral Analysis. Results from this testing helped select the materials that will fly on the Mars 2020 rover. In addition, JSC can use this data to create a correlation to the chemical changes after radiation-which is what the rover will send back while on Mars-to the mechanical changes, such as tensile strength.

  2. Standard Test Method for Contamination Outgassing Characteristics of Spacecraft Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a technique for generating data to characterize the kinetics of the release of outgassing products from materials. This technique will determine both the total mass flux evolved by a material when exposed to a vacuum environment and the deposition of this flux on surfaces held at various specified temperatures. 1.2 This test method describes the test apparatus and related operating procedures for evaluating the total mass flux that is evolved from a material being subjected to temperatures that are between 298 and 398 K. Pressures external to the sample effusion cell are less than 7 × 10−3 Pa (5 × 10−5 torr). Deposition rates are measured during material outgassing tests. A test procedure for collecting data and a test method for processing and presenting the collected data are included. 1.3 This test method can be used to produce the data necessary to support mathematical models used for the prediction of molecular contaminant generation, migration, and deposition. 1.4 Al...

  3. Development of Standardized Material Testing Protocols for Prosthetic Liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, John C; Reinhall, Per G; Hafner, Brian J; Sanders, Joan E

    2017-04-01

    A set of protocols was created to characterize prosthetic liners across six clinically relevant material properties. Properties included compressive elasticity, shear elasticity, tensile elasticity, volumetric elasticity, coefficient of friction (CoF), and thermal conductivity. Eighteen prosthetic liners representing the diverse range of commercial products were evaluated to create test procedures that maximized repeatability, minimized error, and provided clinically meaningful results. Shear and tensile elasticity test designs were augmented with finite element analysis (FEA) to optimize specimen geometries. Results showed that because of the wide range of available liner products, the compressive elasticity and tensile elasticity tests required two test maxima; samples were tested until they met either a strain-based or a stress-based maximum, whichever was reached first. The shear and tensile elasticity tests required that no cyclic conditioning be conducted because of limited endurance of the mounting adhesive with some liner materials. The coefficient of friction test was based on dynamic coefficient of friction, as it proved to be a more reliable measurement than static coefficient of friction. The volumetric elasticity test required that air be released beneath samples in the test chamber before testing. The thermal conductivity test best reflected the clinical environment when thermal grease was omitted and when liner samples were placed under pressure consistent with load bearing conditions. The developed procedures provide a standardized approach for evaluating liner products in the prosthetics industry. Test results can be used to improve clinical selection of liners for individual patients and guide development of new liner products.

  4. Double-blind study on materials testing with applied kinesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehle, H-J; Koch, M J; Pioch, T

    2005-11-01

    Applied Kinesiology (AK) is a scientifically unproven method used in complementary medicine to recognize the (in)tolerance of dental materials. Test-retest reliability of AK was examined. The working hypothesis was the assumption that the reliability of AK would not exceed random chance. Two dentists qualified in AK examined 112 volunteers to determine individual (in)tolerance toward two dental composite materials. After the first examination, 31 subjects were excluded from further testing. At the end of the open test phase, 34 of 81 participants had been classified as "tolerant", and seven as "intolerant" to both materials. The remaining 40 individuals showed a combination of either tolerant (to material I)/intolerant (to material II), or the reverse (n = 20 each). Retrieval rate was tested under blind conditions. In 14 cases, the results of the open and blinded tests matched, whereas in 26 cases they did not (95% confidence interval, 21%-52%; p = 0.98). This outcome confirmed our working hypothesis.

  5. Determination of Material Strengths by Hydraulic Bulge Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hankui Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic bulge test (HBT method is proposed to determine material tensile strengths. The basic idea of HBT is similar to the small punch test (SPT, but inspired by the manufacturing process of rupture discs—high-pressure hydraulic oil is used instead of punch to cause specimen deformation. Compared with SPT method, the HBT method can avoid some of influence factors, such as punch dimension, punch material, and the friction between punch and specimen. A calculation procedure that is entirely based on theoretical derivation is proposed for estimate yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Both conventional tensile tests and hydraulic bulge tests were carried out for several ferrous alloys, and the results showed that hydraulic bulge test results are reliable and accurate.

  6. Determination of Material Strengths by Hydraulic Bulge Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hankui; Xu, Tong; Shou, Binan

    2016-01-01

    The hydraulic bulge test (HBT) method is proposed to determine material tensile strengths. The basic idea of HBT is similar to the small punch test (SPT), but inspired by the manufacturing process of rupture discs—high-pressure hydraulic oil is used instead of punch to cause specimen deformation. Compared with SPT method, the HBT method can avoid some of influence factors, such as punch dimension, punch material, and the friction between punch and specimen. A calculation procedure that is entirely based on theoretical derivation is proposed for estimate yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Both conventional tensile tests and hydraulic bulge tests were carried out for several ferrous alloys, and the results showed that hydraulic bulge test results are reliable and accurate. PMID:28772379

  7. Test or toy? Materiality and the measurement of infant intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacy L

    2015-05-01

    Adopting a material culture perspective, this article interrogates the composition of the copy of the Cattell Infant Intelligence Scale housed at the University of Toronto Scientific Instruments Collection. As a deliberately assembled collection of toys, the Cattell Scale makes clear the indefinite boundary between test and toy in 20th-century American psychology. Consideration of the current condition of some of the material constituents of this particular Cattell Scale provides valuable insight into some of the elusive practices of intelligence testers in situ and highlights the dynamic nature of the testing process. At the same time, attending to the materiality of this intelligence test reveals some of the more general assumptions about the nature of intelligence inherent in tests for young children. The scale and others like it, I argue, exposes psychologists' often-uncritical equation of childhood intelligence with appropriate play undertaken with an appropriate toy, an approach complicit in, and fostered by, midcentury efforts to cultivate particular forms of selfhood. This analysis serves as an example of the kind of work that may be done on the history of intelligence testing when the material objects that were (and are) inherently a part of the testing process are included in historical scholarship. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Test and Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2017-01-01

    Asbestos free solid motor internal insulation samples were tested at the MSFC Hyperthermal Facility. Objectives of the test were to gather data for analog characterization of ablative and in-depth thermal performance of rubber materials subject to high enthalpy/pressure flow conditions. Tests were conducted over a range of convective heat fluxes for both inert and chemically reactive sub-sonic free stream gas flow. Instrumentation included use of total calorimeters, thermocouples, and a surface pyrometer for surface temperature measurement. Post-test sample forensics involved measurement of eroded depth, charred depth, total sample weight loss, and documentation of the general condition of the eroded profile. A complete Charring Material Ablator (CMA) style aero-thermal analysis was conducted for the test matrix and results compared to the measured data. In general, comparisons were possible for a number of the cases and the results show a limited predictive ability to model accurately both the ablative response and the in-depth temperature profiles. Lessons learned and modeling recommendations are made regarding future testing and modeling improvements that will increase understanding of the basic chemistry/physics associated with the complicated material ablation process of rubber materials.

  9. Accelerated indoor durability testing of polymeric photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreski, Gernot

    2010-08-01

    The aim of these investigations was to determine the influence of the relevant load parameters temperature and humidity on the degradation behavior of selected polymeric PV encapsulation materials. A test program concerning three accelerated artificial ageing tests was set up and a comprehensive study of the selected candidate materials and its degradation behavior was done. To assess the long term performance and durability of materials, it was necessary not only to measure the deterioration of macroscopic physical properties, but also to gain information about degradation processes taking place at a molecular level. Therefore, the material properties and the aging behaviour were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, by UV/VIS spectroscopy, by differential scanning calorimetry, by dynamical mechanical analysis and by tensile tests. By IR spectroscopy no significant thermal oxidation was detected for all investigated materials. But UV/VIS spectroscopy showed a significant drop in solar transmittance and reflectance values. Yellowing was observed due to the formation of chromophoric degradation products. For all materials a significant decrease in ultimate mechanical properties due to chemical aging was measured. For both backsheet materials the changes in ultimate mechanical properties can be attributed nearly exclusiveley to the polyester layer. On the other hand, a stiffening of all materials due to physical aging was observed within the first 1000h of damp heat testing. For the backsheet laminates, delamination at the edges was observed. Generally, higher temperature levels during exposure induced faster rate of chemical and physical aging. High humidity levels showed to be less influential on polymer degradation than temperature.

  10. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  11. Compilation of radiation damage test data cable insulating materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: ethylene- propylene rubber, Hypalon, neoprene rubber, polyethylene, polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber, etc. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses from 5*10/sup 5/ to 5*10/sup 6/ Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs, to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (13 refs).

  12. Testing of SRS and RFETS Nylon Bag Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    This report compares the effects of radiation and heating on nylon bagout materials used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Recently, to simplify the processing of sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C), FB-Line has replaced the low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags normally used to package cans of plutonium-bearing material with nylon bags. LDPE and PVC are not soluble in the nitric acid dissolver solution used in F-Canyon, so cans bagged using these materials had to be repackaged before they were added to the dissolver. Because nylon dissolves in nitric acid, cans bagged in nylon can be charged to the F-Canyon dissolvers without repackaging, thereby reducing handling requirements and personnel exposure. As part of a program to process RFETS SS and C at SRS, RFETS has also begun to use a nylon bagout material. The RFETS bag materials is made from a copolymer of nylon 6 and nylon 6.9, while the SRS material is made from a nylon 6 monomer. In addition, the SRS nylon has an anti-static agent added. The RFETS nylon is slightly softer than the SRS nylon, but does not appear to be as resistant to flex cracks initiated by contact with sharp corners of the inner can containing the SS and C.2 FB-Line Operations has asked for measurement of the effects of radiation and heating on these materials. Specifically, they have requested a comparison of the material properties of the plastics before and after irradiation, a measurement of the amount of outgassing when the plastics are heated, and a calculation of the amount of radiolytic gas generation. Testing was performed on samples taken from material that is currently used in FB-Line (color coded orange) and at RFETS. The requested tests are the same tests previously performed on the original and replacement nylon and LDPE bag materials.3,4,5. To evaluate the effect of irradiation on material properties, tensile stresses and elongations to break

  13. Aspects of corrosion testing of thermal-insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, K.G.; Weil, R.

    1983-01-01

    The literature dealing with corrosion by thermal-insulating materials in residential buildings is reviewed. Current corrosiveness test methods are discussed. In view of their shortcomings, the need for a new procedure is evident. Possible methods applicable to various types of insulation are considered. The program for developing the new procedure is outlined. Preliminary test results indicate relationships between existing coupon and rapidly executable electrochemical tests. Field data, which are beginning to be collected, are needed to establish the validity of the new test and its ability to predict behavior under service conditions.

  14. Standard test methods for rockwell hardness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the Rockwell hardness and the Rockwell superficial hardness of metallic materials by the Rockwell indentation hardness principle. This standard provides the requirements for Rockwell hardness machines and the procedures for performing Rockwell hardness tests. 1.2 This standard includes additional requirements in annexes: Verification of Rockwell Hardness Testing Machines Annex A1 Rockwell Hardness Standardizing Machines Annex A2 Standardization of Rockwell Indenters Annex A3 Standardization of Rockwell Hardness Test Blocks Annex A4 Guidelines for Determining the Minimum Thickness of a Test Piece Annex A5 Hardness Value Corrections When Testing on Convex Cylindrical Surfaces Annex A6 1.3 This standard includes nonmandatory information in appendixes which relates to the Rockwell hardness test. List of ASTM Standards Giving Hardness Values Corresponding to Tensile Strength Appendix X1 Examples of Procedures for Determining Rockwell Hardness Uncertainty Appendix X...

  15. Standard test methods for rockwell hardness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the Rockwell hardness and the Rockwell superficial hardness of metallic materials by the Rockwell indentation hardness principle. This standard provides the requirements for Rockwell hardness machines and the procedures for performing Rockwell hardness tests. 1.2 This standard includes additional requirements in annexes: Verification of Rockwell Hardness Testing Machines Annex A1 Rockwell Hardness Standardizing Machines Annex A2 Standardization of Rockwell Indenters Annex A3 Standardization of Rockwell Hardness Test Blocks Annex A4 Guidelines for Determining the Minimum Thickness of a Test Piece Annex A5 Hardness Value Corrections When Testing on Convex Cylindrical Surfaces Annex A6 1.3 This standard includes nonmandatory information in appendixes which relates to the Rockwell hardness test. List of ASTM Standards Giving Hardness Values Corresponding to Tensile Strength Appendix X1 Examples of Procedures for Determining Rockwell Hardness Uncertainty Appendix X...

  16. Scoping Future Policy Dynamics in Raw Materials Through Scenarios Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Vitor; Keane, Christopher; Sturm, Flavius; Schimpf, Sven; Bodo, Balazs

    2017-04-01

    The International Raw Materials Observatory (INTRAW) project is working towards a sustainable future for the European Union in access to raw materials, from an availability, economical, and environmental framework. One of the major exercises for the INTRAW project is the evaluation of potential future scenarios for 2050 to frame economic, research, and environmental policy towards a sustainable raw materials supply. The INTRAW consortium developed three possible future scenarios that encompass defined regimes of political, economic, and technological norms. The first scenario, "Unlimited Trade," reflects a world in which free trade continues to dominate the global political and economic environment, with expectations of a growing demand for raw materials from widely distributed global growth. The "National Walls" scenario reflects a world where nationalism and economic protectionism begins to dominate, leading to stagnating economic growth and uneven dynamics in raw materials supply and demand. The final scenario, "Sustainability Alliance," examines the dynamics of a global political and economic climate that is focused on environmental and economic sustainability, leading towards increasingly towards a circular raw materials economy. These scenarios were reviewed, tested, and provided simulations of impacts with members of the Consortium and a panel of global experts on international raw materials issues which led to expected end conditions for 2050. Given the current uncertainty in global politics, these scenarios are informative to identifying likely opportunities and crises. The details of these simulations and expected responses to the research demand, technology investments, and economic components of raw materials system will be discussed.

  17. Testing of Alternative Materials for Advanced Suit Bladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Makinen, Janice; Tang, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Several candidate advanced pressure bladder membrane materials have been developed for NASA Johnson Space Center by DSM Biomedical for selective permeability of carbon dioxide and water vapor. These materials were elasthane and two other formulations of thermoplastic polyether polyurethane. Each material was tested in two thicknesses for permeability to carbon dioxide, oxygen and water vapor. Although oxygen leaks through the suit bladder would amount to only about 60 cc/hr in a full size suit, significant amounts of carbon dioxide would not be rejected by the system to justify its use. While the ratio of carbon dioxide to oxygen permeability is about 48 to 1, this is offset by the small partial pressure of carbon dioxide in acceptable breathing atmospheres of the suit. Humidity management remains a possible use of the membranes depending on the degree to which the water permeability is inhibited by cations in the sweat. Tests are underway to explore cation fouling from sweat.

  18. Development of Mandarin monosyllabic speech test materials in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Demin; Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Wenbo; Mannell, Robert; Newall, Philip; Zhang, Luo

    2009-05-01

    In this study, monosyllabic Mandarin speech test materials (MSTMs) were developed for use in word recognition tests for speech audiometry in Chinese audiology clinics. Mandarin monosyllabic materials with high familiarity were designed with regard to phonological balance and recorded digitally with a male voice. Inter-list equivalence of difficulty was evaluated for a group of 60 subjects (aged 18-25 years) with normal hearing. Seven lists with 50 words each were found to be equivalent. These seven equivalent lists were used to measure performance-intensity (PI) functions for a group of 32 subjects with normal hearing and a group of 40 subjects with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. The mean slope of PI function was found to be 4.1%/dB and 2.7%/dB, respectively. The seven lists of Mandarin monosyllabic materials were found to have sufficient reliability and validity to be used in clinical situations.

  19. Numerical test on polystyrene tunnel seismic-isolation material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress-strain mechanical properties of polystyrene foam plastic material were tested under different loading conditions. An empirical constitutive model for describing metal materials was proposed for the polystyrene plastic foam. The static and dynamic tests results show that the ductility and watertightness of the polystyrene plastic foam are significantly improved. At the same time, in order to check its seismic-isolation property, the high-performance foam concrete as filling materials of Galongla tunnel in Tibet was simulated by FEM. The simulated results show that the polystyrene plastic foam can remarkably decrease the stress and the plastic zone in final lining, so it can effectively reduce the seismic damage of the tunnel. Considering the seismic-isolation property and low price of polystyrene plastic foam, it is a good reference for the anti-seismic design of tunnels in high intensity zones.

  20. Standard Test Methods for Constituent Content of Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods determine the constituent content of composite materials by one of two approaches. Method I physically removes the matrix by digestion or ignition by one of seven procedures, leaving the reinforcement essentially unaffected and thus allowing calculation of reinforcement or matrix content (by weight or volume) as well as percent void volume. Method II, applicable only to laminate materials of known fiber areal weight, calculates reinforcement or matrix content (by weight or volume), and the cured ply thickness, based on the measured thickness of the laminate. Method II is not applicable to the measurement of void volume. 1.1.1 These test methods are primarily intended for two-part composite material systems. However, special provisions can be made to extend these test methods to filled material systems with more than two constituents, though not all test results can be determined in every case. 1.1.2 The procedures contained within have been designed to be particularly effective for ce...

  1. 44 years of testing radioactive materials packages at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shappert, L.B.; Ludwig, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews the package testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1960 and then examines the trends in the testing activities that occurred during the same period. Radioactive material shipments have been made from ORNL since the 1940s. The first fully operating reactor built at the ORNL site was patterned after the graphite pile constructed by Enrico Fermi under Stagg Field in Chicago. After serving as a test bed for future reactors, it became useful as a producer of radioactive isotopes. The Isotopes Division was established at ORNL to furnish radioactive materials used in the medical community. Often these shipments have been transported by aircraft worldwide due to the short half-lives of many of the materials. This paper touches briefly on the lighter and smaller radioisotope packages that were being shipped from ORNL in large numbers and then deals with the testing of packages designed to handle large radioactive sources, such as spent fuel, and other fissile materials.

  2. Standard test methods for vitrified ceramic materials for electrical applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1986-01-01

    1.1 These test methods outline procedures for testing samples of vitrified ceramic materials that are to be used as electrical insulation. Where specified limits are mentioned herein, they shall not be interpreted as specification limits for completed insulators. 1.2 These test methods are intended to apply to unglazed specimens, but they may be equally suited for testing glazed specimens. The report section shall indicate whether glazed or unglazed specimens were tested. 1.3 The test methods appear as follows: This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific precaution statements are given in 11.3, 13.5, and 15.3.

  3. Type of speech material affects Acceptable Noise Level test outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xaver eKoch

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Acceptable Noise Level (ANL test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual's inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test-retest reliability. The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS, which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was

  4. Design and Testing of Sandwich Structures with Different Core Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik HERRANEN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to design a light-weight sandwich panel for trailers. Strength calculations and selection of different materials were carried out in order to find a new solution for this specific application. The sandwich materials were fabricated using vacuum infusion technology. The different types of sandwich composite panels were tested in 4-point bending conditions according to ASTM C393/C393M. Virtual testing was performed by use of ANSYS software to simplify the core material selection process and to design the layers. 2D Finite element analysis (FEA of 4-point bending was made with ANSYS APDL (Classic software. Data for the FEA was obtained from the tensile tests of glass fiber plastic (GFRP laminates. Virtual 2D results were compared with real 4-point bending tests.  3D FEA was applied to virtually test the selected sandwich structure in real working conditions. Based on FEA results the Pareto optimality concept has been applied and optimal solutions determined.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.1.1340

  5. Chairside CAD/CAM materials. Part 2: Flexural strength testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Michael; Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Mevec, Daniel; Harrer, Walter; Lube, Tanja; Danzer, Robert; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Strength is one of the preferred parameters used in dentistry for determining clinical indication of dental restoratives. However, small dimensions of CAD/CAM blocks limit reliable measurements with standardized uniaxial bending tests. The objective of this study was to introduce the ball-on-three-ball (B3B) biaxial strength test for dental for small CAD/CAM block in the context of the size effect on strength predicted by the Weibull theory. Eight representative chairside CAD/CAM materials ranging from polycrystalline zirconia (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent), reinforced glasses (Vitablocs Mark II, VITA; Empress CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and glass-ceramics (e.max CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Suprinity, VITA; Celtra Duo, Dentsply) to hybrid materials (Enamic, VITA; Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) have been selected. Specimens were prepared with highly polished surfaces in rectangular plate (12×12×1.2mm 3 ) or round disc (Ø=12mm, thickness=1.2mm) geometries. Specimens were tested using the B3B assembly and the biaxial strength was determined using calculations derived from finite element analyses of the respective stress fields. Size effects on strength were determined based on results from 4-point-bending specimens. A good agreement was found between the biaxial strength results for the different geometries (plates vs. discs) using the B3B test. Strength values ranged from 110.9MPa (Vitablocs Mark II) to 1303.21MPa (e.max ZirCAD). The strength dependency on specimen size was demonstrated through the calculated effective volume/surface. The B3B test has shown to be a reliable and simple method for determining the biaxial strength restorative materials supplied as small CAD/CAM blocks. A flexible solution was made available for the B3B test in the rectangular plate geometry. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanical Testing of Carbon Based Woven Thermal Protection Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, John; Agrawal, Parul; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Three Dimensional Woven thermal protection system (TPS) materials are one of the enabling technologies for mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator systems. These materials have been shown capable of serving a dual purpose as TPS and as structural load bearing members during entry and descent operations. In order to ensure successful structural performance, it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of these materials prior to and post exposure to entry-like heating conditions. This research focuses on the changes in load bearing capacity of woven TPS materials after being subjected to arcjet simulations of entry heating. Preliminary testing of arcjet tested materials [1] has shown a mechanical degradation. However, their residual strength is significantly more than the requirements for a mission to Venus [2]. A systematic investigation at the macro and microstructural scales is reported here to explore the potential causes of this degradation. The effects of heating on the sizing (an epoxy resin coating used to reduce friction and wear during fiber handling) are discussed as one of the possible causes for the decrease in mechanical properties. This investigation also provides valuable guidelines for margin policies for future mechanically deployable entry systems.

  7. The Iosipescu shear test method as used for testing polymers and composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a shear test method for polymers and composite materials, based on the Iosipescu (1967) shear test which was originally developed for use with homogeneous isotropic metals. Special attention is given to the loading fixture for the test, the standard specimen design and shear stress measurements. The range of the test applications is indicated. The method is in the final stages of being accepted as an ASTM standard.

  8. Material testing facilities and programs for plasma-facing component testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Doerner, R. P.; Greuner, H.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.

    2017-09-01

    Component development for operation in a large-scale fusion device requires thorough testing and qualification for the intended operational conditions. In particular environments are necessary which are comparable to the real operation conditions, allowing at the same time for in situ/in vacuo diagnostics and flexible operation, even beyond design limits during the testing. Various electron and neutral particle devices provide the capabilities for high heat load tests, suited for material samples and components from lab-scale dimensions up to full-size parts, containing toxic materials like beryllium, and being activated by neutron irradiation. To simulate the conditions specific to a fusion plasma both at the first wall and in the divertor of fusion devices, linear plasma devices allow for a test of erosion and hydrogen isotope recycling behavior under well-defined and controlled conditions. Finally, the complex conditions in a fusion device (including the effects caused by magnetic fields) are exploited for component and material tests by exposing test mock-ups or material samples to a fusion plasma by manipulator systems. They allow for easy exchange of test pieces in a tokamak or stellarator device, without opening the vessel. Such a chain of test devices and qualification procedures is required for the development of plasma-facing components which then can be successfully operated in future fusion power devices. The various available as well as newly planned devices and test stands, together with their specific capabilities, are presented in this manuscript. Results from experimental programs on test facilities illustrate their significance for the qualification of plasma-facing materials and components. An extended set of references provides access to the current status of material and component testing capabilities in the international fusion programs.

  9. Contamination character of materials in space technology testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, D. M.; Haynes, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Determination of the nature and degree of contamination of mirrors in a vacuum environment in the presence of UV irradiation by outgases from some materials that are candidates for use inside spacecraft and simulated spacecraft environments. A vacuum apparatus was developed for testing contamination of mirrors. Offgases from heated test materials are deposited on a refrigerated mirror, half of which is UV irradiated. Reflectance is measured between 1100 and 25,000 A. Thermofit RNF-100, insulated wire TRT-24-19-V-93, and Eccofoam FS and FPH gave heavier deposits on the nonirradiated mirror. Moxness MS60 SO8, Scotch Tape Y-9050, RTV-577, RTV-41, Stycast 1090, and Epon 934 and 828 gave heavier deposits on the irradiated mirror. Raychem wire 44/0411, polyimide tape X1156, Insulgrease G-640, High Vacuum Silicone Grease, and RTV-602 gave only slight deposits on the irradiated and nonirradiated areas of the mirror.

  10. Small punch test evaluation methods for material characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janča, Adam; Siegl, Jan; Haušild, Petr

    2016-12-01

    The Small Punch Test (SPT) is one of the most widespread mechanical testing methods using miniaturized specimens. The paper presented deals with the time independent SPT, in which a flat specimen is bent by means of a (hemi)spherical punch moving at a constant velocity. The main goal is to relate the measured data to deformation processes taking place during specimen loading. Understanding of such relations is crucial for characterizing a material using any non-standardized experimental procedure. Using enhanced instrumentation, not only traditional load-displacement or load-deflection curves could be obtained, but also specimen thinning could be continuously measured and evaluated. Five alloys having a broad range of mechanical properties were tested. The results obtained were evaluated using both traditional and newly proposed methods and they were correlated with results of the conventional tensile test. The methods proposed seem to lead to a universal correlation between SPT results and tensile characteristics.

  11. DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL TEST PACKAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOWARD, BOYD

    2006-02-02

    The purpose of this document is to provide a brief introduction to digital radiography (DR), and a description of the DR configuration that was used to radiographically image the Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Test Packages before and after function tests that have been conducted. Also included are (1) Attachment 1, a comprehensive index that describes at which phase of the certification process that digital radiographic images were acquired, (2) digital radiographic images of each of the six packages at various stages of the certification process, and (3) Attachment 2, imaging instructions, that specify the setup procedures and detailed parameters of the DR imaging methodology that were used.

  12. A 360-deg Digital Image Correlation system for materials testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, K.; Cortese, L.; Rossi, M.; Amodio, D.

    2016-07-01

    The increasing research interest toward natural and advanced engineered materials demands new experimental protocols capable of retrieving highly dense sets of experimental data on the full-surface of samples under multiple loading conditions. Such information, in fact, would allow to capture the possible heterogeneity and anisotropy of the material by using up-to-date inverse characterization methods. Although the development of object-specific test protocols could represent the optimal choice to address this need, it is unquestionable that universal testing machines (UTM) remain the most widespread and versatile option to test materials and components in both academic and industrial contexts. A major limitation of performing standard material tests with UTM, however, consists in the scarce information obtainable with the commonly associated sensors since they provide only global (LVDTs, extensometers, 2D-video analyzers) or local (strain gages) measures of displacement and strain. This paper presents a 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system developed to perform highly accurate full-surface 360-deg measurements on either standard or custom-shaped samples under complex loading within universal testing machines. To this aim, a low cost and easy to setup video rig was specifically designed to overcome the practical limitations entailed with the integration of a multi-camera system within an already existing loading frame. In particular, the proposed system features a single SLR digital camera moved through multiple positions around the specimen by means of a large rotation stage. A proper calibration and data-processing procedure allows to automatically merge the experimental data obtained from the multiple views with an accuracy of 10-2 m m . The results of a full benchmarking of the metrological performances of the system are here reported and discussed together with illustrative examples of full-360-deg shape and deformation measurements on a Grade X65 steel

  13. Composite Material Testing Data Reduction to Adjust for the Systematic 6-DOF Testing Machine Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasios lliopoulos; John G. Michopoulos; John G. C. Hermanson

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a data reduction methodology for eliminating the systematic aberrations introduced by the unwanted behavior of a multiaxial testing machine, into the massive amounts of experimental data collected from testing of composite material coupons. The machine in reference is a custom made 6-DoF system called NRL66.3 and developed at the NAval...

  14. Compression-after-impact testing of thin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Hodge, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    A new method has been devised to test composite specimens as thin as 8 plies and up to 7.6 cm in width for compression strength. This method utilizes a fixture incorporating the best features of the Celanese and IITRI fixtures combined with an antibuckling jig developed at the University of Dayton Research Institute. This new method uses up to 83 percent less material than the most commonly used compression-after-impact technique (which calls for a 48 ply test specimen) and can also be performed on smaller loading frames since a much smaller force is needed to fail the specimen. The thickness of the test specimen can be fabricated to exactly match production part thickness, thus yielding more meaningful results. CAI tests were performed on IM6/3501 carbon/epoxy utilizing this new method. To verify the design, a series of tests were performed in which undamaged specimens were tested using the new fixture and ASTM D 3410-87 (Celanese compression test) and the results compared. The new fixture works well and will be a valuable asset to MSFC's damage tolerance program.

  15. Examination of an optical transmittance test for photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C.; Bengoechea, Jaione; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Köhl, Michael; Powell, Nick E.; Smith, Michael E.; White, Michael D.; Wilson, Helen Rose; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Lynn, Kevin W.

    2013-09-24

    The optical transmittance of encapsulation materials is a key characteristic for their use in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Changes in transmittance with time in the field affect module performance, which may impact product warranties. Transmittance is important in product development, module manufacturing, and field power production (both immediate and long-term). Therefore, an international standard (IEC 62788-1-4) has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the optical performance of PV encapsulation materials. Existing standards, such as ASTM E903, are general and more appropriately applied to concentrated solar power than to PV. Starting from the optical transmittance measurement, the solar-weighted transmittance of photon irradiance, yellowness index (which may be used in aging studies to assess durability), and ultraviolet (UV) cut-off wavelength may all be determined using the proposed standard. The details of the proposed test are described. The results of a round-robin experiment (for five materials) conducted at seven laboratories to validate the test procedure using representative materials are also presented. For example, the Encapsulation Group actively explored the measurement requirements (wavelength range and resolution), the requirements for the spectrophotometer (including the integrating sphere and instrument accessories, such as a depolarizer), specimen requirements (choice of glass-superstrate and -substrate), and data analysis (relative to the light that may be used in the PV application). The round-robin experiment identified both intra- and inter-laboratory instrument precision and bias for five encapsulation materials (encompassing a range of transmittance and haze-formation characteristics).

  16. Cycom 977-2 Composite Material: Impact Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen; Watkins, Casey

    2005-01-01

    The reaction frequency data from 13A testing by MSFC and WSTF appear well behaved for the sample number used by each and exhibit the same type of energy level dependency. The reaction frequency shift in energy level is unexplained at this time. All the 13A data suggest that only a small amount of material is consumed when reactions take place. At ambient pressure, most of not all reactions are quenched as indicated by the small mass loss. As test pressure is increased in LOX using 13B results. Cycom does not support initiation of reactions or propagations of reactions in GOX at 100 psis based on tests at MSFC and WSTF at 72 ft-lb impact energy. No batch effect was identified in LOX or GOX.

  17. Honeycomb technology materials, design, manufacturing, applications and testing

    CERN Document Server

    Bitzer, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Honeycomb Technology is a guide to honeycomb cores and honeycomb sandwich panels, from the manufacturing methods by which they are produced, to the different types of design, applications for usage and methods of testing the materials. It explains the different types of honeycomb cores available and provides tabulated data of their properties. The author has been involved in the testing and design of honeycomb cores and sandwich panels for nearly 30 years. Honeycomb Technology reflects this by emphasizing a `hands-on' approach and discusses procedures for designing sandwich panels, explaining the necessary equations. Also included is a section on how to design honeycomb energy absorbers and one full chapter discussing honeycomb core and sandwich panel testing. Honeycomb Technology will be of interest to engineers in the aircraft, aerospace and building industries. It will also be of great use to engineering students interested in basic sandwich panel design.

  18. Full scale tests of moisture buffer capacity of wall materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2005-01-01

    that are harmful such as growth of house dust mites, surface condensation and mould growth. Therefore a series of experiments has been carried out in a full scale test facility to determine the moisture buffer effect of interior walls of cellular concrete and plaster board constructions. For the cellular concrete...... of the changes of moisture content in specimens of the wall composites exposed to the same environment. It was found that the finishes had a big impact on the buffer performance of the underlying materials. Even though the untreated cellular concrete had a very high buffer capacity, the effect was strongly......, the buffer performance is investigated first for the untreated material, then after adding rendering on the surfaces, and finally with latex paint. Similarly for the walls of plasterboard construction, the buffer effects are investigated first for the insulation (cellulose or mineral wool), then after adding...

  19. Test of airborne fluorometer over land surfaces and geologic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoertz, G. E.; Hemphill, W. R.

    1970-01-01

    Response of an experimental Fraunhofer line discriminator to a wide range of surficial deposits common in deserts and semideserts was tested in the laboratory and from an H-19 helicopter. No signals attributable to fluorescence were recorded during 540 miles of aerial traverses over southeastern California and west-central Arizona. It was concluded that exposed surfaces of target materials throughout the traverses were either nonluminescent at 5890 A or not sufficiently so to be detectable. It cannot be ruled out that the lack of fluorescence is partly attributable to surficial coatings of nonluminescent weathered material. The principal route surveyed from the air was from Needles, California to Furnace Creek Ranch, Death Valley and return, via the Amargosa River valley, Silurian Lake (dry), Silver Lake (dry), and Soda Lake (dry). Principal targets traversed were unconsolidated clastic sediments ranging from silty clay to cobbles, and a wide range of evaporite deposits.

  20. Reliability of wind turbine blades: An overview of materials testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, John W.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2007-01-01

    an understanding of how damage develops in composite structures, composite materials and adhesives. Designing reliable wind turbine blades also requires the further development of laboratory scale and full scale test methods to evaluate the structural response and durability of new materials under various loading......The structural reliability of wind turbine components can have a profound impact on both the profitability and reputation of a wind turbine manufacturer or supplier of wind turbine components. The issue of reliability is of critical concern when large wind farm co-operatives are considered......, and when wind turbines are located in remote regions where the cost of inspections and repairs can be very high. From a structural viewpoint, wind turbine blades are subjected to very complex loading histories with coupled deformation modes. The long-term reliability of wind turbine blades requires...

  1. Testing of ceramic filter materials at the PCFB test facility; Keraamisten suodinmateriaalien testaus PCFB-koelaitoksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R.; Eriksson, T.; Lehtonen, P.; Tiensuu, J. [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula, Finland since 1986. In 1989, a 10 MW PCFB test facility was constructed. The test facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1994 for obtaining data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The main objective of the project Y53 was to evaluate advanced candle filter materials for the Hot Gas Clean-up Unit (HGCU) to be used in a commercial PCFB Demonstration Project. To achieve this goal, the selected candle materials were exposed to actual high temperature, high pressure coal combustion flue gases for a period of 1000-1500 h during the PCFB test runs. The test runs were carried out in three test segments in Foster Wheeler`s PCFB test facility at the Karhula R and D Center. An extensive inspection and sampling program was carried out after the second test segment. Selected sample candles were analyzed by the filter supplier and the preliminary results were encouraging. The material strength had decreased only within expected range. Slight elongation of the silicon carbide candles was observed, but at this phase the elongation can not be addressed to creep, unlike in the candles tested in 1993-94. The third and last test segment was completed successfully in October 1996. The filter system was inspected and several sample candles were selected for material characterization. The results will be available in February - March 1997. (orig.)

  2. Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

    2013-04-30

    studied the effect of x-rays and γ-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

  3. Materials challenges and testing for supply of energy and resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boellinghaus, Thomas; Lexow, Juergen (eds.) [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Kishi, Teruo [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kitagawa, Masaki [Isobe Mihamaku, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    One major goal of the World Materials Research Institute Forum - WMRIF is to promote young scientists in the field of materials science and engineering. To enhance the international knowledge exchange between young postdoctoral scientists all over the world, WMRIF meanwhile regularly organizes joint workshops among the member institutes. These workshops also represent an increasingly appreciated platform to get known to each other and to build co-operations. For such workshops, various topics are selected, pointing to future perspectives and challenges in the field of materials science and engineering. This book contains the following contributions: I. Materials challenges for nuclear fission and fusion - Examination of Dust Particles from Present-Day Controlled Fusion Devices (Elzbieta Fortuna-Zalesna); Quantitative microstructural investigation of neutron-irradiated RAFM steel for nuclear fusion applications (Oliver J. Weiss), Controlling Welding Residual Stresses by means of Alloy Design (Arne Kromm); Degradation Mechanism of Creep Strength Enhanced Ferritic Steels for Power Plants (Kota Sawada); Electrochemical studies on pitting corrosion on Cr13 steel exposed to CO{sub 2} and artificial brine with high chloride concentration (Oleksandra Yevtushenko); Development of {sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} processing for use as a neutron conversion materials (Lars F. Voss). II. Materials challenges for water supply Water overlayers on Cu(110) studied by van der Waals density Functional (Sheng Meng). III. Challenges in conclusive, realistic and system oriented materials testing - Employment of high Resolution RBS to characterize ultrathin transparent electrode in high efficiency GaN based Light Emitting Diode (Grace Huiqi Wang); A possible route to the quantification of piezoresponse force microscopy through correlation with electron backscatter diffraction (Tim L. Burnett); High Resolution Analysis of Tungsten Doped Amorphous Carbon thin Films (Marcin Rasinski); Electron

  4. Lap-joint testing of precoated steel materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chico, B.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In industry, particularly in the building construction, lap-joint technology for precoated steel sheet materials has undergone rapid development. However, standars for lap-joint testing are lacking. This work analyses the behaviour of four precoated steel materials commonly used in the building industry: 55 % Al-Zn and hot dip galvanized, painted and unpainted. Two-year atmospheric exposure tests have been carried out in Madrid and Avilés (Spain, complemented by accelerated weathering tests in climatic cabinets. The latter have consisted of two salt fog/humidity/drying cycles: VDA cycle 621-415 and the "CENIM cycle", which has been designed to adequately simulate the behaviour of materials in this type of joints.

    En la industria en general y, particularmente, en la industria de la construcción, las tecnologías sobre uniones solapadas han experimentado un rápido desarrollo. Sin embargo, no son abundantes los ensayos para este tipo de uniones. Este trabajo analiza el comportamiento de cuatro materiales de acero pre-recubierto comúnmente usados en la industria de la construcción: 55 % Al-Zn y galvanizado por inmersión en caliente, con recubrimiento orgánico y sin él. Se han realizado ensayos de exposición natural durante dos años en las atmósferas de Madrid y Avilés (España, complementados con ensayos de envejecimiento acelerado en cámaras climáticas. En estos últimos se han ensayado dos ciclos de proyección niebla salina/humedad/secado: ciclo VDA 621-415 y un ciclo desarrollado en el CENIM diseñado.

  5. Production integrated nondestructive testing of composite materials and material compounds - an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straß, B.; Conrad, C.; Wolter, B.

    2017-03-01

    Composite materials and material compounds are of increasing importance, because of the steadily rising relevance of resource saving lightweight constructions. Quality assurance with appropriate Nondestructive Testing (NDT) methods is a key aspect for reliable and efficient production. Quality changes have to be detected already in the manufacturing flow in order to take adequate corrective actions. For materials and compounds the classical NDT methods for defectoscopy, like X-ray and Ultrasound (US) are still predominant. Nevertheless, meanwhile fast, contactless NDT methods, like air-borne ultrasound, dynamic thermography and special Eddy-Current techniques are available in order to detect cracks, voids, pores and delaminations but also for characterizing fiber content, distribution and alignment. In Metal-Matrix Composites US back-scattering can be used for this purpose. US run-time measurements allow the detection of thermal stresses at the metal-matrix interface. Another important area is the necessity for NDT in joining. To achieve an optimum material utilization and product safety as well as the best possible production efficiency, there is a need for NDT methods for in-line inspection of the joint quality while joining or immediately afterwards. For this purpose EMAT (Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer) technique or Acoustic Emission testing can be used.

  6. Materials testing for spacecraft use. [by measurement of Total Mass Loss of Volatile Condensable Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    A technique has been developed for determining the outgassing characteristics of materials intended for spacecraft use. A measurement of the total mass loss (TML) and of the collected volatile condensable materials (CVCM) is used as a guide for selecting those materials low in outgassing. The data were used to compare the outgassing from two conductive black paints. In addition, the apparatus was also used in an attempt to simulate expected launch temperatures by collecting the outgassed molecules on a glass plate, which simulates a nearby thermal control surface. The glass plate was then irradiated in vacuum by simulated sunlight. Transmittance patterns of the clean glass plate and also with the condensed material on it were compared with the transmittance pattern after irradiation of the condensate. The transmittance patterns showed a drastic change. The resultant discoloration indicated the detrimental effects of the contamination and aided in selecting the better conductive paint. Additional tests utilizing an aluminized mirror collector plate have been run to show the effect of irradiation upon the CVCM from certain different classes of materials often used on spacecraft.

  7. Materials Science Research Rack-1 Fire Suppressant Distribution Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, P. O.

    2002-01-01

    Fire suppressant distribution testing was performed on the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1), a furnace facility payload that will be installed in the U.S. Lab module of the International Space Station. Unlike racks that were tested previously, the MSRR-1 uses the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) to reduce vibration on experiments, so the effects of ARIS on fire suppressant distribution were unknown. Two tests were performed to map the distribution of CO2 fire suppressant throughout a mockup of the MSRR-1 designed to have the same component volumes and flowpath restrictions as the flight rack. For the first test, the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 60 percent, achieved within 45 s of discharge initiation, meeting the requirement to reach 50 percent throughout the rack within 1 min. For the second test, one of the experiment mockups was removed to provide a worst-case configuration, and the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 58 percent. Comparing the results of this testing with results from previous testing leads to several general conclusions that can be used to evaluate future racks. The MSRR-1 will meet the requirements for fire suppressant distribution. Primary factors that affect the ability to meet the CO2 distribution requirements are the free air volume in the rack and the total area and distribution of openings in the rack shell. The length of the suppressant flowpath and degree of tortuousness has little correlation with CO2 concentration. The total area of holes in the rack shell could be significantly increased. The free air volume could be significantly increased. To ensure the highest maximum CO2 concentration, the PFE nozzle should be inserted to the stop on the nozzle.

  8. Standard test methods for notched bar impact testing of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 These test methods describe notched-bar impact testing of metallic materials by the Charpy (simple-beam) test and the Izod (cantilever-beam) test. They give the requirements for: test specimens, test procedures, test reports, test machines (see Annex A1) verifying Charpy impact machines (see Annex A2), optional test specimen configurations (see Annex A3), precracking Charpy V-notch specimens (see Annex A4), designation of test specimen orientation (see Annex A5), and determining the percent of shear fracture on the surface of broken impact specimens (see Annex A6). In addition, information is provided on the significance of notched-bar impact testing (see Appendix X2), methods of measuring the center of strike (see Appendix X2). 1.2 These test methods do not address the problems associated with impact testing at temperatures below -196 C (-320 F, 77 K). 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. Inch-pound units are provided for information only. This standard does not purpor...

  9. Development of Power Electronics Based Test Platform for Characterization and Testing of Magnetocaloric Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Elamalayil Soman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetocaloric effects of various materials are getting more and more interesting for the future, as they can significantly contribute towards improving the efficiency of many energy intensive applications such as refrigeration, heating, and air conditioning. Accurate characterization of magnetocaloric effects, exhibited by various materials, is an important process for further studies and development of the suitable magnetocaloric heating and cooling solutions. The conventional test facilities have plenty of limitations, as they focus only on the thermodynamic side and use magnetic machines with moving bed of magnetocaloric material or magnet. In this work an entirely new approach for characterization of the magnetocaloric materials is presented, with the main focus on a flexible and efficient power electronic based excitation and a completely static test platform. It can generate a periodically varying magnetic field using superposition of an ac and a dc magnetic field. The scale down prototype uses a customized single phase H-bridge inverter with essential protections and an electromagnet load as actuator. The preliminary simulation and experimental results show good agreement and support the usage of the power electronic test platform for characterizing magnetocaloric materials.

