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Sample records for testing high mutation

  1. High-throughput in vivo genotoxicity testing: an automated readout system for the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Lombardot

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity testing is an important component of toxicity assessment. As illustrated by the European registration, evaluation, authorization, and restriction of chemicals (REACH directive, it concerns all the chemicals used in industry. The commonly used in vivo mammalian tests appear to be ill adapted to tackle the large compound sets involved, due to throughput, cost, and ethical issues. The somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART represents a more scalable alternative, since it uses Drosophila, which develops faster and requires less infrastructure. Despite these advantages, the manual scoring of the hairs on Drosophila wings required for the SMART limits its usage. To overcome this limitation, we have developed an automated SMART readout. It consists of automated imaging, followed by an image analysis pipeline that measures individual wing genotoxicity scores. Finally, we have developed a wing score-based dose-dependency approach that can provide genotoxicity profiles. We have validated our method using 6 compounds, obtaining profiles almost identical to those obtained from manual measures, even for low-genotoxicity compounds such as urethane. The automated SMART, with its faster and more reliable readout, fulfills the need for a high-throughput in vivo test. The flexible imaging strategy we describe and the analysis tools we provide should facilitate the optimization and dissemination of our methods.

  2. Experiences from treatment-predictive KRAS testing; high mutation frequency in rectal cancers from females and concurrent mutations in the same tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Ekstrand, Anna; Edekling, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    . METHODS: We used a real-time PCR based method to determine KRAS mutations in 136 colorectal cancers with mutations identified in 53 (39%) tumors. RESULTS: KRAS mutations were significantly more often found in rectal cancer (21/38, 55%) than in colon cancer (32/98, 33%) (P = 0.02). This finding...... was explained by marked differences mutation rates in female patients who showed mutations in 33% of the colon cancers and in 67% of the rectal cancers (P = 0.01). Concurrent KRAS mutations were identified in three tumors; two colorectal cancers harbored Gly12Asp/Gly13Asp and Gly12Cys/Gly13Asp and a third tumor...... carried Gly12Cys/Gly12Asp in an adenomatous component and additionally acquired Gly12Val in the invasive component. CONCLUSION: The demonstration of a particularly high KRAS mutation frequency among female rectal cancer patients suggests that this subset is the least likely to respond to anti...

  3. Factor V Leiden Mutation and PT 20210 Mutation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders Fibromyalgia Food and Waterborne Illness Fungal Infections Gout Graves Disease Guillain-Barré Syndrome Hashimoto Thyroiditis Heart ... Tested? To determine whether you have an inherited gene mutation that increases your risk of developing a ...

  4. High Frequency of AML1/RUNX1 Point Mutations in Radiation-Associated Myelodysplastic Syndrome Around Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    OpenAIRE

    Dinara, ZHARLYGANOVA; Hironori, HARADA; Yuka, HARADA; Sergey, SHINKAREV; Zhaxybay, ZHUMADILOV; Aigul, ZHUNUSOVA; Naylya J., TCHAIZHUNUSOVA; Kazbek N., APSALIKOV; Vadim, KEMAIKIN; Kassym, ZHUMADILOV; Noriyuki, KAWANO; Akiro, KIMURA; Masaharu, HOSHI; Department of Radiation Biophysics, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University; Department of Hematology and Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University

    2008-01-01

    It is known that bone marrow is a sensitive organ to ionizing radiation, and many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) have been diagnosed in radiation-treated cases and atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The AML1/RUNX1 gene has been known to be frequently mutated in MDS/AML patients among atomic bomb survivors and radiation therapy-related MDS/AML patients. In this study, we investigated the AML1 mutations in radiation-exposed patients wi...

  5. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2 is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3 to >10(4 times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6 the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model. This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation

  6. High Satisfaction and Low Distress in Breast Cancer Patients One Year after BRCA-Mutation Testing without Prior Face-to-Face Genetic Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sie, Aisha S; Spruijt, Liesbeth; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Brunner, Han G; Prins, Judith B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2016-06-01

    According to standard practice following referral to clinical genetics, most high risk breast cancer (BC) patients in many countries receive face-to-face genetic counseling prior to BRCA-mutation testing (DNA-intake). We evaluated a novel format by prospective study: replacing the intake consultation with telephone, written and digital information sent home. Face-to-face counseling then followed BRCA-mutation testing (DNA-direct). One year after BRCA-result disclosure, 108 participants returned long-term follow-up questionnaires, of whom 59 (55 %) had previously chosen DNA-direct (intervention) versus DNA-intake (standard practice i.e., control: 45 %). Questionnaires assessed satisfaction and psychological distress. All participants were satisfied and 85 % of DNA-direct participants would choose this procedure again; 10 % would prefer DNA-intake and 5 % were undecided. In repeated measurements ANOVA, general distress (GHQ-12, p = 0.01) and BC-specific distress (IES-bc, p = 0.03) were lower in DNA-direct than DNA-intake at all time measurements. Heredity-specific distress (IES-her) did not differ significantly between groups. Multivariate regression analyses showed that choice of procedure did not significantly contribute to either general or heredity-specific distress. BC-specific distress (after BC diagnosis) did contribute to both general and heredity-specific distress. This suggests that higher distress scores reflected BC experience, rather than the type of genetic diagnostic procedure. In conclusion, the large majority of BC patients that used DNA-direct reported high satisfaction without increased distress both in the short term, and 1 year after conclusion of genetic testing.

  7. Population genetic testing for cancer susceptibility: founder mutations to genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, William D; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Turnbull, Clare

    2016-01-01

    The current standard model for identifying carriers of high-risk mutations in cancer-susceptibility genes (CSGs) generally involves a process that is not amenable to population-based testing: access to genetic tests is typically regulated by health-care providers on the basis of a labour-intensive assessment of an individual's personal and family history of cancer, with face-to-face genetic counselling performed before mutation testing. Several studies have shown that application of these selection criteria results in a substantial proportion of mutation carriers being missed. Population-based genetic testing has been proposed as an alternative approach to determining cancer susceptibility, and aims for a more-comprehensive detection of mutation carriers. Herein, we review the existing data on population-based genetic testing, and consider some of the barriers, pitfalls, and challenges related to the possible expansion of this approach. We consider mechanisms by which population-based genetic testing for cancer susceptibility could be delivered, and suggest how such genetic testing might be integrated into existing and emerging health-care structures. The existing models of genetic testing (including issues relating to informed consent) will very likely require considerable alteration if the potential benefits of population-based genetic testing are to be fully realized.

  8. Hereditary cancer genes are highly susceptible to splicing mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soemedi, Rachel; Maguire, Samantha; Murray, Michael F.; Monaghan, Sean F.

    2018-01-01

    Substitutions that disrupt pre-mRNA splicing are a common cause of genetic disease. On average, 13.4% of all hereditary disease alleles are classified as splicing mutations mapping to the canonical 5′ and 3′ splice sites. However, splicing mutations present in exons and deeper intronic positions are vastly underreported. A recent re-analysis of coding mutations in exon 10 of the Lynch Syndrome gene, MLH1, revealed an extremely high rate (77%) of mutations that lead to defective splicing. This finding is confirmed by extending the sampling to five other exons in the MLH1 gene. Further analysis suggests a more general phenomenon of defective splicing driving Lynch Syndrome. Of the 36 mutations tested, 11 disrupted splicing. Furthermore, analyzing past reports suggest that MLH1 mutations in canonical splice sites also occupy a much higher fraction (36%) of total mutations than expected. When performing a comprehensive analysis of splicing mutations in human disease genes, we found that three main causal genes of Lynch Syndrome, MLH1, MSH2, and PMS2, belonged to a class of 86 disease genes which are enriched for splicing mutations. Other cancer genes were also enriched in the 86 susceptible genes. The enrichment of splicing mutations in hereditary cancers strongly argues for additional priority in interpreting clinical sequencing data in relation to cancer and splicing. PMID:29505604