  10. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material--ATM-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material 104 (ATM-104), which is spent fuel from Assembly DO47 of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Unit 1), a pressurized-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-104 consists of 128 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 42 MWd/kgM and expected fission gas release of about 1%. A variety of analyses were performed to investigate cladding characteristics, radionuclide inventory, and redistribution of fission products. Characterization data include (1) fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling history; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) and electron probe microanalyses (EPMA); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding.

  11. Installing Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment Test Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Astronaut Jay Apt installs Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM0 test cell on STS-79. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: NASA/John Space Center).

  12. Versatile equipment for mechanical testing of active materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, Johannes; Heimgartner, Peter

    2005-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) 3 different project groups presently perform aging research on active materials. The research fields are fusion, high neutron flux targets and LWR relevant components. Up to now mechanical testing has been performed with small, low dose rate samples behind local shielding, not appropriate for highly activated material. To overcome this situation, a cell concept for active mechanical testing was elaborated and has been erected in PSI's Hotlab. It consists of 4 shielded cells. 3 connected cells are versatile and independently operable for highly beta/gamma active samples. One cell is an alpha/beta/gamma-box which will be realized in a second phase. This paper presents the versatility especially of the beta/gamma-cells: The different user groups perform experiments in these cells, whereas different machines can be placed into the cells. As consequence of the need of heavily shielded cell doors, a special strengthening and levelling of the floor has been required. In all cells the relevant media are installed. Besides the performance of the cells, the project progress as the difficulties and their solutions are described. (Author)

  13. Materials Testing and Performance Optimization for the SAMURAI-TPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, K. D.; Lynch, W. G.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Estee, J.; Shane, R.; Tangwanchareon, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Yurkon, J.

    2012-10-01

    The SAMURAI time-projection chamber (TPC) will be used to make measurements of pion spectra from heavy ion collisions at RIBF in Japan. Such research provides an opportunity to study supra-saturation density neutron-rich matter in the laboratory, and is critical to understanding the structure of neutron stars. It will provide a complete, 3D picture of the ionization deposited in a gas volume, from which particle types and momenta can be determined. The gas-containment volume is composed of surfaces of aluminum and plastic, as well as halogen-free printed circuit board. During multiplication of the ionized electrons at the anode wire plane of the TPC, UV photons are produced. These cause unwanted discharges when they interact with oxidized aluminum surfaces, which have low work functions. This problem can be addressed by application of a suitable conductive paint or epoxy. Paints were investigated to insure they did not contain any materials capable of inhibiting the performance of the detector gas. These investigations were cross-checked by tests carried out using an existing BRAHMS-TPC. Details on these tests and the materials chosen will be shown. The design and optimization of the gating grid, used to limit data collection to triggered events, will also be discussed.

  14. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  15. Radiochemical analyses of several spent fuel Approved Testing Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Wildung, N.J.

    1994-09-01

    Radiochemical characterization data are described for UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} plus 3 wt% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} commercial spent nuclear fuel taken from a series of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs). These full-length nuclear fuel rods include MLA091 of ATM-103, MKP070 of ATM-104, NBD095 and NBD131 of ATM-106, and ADN0206 of ATM-108. ATMs 103, 104, and 106 were all irradiated in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Reactor No.1), a pressurized-water reactor that used fuel fabricated by Combustion Engineering. ATM-108 was part of the same fuel bundle designed as ATM-105 and came from boiling-water reactor fuel fabricated by General Electric and irradiated in the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant. Rod average burnups and expected fission gas releases ranged from 2,400 to 3,700 GJ/kgM. (25 to 40 Mwd/kgM) and from less than 1% to greater than 10%, respectively, depending on the specific ATM. The radiochemical analyses included uranium and plutonium isotopes in the fuel, selected fission products in the fuel, fuel burnup, cesium and iodine on the inner surfaces of the cladding, {sup 14}C in the fuel and cladding, and analyses of the gases released to the rod plenum. Supporting examinations such as fuel rod design and material descriptions, power histories, and gamma scans used for sectioning diagrams are also included. These ATMs were examined as part of the Materials Characterization Center Program conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program.

  16. Adaptive testing of Materials using Preisach Model Parameters Variations - Introductory Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Visnovec

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A new diagnostic method (MAT - Magnetic Adaptive Testing for non-destructive testing of ferromagnetic construction materials (i.e. iron based under mechanical stress is under development, [1]. The method is based on the investigation of the correlation between the mechanical load and the parameters of Preisach-like model describing magnetic properties of such materials as the differential permeability matrix. To get the set of model parameters needed, a number of minor hysteresis loops under defined exciting magnetic field strength waveform shape H(t, especially with constant field change rate dH(t/dt required (which implies the inducted voltage to be proportional to the differential permeability, is to be measured. The influence of initial magnetic state of the investigated material, algorithm of demagnetisation process, the slope of time dependence of exciting magnetic field on the signal-to-noise ratio and stability of the measured signal is discussed.

  17. Alternative buffer material. Status of the ongoing laboratory investigation of reference materials and test package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Daniel [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Lydmark, Sara; Jaegerwall, Sara; Pedersen, Karsten [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden); Hansen, Staffan [LTH Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Bentonite clay is part of the Swedish KBS-3 design of final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Wyoming bentonite with the commercial name MX-80 (American Colloid Co) has long been the reference for buffer material in the KBS-3 concept. Extending the knowledge base of alternative buffer materials will make it possible to optimize regarding safety, availability and cost. For this reason the field experiment Alternative Buffer Material (ABM) was started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2006. The experiment includes three medium-scale test packages, each consisting of a central steel tube with heaters, and a buffer of compacted clay. Eleven different clays were chosen for the buffers to examine effects of smectite content, interlayer cations and overall iron content. Also bentonite pellets with and without additional quartz are being tested. The buffer in package 1 had been subjected to wetting by formation water and heating for more than two years (at 130 deg C for {approx} 1 year) when it was retrieved and analyzed. The main purposes of the project were to characterise the clays with respect to hydro-mechanical properties, mineralogy and chemical composition and to identify any differences in behaviour or long term stability. The diversity of clays and the heater of steel also make the experiment suitable for studies of iron-bentonite interactions. This report concerns the work accomplished up to now and is not to be treated as any final report of the project.

  18. Effect of High-Humidity Testing on Material Parameters of Flexible Printed Circuit Board Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahokallio, Sanna; Saarinen, Kirsi; Frisk, Laura

    2013-09-01

    The tendency of polymers to absorb moisture impairs especially their electrical and mechanical properties. These are important characteristics for printed circuit board (PCB) materials, which should provide mechanical support as well as electrical insulation in many different environments in order to guarantee safe operation for electrical devices. Moreover, the effects of moisture are accelerated at increased temperatures. In this study, three flexible PCB dielectric materials, namely polyimide (PI), fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), were aged over different periods of time in a high-humidity test, in which the temperature was 85°C and relative humidity 85%. After aging, the changes in the structure of the polymers were studied by determining different material parameters such as modulus of elasticity, glass-transition temperature, melting point, coefficient of thermal expansion, water absorption, and crystallinity, and changes in the chemical structure with several techniques including thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, moisture analysis, and a precision scale. The results showed that PI was extremely stable under the aging conditions and therefore an excellent choice for electrical applications under harsh conditions. Similarly, FEP proved to be relatively stable under the applied aging conditions. However, its crystallinity increased markedly during aging, and after 6000 h of aging the results indicated oxidation. PET suffered from hydrolysis during the test, leading to its embrittlement after 2000 h of aging.

  19. Aerogel Hybrid Composite Materials: Designs and Testing for Multifunctional Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K.; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    This webinar will introduce the broad spectrum of aerogel composites and their diverse performance properties such as reduced heat transfer to energy storage, and expands specifically on the aerogel/fiber laminate systems and testing methodologies. The multi-functional laminate composite system, AeroFiber, and its construction is designed by varying the type of fiber (e.g. polyester, carbon, Kevlar®, Spectra® or Innegral(TradeMark) and combinations thereof), the aerogel panel type and thickness, and overall layup configuration. The combination and design of materials may be customized and tailored to achieve a range of desired properties in the resulting laminate system. Multi-functional properties include structural strength, impact resistance, reduction in heat transfer, increased fire resistance, mechanical energy absorption, and acoustic energy dampening. Applications include aerospace, aircraft, automotive, boating, building and construction, lightweight portable structures, liquefied natural gas, cryogenics, transportation and energy, sporting equipment, and military protective gear industries.

  20. Vertical Flume Testing of WIPP Surrogate Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, C. G.; Schuhen, M.; Kicker, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. The DOE demonstrates compliance with 40 CFR 194 by means of performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. WIPP PA calculations estimate the probability and consequences of radionuclide releases for a 10,000 year regulatory period. Human intrusion scenarios include cases in which a future borehole is drilled through the repository. Drilling mud flowing up the borehole will apply a hydrodynamic shear stress to the borehole wall which could result in erosion of the waste and radionuclides being carried up the borehole. WIPP PA uses the parameter TAUFAIL to represent the shear strength of the degraded waste. The hydrodynamic shear strength can only be measured experimentally by flume testing. Flume testing is typically performed horizontally, mimicking stream or ocean currents. However, in a WIPP intrusion event, the drill bit would penetrate the degraded waste and drilling mud would flow up the borehole in a predominantly vertical direction. In order to simulate this, a flume was designed and built so that the eroding fluid enters an enclosed vertical channel from the bottom and flows up past a specimen of surrogate waste material. The sample is pushed into the current by a piston attached to a step motor. A qualified data acquisition system controls and monitors the fluid's flow rate, temperature, pressure, and conductivity and the step motor's operation. The surrogate materials used correspond to a conservative estimate of degraded TRU waste at the end of the regulatory period. The recipes were previously developed by SNL based on anticipated future states of the waste

  1. Fatigue Testing of Materials by UV Pulsed Laser Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, S; Taborelli, M

    2004-01-01

    The energy dissipated by the RF currents in the cavities of pulsed high-power linacs induces cycles of the surface temperature. In the case of the CLIC main linac the expected amplitude of the thermal cycles is above fifty degrees, for a total number of pulses reaching 1011. The differential thermal expansion due to the temperature gradient in the material creates a cyclic stress that can result in surface break-up by fatigue. The materials for cavity fabrication must therefore be selected in order to withstand such constraints whilst maintaining an acceptable surface state. The fatigue behaviour of Cu and CuZr alloy has been tested by inducing larger surface peak temperatures, thus reducing the number of cycles to failure, irradiating the surface with 40 ns pulses of UV light (308 nm) from an excimer laser. Surface break-up is observed after different number of laser shots as a function of the peak temperature. CuZr appears to withstand a much larger number of cycles than Cu, for equal peak temperature. The ...

  2. Standard Test Method for Oxyacetylene Ablation Testing of Thermal Insulation Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the screening of ablative materials to determine the relative thermal insulation effectiveness when tested as a flat panel in an environment of a steady flow of hot gas provided by an oxyacetylene burner. 1.2 This test method should be used to measure and describe the properties of materials, products, or assemblies in response to heat and flame under controlled laboratory conditions and should not be used to describe or appraise the fire hazard of materials, products, or assemblies under actual fire conditions. However, results of this test method may be used as elements of a fire risk assessment which takes into account all of the factors which are pertinent to an assessment of the fire hazard of a particular end use. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limi...

  3. Creating a Multi-material Probing Error Test for the Acceptance Testing of Dimensional Computed Tomography Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges de Oliveira, Fabrício; Stolfi, Alessandro; Bartscher, Markus

    2017-01-01

    -material scenarios and the appropriate parameters for surface determination in a multi-surface setting. Thus, this paper presents – as part of a multi-material acceptance test and to create trust in multi-material CT measurement – a new concept for multi-material probing error testing (P-test) and discusses the test...... design and the first experimental results. This paper also attempts to perform a critical analysis of this new concept ̶ featuring a compound sphere made of two half spheres of different materials ̶ and tries to perform analyses of geometrical features of the new standard....

  4. Heat resistance study of basalt fiber material via mechanical tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y. Q.; Jia, C.; Meng, L.; Li, X. H.

    2017-12-01

    This paper focuses on the study of the relationship between the fracture strength of basalt rovings and temperature. Strong stretching performance of the rovings has been tested after the treatment at fixed temperatures but different heating time and then the fracture strength of the rovings exposed to the heating at different temperatures and cooled in different modes investigated. Finally, the fracture strength of the basalt material after the heat treatment was studied. The results showed that the room-temperature strength tends to decrease with an increase of the heat treatment time at 250 °C, but it has the local maximum after 2h heating. And the basalt rovings strength increased after the heat treatment up to 200 °C. It was 16.7 percent higher than the original strength. The strength depends not only on the temperature and duration of the heating, but also on the cooling mode. The value of the strength measured after cold water cooling was less by 6.3% compared with an ambient air cooling mode. The room-temperature breaking strength of the rovings heated at 200 °C and 100 °C for 2 hours each increased by about 14.6% with respect to unpretreated basalt rovings.

  5. ESP – Data from Restarted Life Tests of Various Silicon Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jim

    2010-10-06

    Current funding has allowed the restart of testing of various silicone materials placed in Life Tests or Aging Studies from past efforts. Some of these materials have been in test since 1982, with no testing for approximately 10 years, until funding allowed the restart in FY97. Charts for the various materials at different thickness, compression, and temperature combinations illustrate trends for the load-bearing properties of the materials.

  6. What is materialism? Testing two dominant perspectives on materialism in the marketing literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchiraju Srikant

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Materialism is defined as the importance an individual attaches to worldly possessions, which has been considered as an important construct in consumer behavior and marketing literature. There are two dominant perspectives on individual materialism in the marketing literature that focus on (1 personality traits or (2 individual personal values. However, several scholars have questioned the aforementioned materialism conceptualizations. Therefore, the present study directly compares the constructs of personality materialism and value materialism. Structural equation modeling was employed to address the following issues: (1 what are the key conceptual dimensions of materialism, (2 how much do they overlap, and (3 what is their discriminant validity in predicting outcomes linked to materialism. We suggest these two dominant perspectives on individual materialism are two distinct constructs, as they shared only 21 percent of common variance. Furthermore, we stress the multi-faceted nature of materialism, with an emphasis on future research directions related to materialism in marketing.

  7. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyeon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jeters, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonheyo, George T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  8. Reference materials and representative test materials to develop nanoparticle characterization methods: the NanoChOp project case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert eRoebben

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the production and characteristics of the nanoparticle test materials prepared for common use in the collaborative research project NanoChOp (Chemical and optical characterisation of nanomaterials in biological systems, in casu suspensions of silica nanoparticles and CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots. This paper is the first to illustrate how to assess whether nanoparticle test materials meet the requirements of a 'reference material' (ISO Guide 30:2015 or rather those of the recently defined category of 'representative test material' (ISO TS 16195:2013. The NanoChOp test materials were investigated with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, dynamic light scattering (DLS and centrifugal liquid sedimentation (CLS to establish whether they complied with the required monomodal particle size distribution. The presence of impurities, aggregates, agglomerates and viable microorganisms in the suspensions was investigated with DLS, CLS, optical and electron microscopy and via plating on nutrient agar. Suitability of surface functionalization was investigated with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (ATR-FTIR and via the capacity of the nanoparticles to be fluorescently labeled or to bind antibodies. Between-unit homogeneity and stability were investigated in terms of particle size and zeta potential. This paper shows that only based on the outcome of a detailed characterization process one can raise the status of a test material to representative test material or reference material, and how this status depends on its intended use.

  9. Cone calorimeter tests of wood-based decking materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    New technologies in building materials have resulted in the use of a wide variety of materials in decks. As part of our effort to address fire concerns in the wildland-urban interface, the Forest Products Laboratory has been examining the fire performance of decking products. In addition to preservative-treated wood, decking products include wood-plastic composites and...

  10. Thermal imaging during ballistic testing of armour materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    During the interaction between a projectile and a target material the kinetic energy of the projectile is transferred into elastic and plastic deformation of both the projectile and target materials. Using a rigid penetrator the loss in kinetic energy is fully converted into energy absorbed by the

  11. Materials Challenges and Testing for Supply of Energy and Resources

    CERN Document Server

    Bollinghaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    One major goal of the World Materials Research Institute Forum - WMRIF is to promote young scientists in the field of materials science and engineering. To enhance the international knowledge exchange between young postdoctoral scientists all over the world, WMRIF meanwhile regularly organizes joint workshops among the member institutes. These workshops also represent an increasingly appreciated platform to get known to each other and to build co-operations. For such workshops, various topics are selected, pointing to future perspectives and challenges in the field of Materials Science and Eng

  12. [Animal experimental tests of a new filling material (Isocap)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethe, P; Rotgans, J; Schmalz, G

    1978-09-01

    An experimental investigation with animals (Rhesus monkeys) concerning pulp tolerance to two premeasured dosages of calcium hydroxide cement (Reocap and Reocap-E) as well as a pre-measured dosage of filling material (Isocap) in an injection capsule was carried out (78 class V cavities). As with the negative controls, a very slight reaction, or none at all, developed in response to the two calcium hydroxide cements and the new filling material, with and without application of capping material. When five other accidentally exposed pulpae were dissected, direct capping under the corresponding preconditions (punctate exposed pulpa, longer storage period for calcium hydroxide cement) showed the characteristic formation of reparative dentin.

  13. Defect detection in conducting materials using eddy current testing techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauer Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lorentz force eddy current testing (LET is a novel nondestructive testing technique which can be applied preferably to the identification of internal defects in nonmagnetic moving conductors. The LET is compared (similar testing conditions with the classical eddy current testing (ECT. Numerical FEM simulations have been performed to analyze the measurements as well as the identification of internal defects in nonmagnetic conductors. The results are compared with measurements to test the feasibility of defect identification. Finally, the use of LET measurements to estimate of the electrical conductors under test are described as well.

  14. Developing Raman spectroscopy for the nondestructive testing of composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The proposed research will develop the application of Raman Spectroscopy as a nondestructive evaluation tool for the condition assessment of carbon fiber composites. Composite materials are increasingly being used in engineered structures and compone...

  15. Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Contamination Survivability: Material Effects Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    the background contamination level and residual substances (decontaminant) that could interfere with sample assay. c. The air inside the chamber...brushing, vacuum cleaning, or washing with soapy water and a sponge . Surface condition, surface cleanliness, corrosion, materials of construction

  16. Fibre Reinforced Concrete: Evaluation of test methods and material development

    OpenAIRE

    Sandbakk, Sindre

    2011-01-01

    Concrete is a structural material with excellent properties when subjected to compression, butthe abilities to resist tensile stresses are rather poor. The concrete’s tensile zone is normallyreinforced with large continuous steel bars, a combination which ensures an excellentconstruction material. Placing the re-bars generates many man-hours, which means that the reinforcement work accounts for a considerable part of the total concrete cost. An alternative to the conventional re-bars is fibre...

  17. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...... correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...... that the diameter of the core material in models is chosen in such a way that the Froude scale law holds for a characteristic pore velocity. The characteristic pore velocity is chosen as the average velocity of a most critical area in the core with respect to porous flow. Finally the method is demonstrated...

  18. Ultra high vacuum adhesion testing of NERVA engine materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program was to determine the effects of surface cleaning and deliberate gaseous contamination on the adhesion behavior of selected candidate materials for use in the NERVA nuclear rocket engine program. Using a torsion balance technique, the relationship between the normal compressive load applied to crossed rod samples and the resultant contact resistance was used to ascertain the extent of adhesion under each set of experimental conditions. In addition to an evaluation of the static adhesion behavior of selected materials combinations, the experimental apparatus was modified to permit a similar investigation relating to the effects of specific tangential displacements of the sample wires, i.e., their sliding friction behavior. During the course of this subcontract, the materials combinations 440 C vs. 440 C. pyrographite vs ZTA graphite, Nbc (graphite) vs. Nbc (graphite), and Electrolize Inconel 718 vs. Au electroplated 302 S/S were evaluated.

  19. Non-destructive magnetic adaptive testing of ferromagnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás̆, I.

    2004-01-01

    A simple way of measuring and processing of magnetic parameters, intended to optimize their ability to reflect mechanical and structural alterations of ferromagnetic materials is described here. The method is adaptive with respect to the investigated material and to the investigated structural alterations of the sample, as it always utilizes that particular range of the measured data, that is the most sensitive to the explored material and to its explored structural change. The optimum elements of the suitably defined matrices of the magnetic variables, based on the measurement of families of minor hysteresis loops, are more sensitive than any of the traditional parameters obtained from the saturation-to-saturation loop. In order to get the optimum elements, the samples do not have to be measured up to their saturation value, but to a pre-determined lower magnetization value only. The method is illustrated on magnetic reflection of plastic deformation of a construction steel sample.

  20. Historical Evolution of NASA Standard Materials Testing with Hypergolic Propellants and Ammonia (NASA Standard 6001 Test 15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Benjamin; McClure, Mark B.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has performed testing of hazardous and reactive aerospace fluids, including hypergolic propellants, with materials since the 1960s with the Apollo program. Amongst other test activities, Test 15 is a NASA standard test for evaluating the reactivity of materials with selected aerospace fluids, in particular hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, uns-dimethylhydrazine, Aerozine 50, dinitrogen tetroxide oxidizers, and ammonia. This manuscript provides an overview of the history of Test 15 over a timeline ranging from prior to its development and first implementation as a NASA standard test in 1974 to its current refinement. Precursor documents to NASA standard tests, as they are currently known, are reviewed. A related supplementary test, international standardization, and enhancements to Test 15 are also discussed. Because WSTF was instrumental in the development and implementation of Test 15, WSTF experience and practices are referred to in this manuscript.

  1. Sonic environment tests of an insulator/ablator material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L. R.; Taylor, A. H.; Rucker, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A 50.8 cm (20 inch) square panel of perpyrolized insulator/ablator was subjected to six 30-minute tests at 160 and 158 dB in the Langley Thermo-Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA). This environment simulates the aerodynamic and engine noise encountered by a research airplane while in captive flight on the B-52 pylon during takeoff and climb. The pyrolized layer sustained damage in the form of three chips and numerous cracks. The chips occurred during the first test. Some cracking resulted during aerodynamic heating tests, and additional cracking resulted from the sonic environment tests.

  2. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator package o-ring seal material validation testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Harold E.; Ferrell, Patrick C.; Knight, Ronald C.

    1995-01-01

    The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Package O-Ring Seal Material Validation Test was conducted to validate the use of the Butyl material as a primary seal throughout the required temperature range. Three tests were performed at (I) 233 K (-40 °F), (2) a specified operating temperature, and (3) 244 K (-20 °F) before returning to room temperature. Helium leak tests were performed at each test point to determine seal performance. The two major test objectives were to establish that butyl rubber material would maintain its integrity under various conditions and within specified parameters and to evaluate changes in material properties.

  3. Ultrasonic and advanced methods for nondestructive testing and material characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, C. H

    2007-01-01

    ... and physics among others. There are at least two dozen NDT methods in use. In fact any sensor that can examine the inside of material nondestructively is useful for NDT. However the ultrasonic methods are still most popular because of its capability, flexibility, and relative cost effectiveness. For this reason this book places a heavy emphasis...

  4. Hot hydrogen testing of metallic turbo pump materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Ralph; Chin, Bryan; Inamdar, Rohit

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to expose heat resistant alloys to hydrogen at elevated temperatures and to use various microstructural and analytical techniques to determine the chemical and rate process involved in degradation of these materials due to hydrogen environment. Inconel 718 and NASA-23 (wrought and cast) are candidate materials. The degradation of these materials in the presence of 1 to 5 atmospheric pressure of hydrogen from 450 C to 1100 C was examined. The hydrogen facility at Auburn University was used for this purpose. Control experiments were also conducted wherein the samples were exposed to vacuum so that a direct comparison of the results would separate the thermal contribution from the hydrogen effects. The samples were analyzed prior to and after exposure. A residual gas collection system was used to determine the gaseous species produced by any chemical reaction that may have occurred during the exposure. Analysis of this gas sample shows only the presence of H2 as expected. Analyses of the samples were conducted using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and weight change. There appears to be no change in weight of the samples as a result of hydrogen exposure. In addition no visible change on the surface structure was detected. This indicates that the materials of interest do not have strong interaction with hot hydrogen. This is consistent with the microstructure results.

  5. Testing the effectiveness of existing psycho-educational material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifteen Setswana speaking participants, with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were exposed to the programme. Semi-structured and screening ... films over formal lectures. Conclusion: Psycho-education material given to people suffering from schizophrenia and their caregivers has to be adapted to their context to be effective.

  6. Impact Testing for Materials Science at NASA - MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikapizye, Mitch

    2010-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility (ITF) at NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center is host to different types of guns used to study the effects of high velocity impacts. The testing facility has been and continues to be utilized for all NASA missions where impact testing is essential. The Facility has also performed tests for the Department of Defense, other corporations, as well as universities across the nation. Current capabilities provided by Marshall include ballistic guns, light gas guns, exploding wire gun, and the Hydrometeor Impact Gun. A new plasma gun has also been developed which would be able to propel particles at velocities of 20km/s. This report includes some of the guns used for impact testing at NASA Marshall and their capabilities.

  7. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Y. F. [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  8. Material Compressing Test of the High Polymer Part Used in Draft Gear of Heavy Load Locomotive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yangang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the actual load cases of heavy load locomotive, the material compressing tests of the high polymer parts used in the locomotive are researched. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing are acquired by means of comparing the many results of the material compressing tests under different test condition. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing is nonlinear in large range of strain, but the relationship is approximately linear in small range of strain. The material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are compared through the tests. The results show that the compressing property of the material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are almost same. The research offers the foundation to study the structure elasticity of the draft gear.

  9. Application of special waveform signals for eddy current testing of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, V. V.; Gracheva, Ya. J.; Egorov, A. V.; Lependin, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents an approach for multifrequency eddy current testing based on special waveform excitation signals. Digital processing of received signals provides data for experimental hodographs of a "sensor - testing sample" system. Hodographs for the testing of samples of aluminum materials with an applied dielectric layer demonstrates the reliability of the proposed approach. The application of principal component analysis improves the identification and differentiation of testing parameters. The obtained results can be used in systems for nondestructive testing of metallic materials and products.

  10. A method of rapid testing of radioactivity of different materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Zabulonov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the detection of low-level ionising radiation in solid, liquid or loose materials, which is based on the use of the Bayesian approach for the estimation of probabilistic parameters and a special statistical criterion, is offered in the present paper. We describe the algorithm and show the advantages of the method. The approach can be effective even in the case of extremely low signals whose intensity is much less than the background radiation.

  11. Development of a Liquid Blast Tube Facility for Material Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelraj, I. Obed; Jagadeesh, G.

    The feasibility of mitigating blast/shock loads using materials such as composites and foams is well known. In order to study their attenuation characteristics and to optimize the mitigation of such loads, use of shock tube to generate an exponentially decaying pressure profile (called blast tube here) is a popular technique. Shock waves in liquids (e.g., water), particularly, are capable of meeting this requirement as they are stronger and also uniform [1].

  12. The SCC testing of nuclear steam generator tubing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, P. E.; Sarver, J. M.; Miglin, B. P.

    1996-05-01

    The integrity of heat-exchanger tubes in a nuclear reaction system is crucial for the safe operation of a power plant. In order to study the corrosion behavior of certain alloys, constant extension rate (CERT) tests were performed on alloy 690 and alloy 800 nuclear steam generator tubing specimens. In this article, the CERT test results (such as maximum stress achieved and crack morphology) are correlated to tubing microstructure, chemistry, and manufacturing processes.

  13. Standard practices for verification of speed for material testing machines

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover procedures and requirements for the calibration and verification of testing machine speed by means of standard calibration devices. This practice is not intended to be complete purchase specifications for testing machines. 1.2 These practices apply to the verification of the speed application and measuring systems associated with the testing machine, such as a scale, dial, marked or unmarked recorder chart, digital display, setting, etc. In all cases the buyer/owner/user must designate the speed-measuring system(s) to be verified. 1.3 These practices give guidance, recommendations, and examples, specific to electro-mechanical testing machines. The practice may also be used to verify actuator speed for hydraulic testing machines. 1.4 This standard cannot be used to verify cycle counting or frequency related to cyclic fatigue testing applications. 1.5 Since conversion factors are not required in this practice, either SI units (mm/min), or English [in/min], can be used as the standa...

  14. Novel fire testing frameworks for Phase Change Materials and hemp-lime insulation

    OpenAIRE

    McLaggan, Martyn Scott

    2016-01-01

    Modern buildings increasingly include the usage of innovative materials aimed at improving sustainability and reducing the carbon footprint of the built environment. Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are one such group of novel materials which reduce building energy consumption. These materials are typically flammable and contained within wall linings yet there has been no detailed assessment of their fire performance. Current standard fire test methods provide means to compare similar materials ...

  15. Microwave cavity studies for thermal testing of ceramic breeder materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuston, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Dielectric heating of proposed ceramic tritium breeder material to study the thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic properties of the material has been previously suggested. Recent computer studies using codes capable of modeling three-dimensional EM cavities with enclosed dielectric material have been used to determine the size limitations of cavity designs at 200 MHz. The sample can be as large as 0.44 /times/ 0.72m in the plane that is transverse to the direction of neutron flux. The uniformity of volumetric heating over the transverse plane is constant to within a few percent. The sample can be as long as 10cm in the direction of the heat flux and match the expected exponential decay of heat generation, exp( /minus/z/lambda), to within +/minus/8%. The design of the chamber is decribed, including the sample region, additional dielectric loading blocks on two sides of the sample region that are required to generate the field uniformity in the transverse plane, and a description of the matching-section portion of the cavity which provides the correct geometry to cause the cavity to resonate at 200 MHz with the right z dependence to stimulate the exponentially-decaying heat profile in the sample region. The matching section consists of two dielectric slabs, one on each wall of the chamber, and an air or free space region in the center of the matching section. The coupling loop is located near the wall end of the matching section in the free space region. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randolph, H.; Verebelyi, D.

    1992-12-01

    The properties of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} superconducting tapes designed and fabricated into SAFIRE-type, encapsulated, grounding links by the Ceramic Engineering Department at Clemson University were investigated (NASA Contract No. NAG-1-1127). Testing at the Savannah River Site included gamma irradiation, vibration, magnetic field, and long-term evaluation. Irradiation and vibration did not change the physical or electrical properties of the tested samples. An applied magnetic field of 1000 Gauss increased the superconduction resistance and invoked semiconductor electrical properties of some samples. The long-term testing began in January 1991 and resistance data showed no increases. No gaseous decomposition has been found.

  17. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randolph, H.; Verebelyi, D.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] superconducting tapes designed and fabricated into SAFIRE-type, encapsulated, grounding links by the Ceramic Engineering Department at Clemson University were investigated (NASA Contract No. NAG-1-1127). Testing at the Savannah River Site included gamma irradiation, vibration, magnetic field, and long-term evaluation. Irradiation and vibration did not change the physical or electrical properties of the tested samples. An applied magnetic field of 1000 Gauss increased the superconduction resistance and invoked semiconductor electrical properties of some samples. The long-term testing began in January 1991 and resistance data showed no increases. No gaseous decomposition has been found.

  18. Near term electric test vehicle ETV-2 (Engineering Materials)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engineering drawings are provided for ETV-2, a unique battery-powered passenger vehicle has been developed that provides a significant improvement over conventional electric vehicle performance, particularly during stop-and-go driving. The vehicle is unique in two major respects: (1) the power system incorporates a flywheel that stores energy during regenerative braking and makes possible the acceleration capability needed to keep up with traffic without reducing range to unacceptable values; and (2) lightweight plastic materials are used for the vehicle unibody to minimize weight and increase range. Reference DOE/CS/51213-01. (WHK)

  19. Assembly and testing of microparticle and microcapsule smart tattoo materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Microscale biochemical sensors are attractive for in vitro diagnostics and disease management, as well as medical and biological research applications. Fluorescent sensors, coupling specific glucose-binding proteins with fluorescent readout methods, have been developed for this purpose. Our work has focused on the development of assembly and packaging systems for producing micro- and nanoscale sensing components that can be used as implants, intracellular reporters, or as elements in larger systems. Both hybrid organic/inorganic particles and hollow microshells have been developed to physically couple the sensing materials together in biocompatible, semipermeable packages. Fabrication details and sensor characterization are used to demonstrate the potential of these sensor concepts.

  20. Non Destructive Testing - Identification of Defects in Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Bachorec

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In electrical impedance tomography (EIT currents are applied through the electrodes attached on the surface of the object, and the resulting voltages are measured using the same or additional electrodes. Internal conductivity distribution is recalculated from the measured voltages and currents. The problem is very ill posed, and therefore, regularization has to be used. The aim is to reconstruct, as accurately as possible, the conductivity distribution s in phantom using finite element method (FEM. In this paper are proposed variations of the regularization term, which are applied to non-destructiveidentification of defects (voids or cracks in conductive material.

  1. Impact test on natural fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chandramohan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, natural fibers like Sisal (Agave sisalana, Banana (Musa sepientum & Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa , Sisal and banana (hybrid , Roselle and banana (hybrid and Roselle and sisal (hybrid are fabricated with bio epoxy resin using molding method. In this work, impact strength of Sisal and banana (hybrid, Roselle and banana (hybridand Roselle and sisal (hybrid composite at dry and wet conditions were studied. Impact test were conducted izod impact testing machine. In this work micro structure of the specimens are scanned by the Scanning Electron Microscope.

  2. A reproducible oral microcosm biofilm model for testing dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudney, J D; Chen, R; Lenton, P; Li, J; Li, Y; Jones, R S; Reilly, C; Fok, A S; Aparicio, C

    2012-12-01

    Most studies of biofilm effects on dental materials use single-species biofilms, or consortia. Microcosm biofilms grown directly from saliva or plaque are much more diverse, but difficult to characterize. We used the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray (HOMIM) to validate a reproducible oral microcosm model. Saliva and dental plaque were collected from adults and children. Hydroxyapatite and dental composite discs were inoculated with either saliva or plaque, and microcosm biofilms were grown in a CDC biofilm reactor. In later experiments, the reactor was pulsed with sucrose. DNA from inoculums and microcosms was analysed by HOMIM for 272 species. Microcosms included about 60% of species from the original inoculum. Biofilms grown on hydroxyapatite and composites were extremely similar. Sucrose pulsing decreased diversity and pH, but increased the abundance of Streptococcus and Veillonella. Biofilms from the same donor, grown at different times, clustered together. This model produced reproducible microcosm biofilms that were representative of the oral microbiota. Sucrose induced changes associated with dental caries. This is the first use of HOMIM to validate an oral microcosm model that can be used to study the effects of complex biofilms on dental materials. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Application of Denisyuk pulsed holography to material testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renesse, R.L. van; Burgmeijer, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    When holography is applied outside the laboratory, some well known problems are experienced: vibrations, rigid body motion, stray daylight. Pulse holography can overcome the difficulties with vibrations, but the other problems are less easily solved. When the object area to be holographically tested

  4. Errors Associated with Flexure Testing of Brittle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    DeSALVO , G. J. Theory and Structural Defin Applications of Welbull Statistics. Westinghouse Astronuclesr Laboratory, WANL-TME- 2688, 1970. 24 F = 1 - exp...ty.Elghth Conftence on the Desig of Experiments in Army Reearc, Deripeaat and Testing, 1983. 28. DeSALVO , G.J. Theory ed Structual Deftx Apphlcetioes of

  5. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10 chro...

  6. 16 CFR 1610.5 - Test apparatus and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... board. The brush is hinged with pin hinges at the rear edge of the base board and rests on the carriage... testing. The angle of inclination shall be 45°. Two guide pins projecting downward from the center of the... pinned for alignment. The specimen shall be firmly sandwiched in between the metal plates with clamps...

  7. Testing of Confining Pressure Impacton Explosion Energy of Explosive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiecki, Jan; Myszkowski, Jacek; Pytlik, Andrzej; Pytlik, Mateusz

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the results of testing the explosion effects of two explosive charges placed in an environment with specified values of confining pressure. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of variable environmental conditions on the suitability of particular explosives for their use in the prevention of natural hazards in hard coal mining. The research results will contribute to improving the efficiency of currently adopted technologies of natural hazard prevention and aid in raising the level of occupational safety. To carry out the subject matter measurements, a special test stand was constructed which allows the value of the initial pressure inside the chamber, which constitutes its integral part, to be altered before the detonation of the charge being tested. The obtained characteristics of the pressure changes during the explosion of the analysed charge helped to identify the work (energy) which was produced during the process. The test results are a valuable source of information, opening up new possibilities for the use of explosives, the development of innovative solutions for the construction of explosive charges and their initiation.

  8. Consensus stability testing protocols for organic photovoltaic materials and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reese, Matthew O.; Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    Procedures for testing organic solar cell devices and modules with respect to stability and operational lifetime are described. The descriptions represent a consensus of the discussion and conclusions reached during the first 3 years of the international summit on OPV stability (ISOS). The proced...

  9. Current Trends on the Applicability of Ground Aerospace Materials Test Data to Space System Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses the application of testing aerospace materials to the environment of space for flammability. Test environments include use of drop towers, and the parabolic flight to simulate the low gravity environment of space.

  10. Practical and theoretical considerations on the fracture toughness testing of dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Wendler, Michael; Zorzin, José I; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    An important tool in materials research, development and characterization regarding mechanical performance is the testing of fracture toughness. A high level of accuracy in executing this sort of test is necessary, with strict requirements given in extensive testing standard documents. Proficiency in quality specimen fabrication and test requires practice and a solid theoretical background, oftentimes overlooked in the dental community. In this review we go through some fundamentals of the fracture mechanics concepts that are relevant to the understanding of fracture toughness testing, and draw attention to critical aspects of practical nature that must be fulfilled for validity and accuracy in results. We describe our experience with some testing methodologies for CAD/CAM materials and discuss advantages and shortcomings of different tests in terms of errors in testing the applicability of the concept of fracture toughness as a single-value material-specific property. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Crack initiation and propagation on the polymeric material ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene), under ultrasonic fatigue testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    G M Domínguez Almaraz; E Correa Gómez; JC Verduzco Juárez; JL Avila Ambriz

    2015-01-01

    ... (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene), under ultrasonic fatigue testing. Three controlled actions were implemented in order to carry out fatigue tests at very high frequency on this material of low thermal conductivity, they are: a...

  12. Evaluation of candidate magnetohydrodynamic materials for the U-02 Phase III test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1978-06-01

    As part of a cooperative U.S.--U.S.S.R. program, electrode and insulator materials tested at the Westinghouse Electrode Systems Test Facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, were evaluated. From this evaluation materials will be selected for use in the third phase of tests being conducted in the U-02 magnetohydrodynamics test facility in the Soviet Union. Electrode and insulator materials were examined with both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The cathodes were found to behave differently from the anodes; most notably, the cathodes showed greater potassium interaction. The lanthanum chromite-based electrodes (excluding those fabricated by plasma-spraying) are recommended for testing in the U-02 Phase III test. Hotpressed, fused-grained MgO and sintered MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/ are recommended as insulator materials. The electrode attachment techniques used in the Westinghouse Tests were inadequate and need to be modified for the U-02 test.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of gelatin-based test materials for verification of trace contraband vapor detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staymates, Jessica L; Gillen, Greg

    2010-10-01

    This work describes a method to produce inexpensive and field deployable test materials that can be used to verify the performance of trace contraband vapor detection systems such as ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) currently deployed worldwide for explosives, narcotics, and chemical warfare agent (CWA) detection. Requirements for such field deployable test materials include long shelf life, portability, and low manufacturing costs. Reported here is a method for fabricating these test materials using encapsulation of high vapor pressure compounds, such as methyl salicylate (MS), into a gelatin matrix. Gelatin serves as a diffusion barrier allowing for controlled and sustained release of test vapors. Test materials were prepared by incorporating serial dilutions of MS into gelatin, which provide controlled analyte vapor release over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude of instrument response. The test materials are simple to prepare and have been shown to be stable for at least one year under controlled laboratory conditions.

  14. Hybrid microcircuit technology handbook materials, processes, design, testing and production

    CERN Document Server

    Licari, James J

    1998-01-01

    The Hybrid Microcircuit Technology Handbook integrates the many diverse technologies used in the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of hybrid segments crucial to the success of producing reliable circuits in high yields. Among these are: resistor trimming, wire bonding, die attachment, cleaning, hermetic sealing, and moisture analysis. In addition to thin films, thick films, and assembly processes, important chapters on substrate selections, handling (including electrostatic discharge), failure analysis, and documentation are included. A comprehensive chapter of design guidelines will

  15. Standard test method for ranking resistance of materials to sliding wear using block-on-ring wear test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers laboratory procedures for determining the resistance of materials to sliding wear. The test utilizes a block-on-ring friction and wear testing machine to rank pairs of materials according to their sliding wear characteristics under various conditions. 1.2 An important attribute of this test is that it is very flexible. Any material that can be fabricated into, or applied to, blocks and rings can be tested. Thus, the potential materials combinations are endless. However, the interlaboratory testing has been limited to metals. In addition, the test can be run with various lubricants, liquids, or gaseous atmospheres, as desired, to simulate service conditions. Rotational speed and load can also be varied to better correspond to service requirements. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Wear test results are reported as the volume loss in cubic millimetres for both the block and ring. Materials...

  16. [Concept formation in children with schizophrenia (from Piaget test material)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedinskiĭ, V V; Novikova, E Iu

    1975-01-01

    The authors studied reasons of a domineering perceptive generalizations in the Piaget test by children with schizophrenia. In teaching the children to distinguish and measure different properties of objects, the most typical appeared to be the following actions: a complete or partial refusal to accomplish them, a substitution of measurements by a perceptive comparison, difficulties in the narration of personal activity in well developed speech. Better results were attained in those who were emotionally positive. On these grounds the authors presumed an autistical genesis of these disturbances.

  17. Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Ruggeri, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the difficulties with developing and verifying accurate impact models is that parameters such as high strain rate material properties, failure modes, static properties, and impact test measurements are often obtained from a variety of different sources using different materials, with little control over consistency among the different sources. In addition there is often a lack of quantitative measurements in impact tests to which the models can be compared. To alleviate some of these problems, a project is underway to develop a consistent set of material property, impact test data and failure analysis for a variety of aircraft materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. This project is jointly funded by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property data and impact test data are obtained using identical material, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. Four parallel efforts are currently underway: Measurement of material deformation and failure response over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and failure analysis of material property specimens and impact test articles conducted by The Ohio State University; development of improved numerical modeling techniques for deformation and failure conducted by The George Washington University; impact testing of flat panels and substructures conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center. This report describes impact testing which has been done on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade. Data from this testing will be used in validating material models developed under this program. The material

  18. Cryogenic Thermal Performance Testing of Bulk-Fill and Aerogel Insulation Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; Sass, J. P.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Heckle, K. W.

    2007-01-01

    The research testing and demonstration of new bulk-fill materials for cryogenic thermal insulation systems was performed by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center. Thermal conductivity testing under actual-use cryogenic conditions is a key to understanding the total system performance encompassing engineering, economics, and materials factors. A number of bulk fill insulation materials, including aerogel beads, glass bubbles, and perlite powder, were tested using a new cylindrical cryostat. Boundary temperatures for the liquid nitrogen boil-off method were 293 K and 78 K. Tests were performed as a function of cold vacuum pressure from high vacuum to no vacuum conditions. Results are compared with other complementary test methods in the range of 300 K to 20 K. Various testing techniques are shown to be required to obtain a complete understanding of the operating performance of a material and to provide data for answers to design engineering questions.