  9. Hereditary cancer genes are highly susceptible to splicing mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy L Rhine

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Substitutions that disrupt pre-mRNA splicing are a common cause of genetic disease. On average, 13.4% of all hereditary disease alleles are classified as splicing mutations mapping to the canonical 5' and 3' splice sites. However, splicing mutations present in exons and deeper intronic positions are vastly underreported. A recent re-analysis of coding mutations in exon 10 of the Lynch Syndrome gene, MLH1, revealed an extremely high rate (77% of mutations that lead to defective splicing. This finding is confirmed by extending the sampling to five other exons in the MLH1 gene. Further analysis suggests a more general phenomenon of defective splicing driving Lynch Syndrome. Of the 36 mutations tested, 11 disrupted splicing. Furthermore, analyzing past reports suggest that MLH1 mutations in canonical splice sites also occupy a much higher fraction (36% of total mutations than expected. When performing a comprehensive analysis of splicing mutations in human disease genes, we found that three main causal genes of Lynch Syndrome, MLH1, MSH2, and PMS2, belonged to a class of 86 disease genes which are enriched for splicing mutations. Other cancer genes were also enriched in the 86 susceptible genes. The enrichment of splicing mutations in hereditary cancers strongly argues for additional priority in interpreting clinical sequencing data in relation to cancer and splicing.

  10. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Francke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inherited BRCA gene mutations convey a high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, but current guidelines limit BRCA mutation testing to women with early-onset cancer and relatives of mutation-positive cases. Benefits and risks of providing this information directly to consumers are unknown.Methods. To assess and quantify emotional and behavioral reactions of consumers to their 23andMe Personal Genome Service® report of three BRCA mutations that are common in Ashkenazi Jews, we invited all 136 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-positive individuals in the 23andMe customer database who had chosen to view their BRCA reports to participate in this IRB-approved study. We also invited 160 mutation-negative customers who were matched for age, sex and ancestry. Semi-structured phone interviews were completed for 32 mutation carriers, 16 women and 16 men, and 31 non-carriers. Questions addressed personal and family history of cancer, decision and timing of viewing the BRCA report, recollection of the result, emotional responses, perception of personal cancer risk, information sharing, and actions taken or planned.Results. Eleven women and 14 men had received the unexpected result that they are carriers of a BRCA1 185delAG or 5382insC, or BRCA2 6174delT mutation. None of them reported extreme anxiety and four experienced moderate anxiety that was transitory. Remarkably, five women and six men described their response as neutral. Most carrier women sought medical advice and four underwent risk-reducing procedures after confirmatory mutation testing. Male carriers realized that their test results implied genetic risk for female relatives, and several of them felt considerably burdened by this fact. Sharing mutation information with family members led to screening of at least 30 relatives and identification of 13 additional carriers. Non-carriers did not report inappropriate actions, such as foregoing cancer screening. All but one of the 32 mutation

  11. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francke, Uta; Dijamco, Cheri; Kiefer, Amy K; Eriksson, Nicholas; Moiseff, Bianca; Tung, Joyce Y; Mountain, Joanna L

    2013-01-01

    Background. Inherited BRCA gene mutations convey a high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, but current guidelines limit BRCA mutation testing to women with early-onset cancer and relatives of mutation-positive cases. Benefits and risks of providing this information directly to consumers are unknown. Methods. To assess and quantify emotional and behavioral reactions of consumers to their 23andMe Personal Genome Service(®) report of three BRCA mutations that are common in Ashkenazi Jews, we invited all 136 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-positive individuals in the 23andMe customer database who had chosen to view their BRCA reports to participate in this IRB-approved study. We also invited 160 mutation-negative customers who were matched for age, sex and ancestry. Semi-structured phone interviews were completed for 32 mutation carriers, 16 women and 16 men, and 31 non-carriers. Questions addressed personal and family history of cancer, decision and timing of viewing the BRCA report, recollection of the result, emotional responses, perception of personal cancer risk, information sharing, and actions taken or planned. Results. Eleven women and 14 men had received the unexpected result that they are carriers of a BRCA1 185delAG or 5382insC, or BRCA2 6174delT mutation. None of them reported extreme anxiety and four experienced moderate anxiety that was transitory. Remarkably, five women and six men described their response as neutral. Most carrier women sought medical advice and four underwent risk-reducing procedures after confirmatory mutation testing. Male carriers realized that their test results implied genetic risk for female relatives, and several of them felt considerably burdened by this fact. Sharing mutation information with family members led to screening of at least 30 relatives and identification of 13 additional carriers. Non-carriers did not report inappropriate actions, such as foregoing cancer screening. All but one of the 32 mutation-positive participants

  12. Skin prick test reactivity to aeroallergens by filaggrin mutation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, M G; Johansen, J D; Linneberg, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations are positively associated with sensitization to aero allergens. We hypothesized that FLG mutations would also have an effect on the mean size of positive skin prick test (SPT) reactions as well as the number of positive reactions....... OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of FLG mutations on the mean size and the number of positive SPT reactions, as well as the association with positive specific IgE. METHODS: A random sample of 3335 adults from the general population in Denmark was genotyped for the R501X and 2282del4 mutations in the FLG...... mutations alone are insufficient to cause secondary sensitization to allergens. The positive association seen in patients must be explained by a combination of further barrier abnormality caused by dermatitis as well as increased allergen exposure....

  13. Evaluation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence, risk prediction models and a multistep testing approach in French‐Canadian families with high risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Moisan, Anne‐Marie; Gaborieau, Valérie; Vézina, Hélène; Durocher, Francine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Plante, Marie; Avard, Denise; Bessette, Paul; Brousseau, Claire; Dorval, Michel; Godard, Béatrice; Houde, Louis; Joly, Yann; Lajoie, Marie‐Andrée; Leblanc, Gilles; Lépine, Jean; Lespérance, Bernard; Malouin, Hélène; Parboosingh, Jillian; Pichette, Roxane; Provencher, Louise; Rhéaume, Josée; Sinnett, Daniel; Samson, Carolle; Simard, Jean‐Claude; Tranchant, Martine; Voyer, Patricia; BRCAs, INHERIT; Easton, Douglas; Tavtigian, Sean V; Knoppers, Bartha‐Maria; Laframboise, Rachel; Bridge, Peter; Goldgar, David

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective In clinical settings with fixed resources allocated to predictive genetic testing for high‐risk cancer predisposition genes, optimal strategies for mutation screening programmes are critically important. These depend on the mutation spectrum found in the population under consideration and the frequency of mutations detected as a function of the personal and family history of cancer, which are both affected by the presence of founder mutations and demographic characteristics of the underlying population. The results of multistep genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a large series of families with breast cancer in the French‐Canadian population of Quebec, Canada are reported. Methods A total of 256 high‐risk families were ascertained from regional familial cancer clinics throughout the province of Quebec. Initially, families were tested for a panel of specific mutations known to occur in this population. Families in which no mutation was identified were then comprehensively tested. Three algorithms to predict the presence of mutations were evaluated, including the prevalence tables provided by Myriad Genetics Laboratories, the Manchester Scoring System and a logistic regression approach based on the data from this study. Results 8 of the 15 distinct mutations found in 62 BRCA1/BRCA2‐positive families had never been previously reported in this population, whereas 82% carried 1 of the 4 mutations currently observed in ⩾2 families. In the subset of 191 families in which at least 1 affected individual was tested, 29% carried a mutation. Of these 27 BRCA1‐positive and 29 BRCA2‐positive families, 48 (86%) were found to harbour a mutation detected by the initial test. Among the remaining 143 inconclusive families, all 8 families found to have a mutation after complete sequencing had Manchester Scores ⩾18. The logistic regression and Manchester Scores provided equal predictive power, and both were significantly better

  14. Automation of diagnostic genetic testing: mutation detection by cyclic minisequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagrund, Katariina; Orpana, Arto K

    2014-01-01

    The rising role of nucleic acid testing in clinical decision making is creating a need for efficient and automated diagnostic nucleic acid test platforms. Clinical use of nucleic acid testing sets demands for shorter turnaround times (TATs), lower production costs and robust, reliable methods that can easily adopt new test panels and is able to run rare tests in random access principle. Here we present a novel home-brew laboratory automation platform for diagnostic mutation testing. This platform is based on the cyclic minisequecing (cMS) and two color near-infrared (NIR) detection. Pipetting is automated using Tecan Freedom EVO pipetting robots and all assays are performed in 384-well micro plate format. The automation platform includes a data processing system, controlling all procedures, and automated patient result reporting to the hospital information system. We have found automated cMS a reliable, inexpensive and robust method for nucleic acid testing for a wide variety of diagnostic tests. The platform is currently in clinical use for over 80 mutations or polymorphisms. Additionally to tests performed from blood samples, the system performs also epigenetic test for the methylation of the MGMT gene promoter, and companion diagnostic tests for analysis of KRAS and BRAF gene mutations from formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tumor samples. Automation of genetic test reporting is found reliable and efficient decreasing the work load of academic personnel.