  19. Characterization of Material Stiffness on Injection Moulded Microspecimens Using Different Test Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Drummer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection moulding of polymer microparts can result in modified material behaviour due to process-induced changes in the internal properties. Thus, a transfer of the mechanical material properties in microparts, determined and valid on standardized test specimens, is only partially possible and should be verified on microtest specimens. This paper investigates both tensile and bending test methods for a suitable characterization of material stiffness in polymer microparts. For this purpose a down-scaled standard specimen is used and tested with different testing methods. The investigations reveal that the different testing methods result in comparable mechanical values. The effects of process-induced modified mechanical behaviour are observable in the investigated testing methods. Consequently, a microbending test is potentially a suitable method for characterizing material stiffness using microspecimens.

  20. Calculation of measurement uncertainty for plastic (ABS material in flexural testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunay A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine mechanical properties of materials various kind of tests can be applied by means of using their tensile strength, lower yield stress, proof stress, impact strength, Brinell, Rockwell and surface hardness, elongation after fracture properties. Among these tests, three point flexural testing method has some advantages such as easy preparation (production of samples and no gripping problems comparing to tension test. Flexural tests results should be obtained accurately to provide expected testing performance. The measurement uncertainty of flexural tests should be calculated by conducting all effective uncertainty parameters during the test procedure. In this study, the measurement uncertainty of the flexural test of ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene material was investigated, which is widely used as industrial plastic material in many applications.

  1. Einstein's Materialism and Modern Tests of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, J. P.

    After a presentation of Einstein's and Bohr's antagonistic point of view on the interpretation of Quantum Mechanics an illustration of their conflicting positions in the particular case of Young's double slit experiment is presented. It is then shown that in their most recent form (i. e. time dependent neutron interferometry) these experiments suggest (if one accepts absolute energymomentum conservation in all individual microprocesses) that Einstein was right in the Bohr-Einstein controversy.Translated AbstractEinsteins Materialismus und heutige Tests der QuantenmechanikNach einer Darstellung von Einsteins und Bohrs antagonistischen Standpunkten in der Interpretation der Quantenmechanik werden ihre widersprüchlichen Positionen im speziellen Fall des Youngschen Doppelspaltexperiments dargestellt. Es wird dann gezeigt, daß diese Experimente in ihrer neuesten Form (d. h. zeitabhängige Neutroneninterferometrie) Einstein in der Bohr-Einsteinkontroverse recht gaben (wenn man absolute Energie-Impulserhaltung bei allen individuellen Mikroprozessen annimmt).

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND BIOLOGICAL TESTING OF NEW SCAFFOLDS FROM BIODEGRADABLE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Vasilets

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The new gel-sublimation technique for preparation porus biodegradable scaffolds (hydroxybutyrate-co-hydro- xyvalerate is presented. The scaffolds with multi-mode internal structure have the of porus sizes varied from ~100 microns up to ~100 nanometers and the porosity in a range of 80–90%. A few techniques for modification of 3D scaffolds by gas discharge plasma are developed and optimized: the microsecond dielectric barrier dischar- ge, the semi-self-maintained discharge supported by an electron beam; the nanosecond dielectric barrier dischar- ge. Biological tests including red blood cell hemolysis and cytotoxicity analysis have shown the possibilities of scaffolds applications for cell-based technologies. 

  3. COOLED PLATE TESTS ON TEXTILE MATERIALS IN SIMULATED COCKPIT UNDER “SOLAR RADIATION”

    OpenAIRE

    Kuklane, Kalev

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated if clothing material with reflective properties has an effect on heat gain in pilot, specifically, under solar radiation. Two materials, conventional pilot suit material (Old) and material coated with coldblack® (New, Schoeller Technologies AG, Switzerland) were tested over variety of underwear layers and in a box simulating cockpit. A hot plate was used to measure textile combinations’ insulation. Under the solar radiation simulation with a Thorn lamp (841 W/m2) a wat...

  4. Development and Execution of a Large-scale DDT Tube Test for IHE Material Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Gary Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Broilo, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lopez-Pulliam, Ian Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vaughan, Larry Dean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Insensitive High Explosive (IHE) Materials are defined in Chapter IX of the DOE Explosive Safety Standard (DOE-STD-1212-2012) as being materials that are massdetonable explosives that are so insensitive that the probability of accidental initiation or transition from burning to detonation is negligible1. There are currently a number of tests included in the standard that are required to qualify a material as IHE, however, none of the tests directly evaluate for the transition from burning to detonation (aka deflagration-to-detonation transition, DDT). Currently, there is a DOE complex-wide effort to revisit the IHE definition in DOE-STD-1212-2012 and change the qualification requirements. The proposal lays out a new approach, requiring fewer, but more appropriate tests, for IHE Material qualification. One of these new tests is the Deflagration-to-Detonation Test. According to the redefinition proposal, the purpose of the new deflagration-todetonation test is “to demonstrate that an IHE material will not undergo deflagration-to-detonation under stockpile relevant conditions of scale, confinement, and material condition. Inherent in this test design is the assumption that ignition does occur, with onset of deflagration. The test design will incorporate large margins and replicates to account for the stochastic nature of DDT events.” In short, the philosophy behind this approach is that if a material fails to undergo DDT in a significant over-test, then it is extremely unlikely to do so in realistic conditions. This effort will be valuable for the B61 LEP to satisfy their need qualify the new production lots of PBX 9502. The work described in this report is intended as a preliminary investigation to support the proposed design of an overly conservative, easily fielded DDT test for updated IHE Material Qualification standard. Specifically, we evaluated the aspects of confinement, geometry, material morphology and temperature. We also developed and tested a

  5. Comparison of irradiated 15Kh2MFA material mechanical properties using conventional testing methods and innovative approach of small punch testing (SPT) and automated ball indentation (ABIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopriva, R.; Petelova, P.; Eliasova, I.; Kytka, M.; Culek, M.

    2017-02-01

    Article describes two innovative testing methods - Small Punch Testing (SPT) and Automated Ball Indentation Test (ABIT) - which are based on the determination and evaluation of material properties from miniaturized testing specimens. These methods are very promising due to minimum material needed for testing and also in case of testing highly irradiated materials of components that are not included in standard surveillance programs. The test results were obtained for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) base material 15Ch2MFA in both states - initial unirradiated and irradiated. Subsequently results were compared with standard tensile tests to prove applicability of these testing methods for the evaluation of degradation of irradiated structural materials of nuclear power plants.

  6. Pump and probe damage testing for investigation of transient material modifications associated with laser damage in optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negres, R A; Feit, M D; DeMange, P; Bude, J D; Demos, S G

    2007-10-18

    Laser-induced breakdown in the bulk of transparent dielectric materials is associated with the generation of extreme localized conditions of temperatures and pressures. In this work, we perform pump and probe damage testing experiments to investigate the evolution of transient absorption by the host material arising from modifications following confined laser energy deposition in fused silica and DKDP materials. Specifically, we measure the size of the damage sites observed in the region of spatial overlap between the pump and probe pulses versus probe time delay and energy. Results of this proof-of-principle experimental work confirm that material modifications under extreme conditions created during a damage event include transient optical absorption. In addition, we found that the relaxation times of the induced absorption are very distinct for DKDP and SiO{sub 2} even under identical excitation conditions, on the order of 100 ns and 100 {micro}s, respectively.

  7. Wind Tunnel Model Design and Test Using Rapid Prototype Materials and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-23

    UNCLASSIFIED WIND TUNNEL MODEL DESIGN AND TEST USING RAPID PROTOTYPE MATERIALS AND PROCESSES Richard R. Heisler and Clifford L. Ratliff The Johns Hopkins...deflection, and attach directly to the strongback with screws. A and tolerance deviations when the material was grown. schematic diagram of the RPM...constructed around the clay to contain the I. R. R. Heisler , "Final Test Report for the Wind pouring of silicon resin. Tunnel Test of the JHU/APL WTM-01 at

  8. State of the art report on the materials testing capabilities for IASCC susceptibility testing at SCK-CEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, R.-W.; Boydens, P.; Vankeerbergen, R.; Van Nieuwenhove, R.; Van Dyck, S

    1999-08-01

    An overview of the current IASCC testing facilities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN is given. The testing techniques are reviewed, and their capabilities as well as their limitations are discussed. Possible future developments in testing techniques are discussed. IASCC is caused by a complex interaction between materials, its environment and mechanical stresses. Characterisation techniques assessing mechanical stresses as well as electrochemical and microstructural characteristics are reported on.

  9. The Use of Empirical Methods for Testing Granular Materials in Analogue Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Domenico; Agostini, Andrea; Bonini, Marco; Corti, Giacomo; Ventisette, Chiara Del

    2017-06-09

    The behaviour of a granular material is mainly dependent on its frictional properties, angle of internal friction, and cohesion, which, together with material density, are the key factors to be considered during the scaling procedure of analogue models. The frictional properties of a granular material are usually investigated by means of technical instruments such as a Hubbert-type apparatus and ring shear testers, which allow for investigating the response of the tested material to a wide range of applied stresses. Here we explore the possibility to determine material properties by means of different empirical methods applied to mixtures of quartz and K-feldspar sand. Empirical methods exhibit the great advantage of measuring the properties of a certain analogue material under the experimental conditions, which are strongly sensitive to the handling techniques. Finally, the results obtained from the empirical methods have been compared with ring shear tests carried out on the same materials, which show a satisfactory agreement with those determined empirically.

  10. [Ninhydrin permeability tests of common packaging materials in the field of fingerprint examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Lothar; Hermanowski, Mona-Lena

    2008-01-01

    With a simple experimental set-up, common packaging materials were tested for their ninhydrin permeability. The packaging material was loaded with a ninhydrin treated paper on the inside and covered with an amino acid treated paper on the outside. If ninhydrin penetrates through the packaging film, "Ruhemann's purple" will form on the amino acid treated paper. In all, 28 packaging materials were tested over a period of 24 weeks. It turned out that all the films made of polyethylene (PE) showed ninhydrin permeability. With one exception, this permeability occurred after three days already. All packages made of other film material were not permeable to ninhydrin.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of MCC (Materials Characterization Center) approved testing material: ATM-10 glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-10 glass represents a reference commercial high-level waste form similar to that which will be produced by the West Valley Nuclear Service Co. Inc., West Valley, New York. The target composition and acceptable range of composition were defined by the sponsor, West Valley Nuclear Service. The ATM-10 glass was produced in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of the work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-10 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. All of the ATM-10 glass was produced in the form of bars 1.9 /times/ 1.9 /times/ 10 cm nominal size, and 93 g nominal mass. A total of 15 bars of ATM-10 glass weighing 1394 g was produced. The production bars were characterized to determine the mean composition, oxidation state, and microstructure of the ATM-10 product. Table A summarizes the characterization results. The ATM-10 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the specifications of the client. Visually, the ATM-10 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination revealed low (less than 2 wt %) concentractions of 3-..mu..m iron-chrome (suspected spinel) crystals and /approximately/0.5-..mu..m ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 5 to 250 ..mu..m, was observed in all samples. 4 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF BURN TEST SPECIFICATIONS FOR FIRE PROTECTION MATERIALS IN RAM PACKAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, N.

    2010-03-03

    The regulations in 10 CFR 71 require that the radioactive material (RAM) packages must be able to withstand specific fire conditions given in 10 CFR 71.73 during Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). This requirement is normally satisfied by extensive testing of full scale test specimens under required test conditions. Since fire test planning and execution is expensive and only provides a single snapshot into a package performance, every effort is made to minimize testing and supplement tests with results from computational thermal models. However, the accuracy of such thermal models depends heavily on the thermal properties of the fire insulating materials that are rarely available at the regulatory fire temperatures. To the best of authors knowledge no test standards exist that could be used to test the insulating materials and derive their thermal properties for the RAM package design. This paper presents a review of the existing industry fire testing standards and proposes testing methods that could serve as a standardized specification for testing fire insulating materials for use in RAM packages.

  13. Clinical experience of a new reference material for exercise capacity in exercise stress testing in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindow, Thomas; Mosén, Henrik; Engblom, Henrik

    2017-09-21

    In 2014, the Swedish Association of Clinical Physiology recommended the use of a new reference material for exercise capacity in bicycle exercise stress testing, 'the Kalmar material'. Compared to the formerly used reference material, 'the Kristianstad material', an increase in the amount of patients being classified as having decreased exercise capacity was expected, but the extent of this in clinical practice is not known. Results of exercise capacity from 1449 bicycle exercise tests, in patients aged ≥20 years (656 women, 793 men) performed at two departments of Clinical Physiology before and after change of reference materials, were collected. Maximal workload was related to the predicted values of both reference materials. If made, recommendations for supplemental nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging study by the attending physician were noted. Using the new reference material, 31% of all patients were classified as having a decreased exercise capacity, compared to 17% using the formerly used reference material. The difference between the two reference materials was largest in the older age groups. In one of the departments, an increase in recommendations of supplemental myocardial perfusion studies was seen after introduction of the new reference material, whereas the opposite was seen at the other department. A large amount of patients are being classified as having decreased exercise capacity and very few as having good exercise capacity using the new reference material for exercise capacity. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Standard test method for linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness KIc of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2013-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fracture toughness (KIc) of metallic materials under predominantly linear-elastic, plane-strain conditions using fatigue precracked specimens having a thickness of 1.6 mm (0.063 in.) or greater subjected to slowly, or in special (elective) cases rapidly, increasing crack-displacement force. Details of test apparatus, specimen configuration, and experimental procedure are given in the Annexes. Note 1—Plane-strain fracture toughness tests of thinner materials that are sufficiently brittle (see 7.1) can be made using other types of specimens (1). There is no standard test method for such thin materials. 1.2 This test method is divided into two parts. The first part gives general recommendations and requirements for KIc testing. The second part consists of Annexes that give specific information on displacement gage and loading fixture design, special requirements for individual specimen configurations, and detailed procedures for fatigue precracking. Additional a...

  15. Standard test method for linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness KIc of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fracture toughness (KIc) of metallic materials under predominantly linear-elastic, plane-strain conditions using fatigue precracked specimens having a thickness of 1.6 mm (0.063 in.) or greater subjected to slowly, or in special (elective) cases rapidly, increasing crack-displacement force. Details of test apparatus, specimen configuration, and experimental procedure are given in the Annexes. Note 1—Plane-strain fracture toughness tests of thinner materials that are sufficiently brittle (see 7.1) can be made using other types of specimens (1). There is no standard test method for such thin materials. 1.2 This test method is divided into two parts. The first part gives general recommendations and requirements for KIc testing. The second part consists of Annexes that give specific information on displacement gage and loading fixture design, special requirements for individual specimen configurations, and detailed procedures for fatigue precracking. Additional a...

  16. Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ARMSEF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  17. Standard test methods for conducting creep, creep-rupture, and stress-rupture tests of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the amount of deformation as a function of time (creep test) and the measurement of the time for fracture to occur when sufficient force is present (rupture test) for materials when under constant tensile forces at constant temperature. It also includes the essential requirements for testing equipment. For information of assistance in determining the desirable number and duration of tests, reference should be made to the product specification. 1.2 These test methods list the information which should be included in reports of tests. The intention is to ensure that all useful and readily available information is transmitted to interested parties. Reports receive special attention for the following reasons: (1) results from different, recognized procedures vary significantly; therefore, identification of methods used is important; (2) later studies to establish important variables are often hampered by the lack of detailed information in published reports; (3) t...

  18. Intelligent transportation systems field operational test cross-cutting study : hazardous material incident management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Hazardous Materials Incident Response Cross-Cutting report summarizes and interprets the results of three Field Operational Tests (FOTs) that are evaluating systems for improving the accuracy and availability of HazMat information provided to emergen...

  19. Ballistic Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Emmerling, William C.; Altobelli, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental program is underway to develop a consistent set of material property and impact test data, and failure analysis, for a variety of materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property information and impact test results are obtained using identical materials, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. This report describes ballistic impact testing which has been conducted on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade.

  20. Non-Destructive Metallic Materials Testing-Recent Research and Future Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    João Manuel R S; Victor Hugo C de

    2017-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) has become extremely important formicrostructural characterization, mainly by allowing the assessment of metallic material properties in an effective and reasonable manner, in addition to maintaining...

  1. Dynamic material characterization by combining ballistic testing and an engineering model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.; Wal, R. van der

    2013-01-01

    At TNO several energy-based engineering models have been created for various failure mechanism occurring in ballistic testing of materials, like ductile hole growth, denting, plugging, etc. Such models are also under development for ceramic and fiberbased materials (fabrics). As the models are

  2. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  3. Performance testing of elastomeric seal materials under low and high temperature conditions: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRONOWSKI,DAVID R.

    2000-06-01

    The US Department of Energy Offices of Defense Programs and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management jointly sponsored a program to evaluate elastomeric O-ring seal materials for radioactive material shipping containers. The report presents the results of low- and high-temperature tests conducted on 27 common elastomeric compounds.

  4. Design and building of a new experimental setup for testing hydrogen storage materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.

    2005-01-01

    For hydrogen to become the future energy carrier a suitable way of storing hydrogen is needed, especially if hydrogen is to be used in mobile applications such as cars. To test potential hydrogen storage materials with respect to capacity, kinetics andthermodynamics the Materials Research...

  5. Deducing material quality in cast and hot-forged steels by new bending test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valberg, Henry; Langøy, Morten; Nedreberg, Mette; Helvig, Torgeir

    2017-10-01

    A special bend test has been developed and applied for the purpose of characterization and comparison of the material ductility in crankpin steel discs manufactured by casting, or casting subsequently followed by hot open-die forging (ODF) or closed-die forging (CDF). The bending test specimen consists of a small rectangular plate of material with a round hole cut out in the middle. The "eye-shape" specimens were cut out from various positions either near to the surface of, or from the interior of the discs. The test method revealed differences in ductility for the investigated materials, and for different depth positions inside the discs. The roughening of the specimen surface on the top-side of the specimen bend also varied dependent on the processing method for the material. Current results show that this test method is useful for evaluation of material quality in differently processed material. Experimental bend test results are presented for differently processed variants of the same material, i.e., crankpin discs either made by solely casting or casting subsequently followed by hot working either by ODF or CDF.

  6. USE OF ROUND BAR SPECIMEN IN FRACTURE TOUGHNESS TEST OF METALLIC MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    NEELAKANTHA V LONDE,; DR. T.JAYARAJU; DR. P.R.SADANANDA RAO

    2010-01-01

    The fracture toughness of high strength metallic materials is determined by standard test methods like ASTM E 399, ASTM E-1820 using standard specimen geometries such as Compact tension (CT) or Single edge notched bend (SENB) specimens. This paper explains a simple test methodology based on fracture mechanics approach usingcircumferentially cracked round bar (CCRB) specimen. Specimen preparation and fatigue precracking is quite simple, consuming less material and machining time. This CCRB, be...

  7. IN VITRO TESTING – AN ESENTIAL METHOD FOR EVALUATING THE PERFORMANCE OF DENTAL MATERIALS AND DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca VIŢALARIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dentistry is unique among biomaterials specialties as to the large variety of materials used, and nature of the challenges they must resist. Intra-oral service demands materials adapted to a warm and moist environment, resisting the attack of digestive acids and enzymes. The materials subjected to mechanical forces should preserve their strength, fatigue and wear characteristics, for accomplishing their function. The wide range of materials available for restorative dentistry demands knowledge of their relative strengths and trade-offs, and offers the opportunity for many interesting lines of research. The spectrum extensively ranges from elastic impression materials to extremely stiff metal and ceramic appliances, so that familiarity with a variety of mechanical testing situations is required from a well-rounded dental materials laboratory. Evaluating the mechanical and wear characteristics of dental restorative materials and analyzing the durability of adhesives is critical to the development of improved dental devices

  8. Assessment of the quality of test results from selected civil engineering material testing laboratories in Tanzania

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbawala, SJ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available . Three soil samples commonly found on construction sites in Tanzania were sampled and submitted to the selected five laboratories that were requested to perform the foundation indicator tests (particle size distribution, liquid limit and plastic limit...

  9. L'Uso dei Materiali Video nei Test Linguistici (The Use of Video Materials in Language Tests).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diadori, Pierangela

    1995-01-01

    This article argues that a communicative language course must have communicative exams. It explains how to choose and use material to test students' listening comprehension and socio-cultural knowledge. Transcripts of a commercial, a talk show, a film, a TV news show, and a documentary are included accompanied by exercises. (CFM)

  10. The Virtual Employment Test Bed: An Immersive Synthetic Environment Allows Engineers to Test and Evaluate Material Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-03

    synthetic environment allows engineers to test and evaluate material solutions Robert DeMarco, MSBME; Gordon Cooke, MEME ; John Riedener, MSSE...ROBERT DEMARCO, MSBME, is a Project Lead Engineer and Certified LabVIEW Associate Developer. GORDON COOKE, MEME , is a Principal Investigator at the

  11. Recommendation of tests for assessing flame spread of materials in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Wan K.I.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance-based design for passive building fire safety provisions is accepted by the authority in Hong Kong since 1998. This is also known as the "fire engineering approach", though the performance-based fire code is not yet available. To cope with the use of new building materials, appropriate flame spread tests on materials and components should be specified. After reviewing four standard tests in the literature, i.e. ASTM E1321-97a, BS476: Part 7: 1997, ASTM E84-99/NFPA 255, and ISO 9705: 1993(E, it appears that ISO 9705: 1993(E is suitable for assessing the flame spread of materials. .

  12. Diffusion-controlled toluene reference material for VOC emissions testing: international interlaboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Liu, Zhe; Cox, Steven; Leber, Dennis; Samarov, Dan; Little, John C

    2014-04-01

    The measurement of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from building products and materials by manufacturers and testing laboratories, and the use of the test results for labeling programs, continue to expand. One issue that hinders wide acceptance for chamber product testing is the lack of a reference material to validate test chamber performance. To meet this need, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Virginia Tech (VT) have developed a prototype reference material that emits a single VOC similar to the emissions of a diffusion-controlled building product source with a dynamic emissions profile. The prototype material has undergone extensive testing at NIST and a pilot interlaboratory study (ILS) with four laboratories. The next development step is an evaluation of the prototype source in multiple-sized chambers of 14 laboratories in seven countries. Each laboratory was provided duplicate specimens and a test protocol. Study results identified significant issues related to the need to store the source at a subzero Celsius temperature until tested and possible inconsistencies in large chambers. For laboratories using a small chamber and meeting all the test method criteria, the results were very encouraging with relative standard deviations ranging from 5% to 10% across the laboratories. Currently, the chamber performance of laboratories conducting product VOC emissions testing is assessed through interlaboratory studies (ILS) using a source with an unknown emission rate. As a result, laboratory proficiency can only be based on the mean and standard deviation of emission rates measured by the participating ILS laboratories. A reference material with a known emission rate has the potential to provide an independent assessment of laboratory performance as well as improve the quality of interlaboratory studies. Several international laboratories with different chamber testing systems demonstrated the ability to measure the emission rate

  13. Results of ASTM round robin testing for mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    The results are summarized of several interlaboratory 'round robin' test programs for measuring the mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of advanced fiber reinforced composite materials. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were conducted by participants in ASTM committee D30 on High Modulus Fibers and their Composites and by representatives of the European Group on Fracture (EGF) and the Japanese Industrial Standards Group (JIS). DCB tests were performed on three AS4 carbon fiber reinforced composite materials: AS4/3501-6 with a brittle epoxy matrix; AS4/BP907 with a tough epoxy matrix; and AS4/PEEK with a tough thermoplastic matrix. Difficulties encountered in manufacturing panels, as well as conducting the tests are discussed. Critical issues that developed during the course of the testing are highlighted. Results of the round robin testing used to determine the precision of the ASTM DCB test standard are summarized.

  14. Computational testing and design of materials for wind energy and structural applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2012-01-01

    and reliability of wind blades is to develop new advanced materials with improved structures. In this work, several computational micromechanical models of wind blade materials are presented. The possibility of computational testing of materials and their numerical optimization are discussed.......The requirements to wind turbine blades and other elements are quite high, In the ideal case, a wind turbine should work for 20.30 years without or with minimum maintenance. That is why the damage resistance and strength of wind blade materials is of great importance. A way to enhance the strength...

  15. Compendium of information on identification and testing of materials for plastic solar thermal collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinniss, V.D.; Sliemers, F.A.; Landstrom, D.K.; Talbert, S.G.

    1980-07-31

    This report is intended to organize and summarize prior and current literature concerning the weathering, aging, durability, degradation, and testing methodologies as applied to materials for plastic solar thermal collectors. Topics covered include (1) rate of aging of polymeric materials; (2) environmental factors affecting performance; (3) evaluation and prediction of service life; (4) measurement of physical and chemical properties; (5) discussion of evaluation techniques and specific instrumentation; (6) degradation reactions and mechanisms; (7) weathering of specific polymeric materials; and (8) exposure testing methodology. Major emphasis has been placed on defining the current state of the art in plastics degradation and on identifying information that can be utilized in applying appropriate and effective aging tests for use in projecting service life of plastic solar thermal collectors. This information will also be of value where polymeric components are utilized in the construction of conventional solar collectors or any application where plastic degradation and weathering are prime factors in material selection.

  16. Proof of concept testing of a positive reference material for in vivo and in vitro skin irritation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Lee, Michelle; Fukui, Chie; Watanabe, Kayo; Olsen, Daniel; Turley, Audrey; Morishita, Yuki; Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Yuba, Toshiyasu; Fujimaki, Hideo; Inoue, Kaoru; Yoshida, Midori; Ogawa, Kumiko; Haishima, Yuji

    2017-12-11

    In vivo and in vitro irritation testing is important for evaluating the biological safety of medical devices. Here, the performance of positive reference materials for skin irritation testing was evaluated. Four reference standards, referred to as Y-series materials, were analyzed: a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) sheet spiked with 0 (Y-1), 1.0 (Y-2), 1.5 (Y-3), or 10 (Y-4) parts of Genapol X-080 per 100 parts of PVC by weight. Y-1, Y-2, and Y-3 did not induce skin irritation responses in an in vitro reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) tissue model, as measured by tissue viability or interleukin-1α release, or in an in vivo intracutaneous response test using rabbits. In contrast, Y-4 extracts prepared with saline or sesame oil at 37°C and 50°C clearly elicited positive irritation responses, including reduced viability (< 50%) and significantly higher interleukin-1α release compared with the solvent alone group, in the RhE tissue model and an intracutaneous response test, where substantial necrosis was observed by histopathology. The positive skin irritation responses induced in vitro under various extraction conditions, as well as those elicited in vivo, indicate that Y-4 is an effective extractable positive control material for in vivo and in vitro skin irritation tests of medical devices. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Subscale Testing of Nozzle Ablative Materials in a Supersonic Particle Impingement Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howse, S.; Lawrence, T.

    2004-01-01

    Recent efforts to evaluate materials to replace the current NARC rayon used in the nozzle ablative of the NASA's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (SRM), several tests were developed to look at the performance of supersonic particle impact region of the aft exit cone. It was seen in early testing that some potential candidates did not perform as well as the current NARC based material and so the 24 inch Solid Rocket Motor (SRTM) exit cone design was extended and contoured to induce particle impingement in the aft end. The SRTM testing provided a larger testbed to evaluate the results seen in the Solid Fuel Supersonic Blast Tube. Testing was performed in each test bed on two variants of the final two candidate materials. The materials were a standard prewoven Lyocell, a postwoven Lyocell, an Enka rayon, and Enka rayon processed at a higher carbonization temperature. This paper presents the results of the four materials in the SSBT and the SRTM tests as compared against the NARC baseline. Erosion, char, and plylift results are discussed in detail.

  18. Exposure testing and evaluation of solar utilization materials. Semiannual report, May 1, 1975--October 31, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilligan, J.E.; Brzuskiewicz, J.

    1975-01-01

    The initial efforts of a program of research and experimental testing is described in which the optical performance of materials for use in solar energy utilization devices will be determined before and after exposure to outdoor weathering tests. Materials which are currently in use and others which are being considered or developed for these applications will be characterized and exposed to natural solar radiation. Outdoor testing will be accomplished in Phoenix (Ariz.), Miami (Fla.), and Chicago (Ill.). The results of these tests, primarily the effects of outdoor exposure on optical and physical properties, will be compiled in a handbook, along with cost, availability and other pertinent information. These data are vital to the intelligent selection of solar utilization materials, since a knowledge of the cost performance and lifetime characteristics of candidate materials will greatly assist the design of efficient and reliable solar energy utilization devices. Primary accomplishments include the definition of sample requirements, specification of test samples and test configurations, formulation of acceptance/rejection criteria and contacts with numerous potential materials suppliers.

  19. Compositions, Functions, and Testing of Friction Brake Materials and Their Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, PJ

    2001-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to present a survey of commercial brake materials and additives, and to indicate their typical properties and functions, especially as regards their use in heavy trucks. Most truck pad and shoe materials described here were designed to wear against cast iron. Brake material test methods are also briefly described. This report does not address issues associated with the fabrication and manufacturing of brake materials. Since there are literally thousands of brake material additives, and their combinations are nearly limitless, it is impractical to list them all here. Rather, an attempt has been made to capture the primary constituents and their functions. An Appendix contains thermo-physical properties of some current and potential brake materials.

  20. Experimental assessment of the performance of ablative heat shield materials from plasma wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhle, S.; Hermann, T.; Zander, F.

    2017-12-01

    A method for assessing the performance of typical heat shield materials is presented in this paper. Three different material samples, the DLR material uc(Zuram), the Airbus material uc(Asterm) and the carbon preform uc(Calcarb) were tested in the IRS plasma wind tunnel PWK1 at the same nominal condition. State of the art diagnostic tools, i.e., surface temperature with pyrometry and thermography and boundary layer optical emission spectroscopy were completed by photogrammetric surface recession measurements. These data allow the assessment of the net heat flux for each material. The analysis shows that the three materials each have a different effect on heat flux mitigation with ASTERM showing the largest reduction in surface heat flux. The effect of pyrolysis and blowing is clearly observed and the heat flux reduction can be determined from an energy balance.

  1. Modeling of material orientation effects on AHSS crush and fracture behavior in axial crush tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guofei; Link, Todd M; Shi, Ming F; Tyan, Tau

    2013-01-01

    Due to the rolling manufacturing process, most advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) demonstrate in-plane anisotropic material behavior. This study investigates the effects of material orientation on the axial crush behavior and fracture of AHSS with axial crush tests and computer simulations. Crush simulation models considering material anisotropy and damage evolution were developed in LS-DYNA based on the drop-tower crush test results and coupon characterization test data for DP780 steel. The modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC) isotropic fracture model was employed in the crush simulation models for fracture prediction. The 12-sided components fabricated in the transverse (T) direction of the sheet exhibited slightly higher crush loads and reduced crush distances compared to those in the longitudinal (L) direction. The crush behavior in each direction was generally proportional to ultimate tensile strength. All of the materials investigated in this study showed some cracking in the crush tests for both component orientations, but only DP780 showed significant anisotropy in fracture behavior with more cracking for the T direction compared to the L direction. Overall, the amount of cracking observed in the tests had little or no significant effect on the axial crush performance. The MMC fracture loci in both the L and T directions were determined using a reverse engineering approach, and the stress-strain curves beyond the uniform elongation point were extended using an optimization method. Both material models MAT103 and MAT224 predicted the crush and fracture behavior with reasonably good accuracy. The predicted fracture mode and force-displacement curves agreed well with the test data for both the L and T directions in axial crush tests of the 12-sided components. The simple isotropic material model MAT224 is adequate for crush simulations to predict material orientation effects on AHSS component crush performance and fracture behavior.

  2. Implants in bone: part II. Research on implant osseointegration: material testing, mechanical testing, imaging and histoanalytical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Moest, Tobias; Nkenke, Emeka; Stelzle, Florian; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2014-12-01

    In order to determine whether a newly developed implant material conforms to the requirements of biocompatibility, it must undergo rigorous testing. To correctly interpret the results of studies on implant material osseointegration, it is necessary to have a sound understanding of all the testing methods. The aim of this overview is to elucidate the methods that are used for the experimental evaluation of the osseointegration of implant materials. In recent decades, there has been a constant proliferation of new materials and surface modifications in the field of dental implants. This continuous development of innovative biomaterials requires a precise and detailed evaluation in terms of biocompatibility and implant healing before clinical use. The current gold standard is in vivo animal testing on well validated animal models. However, long-term outcome studies on patients have to follow to finally validate and show patient benefit. No experimental set-up can provide answers for all possible research questions. However, a certain transferability of the results to humans might be possible if the experimental set-up is carefully chosen for the aspects and questions being investigated. To enhance the implant survival rate in the rising number of patients with chronic diseases which compromise wound healing and osseointegration, dental implant research on compromised animal models will further gain importance in future.

  3. Determination of radon exhalation from construction materials using VOC emission test chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Jann, O; Kemski, J; Schneider, U; Krocker, C; Hoffmann, B

    2013-10-01

    The inhalation of (222) Rn (radon) decay products is one of the most important reasons for lung cancer after smoking. Stony building materials are an important source of indoor radon. This article describes the determination of the exhalation rate of stony construction materials by the use of commercially available measuring devices in combination with VOC emission test chambers. Five materials - two types of clay brick, clinker brick, light-weight concrete brick, and honeycomb brick - generally used for wall constructions were used for the experiments. Their contribution to real room concentrations was estimated by applying room model parameters given in ISO 16000-9, RP 112, and AgBB. This knowledge can be relevant, if for instance indoor radon concentration is limited by law. The test set-up used here is well suited for application in test laboratories dealing with VOC emission testing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Permeation Testing of Materials With Chemical Agents or Simulants (Swatch Testing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    water), decontaminants, firefighting foam, insect repellant [N,N- diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET)], body fluids (simulated sweat, urine, blood, and feces...Control. (1) All data will be handled using chain of custody (CoC) procedures. (2) All test, analytical, and environmental QC data will be audited to... Insect repellant [DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide)]. 3. FORMULATIONS FOR SIMULATED FLUIDS. 3.1. Simulated Sea Water. The following formulation for

  5. Discrete Element Method and its application to materials failure problem on the example of Brazilian Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klejment, Piotr; Kosmala, Alicja; Foltyn, Natalia; Dębski, Wojciech

    2017-04-01

    The earthquake focus is the point where a rock under external stress starts to fracture. Understanding earthquake nucleation and earthquake dynamics requires thus understanding of fracturing of brittle materials. This, however, is a continuing problem and enduring challenge to geoscience. In spite of significant progress we still do not fully understand the failure of rock materials due to extreme stress concentration in natural condition. One of the reason of this situation is that information about natural or induced seismic events is still not sufficient for precise description of physical processes in seismic foci. One of the possibility of improving this situation is using numerical simulations - a powerful tool of contemporary physics. For this reason we used an advanced implementation of the Discrete Element Method (DEM). DEM's main task is to calculate physical properties of materials which are represented as an assembly of a great number of particles interacting with each other. We analyze the possibility of using DEM for describing materials during so called Brazilian Test. Brazilian Test is a testing method to obtain the tensile strength of brittle material. One of the primary reasons for conducting such simulations is to measure macroscopic parameters of the rock sample. We would like to report our efforts of describing the fracturing process during the Brazilian Test from the microscopic point of view and give an insight into physical processes preceding materials failure.

  6. Fast test method for the determination of the grindability of fine materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mucsi, G. [University of Miskolc, Miskolc (Hungary)

    2008-04-15

    This paper presents briefly the standard grindability testing methods such as Bond- and Hardgrove process. Then the study shows two relatively fast alternative way for the determination of specific grinding work and Bond work index of brittle materials. The standard laboratory grindability tests can be applied to the grinding of materials in a relatively coarse particle size interval (Bond method: x {lt} 3.36 mm, Hardgrove: x = 0.59-1.19 mm, Zeisel process: x = 0.75-1.00 mm). However, there has been huge industrial demand for the production of different kind of fine materials for few decades. The feed material particle size is generally below 50-100 {mu} m. That is way the reliable mill dimensioning demands the investigation of the grindability of fine materials. One of the main aims of the grindability research is to develop a grindability determination method, mainly for fine materials, by means of the improvement of Hardgrove and Bond measuring methods and devices. Therefore, the Hardgrove- and Bond mills were equipped with torque and power input measuring instruments (torque-meter, electric energy meter). Standard and modified Bond- and Hardgrove tests were carried out systematically with different kind of brittle materials in the standard particle size range. Furthermore, locked-cycle grinding experiments were completed with Universal Hardgrove mill in order to compare the results with the values obtained previously by the 'one-step' Hardgrove grindability test. The results proved the reliability of the new modified tests. Thereafter experiment series were performed with fine materials such as alumina and power station coal fly ash. In case of alumina sample the laboratory specific grinding work results were compared with those values of industrial ball mill.

  7. Testing Penetration of Epoxy Resin and Diamine Hardeners through Protective Glove and Clothing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Mäkelä, Erja A; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-10-01

    Efficient, comfortable, yet affordable personal protective equipment (PPE) is needed to decrease the high incidence of allergic contact dermatitis arising from epoxy resin systems (ERSs) in industrial countries. The aim of this study was to find affordable, user-friendly glove and clothing materials that provide adequate skin protection against splashes and during the short contact with ERS that often occurs before full cure. We studied the penetration of epoxy resin and diamine hardeners through 12 glove or clothing materials using a newly developed test method. The tests were carried out with two ERS test mixtures that had a high content of epoxy resin and frequently used diamine hardeners of different molar masses. A drop (50 µl) of test mixture was placed on the outer surface of the glove/clothing material, which had a piece of Fixomull tape or Harmony protection sheet attached to the inner surface as the collection medium. The test times were 10 and 30 min. The collecting material was removed after the test was finished and immersed into acetone. The amounts of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), isophorone diamine (IPDA), and m-xylylenediamine (XDA) in the acetone solution were determined by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The limit for acceptable penetration of XDA, IPDA, and DGEBA through glove materials was set at 2 µg cm(-2). Penetration through the glove materials was 1.4 µg cm(-2) or less. The three tested chemical protective gloves showed no detectable penetration (<0.5 µg cm(-2)). Several affordable glove and clothing materials were found to provide adequate protection during short contact with ERS, in the form of, for example, disposable gloves or clothing materials suitable for aprons and as additional protective layers on the most exposed parts of clothing, such as the front of the legs and thighs and under the forearms. Every ERS combination in use should be tested separately to find the best skin protection material

  8. Molding of strength testing samples using modern PDCPD material for purpose of automotive industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, L.; Baier, A.; Sobek, M.

    2017-08-01

    The casting of metal materials is widely known but the molding of composite polymer materials is not well-known method still. The initial choice of method for producing composite bodies was the method of casting of PDCPD material. For purpose of performing casting of polymer composite material, a special mold was made. Firstly, the 3D printed, using PLA material, mold was used. After several attempts of casting PDCPD many problems were encountered. The second step was to use mold milled from a firm and dense isocyanate foam. After several attempts research shown that this solution is more resistant to high-temperature peak, but this material is too fragile to use it several times. This solution also prevents mold from using external heating, which can be necessary for performing correct molding process. The last process was to use the aluminum mold, which is dedicated to PDCPD polymer composite, because of low adhesiveness. This solution leads to perform correct PDCPD polymer composite material injection. After performing casting operation every PDCPD testing samples were tested. These results were compared together. The result of performed work was to archive correct properties of injection of composite material. Research and results were described in detail in this paper.

  9. A Micro-Test Structure for the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Metal Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Ren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An innovative micro-test structure for detecting the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC of metal materials is presented in this work. Throughout this method, a whole temperature sensing moveable structures are supported by four groups of cascaded chevrons beams and packed together. Thermal expansion of the metal material causes the deflection of the cascaded chevrons, which leads to the capacitance variation. By detecting the capacitance value at different temperatures, the TEC value of the metal materials can be calculated. A finite element model has been established to verify the relationship between the TEC of the material and the displacement of the structure on horizontal and vertical directions, thus a function of temperature for different values of TEC can be deduced. In order to verify the analytical model, a suspended-capacitive micro-test structure has been fabricated by MetalMUMPs process and tested in a climate chamber. Test results show that in the temperature range from 30 °C to 80 °C, the TEC of the test material is 13.4 × 10−6 °C−1 with a maximum relative error of 0.8% compared with the given curve of relationship between displacement and temperature.

  10. Tests and studies of USSR materials at the US coal burning MHD facility UTSI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegin, G P; Romanov, A I; Rekov, A I; Spiridonov, E G; Barodina, T I; Vysotsky, D A

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the overall program of the US--USSR cooperation in the field of MHD power generation tests of Soviet electrode materials were conducted at the coal burning MHD facility UTSI-2 of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. The main purposes of the tests are evaluation of electrode materials behavior in the channel of the MHD generator operating with combustion products of coal containing ionizing alkali seed, study of thermal and physical stability of materials in the presence of corrosive slag, study of electrophysical characteristics of electrode materials when they are subjected to the passage of current through the plasma-slag-electrode system. Tests were conducted on electrodes made of silicon carbide doped with titanium and LaCrO/sub 3/--Cr cermet. Results are reported on the phase and chemical composition and structure of these two materials, their thermophysical and electrophysical properties, and the electrode fabrication methods. The MHD facility UTSI-2, where the tests were conducted is one of few utilizing actual coal as the fuel. A description of this facility is given, and its main operating parameters and the methods used to conduct electrode tests with and without an applied current are described.

  11. Study on Identification of Material Model Parameters from Compact Tension Test on Concrete Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokes, Filip; Kral, Petr; Husek, Martin; Kala, Jiri

    2017-10-01

    Identification of a concrete material model parameters using optimization is based on a calculation of a difference between experimentally measured and numerically obtained data. Measure of the difference can be formulated via root mean squared error that is often used for determination of accuracy of a mathematical model in the field of meteorology or demography. The quality of the identified parameters is, however, determined not only by right choice of an objective function but also by the source experimental data. One of the possible way is to use load-displacement curves from three-point bending tests that were performed on concrete specimens. This option shows the significance of modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and specific fracture energy. Another possible option is to use experimental data from compact tension test. It is clear that the response in the second type of test is also dependent on the above mentioned material parameters. The question is whether the parameters identified within three-point bending test and within compact tension test will reach the same values. The presented article brings the numerical study of inverse identification of material model parameters from experimental data measured during compact tension tests. The article also presents utilization of the modified sensitivity analysis that calculates the sensitivity of the material model parameters for different parts of loading curve. The main goal of the article is to describe the process of inverse identification of parameters for plasticity-based material model of concrete and prepare data for future comparison with identified values of the material model parameters from different type of fracture tests.

  12. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-10-01

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

  13. Apparatus and test method for characterizing the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bao-guo; Zhang, Shan; Zhang, De-pin

    2017-05-01

    In order to evaluate the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials such as fabrics treated with phase change material microcapsules, a new apparatus was developed. The apparatus and the test method can measure the heat flux, temperature, and displacement signals during the dynamic contact and then quickly give an evaluation for the temperature regulating properties by simulating the dynamic heat transfer and temperature regulating process when the materials contact the body skin. A series of indices including the psychosensory intensity, regulating capability index, and relative regulating index were defined to characterize the temperature regulating properties. The measurement principle, the evaluation criteria and grading method, the experimental setup and the test results discussion, and the gage capability analysis of the apparatus are presented. The new apparatus provides a method for the objective measurement and evaluation of the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials.

  14. Analysis instrument test on mathematical power the material geometry of space flat side for grade 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmaryono, Imam; Suyitno, Hardi; Dwijanto, Karomah, Nur

    2017-08-01

    The main problem of research to determine the quality of test items on the material side of flat geometry to assess students' mathematical power. The method used is quantitative descriptive. The subjects were students of class 8 as many as 20 students. The object of research is the quality of test items in terms of the power of mathematics: validity, reliability, level of difficulty and power differentiator. Instrument mathematical power ratings are tested include: written tests and questionnaires about the disposition of mathematical power. Data were obtained from the field, in the form of test data on the material geometry of space flat side and questionnaires. The results of the test instrument to the reliability of the test item is influenced by many factors. Factors affecting the reliability of the instrument is the number of items, homogeneity test questions, the time required, the uniformity of conditions of the test taker, the homogeneity of the group, the variability problem, and motivation of the individual (person taking the test). Overall, the evaluation results of this study stated that the test instrument can be used as a tool to measure students' mathematical power.

  15. Standard Test Method for Solar Photometric Transmittance of Sheet Materials Using Sunlight

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of solar photometric transmittance of materials in sheet form. Solar photometric transmittance is measured using a photometer (illuminance meter) in an enclosure with the sun and sky as the source of radiation. The enclosure and method of test is specified in Test Method E 1175 (or Test Method E 1084). 1.2 The purpose of this test method is to specify a photometric sensor to be used with the procedure for measuring the solar photometric transmittance of sheet materials containing inhomogeneities in their optical properties. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. Arc Jet Test and Analysis of Asbestos Free Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Dome Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2017-01-01

    Asbestos free solid motor internal insulation samples were recently tested at the MSFC Hyperthermal Arc Jet Facility. Objectives of the test were to gather data for solid rocket motor analog characterization of ablative and in-depth thermal performance of rubber materials subject to high enthalpy/pressure flow conditions. Tests were conducted over a range of convective heat fluxes for both inert and chemically reactive sub-sonic free stream gas flow. Active instrumentation included use of total calorimeters, in-depth thermocouples, and a surface pyrometer for in-situ surface temperature measurement. Post-test sample forensics involved determination of eroded depth, charred depth, total sample weight loss, and documentation of the general condition of the eroded profile. A complete Charring Material Ablator (CMA) style aero thermal analysis was conducted for the test matrix and results compared to the measured data. In general, comparisons were possible for a number of the cases and the results show a limited predictive ability to model accurately both the ablative response and the in-depth temperature profiles. Lessons learned and modeling recommendations are made regarding future testing and modeling improvements that will increase understanding of the basic chemistry/physics associated with the complicated material ablation process of rubber materials.

  17. The role of the modified taylor impact test in dynamic material research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagusat Frank

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic material research with strain rates of more than 1000 1/s is experimentally very often done with a Split-Hopkinson Bar, Taylor impact tests or planar plate impact test investigations. At the Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI, a variant of an inverted classical Taylor impact test is used by application of velocity interferometers of the VISAR type (“Modified Taylor Impact Test”, MTT. The conduction of the experiments is similar to that of planar plate impact tests. The data reduction and derivation of dynamic material data can also be restricted to an analysis of the VISAR signal. Due to these properties, nearly each highly dynamic material characterization in our institute done by planar plate investigations is usually accompanied by MTT experiments. The extended possibilities and usefulness of a combined usage of these two highly dynamic characterization methods are explained. Recently, further developed MTT experiments with very small specimen sizes are presented. For the first time, Taylor impact and planar impact specimen can be used for which the load directions even in case of thin plate test material are identical and not perpendicular to each other. Consequences for testing construction elements are discussed.

  18. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  19. Standard Test Method for Testing Polymeric Seal Materials for Geothermal and/or High Temperature Service Under Sealing Stress

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the initial evaluation of (screening) polymeric materials for seals under static sealing stress and at elevated temperatures. 1.2 This test method applies to geothermal service only if used in conjunction with Test Method E 1068. 1.3 The test fluid is distilled water. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  20. Railgun Application for High Energy Impact Testing of Nano-Reinforced Kevlar-Based Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, D.; Vricella, A.; Pastore, R.; Morles, R. B.; Marchetti, M.

    2013-08-01

    An advanced electromagnetic accelerator, called railgun, has been assembled and tuned in order to perform high energy impact test on layered structures. Different types of layered composite materials have been manufactured and characterized in terms of energy absorbing capability upon impact of metallic bullets fired at high velocity. The composite materials under testing are manufactured by integrating several layers of Kevlar fabric and carbon fiber ply within a polymeric matrix reinforced by carbon nanotubes at 1% of weight percentage. The experimental results show that the railgun-device is a good candidate to perform impact testing of materials in the space debris energy range, and that carbon nanotubes may enhance, when suitably coupled to the composite's matrix, the excellent antiballistic properties of the Kevlar fabrics.

  1. Testing and Selection of Fire-Resistant Materials for Spacecraft Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Robert; Jackson, Brian; Olson, Sandra

    2000-01-01

    Spacecraft fire-safety strategy emphasizes prevention, mostly through the selection of onboard items classified accord- ing to their fire resistance. The principal NASA acceptance tests described in this paper assess the flammability of materials and components under "worst-case" normal-gravity conditions of upward flame spread in controlled-oxygen atmospheres. Tests conducted on the ground, however, cannot duplicate the unique fire characteristics in the nonbuoyant low-gravity environment of orbiting spacecraft. Research shows that flammability an fire-spread rates in low gravity are sensitive to forced convection (ventilation flows) and atmospheric-oxygen concentration. These research results are helping to define new material-screening test methods that will better evaluate material performance in spacecraft.

  2. Significance of tests and properties of concrete and concrete-making materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pielert, James H

    2006-01-01

    Reflects a decade of technological changes in concrete industry! The newest edition of this popular ASTM publication reflects the latest technology in concrete and concrete-making materials. Six sections cover: (1) General information on the nature of concrete, sampling, variability, and testing laboratories. A new chapter deals with modeling cement and concrete properties. (2) Properties of freshly mixed concrete. (3) Properties of hardened concrete. (4) Concrete aggregates—this section has been revised and the chapters are presented in the order that most concerns concrete users: grading, density, soundness, degradation resistance, petrographic examination, reactivity, and thermal properties. (5) Materials other than aggregates—the chapter on curing materials now reflects the current technology of materials applied to new concrete surfaces. The chapter on mineral admixtures has been separated into two chapters: supplementary cementitious materials and ground slag. (6) Specialized concretes—contains a ...

  3. Standard test method for conducting friction tests of piston ring and cylinder liner materials under lubricated conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for conducting laboratory bench-scale friction tests of materials, coatings, and surface treatments intended for use in piston rings and cylinder liners in diesel or spark-ignition engines. The goal of this procedure is to provide a means for preliminary, cost-effective screening or evaluation of candidate ring and liner materials. A reciprocating sliding arrangement is used to simulate the contact that occurs between a piston ring and its mating liner near the top-dead-center position in the cylinder where liquid lubrication is least effective, and most wear is known to occur. Special attention is paid to specimen alignment, running-in, and lubricant condition. 1.2 This test method does not purport to simulate all aspects of a fired engine’s operating environment, but is intended to serve as a means for preliminary screening for assessing the frictional characteristics of candidate piston ring and liner material combinations in the presence of fluids that behave as u...

  4. Design and production of a novel sand materials strength testing machine for foundry applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Hansen, K. S.; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    In the foundry, existing strength testing machines are used to measure only the maximum fracture strength of mould and core materials. With traditionally used methods, the loading history to ascertain deformation of the material is not available. In this paper, a novel moulding material strength....... The force was calibrated using an Amsler Hydraulic Press while the displacements were calibrated with and without loading using a displacement calibrator (Heidenhain Digitaler). The calibration results showed that the data obtained are stable and reliable and the machine can be used for the measurement...

  5. Accurate anisotropic material modelling using only tensile tests for hot and cold forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abspoel, M.; Scholting, M. E.; Lansbergen, M.; Neelis, B. M.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate material data for simulations require a lot of effort. Advanced yield loci require many different kinds of tests and a Forming Limit Curve (FLC) needs a large amount of samples. Many people use simple material models to reduce the effort of testing, however some models are either not accurate enough (i.e. Hill’48), or do not describe new types of materials (i.e. Keeler). Advanced yield loci describe the anisotropic materials behaviour accurately, but are not widely adopted because of the specialized tests, and data post-processing is a hurdle for many. To overcome these issues, correlations between the advanced yield locus points (biaxial, plane strain and shear) and mechanical properties have been investigated. This resulted in accurate prediction of the advanced stress points using only Rm, Ag and r-values in three directions from which a Vegter yield locus can be constructed with low effort. FLC’s can be predicted with the equations of Abspoel & Scholting depending on total elongation A80, r-value and thickness. Both predictive methods are initially developed for steel, aluminium and stainless steel (BCC and FCC materials). The validity of the predicted Vegter yield locus is investigated with simulation and measurements on both hot and cold formed parts and compared with Hill’48. An adapted specimen geometry, to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution in the Gleeble hot tensile test, was used to measure the mechanical properties needed to predict a hot Vegter yield locus. Since for hot material, testing of stress states other than uniaxial is really challenging, the prediction for the yield locus adds a lot of value. For the hot FLC an A80 sample with a homogeneous temperature distribution is needed which is due to size limitations not possible in the Gleeble tensile tester. Heating the sample in an industrial type furnace and tensile testing it in a dedicated device is a good alternative to determine the necessary parameters for the FLC

  6. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curits, P.C.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90{degrees}C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron- absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. the stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on it chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high- chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. the results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  7. A new penetration test method: protection efficiency of glove and clothing materials against diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Mäkelä, Erja

    2015-03-01

    Reported cases of allergic contact dermatitis caused by methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) have increased and thereby increased the need for adequate skin protection. Current standardized permeation and penetration test methods give information about efficacy of protective materials against individual components of the polyurethane systems. They do not give information of what kind of clothing materials workers should wear against splashes when handling mixed MDI-polyurethane formulations, which contain MDI, its oligomers, and polyols. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a sensitive penetration test method that can be used to select clothing that is protective enough against uncured splashes of MDI-polyurethane, still easy to use, and also, to find affordable glove materials that provide adequate protection during a short contact. The penetration of MDI through eight representative glove or clothing materials was studied with the developed test procedure. One MDI hardener and two polymeric MDI (PMDI)-polyol formulations representing different curing times were used as test substances. The materials tested included work clothing (woven) fabric, arm shields (nonwoven fabric), old T-shirt, winter gloves, and gloves of nitrile rubber, leather, vinyl (PVC), and natural rubber. A drop (50 µl) of test substance was added to the outer surface of the glove/clothing material, which had Tape Fixomull attached to the inner surface as a collection medium. After penetration times of 5 or 20min, the collecting material was removed and immediately immersed into acetonitrile containing 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazine for derivatization. The formed urea derivatives of 2,4'-MDI and 4,4'-MDI were analysed using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric and UV detection. The precision of the test method was good for the material with high penetration (work clothing fabric) of MDI, as the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 14 and 20%. For the arm shield with a low

  8. Prediction of aortic enhancement on coronary CTA images using a test bolus of diluted contrast material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takanori; Funama, Yoshinori; Imada, Naoyuki; Sato, Tomoyasu; Yamagami, Takuji; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Awai, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare test bolus techniques using undiluted or diluted contrast material for their ability to predict aortic enhancement on coronary computed tomographic angiography (c-CTA) images. We divided 200 consecutive patients who underwent c-CTA on a 64-MDCT scanner into two groups. In group A (n = 100), we used a test bolus of undiluted contrast material and in group B (n = 100), the contrast material was diluted. The injection volume was body weight × 0.2 (contrast material 100%) in group A and body weight × 0.7 (contrast material 30%, saline 70%) in group B. We then compared the CT number in the ascending aorta on c-CTA images obtained with undiluted and diluted contrast media to the CT number on c-CTA images. The mean CT number in the ascending aorta was significantly higher in group B than group A (217.1 vs. 157.4 HU, P images and on images acquired with the test bolus using undiluted or diluted test bolus (P enhancement before c-CTA scanning. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanical characterization of soft materials using transparent indenter testing system and finite element simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yue

    Background. Soft materials such as polymers and soft tissues have diverse applications in bioengineering, medical care, and industry. Quantitative mechanical characterization of soft materials at multiscales is required to assure that appropriate mechanical properties are presented to support the normal material function. Indentation test has been widely used to characterize soft material. However, the measurement of in situ contact area is always difficult. Method of Approach. A transparent indenter method was introduced to characterize the nonlinear behaviors of soft materials under large deformation. This approach made the direct measurement of contact area and local deformation possible. A microscope was used to capture the contact area evolution as well as the surface deformation. Based on this transparent indenter method, a novel transparent indentation measurement systems has been built and multiple soft materials including polymers and pericardial tissue have been characterized. Seven different indenters have been used to study the strain distribution on the contact surface, inner layer and vertical layer. Finite element models have been built to simulate the hyperelastic and anisotropic material behaviors. Proper material constants were obtained by fitting the experimental results. Results.Homogeneous and anisotropic silicone rubber and porcine pericardial tissue have been examined. Contact area and local deformation were measured by real time imaging the contact interface. The experimental results were compared with the predictions from the Hertzian equations. The accurate measurement of contact area results in more reliable Young's modulus, which is critical for soft materials. For the fiber reinforced anisotropic silicone rubber, the projected contact area under a hemispherical indenter exhibited elliptical shape. The local surface deformation under indenter was mapped using digital image correlation program. Punch test has been applied to thin films of

  10. Performance tests on column materials for {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sombrito, E.Z.; Bulos, A.D.; Tangonan, M.C. [Chemistry Research Section, Atomic Research Div., Philippine Nuclear Research Inst., Quezon (Philippines)

    1998-10-01

    To meet the need of producing a {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc generator, based on low specific activity reactor-produced {sup 99}Mo, different procedures for preparing zirconium molybdate gels were tested. Performance tests were done on molybdate gel columns prepared using the procedures developed by Vietnam and China, and recently, on a polyzirconium compound (PZC) prepared in Japan. The conditions for the batch drying of a large volume of the gel material were studied as well as the conditions in preparing a column to concentrate technetium-99m. The performance of PZC sample as column material for the generator was also evaluated. (author)

  11. Breakdown Tests of Composite Materials, and the Importance of the Volume Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Holbøll, Joachim; Henriksen, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    High voltage testing of inhomogeneous composite materials often shows that the stressed volume has a great influence on the result. This paper tries to develop methods of estimating the stressed volume by calculating the theoretical extent of streamer propagation along insulating surfaces....... A dynamical numerical model of a certain test setup is used to predict the actual volume tested depending on electrode geometry and peak impulse voltage. The geometry of the test setup as well as the thickness of the Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) has been varied....

  12. Standard test method for plane-strain (Chevron-Notch) fracture toughness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plane-strain (chevron-notch) fracture toughnesses, KIv or KIvM, of metallic materials. Fracture toughness by this method is relative to a slowly advancing steady state crack initiated at a chevron-shaped notch, and propagating in a chevron-shaped ligament (Fig. 1). Some metallic materials, when tested by this method, exhibit a sporadic crack growth in which the crack front remains nearly stationary until a critical load is reached. The crack then becomes unstable and suddenly advances at high speed to the next arrest point. For these materials, this test method covers the determination of the plane-strain fracture toughness, KIvj or KIvM, relative to the crack at the points of instability. Note 1—One difference between this test method and Test Method E 399 (which measures KIc) is that Test Method E 399 centers attention on the start of crack extension from a fatigue precrack. This test method makes use of either a steady state slowly propagating crack, or a...

  13. Standard test method for determining the superplastic properties of metallic sheet materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the procedure for determining the superplastic forming properties (SPF) of a metallic sheet material. It includes tests both for the basic SPF properties and also for derived SPF properties. The test for basic properties encompasses effects due to strain hardening or softening. 1.2 This test method covers sheet materials with thicknesses of at least 0.5 mm but not greater than 6 mm. It characterizes the material under a uni-axial tensile stress condition. Note 1—Most industrial applications of superplastic forming involve a multi-axial stress condition in a sheet; however it is more convenient to characterize a material under a uni-axial tensile stress condition. Tests should be performed in different orientations to the rolling direction of the sheet to ascertain initial anisotropy. 1.3 This method has been used successfully between strain rates of 10-5 to 10-1 per second. 1.4 This method has been used successfully on Aluminum and Titanium alloys. The use of the method wi...

  14. Simulation Research on Adaptive Control of a Six-degree-of-freedom Material-testing Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an adaptive controller equipped with a stiffness estimation method for a novel material-testing machine, in order to alleviate the performance depression caused by the stiffness variance of the tested specimen. The dynamic model of the proposed machine is built using the Kane method, and kinematic model is established with a closed-form solution. The stiffness estimation method is developed based on the recursive least-squares method and the proposed stiffness equivalent matrix. Control performances of the adaptive controller are simulated in detail. The simulation results illustrate that the proposed controller can greatly improve the control performance of the target material-testing machine by online stiffness estimation and adaptive parameter tuning, especially in low-cycle fatigue (LCF and high-cycle fatigue (HCF tests.

  15. Standard test method for translaminar fracture toughness of laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of translaminar fracture toughness, KTL, for laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials of various ply orientations using test results from monotonically loaded notched specimens. 1.2 This test method is applicable to room temperature laboratory air environments. 1.3 Composite materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by type of polymer matrix or fiber, provided that the specimen sizes and the test results meet the requirements of this test method. This test method was developed primarily from test results of various carbon fiber – epoxy matrix laminates and from additional results of glass fiber – epoxy matrix, glass fiber-polyester matrix pultrusions and carbon fiber – bismaleimide matrix laminates (1-4, 6, 7). 1.4 A range of eccentrically loaded, single-edge-notch tension, ESE(T), specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but planar size may be variable and adjusted, with asso...

  16. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe HRL, LOT project. Final report on the A0 test parcel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern; Faelth, Billy (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Jansson, Mats; Eriksen, Trygve E.; Svaerdstroem, Kjell (KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Rosborg, Bo (Studsvik AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Muurinen, Arto (VTT, Espoo (Finland))

    2011-02-15

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, could be expected to produce minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory are focused on identifying and quantifying any mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks to a total diameter of 30 cm as well as temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity sensors. In each test parcel, an electrical heater placed inside the copper tube is used to simulate the heat generation from the decaying spent fuel. Three test parcels (S1 to S3) have been exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and three parcels (A1 to A3) to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below approx140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (> 5 years) and long term tests (> 10 years). The present report concerns an additional short term test, thereby the designation A0, which was exposed to adverse conditions for approximately 1.5 years. Cu-coupons, 134Cs and 57Co tracers and specific chemical agents were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at the test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses

  17. Profile of Students' Creative Thinking Skills on Quantitative Project-Based Protein Testing using Local Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to obtain a profile of students’ creative thinking skills on quantitative project-based protein testing using local materials. Implementation of the research is using quasi-experimental method pre-test post-test control group design with 40 students involved in Biochemistry lab. The research instrument is pre-test and post-test using creative thinking skills in the form of description and students’ questionnaire. The analysis was performed with SPSS 22.0 program to see the significance normality, U Mann-Whitney test for nonparametric statistics, N-Gain score, and the percentage of student responses to the practicum performed. The research result shows that the pretest rate in the experimental group is 8.25 while in the control group is 6.90. After attending a project-based practicum with local materials, the experimental group obtained the mean of posttest is 37.55 while in control class is 11.18. The students’ improvement on creative thinking skills can be seen from the average of N-Gain in the experimental class with 0.32 (medium category and in the control category with 0.05 (low category. The experimental and control class have different creative thinking skills significantly different fluency, flexibility, novelty, and detail. It can be concluded that quantitative project-based protein testing using local materials can improve students’ creative thinking skills. 71% of total students feel that quantitative project-based protein testing using local materials make them more creative in doing a practicum in the laboratory.

  18. A Combined Hazard Index Fire Test Methodology for Aircraft Cabin Materials. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    10 4 OHIO STATE UNIVERSIY HFAT REL PA R TE IRIM rIR. ............... 14 5 SAi WLE HOLDERS AND INJECTION ICHANISM (WIH MLT UNIT) ............. 15 7 CHAS...fiberglass backface. The third panel was a 1958 design, using wood veneer facing and self-extinguishing paper honeycomb core. The fourth panel was identical...in construction to panel 1, except for the use of epoxy resin instead of modified phenolic. METHODOEY CHI TEST Testing a material to determine a CHI

  19. Simulation Research on Adaptive Control of a Six-degree-of-freedom Material-testing Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Wang; Rui Fan; Wuyi Chen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive controller equipped with a stiffness estimation method for a novel material-testing machine, in order to alleviate the performance depression caused by the stiffness variance of the tested specimen. The dynamic model of the proposed machine is built using the Kane method, and the kinematic model is established with a closed-form solution. The stiffness estimation method is developed based on the recursive least-squares method and the proposed stiffness equivale...

  20. Standard Guide for Selection of Test Methods for Interlayer Materials for Aerospace Transparent Enclosures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the standard test methods available for determining physical and mechanical characteristics of interlayer materials used in multi-ply aerospace transparent enclosures. 1.2 Interlayer materials are used to laminate glass-to-glass, glass-to-plastic, and plastic-to-plastic. Interlayer materials are basically transparent adhesives with high-quality optical properties. They can also serve as an energy absorbing medium, a fail-safe membrane to contain cockpit pressure and to prevent entry of impact debris; a strain insulator to accommodate different thermal expansion rates of members being laminated and as an adherent to prevent spalling of inner surface ply material fragments. The relative importance of an interlayer characteristic will be a function of the prime use it serves in its particular application. 1.3 This guide, as a summary of various methods in Section 2, is intended to facilitate the selection of tests that can be applied to interlayer materials. 1.4 The test methods list...

  1. Design and Testing of Braided Composite Fan Case Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Braley, Michael S.; Arnold, William a.; Dorer, James D.; Watson, William R/.

    2009-01-01

    Triaxial braid composite materials are beginning to be used in fan cases for commercial gas turbine engines. The primary benefit for the use of composite materials is reduced weight and the associated reduction in fuel consumption. However, there are also cost benefits in some applications. This paper presents a description of the braided composite materials and discusses aspects of the braiding process that can be utilized for efficient fabrication of composite cases. The paper also presents an approach that was developed for evaluating the braided composite materials and composite fan cases in a ballistic impact laboratory. Impact of composite panels with a soft projectile is used for materials evaluation. Impact of composite fan cases with fan blades or blade-like projectiles is used to evaluate containment capability. A post-impact structural load test is used to evaluate the capability of the impacted fan case to survive dynamic loads during engine spool down. Validation of these new test methods is demonstrated by comparison with results of engine blade-out tests.

  2. A Study of the Rockfill Material Behavior in Large-Scale Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghanbari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Inspecting the behavior of the rockfill materials is of significant importance in analysis of rockfill dams. Since the dimensions of grains in such materials are greater than the conventional sizes suitable for soil mechanics tests, it is necessary to experimentally study them in specific large-scale apparatuses. In this research, the behavior of rockfill materials in two large rockfill dams constructed in northwest of Iran were studied using large-scale direct shear and triaxial tests. Various indices regarding the quantity of particle breakage in rockfill materials were assessed for both dams and an experimental correlation has been proposed between the Los Angeles Abrasion Value and internal friction angle of rockfill material. Also, the effect of surcharge intensity, grain size distribution and degree of compaction on the shear strength of rockfill material for both dams was studied. The findings indicate that increase in particle breakage leads to reduction of internal friction angle. Also, for a specific sample the particle breakage index increases with an increase in surcharge, percentage of gravel and degree of compaction.

  3. 8th RILEM International Symposium on Testing and Characterization of Sustainable and Innovative Bituminous Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Partl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the results of RILEM TC 237-SIB (Testing and characterization of sustainable innovative bituminous materials and systems). The papers have been selected for publication after a rigorous peer review process and will be an invaluable source to outline and clarify the main directions of present and future research and standardization for bituminous materials and pavements. The following topics are covered: - Characterization of binder-aggregate interaction - Innovative testing of bituminous binders, additives and modifiers - Durability and aging of asphalt pavements - Mixture design and compaction analysis - Environmentally sustainable materials and technologies - Advances in laboratory characterization of bituminous materials - Modeling of road materials and pavement performance prediction - Field measurement and in-situ characterization - Innovative materials for reinforcement and interlayer systems - Cracking and damage characterization of asphalt pavements - Rec...

  4. ADAPTATION OF CRACK GROWTH DETECTION TECHNIQUES TO US MATERIAL TEST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter; Joy L. Rempe

    2015-04-01

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some test reactors outside the United States, such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have developed techniques to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. The basic approach is to use a custom-designed compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation, while the crack in the specimen is monitored in-situ using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. In 2012 the US Department of Energy commissioned the Idaho National Laboratory and the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (MIT NRL) to take the basic concepts developed at the HBWR and adapt them to a test rig capable of conducting in-pile IASCC tests in US Material Test Reactors. The first two and half years of the project consisted of designing and testing the loader mechanism, testing individual components of the in-pile rig and electronic support equipment, and autoclave testing of the rig design prior to insertion in the MIT Reactor. The load was applied to the specimen by means of a scissor like mechanism, actuated by a miniature metal bellows driven by pneumatic pressure and sized to fit within the small in-core irradiation volume. In addition to the loader design, technical challenges included developing robust connections to the specimen for the applied current and voltage measurements, appropriate ceramic insulating materials that can endure the LWR environment, dealing with the high electromagnetic noise environment of a reactor core at full power, and accommodating material property changes in the specimen, due primarily to fast neutron damage, which change the specimen resistance without additional crack growth. The project culminated with an in

  5. Testing and performance evaluation of T1000G/RS-14 graphite/polycyanate composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starbuck, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a graphite fiber/polycyanate matrix composite material system, T1000G/RS-14, was evaluated by performing an extensive mechanical property test program. The test program included both static strength and long-term tests for creep, fatigue, and stress rupture. The system was evaluated at both ambient temperature and elevated temperatures. The specimens were machined from composite cylinders that had a unidirectional layup with all the fibers oriented in the hoop direction. The cylinders were fabricated using the wet-filament winding process. In general, the T1000G/RS-14 system demonstrated adequate static strengths for possible aerospace structural applications. The results from the static tests indicated that very high composite hoop tensile strengths can be achieved with this system at both ambient and elevated temperatures as high as 350{degree}F. However, in the long-term testing for compressive creep and tension-tension fatigue the results indicated a lower elevated temperature was required to minimize the risk of using this material system. Additional testing and analysis activities led to the selection of 275{degree}F as the desired temperature for future performance evaluation. Subsequent testing efforts for determining the resin and composite transverse compressive creep responses at 275{degrees}F indicated that excessive creep strain rates may still be a weakness of this system. In the long-term tests, sufficient data was generated from impregnated strand and composite ring stress-life testing, and composite ring tension-tension fatigue to determine failure probabilities for a given set of design requirements. The statistical analyses of the test data, in terms of determining failure probability curves, will be reported on in a separate report. However, it is expected that this material system will have a very low failure probability for stress rupture based on the collected stress-life data. Material responses that will require further

  6. Standardization Efforts for Mechanical Testing and Design of Advanced Ceramic Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems occasionally require the use of very brittle materials such as sapphire and ultra-high temperature ceramics. Although great progress has been made in the development of methods and standards for machining, testing and design of component from these materials, additional development and dissemination of standard practices is needed. ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics and ISO TC 206 have taken a lead role in the standardization of testing for ceramics, and recent efforts and needs in standards development by Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics will be summarized. In some cases, the engineers, etc. involved are unaware of the latest developments, and traditional approaches applicable to other material systems are applied. Two examples of flight hardware failures that might have been prevented via education and standardization will be presented.

  7. Thermophysical and Optical Properties of Materials Considered for Use on the LDSD Test Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Matthew; Mastropietro, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    In June 2014, the first of multiple flights in the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) technology development program took place and successfully demonstrated a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) in Mars-like conditions. Although the primary goal of the technology program was the development of new decelerators for landing heavier payloads on Mars, the low-cost thermal design of the test vehicle was only possible through the innovative use of a combination of both commercial off the shelf (COTS) and aerospace grade materials. As a result, numerous thermophysical and optical property measurements were undertaken to characterize material candidates before the final material selection was made. This paper presents thermophysical and optical property measurements performed over the course of the LDSD test vehicle development, including those not ultimately selected for use on the vehicle. These properties are compared and contrasted with the existing measurements available in previous literature.

  8. Materials of large wind turbine blades: Recent results in testing and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl; Nijssen, Rogier

    2012-01-01

    for the experimental determination of reliable material properties used in the design of wind turbine blades and experimental validation of design models, (ii) development of predictive models for the life prediction, prediction of residual strength and failure probability of the blades and (iii) analysis...... of the effect of the microstructure of wind turbine blade composites on their strength and ways of microstructural optimization of the materials. By testing reference coupons, the effect of testing parameters (temperature and frequency) on the lifetime of blade composites was investigated, and the input data...... validated. Two methods of structural reliability estimation of the blade, which take into account the stochastic nature of the anisotropic material properties and loads, were developed on the basis of the response surface method and the Edgeworth expansion technique, respectively. The effects of fiber...

  9. 9 CFR 113.10 - Testing of bulk material for export or for further manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Testing of bulk material for export or for further manufacture. 113.10 Section 113.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... manufacture. When a product is prepared in a licensed establishment for export in large multiple-dose...

  10. Component design and testing for a miniaturised autonomous sensor based on a nanowire materials platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annett Gawlik; Elizabeth Buitrago; John C De Mello; Nikolay Petkov; Frank van der Bent; Ing. Erik Puik; Ran Yu; Naser Khosropour; Hien Duy Tong; Fritz Falk; Yordan M. Georgiev; Rik Lafeber; Francois Krummenacher; Olan Lotty; Justin D. Holmes; Montserrat Fernández-Bolaños Badia; Guobin Jia; Adrian M. Nightingale; Björn Eisenhawer; Giorgos Fagas; Michael Nolan; Maher Kayal; Rajesh Ramaneti; Cees van Rijn; Adrian M. Ionescu

    2014-01-01

    From Springer description: "We present the design considerations of an autonomous wireless sensor and discuss the fabrication and testing of the various components including the energy harvester, the active sensing devices and the power management and sensor interface circuits. A common materials

  11. First industrial strength multi-axial Robotic testing campaign for composite material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Michopoulos; John C. Hermanson; Athanasios Iliopoulos

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we are reporting on the first successful campaign of systematic, automated and massive multiaxial tests for composite material constitutive characterization. The 6 degrees of freedom system developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) called NRL66.3, was used for this task. This was the inaugural run that served as the validation of the...

  12. Advanced testing and characterization of shear modulus and deformation characteristics of oil sand materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available the need to characterize the stress dependent, visco-elastic and plastic behavior of oil sand materials under dynamic loading of off-road construction and mining equipment. This paper introduces a new cyclic triaxial test procedure for determining shear...

  13. Physicists purchase materials testing machine in support of pioneering particle physics experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    Sharpe, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    "The particle physics group at Liverpool University has purchased an LRXPlus singlecolumn materials testing machine from Lloyd Instruments, which will be used to help characterise the carbon-fibre support frames for detectors used for state-of-the-art particle physics experiments." (1 page)

  14. Static pile load tests on driven piles into Intermediate-Geo Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) has concerns with both predicting pile lengths and pile capacities for H-piles driven into Intermediate-Geo Materials (IGM). The goal of the research was to perform 7 static axial load tests at 7 lo...

  15. Tensile tests of specimens made of selected group of the filament materials manufactured with FDM method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabowik Cezary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of tensile tests carried out for specimens made of the selected group of the filament materials. As a manufacturing technology FDM 3D printing method was chosen. The selected group of the filament materials involved the group of wood, PLA, ABS, PET, PMMA and ASA. Herein, it should be noticed, that technical data sheets that are delivered by filament materials producers include data that are valid for only one specific printing direction. This printing direction is deliberately selected, in such way that ensures the best material characteristics. Therefore, received during the research results allow to make comparison between a catalogue data and data obtained in the printing process. It aids both mechanical designer and product manufacturer at the stage of the printed product mechanical properties shaping.

  16. Combination of Universal Mechanical Testing Machine with Atomic Force Microscope for Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; He, Dannong

    2015-08-01

    Surface deformation and fracture processes of materials under external force are important for understanding and developing materials. Here, a combined horizontal universal mechanical testing machine (HUMTM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) system is developed by modifying UMTM to combine with AFM and designing a height-adjustable stabilizing apparatus. Then the combined HUMTM-AFM system is evaluated. Finally, as initial demonstrations, it is applied to analyze the relationship among macroscopic mechanical properties, surface nanomorphological changes under external force, and fracture processes of two kinds of representative large scale thin film materials: polymer material with high strain rate (Parafilm) and metal material with low strain rate (aluminum foil). All the results demonstrate the combined HUMTM-AFM system overcomes several disadvantages of current AFM-combined tensile/compression devices including small load force, incapability for large scale specimens, disability for materials with high strain rate, and etc. Therefore, the combined HUMTM-AFM system is a promising tool for materials research in the future.

  17. Fatigue testing of a carbon fibre composite wind turbine blade with associated material characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, G.A.; Richardson, D.J. [Univ. of the West of England, Faculty of Engineering, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    Within the EC project JOULE 2, the University of the West of England (UWE) tested a carbon fibre reinforced epoxy (CFRE) full scale wind turbine blade together with an associated material test coupon programme. All the work was closely linked with the manufacturer Polymarine BV of the Netherlands, who designed and manufactured the blade and provided test specimens, the UWE carried out the research into the validation of the design calculations together with a check of the strength and fatigue life of the blade. (au)

  18. Performance evaluation of DAAF as a booster material using the onionskin test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Elizabeth G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harry, Herbert H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-02

    Initiation of insensitive high explosive (IHE) formulations requires the use of a booster explosive in the initiation train. Booster material selection is crucial, as the initiation must reliably function across some spectrum of physical parameters. The interest in Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) for this application stems from the fact that it possesses many traits of an IHE but is shock sensitive enough to serve as an explosive booster. A hemispherical wave breakout test, termed the onionskin test, is one of the methods used to evaluate the performance of a booster material. The wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemispherical IHE charge is recorded and the relative uniformity of the breakout can be quantitatively compared between booster materials. A series of onionskin tests were performed to investigate breakout and propagation diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) at low temperatures to evaluate ignition and detonation spreading in comparison to other explosives commonly used in booster applications. Some wave perturbation was observed with the DAAF booster in the onionskin tests presented. The results of these tests will be presented and discussed.

  19. [Validity assessment of a low level phonological processing test material in preschool children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptok, M; Altwein, F

    2012-07-01

    The BISC (Bielefelder Screening) is a German test to evaluate phonological skills believed to be a prerequisite for future reading and writing skills. BISC results may indicate an elevated risk for dyslexia. Our research group has put forward test material in order to specifically examine low-level phonological processing LLPP. In this study we analysed whether BISC and low-level phonological processing correlate. A retrospective correlation analysis was carried out on primary school children's test results of the BISC and the newly developed low-level phonological processing test material. Spearman's rho was 0.52 between total LLPP and total BISC. The subscales correlated with a rho below 0.5. Results indicate that a low level phonological processing and higher level phonological processing can be differentiated. Future studies will have to clarify whether these results can be used to construct specifically targeting therapy strategies and whether the LLPP test material can be used to assess the risk of subsequent dyslexia also. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Examination of a Size-Change Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D. C.; Ji, L.; Kelly, G.; Gu, X.; Nickel, N.; Norum, P.; Shioda, T.; Tamizhmani, G.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    We examine a proposed test standard that can be used to evaluate the maximum representative change in linear dimensions of sheet encapsulation products for photovoltaic modules (resulting from their thermal processing). The proposed protocol is part of a series of material-level tests being developed within Working Group 2 of the Technical Committee 82 of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The characterization tests are being developed to aid module design (by identifying the essential characteristics that should be communicated on a datasheet), quality control (via internal material acceptance and process control), and failure analysis. Discovery and interlaboratory experiments were used to select particular parameters for the size-change test. The choice of a sand substrate and aluminum carrier is explored relative to other options. The temperature uniformity of +/- 5C for the substrate was confirmed using thermography. Considerations related to the heating device (hot-plate or oven) are explored. The time duration of 5 minutes was identified from the time-series photographic characterization of material specimens (EVA, ionomer, PVB, TPO, and TPU). The test procedure was revised to account for observed effects of size and edges. The interlaboratory study identified typical size-change characteristics, and also verified the absolute reproducibility of +/- 5% between laboratories.

  1. Examination of a Size-Change Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Gu, X.; Ji, L.; Kelly, G.; Gu, X.; Nickel, N.; Norum, P.; Shioda, T.; Tamizhmani, G.

    2012-08-01

    We examine a proposed test standard that can be used to evaluate the maximum representative change in linear dimensions of sheet encapsulation products for photovoltaic modules (resulting from their thermal processing). The proposed protocol is part of a series of material-level tests being developed within Working Group 2 of the Technical Committee 82 of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The characterization tests are being developed to aid module design (by identifying the essential characteristics that should be communicated on a datasheet), quality control (via internal material acceptance and process control), and failure analysis. Discovery and interlaboratory experiments were used to select particular parameters for the size-change test. The choice of a sand substrate and aluminum carrier is explored relative to other options. The temperature uniformity of +/- 5C for the substrate was confirmed using thermography. Considerations related to the heating device (hot-plate or oven) are explored. The time duration of 5 minutes was identified from the time-series photographic characterization of material specimens (EVA, ionomer, PVB, TPO, and TPU). The test procedure was revised to account for observed effects of size and edges. The interlaboratory study identified typical size-change characteristics, and also verified the absolute reproducibility of +/- 5% between laboratories.

  2. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  4. Long-term water absorption tests for frost insulation materials taking into account frost attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni A. Pakkala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water absorption of several different frost insulation materials was tested for four years. The test took into account both immersion and frost attack to materials. On the basis of the research the water absorption on XPS specimens is significantly minor compared to EPS specimens that were studied. The most significant result was that freezing of test specimens did not affect on water absorption of XPS specimens but had a major effect on water absorption of EPS specimens. With frozen EPS specimen the absorption continued increasing even after 48 months of immersion. Presumably the reason for such a behaviour is that the pore structure of EPS is not able to resist the tension caused by freezing water and therefore cracks are formed. Thus, more water absorbs inside the EPS through the cracks and it causes cracking deeper in the specimen which is why absorption increases after every freezing period.

  5. [Effect of storage conditions of clinical materials on virological tests results by RT-PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzcińiska, Agnieszka; Laskowska, Anna; Siennicka, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Obtaining a reliable laboratory test result depends on many factors, among which preanalitical factors play a significant role. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temperature, storage time of samples and number of freezing and thawing cycles on the results of tests carried out by RT-PCR. The study was conducted in a model of measles virus (RNA). The results revealed that: (1) Samples of clinical material (serum, cerebrospinal fluid, urine) for testing by RT-PCR can be stored for at least 5 days at room temperature or refrigerated and at least 7 days when frozen, (2) Freezing and thawing three times, samples of clinical material does not affect the outcome of the presence of viral RNA, (3) Isolated viral RNA is stable at freezer temperature and can be subjected to at least 20 freeze-thaw cycles without affecting the results.

  6. Shear test of glass reinforced composite materials at 4.2 K

    CERN Document Server

    Levesy, B; Desirelli, A.; Rey, J M; Reytier, M; Rondeaux, F; Desirelli, Alberto

    2000-01-01

    Finite element analysis of the 4-T, 12.5-m long, 6-m-bore diameter superconducting solenoid for the CMS experiment at LHC shows that the insulation system is subjected mainly to shear forces during magnet operation at 4.5 K. This paper describes the development of a test procedure to evaluate shear properties of the glass reinforced composite material at 4.2 K. The calculation supporting the new specimen shape and the relation between coil and specimen Finite Element Analysis (FEA) are presented. As an application, this-test procedure is used to compare three different surface treatments of the conductor: solvent cleaning, sand blasting and anodic oxidation. Results from these tests are reported. Values up to 110 MPa at 4.2 K have been obtained for the CMS foreseen insulation material, the conductor being treated by anodic oxidation. (5 refs).

  7. Flight and ground tests of a very low density elastomeric ablative material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G. C.; Chapman, A. J., III

    1972-01-01

    A very low density ablative material, a silicone-phenolic composite, was flight tested on a recoverable spacecraft launched by a Pacemaker vehicle system; and, in addition, it was tested in an arc heated wind tunnel at three conditions which encompassed most of the reentry heating conditions of the flight tests. The material was composed, by weight, of 71 percent phenolic spheres, 22.8 percent silicone resin, 2.2 percent catalyst, and 4 percent silica fibers. The tests were conducted to evaluate the ablator performance in both arc tunnel and flight tests and to determine the predictability of the albator performance by using computed results from an existing one-dimensional numerical analysis. The flight tested ablator experienced only moderate surface recession and retained a smooth surface except for isolated areas where the char was completely removed, probably following reentry and prior to or during recovery. Analytical results show good agreement between arc tunnel and flight test results. The thermophysical properties used in the analysis are tabulated.

  8. Biological induced corrosion of materials II: New test methods and experiences from mir station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintworth, R.; Reher, H. J.; Viktorov, A. N.; Bohle, D.

    1999-09-01

    During previous long-term manned missions, more than 100 species of microorganisms have been identified on surfaces of materials (bacteria and fungi). Among them were potentially pathogenic ones (saprophytes) which are capable of active growth on artificial substrates, as well as technophilic bacteria and fungi causing damages (destruction and degradation) to various materials (metals and polymers), resulting in failures and disruptions in the functioning of equipment and hardware. Aboard a space vehicle some microclimatic parameters are optimal for microorganism growth: the atmospheric fluid condensate with its specific composition, chemical and/or antropogenic contaminants (human metobolic products, etc.) all are stimulating factors for the development of bacteria and mould fungi on materials of the interior and equipment of an orbital station during its operational phase(s). Especially Russian long-term missions (SALJUT, MIR) have demonstrated that uncontrolled interactions of microorganisms with materials will ultimately lead to the appearence of technological and medical risks, significantly influencing safety and reliability characteristics of individual as well as whole systems and/ or subsystems. For a first conclusion, it could be summarized, that countermeasures and anti-strategies focussing on Microbial Contamination Management (MCM) for the International Space Station (ISS, next long-term manned mission) at least require a new materials test approach. Our respective concept includes a combined age-ing/biocorrosion test sequence. It is represented here, as well as current status of MCM program, e.g. continuous monitoring (microbiological analyses), long-term disinfection, frequent cleaning methods, mathematical modeling of ISS, etc.

  9. X-ray based methods for non-destructive testing and material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Randolf; Fuchs, Theobald; Uhlmann, Norman

    2008-06-01

    The increasing complexity and miniaturization in the field of new materials as well as in micro-production requires in the same way improvements and technical advances in the field of micro-NDT to provide better quality data and more detailed knowledge about the internal structures of micro-components. Therefore, non-destructive methods like radioscopy, ultrasound, optical or thermal imaging increasingly gain in importance with respect to ongoing product and material development in the different phases like material characterization, production control or module reliability testing. Because of the manifold different application fields, i.e., certain physical NDT methods applied to material inspection, characterization or reliability testing, this contribution will focus on the radioscopic-based methods related to their most important applications. Today, in modern industrial quality control, X-ray transmission is used in two different ways: Two-dimensional radioscopic transmission imaging (projection technique), usually applied to inline inspection tasks in application fields like lightweight material production, electronic component soldering or food production. Computed tomography (CT) for generation of three-dimensional data, representing spatial information and density distribution of objects. CT application fields are on the one hand the understanding of production process failure or component and module inspection (completeness) and on the other hand the dimensional measuring of hidden geometrical outlines (metrology). This paper demonstrates the methods including technical set-ups (X-ray source and detector), imaging and reconstruction results and the methods for high speed and high-resolution volume data generation and evaluation.