  15. High resolution melting analysis: a rapid and accurate method to detect CALR mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Bilbao-Sieyro

    Full Text Available The recent discovery of CALR mutations in essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF patients without JAK2/MPL mutations has emerged as a relevant finding for the molecular diagnosis of these myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN. We tested the feasibility of high-resolution melting (HRM as a screening method for rapid detection of CALR mutations.CALR was studied in wild-type JAK2/MPL patients including 34 ET, 21 persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN and 98 suspected secondary thrombocytosis. CALR mutation analysis was performed through HRM and Sanger sequencing. We compared clinical features of CALR-mutated versus 45 JAK2/MPL-mutated subjects in ET.Nineteen samples showed distinct HRM patterns from wild-type. Of them, 18 were mutations and one a polymorphism as confirmed by direct sequencing. CALR mutations were present in 44% of ET (15/34, 14% of persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN (3/21 and none of the secondary thrombocytosis (0/98. Of the 18 mutants, 9 were 52 bp deletions, 8 were 5 bp insertions and other was a complex mutation with insertion/deletion. No mutations were found after sequencing analysis of 45 samples displaying wild-type HRM curves. HRM technique was reproducible, no false positive or negative were detected and the limit of detection was of 3%.This study establishes a sensitive, reliable and rapid HRM method to screen for the presence of CALR mutations.

  16. Rapid BRAF mutation tests in patients with advanced melanoma : Comparison of immunohistochemistry, Droplet Digital PCR, and the Idylla Mutation Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, Cornelis; Ter Elst, Arja; Bosman, Lisette J; Platteel, Inge; Jalving, Mathilde; van den Berg, Anke; Diepstra, Arjan; van Hemel, Bettien; Diercks, Gilles F H; Hospers, Geke A P; Schuuring, Ed

    BRAF mutational testing has become a common practice in the diagnostic process of patients with advanced melanoma. Although time-consuming, DNA sequencing techniques are the current gold standard for mutational testing. However, in certain clinical situations, a rapid test result is required. In

  17. BRAF mutation testing in solid tumors: a methodological comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, Grace W; Wisotzkey, Jeffrey D; Benko, Floyd A; Donaldson, Keri J

    2014-09-01

    Solid tumor genotyping has become standard of care for the characterization of proto-oncogene mutational status, which has traditionally been accomplished with Sanger sequencing. However, companion diagnostic assays and comparable laboratory-developed tests are becoming increasingly popular, such as the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 Mutation Test and the INFINITI KRAS-BRAF assay, respectively. This study evaluates and validates the analytical performance of the INFINITI KRAS-BRAF assay and compares concordance of BRAF status with two reference assays, the cobas test and Sanger sequencing. DNA extraction from FFPE tissue specimens was performed followed by multiplex PCR amplification and fluorescent label incorporation using allele-specific primer extension. Hybridization to a microarray, signal detection, and analysis were then performed. The limits of detection were determined by testing dilutions of mutant BRAF alleles within wild-type background DNA, and accuracy was calculated based on these results. The INFINITI KRAS-BRAF assay produced 100% concordance with the cobas test and Sanger sequencing and had sensitivity equivalent to the cobas assay. The INFINITI assay is repeatable with at least 95% accuracy in the detection of mutant and wild-type BRAF alleles. These results confirm that the INFINITI KRAS-BRAF assay is comparable to traditional sequencing and the Food and Drug Administration-approved companion diagnostic assay for the detection of BRAF mutations. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High incidence of GJB2 gene mutations among assortatively mating ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High incidence of GJB2 gene mutations among assortatively mating hearing impaired families in Kerala: future implications. Amritkumar Pavithra, Justin Margret Jeffrey, Jayasankaran Chandru, Arabandi Ramesh and C. R. Srikumari Srisailapathy. J. Genet. 93, 207–213. Table 1. Consolidated table of GJB2 mutation status ...

  19. High resolution melting for mutation scanning of TP53 exons 5–8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krypuy, Michael; Dobrovic, Alexander; Ahmed, Ahmed Ashour; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Hyland, Sarah J; Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group; Fazio, Anna de; Fox, Stephen B; Brenton, James D; Bowtell, David D

    2007-01-01

    p53 is commonly inactivated by mutations in the DNA-binding domain in a wide range of cancers. As mutant p53 often influences response to therapy, effective and rapid methods to scan for mutations in TP53 are likely to be of clinical value. We therefore evaluated the use of high resolution melting (HRM) as a rapid mutation scanning tool for TP53 in tumour samples. We designed PCR amplicons for HRM mutation scanning of TP53 exons 5 to 8 and tested them with DNA from cell lines hemizygous or homozygous for known mutations. We assessed the sensitivity of each PCR amplicon using dilutions of cell line DNA in normal wild-type DNA. We then performed a blinded assessment on ovarian tumour DNA samples that had been previously sequenced for mutations in TP53 to assess the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the HRM technique. We also performed HRM analysis on breast tumour DNA samples with unknown TP53 mutation status. One cell line mutation was not readily observed when exon 5 was amplified. As exon 5 contained multiple melting domains, we divided the exon into two amplicons for further screening. Sequence changes were also introduced into some of the primers to improve the melting characteristics of the amplicon. Aberrant HRM curves indicative of TP53 mutations were observed for each of the samples in the ovarian tumour DNA panel. Comparison of the HRM results with the sequencing results revealed that each mutation was detected by HRM in the correct exon. For the breast tumour panel, we detected seven aberrant melt profiles by HRM and subsequent sequencing confirmed the presence of these and no other mutations in the predicted exons. HRM is an effective technique for simple and rapid scanning of TP53 mutations that can markedly reduce the amount of sequencing required in mutational studies of TP53

  20. Higher Quality of Molecular Testing, an Unfulfilled Priority: Results from External Quality Assessment for KRAS Mutation Testing in Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tembuyser, L.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Normanno, N.; Delen, S.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Dequeker, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Precision medicine is now a key element in clinical oncology. RAS mutational status is a crucial predictor of responsiveness to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor agents in metastatic colorectal cancer. In an effort to guarantee high-quality testing services in molecular pathology, the European

  1. Teaching the fluctuation test in silico by using mutate: a program to distinguish between the adaptive and spontaneous mutation hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary aspects of current genetics such as sequence databases, DNA mutations, and hypothesis testing, while introducing the fluctuation test. This seminal experiment was originally performed studying Escherichia coli resistance to the infection by bacteriophage T1. The fluctuation test initiated the modern bacterial genetics that 25 years later ushered in the era of the recombinant DNA. Nowadays we know that some deletions in fhuA, the gene responsible for E. coli membrane receptor of T1, could cause the E. coli resistance to this phage. For the sake of simplicity, we will introduce the assumption that a single mutation generates the resistance to T1. During the practical, the students use the program to download some fhuA gene sequences, manually introduce some stop codon mutations, and design a fluctuation test to obtain data for distinguishing between preadaptative (spontaneous) and induced (adaptive) mutation hypotheses. The program can be launched from a browser or, if preferred, its executable file can be downloaded from http://webs.uvigo.es/acraaj/MutateWeb/Mutate.html. It requires the Java 5.0 (or higher) Runtime Environment (freely available at http://www.java.com). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Teaching the Fluctuation Test "In Silico" by Using Mutate: A Program to Distinguish between the Adaptive and Spontaneous Mutation Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Rodriguez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary…

  3. New Mutation Identified in the SRY Gene High Mobility Group (HMG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride İffet Şahin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the SRY gene prevent the differentiation of the fetal gonads to testes and cause developing female phenotype, and as a result sex reversal and pure gonadal dysgenesis (Swyer syndrome can be developed. Different types of mutations identified in the SRY gene are responsible for 15% of the gonadal dysgenesis. In this study, we report a new mutation (R132P in the High Mobility Group (HMG region of SRY gene was detected in a patient with primary amenorrhea who has 46,XY karyotype. This mutation leads to replacement of the polar and basic arginine with a nonpolar hydrophobic proline residue at aminoacid 132 in the nuclear localization signal region of the protein. With this case report we want to emphasize the genetic approach to the patients with gonadal dysgenesis. If Y chromosome is detected during cytogenetic analysis, revealing the presence of the SRY gene and identification of mutations in this gene by sequencing analysis is become important in.

  4. Germline mutations in 40 cancer susceptibility genes among Chinese patients with high hereditary risk breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junyan; Jing, Ruilin; Wei, Hongyi; Wang, Minghao; Qi, Xiaowei; Liu, Haoxi; Liu, Jian; Ou, Jianghua; Jiang, Weihua; Tian, Fuguo; Sheng, Yuan; Li, Hengyu; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Ruishan; Guan, Aihua; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Hongchuan; Ren, Yu; He, Jianjun; Huang, Weiwei; Liao, Ning; Cai, Xiangjun; Ming, Jia; Ling, Rui; Xu, Yan; Hu, Chunyan; Zhang, Jianguo; Guo, Baoliang; Ouyang, Lizhi; Shuai, Ping; Liu, Zhenzhen; Zhong, Ling; Zeng, Zhen; Zhang, Ting; Xuan, Zhaoling; Tan, Xuanni; Liang, Junbin; Pan, Qinwen; Chen, Li; Zhang, Fan; Fan, Linjun; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Xinhua; Li, Jingbo; Chen, Chongjian; Jiang, Jun

    2018-05-12

    Multigene panel testing of breast cancer predisposition genes have been extensively conducted in Europe and America, which is relatively rare in Asia however. In this study, we assessed the frequency of germline mutations in 40 cancer predisposition genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, among a large cohort of Chinese patients with high hereditary risk of BC. From 2015 to 2016, consecutive BC patients from 26 centers of China with high hereditary risk were recruited (n=937). Clinical information was collected and next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed using blood samples of participants to identify germline mutations. In total, we acquired 223 patients with putative germline mutations, including 159 in BRCA1/2, 61 in 15 other BC susceptibility genes and 3 in both BRCA1/2 and non-BRCA1/2 gene. Major mutant non-BRCA1/2 genes were TP53 (n=18), PALB2 (n=11), CHEK2 (n=6), ATM (n=6), and BARD1 (n=5). No factors predicted pathologic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes when treated as a whole. TP53 mutations were associated with HER-2 positive BC and younger age at diagnosis; and CHEK2 and PALB2 mutations were enriched in patients with luminal BC. Among high hereditary risk Chinese BC patients, 23.8% contained germline mutations, including 6.8% in non-BRCA1/2 genes. TP53 and PALB2 had a relatively high mutation rates (1.9% and 1.2%). Although no factors predicted for detrimental mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes, some clinical features were associated with mutations of several particular genes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 UICC.

  5. Impact of 226C>T MSH2 gene mutation on cancer phenotypes in two HNPCC-associated highly-consanguineous families from Kuwait: emphasis on premarital genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafie, Makia J; Al-Awadi, Sadiqa; Al-Mosawi, Fatemah; Elshafey, Alaa; Al-Ali, Waleed; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2009-01-01

    Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is one of the commonest cancer susceptibility syndromes. It is characterized by early onset colon cancer and a variety of extracolonic tumours. Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS1, and PMS2) are responsible for this disorder. Identifying an affected individual depends on the tumour histopathology, family history that fulfils the Amsterdam and/or Bethesda criteria, tumour immunohistochemistry, microsatellite instability, and finally molecular analysis of an affected member. It is a laborious, time consuming and expensive procedure, which needs the effort of a multi-disciplinary team. However, once the diagnosis is established and germline defect is identified, other high risk pre-symptomatic carriers could be offered intensive surveillance and management as a preventive measure against cancer development. Here, we present two large highly consanguineous HNPCC-families from Kuwait in whom a founder MSH2 mutation was identified. The relationship between this mutation and cancer expressivity in two large consanguineous families harbouring other genetic defects is discussed. Moreover, we shed light on the challenges pertaining to diagnosis, screening, premarital counselling of couples and prenatal diagnosis of offspring with biallelic MSH2 gene mutation.

  6. High voltage test techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Kind, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    The second edition of High Voltage Test Techniques has been completely revised. The present revision takes into account the latest international developments in High Voltage and Measurement technology, making it an essential reference for engineers in the testing field.High Voltage Technology belongs to the traditional area of Electrical Engineering. However, this is not to say that the area has stood still. New insulating materials, computing methods and voltage levels repeatedly pose new problems or open up methods of solution; electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) or components and systems al

  7. Automated objective determination of percentage of malignant nuclei for mutation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viray, Hollis; Coulter, Madeline; Li, Kevin; Lane, Kristin; Madan, Aruna; Mitchell, Kisha; Schalper, Kurt; Hoyt, Clifford; Rimm, David L

    2014-01-01

    Detection of DNA mutations in tumor tissue can be a critical companion diagnostic test before prescription of a targeted therapy. Each method for detection of these mutations is associated with an analytic sensitivity that is a function of the percentage of tumor cells present in the specimen. Currently, tumor cell percentage is visually estimated resulting in an ordinal and highly variant result for a biologically continuous variable. We proposed that this aspect of DNA mutation testing could be standardized by developing a computer algorithm capable of accurately determining the percentage of malignant nuclei in an image of a hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue. Using inForm software, we developed an algorithm, to calculate the percentage of malignant cells in histologic specimens of colon adenocarcinoma. A criterion standard was established by manually counting malignant and benign nuclei. Three pathologists also estimated the percentage of malignant nuclei in each image. Algorithm #9 had a median deviation from the criterion standard of 5.4% on the training set and 6.2% on the validation set. Compared with pathologist estimation, Algorithm #9 showed a similar ability to determine percentage of malignant nuclei. This method represents a potential future tool to assist in determining the percent of malignant nuclei present in a tissue section. Further validation of this algorithm or an improved algorithm may have value to more accurately assess percentage of malignant cells for companion diagnostic mutation testing.

  8. Competitive amplification of differentially melting amplicons (CADMA improves KRAS hotspot mutation testing in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Lasse

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is an extremely heterogeneous group of diseases traditionally categorized according to tissue of origin. However, even among patients with the same cancer subtype the cellular alterations at the molecular level are often very different. Several new therapies targeting specific molecular changes found in individual patients have initiated the era of personalized therapy and significantly improved patient care. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC a selected group of patients with wild-type KRAS respond to antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Testing for KRAS mutations is now required prior to anti-EGFR treatment, however, less sensitive methods based on conventional PCR regularly fail to detect KRAS mutations in clinical samples. Methods We have developed sensitive and specific assays for detection of the seven most common KRAS mutations based on a novel methodology named Competitive Amplification of Differentially Melting Amplicons (CADMA. The clinical applicability of these assays was assessed by analyzing 100 colorectal cancer samples, for which KRAS mutation status has been evaluated by the commercially available TheraScreen® KRAS mutation kit. Results The CADMA assays were sensitive to at least 0.5% mutant alleles in a wild-type background when using 50 nanograms of DNA in the reactions. Consensus between CADMA and the TheraScreen kit was observed in 96% of the colorectal cancer samples. In cases where disagreement was observed the CADMA result could be confirmed by a previously published assay based on TaqMan probes and by fast COLD-PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. Conclusions The high analytical sensitivity and specificity of CADMA may increase diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of KRAS mutation testing in mCRC patients.