  10. Life Cycle Testing of Viscoelastic Material for Hubble Space Telescope Solar Array 3 Damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Reed, Benjamin B.; Viens, Michael J.; Parker, Bradford H.; Pendleton, Scott C.

    2003-01-01

    During the March 2002 Servicing Mission by Space Shuttle (STS 109), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was refurbished with two new solar arrays that now provide all of its power. These arrays were built with viscoelastic/titanium dampers, integral to the supporting masts, which reduce the interaction of the wing bending modes with the Telescope. Damping of over 3% of critical was achieved. To assess the damper s ability to maintain nominal performance over the 10-year on-orbit design goal, material specimens were subjected to an accelerated life test. The test matrix consisted of scheduled events to expose the specimens to pre-determined combinations of temperatures, frequencies, displacement levels, and numbers of cycles. These exposure events were designed to replicate the life environment of the damper from fabrication through testing to launch and life on-orbit. To determine whether material degradation occurred during the exposure sequence, material performance was evaluated before and after the accelerated aging with complex stiffness measurements. Based on comparison of pre- and post-life-cycle measurements, the material is expected to maintain nominal performance through end of life on-orbit. Recent telemetry from the Telescope indicates that the dampers are performing nominally.

  11. HiRadMat: A New Irradiation Facility for Material Testing at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Efthymiopoulos, I; Gaillard, H; Grenier, D; Meddahi, M; Trilhe, P; Pardons, A; Theis, C; Charitonidis, N; Evrard, S; Vincke, H; Lazzaroni, M

    2011-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a new facility under construction at CERN designed to provide high intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies can be tested. The facility uses a 440 GeV proton beam extracted from the CERN SPS with a pulse length of 7.2μs, to a maximum pulse energy of 3.4 MJ. In addition to protons, ion beams with an energy of 173.5 GeV/nucleon and a total pulse energy of 21 kJ can be used. The facility is expected to become operational in autumn 2011. The first tests will include candidate materials and prototype assemblies of LHC collimators foreseen to operate at the ultimate LHC beam powers. Experiments on beam windows and high-power target material options, such as tungsten powder, are also planned. The paper will describe the layout and design parameters for the facility and the way experiments can be operated. Ideas on online and post-irradiation tests and instrumentation will be outlined.

  12. Developing a reference material for diffusion-controlled formaldehyde emissions testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xiaomin; Cox, Steven S; Little, John C

    2013-11-19

    Formaldehyde, a known human carcinogen and mucous membrane irritant, is emitted from a variety of building materials and indoor furnishings. The drive to improve building energy efficiency by decreasing ventilation rates increases the need to better understand emissions from indoor products and to identify and develop lower emitting materials. To help meet this need, formaldehyde emissions from indoor materials are typically measured using environmental chambers. However, chamber testing results are frequently inconsistent and provide little insight into the mechanisms governing emissions. This research addresses these problems by (1) developing a reference formaldehyde emissions source that can be used to validate chamber testing methods for characterization of dynamic sources of formaldehyde emissions and (2) demonstrating that emissions from finite formaldehyde sources can be predicted using a fundamental mass-transfer model. Formaldehyde mass-transfer mechanisms are elucidated, providing practical approaches for developing diffusion-controlled reference materials that mimic actual sources. The fundamental understanding of emissions mechanisms can be used to improve emissions testing and guide future risk reduction actions.

  13. Toxicity Testing of Restorative Dental Materials Using Brine Shrimp Larvae (Artemia salina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manar M. Milhem

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of extracts of different composites, glass ionomer cement (GICs and compomers on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. Ethanolic extracts of four dental composites (Z-100; Solitaire 2; Filtek P60 and Synergy, a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, two compomers (F2000; Dyract AP, and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow were prepared from each material. Following evaporation of the ethanol, the extracts were resuspended in distilled water, which was then used to test the effects on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. For the composites, the extract of Synergy was the least toxic (88% viability followed by the extracts of Solitaire 2, Z100 and P60 (75%, 67.5% and 50% viability, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the resin composite materials (p<0.001. Follow-up comparison between the composite groups by Tukey's pairwise multiple-comparison test (α =0.05 showed that the extract of Synergy was significantly less toxic than the extracts of all the other materials except that of Solitaire 2. The compomers showed 100% lethality, while the percentage of viable larvae for the extracts of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer were 32.3%, and 37.0%, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the groups of materials (p<0.001. Follow-up comparison between the groups by Tukey's test (α = 0.05 showed that the toxic effect of the extracts of the compomers were significantly greater than that of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer. The differences in the toxic effects of Vitremer and Ketac-Fil were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the toxicity of composite materials varied according to their chemical composition. Compomers were the most lethal materials to brine shrimp larvae followed by GICs and then composites.

  14. Standard test method for ball punch deformation of metallic sheet material

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the procedure for conducting the ball punch deformation test for metallic sheet materials intended for forming applications. The test applies to specimens with thicknesses between 0.008 and 0.080 in. (0.20 and 2.00 mm). 1.2 The values stated in inch–pound units are to be regarded as the standard. Note 1—The ball punch deformation test is intended to replace the Olsen cup test by standardizing many of the test parameters that previously have been left to the discretion of the testing laboratory. Note 2—The modified Erichsen test has been standardized in Europe. The main differences between the ball punch deformation test and the Erichsen test are the diameters of the penetrator and the dies. Erichsen cup heights are given in SI units. 1.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.4 This standard does...

  15. Standard practice for conducting force controlled constant amplitude axial fatigue tests of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the procedure for the performance of axial force controlled fatigue tests to obtain the fatigue strength of metallic materials in the fatigue regime where the strains are predominately elastic, both upon initial loading and throughout the test. This practice is limited to the fatigue testing of axial unnotched and notched specimens subjected to a constant amplitude, periodic forcing function in air at room temperature. This practice is not intended for application in axial fatigue tests of components or parts. Note 1-The following documents, although not directly referenced in the text, are considered important enough to be listed in this practice: E 739 Practice for Statistical Analysis of Linear or Linearized Stress-Life (S-N) and Strain-Life (-N) Fatigue Data STP 566 Handbook of Fatigue Testing STP 588 Manual on Statistical Planning and Analysis for Fatigue Experiments STP 731 Tables for Estimating Median Fatigue Limits

  16. Guidelines for conducting impact tests on shipping packages for radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, G.C.; Carlson, R.W.; Lu, S.C.; Fischer, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    Federal regulation (10 CFR Part 71) specifies a number of impact conditions (free-drop, penetration, and puncture), under which a package for the transport of radioactive materials must be tested or evaluated to demonstrate compliance with the regulation. This report is a comprehensive guide to the planning and execution of these impact tests. The report identifies the required considerations for both the design, pre-, and post-test inspections of the test model and the measurement, recording, analysis, and reporting of the test data. The report also presents reasons for the requirements, identifies the major difficulties in meeting these requirements, and suggests possible methods to overcome the difficulties. Discussed in substantial detail is the use of scale models and instrumented measurements.

  17. Dynamic testing of horseshoe designs at impact on synthetic and dirt Thoroughbred racetrack materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, C A; Peterson, M L; Thomason, J J; McIlwraith, C W

    2016-01-01

    Different horseshoe designs have been developed in an attempt to optimise footing for equine athletes. Horseshoe performance is assumed to be dependent on the surface and gait, but there are limited data on horseshoe performance on different surfaces, independent of gait variation. To quantify the dynamic loading for 3 aluminium racing shoe designs on Thoroughbred racetrack surface materials, using a biomechanical surface tester. A flat racing plate, a serrated V-Grip and a shoe with a 6 mm toe grab and 10 mm heel calks were tested on synthetic and dirt surfaces under typical operating conditions of temperature and moisture content for the respective material samples. Samples were tested under laboratory conditions, replicating a track surface by compacting material into a latex-lined mould surrounded by silica sand for representative boundary conditions. Peak loading and loading rates were measured vertically and horizontally (craniocaudal), simulating aspects of primary and secondary impacts of the hoof in a galloping horse. Maximum vertical and shear loads and loading rates were not significantly different between shoe types, with the exception of a reduced craniocaudal loading rate for the V-Grip shoe on the synthetic surface. All other statistical significance was related to the surface material. These 3 different Thoroughbred racing shoes do not have a significant impact on loading and loading rate, with the exception of the V-Grip shoe on a synthetic surface. Although the V-Grip may reduce craniocaudal peak load rates in a synthetic material with relatively high wax and/or low oil content, the reduction in load rate is less than the difference found between materials. This study indicates that shoeing has little effect, and that a track's surface material and its preparation have a significant effect on the dynamic loading during the impact phase of the stance. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  18. Planar biaxial testing of heart valve cusp replacement biomaterials: Experiments, theory and material constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrosse, Michel R; Jafar, Reza; Ngu, Janet; Boodhwani, Munir

    2016-11-01

    Aortic valve (AV) repair has become an attractive option to correct aortic insufficiency. Yet, cusp reconstruction with various cusp replacement materials has been associated with greater long-term repair failures, and it is still unknown how such materials mechanically compare with native leaflets. We used planar biaxial testing to characterize six clinically relevant cusp replacement materials, along with native porcine AV leaflets, to ascertain which materials would be best suited for valve repair. We tested at least six samples of: 1) fresh autologous porcine pericardium (APP), 2) glutaraldehyde fixed porcine pericardium (GPP), 3) St Jude Medical pericardial patch (SJM), 4) CardioCel patch (CC), 5) PeriGuard (PG), 6) Supple PeriGuard (SPG) and 7) fresh porcine AV leaflets (PC). We introduced efficient displacement-controlled testing protocols and processing, as well as advanced convexity requirements on the strain energy functions used to describe the mechanical response of the materials under loading. The proposed experimental and data processing pipeline allowed for a robust in-plane characterization of all the materials tested, with constants determined for two Fung-like hyperelastic, anisotropic strain energy models. Overall, CC and SPG (respectively PG) patches ranked as the closest mechanical equivalents to young (respectively aged) AV leaflets. Because the native leaflets as well as CC, PG and SPG patches exhibit significant anisotropic behaviors, it is suggested that the fiber and cross-fiber directions of these replacement biomaterials be matched with those of the host AV leaflets. The long-term performance of cusp replacement materials would ideally be evaluated in large animal models for AV disease and cusp repair, and over several months or more. Given the unavailability and impracticality of such models, detailed information on stress-strain behavior, as studied herein, and investigations of durability and valve dynamics will be the best surrogates

  19. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  20. A reciprocating pin-on-plate test-rig for studying friction materials for holding brakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Drago, Nicola; Klit, Peder

    2014-01-01

    This paper refers to testing of friction materials for holding brakes. In contrast to the more typical case of high energy brakes, holding brakes operate usually in a reciprocating sense, at very low sliding speeds and allow significantly higher clamping pressures. The design of a reciprocating p...... different friction materials running against an unhardened steel surface are presented as a usage case. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.......This paper refers to testing of friction materials for holding brakes. In contrast to the more typical case of high energy brakes, holding brakes operate usually in a reciprocating sense, at very low sliding speeds and allow significantly higher clamping pressures. The design of a reciprocating pin......-on-plate test-rig for studying the evolution of wear by monitoring the pin height reduction using Eddy-current proximity sensors is presented. Moreover, a new mechanism for recording the friction force is suggested. Apart from the design of the test-rig, friction force and wear rate measurements for two...

  1. Nanorobotic System iTRo for Controllable 1D Micro/nano Material Twisting Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haojian; Shang, Wanfeng; Wei, Xueyong; Yang, Zhan; Fukuda, Toshio; Shen, Yajing

    2017-06-08

    In-situ micro/nano characterization is an indispensable methodology for material research. However, the precise in-situ SEM twisting of 1D material with large range is still challenge for current techniques, mainly due to the testing device's large size and the misalignment between specimen and the rotation axis. Herein, we propose an in-situ twist test robot (iTRo) to address the above challenges and realize the precise in-situ SEM twisting test for the first time. Firstly, we developed the iTRo and designed a series of control strategies, including assembly error initialization, triple-image alignment (TIA) method for rotation axis alignment, deformation-based contact detection (DCD) method for sample assembly, and switch control for robots cooperation. After that, we chose three typical 1D material, i.e., magnetic microwire Fe74B13Si11C2, glass fiber, and human hair, for twisting test and characterized their properties. The results showed that our approach is able to align the sample to the twisting axis accurately, and it can provide large twisting range, heavy load and high controllability. This work fills the blank of current in-situ mechanical characterization methodologies, which is expected to give significant impact in the fundamental nanomaterial research and practical micro/nano characterization.

  2. In situ thermomechanical testing methods for micro/nano-scale materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wonmo; Merrill, Marriner; Wheeler, Jeffrey M

    2017-02-23

    The advance of micro/nanotechnology in energy-harvesting, micropower, electronic devices, and transducers for automobile and aerospace applications has led to the need for accurate thermomechanical characterization of micro/nano-scale materials to ensure their reliability and performance. This persistent need has driven various efforts to develop innovative experimental techniques that overcome the critical challenges associated with precise mechanical and thermal control of micro/nano-scale specimens during material characterization. Here we review recent progress in the development of thermomechanical testing methods from miniaturized versions of conventional macroscopic test systems to the current state of the art of in situ uniaxial testing capabilities in electron microscopes utilizing either indentation-based microcompression or integrated microsystems. We discuss the major advantages/disadvantages of these methods with respect to specimen size, range of temperature control, ease of experimentation and resolution of the measurements. We also identify key challenges in each method. Finally, we summarize some of the important discoveries that have been made using in situ thermomechanical testing and the exciting research opportunities still to come in micro/nano-scale materials.

  3. Use of cortical neuronal networks for in vitro material biocompatibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkhkar, Hamid; Frewin, Christopher; Nezafati, Maysam; Knaack, Gretchen L; Peixoto, Nathalia; Saddow, Stephen E; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2014-03-15

    Neural interfaces aim to restore neurological function lost during disease or injury. Novel implantable neural interfaces increasingly capitalize on novel materials to achieve microscale coupling with the nervous system. Like any biomedical device, neural interfaces should consist of materials that exhibit biocompatibility in accordance with the international standard ISO10993-5, which describes in vitro testing involving fibroblasts where cytotoxicity serves as the main endpoint. In the present study, we examine the utility of living neuronal networks as functional assays for in vitro material biocompatibility, particularly for materials that comprise implantable neural interfaces. Embryonic mouse cortical tissue was cultured to form functional networks where spontaneous action potentials, or spikes, can be monitored non-invasively using a substrate-integrated microelectrode array. Taking advantage of such a platform, we exposed established positive and negative control materials to the neuronal networks in a consistent method with ISO 10993-5 guidance. Exposure to the negative controls, gold and polyethylene, did not significantly change the neuronal activity whereas the positive controls, copper and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), resulted in reduction of network spike rate. We also compared the functional assay with an established cytotoxicity measure using L929 fibroblast cells. Our findings indicate that neuronal networks exhibit enhanced sensitivity to positive control materials. In addition, we assessed functional neurotoxicity of tungsten, a common microelectrode material, and two conducting polymer formulations that have been used to modify microelectrode properties for in vivo recording and stimulation. These data suggest that cultured neuronal networks are a useful platform for evaluating the functional toxicity of materials intended for implantation in the nervous system. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Composite Structures Materials Testing for the Orion Crew Vehicle Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemani, Farah N.

    2011-01-01

    As research is being performed for the new heat shield for the Orion capsule, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the first composite heat shield. As an intern of the Structures Branch in the Engineering Directorate (ES 2), my main task was to set up a test plan to determine the material properties of the honeycomb that will be used on the Orion Crew Module heat shield to verify that the composite is suitable for the capsule. Before conducting composite shell tests, which are performed to simulate the crush performance of the heat shield on the capsule, it is necessary to determine the compression and shear properties of the composite used on the shell. During this internship, I was responsible for developing a test plan, designing parts for the test fixtures as well as getting them fabricated for the honeycomb shear and compression testing. This involved work in Pro/Engineer as well as coordinating with Fab Express, the Building 9 Composite Shop and the Structures Test Laboratory (STL). The research and work executed for this project will be used for composite sandwich panel testing in the future as well. As a part of the Structures Branch, my main focus was to research composite structures. This involves system engineering and integration (SE&I) integration, manufacturing, and preliminary testing. The procedures for these projects that were executed during this internship included design work, conducting tests and performing analysis.

  5. Use of diagnostic self-tests on body materials among Internet users in the Netherlands : prevalence and correlates of use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronda, G.; Portegijs, P.; Dinant, G.J.; Buntinx, F.; Norg, R.; Weijden, T.T. van der

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A range of self-tests on body materials has become available to the general public, but the extent of their use has hardly been studied. This study examined how many people use diagnostic self-tests on body materials such as blood or urine, as well as the type of tests that are used, and

  6. Additive value of patch testing custom epoxy materials from the workplace at the occupational disease specialty clinic in Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Marie-Claude; Holness, D Linn; Dekoven, Joel; Skotnicki, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to epoxy resins is one of the major causes of occupationally induced ACD. Testing of custom epoxy materials from the workplace is often performed to diagnose ACD. The objective of this study was to investigate the additive value of patch testing custom-made epoxy materials. We retrospectively analyzed outcomes of 24 patients who were tested to custom epoxy resin materials between January 2002 and July 2011. For 11 patients (46%), the testing of their materials from work had no additional value (negative results). For 13 patients (54%), there was an additional value of testing custom allergens. Of those, 7 patients (54%) had positive reactions to custom epoxy materials that reinforced the test results found with the commercially available allergens, and 6 (46%) patients had positive reactions only to custom epoxy materials. Therefore, for 6 patients (25%), there was a definite additive value of testing custom epoxy materials because the allergy was discovered with custom testing and not with the commercially available allergens. Because of the high percentage (54%) of patients with additive value of patch testing custom epoxy materials, we think that the inclusion of actual workplace epoxy materials should be strongly considered when patch testing patients with occupational epoxy exposure.

  7. NASA GRC's High Pressure Burner Rig Facility and Materials Test Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at NASA Glenn Research Center is a high-velocity. pressurized combustion test rig used for high-temperature environmental durability studies of advanced materials and components. The facility burns jet fuel and air in controlled ratios, simulating combustion gas chemistries and temperatures that are realistic to those in gas turbine engines. In addition, the test section is capable of simulating the pressures and gas velocities representative of today's aircraft. The HPBR provides a relatively inexpensive. yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials. The facility has the unique capability of operating under both fuel-lean and fuel-rich gas mixtures. using a fume incinerator to eliminate any harmful byproduct emissions (CO, H2S) of rich-burn operation. Test samples are easily accessible for ongoing inspection and documentation of weight change, thickness, cracking, and other metrics. Temperature measurement is available in the form of both thermocouples and optical pyrometery. and the facility is equipped with quartz windows for observation and video taping. Operating conditions include: (1) 1.0 kg/sec (2.0 lbm/sec) combustion and secondary cooling airflow capability: (2) Equivalence ratios of 0.5- 1.0 (lean) to 1.5-2.0 (rich), with typically 10% H2O vapor pressure: (3) Gas temperatures ranging 700-1650 C (1300-3000 F): (4) Test pressures ranging 4-12 atmospheres: (5) Gas flow velocities ranging 10-30 m/s (50-100) ft/sec.: and (6) Cyclic and steady-state exposure capabilities. The facility has historically been used to test coupon-size materials. including metals and ceramics. However complex-shaped components have also been tested including cylinders, airfoils, and film-cooled end walls. The facility has also been used to develop thin-film temperature measurement sensors.

  8. Double Cantilever Beam and End Notched Flexure Fracture Toughness Testing of Two Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Two different unidirectional composite materials were provided by NASA Langley Research Center and tested by the Composite Materials Research Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wyoming. Double cantilever beam and end notched flexure tests were performed to measure the mode I (crack opening) and mode II (sliding or shear) interlaminar fracture toughness of the two materials. The two composites consisted of IM7 carbon fiber combined with either RP46 resin toughened with special formulation of LaRC IA resin, known as JJS1356; or PES chain extended thermoplastic resin known as JJS1361. Double Cantilever Beam Specimen Configuration and Test Methods As received from NASA, the test specimens were nominally 0.5 inch wide, 6 inches long, and 0.2 inch thick. A 1 inch long Kapton insert at the midplane of one end of the specimen (placed during laminate fabrication) facilitated crack initiation and extension. It was noted that the specimens provided were smaller than the nominal 1.5 inch wide, 9.0 inch long configuration specified. Similarly, the Kapton inserts were of greater length than those in the present specimens. Hence, the data below should not be compared directly to those generated with the referenced methods. No preconditioning was performed on the specimens prior to testing. In general, the methodology was used for the present work. Crack opening loads were introduced to the specimens via piano hinges attached to the main specimen faces at a single end of each specimen. Hinges were bolted to the specimens using the technique presented. The cracks were extended a small distance from the end of the Kapton insert prior to testing. Just before precracking, the sides of the specimens were coated with water-soluble typewriter correction fluid to aid in crack visualization. Scribe marks were then made in the coating at half-inch intervals.

  9. Testing and environmental exposure of parachute materials for the solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannehill, B. K.

    1978-01-01

    Static tests and evaluation of nonmetallic materials for use in parachutes for recovery of solid rocket boosters used in the space shuttle program are reported. Literature survey and manufacturer and vendor contacts led to the choice of nylon as the fabric most capable of withstanding the extreme loads and environmental conditions during repeated use. The material tests included rupture strength, elongation, abrasion resistance, shrinkage, environmental exposure, and degradation levels. Rinsing and drying procedures were also investigated and a salt-free level for nylon recommended in preparation for reuse. In all possible cases, worst-case conditions were used (e.g., inflation loads, seawater exposure for 3 days per drop-recovery, etc.).

  10. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  11. Standard Test Method for Water Absorption of Core Materials for Structural Sandwich Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the relative amount of water absorption by various types of structural core materials when immersed or in a high relative humidity environment. This test method is intended to apply to only structural core materials; honeycomb, foam, and balsa wood. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given may be approximate. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. Standard Test Methods for Solar Energy Transmittance and Reflectance (Terrestrial) of Sheet Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1971-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the measurement of solar energy transmittance and reflectance (terrestrial) of materials in sheet form. Method A, using a spectrophotometer, is applicable for both transmittance and reflectance and is the referee method. Method B is applicable only for measurement of transmittance using a pyranometer in an enclosure and the sun as the energy source. Specimens for Method A are limited in size by the geometry of the spectrophotometer while Method B requires a specimen 0.61 m2 (2 ft2). For the materials studied by the drafting task group, both test methods give essentially equivalent results. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety problems, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. A Cognitive Approach to the Compilation of Test Materials for the Evaluation of Translator's Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Berg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A Cognitive Approach to the Compilation of Test Materials for the Evaluation of Translator's Skills This paper discusses the importance of a cognitive approach to the evaluation of translator’s skills. The authors set forth their recommendations for the compilation of test materials for the evaluation of translators’ cognitive ability.   Kognitywne podejście do kompilowania tekstów służących ocenie umiejętności tłumacza Artykuł porusza wagę kognitywnego podejścia do ewaluacji umiejętności tłumacza. Autorzy przedstawiają swoje zalecenia co do kompilowania materiałów testowych do ewaluacji kognitywnych zdolności tłumacza.

  14. Testing a model for the critical degree of saturation at freezing of porous building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1996-01-01

    during freezing. The reliability and usefulness of the model are discussed, e.g. in relation to air-entrained materials and in relation to the description of the pore structure.Keywords: Brick tile, concrete, critical degree of saturation, eigenstrain, fracture mechanics, frost resistance, pore structure......Frost resistance of porous materials can be characterized by the critical degree of saturation, SCR. An experimental determination of SCR is very laborious and therefore only seldom used when testing frost resistance. A theoretical model for prediction of SCR based on fracture mechanics and phase......-thaw without de-icing salts. The model has been tested on various concretes without air-entrainment and on brick tiles with different porosities. Results agree qualitatively with values of the critical degree of saturation determined by measuring resonance frequencies and length change of sealed specimens...

  15. Test system for defect detection in cementitious material with artificial neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saowanee Saechai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a newly developed test system for defect detection, classification of number of defects andidentification of defect materials in cement-based products. With the system, the pattern of ultrasonic waves for each case ofspecimen can be obtained from direct and indirect measurements. The machine learning algorithm called artificial neuralnetwork classifier with back-propagation model is employed for classification and verification of the wave patterns obtainedfrom different specimens. By applying the system, the presence or absence of a defect in mortar can be identified. Moreover,the system is applied to identify the number and materials of defects inside the mortar. The methodology is explained and theclassification results are discussed. The effectiveness of the developed test system is evaluated. Comparison of the classification results between different input features with different number of training sets is demonstrated. The results show that thistechnique based on pattern recognition has a potential for practical inspection of concrete structures.

  16. Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Miron, Y. [Bureau of Mines (United States)

    1994-01-01

    To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

  17. Verification of cardiac mechanics software: benchmark problems and solutions for testing active and passive material behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Sander; Gurev, Viatcheslav; Arens, Sander; Augustin, Christoph M; Baron, Lukas; Blake, Robert; Bradley, Chris; Castro, Sebastian; Crozier, Andrew; Favino, Marco; Fastl, Thomas E; Fritz, Thomas; Gao, Hao; Gizzi, Alessio; Griffith, Boyce E; Hurtado, Daniel E; Krause, Rolf; Luo, Xiaoyu; Nash, Martyn P; Pezzuto, Simone; Plank, Gernot; Rossi, Simone; Ruprecht, Daniel; Seemann, Gunnar; Smith, Nicolas P; Sundnes, Joakim; Rice, J Jeremy; Trayanova, Natalia; Wang, Dafang; Jenny Wang, Zhinuo; Niederer, Steven A

    2015-12-08

    Models of cardiac mechanics are increasingly used to investigate cardiac physiology. These models are characterized by a high level of complexity, including the particular anisotropic material properties of biological tissue and the actively contracting material. A large number of independent simulation codes have been developed, but a consistent way of verifying the accuracy and replicability of simulations is lacking. To aid in the verification of current and future cardiac mechanics solvers, this study provides three benchmark problems for cardiac mechanics. These benchmark problems test the ability to accurately simulate pressure-type forces that depend on the deformed objects geometry, anisotropic and spatially varying material properties similar to those seen in the left ventricle and active contractile forces. The benchmark was solved by 11 different groups to generate consensus solutions, with typical differences in higher-resolution solutions at approximately 0.5%, and consistent results between linear, quadratic and cubic finite elements as well as different approaches to simulating incompressible materials. Online tools and solutions are made available to allow these tests to be effectively used in verification of future cardiac mechanics software.

  18. Penerapan Three Tier-Test untuk Identifikasi Kuantitas Siswa Yang Miskonsepsi Pada Materi Magnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reny Silviani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Proses pembelajaran yang bersifat informative dan hanya ditekankan pada konsep teoritik saja dapat menyebabkan siswa kurang menguasai konsep ilmiah.Faktor yang menyebabkan rendahnya penguasaan konsep siswa adalah miskonsepsi. Miskonsepsi merupakan kekeliruan dalam memahami suatu konsep materi pembelajaran yang tidak akurat, yang dapat menyebabkan ketidaksesuaian antara konsep yang dimiliki pribadi dengan konsep ilmiah. Dengan adanya miskonsepsi yang terjadi, hal ini dapat menghambat siswa untuk menerima informasi yang baru, sehingga siswa menolak untuk mengubah miskonsepsinya menjadi konsep ilmiah. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi mengenai kuantitas siswa yang miskonsepsi pada materi magnet. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian deskriptif kuantitatif dengan teknik pengambilan sampel adalah purposive sampling.Instrumen penelitian yang digunakan adalah three tier-test. Penggunaan three tier-test yaitu untuk mengidentifikasi kuantita ssiswa yang miskonsepsi. Jawaban yang telah dianalisis, selanjutnya akan dihitung dalam bentuk persentase. Hasil dari penelitian menunjukkan bahwa terdapat 3 konsep distribusi atau sebaran miskonsepsi pada materi magnet, yaitu; 1. Semua benda berwarna perak ditarik magnet; 2. Tarikan magnet yang lebih besar pasti lebih kuat dari tarikan magnet yang kecil; 3. Semua logam dapat ditarik magnet.Miskonsepsi tertinggi terdapat pada konsep tarikan magnet yang lebih besar pasti lebih kuat dari tarikan magnet yang kecil. Diharapkan hasil dari penelitian ini dapat dijadikan referensi untuk mencari solusi dalam menurunkan kuantitas siswa yang miskonsepsik hususnya pada materi magnet.

  19. THE REACTION TO FIRE TEST FOR FIRE RETARDANT AND FOR COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaida FANFAROVÁ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently the natural materials become popular building material for houses, buildings and recreational property. The risk of fires in residential timber construction or eco houses cannot be completely ruled out, therefore there is a need for proper and correct implementing preventive measures and application of all available solutions, which may reduce the risk of fire as far as possible, to slow down the combustion process, to protect the life of people, animals and also the building itself until arrival members of the Fire and Rescue Services. Fireproofing of combustible materials is a specific area of fire protection. For scientific research as well as for real-life practice, not only their structural and physical properties, but also fire-technical characteristics are really important. The present researchers mostly focus on fire-retardant treatment of wood that is why the authors of this contribution focused on a different combustible material. This research article presents the experimental testing and examination of the reaction to fire test of the selected thermal insulation of hemp fiber that was impregnated by the selected fire retardant in laboratory conditions.

  20. Batch Test Screening of Industrial Product/Byproduct Filter Materials for Agricultural Drainage Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J. Allred

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Filter treatment may be a viable means for removing the nitrate (NO3−, phosphate (PO43−, and pesticides discharged with agricultural drainage waters that cause adverse environmental impacts within the U.S. on local, regional, and national scales. Laboratory batch test screening for agricultural drainage water treatment potential was conducted on 58 industrial product/byproduct filter materials grouped into six categories: (1 high carbon content media; (2 high iron content media; (3 high aluminum content media; (4 surfactant modified clay/zeolite; (5 coal combustion residuals; and (6 spent foundry sands. Based on a percent contaminant removal criteria of 75% or greater, seven industrial products/byproducts were found to meet this standard for NO3− alone, 44 met this standard for PO43−, and 25 met this standard for the chlorinated triazine herbicide, atrazine. Using a 50% or greater contaminant removal criteria, five of the industrial product/byproduct filter materials exhibited potential for removing NO3−, PO43−, and atrazine together; eight showed capability for combined NO3− and PO43− removal; 21 showed capability for combined PO43− and atrazine removal; and nine showed capability for combined NO3− and atrazine removal. The results of this study delineated some potential industrial product/byproduct filter materials for drainage water treatment; however, a complete feasibility evaluation for drainage water treatment of any of these filter materials will require much more extensive testing.

  1. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  2. Development of high resolution shearography device for non-destructive testing of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, Mikhail; Lyubutin, Pavel; Byakov, Anton; Panin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents the results of preliminary testing of high-resolution shearographic device and software for signal processing to be applied for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of composite materials. Shearography is an interferometric non-contact NDT/E method that allows obtaining strain data straightly at video frame rate to diagnose different composite structures to provide the safe operation of the structure and reduce the possibility of accidents. The optical part of the device based on the Canon 450D DSLR camera is described. The tests have been performed to ensure the proper functioning of the device and to establish the image processing technique.

  3. Material Response Models and Ground Motion Calculations for High Explosive Tests in G-Tunnel Tuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-25

    through the use of a viscoelastic model in the form of a standard linear solid. 2.2 PHYSICAL PROPERTIES Physical properties from five G- Tunnel , U12G -OT...34Determination of In Situ Stress in U12g Tunnel , Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,’ U.S. Geological Survey, USGS-474-219, January 1976. 7. Patch, D. F...A -’"’- "’ " [ N • HilM61 AD-A151 737 DNA-TR-84-124 MATERIAL RESPONSE MODELS AND GROUND MOTION CALCULATIONS FOR HIGH EXPLOSIVE TESTS IN G- TUNNEL TUFF

  4. Nonferromagnetic material inserted magnetostrictive patch bonding technique for torsional modal testing of a ferromagnetic cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Il; Kim, Yoon Young

    2010-03-01

    Torsional vibration testing requires pure torsional mode transduction. However, no reliable technique is available for exciting torsional vibrations in ferromagnetic cylinders for a relatively wide range of frequencies. A magnetostrictive patch bonding excitation method developed for nonferromagnetic cylinders, based on the magnetostrictive principle, may be considered for ferromagnetic cylinders. However, the direct bonding of a magnetostrictive patch onto a ferromagnetic cylinder fails because the applied magnetic field spreads to both the patch and the cylinder and thus generates unwanted modes of vibration such as longitudinal modes. Thus, a modified or new technique must be developed in order to concentrate the applied magnetic field mainly on the patch, while causing the patch deformation to fully transfer to the cylinder. This paper presents a modified magnetostrictive patch bonding excitation and measurement technique suitable for ferromagnetic cylinders. The key idea is to insert a nonferromagnetic material between the test cylinder and the magnetostrictive patch. Because the thickness of the material or the gap size critically affects the torsional vibration test by the magnetostrictive patch bonding method, a series of numerical and experimental investigations to find the optimal gap size are conducted. Other factors affecting the developed modal testing method are also considered. The validity of the developed method is checked by comparing the experimentally obtained eigenfrequencies of a test ferromagnetic cylinder with the theoretical eigenfrequencies.

  5. Life and stability testing of packaged low-cost energy storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frysinger, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal cycling and performance tests, performed to verify the package integrity, life, and stability of the chub packaged materials system for storage coolness with application to residential air conditioning, are described. The moisture vapor retention characteristics of the laminate film for long term chub performance was determined. The stability, mechanical integrity, and thermal performance of chubs following mechanical shock, vibration, and temperature extremes is reported.

  6. The surgical gowns and drapes of tomorrow. Specifying material performance and test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S R; Urech, D; Werner, H P

    1998-09-01

    A mandatory European standard is being developed to establish basic requirements and test methods for disposable and reusable materials used for surgical gowns and drapes. Once this standard has been adopted, the continued use of cotton textiles and conventional cotton-polyester-mixed textiles will become questionable. This article outlines the proposed requirements and looks at alternative methods that use liquid-repellent micro-filament textiles or liquid-proof textile laminates.

  7. Determination of Constant Parameters of Copper as Power-Law Hardening Material at Different Test Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kowser Md. A.; Mahiuddin Md.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a technique has been developed to determine constant parameters of copper as a power-law hardening material by tensile test approach. A work-hardening process is used to describe the increase of the stress level necessary to continue plastic deformation. A computer program is used to show the variation of the stress-strain relation for different values of stress hardening exponent, n and power-law hardening constant, α . Due to its close tolerances, excellent corrosion resistanc...

  8. Laboratory and field testing for utilization of an excavated soil as landfill liner material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozbey, Ilknur; Guler, Erol

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using a silty soil excavated in highway construction as landfill liner material. The tests were conducted both at laboratory and in situ scales, and the soil was tested in pure and lime treated forms. Different levels of compaction energy were used. For the field study, a test pad was constructed and in situ hydraulic conductivity experiments were conducted by sealed double ring infiltrometers (SDRI). Laboratory testing revealed that while lime treatment improved the shear strength, it resulted in higher hydraulic conductivity values compared to pure soil. It was observed that leachate permeation did not change the hydraulic conductivity of the pure and lime treated samples. Laboratory hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 10(-9) m/s and met the 1.0E-08 m/s criterion in the Turkish regulations, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value allowed in most developed countries. SDRI testing, which lasted for 6 mo, indicated that lime treatment increased the hydraulic conductivity of pure soil significantly in the field scale tests. In situ hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 1E-08 and 1E-07 m/s, and exceeded the allowable value in the Turkish regulations. Undisturbed samples collected from the test pad were not representative of field hydraulic conductivities. Contrary to laboratory findings, higher compaction efforts did not result in lower hydraulic conductivities in field scales. The study verified the importance of in situ hydraulic conductivity testing in compacted liners.

  9. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos [CERN; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias [CERN; Fabich, Adrian [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  10. Materials testing facilities and programmes for fission and ion implantation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Vicente, S. M.; Boutard, J.-L.; Zinkle, S. J.; Tanigawa, H.

    2017-09-01

    Currently there is no fusion neutron dedicated source with a high enough flux to mimic irradiation conditions relevant to those to be experienced by the First Wall in a fusion reactor. Nevertheless, very valuable information can be obtained from existing irradiation sources, in particular Materials Test Reactors, Fast neutron reactors and Ion accelerators. Partial information is provided by these irradiation facilities that can be used to down select main materials candidates for DEMO fusion reactors and evaluate their performance under limited conditions. Modelling is an indispensable tool to interpret all the available information and build a test matrix of experiments to be carried out in a dedicated fusion neutron source. Available tools for testing materials exposed to ion or neutron irradiation, including their advantages and limitations when mimicking fusion conditions, are discussed in this paper. Next generation of fusion devices, such as DEMO, will need the input provided by a dedicated fusion neutron source to enable them to proceed in an efficient and safe manner to reach their full mission and performance.

  11. Furnace for testing materials in air at temperatures up to 1850 deg C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, V. Y.; Smirnitskiy, A. M.; Satanovskiy, A. V.; Balkevich, V. L.; Mosin, Y. M.

    1986-02-01

    A tubular high-temperature air furnace with a La2(CrO3)3 heater element was developed for testing materials. The electrical resistance of this heater element is 200 ohm at 20 C room temperature and 20 to 30 ohms at the top temperature. The helical heater is surrounded by three cylindrical layers of refractory thermally insulating materials within a cylindrical metal enclusure: a layer of high-density corundum on the inside and a layer of ShLB-0.4 fireclay on the outside with a layer of KL-1.3 plain corundum in between. The heater is energized from a 220 V - 50Hz power line through a thyristor bank. The furnace temperature is controlled by a high-precision regulator around the heater extension above the lining, with a PR(Pt-Rh) 30/6 thermocouple mounted preferably inside rather than outside the heater coil for faster response and better accuracy. The test tube with a specimen is inserted inside the heater coil, where it can remain for more than 50 h at 1850 C and for short periods at 1900 C. The furnace can be cycled at least 50 times in a row by heating at a rate of 20 C/min and then cooling to 20 C. Refractory materials can be tested in this furnace also with air replaced by an oxidizing atmosphere.

  12. Solar tests of aperture plate materials for solar thermal dish collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    If a malfunction occurs in a solar thermal point-focus distributed receiver power plant while a concentrator is pointed at the sun, motion of the concentrator may stop. As the sun moves relative to the earth, the spot of concentrated sunlight then slowly walks off the receiver aperture, across the receiver face plate, and perhaps across adjacent portions of the concentrator. Intense local heating by the concentrated sunlight may damage or destroy these parts. The behavior of various materials under conditions simulating walk-off of a parabolic dish solar collector were evaluated. Each test consisted of exposure to concentrated sunlight at a peak flux density of about 7000 kW/square meter for 15 minutes. Types of materials tested included graphite, silicon carbide, silica, various silicates, alumina, zirconia, aluminum, copper, steel, and polytetrafluroethylene. The only material that neither cracked nor melted was grade G-90 graphite. Grade CS graphite, a lower cost commercial grade, cracked half-way across, but did not fail apart. Both of these grades are medium-grain extruded graphites. A graphite cloth (graphitized polyacrylonitrile) showed fair performance when tested as a single thin ply; it might be useful as a multi-ply assembly. High purity slipcast silica showed some promise also.

  13. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/201...

  14. Review of Mechanical Testing and Modelling of Thrombus Material for Vascular Implant and Device Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S; Duffy, S; Gunning, G; Gilvarry, M; McGarry, J P; McHugh, P E

    2017-08-28

    A thrombus or blood clot is a solid mass, made up of a network of fibrin, platelets and other blood components. Blood clots can form through various pathways, for example as a result of exposed tissue factor from vascular injury, as a result of low flow/stasis, or in very high shear flow conditions. Embolization of cardiac or vascular originating blood clots, causing an occlusion of the neurovasculature, is the major cause of stroke and accounts for 85% of all stroke. With mechanical thrombectomy emerging as the new standard of care in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS), the need to generate a better understanding of the biomechanical properties and material behaviour of thrombus material has never been greater, as it could have many potential benefits for the analysis and performance of these treatment devices. Defining the material properties of a thrombus has obvious implications for the development of these treatment devices. However, to-date this definition has not been adequately established. While some experimentation has been performed, model development has been extremely limited. This paper reviews the previous literature on mechanical testing of thrombus material. It also explores the use of various constitutive and computational models to model thrombus formation and material behaviour.

  15. The tensile strength test of thermoplastic materials based on poly(butylene terephtalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzepecka Anna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic composites go toward making an increasingly greater percentage of all manufacturing polymer composites. They have a lot of beneficial properties and their manufacturing using injecting and extrusion methods is a very easy and cheap process. Their properties significantly overtake the properties of traditional materials and it is the reason for their use. Scientists are continuously carrying out research to find new applications of composites materials in new industries, not only in the automotive or aircraft industry. When thermoplastic composites are manufactured a very important factor is the appropriate accommodation of tensile strength to their predestination. Scientists need to know the behaviour of these materials during the impact of different forces, and the factors of working in normal conditions too. The main aim of this article was macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the structure of thermoplastic composites after static tensile strength test. Materials which were analysed were thermoplastic materials which have poly(butylene terephthalate – PBT matrix reinforced with different content glass fibres – from 10% for 30%. In addition, research showed the necessary force to receive fracture and set their distinguishing characteristic down.

  16. Mechanical testing of CFRP materials for application as skins of sandwich composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana STEFAN

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich structures are ultralight materials that are part of a special class and consist of two face skins, that are thin, light and stiff. These materials are of great interest for aeronautical and aerospace applications and they represent one of the important research directions in this field. As skins, a large variety of materials can be used, i.e. aluminium, titanium or polymeric laminates. For the evaluation of sandwich composites based on metallic foam core, a larger study is being currently conducted, one of the objectives within this study being the evaluation of the sandwich system components (CFRP skins developed by two different methods: manual lay-up/room temperature curing and prepreg processing; as well as evaluation of core materials. This paper contains technical work that presents the preliminary results regarding the evaluation of CFRP skins based on CARP/T193 carbon fiber fabric and low viscosity L20 epoxy resin (Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol A developed by manual lay-up/room temperature curing. The obtained materials were tested at different mechanical loads and the failure mode was analyzed with the aim to evaluate their performances as possible skins of the sandwich structure with metallic foam core.

  17. THE FIRST BULGARIAN STANDARDIZED SERIES FOR EPICUTANEOUS PATCH TESTING FOR ALLERGIES TO DENTAL MATERIALS AND ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dencheva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The teeth and teeth rows restoration in the maxillofacial area is the last stage of the ongoing patient treatment and a basic purpose for the dental doctors. For this purpose a different set of modern and classic contemporary dental materials is used. The choice of each material during the treatment of every patient with proven allergy to different kind of allergens is very specific and strictly individual. In the everyday oral diagnostics a standardized set of allergens for diagnostics is used for proving the allergy to dental materials. The set has been developed on the base of all existing and permitted by the Bulgarian authorities dental materials, as well as professional series.The difference between the developed and standardized allergens for diagnostics used in our country and the existing ready-for-use series is that the first are made of the final product (material in the form introduced to the oral cavity and persisting there for a different period of time, sometimes for tenths of years. This enables the possibility for early or late contact allergic reactions with symptoms in the oral cavity and on the skin, maxillofacial area, head and neck, as well as the entire organism.The current article introduces the readers to the results obtained by the realization of the research project №28/2011 “Research on the type of sensibilisation to contemporary dental materials and development of set of allergens for its diagnosing through epicutaneous patch testing” funded by the Committee of Medical science of MU Sofia (CMC. Through the project became possible the creation and the initial research of the first Bulgarian series for epicutaneous testing whose aim is to prove the allergenic potential of the most frequently used by the dental doctors dental materials.

  18. Long term test of buffer material. Final Report on the pilot parcels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Sanden, Torbjoern; Johannesson, Lars-Erik [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Eriksen, Trygve E; Jansson, Mats; Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Pedersen, Karsten; Motamedi, Mehrdad [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden); Rosborg, Bo [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    The 'Long Term Test of Buffer Material' (LOT) series at the Aespoe HRL aims at checking models and hypotheses for a bentonite buffer material under conditions similar to those in a KBS3 repository. The test series comprises seven test parcels, which are exposed to repository conditions for 1, 5 and 20 years. This report concerns the two completed pilot tests (1-year tests) with respect to construction, field data and laboratory results. Four research groups were engaged in this part of the project working on physical properties - mineralogy, cation diffusion, bacteria and copper corrosion, respectively. The experimental layout was to place parcels containing heater, central copper tube, pre-compacted bentonite blocks and instruments in vertical boreholes in crystalline rock. The heaters were used for simulating the decay power from spent nuclear fuel at standard KBS3 conditions (S1 parcel, 90 deg C) and to give adverse conditions (A1 parcel, 130 deg C). The latter was used in order to accelerate possible processes. Temperature, total pressure, water pressure and water content were measured during the heating period. The two pilot tests were terminated after approximately 12 months of heating, and the parcels were extracted by overlapping core drilling outside the original borehole. The entire 4.5 m long S1-parcel with approximately 20 cm rock cover was successfully lifted in one piece from the rock, whereas the central part of the A1 parcel was lost during drilling. The upper and lower parts were however retrieved. Reference and exposed bentonite material were analysed with respect to physical properties (triaxial, beam and oedometer tests), and to mineralogical properties (XRD, CEC, ICP-AES and SEM analyses) according to a defined test program. Some precipitation, mainly gypsum, was found in the warmest part of the parcels, and the only unpredicted change was minor uptake of Cu into the clay matrix. An overarching conclusion is that no degrading

  19. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T. [Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  20. Materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 20 mass % Na{sub 2}O, 10 mass % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 8 mass % B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 1.5 mass % K{sub 2}O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired.

  2. Pengembangan M-Diagnostic Test Untuk Mengidentifikasi Tingkat Pemahaman Konsep Siswa SMP Pada Materi Suhu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rusdianti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengembangkan produk tes diagnostik berbasis mobile phone yang layak digunakan untuk mengidentifikasi pemahaman konsep siswa pada materi suhu. Dalam penelitian ini terdapat tiga tahap. Tiga tahap ini antara lain uji coba skala terbatas, uji coba skala luas, dan implementasi. Hasil validasi dari kelayakan produk dilakukan oleh pakar instrumen tes, pakar media, dan angket tanggapan siswa, menunjukkan m-diagnostic test yang dikembangkan oleh penelitian dinyatakan layak untuk digunakan karena telah memenuhi aspek kelayakan isi, bahasa, konstruk, rekayasa perangkat lunak, dan komunikasi visual. Hasil tes diagnostik pada tahap implementasi menunjukkan ada 6 siswa dari 18 siswa yang memenuhi aspek ketuntasan minimal.Hasil persentase tingkat pemahaman siswa yang termasuk dalam kriteria relational understanding pada tiap indikator ialah 50% relational understanding untuk indikator 1 (mengetahui definisi suhu dan kalor, 55% relational understanding untuk indikator 2 (memahami skala suhu pada termometer. Hasil dari penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa m-diagnostic test telah layak digunakan untuk mendiagnosis tingkat pemahaman konsep siswa. Kata kunci: m-diagnostic test, pemahaman konsep, suhu. Abstract The purpose of this research was develop a mobile phone diagnostic test product which use to identify student’s concept understanding in the temperature and heat material. This result indicated the level of student’s concept understanding in the temperature and heat material. This research have three steps for trial product. The steps were limited-scale, wide-scale, and implementation. The validation result by proffesional of instrument test, proffesional of  media, and the questionnaire responses of students has been showed that the m-diagnostic test worthy to used because the product has fulfilled contents aspect, language aspect, construct aspect, software technology aspect, and visual communication aspect. The

  3. Examination of an Optical Transmittance Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.; Bengoechea, J.; Bokria, J.; Kohl, M.; Powell, N. E.; Smith, M. E.; White, M. D.; Wilson, H. R.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    The optical transmittance of encapsulation materials is a key characteristic for their use in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Changes in transmittance with time in the field affect module performance, which may impact product warranties. Transmittance is important in product development, module manufacturing, and field power production (both immediate and long-term). Therefore, an international standard (IEC 62788-1-4) has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the optical performance of PV encapsulation materials. Existing standards, such as ASTM E903, are general and more appropriately applied to concentrated solar power than to PV. Starting from the optical transmittance measurement, the solar-weighted transmittance of photon irradiance, yellowness index (which may be used in aging studies to assess durability), and ultraviolet (UV) cut-off wavelength may all be determined using the proposed standard. The details of the proposed test are described. The results of a round-robin experiment (for five materials) conducted at seven laboratories to validate the test procedure using representative materials are also presented. For example, the Encapsulation Group actively explored the measurement requirements (wavelength range and resolution), the requirements for the spectrophotometer (including the integrating sphere and instrument accessories, such as a depolarizer), specimen requirements (choice of glass-superstrate and -substrate), and data analysis (relative to the light that may be used in the PV application). The round-robin experiment identified both intra- and inter-laboratory instrument precision and bias for five encapsulation materials (encompassing a range of transmittance and haze-formation characteristics).

  4. Crack initiation and propagation on the polymeric material ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, under ultrasonic fatigue testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Domínguez Almaraz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Crack initiation and propagation have been investigated on the polymeric material ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, under ultrasonic fatigue testing. Three controlled actions were implemented in order to carry out fatigue tests at very high frequency on this material of low thermal conductivity, they are: a The applying load was low to limit heat dissipation at the specimen neck section, b The dimensions of testing specimen were small (but fitting the resonance condition, in order to restraint the temperature gradient at the specimen narrow section, c Temperature at the specimen neck section was restrained by immersion in water or oil during ultrasonic fatigue testing. Experimental results are discussed on the basis of thermo-mechanical behaviour: the tail phenomenon at the initial stage of fatigue, initial shear yielding deformation, crazed development on the later stage, plastic strain on the fracture surface and the transition from low to high crack growth rate. In addition, a numerical analysis is developed to evaluate the J integral of energy dissipation and the stress intensity factor K, with the crack length

  5. Characterization of Ceramic Material Produced From a Cold Crucible Induction Melter Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-30

    This report summarizes the results from characterization of samples from a melt processed surrogate ceramic waste form. Completed in October of 2014, the first scaled proof of principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test was conducted to process a Fe-hollandite-rich titanate ceramic for treatment of high level nuclear waste. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the CCIM material produced. Core samples at various radial locations from the center of the CCIM were taken. These samples were also sectioned and analyzed vertically. Together, the various samples were intended to provide an indication of the homogeneity throughout the CCIM with respect to phase assemblage, chemical composition, and chemical durability. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Hollandite and zirconolite were identified in addition to possible highly-substituted pyrochlore and perovskite. Minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs were also identified. Remarkably only minor differences were observed vertically or radially in the CCIM material with respect to chemical composition, phase assemblage, and durability. This recent CCIM test and the resulting characterization in conjunction with demonstrated compositional improvements support continuation of CCIM testing with an improved feed composition and improved melter system.

  6. Performance testing of aged hydrogen getters against criteria for interim safe storage of plutonium bearing materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Nissen, April; Buffleben, George M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen getters were tested for use in storage of plutonium-bearing materials in accordance with DOE's Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials. The hydrogen getter HITOP was aged for 3 months at 70 C and tested under both recombination and hydrogenation conditions at 20 and 70 C; partially saturated and irradiated aged getter samples were also tested. The recombination reaction was found to be very fast and well above the required rate of 45 std. cc H2h. The gettering reaction, which is planned as the backup reaction in this deployment, is slower and may not meet the requirements alone. Pressure drop measurements and {sup 1}H NMR analyses support these conclusions. Although the experimental conditions do not exactly replicate the deployment conditions, the results of our conservative experiments are clear: the aged getter shows sufficient reactivity to maintain hydrogen concentrations below the flammability limit, between the minimum and maximum deployment temperatures, for three months. The flammability risk is further reduced by the removal of oxygen through the recombination reaction. Neither radiation exposure nor thermal aging sufficiently degrades the getter to be a concern. Future testing to evaluate performance for longer aging periods is in progress.

  7. Non-destructive testing of composite materials used in military applications by eddy current thermography method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, Waldemar

    2016-10-01

    Eddy current thermography is a new NDT-technique for the detection of cracks in electro conductive materials. It combines the well-established inspection techniques of eddy current testing and thermography. The technique uses induced eddy currents to heat the sample being tested and defect detection is based on the changes of induced eddy currents flows revealed by thermal visualization captured by an infrared camera. The advantage of this method is to use the high performance of eddy current testing that eliminates the known problem of the edge effect. Especially for components of complex geometry this is an important factor which may overcome the increased expense for inspection set-up. The paper presents the possibility of applying eddy current thermography method for detecting defects in ballistic covers made of carbon fiber reinforced composites used in the construction of military vehicles.

  8. Dimensional accuracy and detail reproduction of two hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane impression materials tested under different conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyayan, Preeti Agarwal; Kalavathy, Natarajan; Katyayan, Manish

    2011-01-01

    A limitation of vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials is hydrophobicity, and manufacturers have added surfactants and labeled these new products as "hydrophilic." The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate and compare the dimensional accuracy and surface detail reproduction of two hydrophilic VPS impression materials under dry, moist, and wet conditions. Ten impressions were made under dry, moist, and wet conditions respectively, with monophase, and regular body VPS impression material using a stainless steel metal die similar to that described in American Dental Association (ADA) specification 19, with lines scribed on it. Dimensional accuracy was measured by comparing the average length of the middle horizontal line in each impression to the same line on the metal die, by using a measuring microscope. The surface detail was evaluated. A one-way analysis of variance and Student t-test were used to compare mean dimensional changes (α = 0.05). Conditions (dry, moist, and wet) did not cause significant adverse effects on the dimensional accuracy of either material. The mean dimensional changes were 0.00084% (+0.00041%) for monophase and 0.00119% (+0.00033%) for regular body. Monophase material was satisfactory in detail reproduction 100% of the time in dry conditions, 90% in moist, and only 20% in wet conditions. The regular body showed 100% satisfactory impressions in dry, 80% in moist, and 10% in wet conditions. With the additional smooth surface evaluation, only under dry conditions impressions with clinically acceptable surface quality were produced. Dimensional changes for both materials were well within ADA standards of minimal shrinkage value of 0.5%.

  9. Isothermal Microcalorimetric Evaluation of Compatibility of Proposed Injector Materials with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    2003-01-01

    High-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) is receiving renewed interest as a monopropellant and as the oxidizer for bipropellant systems. HTP is hydrogen peroxide in concentrations ranging from 70 to 98%. All surfaces wetted by HTP must be evaluated for compatibility with the fluid. In the case of tanks, lines and valves compatibility is required to preserve the HTP oxygen and energy content and to avoid overpressurization due to decomposition. With injectors and regenerative cooling passages shorter exposure time reduces these concerns. However, phase changes from fluid to gas impact heat transfer and become the dominant compatibility concern. Isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) provides a convenient and reproducible means to observe the decomposition of HTP when exposed to structural materials and therefore the compatibility of those materials'. The instrument provides heat flow values in terms of watts that may be converted to a reaction rate given the heat of reaction for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. These values are then converted to percent active oxygen loss per week (%AOL/wk) to preserve an earlier convention for quantifying HTP compatibility. Additionally, qualitative designations of compatibility have been assigned to these values. This scheme consists of four classes with Class 1 being the most compatible. While historical compatibility data is available its current applicability is in question due to subtle changes in the compositions of both HTP and structural materials. Trace levels of molecules can have significant influence on compatibility. Therefore representative samples of materials must be evaluated with current HTP formulations. In this work seven materials were selected for their strength characteristics at high temperature as expected in a HTP injector. The materials were then evaluated by IMC for HTP compatibility.

  10. Quantitative ultrasonic testing of acoustically anisotropic materials with verification on austenitic and dissimilar weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, C.; Pudovikov, S.; Bulavinov, A.

    2012-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steel materials are widely used in a variety of industry sectors. In particular, the material is qualified to meet the design criteria of high quality in safety related applications. For example, the primary loop of the most of the nuclear power plants in the world, due to high durability and corrosion resistance, is made of this material. Certain operating conditions may cause a range of changes in the integrity of the component, and therefore require nondestructive testing at reasonable intervals. These in-service inspections are often performed using ultrasonic techniques, in particular when cracking is of specific concern. However, the coarse, dendritic grain structure of the weld material, formed during the welding process, is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of ultrasonic Phased Array techniques becomes desirable. The "Sampling Phased Array" technique, invented and developed by Fraunhofer IZFP, allows the acquisition of time signals (A-scans) for each individual transducer element of the array along with fast image reconstruction techniques based on synthetic focusing algorithms. The reconstruction considers the sound propagation from each image pixel to the individual sensor element. For anisotropic media, where the sound beam is deflected and the sound path is not known a-priori, a novel phase adjustment technique called "Reverse Phase Matching" is implemented. By taking into account the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the weld structure, a ray tracing algorithm for modeling the acoustic wave propagation and calculating the sound propagation time is applied. This technique can be utilized for 2D and 3D real time image reconstruction. The

  11. Thermal cycling for restorative materials: does a standardized protocol exist in laboratory testing? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morresi, Anna Lucia; D'Amario, Maurizio; Capogreco, Mario; Gatto, Roberto; Marzo, Giuseppe; D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Monaco, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    In vitro tests continue to be an indispensable method for the initial screening of dental materials. Thermal cycling is one of the most widely used procedures to simulate the physiological aging experienced by biomaterials in clinical practice. Consequently it is routinely employed in experimental studies to evaluate materials' performance. A literature review aimed to elucidate test parameters for in vitro aging of adhesive restorations was performed. This study aims to assess whether or not a standardized protocol of thermal cycling has been acknowledged from a review of the literature. An exhaustive literature search, examining the effect of thermal cycling on restorative dental materials, was performed with electronic database and by hand. The search was restricted to studies published from 1998 to August 2013. No language restrictions were applied. The search identified 193 relevant experimental studies. Only twenty-three studies had faithfully applied ISO standard. The majority of studies used their own procedures, showing only a certain consistency within the temperature parameter (5-55°C) and a great variability in the number of cycles and dwell time chosen. A wide variation in thermal cycling parameters applied in experimental studies has been identified. The parameters selected amongst these studies seem to be done on the basis of convenience for the authors in most cases. A comparison of results between studies would appear to be impossible. The available data suggest that further investigations will be required to ultimately develop a standardized thermal cycling protocol. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sensor calibration of polymeric Hopkinson bars for dynamic testing of soft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martarelli, Milena; Mancini, Edoardo; Lonzi, Barbara; Sasso, Marco

    2018-02-01

    Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing is one of the most common techniques for the estimation of the constitutive behaviour of metallic materials. In this paper, the characterisation of soft rubber-like materials has been addressed by means of polymeric bars thanks to their reduced mechanical impedance. Due to their visco-elastic nature, polymeric bars are more sensitive to temperature changes than metallic bars, and due to their low conductance, the strain gauges used to measure the propagating wave in an SHPB may be exposed to significant heating. Consequently, a calibration procedure has been proposed to estimate quantitatively the temperature influence on strain gauge output. Furthermore, the calibration is used to determine the elastic modulus of the polymeric bars, which is an important parameter for the synchronisation of the propagation waves measured in the input and output bar strain gate stations, and for the correct determination of stress and strain evolution within the specimen. An example of the application has been reported in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique. Different tests at different strain rates have been carried out on samples made of nytrile butadyene rubber (NBR) from the same injection moulding batch. Thanks to the correct synchronisation of the measured propagation waves measured by the strain gauges and applying the calibrated coefficients, the mechanical behaviour of the NBR material is obtained in terms of strain-rate–strain and stress–strain engineering curves.

  13. Influence of disinfectant solutions on test materials used for the determination of masticatory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Simone Silvério; Pereira, Cássio Vicente; Zangerônimo, Márcio Gilberto; Marques, Leandro Silva; Pereira, Luciano José

    2013-01-01

    Masticatory function can be evaluated objectively as the capacity of an individual to fragment solid food after a fixed number of chewing cycles, the so-called masticatory performance (MP). The objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of four different test materials (Optosil, Optocal, Zetapuls, and Perfil) and five disinfection protocols by aspersion and immersion (no disinfection, 2% glutaraldehyde, 2% chlorhexidine, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, and 70% alcohol) on the MP, determined at three moments (24 hours, 15 and 60 days) after storing the fragmented blocks. MP was evaluated by calculating X50 through the sieving technique and the Rosim-Ramler equation. The weight and microbiologic count (colony forming units, CFUs) of chewed blocks were measured to identify any variations that would make MP determination unfeasible. Differences in MP were observed among the materials (p Perfil presented the highest X50 value (worst MP determination), followed by Zetaplus (both p 0.05). The time and disinfection type had no influence on MP (p > 0.05). The number of CFUs differed between the nondisinfected group and all other disinfection groups at all time points (p < 0.01). No other significant difference in CFU count between disinfection groups was observed. In conclusion, disinfection did not alter the reliability of the test materials for the MP calculation for up to 60 days.

  14. Investigation of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Piccione, Neil; Zhao, Tianqi; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Hanlin, Suzanne; Jermy, Mark; Waddell, J Neil

    2016-06-01

    Routine forensic research into in vitro skin/skull/brain ballistic blood backspatter behavior has traditionally used gelatin at a 1:10 Water:Powder (W:P) ratio by volume as a brain simulant. A limitation of gelatin is its high elasticity compared to brain tissue. Therefore this study investigated the use of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing. Fresh deer brain, alginate (W:P ratio 91.5:8.5) and agar (W:P ratio 81:19) specimens (n=10) (11×22×33mm) were placed in transparent Perspex boxes of the same internal dimensions prior to shooting with a 0.22inch caliber high velocity air gun. Quantitative analysis to establish kinetic energy loss, vertical displacement elastic behavior and qualitative analysis to establish elasticity behavior was done via high-speed camera footage (SA5, Photron, Japan) using Photron Fastcam Viewer software (Version 3.5.1, Photron, Japan) and visual observation. Damage mechanisms and behavior were qualitatively established by observation of the materials during and after shooting. The qualitative analysis found that of the two simulant materials tested, agar behaved more like brain in terms of damage and showed similar mechanical response to brain during the passage of the projectile, in terms of energy absorption and vertical velocity displacement. In conclusion agar showed a mechanical and subsequent damage response that was similar to brain compared to alginate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of disinfectant solutions on test materials used for the determination of masticatory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Silvério Campos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Masticatory function can be evaluated objectively as the capacity of an individual to fragment solid food after a fixed number of chewing cycles, the so-called masticatory performance (MP. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of four different test materials (Optosil, Optocal, Zetapuls, and Perfil and five disinfection protocols by aspersion and immersion (no disinfection, 2% glutaraldehyde, 2% chlorhexidine, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, and 70% alcohol on the MP, determined at three moments (24 hours, 15 and 60 days after storing the fragmented blocks. MP was evaluated by calculating X50 through the sieving technique and the Rosim-Ramler equation. The weight and microbiologic count (colony forming units, CFUs of chewed blocks were measured to identify any variations that would make MP determination unfeasible. Differences in MP were observed among the materials (p 0.05. The time and disinfection type had no influence on MP (p > 0.05. The number of CFUs differed between the nondisinfected group and all other disinfection groups at all time points (p < 0.01. No other significant difference in CFU count between disinfection groups was observed. In conclusion, disinfection did not alter the reliability of the test materials for the MP calculation for up to 60 days.

  16. Hypervelocity impact testing of advanced materials and structures for micrometeoroid and orbital debris shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2013-02-01

    A series of 66 hypervelocity impact experiments have been performed to assess the potential of various materials (aluminium, titanium, copper, stainless steel, nickel, nickel/chromium, reticulated vitreous carbon, silver, ceramic, aramid, ceramic glass, and carbon fibre) and structures (monolithic plates, open-cell foam, flexible fabrics, rigid meshes) for micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding. Arranged in various single-, double-, and triple-bumper configurations, screening tests were performed with 0.3175 cm diameter Al2017-T4 spherical projectiles at nominally 6.8 km/s and normal incidence. The top performing shields were identified through target damage assessments and their respective weight. The top performing candidate shield at the screening test condition was found to be a double-bumper configuration with a 0.25 mm thick Al3003 outer bumper, 6.35 mm thick 40 PPI aluminium foam inner bumper, and 1.016 mm thick Al2024-T3 rear wall (equal spacing between bumpers and rear wall). In general, double-bumper candidates with aluminium plate outer bumpers and foam inner bumpers were consistently found to be amongst the top performers. For this impact condition, potential weight savings of at least 47% over conventional all-aluminium Whipple shields are possible by utilizing the investigated materials and structures. The results of this study identify materials and structures of interest for further, more in-depth, impact investigations.

  17. Predicting the Reliability of Brittle Material Structures Subjected to Transient Proof Test and Service Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Palfi, Tamas; Baker, Eric H.

    Brittle materials today are being used, or considered, for a wide variety of high tech applications that operate in harsh environments, including static and rotating turbine parts, thermal protection systems, dental prosthetics, fuel cells, oxygen transport membranes, radomes, and MEMS. Designing brittle material components to sustain repeated load without fracturing while using the minimum amount of material requires the use of a probabilistic design methodology. The NASA CARES/Life 1 (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structure/Life) code provides a general-purpose analysis tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. This capability includes predicting the time-dependent failure probability of ceramic components against catastrophic rupture when subjected to transient thermomechanical loads (including cyclic loads). The developed methodology allows for changes in material response that can occur with temperature or time (i.e. changing fatigue and Weibull parameters with temperature or time). For this article an overview of the transient reliability methodology and how this methodology is extended to account for proof testing is described. The CARES/Life code has been modified to have the ability to interface with commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) codes executed for transient load histories. Examples are provided to demonstrate the features of the methodology as implemented in the CARES/Life program.

  18. Standardization of the carbon-phenolic materials and processes. Vol. 2: Test methods and specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William B.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon-phenolic composite materials are used in the ablation process in the nozzles of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The nozzle is lined with carbon cloth-phenolic resin composites. The extreme heat and erosion of the burning propellant are controlled by the carbon-phenolic composite by means of ablation, a heat and mass transfer process in which a large amount of heat is dissipated by sacrificailly removing material from a surface. Phenolic materials ablate with the initial formation of a char. The depth of the char is a function of the heat conduction coefficient of the composite. The char layer is a poor conductor so it protects the underlying phenolic composite from the high heat of the burning propellant. The nozzle component ablative liners (carbon cloth-phenolic resin composites) are tape wrapped, hydroclave and/or autoclave cured, machined and assembled. The tape consists of prepreg broadcloth. The materials flow sheet for the nozzle ablative liners is given. The prepreg is a three component system: phenolic resin, carbon cloth, and carbon filler. This is Volume 2 of the report, Test Methods and Specifications.

  19. Preliminary geochemical and physical testing of materials for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.L.; Anttonen, G.J.; O' Rourke, J.E.; Allirot, D.

    1980-04-01

    The available data on environmental conditions (both natural and man-made) at the Hanford Site are sufficient for preconceptual plug system design. Results of the geochemical testing program indicate that preferred candidate plug materials are chemically nonreactive during laboratory tests that simulated some of the expected environmental conditions. Agitated, crushed-basalt samples and mixtures containing basalt were found to be self-cementing under the hydrothermal conditions. Materials considered most suitable for consideration in future test programs and preconceptual plug design are mixtures of natural materials (basalt, clay, glaciofluvial sand, gravel, and zeolite) and processed natural materials (portland cement Type V and grouts plus additives).

  20. Leather for motorcyclist garments: Multi-test based material model fitting in terms of Ogden parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bońkowski T.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on experimental testing and modeling of genuine leather used for a motorcycle personal protective equipment. Simulations of powered two wheelers (PTW accidents are usually performed using human body models (HBM for the injury assessment equipped only with the helmet model. However, the kinematics of the PTW rider during a real accident is disturbed by the stiffness of his suit, which is normally not taken into account during the reconstruction or simulation of the accident scenario. The material model proposed in this paper can be used in numerical simulations of crash scenarios that include the effect of motorcyclist rider garment. The fitting procedure was conducted on 2 sets of samples: 5 uniaxial samples and 5 biaxial samples. The experimental characteristics were used to obtain the set of 25 constitutive material models in terms of Ogden parameters.

  1. TOXICITY TESTING OF RESTORATIVE DENTAL MATERIALS USING BRINE SHRIMP LARVAE (ARTEMIA SALINA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhem, Manar M.; Al-Hiyasat, Ahmad S.; Darmani, Homa

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of extracts of different composites, glass ionomer cement (GIC)s and compomers on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. Ethanolic extracts of four dental composites (Z-100; Solitaire 2; Filtek P60 and Synergy), a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer), two compomers (F2000; Dyract AP), and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow) were prepared from each material. Following evaporation of the ethanol, the extracts were resuspended in distilled water, which was then used to test the effects on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. For the composites, the extract of Synergy was the least toxic (88% viability) followed by the extracts of Solitaire 2, Z100 and P60 (75%, 67.5% and 50% viability, respectively). One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the resin composite materials (pbrine shrimp larvae followed by GICs and then composites. PMID:19089264

  2. Analysis of molybdenum-99 production capability in the materials test station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, Eric J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The United States of America currently relies on foreign suppliers to meet all of it needs for molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) used in medical diagnostic procedures. The current US demand is at least 5000 six-day curies per week. Neutronics calculations have been performed to assess whether the proposed Materials Test Station (MTS) could potentially generate Mo-99. Two target material options have been explored for Mo-99 production in the MTS: low enriched uranium (LEU) and Tc-99. For LEU, scoping calculations indicate that MTS can supply nearly half of the current US demand with only minor neutronic impact on the MTS primary mission. For the Tc-99 option, the MTS could produce about one-tenth of the US demand.

  3. Use of Silicon Carbide as Beam Intercepting Device Material: Tests, Issues and Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Delonca, M; Gil Costa, M; Vacca, A

    2014-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) stands as one of the most promising ceramic material with respect to its thermal shock resistance and mechanical strengths. It has hence been considered as candidate material for the development of higher performance beam intercepting devices at CERN. Its brazing with a metal counterpart has been tested and characterized by means of microstructural and ultrasound techniques. Despite the positive results, its use has to be evaluated with care, due to the strong evidence in literature of large and permanent volumetric expansion, called swelling, under the effect of neutron and ion irradiation. This may cause premature and sudden failure, and can be mitigated to some extent by operating at high temperature. For this reason limited information is available for irradiation below 100°C, which is the typical temperature of interest for beam intercepting devices like dumps or collimators. This paper describes the brazing campaign carried out at CERN, the results, and the theoretical and numeric...

  4. Preliminary experiences with material testing at the oxyfuel pilot plant at Schwarze Pumpe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjoernhede, Anders [Vattenfall Power, Gothenborg (Sweden); Montgomery, Melanie [Technical Univ. Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Inst. for Mekanisk Teknologi; Vattenfall Heat Nordic, Lyngby (Denmark); Bjurman, Martin; Henderson, Pamela [Vattenfall AB (Sweden). Research and Development; Gerhardt, Alexander [Vattenfall AB, Berlin (Germany). Research and Development

    2010-07-01

    Several material related issues may arise from oxyfuel combustion of coal due to the presence of CO{sub 2} but also as an effect of the partial recirculation of the flue gas. Two examples are increased corrosion and carburisation which may limit steam data, hence limiting the efficiency. A number of corrosion tests, in both conventional air-firing and oxyfuel mode, have been made in Vattenfalls 30 MW oxyfuel pilot plant located in Schwarze Pumpe, Germany. Internally cooled corrosion probes, equipped with ferritic, austenitic, super austenitic steels as well as Ni-based and FeCrAl alloys, simulating superheaters, economisers and air preheaters were exposed for up to 1500 hrs. The analyses show an indication of higher material wastage in oxyfuel compared to air combustion especially at the lower exposure temperatures. This may be due to increased sulphur concentration in corrosion front, increased heat flux, carburisation or other precipitate formations on austenitic steels and Ni-based alloys. (orig.)

  5. Non-Destructive Testing for the In Situ Assessment of the Ionic Flux in Cementitious Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Pierpaoli, Mattia; Giosuè, Chiara; Ruello, M. Letizia

    2017-08-01

    The study deals with the design, calibration and testing of a diffusive sampling probe for in situ assessment of ion mobility in binder-based matrix. In parallel, leaching texts were conducted to compare the ions release obtained under equilibrium condition with the dynamic flux induced by the diffusive sampling probe. The probe contains an ionic exchange resin that acts as sink, causing a re-supply of ions from the solid to the solution phase, and inducing diffusion fluxes from the mortar through a thin diffusion chamber. The flux depends on the quantity of mobile ions in the solid phase and on the exchanging rate from solid phase to solution. By means of the in situ sampling with this diffusive probe, information about the interaction of materials with the environment can be obtained. This information is very useful for the environmental impact assessment of the material and its durability.

  6. A steam loop for materials testing at 600 C in a biomass and waste fired boiler. Results of corrosion testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Pamela [Vattenfall AB, Stockholm (Sweden). Research and Development; Lundberg, Mats [Sandvik Materials Technology, Sandviken (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    A steam loop for corrosion testing was constructed in Esshete 1250 and attached to one of the superheaters in a 100 MWth bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) boiler. The loop raised the final steam temperature to about 600 C at 140 bar. A number of different test materials were welded into the loop for evaluation at low temperature (500 C steam) and high temperature (600 C steam). Their wall thicknesses were measured with a high resolution ultrasonic probe before and after exposure. A number of sections were examined metallographically after exposure. The steam loop was in service for one firing season (about 5500 h) and the fuel mixture was initially a biomass mix co-firing with 15% coal. However halfway through the firing season the coal was replaced with 15% packaging waste containing plastic and aluminium. The latter mixture (biomass and waste) was highly corrosive and accounted for most of the corrosion. The alloys with the highest Ni and Cr contents, Haynes 230, AC 66 and HR11N, showed negligible steam-side corrosion. The 11% chromium steel X20 and the nickel-base alloy HR11N were not tested at the higher steam temperature because of strength considerations. Regarding fireside corrosion at 500 C steam the alloys with the best corrosion resistance were Haynes 230, HR11N, AC 66 and HR3C followed by Esshete 1250 and TP247HFG. The corrosion rate of X20 was unacceptably high and is totally unsuitable for this fuel mix. At 600 C Haynes 230 showed the lowest corrosion rates, followed by TP 347 HFG, HR3C, AC66, and Esshete 1250. Large amounts of internal corrosion were seen. (orig.)

  7. Extracting material response from simple mechanical tests on hardening-softening-hardening viscoplastic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Nisha

    Compliant foams are usually characterized by a wide range of desirable mechanical properties. These properties include viscoelasticity at different temperatures, energy absorption, recoverability under cyclic loading, impact resistance, and thermal, electrical, acoustic and radiation-resistance. Some foams contain nano-sized features and are used in small-scale devices. This implies that the characteristic dimensions of foams span multiple length scales, rendering modeling their mechanical properties difficult. Continuum mechanics-based models capture some salient experimental features like the linear elastic regime, followed by non-linear plateau stress regime. However, they lack mesostructural physical details. This makes them incapable of accurately predicting local peaks in stress and strain distributions, which significantly affect the deformation paths. Atomistic methods are capable of capturing the physical origins of deformation at smaller scales, but suffer from impractical computational intensity. Capturing deformation at the so-called meso-scale, which is capable of describing the phenomenon at a continuum level, but with some physical insights, requires developing new theoretical approaches. A fundamental question that motivates the modeling of foams is `how to extract the intrinsic material response from simple mechanical test data, such as stress vs. strain response?' A 3D model was developed to simulate the mechanical response of foam-type materials. The novelty of this model includes unique features such as the hardening-softening-hardening material response, strain rate-dependence, and plastically compressible solids with plastic non-normality. Suggestive links from atomistic simulations of foams were borrowed to formulate a physically informed hardening material input function. Motivated by a model that qualitatively captured the response of foam-type vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) pillars under uniaxial compression [2011,"Analysis of

  8. 2006/07 Field Testing of Cellulose Fiber Insulation Enhanced with Phase Change Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Petrie, Thomas [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Syed, Azam M [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    Most recent improvements in building envelope technologies suggest that in the near future, residences will be routinely constructed to operate with very low heating and cooling loads. In that light, the application of novel building materials containing active thermal components (e.g., phase change materials [PCMs,] sub-venting, radiant barriers, and integrated hydronic systems) is like a final step in achieving relatively significant heating and cooling energy savings from technological improvements in the building envelope. It is expected that optimized building envelope designs using PCMs for energy storage can effectively bring notable savings in energy consumption and reductions in peak hour power loads. During 2006/07, a research team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a series of laboratory and field tests of several wall and roof assemblies using PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. This report summarizes the test results from the perspective of energy performance. The ORNL team is working on both inorganic and organic PCMs; this report discusses only paraffinic PCMs. A limited economical analysis also is presented. PCMs have been tested as a thermal mass component in buildings for at least 40 years. Most of the research studies found that PCMs enhanced building energy performance. In the case of the application of organic PCMs, problems such as high initial cost and PCM leaking (surface sweating) have hampered widespread adoption. Paraffinic hydrocarbon PCMs generally performed well, with the exception that they increased the flammability of the building envelope.

  9. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM0 Flight Hardware in Bench Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Engineering bench system hardware for the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested on a lab bench at the University of Colorado in Boulder. This is done in a horizontal arrangement to reduce pressure differences so the tests more closely resemble behavior in the microgravity of space. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  10. Standard Test Method for Effects of Cleaning and Chemical Maintenance Materials on Painted Aircraft Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers determination of the effects of cleaning solutions and liquid cleaner concentrates on painted aircraft surfaces (Note 1). Streaking, discoloration, and blistering may be determined visually. Softening is determined with a series of specially prepared pencils wherein determination of the softest pencil to rupture the paint film is made. Note 1—This test method is applicable to any paint film that is exposed to cleaning materials. MIL-PRF-85285 has been selected as a basic example. When other paint finishes are used, refer to the applicable material specification for panel preparation and system curing prior to testing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user ...

  11. Investigating Fracture Behaviors of Polymer and Polymeric Composite Materials Using Spiral Notch Torsion Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL; Tan, Ting [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Agastra, Pancasatya [Montana State University; Mandell, John [Montana State University; Bertelsen, Williams D. [Gougeon Brothers, Inc.; LaFrance, Carl M. [Molded Fiber Glass Companies

    2011-01-01

    Wind turbine blades are usually fabricated from fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) materials, which are subject to complex loading conditions during service. The reliability of the blades thus depends on the mechanical behaviors of the FRP under various loading conditions. Specifically, the fracture behavior of FRP is of great importance to both the scientific research community and the wind industry. In the current project, a new testing technique is proposed based on the spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) to study the fracture behavior of composite structures under mixed mode loading conditions, particularly under combined Mode I (flexural or normal tensile stress) and Mode III (torsional shear stress) loading. For the SNTT test method, round-rod specimens with V-grooved spiral lines are subjected to pure torsion. Depending on the pitch angle of the spiral lines, pure Mode I, pure Mode III, or mixed Mode I/Mode III loading conditions can be simulated. A three dimensional finite element analysis is then used to evaluate the fracture toughness and energy release rate of SNTT specimens. In the current study, both epoxy and fiberglass reinforced epoxy materials are investigated using the SNTT technique. This paper will discuss the fracture behaviors of mode I and mixed mode samples, with or without fatigue precrack. In addition, results from fractographic study and finite element analysis will be presented and discussed in detail.

  12. Hydraulic machine tests for compression of a quasi-brittle material at medium strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirion, Y.; Lesaffre, A. S.

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes an experimental device used to determine the dynamic compressive behaviour of quasi-brittle material at medium strain rates (1 to 100 s - 1). The tool combines a servo-hydraulic machine with a high-speed photography. Tests consist in compressing a sample between a dynamic jack and an instrumented anvil according to the direct impact method. The main difficulty of brittle material testing is to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the sample before failure because of their low failure strains. Furthermore, oscillations phenomena disturb load measurement. In this paper, we present adequate methods in order to carry out homogeneous testing and to simplify data interpretation. Two experimental configurations are developed. We use firstly the anvil as a load cell for low impact velocity and secondly the wave propagation in the anvil for medium impact velocity. Finally, in order to investigate experimentally the strain uniformity, axial strain measurements are quantified by image processing. Results are compared with experimental ones obtained on a crossbow system.

  13. High-resolution nondestructive testing of multilayer dielectric materials using wideband microwave synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hee; James, Robin; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2017-04-01

    Fiber Reinforced Polymer or Plastic (FRP) composites have been rapidly increasing in the aerospace, automotive and marine industry, and civil engineering, because these composites show superior characteristics such as outstanding strength and stiffness, low weight, as well as anti-corrosion and easy production. Generally, the advancement of materials calls for correspondingly advanced methods and technologies for inspection and failure detection during production or maintenance, especially in the area of nondestructive testing (NDT). Among numerous inspection techniques, microwave sensing methods can be effectively used for NDT of FRP composites. FRP composite materials can be produced using various structures and materials, and various defects or flaws occur due to environmental conditions encountered during operation. However, reliable, low-cost, and easy-to-operate NDT methods have not been developed and tested. FRP composites are usually produced as multilayered structures consisting of fiber plate, matrix and core. Therefore, typical defects appearing in FRP composites are disbondings, delaminations, object inclusions, and certain kinds of barely visible impact damages. In this paper, we propose a microwave NDT method, based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging algorithms, for stand-off imaging of internal delaminations. When a microwave signal is incident on a multilayer dielectric material, the reflected signal provides a good response to interfaces and transverse cracks. An electromagnetic wave model is introduced to delineate interface widths or defect depths from the reflected waves. For the purpose of numerical analysis and simulation, multilayered composite samples with various artificial defects are assumed, and their SAR images are obtained and analyzed using a variety of high-resolution wideband waveforms.

  14. Matrix Effects in Proficiency Testing Materials Influence the Accurate Measurement of Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Wang, Jianbing; Huang, Xianzhang; Zeng, Ruili; Zhang, Qiaoxuan; Lin, Haibiao; Han, Liqiao; Ke, Peifeng; Zhuang, Junhua

    2016-10-01

    A consensus on an accurate method to measure γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity for clinical purposes has not been achieved among practicing clinical laboratories. To improve analytical trueness, we evaluated the influences of matrix effects in proficiency testing (PT) materials on the measurement of GGT activity in human serum samples. Five fresh frozen human samples (FFS1-5) and five lyophilized proficiency testing materials (Lyo1-5) were distributed to 23 participating clinical laboratories for the measurement of GGT activity. Target GGT activity values for the samples were obtained by using previously approved reference methods. The results obtained by the Beckman Coulter Unicel DxC 800 Synchron analyzer were compared to the target values assigned by two reference laboratories, and the commutability of the lyophilized materials was evaluated according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guideline EP14-A2. The relative bias between the results obtained by the Beckman Coulter analyzer and the reference target values ranged from -27.2% to -18.0% for FFS1-5 and from 9.1% to 2.5% for Lyo1-5. Non-commutability of all lyophilized samples falling outside of the 95% prediction interval was observed. The results obtained for the lyophilized PT materials were deemed acceptable within the total allowable errors, suggesting that matrix effects may impart a false sense of confidence that clinical analytical systems are performing very well. A primary reference measurement procedure on fresh frozen serum provides a valuable method for evaluating the trueness of results measured by PT.

  15. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E

    2016-06-09

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  16. Scuffing resistance testing of piston ring materials for marine two-stroke diesel engines and mapping of the operating mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Olander, Petra; Jacobson, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    The incentive is strong for optimising sliding materials to reduce the risk for scuffing. In this study, scuffing tests were performed aiming towards finding new piston ring materials for greener marine diesel engines and also towards understanding scuffing mechanisms better. The tested ring materials where grey iron, Stellite 6, plasma sprayed cermet and high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) cermet (both cermets with the same compounds: Cr-carbide, Ni, Cr, Mo). The Stellite 6 and HVOF cermet perform...

  17. Identification of exponent from load-deformation relation for soft materials from impact tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciornei, F. C.; Alaci, S.; Romanu, I. C.; Ciornei, M. C.; Sopon, G.

    2018-01-01

    When two bodies are brought into contact, the magnitude of occurring reaction forces increase together with the amplitude of deformations. The load-deformation dependency of two contacting bodies is described by a function having the form F = Cxα . An accurate illustration of this relationship assumes finding the precise coefficient C and exponent α. This representation proved to be very useful in hardness tests, in dynamic systems modelling or in considerations upon the elastic-plastic ratio concerning a Hertzian contact. The classical method for identification of the exponent consists in finding it from quasi-static tests. The drawback of the method is the fact that the accurate estimation of the exponent supposes precise identification of the instant of contact initiation. To overcome this aspect, the following observation is exploited: during an impact process, the dissipated energy is converted into heat released by internal friction in the materials and energy for plastic deformations. The paper is based on the remark that for soft materials the hysteresis curves obtained for a static case are similar to the ones obtained for medium velocities. Furthermore, utilizing the fact that for the restitution phase the load-deformation dependency is elastic, a method for finding the α exponent for compression phase is proposed. The maximum depth of the plastic deformations obtained for a series of collisions, by launching, from different heights, a steel ball in free falling on an immobile prism made of soft material, is evaluated by laser profilometry method. The condition that the area of the hysteresis loop equals the variation of kinetical energy of the ball is imposed and two tests are required for finding the exponent. Five collisions from different launching heights of the ball were taken into account. For all the possible impact-pair cases, the values of the exponent were found and close values were obtained.

  18. Nacre-like materials using a simple doctor blading technique: Fabrication, testing and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkhalaf, M; Barthelat, F

    2016-03-01

    The remarkable mechanical performance of biological materials such as bone, nacre, and spider silk stems from their staggered microstructure in which stiff and strong reinforcements are elongated in the direction of loading, separated by softer interfaces, and shifted relative to each other. This structure results in useful combinations of modulus, strength and toughness and therefore is increasingly mimicked in bio-inspired engineering composites. Here, we report the use of a simple and versatile technique based on doctor-blading to fabricate staggered composites of microscopic alumina tablets with high alignment in a chitosan matrix. Tensile tests on these nacre-like materials show that the modulus and strength of the composite films are enhanced by the incorporation of ceramic tablets, but only up to 15vol% after which all properties degrade. This phenomenon, also reported in the past for most of nacre-like materials, composed of micro/nano tablets, obtained from different techniques, has been limiting our ability to produce large volumes of high-performance nacre-like materials. Examination of the structure of the films revealed that at lower tablet concentrations the tablets are well-aligned and well dispersed thorough the volume of the film. At 15vol% and beyond, we observed tablet misalignment and clustering. In order to investigate the impact of these imperfections on material performance we developed large scale finite element models representative of the structure of the composite films. These models show that the mechanical performance significantly degrades with tablet misalignment, and especially at high tablet concentrations. The simulations along with the SEM images therefore quantitatively explain the experimental trends, e.g. the degradation of mechanical properties at high tablet contents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL FATIGUE OF METALLIC MATERIALS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS – A REVIEW OF KOREAN TEST PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHANGHEUI JANG

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental fatigue of the metallic components in light water reactors has been the subject of extensive research and regulatory interest in Korea and abroad. Especially, it was one of the key domestic issues for the license renewal of operating reactors and licensing of advanced reactors during the early 2000s. To deal with the environmental fatigue issue domestically, a systematic test program has been initiated and is still underway. The materials tested were SA508 Gr.1a low alloy steels, 316LN stainless steels, cast stainless steels, and an Alloy 690 and 52M weld. Through tests and subsequent analysis, the mechanisms of reduced low cycle fatigue life have been investigated for those alloys. In addition, the effects of temperature, dissolved oxygen level, and dissolved hydrogen level on low cycle fatigue behaviors have been investigated. In this paper, the test results and key analysis results are briefly summarized. Finally, an on-going test program for hot-bending of 347 stainless steel is introduced.