  9. Sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of blood as a diagnostic test in mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Vestergaard, Hanne; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The recent progress in sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis suggests that mutation analysis of peripheral blood (PB) represents a promising diagnostic test in mastocytosis. However, there is a need for systematic assessment of the analytical sensitivity and specificity of the approach in order...... to establish its value in clinical use. We therefore evaluated sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of PB as a diagnostic test in an entire case-series of adults with mastocytosis. We demonstrate for the first time that by using a sufficiently sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis, it is possible to detect...... the mutation in PB in nearly all adult mastocytosis patients. The mutation was detected in PB in 78 of 83 systemic mastocytosis (94%) and 3 of 4 cutaneous mastocytosis patients (75%). The test was 100% specific as determined by analysis of clinically relevant control patients who all tested negative. Mutation...

  10. High-resolution melting curve analysis for rapid detection of mutations in a Medaka TILLING library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguchi Tomonori

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last two decades, DNA sequencing has led to the identification of numerous genes in key species; however, in most cases, their functions are still unknown. In this situation, reverse genetics is the most suitable method to assign function to a gene. TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes is a reverse-genetic strategy that combines random chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput discovery of the induced mutations in target genes. The method has been applied to a variety of plant and animal species. Screening of the induced mutations is the most important step in TILLING. Currently, direct sequencing or nuclease-mediated screening of heteroduplexes is widely used for detection of mutations in TILLING. Both methods are useful, but the costs are substantial and turnaround times are relatively long. Thus, there is a need for an alternative method that is of higher throughput and more cost effective. Results In this study, we developed a high resolution melting (HRM assay and evaluated its effectiveness for screening ENU-induced mutations in a medaka TILLING library. We had previously screened mutations in the p53 gene by direct sequencing. Therefore, we first tested the efficiency of the HRM assay by screening mutations in p53, which indicated that the HRM assay is as useful as direct sequencing. Next, we screened mutations in the atr and atm genes with the HRM assay. Nonsense mutations were identified in each gene, and the phenotypes of these nonsense mutants confirmed their loss-of-function nature. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the HRM assay is useful for screening mutations in TILLING. Furthermore, the phenotype of the obtained mutants indicates that medaka is an excellent animal model for investigating genome stability and gene function, especially when combined with TILLING.

  11. Simple PCR assays improve the sensitivity of HIV-1 subtype B drug resistance testing and allow linking of resistance mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The success of antiretroviral therapy is known to be compromised by drug-resistant HIV-1 at frequencies detectable by conventional bulk sequencing. Currently, there is a need to assess the clinical consequences of low-frequency drug resistant variants occurring below the detection limit of conventional genotyping. Sensitive detection of drug-resistant subpopulations, however, requires simple and practical methods for routine testing. METHODOLOGY: We developed highly-sensitive and simple real-time PCR assays for nine key drug resistance mutations and show that these tests overcome substantial sequence heterogeneity in HIV-1 clinical specimens. We specifically used early wildtype virus samples from the pre-antiretroviral drug era to measure background reactivity and were able to define highly-specific screening cut-offs that are up to 67-fold more sensitive than conventional genotyping. We also demonstrate that sequencing the mutation-specific PCR products provided a direct and novel strategy to further detect and link associated resistance mutations, allowing easy identification of multi-drug-resistant variants. Resistance mutation associations revealed in mutation-specific amplicon sequences were verified by clonal sequencing. SIGNIFICANCE: Combined, sensitive real-time PCR testing and mutation-specific amplicon sequencing provides a powerful and simple approach that allows for improved detection and evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations.

  12. Detection of somatic mutations by high-resolution DNA melting (HRM) analysis in multiple cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Calcei, Jacob; Wei, Jun S; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Sherman, Mark E; Hewitt, Stephen; Vockley, Joseph; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah P; Khan, Javed; Chanock, Stephen

    2011-01-17

    Identification of somatic mutations in cancer is a major goal for understanding and monitoring the events related to cancer initiation and progression. High resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis represents a fast, post-PCR high-throughput method for scanning somatic sequence alterations in target genes. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis for tumor mutation screening in a range of tumor samples, which included 216 frozen pediatric small rounded blue-cell tumors as well as 180 paraffin-embedded tumors from breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers (60 of each). HRM analysis was performed in exons of the following candidate genes known to harbor established commonly observed mutations: PIK3CA, ERBB2, KRAS, TP53, EGFR, BRAF, GATA3, and FGFR3. Bi-directional sequencing analysis was used to determine the accuracy of the HRM analysis. For the 39 mutations observed in frozen samples, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis were 97% and 87%, respectively. There were 67 mutation/variants in the paraffin-embedded samples, and the sensitivity and specificity for the HRM analysis were 88% and 80%, respectively. Paraffin-embedded samples require higher quantity of purified DNA for high performance. In summary, HRM analysis is a promising moderate-throughput screening test for mutations among known candidate genomic regions. Although the overall accuracy appears to be better in frozen specimens, somatic alterations were detected in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded samples.

  13. Detection of somatic mutations by high-resolution DNA melting (HRM analysis in multiple cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Gonzalez-Bosquet

    Full Text Available Identification of somatic mutations in cancer is a major goal for understanding and monitoring the events related to cancer initiation and progression. High resolution melting (HRM curve analysis represents a fast, post-PCR high-throughput method for scanning somatic sequence alterations in target genes. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis for tumor mutation screening in a range of tumor samples, which included 216 frozen pediatric small rounded blue-cell tumors as well as 180 paraffin-embedded tumors from breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers (60 of each. HRM analysis was performed in exons of the following candidate genes known to harbor established commonly observed mutations: PIK3CA, ERBB2, KRAS, TP53, EGFR, BRAF, GATA3, and FGFR3. Bi-directional sequencing analysis was used to determine the accuracy of the HRM analysis. For the 39 mutations observed in frozen samples, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis were 97% and 87%, respectively. There were 67 mutation/variants in the paraffin-embedded samples, and the sensitivity and specificity for the HRM analysis were 88% and 80%, respectively. Paraffin-embedded samples require higher quantity of purified DNA for high performance. In summary, HRM analysis is a promising moderate-throughput screening test for mutations among known candidate genomic regions. Although the overall accuracy appears to be better in frozen specimens, somatic alterations were detected in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded samples.

  14. High Intra- and Inter-Tumoral Heterogeneity of RAS Mutations in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Jeantet

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 30% of patients with wild type RAS metastatic colorectal cancer are non-responders to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies (anti-EGFR mAbs, possibly due to undetected tumoral subclones harboring RAS mutations. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of RAS mutations in different areas of the primary tumor, metastatic lymph nodes and distant metastasis. A retrospective cohort of 18 patients with a colorectal cancer (CRC was included in the study. Multiregion analysis was performed in 60 spatially separated tumor areas according to the pathological tumor node metastasis (pTNM staging and KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutations were tested using pyrosequencing. In primary tumors, intra-tumoral heterogeneity for RAS mutation was found in 33% of cases. Inter-tumoral heterogeneity for RAS mutation between primary tumors and metastatic lymph nodes or distant metastasis was found in 36% of cases. Moreover, 28% of tumors had multiple RAS mutated subclones in the same tumor. A high proportion of CRCs presented intra- and/or inter-tumoral heterogeneity, which has relevant clinical implications for anti-EGFR mAbs prescription. These results suggest the need for multiple RAS testing in different parts of the same tumor and/or more sensitive techniques.