  20. Environmental Fatigue of Metallic Materials in Nuclear Power Plants - A Review of Korean Test Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Changheul; Jang, Hun; Hong, Jongdae [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyunchul [Doosan Heavy Industry and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Soon; Lee, Jaegon [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Environmental fatigue of the metallic components in light water reactors has been the subject of extensive research and regulatory interest in Korea and abroad. Especially, it was one of the key domestic issues for the license renewal of operating reactors and licensing of advanced reactors during the early 2000s. To deal with the environmental fatigue issue domestically, a systematic test program has been initiated and is still underway. The materials tested were SA508 Gr.1a low alloy steels, 316LN stainless steels, cast stainless steels, and an Alloy 690 and 52M weld. Through tests and subsequent analysis, the mechanisms of reduced low cycle fatigue life have been investigated for those alloys. In addition, the effects of temperature, dissolved oxygen level, and dissolved hydrogen level on low cycle fatigue behaviors have been investigated. In this paper, the test results and key analysis results are briefly summarized. Finally, an on-going test program for hot-bending of 347 stainless steel is introduced.

  1. The 5th surveillance testing for Kori unit 1 reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwun Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-08-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 5th surveillance testing was performed primarily by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and Westinhouse corporation partially involved in testing and calculation data evaluation in order to obtain reliable test result. Fast neutron fluences for capsule V, T, S, R and P were 5.087E+18, 1.115E+19, 1.228E+19, 2.988E+19, and 3.938E+19n/cm2, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.940 for the 1st through 5th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 7% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.9846E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 17th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 24, 32, 40 and 48EFPY would reach 3.0593E+19, 4.0695E+19, 5.0797E+19 and 6.0900E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. PTS analysis for Kori unit 1 showed that 27.93EFPY was the threshold value for 300 deg F requirement. 71 refs., 33 figs., 52 tabs. (Author)

  2. The JRC Nanomaterials Repository: A unique facility providing representative test materials for nanoEHS research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totaro, Sara; Cotogno, Giulio; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Pianella, Francesca; Roncaglia, Marco; Olsson, Heidi; Riego Sintes, Juan M; Crutzen, Hugues P

    2016-11-01

    The European Commission has established a Nanomaterials Repository that hosts industrially manufactured nanomaterials that are distributed world-wide for safety testing of nanomaterials. In a first instance these materials were tested in the OECD Testing Programme. They have then also been tested in several EU funded research projects. The JRC Repository of Nanomaterials has thus developed into serving the global scientific community active in the nanoEHS (regulatory) research. The unique Repository facility is a state-of-the-art installation that allows customised sub-sampling under the safest possible conditions, with traceable final sample vials distributed world-wide for research purposes. This paper describes the design of the Repository to perform a semi-automated subsampling procedure, offering high degree of flexibility and precision in the preparation of NM vials for customers, while guaranteeing the safety of the operators, and environmental protection. The JRC nanomaterials are representative for part of the world NMs market. Their wide use world-wide facilitates the generation of comparable and reliable experimental results and datasets in (regulatory) research by the scientific community, ultimately supporting the further development of the OECD regulatory test guidelines. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Complementary methods for nondestructive testing of composite materials reinforced with carbon woven fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigmann, R.; Iftimie, N.; Sturm, R.; Vizureanu, P.; Savin, A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents complementary methods used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite materials reinforced with carbon woven fibers as two electromagnetic methods using sensor with orthogonal coils and sensor with metamaterials lens as well as ultrasound phased array method and Fiber Bragg gratings embedded instead of a carbon fiber for better health monitoring. The samples were impacted with low energy in order to study delamination influence. The electromagnetic behavior of composite was simulated by finite- difference time-domain (FDTD) software, showing a very good concordance with electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation tests.

  4. Materials Testing and Cost Modeling for Composite Parts Through Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    fabrication (FFF) through Mark Forged, Inc.’s Mark One machine, this research creates PA6 dog- bone specimens for (1) a design of experiments (DOE...procedure and (2) a destructive test of a continuous fiber composite specimen from the Mark One machine. Second, this ^Åèìáëáíáçå=oÉëÉ~êÅÜ=mêçÖê~ãW= `êÉ...accomplished by avoiding the tools , dies, and material waste that accompany conventional manufacturing processes (Morrow et al., 2007; Serres et al

  5. Thermal-vacuum facility with in-situ mechanical loading. [for testing space construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Hansen, J. S.; Holzer, R. P.; Uffen, B.; Mabson, G.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a thermal-vacuum space simulator used to assess property changes of fiber-reinforced polymer composite systems. The facility can achieve a vacuum of approximately .0000001 torr with temperatures ranging from -200 to +300 F. Some preliminary experimental results are presented for materials subjected to thermal loading up to 200 F. The tests conducted include the evaluation of matrix modulus and strength, coefficients of thermal expansion, and fracture toughness. Though the experimental program is at an early stage, the data appear to indicate that these parameters are influenced by hard vacuum.

  6. Common Diaper Ingredient Questions: Modern Disposable Diaper Materials Are Safe and Extensively Tested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counts, Jennifer; Weisbrod, Annie; Yin, Shan

    2017-05-01

    Today's disposable diapers are high-performance and well-tested products, designed to keep skin dry and healthy. They are primarily made of biologically inert polymers, commonly used in fabrics and other materials that are in contact with skin, and in foods and cosmetics. Still, product safety and ingredients in everyday products can be a source of anxiety for new parents. This article provides the facts behind some commonly asked questions from consumers about diaper ingredients and safety, including myths and facts related to chlorine, latex, dyes, and chemical additives.

  7. A High Temperature Cyclic Oxidation Data Base for Selected Materials Tested at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic oxidation test results for some 1000 high temperature commercial and experimental alloys have been collected in an EXCEL database. This database represents over thirty years of research at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The data is in the form of a series of runs of specific weight change versus time values for a set of samples tested at a given temperature, cycle time, and exposure time. Included on each run is a set of embedded plots of the critical data. The nature of the data is discussed along with analysis of the cyclic oxidation process. In addition examples are given as to how a set of results can be analyzed. The data is assembled on a read-only compact disk which is available on request from Materials Durability Branch, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  8. Testing of Bearing Materials for Large Two-stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder; Persson, Sebastian; Vølund, Anders

    2013-01-01

    In large two-stroke marine diesel engines bearings are designed with the intention that these need not be replaced during the life of the engine. The design has shown very good service experiences. The design parameters of the main bearings are, among others, based on the average maximum specific...... load which the bearing should operate under. In general, the frictional loss is less than 1% of the nominal power of the engine but is still a target for optimization. Fatigue mechanisms of bearing lining material are not fully understood and the design limits with regards to minimum oil film thickness...... disc, with a rotational speed of 2000 rpm. Parameters, such as bearing load, rotational speed, oil temperature, oil contamination is controlled/monitored in order to achieve repeatability and a systematic approach to the experiments. Test performed on the test-rig shows good correlation on the fatigue...

  9. Testing of bearing materials for large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vølund, Anders; Klit, Peder; Persson, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    In large two-stroke marine diesel engines, bearings are designed to last the lifetime of the engine. The design has shown very good service experiences. The design parameters of the main bearings are, among others, based on the average maximum specific load which the bearing should operate under....... In general, the frictional loss is less than 1% of the nominal power of the engine but is still a target for optimization. Fatigue mechanisms of bearing lining material are not fully understood and the design limits with regards to minimum oil film thickness, max oil film pressure and oil film pressure...... repeatability and a systematic approach to the experiments. Test performed on the test-rig shows good correlation on the fatigue cracks with those experienced on large two-stroke journal bearings....

  10. Solar tests of aperture plate materials for solar thermal dish collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1983-08-01

    In parabolic dish solar collectors, walk-off of the spot of concentrated sunlight is a hazard if a malfunction causes the concentrator to stop following the Sun. Therefore, a test program was carried out to evaluate the behavior of various ceramics, metals, and polymers under solar irradiation of about 7000 kW/sq m. (peak) for 15 minutes. The only materials that did not slump or shatter were two grades of medium-grain extruded graphite. High purity, slip-cast silica might be satisfactory at somewhat lower flux. Oxidation of the graphite appeared acceptable during tests simulating walk-off, acquisition (2000 cycles on/off Sun), and spillage (continuous on-Sun operation).

  11. Standard practice for slow strain rate testing to evaluate the susceptibility of metallic materials to environmentally assisted cracking

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for the design, preparation, and use of axially loaded, tension test specimens and fatigue pre-cracked (fracture mechanics) specimens for use in slow strain rate (SSR) tests to investigate the resistance of metallic materials to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). While some investigators utilize SSR test techniques in combination with cyclic or fatigue loading, no attempt has been made to incorporate such techniques into this practice. 1.2 Slow strain rate testing is applicable to the evaluation of a wide variety of metallic materials in test environments which simulate aqueous, nonaqueous, and gaseous service environments over a wide range of temperatures and pressures that may cause EAC of susceptible materials. 1.3 The primary use of this practice is to furnish accepted procedures for the accelerated testing of the resistance of metallic materials to EAC under various environmental conditions. In many cases, the initiation of EAC is accelerated through the applic...

  12. Ames Research Center Shear Tests of SLA-561V Heat Shield Material for Mars-Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Michael; Tran, Huy; Henline, William; Cartledge, Alan; Hui, Frank; Tran, Duoc; Zimmerman, Norm

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results of arc-jet testing at Ames Research Center on behalf of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the development of the Mars-Pathfinder heat shield. The current test series evaluated the performance of the ablating SLA-561V heat shield material under shear conditions. In addition, the effectiveness of several methods of repairing damage to the heat shield were evaluated. A total of 26 tests were performed in March 1994 in the 2 in. X 9 in. arc-heated turbulent Duct Facility, including runs to calibrate the facility to obtain the desired shear stress conditions. A total of eleven models were tested. Three different conditions of shear and heating were used. The non-ablating surface shear stresses and the corresponding, approximate, non-ablating surface heating rates were as follows: Condition 1, 170 N/m(exp 2) and 22 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 2, 240 N/m(exp 2) and 40 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 3, 390 N/m(exp 2) and 51 W/cm(exp 2). The peak shear stress encountered in flight is represented approximately by Condition 1; however, the heating rate was much less than the peak flight value. The peak heating rate that was available in the facility (at Condition 3) was about 30 percent less than the maximum value encountered during flight. Seven standard ablation models were tested, of which three models were instrumented with thermocouples to obtain in-depth temperature profiles and temperature contours. An additional four models contained a variety of repair plugs, gaps, and seams. These models were used to evaluated different repair materials and techniques, and the effect of gaps and construction seams. Mass loss and surface recession measurements were made on all models. The models were visually inspected and photographed before and after each test. The SLA-561 V performed well; even at test Condition 3, the char remained intact. Most of the resins used for repairs and gap fillers performed poorly. However, repair plugs made of SLA-561V performed

  13. Results of a Saxitoxin Proficiency Test Including Characterization of Reference Material and Stability Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Harju

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A saxitoxin (STX proficiency test (PT was organized as part of the Establishment of Quality Assurance for the Detection of Biological Toxins of Potential Bioterrorism Risk (EQuATox project. The aim of this PT was to provide an evaluation of existing methods and the European laboratories’ capabilities for the analysis of STX and some of its analogues in real samples. Homogenized mussel material and algal cell materials containing paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP toxins were produced as reference sample matrices. The reference material was characterized using various analytical methods. Acidified algal extract samples at two concentration levels were prepared from a bulk culture of PSP toxins producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii. The homogeneity and stability of the prepared PT samples were studied and found to be fit-for-purpose. Thereafter, eight STX PT samples were sent to ten participating laboratories from eight countries. The PT offered the participating laboratories the possibility to assess their performance regarding the qualitative and quantitative detection of PSP toxins. Various techniques such as official Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC methods, immunoassays, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for sample analyses.

  14. Finite element analysis of the high strain rate testing of polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwade, C. V.; Alghamdi, A. S.; Ashcroft, I. A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.; Song, M.

    2012-08-01

    Advanced polymer materials are finding an increasing range of industrial and defence applications. Ultra-high molecular weight polymers (UHMWPE) are already used in lightweight body armour because of their good impact resistance with light weight. However, a broader use of such materials is limited by the complexity of the manufacturing processes and the lack of experimental data on their behaviour and failure evolution under high-strain rate loading conditions. The current study deals with an investigation of the internal heat generation during tensile of UHMWPE. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the tensile test is developed and validated the with experimental work. An elastic-plastic material model is used with adiabatic heat generation. The temperature and stresses obtained with FE analysis are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental results. The model can be used as a simple and cost effective tool to predict the thermo-mechanical behaviour of UHMWPE part under various loading conditions.

  15. Ablative material testing for low-pressure, low-cost rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, G. Paul; Smith, Timothy D.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of ablative materials suitable for the production of light weight, low cost rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles are presented. Ten individual specimens of four different compositions of silica cloth-reinforced phenolic resin materials were evaluated for comparative erosion in a subscale rocket engine combustion chamber. Gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen were used as propellants, operating at a nominal chamber pressure of 1138 kPa (165 psi) and a nominal mixture ratio (O/F) of 3.3. These conditions were used to thermally simulate operation with RP-1 and liquid oxygen, and achieved a specimen throat gas temperature of approximately 2456 K (4420 R). Two high-density composition materials exhibited high erosion resistance, while two low-density compositions exhibited approximately 6-75 times lower average erosion resistance. The results compare favorably with previous testing by NASA and provide adequate data for selection of ablatives for low pressure, low cost rocket engines.

  16. Results of a Saxitoxin Proficiency Test Including Characterization of Reference Material and Stability Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harju, Kirsi; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Avondet, Marc-André; Arnold, Werner; Schär, Martin; Luginbühl, Werner; Kremp, Anke; Suikkanen, Sanna; Kankaanpää, Harri; Burrell, Stephen; Söderström, Martin; Vanninen, Paula

    2015-11-25

    A saxitoxin (STX) proficiency test (PT) was organized as part of the Establishment of Quality Assurance for the Detection of Biological Toxins of Potential Bioterrorism Risk (EQuATox) project. The aim of this PT was to provide an evaluation of existing methods and the European laboratories' capabilities for the analysis of STX and some of its analogues in real samples. Homogenized mussel material and algal cell materials containing paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins were produced as reference sample matrices. The reference material was characterized using various analytical methods. Acidified algal extract samples at two concentration levels were prepared from a bulk culture of PSP toxins producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii. The homogeneity and stability of the prepared PT samples were studied and found to be fit-for-purpose. Thereafter, eight STX PT samples were sent to ten participating laboratories from eight countries. The PT offered the participating laboratories the possibility to assess their performance regarding the qualitative and quantitative detection of PSP toxins. Various techniques such as official Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) methods, immunoassays, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for sample analyses.

  17. Small specimen test technology of fracture toughness in structural material F82H steel for fusion nuclear reactors

    OpenAIRE

    若井 栄一; 大塚 英男; 松川 真吾; 安堂 正己; 實川 資朗

    2006-01-01

    Small specimen test technology (SSTT) has been developed to investigate mechanical properties of nuclear materials. SSTT has been driven by limited availability of effective irradiation volumes in test reactors and accelerator-based neutron and charged particle sources, and it is very useful for the reduction of waste materials produced in nuclear engineering. In this study new bend test machines have been developed to obtain fracture behaviors of F82H steel for very small bend specimens of p...

  18. Reaction-to-Fire of Wood Products and Other Building Materials: Part 1, Room/Corner Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrej Grexa; Mark A. Dietenberger; Robert H. White

    2012-01-01

    This project researched the assessment of reaction-to-fire of common materials using the full-scale room/corner test (ISO 9705) protocol and the predictions of time to flashover using results from the bench-scale cone calorimeter test (ISO 5660-1). Using a burner protocol of 100 kW for 10 min, followed by 300 kW for 10 min and the test materials on the walls only, we...

  19. Development of a Low-Cost, Subscale Test System to Evaluate Particle Impingement Erosion in Nozzle Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansing, Matthew D.; Lawrence, Timothy W.; Gordon, Gail H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview on the development of a low-cost, subscale test system to evaluate particle impingement erosion in nozzle ablative materials. Details are given on the need for a new test bed, solid fuel torch components, solid fuel torch test, additional uses for the solid fuel torch, the development of a supersonic blast tube (SSBT), and particle impingement material discrimination.

  20. Threshold Studies of Heated HMX-Based Energetic Material Targets Using the Steven Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switzer, L L; Vandersall, K S; Chidester, S K; Greenwood, D W; Tarver, C M

    2003-07-01

    Impact tests performed at low velocity on heated energetic material samples are of interest when considering the situation of energetic materials involved in a fire. To determine heated reaction thresholds, Steven Test targets containing PBX 9404 or LX-04 samples heated to the range of 150-170 C were impacted at velocities up to 150 m/s by two different projectile head geometries. Comparing these measured thresholds to ambient temperature thresholds revealed that the heated LX-04 thresholds were considerably higher than ambient, whereas the heated PBX 9404 thresholds were only slightly higher than the ambient temperature thresholds. The violence of reaction level of the PBX 9404 was considerably higher than that of the LX-04 as measured with four overpressure gauges. The varying results in these samples with different HMX/binder configurations indicate that friction plays a dominant role in reaction ignition during impact. This work outlines the experimental details, compares the thresholds and violence levels of the heated and ambient temperature experiments, and discusses the dominant mechanisms of the measured thresholds.

  1. Characterization of the decomposition of compounds derived from imidazolidinyl urea in cosmetics and patch test materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Takahiro; Takeda, Akihiro; Asada, Akiko; Kajimura, Keiji

    2012-11-01

    Imidazolidinyl urea releases formaldehyde through decomposition. However, there have been few reports on the chemistry of imidazolidinyl urea in cosmetics. The aim of this study was to characterize imidazolidinyl urea-derived compounds in cosmetics and to determine which compounds are responsible for the cross-reactivity with diazolidinyl urea. We analysed imidazolidinyl urea dissolved in aqueous solutions, imidazolidinyl urea patch test materials and imidazolidinyl urea-preserved cosmetics by high-performance liquid chromatography/photodiode array detection and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The results were compared with those obtained with a diazolidinyl urea aqueous solution. In the analysed cosmetic samples and patch test materials, imidazolidinyl urea was primarily composed of allantoin, (4-hydroxymethyl-2,5-dioxo-imidazolidine-4-yl)-urea (HU), (3,4-bis-hydroxymethyl-2,5-dioxo-imidazolidine-4-yl)-urea (3,4-BHU), and (3-hydroxymethyl-2,5-dioxo-imidazolidine-4-yl)-urea. Two of the imidazolidinyl urea-derived major decomposition compounds - HU and 3,4-BHU - are common in the diazolidinyl urea-decomposed compound present in cosmetics. These compounds are possible causative agents of the cross-reactivity between diazolidinyl urea and imidazolidinyl urea. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Testing of High Thermal Cycling Stability of Low Strength Concrete as a Thermal Energy Storage Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete has the potential to become a solution for thermal energy storage (TES integrated in concentrating solar power (CSP systems due to its good thermal and mechanical properties and low cost of material. In this study, a low strength concrete (C20 is tested at high temperatures up to 600 °C. Specimens are thermally cycled at temperatures in the range of 400–300 °C, 500–300 °C, and 600–300 °C, which TES can reach in operation. For comparison, specimens also cycled at temperature in the range of 400–25 °C (room temperature, 500–25 °C, and 600–25 °C. It is found from the test results that cracks are not observed on the surfaces of concrete specimens until the temperature is elevated up to 500 °C. There is mechanical deterioration of concrete after exposure to high temperature, especially to high thermal cycles. The residual compressive strength of concrete after 10 thermal cycles between 600 °C and 300 °C is about 58.3%, but the specimens remain stable without spalling, indicating possible use of low strength concrete as a TES material.

  3. Using plastic instability to validate and test the strength law of a material under pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolis Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In dynamical experiments (pressures higher than 10 GPa, strain rate around 104–106 s−1, metals are classically described using an equation of state and a strength law which is usually set using data from compression or traction tests at low pressure (few MPa and low strain rates (less than 103 s−1. In consequence, it needs to be extrapolated during dynamical experiments. Classical shock experiments do not allow a fine validation of the stress law due to the interaction with the equation of state. To achieve this aim, we propose to use a dedicated experiment. We started from the works of Barnes et al. (1974 and 1980 where plastic instabilities initiated by a sinusoidal perturbation at the surface of the metal develop with the pressure. We adapted this principle to a new shape of initial perturbation and realized several experiments. We will present the setup and its use on a simple material: gold. We will detail how the interpretation of the experiments, coupled with previous characterization experiments helps us to test the strength lax of this material at high pressure and high strain rate.

  4. Identification of material parameters for springback prediction using cyclic tension–compression test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaweesak Phongsai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In sheet metal forming process, springback is a critical problem for die makers, particularly in case of advanced high strength steels. Therefore, FE simulations were often used to calculate materials deformation behavior and the springback occurrence of formed sheet metals. Recently, the Yoshida–Uemori model, a kinematic hardening model, has shown great capability for describing the elastic recovery of a material. Nevertheless, determination of model parameters is sophisticated for industrial applications. In this work, an AHS steel grade JIS JSC780Y was investigated, in which tension–compression tests were carried out and the procedure of parameter identification was analyzed. Different fitting methods were examined and verified by evaluation of cyclic stress–strain responses obtained from simulations of 1–element model and experiments. The most appropriate parameter set was determined. Finally, hat shape forming test was performed and springback obtained by calculation and experiment was compared. It was found that the introduced procedure could be acceptably applied.

  5. Reading materials for post-literacy: The development and testing of a model of social writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Harbans S.

    1989-12-01

    A model of social writing, for use in writing socially relevant, easy-to-read, follow-up books for neo-literate adults, is presented. The model was fully developed and tested in the context of a series of writers' workshops during 1981-87; and incorporates all of the three aspects of writing: the expressive, the cognitive, and the social. Specifically, the following elements are included: selection of subject and topic within a dialectic of national development needs and community learning needs; negotiable definitions of general and specific objectives; acquiring knowledge of subject matter, and establishing necessary collaboration with subject-matter specialists; content planning to choose content and language of discourse, participatively with the future community of readers; choice of treatment of content as didactic or dramatic; outlining of manuscript as argument, dialogue or story; writing easy-to-read yet interesting materials; trying out the manuscript and making revisions; working with the illustrator and the editor; and preparing the manuscript for printing. Both the development and the testing of the model involved reflection-in-action and not stand-alone research exercises. The successful use of the model in workshops to train writers of post-literacy materials provided one source of support for the model. A comparison of this model of social writing with other models of writing available in literature has provided further support for the conceptual and procedural structure of the model. Transfers of the model to other cultural settings as well as to the writing of other types of educational materials, such as distance education texts and units, have also proved effective.

  6. Cryopreservation: Extending the viability of biological material from sea urchin (Echinometra lucunter) in ecotoxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Raphaela Cantarino; da Silva Veronez, Alexandra Caroline; Tovar, Thaís Tristão; Adams, Serean; Bartolomeu, Dayse Aline; Peronico, Clayton; Furley, Tatiana Heid

    2017-11-08

    The sea urchin, Echinometra lucunter, is widely used in embryo-larval tests for ecotoxicological studies in Brazil and other countries. For each test, sea urchins are collected from the wild and this can cause impact on wild populations and it is limited by the weather and season which in turn limits the ability to carry out the tests. Cryopreservation is a method of live biological material storage at low temperature and can be used for long periods with little decline in viability, reducing the number of animals taken from the wild and enabling testing to be carried out on demand, irrespective of spawning season or location. In this study, 15 combinations of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) were evaluated on spermatozoa, subjected to a rapid cooling curve followed by immersion in liquid nitrogen. Twenty-four CPA combinations were evaluated on eggs subjected to a more gradual cooling curve in nitrogen vapor down to -35 °C and then plunging in liquid nitrogen. Fertilization tests using cryopreserved spermatozoa gave high pluteus larvae yields (≈80%) when concentrations of 10.5% or 13.65% ME2SO or 13.65% ME2SO+15.75% sucrose were used. The higher concentrations of ME2SO plus sucrose were more effective at maintaining the fertilization capacity of spermatozoa post-thawing. Egg cryopreservation was not successful with 0% fertilization observed post-thawing. The results suggest that it is feasible to implement spermatozoa cryopreservation as technological innovation to create a sperm bank for E. lucunter, which can be used in ecotoxicological tests, bringing benefits for researches and contributing to the conservation of the species. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Tests for evaluation of pellets as foundation bed material KBP1003 - ASKAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsson, Anna (ES-Konsult AB (Sweden))

    2011-12-15

    The reference design for the backfill of deposition tunnels, described in SKB (2010), include bentonite blocks, bentonite pellets and a foundation bed of bentonite pellets or granulate. The tunnel floor needs to be flat and have sufficient bearing capacity to make it possible to stack the backfill blocks according to the reference design. To achieve a flat foundation the tunnel floor will be covered with a bed of pellets or granulate made of bentonite clay. The bed can be either compacted or non compacted. Bed tests have been performed as a part of the project KBP1003 DP1 Design, which is a subproject of KBP1003 ASKAR. The main objectives for KBP1003 DP1 is to define all requirements for the backfill and its production and installation prior to start of the large scale tests, based on given perquisites. KBP1003 is based on the reference design for the backfill of deposition tunnels which was developed in 2010 (SKB 2010). The concept for installation and block design has been further developed during the project. A new dimension of the backfill blocks has been developed; the chosen dimension makes it possible to gain overlapping joints between the blocks by block stacking. The further developed concept is hereinafter referred to as the ASKAR-concept. The purpose of the performed bed tests was to define the bed requirements in the backfill installation to enable stable stacking of backfill blocks. The tests included stacking of blocks on different bed materials, on blasted and wire sawn floor, with and without concurrent water inflow. The bed tests was subdivided into four main parts: - block stacking on different bed compositions - block stacking on bed during water inflow - block stacking in a realistic test tunnel - block stacking on the upper part of the deposition hole and bevel

  8. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1979-06-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. During the past year, the technical activities emphasized the reformulation of a commercial grade of ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer for use as a pottant in solar cell module manufacture. After experimenting with a variety of techniques, a vacuum-bag process was developed and found to be an excellent encapsulation method. Adhesive strengths and primers for the bonding of ethylene/vinyl acetate to superstrate and substrate materials was assessed with encouraging results. The weathering effects on ten other polymers exposed to twelve months of weathering in Arizona, Florida, and under EMMAQUA were evaluated by determination of tensile strengths, elongations, optical transmission, etc. As may be expected, the best overall retention of mechanical properties is found for the fluorocarbon polymers, especially FEP. Hard coatings containing ultraviolet absorbers were investigated for the purpose of providing a soil resistant surface and additional weathering stability to the soft EVA pottant. Corrosion studies using a standard salt spray test were used to determine the degree of protection offered to a variety of metals by encapsulation in EVA pottant. A survey of scrim materials was also conducted. These open hole weaves are intended for use as spacers between the cell and substrate to provide a mechanical barrier, improve insulation resistance and prevent migration of the pigmented pottant over the cell surface. A mechanical engineering analysis of composite structural materials for use as substrates was performed. Results are presented in detail. (WHK)

  9. FIFTH STATUS REPORT: TESTING OF AGED SOFTWOOD FIBERBOARD MATERIAL FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.; Dunn, K.

    2014-04-15

    Samples have been prepared from a 9975 lower fiberboard subassembly fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in elevated humidity environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the hotter dry environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAC storage environment for up to 15 years. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected. Additional samples will be added to each aging environment, to support development of an aging model specific to softwood fiberboard. Post-conditioning data have been measured on samples from a single softwood fiberboard assembly, and baseline data are also available from a limited number of vendor-provided samples. This provides minimal information on the possible sample-to-sample variation exhibited by softwood fiberboard. Data to date are generally consistent with the range seen in cane fiberboard, but some portions of the data trends are skewed toward the lower end of that range. Two additional softwood fiberboard source packages have been obtained and will begin to provide data on the range of variability of this material.

  10. Remediation of metal-contaminated soils with the addition of materials - part II: leaching tests to evaluate the efficiency of materials in the remediation of contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Núñez, R; Alba, M D; Orta, M M; Vidal, M; Rigol, A

    2012-05-01

    The effect of the addition of materials on the leaching pattern of As and metals (Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, and Cd) in two contaminated soils was investigated. The examined materials included bentonites, silicates and industrial wastes, such as sugar foam, fly ashes and a material originated from the zeolitization of fly ash. Soil + material mixtures were prepared at 10% doses. Changes in the acid neutralization capacity, crystalline phases and contaminant leaching over a wide range of pHs were examined by using pH(stat) leaching tests. Sugar foam, the zeolitic material and MX-80 bentonite produced the greatest decrease in the leaching of pollutants due to an increase in the pH and/or the sorption capacity in the resulting mixture. This finding suggests that soil remediation may be a feasible option for the reuse of non-hazardous wastes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Not New, but Nearly Forgotten: the Testing Effect Decreases or even Disappears as the Complexity of Learning Materials Increases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gog, Tamara; Sweller, John

    2015-01-01

    The testing effect is a finding from cognitive psychology with relevance for education. It shows that after an initial study period, taking a practice test improves long-term retention compared to not taking a test and—more interestingly—compared to restudying the learning material. Boundary

  12. Not New, but Nearly Forgotten: The Testing Effect Decreases or Even Disappears as the Complexity of Learning Materials Increases

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gog, Tamara; Sweller, John

    2015-01-01

    The testing effect is a finding from cognitive psychology with relevance for education. It shows that after an initial study period, taking a practice test improves long-term retention compared to not taking a test and--more interestingly--compared to restudying the learning material. Boundary conditions of the effect that have received attention…

  13. Not New, but Nearly Forgotten: the Testing Effect Decreases or even Disappears as the Complexity of Learning Materials Increases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A.J.M. van Gog (Tamara); J. Sweller (John)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe testing effect is a finding from cognitive psychology with relevance for education. It shows that after an initial study period, taking a practice test improves long-term retention compared to not taking a test and—more interestingly—compared to restudying the learning material.

  14. Calculation and comparisons with measurement of fast neutron fluxes in the material testing facilities of the NRU research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, T.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The NRU reactor at Chalk River provides three irradiation facilities to study the effects of fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) on reactor materials for assessing material damage and deformation. The facilities comprise two types of fast neutron rods (Mark 4 and Mark 7), and a Material Test Bundle (MTB) irradiated in a loop site. This paper describes the neutronic simulation of these testing facilities using the WIMS-AECL and TRIAD codes, and comparisons with the fast neutron flux measurements using iron-wire activation techniques. It also provides comparisons of flux levels, neutron spectra, and size limitations of the experimental cavities between these test facilities. (author)

  15. Material factors in relation to development time in liquid-penetrant inspection. Part 3. Testing of model plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irek P.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is the continuation of the previous ones entitled „Material factors in relation to development time in liquid-penetrant inspection. Part 1. Material factors“ and „Material factors in relation to development time in liquid-penetrant inspection. Part 2. Investigation programme and preliminary tests“ in which material factors influencing essentially the development time in penetrant testing as well as the range of their values have been specified. These factors are: material kind, surface roughness and imperfection width.

  16. Achieving Innovation and Affordability Through Standardization of Materials Development and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, M. H.; Zook, L. M.; Raley, R. E.; Chapman, C.

    2011-01-01

    The successful expansion of development, innovation, and production within the aeronautics industry during the 20th century was facilitated by collaboration of government agencies with the commercial aviation companies. One of the initial products conceived from the collaboration was the ANC-5 Bulletin, first published in 1937. The ANC-5 Bulletin had intended to standardize the requirements of various government agencies in the design of aircraft structure. The national space policy shift in priority for NASA with an emphasis on transferring the travel to low earth orbit to commercial space providers highlights an opportunity and a need for the national and global space industries. The same collaboration and standardization that is documented and maintained by the industry within MIL-HDBK-5 (MMPDS-01) and MIL-HBDK-17 (nonmetallic mechanical properties) can also be exploited to standardize the thermal performance properties, processing methods, test methods, and analytical methods for use in aircraft and spacecraft design and associated propulsion systems. In addition to the definition of thermal performance description and standardization, the standardization for test methods and analysis for extreme environments (high temperature, cryogenics, deep space radiation, etc) would also be highly valuable to the industry. Its subsequent revisions and conversion to MIL-HDBK-5 and then MMPDS-01 established and then expanded to contain standardized mechanical property design values and other related design information for metallic materials used in aircraft, missiles, and space vehicles. It also includes guidance on standardization of composition, processing, and analytical methods for presentation and inclusion into the handbook. This standardization enabled an expansion of the technologies to provide efficiency and reliability to the consumers. It can be established that many individual programs within the government agencies have been overcome with development costs

  17. Industry to Education Technical Transfer Program & Composite Materials. Composite Materials Course. Fabrication I Course. Fabrication II Course. Composite Materials Testing Course. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massuda, Rachel

    These four reports provide details of projects to design and implement courses to be offered as requirements for the associate degree program in composites and reinforced plastics technology. The reports describe project activities that led to development of curricula for four courses: composite materials, composite materials fabrication I,…

  18. Testing and Failure Mechanisms of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Hawkins-Reynolds, Ebony

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as specific spacecraft orientations in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and low beta angle Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM s have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents the results of testing that occurred from March through September of 2010 and builds on testing that occurred during the previous year.

  19. Standard test method for nondestructive assay of radioactive material by tomographic gamma scanning

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the nondestructive assay (NDA) of gamma ray emitting radionuclides inside containers using tomographic gamma scanning (TGS). High resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify the radionuclides of interest. The attenuation of an external gamma ray transmission source is used to correct the measurement of the emission gamma rays from radionuclides to arrive at a quantitative determination of the radionuclides present in the item. 1.2 The TGS technique covered by the test method may be used to assay scrap or waste material in cans or drums in the 1 to 500 litre volume range. Other items may be assayed as well. 1.3 The test method will cover two implementations of the TGS procedure: (1) Isotope Specific Calibration that uses standards of known radionuclide masses (or activities) to determine system response in a mass (or activity) versus corrected count rate calibration, that applies to only those specific radionuclides for which it is calibrated, and (2) Respo...

  20. Thermal Vacuum Test of Ice as a Phase Change Material Integrated with a Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steve A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan; Le, Hung V.

    2010-01-01

    Water may be used as radiation shielding for Solar Particle Events (SPE) to protect crewmembers in the Lunar Electric Rover (LER). Because the water is already present for radiation protection, it could also provide a mass efficient solution to the vehicle's thermal control system. This water can be frozen by heat rejection from a radiator and used as a Phase Change Material (PC1V1) for thermal storage. Use of this water as a PCM can eliminate the need for a pumped fluid loop thermal control system as well as reduce the required size of the radiator. This paper describes the testing and analysis performed for the Rover Engineering Development Unit (REDU), a scaled-down version of a water PCM heat sink for the LER. The REDU was tested in a thermal-vacuum chamber at environmental temperatures similar to those of a horizontal radiator panel on the lunar surface. Testing included complete freeze and melt cycles along with scaled transient heat load profiles simulating a 24-hour day for the rover.

  1. Sixth Status Report: Testing of Aged Softwood Fiberboard Material for the 9975 Shipping Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-31

    Samples have been prepared from several 9975 lower fiberboard subassemblies fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in some environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the two most aggressive environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAC storage environment for up to 15 years. Samples from an additional 3 softwood fiberboard assemblies have begun aging during the past year to provide information on the variability of softwood fiberboard behavior. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected to support development of an aging model specific to softwood fiberboard.

  2. Synthesis and testing of a conducting polymeric composite material for lightning strike protection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katunin, A.; Krukiewicz, K.; Turczyn, R.; Sul, P.; Łasica, A.; Catalanotti, G.; Bilewicz, M.

    2017-02-01

    Lightning strike protection is one of the important issues in the modern maintenance problems of aircraft. This is due to a fact that the most of exterior elements of modern aircraft is manufactured from polymeric composites which are characterized by isolating electrical properties, and thus cannot carry the giant electrical charge when the lightning strikes. This causes serious damage of an aircraft structure and necessity of repairs and tests before returning a vehicle to operation. In order to overcome this problem, usually metallic meshes are immersed in the polymeric elements. This approach is quite effective, but increases a mass of an aircraft and significantly complicates the manufacturing process. The approach proposed by the authors is based on a mixture of conducting and dielectric polymers. Numerous modeling studies which are based on percolation clustering using kinetic Monte Carlo methods, finite element modeling of electrical and mechanical properties, and preliminary experimental studies, allow achieving an optimal content of conducting particles in a dielectric matrix in order to achieve possibly the best electrical conductivity and mechanical properties, simultaneously. After manufacturing the samples with optimal content of a conducting polymer, mechanical and electrical characterization as well as high-voltage testing was performed. The application of such a material simplifies manufacturing process and ensures unique properties of aircraft structures, which allows for minimizing damage after lightning strike, as well as provide electrical bounding and grounding, interference shielding, etc. The proposed solution can minimize costs of repair, testing and certification of aircraft structures damaged by lightning strikes.

  3. Material Factors in Relation to Development Time in Liquid-Penetrant Inspection. Part 2. Investigation Programme and Preliminary Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irek P.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is the continuation of the previous one entitled “Material factors in relation to development time in liquid-penetrant inspection. Part 1. Material factors” in which the material factors influencing essentially the development time in penetrant testing have been marked out. These are: type of material, surface roughness and imperfection width. In the paper it has been described how to prepare the factorial plan which will enable to test every factor with taking into account its different values. Moreover, it has been presented investigations on natural cracks, their width and roughness profile what will allow to assign suitable values of independent variables to the factorial plan. The purpose of the plan prepared in such a way will be the determination of the influence of the material kind, surface roughness and discontinuity width on the development time in penetrant testing.

  4. Degradation of Polymeric Material used for Osteosynthesis and Comparison of Fracture Toughness Between Test and FEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijoy Paul

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable polymers such as PLA, PGA, PLGA etc., inside the human body often pose a tough challenge for the orthopedic doctors and material scientists. Unlike metallic or ceramic implants, where deterioration of the mechanical properties has never been an issue, biodegradable polymeric implants, used for Osteosynthesis, deteriorate while the fractured bone is subjected to kinesiological stress during healing process. To understand how biodegradable materials lose its mechanical properties, an investigation into the influence of degradation process on Mode-I fracture toughness of poly (lactide-co-glycolide, PLGA 85:15 material was initiated. The objective of this study was to build an improved understanding of the deterioration of biodegradable polymers mechanical properties during in-vitro degradation and how this change may affect long term in-vivo performance of the implants. A simple mathematical relationship was established to understand the change in the Young’s modulus during the degradation process. Compact tension specimens were designed and molded for mode-I fracture criterion and then put in 3% concentrated Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 to study the degradation process. FEA (Finite Element Analysis was used to study the change in mechanical properties and then the results were compared with the physical test. Mode-I fracture toughness, KIC was measured and the behavior of the polymer was also identified. It was seen that the fracture toughness, KIC of PLGA 85:15 decreased with the progression of degradation. Finally, it was concluded that an increase in the Young’s modulus made PLGA 85:15 very brittle and hence resulted in reduced fracture toughness.

  5. Effect of humic matter on metal adsorption onto clay materials: testing the linear additive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, Holger; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2009-10-13

    Migration of contaminants with low affinity for the aqueous phase is essentially governed by interaction with mobile carriers such as humic colloids. Their impact is, however, not sufficiently described by interaction constants alone since the humic carriers themselves are subject to a solid-liquid distribution that depends on geochemical parameters. In our study, co-adsorption of the REE terbium (as an analogue of trivalent actinides) and humic acid onto three clay materials (illite, montmorillonite, Opalinus clay) was investigated as a function of pH. (160)Tb(III) and (131)I-labelled humic acid were employed as radiotracers, allowing experiments at very low concentrations to mimic probable conditions in the far-field of a nuclear waste repository. Humate complexation of Tb was examined by anion and cation exchange techniques, also considering competitive effects of metals leached from the clay materials. The results revealed that desorption of metals from clay barriers, occurring in consequence of acidification processes, is generally counteracted in the presence of humic matter. For all clay materials under study, adsorption of Tb was found to be enhanced in neutral and acidic systems with humic acid, which is explained by additional adsorption of humic-bound Tb. A commonly used composite approach (linear additive model) was tested for suitability in reconstructing the solid-liquid distribution of Tb in ternary systems (Tb/humic acid/clay) on the basis of data determined for binary subsystems. The model can qualitatively explain the influence of humic acid as a function of pH, but it failed to reproduce our experimental data quantitatively. It appears that the elementary processes (metal adsorption, metal-humate complexation, humic acid adsorption) cannot be considered to be independent of each other. Possible reasons are discussed.

  6. Effect of humic matter on metal adsorption onto clay materials: Testing the linear additive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, Holger; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2009-10-01

    Migration of contaminants with low affinity for the aqueous phase is essentially governed by interaction with mobile carriers such as humic colloids. Their impact is, however, not sufficiently described by interaction constants alone since the humic carriers themselves are subject to a solid-liquid distribution that depends on geochemical parameters. In our study, co-adsorption of the REE terbium (as an analogue of trivalent actinides) and humic acid onto three clay materials (illite, montmorillonite, Opalinus clay) was investigated as a function of pH. 160Tb(III) and 131I-labelled humic acid were employed as radiotracers, allowing experiments at very low concentrations to mimic probable conditions in the far-field of a nuclear waste repository. Humate complexation of Tb was examined by anion and cation exchange techniques, also considering competitive effects of metals leached from the clay materials. The results revealed that desorption of metals from clay barriers, occurring in consequence of acidification processes, is generally counteracted in the presence of humic matter. For all clay materials under study, adsorption of Tb was found to be enhanced in neutral and acidic systems with humic acid, which is explained by additional adsorption of humic-bound Tb. A commonly used composite approach (linear additive model) was tested for suitability in reconstructing the solid-liquid distribution of Tb in ternary systems (Tb/humic acid/clay) on the basis of data determined for binary subsystems. The model can qualitatively explain the influence of humic acid as a function of pH, but it failed to reproduce our experimental data quantitatively. It appears that the elementary processes (metal adsorption, metal-humate complexation, humic acid adsorption) cannot be considered to be independent of each other. Possible reasons are discussed.

  7. Cleaning and materials compatibility test results for elimination of flammable solvents in wipe applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Edwin Paul

    2005-06-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made within the nuclear weapons complex (National Nuclear Security Administration) of the Department of Energy (DOE) to replace Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated solvents (i.e., flammable, toxic, corrosive, and reactive) and ozone-depleting chemicals (ODC) with more benign alternatives. Within the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) sectors, these solvents are used for cleaning hardware during routine maintenance operations. A primary goal of this study is to replace flammable solvents used in wiping applications. Two cleaners, including a hydrofluoroether (HFE) and an azeotrope of the HFE and isopropyl alcohol (IPA), have been studied as potential replacements for flammable solvents. Cleaning efficacy, short-term and long-term materials compatibility, corrosion, drying times, flammability, environment, safety and health (ES&H) and accelerated aging issues were among the experiments used to screen candidate solvents by the interagency team performing this work. This report presents cleaning efficacy results as determined by the contact angle Goniometer as well as materials compatibility results of various metal alloys and polymers. The results indicate that IPA (baseline cleaner) and the HFE/IPA azeotrope are roughly equivalent in their ability to remove fluorinated grease, silicone grease, and a simulated finger print contaminant from various metal alloys. All of the ASTM sandwich and immersion corrosion tests with IPA, HFE or the HFE/IPA azeotrope on metal alloys showed no signs of corrosion. Furthermore, no deleterious effects were noted for polymeric materials immersed in IPA, HFE, or the HFE/IPA azeotrope.

  8. A spallation-based irradiation test facility for fusion and future fission materials

    CERN Document Server

    Samec, K; Kadi, Y; Luis, R; Romanets, Y; Behzad, M; Aleksan, R; Bousson, S

    2014-01-01

    The EU’s FP7 TIARA program for developing accelerator-based facilities has recently demonstrated the unique capabilities of a compact and powerful spallation source for irradiating advanced nuclear materials. The spectrum and intensity of the neutron flux produced in the proposed facility fulfils the requirements of the DEMO fusion reactor for ITER, ADS reactors and also Gen III / IV reactors. Test conditions can be modulated, covering temperature from 400 to 550°C, liquid metal corrosion, cyclical or static stress up to 500 MPa and neutron/proton irradiation damage of up to 25 DPA per annum. The entire “TMIF” facility fits inside a cube 2 metres on a side, and is dimensioned for an accelerator beam power of 100 kW, thus reducing costs and offering great versatility and flexibility.

  9. Crack propagation through disordered materials as a depinning transition: A critical test of the theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponson, Laurent; Pindra, Nadjime

    2017-05-01

    The dynamics of a planar crack propagating within a brittle disordered material is investigated numerically. The fracture front evolution is described as the depinning of an elastic line in a random field of toughness. The relevance of this approach is critically tested through the comparison of the roughness front properties, the statistics of avalanches, and the local crack velocity distribution with experimental results. Our simulations capture the main features of the fracture front evolution as measured experimentally. However, some experimental observations such as the velocity distribution are not consistent with the behavior of an elastic line close to the depinning transition. This discrepancy suggests the presence of another failure mechanism not included in our model of brittle failure.

  10. Investigation of Thunniform Swimming Using Material Testing, Biomimetic Robotics and Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Saraiya, Vishaal; Zhu, Jianzhong; Lewis, Gregory; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2015-11-01

    Thunniform swimming is well recognized as an efficient method for high-speed long-distance underwater travelers such as tuna. Previous research has shown that tuna relies on contraction and relaxation of red muscle to generate angular motion of its large, crescent-shaped caudal fin through its peduncle. However, few researchers conduct deep investigation of material properties of tuna caudal fin and peduncle. This research project is composed of two parts, first of which is determining mechanical properties of components such as spine joints, tendons, fin rays and cartilage, from which the biomechanics of tuna tail can be better understood. The second part is building a robotic system mimicking a real tuna tail based on previously retrieved information, and testing the system inside a flow tank. With the help of PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry), fluid-structure interaction of the biomimetic fin is visualized and data such as swimming speed and power consumption are retrieved through the robotic system. The final outcome should explain how the material properties of tuna tail affect fluid dynamics of thunniform swimming. This project is supported by Office of Naval Research (ONRBAA13-022).

  11. Modelling welded material for ultrasonic testing using MINA: Theory and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysan, J.; Corneloup, G.; Chassignole, B.; Gueudré, C.; Ploix, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    Austenitic steel multi-pass welds exhibit a heterogeneous and anisotropic structure that causes difficulties in the ultrasonic testing. Increasing the material knowledge is a long term research field for LCND laboratory and EDF Les Renardières in France. A specific model has been developed: the MINA model (Modelling an Isotropy from Notebook of Arc welding). Welded material is described in 2D for flat position arc welding with shielded electrode (SMAW) at a functional scale for UT modeling. The grain growth is the result of three physical phenomena: epitaxial growth, influence of temperature gradient, and competition between the grains. The model uses phenomenological rules to combine these three phenomena. A limited number of parameters is used to make the modelling possible from the information written down in a notebook of arc welding. We present all these principles with 10 years' hindsight. To illustrate the model's use, we present conclusions obtained with two recent applications. In conclusion we give also insights on other research topics around this model : inverse problem using a F.E.M. code simulating the ultrasonic propagation, in position welding, 3D prospects, GTAW.

  12. Fabrication and Testing of CERMET Fuel Materials for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Robert; Broadway, Jeramie; Mireles, Omar

    2012-01-01

    A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is currently being developed for Advanced Space Exploration Systems. The overall goal of the project is to address critical NTP technology challenges and programmatic issues to establish confidence in the affordability and viability of NTP systems. The current technology roadmap for NTP identifies the development of a robust fuel form as a critical near term need. The lack of a qualified nuclear fuel is a significant technical risk that will require a considerable fraction of program resources to mitigate. Due to these risks and the cost for qualification, the development and selection of a primary fuel must begin prior to Authority to Proceed (ATP) for a specific mission. The fuel development is a progressive approach to incrementally reduce risk, converge the fuel materials, and mature the design and fabrication process of the fuel element. A key objective of the current project is to advance the maturity of CERMET fuels. The work includes fuel processing development and characterization, fuel specimen hot hydrogen screening, and prototypic fuel element testing. Early fuel materials development is critical to help validate requirements and fuel performance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview and status of the work at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  13. Standard Test Method for Obtaining Char Density Profile of Ablative Materials by Machining and Weighing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the char density profile of a charred ablator that can be used with the following limitations: 1.1.1 The local surface imperfections must be removed, and the char must be able to be machined off in a plane parallel to the char-virgin material interface before the density profiles can be determined. 1.1.2 The char must be strong enough to withstand the machining and handling techniques employed. 1.1.3 The material should have orderly density variations. The total thickness of the char and degradation zone must be larger than the machining thicknesses required. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.2.1 Exception—Certain inch-pound equivalent units are included in parentheses for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establis...

  14. The Jules Horowitz reactor (JHR), a European material testing reactor (MTR), with extended experimental capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A.; Bergamaschi, Y.; Bouilloux, Y.; Bravo, X.; Guigon, B.; Rommens, M.; Tremodeux, P. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)]|[CEA Saclay Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is the European MTR (Material Testing Reactor) designed to provide, after 2010, the necessary knowledge for keeping the existing power plants in operation and to design innovative reactors types with new objectives such as: minimizing the radioactive waste production, taking into account additional safety requirements, preventing risks of nuclear proliferation... To achieve such an ambitious objective. The JHR is designed with a high flexibility in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and to be able to accommodate future requirements. The JHR will offer a wide range of performances and services in gathering, in a single site at Cadarache, all the necessary functionalities and facilities for an effective production of results: e.g. fuel fabrication laboratories, preparation of the instrumented devices, interpretation of the experiments, modelling. The JHR must rely on a top level scientific environment based on experts teams from CEA and EC and local universities. With a thermal flux of 7,4.10{sup 14} ncm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and a fast flux of 6,4.10{sup 14} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, it is possible to carry out irradiation experiments on materials and fuels whatever the reactor type considered. It will also be possible to carry out locally, fast neutron irradiation to achieve damage effect up to 25 dpa/year. (dpa = displacement per atom.) The study of the fuels behavior under accidental conditions, from analytical experiments, on a limited amount of irradiated fuel, is a major objective of the project. These oriented safety tests are possible by taking into account specific requirements in the design of the facility such as the tightness level of the containment building, the addition of an alpha hot cell and a laboratory for on line fission products measurement. (authors)

  15. The 4th surveillance testing for Kori unit 3 reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwun Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-10-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Kori unit 3 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 4.983E+18, 1.641E+19, 3.158E+19, and 4.469E+19n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.840 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 12% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.362E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 12th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.481E+19, 4.209E+19, 5.144E+19 and 5.974E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Kori unit 3 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 48 refs., 35 figs., 41 tabs. (Author)

  16. The 5th surveillance testing for Kori unit 2 reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 5th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Kori unit 2 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules V, R, P, T and N are 2.837E+18, 1.105E+19, 2.110E+19, 3.705E+19 and 4.831E+19n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement/calculation, was 0.918 for the 1st through 5th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 11.6% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.898E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 15th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 4.203E+19, 5.232E+19, 6.262E+19 and 7.291E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Kori unit 2 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 49 refs., 35 figs., 48 tabs. (Author)

  17. Evaluation and use of the Materials and Test (MATT) Data System for quality of construction and management review : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    This report documents the review of the MATerials and Test (MATT) Data System to check the validity of data within the system. A computer program to generate the quality level of a construction material was developed. Programs were also developed to ...

  18. A comparison of the Nordtest and Japanese test methods for the moisture buffering performance of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roels, Staf; Janssen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Two test methods, one worked out in a Nordtest project and the other available as a Japanese Industrial Standard, both developed to characterize building materials with respect to moisture buffering performance, are analyzed in detail by a numerical study on four different materials. Both test...... methods are based on a similar kind of dynamic loading, but the specifications of each test protocol vary. Therefore, the sensitivity of the test protocols is investigated by varying different protocol parameters. Subsequently, the practical applicability of the obtained values is investigated...

  19. Evaluation of patients with oral lichenoid lesions by dental patch testing and results of removal of the dental restoration material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Buket Şahin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Oral lichenoid lesions (OLL are contact stomatitis characterized by white reticular or erosive patches, plaque-like lesions that are clinically and histopathologically indistinguishable from oral lichen planus (OLP. Amalgam dental fillings and dental restoration materials are among the etiologic agents. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the standard and dental series patch tests in patients with OLL in comparison to a control group and evaluate our results. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with OLL or OLP and 30 healthy control subjects, who had at least one dental restoration material and/or dental filling, were included in the study. Both groups received standard series and dental patch test and the results were evaluated simultaneously. Results: The most frequent allergens in the dental series patch test in the patient group were palladium chloride (n=4; 12.12% and benzoyl peroxide (n=2, 6.06%. Of the 33 patients with OLL; 8 had positive reaction to allergents in the standard patch test series and 8 had positive reaction in the dental patch test series. There was no significant difference in the rate of patch test reaction to the dental and standard series between the groups. Ten patients were advised to have the dental restoration material removed according to the results of the patch tests. The lesions improved in three patients [removal of all amalgam dental fillings (n=1, replacement of all amalgam dental fillings with an alternative filling material (n=1 and replacement of the dental prosthesis (n=1] following the removal or replacement of the dental restoration material. Conclusion: Dental patch test should be performed in patients with OLL and dental restoration material. Dental filling and/or prosthesis should be removed/replaced if there is a reaction against a dental restoration material-related allergen.

  20. Characterization and Testing of Improved Hydrogen Getter Materials - FY16 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Kevin Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-07

    Organic-based hydrogen getter materials have been in use for many years. These materials are able to prevent the dangerous buildup of hydrogen gas in sealed containers, and are also used to protect surrounding materials from degradation caused by chemical reactions. This document describes these materials.

  1. Fracture toughness determination of dental materials by laboratory testing and finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidaparti, R M; Beatty, M W

    1995-03-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of finite element analysis in predicting the stress intensity factor (KIC) for three types of dental materials: a glass ionomer, a dental amalgam, and a composite resin. Laboratory tests were conducted on small single-edge notch specimens loaded in three-point bending to determine values for fracture toughness (KQ). Using the dimensions measured for each laboratory specimen, a J integral approach was employed to calculate KIC using finite element analysis. Both two-dimensional plane strain and three-dimensional models were used in determining KIC for each specimen, and these values were compared to the KQ values obtained from laboratory tests. The results indicated that no significant differences existed between laboratory results and those obtained from both two- and three-dimensional finite element models (P > .85). For the three-dimensional model, values for KIC were found to vary across the specimen thickness, with the values at the center of the specimen closely paralleling those obtained from the two-dimensional plane strain model. It was concluded that the two-dimensional plane strain J integral technique was as effective as the three-dimensional technique in calculating values for KIC.

  2. High strain rate tensile testing of sheet materials using three Hopkinson pressure bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary G.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to circumvent the inherent problems associated with Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar (SHTB systems, a new experimental technique is proposed for the high strain rate tensile testing of sheet specimens in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB systems. Existing solutions employ a multiple gage section hat-shaped specimen to transform the incoming pulse from compression into tension at the specimen level. However, multiple gage section specimens are not suitable for studying the post-necking behavior of materials as the required symmetry of the mechanical system is no longer guaranteed in the post-necking range. Here, we present a new load-inversion device that is used in conjunction with three Hopkinson pressure bars for the tensile loading of single gage section sheet specimen. The device is designed to transform the compression load applied at its boundaries into a tensile loading of the specimen. Two output bars are used to measure the total force applied on the specimen boundaries, while Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to determine the strain histories on the specimen surface based on photographs acquired at a frequency of about 100 kHz. In addition to uniaxial tensile experiments on TRIP780 steel sheet specimens at strain rates ranging from 200/s to 1000/s, results are presented on the dynamic fracture testing of notched tensile specimens.

  3. Identification and Modeling of Electrohydraulic Force Control of the Material Test System (MTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, J.; Pei, X.; Zhu, F. M.

    2006-10-01

    In the heavy-duty material test device, an electrohydraulic force servo system is usually utilized to load the tested samples. The signal from the pressure sensor is compared with the instruction and the difference between them is then fed to a digital servo valve to form a closed loop control to the target force. The performance of the electrohydraulic force servo system is not only closely related to how accurate to feed the flow rate to the hydraulic cylinder, but also the stiffness of the system which is dominated by the compressibility of oil. Thus the clarification of the characteristic parameters becomes the key of the solution to optimal force control. To identify the electrohydraulic force servo system various step signals are input to excite the dynamic response of the system. From the relationship between the step magnitude and the force response, the system model and the key control parameters are determined. The electrohydraulic force servo system is identified as a first order system with time constant varied with the pressure. Based on the identification of the system optimal control parameters are finally obtained and force rate error is reduced to 0.2% from original 3%.

  4. Development of leachate test for delayed ettringite formation potential in cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    France-Mensah, Jojo

    Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) has been known to be the cause of expansion and cracking at latter ages in concrete that has been heat cured at temperatures around 70 degree Celsius or above. Currently, the only method available for measuring DEF-related physical expansion in concrete can sometimes take over a year to yield relevant results. A leachate method was proposed as a means of taking advantage of the release and solubility of the adsorbed ions (e.g., calcium, sulfates and aluminates) and alkali ions (e.g., sodium and potassium) in the pore solution after heat curing of the cement paste matrix. These ions, known to contribute to DEF, were leached out of concrete into the leaching solution. The results of the leachate test were correlated to physical expansion data of similar samples from an earlier study. The aim of this research is to apply this knowledge to develop an accelerated leachate test method for identifying the potential for DEF in cementitious materials in a shorter time than the existing method. The objectives of this research are: (1) to identify the ion(s) through leaching that is/are the controlling factors in predicting the rate of expansion and overall expansion of mortar; (2) to identify the ion(s) that is/are responsible for the lag time or age of deleterious expansion through DEF; and (3) to investigate the effect of heat curing on the overall, rate of, and age (time) of expansion.

  5. Post-test analysis of lithium-ion battery materials at Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareno, Javier; Dietz-Rago, Nancy; Bloom, Ira

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical performance is often limited by surface and interfacial reactions at the electrodes. However, routine handling of samples can alter the very surfaces that are the object of study. Our approach combines standardized testing of batteries with sample harvesting under inert atmosphere conditions. Cells of different formats are disassembled inside an Argon glove box with controlled water and oxygen concentrations below 2 ppm. Cell components are characterized in situ, guaranteeing that observed changes in physicochemical state are due to electrochemical operation, rather than sample manipulation. We employ a complementary set of spectroscopic, microscopic, electrochemical and metallographic characterization to obtain a complete picture of cell degradation mechanisms. The resulting information about observed degradation mechanisms is provided to materials developers, both academic and industrial, to suggest new strategies and speed up the Research & Development cycle of Li-ion and related technologies. This talk will describe Argonne's post-test analysis laboratory, with an emphasis on capabilities and opportunities for collaboration. Cell disassembly, sample harvesting procedures and recent results will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies, Hybrid and Electric Systems, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Alternate Material Pallet, 40" x 48", MIL-STD-1660, Engineering Evaluation Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dugan, Jeffery

    2003-01-01

    .... The Test Unit had a total test weight of 3,900 pounds. The plan was to test the Test Unit by accomplishing the stacking, vibration, drop, incline impact, sling compatibility, forklift handling, and disassembly tests...

  7. An objective approach for Burkholderia pseudomallei strain selection as challenge material for medical countermeasures efficacy testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher E. Van Zandt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a rare disease of biodefense concern with high mortality and extreme difficulty in treatment. No human vaccines are available that protect against B. pseudomallei infection, and with the current limitations of antibiotic treatment, the development of new preventative and therapeutic interventions is crucial. Although clinical trials could be used to test the efficacy of new medical countermeasures (MCMs, the high mortality rates associated with melioidosis raises significant ethical issues concerning treating individuals with new compounds with unknown efficacies. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA has formulated a set of guidelines for the licensure of new MCMs to treat diseases in which it would be unethical to test the efficacy of these drugs in humans. The FDA Animal Rule 21 CFR 314 calls for consistent, well-characterized B. pseudomallei strains to be used as challenge material in animal models. In order to facilitate the efficacy testing of new MCMs for melioidosis using animal models, we intend to develop a well-characterized panel of strains for use. This panel will comprise of strains that were isolated from human cases, have a low passage history, are virulent in animal models, and are well characterized phenotypically and genotypically. We have reviewed published and unpublished data on various B. pseudomallei strains to establish an objective method for selecting the strains to be included in the panel of B. pseudomallei strains with attention to five categories: animal infection models, genetic characterization, clinical and passage history, and availability of the strain to the research community. We identified 109 strains with data in at least one of the five categories, scored each strain based on the gathered data and identified 6 strains as candidate for a B. pseudomallei strain panel.

  8. Pathology of Building Materials in Historic Buildings. Relationship Between Laboratory Testing and Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerma, C.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Study of historic buildings requires a pathology analysis of the construction materials used in order to define their conservation state. Usually we can find capillary moisture, salt crystalli-zation or density differences by deterioration. Sometimes this issue is carried out by destructive testing which determine materials’ physical and chemical characteristics. However, they are unfavorable regarding the building’s integrity, and they are sometimes difficult to implement. This paper presents a technique using infrared thermography to analyze the existing pathology and has the advantage of being able to diagnose inaccessible areas in buildings. The results obtained by this technique have been compared with those obtained in the laboratory, in order to validate this study and thus to extrapolate the methodology to other buildings and materials.El estudio de edificios históricos requiere un análisis de la patología de los materiales de construcción empleados para poder definir su estado de conservación. Habitualmente nos encontramos con humedades por capilaridad, cristalización de sales o diferencias de densidad por deterioro. En ocasiones esto se lleva a cabo mediante ensayos destructivos que nos determinan las características físicas y químicas de los materiales, pero que resultan desfavorables respecto a la integridad del edificio, y en ocasiones resulta complejo llevarlos a cabo. Este trabajo presenta una técnica para analizar la patología existente mediante el empleo de termografía infrarroja con la ventaja de poder diagnosticar zonas de difícil acceso en los edificios. Para validar este estudio se han comparado los resultados obtenidos mediante esta técnica con los alcanzados en el laboratorio. De esta forma podemos extrapolar la metodología empleada a otros edificios y materiales.

  9. Relationship between index testing and California Bearing Ratio values for natural road construction materials in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Breytenbach, IJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Research was done to determine whether a relationship can be established between index testing and CBR (California Bearing Ratio) results. The process involved compiling a database of test results for a range of rock material types across moist...

  10. 16 CFR 1500.43 - Method of test for flashpoint of volatile flammable materials by Tagliabue open-cup apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of test for flashpoint of volatile flammable materials by Tagliabue open-cup apparatus. 1500.43 Section 1500.43 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... in the cup of a Tag Open Tester, and heated at a slow but constant rate. A small test flame is passed...

  11. Test and evaluation of computerized nuclear material accounting methods. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    In accordance with the definition of a Material Balance Area (MBA) as a well-defined geographical area involving an Integral operation, the building housing the BFS-1 and BFS-1 critical facilities is considered to consist of one MBA. The BFS materials are in the form of small disks clad in stainless steel and each disk with nuclear material has its own serial number. Fissile material disks in the BFS MBA can be located at three key monitoring points: BFS-1 facility, BFS-2 facility and main storage of BFS fissile materials (storage 1). When used in the BFS-1 or BFS-2 critical facilities, the fissile material disks are loaded in tubes (fuel rods) forming critical assembly cores. The following specific features of the BFS MBA should be taken into account for the purpose of computerized accounting of nuclear material: (1) very large number of nuclear material items (about 70,000 fissile material items); and (2) periodically very intensive shuffling of nuclear material items. Requirements for the computerized system are determined by basic objectives of nuclear material accounting: (1) providing accurate information on the identity and location of all items in the BFS material balance area; (2) providing accurate information on location and identity of tamper-indicating devices; (3) tracking nuclear material inventories; (4) issuing periodic reports; (5) assisting with the detection of material gains or losses; (6) providing a history of nuclear material transactions; (7) preventing unauthorized access to the system and data falsification. In August 1995, the prototype computerized accounting system was installed on the BFS facility for trial operation. Information on two nuclear material types was entered into the data base: weapon-grade plutonium metal and 36% enriched uranium dioxide. The total number of the weapon-grade plutonium disks is 12,690 and the total number of the uranium dioxide disks is 1,700.

  12. Piezoelectric materials involved in road traffic applications test system; Banco de ensayos para materiales piezoelectricos en aplicaciones viales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Rodriguez, M.; Jimenez Martinez, F.; Frutos, J. de

    2011-07-01

    The test bench system described in this paper performs experiments on piezoelectric materials used in road traffic applications, covering a range between 14 and 170 km/h, which is considered enough for testing under standard traffic conditions. A software has been developed to control the three phase induction motor driver and to acquire all the measurement data of the piezoelectric materials. The mass over each systems axis can be selected, with a limit of 60 kg over each wheel. The test bench is used to simulate the real behaviour of buried piezoelectric cables in road traffic applications for both light and heavy vehicles. This new test bed system is a powerful research tool and can be applied to determine the optimal installation and configuration of the piezoelectric cable sensors and opens a new field of research: the study of energy harvesting techniques based on piezoelectric materials. (Author) 10 refs.

  13. [Possibilities of testing the biological acceptability of composite filling materials, with special reference to the microscopic test for pulp vitality. Review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyárasdy, I

    1990-08-01

    The main problem of microscopically observing the living pulpa consists in that it lies embedded into hard tissue. The haemodynamics of the pulpa may be defined by studying the physical parameters by examining the characteristics of blood flow and by the factors determining them. By comparison with other tissues little work is dealing with regulating the blood flow. The vital microscopic model of the rat incisor pulpa was first employed by Gängler to testing dental filling materials. The results thereof well complete the findings of standardized tests. On basis of the foregoing the sublining in case of clinical employment of composite filling materials is unconditionally suggested.

  14. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  15. Wood-based Tri-Axial Sandwich Composite Materials: Design, Fabrication, Testing, Modeling and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinghao Li; John F. Hunt; Shaoqin Gong; Zhiyong Cai

    2014-01-01

    As the demand for sustainable materials increases, there are unique challenges and opportunities to develop light-weight green composites materials for a wide range of applications. Thus wood-based composite materials from renewable forests may provide options for some niche applications while helping to protect our environment. In this paper, the wood-based tri-axial...

  16. Dissolution of Material and Test reactor Fuel in an H-Canyon Dissolver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-26

    In an amended record of decision for the management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site, the US Department of Energy has authorized the dissolution and recovery of U from 1000 bundles of Al-clad SNF. The SNF is fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors and is typically referred to as Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel. Bundles of MTR fuel containing assemblies fabricated from U-Al alloys (or other U compounds) are currently dissolved using a Hg-catalyzed HNO3 flowsheet. Since the development of the existing flowsheet, improved experimental methods have been developed to more accurately characterize the offgas composition and generation rate during laboratory dissolutions. Recently, these new techniques were successfully used to develop a flowsheet for the dissolution of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel. Using the data from the HFIR dissolution flowsheet development and necessary laboratory experiments, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to define flowsheet conditions for the dissolution of MTR fuels. With improved offgas characterization techniques, SRNL will be able define the number of bundles of fuel which can be charged to an H-Canyon dissolver with much less conservatism.

  17. Development, Testing, and Failure Mechanisms of a Replicative Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Hansen, Scott; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM's have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. Wax PCM units have been baselined for the Orion thermal control system and also provide risk mitigation for the Altair Lander. However, the use of water as a PCM has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. An ice PCM heat exchanger that replicates the thermal energy storage capacity of an existing wax PCM unit was fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion are investigated. This paper presents the results to date of this investigation. Nomenclature

  18. Development Of A Pig Skin Model To Test Nanocomposite Materials For Antibacterial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Rushford

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane is making advancements towards medical application as an effective material for drug delivery. POSS is a unique molecule because of its structure. It is a class of organosilicon- three-dimensional compounds with cage frameworks and different degrees of symmetry. OBJECTIVE Our objective was to introduce a biomedical application for POSS in area of drug delivery. For large open wounds it should have a capability to reduce bleeding and as well as provide the release of an antibiotics to reach minimal inhibitory concentrations at the site for infection coverage. If the treatment is successful POSS can be applied in the field as a protective dressing that is capable of enhancing clot formation prevent infection and ultimately enhance tissue repair. METHODS Two formulations of POSS were prepared and tested in vitro to release inhibitory concentration of Clindamycin. Clindamycin release was determined spectrophotometrically and the MIC was determined using a bacterial pig skin wound model were determined. RESULTS Minimal inhibitory concentration of Clindamycin was detected from both POSS formulation for up to 96 hours. In the pig skin wound model the POSS formulation without kaolin reduced the bacterial load more efficiently than POSS containing kaolin and was comparable to a triple antibiotic cream coverage. CONCLUSION Nanocomposites of POSS can be formulated to limit bacterial growth and further reduction of bacterial load can be accomplished by attaching an antibiotic to the functional groups of the caged nanostructure of POSS.

  19. In Vitro Shock Absorption Tests on Implant-Supported Crowns: Influence of Crown Materials and Luting Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentritt, Martin; Schneider-Feyrer, Sibylle; Behr, Michael; Preis, Verena

    2017-05-18

    To investigate the force absorption capacity of implant-supported crowns made of different restorative materials and connected to abutments with different luting agents. Molar crowns were milled of different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture materials (n = 8 crowns per material): polymethyl methacrylate, polyether ether ketone, composite, lithium disilicate, titanium, and zirconia. Crowns were mounted on titanium implant replicas using different luting agents: uncemented, temporarily cemented (zinc oxide-eugenol cement), conventionally cemented (zinc oxide phosphate cement), and adhesively bonded. As a reference, one implant replica was tested without a crown. Force absorptions of the different combinations of crown materials and luting agents were determined by applying an increasing force (0 to 250 N) on the occlusal crown surface and measuring the resulting force below the implant. Mean curves of applied and resulting forces up to 200 N were determined (six measurements per group), and slopes were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed (one-way analysis of variance, Bonferroni post hoc test, α = .05). Significant (P crown materials that were uncemented, temporarily cemented, cemented, and adhesively bonded. Materials with higher moduli of elasticity (ceramics, titanium) showed steeper slopes of the force curves and lower shock-absorbing capacity than resin-based materials, but were influenced more by the luting agents. The damping effects of resin-based materials were higher in combination with all cementation and luting modes. Shock absorption tests exhibited a strong material-dependent damping behavior of implant-supported crowns. The shock-absorbing capacity of crown materials with high moduli of elasticity may benefit from conventional cementation.

  20. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high

  1. Evaluation of Dynamic Deformation Behaviors in Metallic Materials under High Strain-Rates Using Taylor Bar Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Oh; Shin, Hyung Seop [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To ensure the reliability and safety of various mechanical systems in accordance with their high-speed usage, it is necessary to evaluate the dynamic deformation behavior of structural materials under impact load. However, it is not easy to understand the dynamic deformation behavior of the structural materials using experimental methods in the high strain-rate range exceeding 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. In this study, the Taylor bar impact test was conducted to investigate the dynamic deformation behavior of metallic materials in the high strain-rate region, using a high-speed photography system. Numerical analysis of the Taylor bar impact test was performed using AUTODYN S/W. The results of the analysis were compared with the experimental results, and the material behavior in the high strain-rate region was discussed.

  2. Relevance of in vitro tests of adhesive and composite dental materials, a review in 3 parts. Part 1: Approval requirements and standardized testing of composite materials according to ISO specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Siegward D; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this three-part review on the relevance of laboratory testing of composites and adhesives deals with approval requirements for composite materials. We compare the in vivo and in vitro literature data and discuss the relevance of in vitro analyses. The standardized ISO protocols are presented, with a focus on the evaluation of physical parameters. These tests all have a standardized protocol that describes the entire test set-up. The tests analyse flexural strength, depth of cure, susceptibility to ambient light, color stability, water sorption and solubility, and radiopacity. Some tests have a clinical correlation. A high flexural strength, for instance, decreases the risk of fractures of the marginal ridge in posterior restorations and incisal edge build-ups of restored anterior teeth. Other tests do not have a clinical correlation or the threshold values are too low, which results in an approval of materials that show inferior clinical properties (e.g., radiopacity). It is advantageous to know the test set-ups and the ideal threshold values to correctly interpret the material data. Overall, however, laboratory assessment alone cannot ensure the clinical success of a product.

  3. Use of diagnostic self-tests on body materials among Internet users in the Netherlands: prevalence and correlates of use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norg Roelf

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A range of self-tests on body materials has become available to the general public, but the extent of their use has hardly been studied. This study examined how many people use diagnostic self-tests on body materials such as blood or urine, as well as the type of tests that are used, and factors associated with their use. Methods Cross-sectional survey. Participants were recruited from an existing Dutch Internet panel of 12,529 persons, and information was collected by means of a structured Internet-based questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess correlates of self-test use. Results Response to the survey was 63%. Sixteen percent of the respondents said they had ever used at least one self-test, with a mean of 2.1 tests per self-tester. The most frequently reported self-tests were those for diabetes and cholesterol. Self-testers generally reported lower health status and had a higher BMI than non-testers. On the other hand, they were more likely to engage in health-related behaviour such as the use of dietary supplements and homeopathic medicine. Conclusion Self-testing proved to be relatively prevalent among Dutch Internet users. We therefore think that it is essential to develop appropriate information for consumers, health care providers and policymakers, about the pros and cons of self-testing and specific self-tests. More test-specific research is needed.

  4. Numerical development of a new correlation between biaxial fracture strain and material fracture toughness for small punch test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Dutta, B. K.; Chattopadhyay, J.

    2017-04-01

    The miniaturized specimens are used to determine mechanical properties of the materials, such as yield stress, ultimate stress, fracture toughness etc. Use of such specimens is essential whenever limited quantity of material is available for testing, such as aged/irradiated materials. The miniaturized small punch test (SPT) is a technique which is widely used to determine change in mechanical properties of the materials. Various empirical correlations are proposed in the literature to determine the value of fracture toughness (JIC) using this technique. bi-axial fracture strain is determined using SPT tests. This parameter is then used to determine JIC using available empirical correlations. The correlations between JIC and biaxial fracture strain quoted in the literature are based on experimental data acquired for large number of materials. There are number of such correlations available in the literature, which are generally not in agreement with each other. In the present work, an attempt has been made to determine the correlation between biaxial fracture strain (εqf) and crack initiation toughness (Ji) numerically. About one hundred materials are digitally generated by varying yield stress, ultimate stress, hardening coefficient and Gurson parameters. Such set of each material is then used to analyze a SPT specimen and a standard TPB specimen. Analysis of SPT specimen generated biaxial fracture strain (εqf) and analysis of TPB specimen generated value of Ji. A graph is then plotted between these two parameters for all the digitally generated materials. The best fit straight line determines the correlation. It has been also observed that it is possible to have variation in Ji for the same value of biaxial fracture strain (εqf) within a limit. Such variation in the value of Ji has been also ascertained using the graph. Experimental SPT data acquired earlier for three materials were then used to get Ji by using newly developed correlation. A reasonable

  5. Relevance of in vitro tests of adhesive and composite dental materials. A review in 3 parts. Part 3: in vitro tests of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Siegward D; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    In the third part of this review of laboratory testing, methods of testing adhesive systems are evaluated. Test set-ups that are used to analyze the restorative material in combination with the adhesive system are presented. Currently, there is no standardized protocol available for the evaluation of adhesives. This complicates any direct comparisons of values between different testing institutes. Therefore, the statistically evaluated ranking of the different adhesives is more important than mean values. Depending on the testing institute, a correlation between bond strength measurements and clinical outcomes may exist. Qualitative analysis of adhesive/tooth interaction can help explain the functioning of a system, but the depth of penetration of the adhesive cannot predict bond strength. Indirect bond measurements or analyses of the interactions of adhesive and composite materials, such as dye penetration or marginal analysis, do not correlate or correlate only partially with clinical findings. Adhesive systems should be tested in vitro and compared to a well-known standard adhesive before they are used in the clinic. Water storage of specimens for several months before testing increases the predictability of the bonding performance of the tested adhesive.

  6. WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-05-30

    The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S-I-S hetero-structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

  7. Mechanical Testing of 3D Fabric Composites and Their Matrix Material SC-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) 14. ABSTRACT The U.S. Army is actively investigating advanced light-weight structural materials...performance due to the creation of matrix pockets. Measurements can be made using shearography (12), Moiré interferometry fringe patterns (13) or...composite systems . Included in this study is an evaluation of the matrix material, SC-15. The matrix material properties have been widely reported in a

  8. Applicability test of new nanotechnology thermal insulation material Spacloft into building constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Zrim, Grega

    2009-01-01

    The subject of the thesis is influence analysis of aerogel thermal insulation material implementation into constructional complexes. The work is separated into three modules, each of them represents a different scale of observation. First one is dedicated to technical characteristics of the material and a short comparison with the characteristics of two other insulation materials. Second module introduces a more vast stationary thermal analysis of the constructional complexes with different c...

  9. Test methods and reduction of organic pollutant compound emissions from wood-based building and furniture materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sumin; Choi, Yoon-Ki; Park, Kyung-Won; Kim, Jeong Tai

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews different methods for the analysis of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wood-based panel materials for furniture and building interiors and highlights research on reduction of emission from wood-based panels that can adversely affect indoor air quality. In Korea, standard test methods have been developed to determine formaldehyde and VOC emissions from building products, and the Ministry of Environment regulates the use of building materials with pollutant emissions. Desiccator and perforator methods are being used for formaldehyde and the chamber and field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) methods for VOC and formaldehyde emissions. The VOC analyzer is a suitable pre-test method for application as a total VOC (TVOC) emission test and bake-out is a useful method to reduce TVOC and formaldehyde emissions from furniture materials in indoor environments. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Needs assessment for nondestructive testing and materials characterization for improved reliability in structural ceramics for heat engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.; McClung, R.W.; Janney, M.A.; Hanusiak, W.M.

    1987-08-01

    A needs assessment was performed for nondestructive testing and materials characterization to achieve improved reliability in ceramic materials for heat engine applications. Raw materials, green state bodies, and sintered ceramics were considered. The overall approach taken to improve reliability of structural ceramics requires key inspections throughout the fabrication flowsheet, including raw materials, greed state, and dense parts. The applications of nondestructive inspection and characterization techniques to ceramic powders and other raw materials, green ceramics, and sintered ceramics are discussed. The current state of inspection technology is reviewed for all identified attributes and stages of a generalized flowsheet for advanced structural ceramics, and research and development requirements are identified and listed in priority order. 164 refs., 3 figs.

  11. A long-term laboratory test on staining susceptibility of esthetic composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardu, Stefano; Braut, Vedrana; Gutemberg, Daniel; Krejci, Ivo; Dietschi, Didier; Feilzer, Albert J

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the color stability of composite resin types designed for esthetic anterior restorations when continuously exposed to various staining agents. Thirty-six disk-shaped specimens were made of each of 12 composite materials (1 microfilled and 11 hybrid composites). After dry storage at 37 degrees C for 24 hours in an incubator (INP-500, Memmert), the initial color of each specimen was assessed by a calibrated reflectance spectrophotometer (SpectroShade). Specimens were immersed in five staining solutions or dry stored (control). All specimens were kept in an incubator at 37 degrees C for 99 days. Test solutions were changed every 14th day to avoid bacteria or yeast contamination. After 99 days of storage, spectrophotometric measurements were again performed and L*a*b* scores once more recorded to determine the color changes. Wine proved to have the highest staining potential followed by coffee, tea, orange juice, and cola, which had the lowest staining potential. The highest color change measured against a white background was observed for Durafill (Heraeus Kulzer) in wine (DeltaE = 62.3), while the least staining was found for Enamel HFO (Micerium) in cola (DeltaE = 3.5). The highest color change measured against a black background was observed for EsthetX (Dentsply) in wine (DeltaE = 46.0), while the least staining was observed for Enamel HFO in cola (DeltaE = 2.5). Composite staining susceptibility proved to vary among composite structure and brands. Potential discoloration might be limited by dietary restriction based on such in vitro evaluation.

  12. Assessing the environmental performance of construction materials testing using EMS: An Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejkovski, Nick

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports the audit findings of the waste management practices at 30 construction materials testing (CMT) laboratories (constituting 4.6% of total accredited CMT laboratories at the time of the audit) that operate in four Australian jurisdictions and assesses the organisation's Environmental Management System (EMS) for indicators of progress towards sustainable development (SD). In Australia, waste indicators are 'priority indicators' of environmental performance yet the quality and availability of waste data is poor. National construction and demolition waste (CDW) data estimates are not fully disaggregated and the contribution of CMT waste (classified as CDW) to the national total CDW landfill burden is difficult to quantify. The environmental and human impacts of anthropogenic release of hazardous substances contained in CMT waste into the ecosphere can be measured by construing waste indicators from the EMS. An analytical framework for evaluating the EMS is developed to elucidate CMT waste indicators and assess these indicators against the principle of proportionality. Assessing against this principle allows for: objective evaluations of whether the environmental measures prescribed in the EMS are 'proportionate' to the 'desired' (subjective) level of protection chosen by decision-makers; and benchmarking CMT waste indicators against aspirational CDW targets set by each Australian jurisdiction included in the audit. Construed together, the EMS derived waste indicators and benchmark data provide a composite indicator of environmental performance and progress towards SD. The key audit findings indicate: CMT laboratories have a 'poor' environmental performance (and overall progress towards SD) when EMS waste data are converted into indicator scores and assessed against the principle of proportionality; CMT waste recycling targets are lower when benchmarked against jurisdictional CDW waste recovery targets; and no significant difference in the average

  13. Algal growth inhibition test in filled, closed bottles for volatile and sorptive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Nyholm, Niels; Verbruggen, Eric M. J.

    2000-01-01

    , and the resulting dissolved CO2 concentration supported maximum algal growth rates without pH drift for algal densities up to 4 mg dry weight/L. Two-day toxicity tests with kerosene were performed with this new test design and compared with an open bottle test and with a closed bottle test with headspace. Exposure...... concentrations of the volatile fraction of kerosene decreased by 99% in the open test, by 77% in the closed flask test with headspace, and by 16% in the filled closed bottle test. Algal growth inhibition was observed at much lower additions of kerosene in the new test design because of the improved maintenance...

  14. Design and fabrication of a cryostat for low temperature mechanical testing for the Mechanical and Materials Engineering group at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Aviles Santillana, I; Gerardin, A; Guinchard, M; Langeslag, S A E; Sgobba, S

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical testing of materials at low temperatures is one of the cornerstones of the Mechanical and Materials Engineering (MME) group at CERN. A long tradition of more than 20 years and a unique know - how of such tests has been developed with an 18 kN double-walled cryostat. Large campaigns of material qualification have been carried out and the mechanical behaviour of materials at 4 K has been vastly studied in sub - size samples for projects like LEP, LHC and its experiments. With the aim of assessing the mechanical properties of materials of higher strength and/or issued from heavy gauge products for which testing standardized specimens of larger cross section might be more adapted, a new 100 kN cryostat capable of hosting different shapes of normalized samples has been carefully designed and fabricated inhouse together with the associated tooling and measurement instrumentation. It has been conceived to be able to adapt to different test frames both dynamic and static, which will be of paramount importa...

  15. A data base and a standard material for use in acceptance testing of low-activity waste products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, S.F.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Strachan, D.M.

    1998-04-01

    The authors have conducted replicate dissolution tests following the product consistency test (PCT) procedure to measure the mean and standard deviation of the solution concentrations of B, Na, and Si at various combinations of temperature, duration, and glass/water mass ratio. Tests were conducted with a glass formulated to be compositionally similar to low-activity waste products anticipated for Hanford to evaluate the adequacy of test methods that have been designated in privatization contracts for use in product acceptance. An important finding from this set of tests is that the solution concentrations generated in tests at 20 C will likely be too low to measure the dissolution rates of waste products reliably. Based on these results, the authors recommend that the acceptance test be conducted at 40 C. Tests at 40 C generated higher solution concentrations, were more easily conducted, and the measured rates were easily related to those at 20 C. Replicate measurements of other glass properties were made to evaluate the possible use of LRM-1 as a standard material. These include its composition, homogeneity, density, compressive strength, the Na leachability index with the ANSI/ANS 16.1 leach test, and if the glass is characteristically hazardous with the toxicity characteristic leach procedure. The values of these properties were within the acceptable limits identified for Hanford low-activity waste products. The reproducibility of replicate tests and analyses indicates that the glass would be a suitable standard material.

  16. A long-term laboratory test on staining susceptibility of esthetic composite resin materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardu, S.; Braut, V.; Gutemberg, D.; Krejci, I.; Dietschi, D.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the color stability of composite resin types designed for esthetic anterior restorations when continuously exposed to various staining agents. Method and Materials: Thirty-six disk-shaped specimens were made of each of 12 composite materials (1 microfilled and 11 hybrid

  17. Testing facility for hydrogen storage materials designed to simulate application based conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerwaal, R.J.; Nyqvist, R.G.; Haije, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    For the daily use of hydrogen storage materials, not only their intrinsic storage properties are important, but also equally important is the performance under practical conditions. Besides the techniques already available for the fundamental characterization of storage materials, there is a growing

  18. Developing a Reference Material for Diffusion-Controlled Formaldehyde Emissions Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions of formaldehyde from building materials can contaminate indoor air and create significant risks to human health. The need to control formaldehyde emissions from indoor materials is made more urgent by the prevailing drive to improve building energy by decreasing ventil...

  19. In-situ hot corrosion testing of candidate materials for exhaust valve spindles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe; Hoeg, Harro A.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2011-01-01

    used, exhaust valve spindles in marine diesel engines are subjected to high temperatures and stresses as well as molten salt induced corrosion. To investigate candidate materials for future designs which will involve the HIP process, a spindle with Ni superalloy material samples inserted in a HIPd Ni49...

  20. Summary of U. S. LMFBR programs on high temperature structural design and associated materials testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-10-01

    This document was prepared at the request of the Division of Reactor Development and Demonstration (DRDD), U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. Four general areas of research and development are included: high-temperature structural design; irradiation effects--mechanical properties of structural materials; sodium environmental effects--influence of sodium on mechanical properties; and general material qualification.