  15. The value of KRAS mutation testing with CEA for the diagnosis of pancreatic mucinous cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadayifci, Abdurrahman; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Atar, Mustafa; Dewitt, John M.; Forcione, David G.; Sherman, Stuart; Casey, Brenna W.; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Schmidt, C. Max; Pitman, Martha B.; Brugge, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Pancreatic cyst fluid (PCF) CEA has been shown to be the most accurate preoperative test for detection of cystic mucinous neoplasms (CMNs). This study aimed to assess the added value of PCF KRAS mutational analysis to CEA for diagnosis of CMNs. Patients and methods: This is a retrospective study of prospectively collected endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) fine-needle aspiration (FNA) data. KRAS mutation was determined by direct sequencing or equivalent methods. Cysts were classified histologically (surgical cohort) or by clinical (EUS or FNA) findings (clinical cohort). Performance characteristics of KRAS, CEA and their combination for detection of a cystic mucinous neoplasm (CMN) and malignancy were calculated. Results: The study cohort consisted of 943 patients: 147 in the surgical cohort and 796 in the clinical cohort. Overall, KRAS and CEA each had high specificity (100 % and 93.2 %), but low sensitivity (48.3 % and 56.3 %) for the diagnosis of a CMN. The positivity of KRAS or CEA increased the diagnostic accuracy (80.8 %) and AUC (0.84) significantly compared to KRAS (65.3 % and 0.74) or CEA (65.8 % and 0.74) alone, but only in the clinical cohort (P < 0.0001 for both). KRAS mutation was significantly more frequent in malignant CMNs compared to histologically confirmed non-malignant CMNs (73 % vs. 37 %, P = 0.001). The negative predictive value of KRAS mutation was 77.6 % in differentiating non-malignant cysts. Conclusions: The detection of a KRAS mutation in PCF is a highly specific test for mucinous cysts. It outperforms CEA for sensitivity in mucinous cyst diagnosis, but the data does not support its routine use. PMID:27092317

  16. Pitfalls in genetic testing: the story of missed SCN1A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djémié, Tania; Weckhuysen, Sarah; von Spiczak, Sarah; Carvill, Gemma L; Jaehn, Johanna; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Brilstra, Eva; Caglayan, Hande S; de Kovel, Carolien G; Depienne, Christel; Gaily, Eija; Gennaro, Elena; Giraldez, Beatriz G; Gormley, Padhraig; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Guerrini, Renzo; Hämäläinen, Eija; Hartmann, Corinna; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Hjalgrim, Helle; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R; Leu, Costin; Marini, Carla; McMahon, Jacinta M; Mei, Davide; Møller, Rikke S; Muhle, Hiltrud; Myers, Candace T; Nava, Caroline; Serratosa, Jose M; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Stephani, Ulrich; Striano, Pasquale; van Kempen, Marjan J A; Verbeek, Nienke E; Usluer, Sunay; Zara, Federico; Palotie, Aarno; Mefford, Heather C; Scheffer, Ingrid E; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Suls, Arvid

    2016-07-01

    Sanger sequencing, still the standard technique for genetic testing in most diagnostic laboratories and until recently widely used in research, is gradually being complemented by next-generation sequencing (NGS). No single mutation detection technique is however perfect in identifying all mutations. Therefore, we wondered to what extent inconsistencies between Sanger sequencing and NGS affect the molecular diagnosis of patients. Since mutations in SCN1A, the major gene implicated in epilepsy, are found in the majority of Dravet syndrome (DS) patients, we focused on missed SCN1A mutations. We sent out a survey to 16 genetic centers performing SCN1A testing. We collected data on 28 mutations initially missed using Sanger sequencing. All patients were falsely reported as SCN1A mutation-negative, both due to technical limitations and human errors. We illustrate the pitfalls of Sanger sequencing and most importantly provide evidence that SCN1A mutations are an even more frequent cause of DS than already anticipated.

  17. Exome sequencing identifies ZNF644 mutations in high myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Myopia is the most common ocular disorder worldwide, and high myopia in particular is one of the leading causes of blindness. Genetic factors play a critical role in the development of myopia, especially high myopia. Recently, the exome sequencing approach has been successfully used for the disease gene identification of Mendelian disorders. Here we show a successful application of exome sequencing to identify a gene for an autosomal dominant disorder, and we have identified a gene potentially responsible for high myopia in a monogenic form. We captured exomes of two affected individuals from a Han Chinese family with high myopia and performed sequencing analysis by a second-generation sequencer with a mean coverage of 30× and sufficient depth to call variants at ∼97% of each targeted exome. The shared genetic variants of these two affected individuals in the family being studied were filtered against the 1000 Genomes Project and the dbSNP131 database. A mutation A672G in zinc finger protein 644 isoform 1 (ZNF644 was identified as being related to the phenotype of this family. After we performed sequencing analysis of the exons in the ZNF644 gene in 300 sporadic cases of high myopia, we identified an additional five mutations (I587V, R680G, C699Y, 3'UTR+12 C>G, and 3'UTR+592 G>A in 11 different patients. All these mutations were absent in 600 normal controls. The ZNF644 gene was expressed in human retinal and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Given that ZNF644 is predicted to be a transcription factor that may regulate genes involved in eye development, mutation may cause the axial elongation of eyeball found in high myopia patients. Our results suggest that ZNF644 might be a causal gene for high myopia in a monogenic form.

  18. Diphtheria toxin resistance in human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts in the in vivo somatic cell mutation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, D.J.; Wei, L.; Laurie, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown that circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used for the enumeration of 6-thioguanine-resistant cells that presumably arise by mutation in vivo. This somatic cell mutation test has been studied in lymphocytes from human populations exposed to known mutagens and/or carcinogens. The sensitivity of the test could be further enhanced by including other gene markers, since there is evidence for locus-specific differences in response to mutagens. Resistance to diphtheria toxin (Dip/sup r/) seemed like a potential marker to incorporate into the test because the mutation acts codominantly, can readily be selected in human diploid fibroblasts and Chinese hamster cells with no evidence for cell density or cross-feeding effects, and can be assayed for in nondividing cells by measuring protein synthesis inhibition. Blood samples were collected from seven individuals, and fresh, cryopreserved, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes were tested for continued DNA synthesis ( 3 H-thymidine, autoradiography) or protein synthesis ( 35 S-methionine, scintillation counting). Both fresh and cryopreserved lymphocytes, stimulated to divide with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), continued to synthesize DNA in the presence of high doses of diphtheria toxin (DT). Similarly, both dividing (PHA-stimulated) and nondividing fresh lymphocytes carried on significant levels of protein synthesis even 68 hr after exposure to 100 flocculating units (LF)/ml DT. The results suggest that human T and B lymphocytes may not be as sensitive to DT protein synthesis inhibition as human fibroblast and Chinese hamster cells. For this reason, Dip/sup r/ may not be a suitable marker for the somatic cell mutation test

  19. Preclinical test: bacterial reverse mutation test for {sup 18}F-fluorocholine produced in CDTN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Bruno M.; Bispo, Ana Carolina A.; Campos, Danielle C.; Silva, Juliana B., E-mail: bmm@cdtn.br, E-mail: acab@cdtn.br, E-mail: dcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvajb@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The choline labeled with fluorine-18 (18FCH) is being considered as a great importance radiopharmaceutical due to its effective detection of many type of malignant neoplasm. The research related to {sup 18}F-fluorocholine synthesis in CDTN was initiated in 2010. In order to obtain clinical research approval, as well as to register {sup 18}FCH for marketing, safety and efficacy preclinical testing are required. The present work evaluated the {sup 18}FCH genotoxic potential through the bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames test) using Salmonella typhimurium TA-98, TA-100, TA-1535 and TA-1537 strains and Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA strain. The reverse mutation test in bacteria for fluorcolina was conducted in two stages. Initially the method was applied to 'cold' fluorocholine molecule (19FCH). Subsequently, the decayed product of {sup 18}FCH synthesis was evaluated. The first step was performed in order to examine the FCH molecule mutagenicity. The second was carried out to determine the mutagenic potential of final product. All strains were tested in triplicate for each exposure concentration, in the presence and absence of metabolic activation (S-9 mix - 10%). There were no statistically significant increases in revertant colonies rate for any strains tested after their exposure to decayed {sup 18}FCH or {sup 19}FCH. The number of revertant colonies in positive controls was significantly higher than that observed in significant increases in revertant colonies rate for any strains tested after their exposure to decayed {sup 18}FCH or {sup 19}FCH. The number of revertant colonies in positive controls was significantly higher than that observed in negative controls. Based on results of this assay, {sup 18}FCH and {sup 19}FCH, at tested doses, were found to be non-mutagenic in bacterial reverse mutation test. (author)

  20. Preclinical test: bacterial reverse mutation test for 18F-fluorocholine produced in CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Bruno M.; Bispo, Ana Carolina A.; Campos, Danielle C.; Silva, Juliana B.

    2013-01-01

    The choline labeled with fluorine-18 (18FCH) is being considered as a great importance radiopharmaceutical due to its effective detection of many type of malignant neoplasm. The research related to 18 F-fluorocholine synthesis in CDTN was initiated in 2010. In order to obtain clinical research approval, as well as to register 18 FCH for marketing, safety and efficacy preclinical testing are required. The present work evaluated the 18 FCH genotoxic potential through the bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames test) using Salmonella typhimurium TA-98, TA-100, TA-1535 and TA-1537 strains and Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA strain. The reverse mutation test in bacteria for fluorcolina was conducted in two stages. Initially the method was applied to 'cold' fluorocholine molecule (19FCH). Subsequently, the decayed product of 18 FCH synthesis was evaluated. The first step was performed in order to examine the FCH molecule mutagenicity. The second was carried out to determine the mutagenic potential of final product. All strains were tested in triplicate for each exposure concentration, in the presence and absence of metabolic activation (S-9 mix - 10%). There were no statistically significant increases in revertant colonies rate for any strains tested after their exposure to decayed 18 FCH or 19 FCH. The number of revertant colonies in positive controls was significantly higher than that observed in significant increases in revertant colonies rate for any strains tested after their exposure to decayed 18 FCH or 19 FCH. The number of revertant colonies in positive controls was significantly higher than that observed in negative controls. Based on results of this assay, 18 FCH and 19 FCH, at tested doses, were found to be non-mutagenic in bacterial reverse mutation test. (author)

  1. KRAS mutation testing in colorectal cancer: comparison of the results obtained using 3 different methods for the analysis of codons G12 and G13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihl, Michel P; Hoeller, Sylvia; Andreozzi, Maria Carla; Foerster, Anja; Rufle, Alexander; Tornillo, Luigi; Terracciano, Luigi

    2012-03-01

    Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a new therapeutic option for patients with metastatic colorectal or lung carcinoma. However, the therapy efficiency highly depends on the KRAS mutation status in the given tumour. Therefore a reliable and secure KRAS mutation testing is crucial. Here we investigated 100 colorectal carcinoma samples with known KRAS mutation status (62 mutated cases and 38 wild type cases) in a comparative manner with three different KRAS mutation testing techniques (Pyrosequencing, Dideoxysequencing and INFINITI) in order to test their reliability and sensitivity. For the large majority of samples (96/100, 96%), the KRAS mutation status obtained by all three methods was the same. Only two cases with clear discrepancies were observed. One case was reported as wild type by the INFINITI method while the two other methods detected a G13C mutation. In the second case the mutation could be detected by the Pyrosequencing and INFINITI method (15% and 15%), while no signal for mutation could be observed with the Dideoxysequencing method. Additional two unclear results were due to a detection of a G12V with the INFINITI method, which was below cut-off when repeated and which was not detectable by the other two methods and very weak signals in a G12V mutated case with the Dideoxy- and Pyroseqencing method compared to the INFINITI method, respectively. In summary all three methods are reliable and robust methods in detecting KRAS mutations. INFINITI, however seems to be slightly more sensitive compared to Dideoxy- and Pyrosequencing.

  2. Validation of high-resolution DNA melting analysis for mutation scanning of the CDKL5 gene: identification of novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Laure; Diebold, Bertrand; Leroux, Céline; Maurey, Hélène; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Delahaye, Andre; Dulac, Olivier; Metreau, Julia; Melikishvili, Gia; Toutain, Annick; Rivier, François; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been predominantly described in epileptic encephalopathies of female, including infantile spasms with Rett-like features. Up to now, detection of mutations in this gene was made by laborious, expensive and/or time consuming methods. Here, we decided to validate high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for mutation scanning of the CDKL5 gene. Firstly, using a large DNA bank consisting to 34 samples carrying different mutations and polymorphisms, we validated our analytical conditions to analyse the different exons and flanking intronic sequences of the CDKL5 gene by HRMA. Secondly, we screened CDKL5 by both HRMA and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) in a cohort of 135 patients with early-onset seizures. Our results showed that point mutations and small insertions and deletions can be reliably detected by HRMA. Compared to dHPLC, HRMA profiles are more discriminated, thereby decreasing unnecessary sequencing. In this study, we identified eleven novel sequence variations including four pathogenic mutations (2.96% prevalence). HRMA appears cost-effective, easy to set up, highly sensitive, non-toxic and rapid for mutation screening, ideally suited for large genes with heterogeneous mutations located along the whole coding sequence, such as the CDKL5 gene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A high-throughput protocol for mutation scanning of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondow, Heather L; Fox, Stephen B; Mitchell, Gillian; Scott, Rodney J; Beshay, Victoria; Wong, Stephen Q; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Detection of mutations by DNA sequencing can be facilitated by scanning methods to identify amplicons which may have mutations. Current scanning methods used for the detection of germline sequence variants are laborious as they require post-PCR manipulation. High resolution melting (HRM) is a cost-effective rapid screening strategy, which readily detects heterozygous variants by melting curve analysis of PCR products. It is well suited to screening genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 as germline pathogenic mutations in these genes are always heterozygous. Assays for the analysis of all coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were designed, and optimised. A final set of 94 assays which ran under identical amplification conditions were chosen for BRCA1 (36) and BRCA2 (58). Significant attention was placed on primer design to enable reproducible detection of mutations within the amplicon while minimising unnecessary detection of polymorphisms. Deoxyinosine residues were incorporated into primers that overlay intronic polymorphisms. Multiple 384 well plates were used to facilitate high throughput. 169 BRCA1 and 239 BRCA2 known sequence variants were used to test the amplicons. We also performed an extensive blinded validation of the protocol with 384 separate patient DNAs. All heterozygous variants were detected with the optimised assays. This is the first HRM approach to screen the entire coding region of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes using one set of reaction conditions in a multi plate 384 well format using specifically designed primers. The parallel screening of a relatively large number of samples enables better detection of sequence variants. HRM has the advantages of decreasing the necessary sequencing by more than 90%. This markedly reduced cost of sequencing will result in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing becoming accessible to individuals who currently do not undergo mutation testing because of the significant costs involved

  4. Stability Test For Sorghum Mutant Lines Derived From Induced Mutations with Gamma-Ray Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Human

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum breeding program had been conducted at the Center for the Application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, BATAN. Plant genetic variability was increased through induced mutations using gamma-ray irradiation. Through selection process in successive generations, some promising mutant lines had been identified to have good agronomic characteristics with high grain yield. These breeding lines were tested in multi location trials and information of the genotypic stability was obtained to meet the requirements for officially varietal release by the Ministry of Agriculture. A total of 11 sorghum lines and varieties consisting of 8 mutant lines derived from induced mutations (B-100, B-95, B-92, B-83, B-76, B-75, B-69 and Zh-30 and 3 control varieties (Durra, UPCA-S1 and Mandau were included in the experiment. All materials were grown in 10 agro-ecologically different locations namely Gunungkidul, Bantul, Citayam, Garut, Lampung, Bogor, Anyer, Karawaci, Cianjur and Subang. In each location, the local adaptability test was conducted by randomized block design with 3 replications. Data of grain yield was used for evaluating genotypic stability using AMMI approach. Results revealed that sorghum mutation breeding had generated 3 mutant lines (B-100, B-76 and Zh-30 exhibiting grain yield significantly higher than the control varieties. These mutant lines were genetically stable in all locations so that they would be recommended for official release as new sorghum varieties to the Ministry of Agriculture

  5. A Comprehensive Strategy for Accurate Mutation Detection of the Highly Homologous PMS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianli; Dai, Hongzheng; Feng, Yanming; Tang, Jia; Chen, Stella; Tian, Xia; Gorman, Elizabeth; Schmitt, Eric S; Hansen, Terah A A; Wang, Jing; Plon, Sharon E; Zhang, Victor Wei; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2015-09-01

    Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2 underlie the cancer susceptibility syndrome, Lynch syndrome. However, accurate molecular testing of PMS2 is complicated by a large number of highly homologous sequences. To establish a comprehensive approach for mutation detection of PMS2, we have designed a strategy combining targeted capture next-generation sequencing (NGS), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and long-range PCR followed by NGS to simultaneously detect point mutations and copy number changes of PMS2. Exonic deletions (E2 to E9, E5 to E9, E8, E10, E14, and E1 to E15), duplications (E11 to E12), and a nonsense mutation, p.S22*, were identified. Traditional multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and Sanger sequencing approaches cannot differentiate the origin of the exonic deletions in the 3' region when PMS2 and PMS2CL share identical sequences as a result of gene conversion. Our approach allows unambiguous identification of mutations in the active gene with a straightforward long-range-PCR/NGS method. Breakpoint analysis of multiple samples revealed that recurrent exon 14 deletions are mediated by homologous Alu sequences. Our comprehensive approach provides a reliable tool for accurate molecular analysis of genes containing multiple copies of highly homologous sequences and should improve PMS2 molecular analysis for patients with Lynch syndrome. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutation screening of the HGD gene identifies a novel alkaptonuria mutation with significant founder effect and high prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, Srinivasan; Zatkova, Andrea; Nemethova, Martina; Surovy, Milan; Kadasi, Ludevit; Saravanan, Madurai P

    2014-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder; caused by the mutations in the homogentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene located on Chromosome 3q13.33. AKU is a rare disorder with an incidence of 1: 250,000 to 1: 1,000,000, but Slovakia and the Dominican Republic have a relatively higher incidence of 1: 19,000. Our study focused on studying the frequency of AKU and identification of HGD gene mutations in nomads. HGD gene sequencing was used to identify the mutations in alkaptonurics. For the past four years, from subjects suspected to be clinically affected, we found 16 positive cases among a randomly selected cohort of 41 Indian nomads (Narikuravar) settled in the specific area of Tamil Nadu, India. HGD gene mutation analysis showed that 11 of these patients carry the same homozygous splicing mutation c.87 + 1G > A; in five cases, this mutation was found to be heterozygous, while the second AKU-causing mutation was not identified in these patients. This result indicates that the founder effect and high degree of consanguineous marriages have contributed to AKU among nomads. Eleven positive samples were homozygous for a novel mutation c.87 + 1G > A, that abolishes an intron 2 donor splice site and most likely causes skipping of exon 2. The prevalence of AKU observed earlier seems to be highly increased in people of nomadic origin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  7. Pitfalls in genetic testing: the story of missed SCN1A mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Djémié, T.; Weckhuysen, S.; von Spiczak, S.; Carvill, G. L.; Jaehn, J.; Anttonen, A-K; Brilstra, E.; Caglayan, H. S.; de Kovel, C. G.; Depienne, C.; Gaily, E.; Gennaro, E.; Giraldez, B. G.; Gormley, P.; Guerrero-López, R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sanger sequencing, still the standard technique for genetic testing in most diagnostic laboratories and until recently widely used in research, is gradually being complemented by next-generation sequencing (NGS). No single mutation detection technique is however perfect in identifying all mutations. Therefore, we wondered to what extent inconsistencies between Sanger sequencing and NGS affect the molecular diagnosis of patients. Since mutations in SCN1A, the major gene implicated ...

  8. Pitfalls in genetic testing : the story of missed SCN1A mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Djémié, Tania; Weckhuysen, Sarah; von Spiczak, Sarah; Carvill, Gemma L; Jaehn, Johanna; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Brilstra, Eva; Caglayan, Hande S; de Kovel, Carolien G; Depienne, Christel; Gaily, Eija; Gennaro, Elena; Giraldez, Beatriz G; Gormley, Padhraig; Guerrero-López, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sanger sequencing, still the standard technique for genetic testing in most diagnostic laboratories and until recently widely used in research, is gradually being complemented by next-generation sequencing (NGS). No single mutation detection technique is however perfect in identifying all mutations. Therefore, we wondered to what extent inconsistencies between Sanger sequencing and NGS affect the molecular diagnosis of patients. Since mutations in SCN1A, the major gene implicated ...

  9. Genetic Testing for TMEM154 Mutations Associated with Lentivirus Susceptibility in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, Dustin T.; Simpson, Barry; Kijas, James W.; Clawson, Michael L.; Chitko-McKown, Carol G.; Harhay, Gregory P.; Leymaster, Kreg A.

    2013-01-01

    In sheep, small ruminant lentiviruses cause an incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative disease that affects millions of animals worldwide. Known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in the U.S., and Visna/Maedi virus (VMV) elsewhere, these viruses reduce an animal’s health, productivity, and lifespan. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154) has been previously associated with OPPV infection in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the ancestral TMEM154 haplotype encoding glutamate (E) at position 35, and either form of an N70I variant, were highly-susceptible compared to sheep homozygous for the K35 missense mutation. Our current overall aim was to characterize TMEM154 in sheep from around the world to develop an efficient genetic test for reduced susceptibility. The average frequency of TMEM154 E35 among 74 breeds was 0.51 and indicated that highly-susceptible alleles were present in most breeds around the world. Analysis of whole genome sequences from an international panel of 75 sheep revealed more than 1,300 previously unreported polymorphisms in a 62 kb region containing TMEM154 and confirmed that the most susceptible haplotypes were distributed worldwide. Novel missense mutations were discovered in the signal peptide (A13V) and the extracellular domains (E31Q, I74F, and I102T) of TMEM154. A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect these and six previously reported missense and two deletion mutations in TMEM154. In blinded trials, the call rate for the eight most common coding polymorphisms was 99.4% for 499 sheep tested and 96.0% of the animals were assigned paired TMEM154 haplotypes (i.e., diplotypes). The widespread distribution of highly-susceptible TMEM154 alleles suggests that genetic testing and selection may improve the health and productivity of infected flocks. PMID:23408992

  10. Genetic testing for TMEM154 mutations associated with lentivirus susceptibility in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Heaton

    Full Text Available In sheep, small ruminant lentiviruses cause an incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative disease that affects millions of animals worldwide. Known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV in the U.S., and Visna/Maedi virus (VMV elsewhere, these viruses reduce an animal's health, productivity, and lifespan. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154 has been previously associated with OPPV infection in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the ancestral TMEM154 haplotype encoding glutamate (E at position 35, and either form of an N70I variant, were highly-susceptible compared to sheep homozygous for the K35 missense mutation. Our current overall aim was to characterize TMEM154 in sheep from around the world to develop an efficient genetic test for reduced susceptibility. The average frequency of TMEM154 E35 among 74 breeds was 0.51 and indicated that highly-susceptible alleles were present in most breeds around the world. Analysis of whole genome sequences from an international panel of 75 sheep revealed more than 1,300 previously unreported polymorphisms in a 62 kb region containing TMEM154 and confirmed that the most susceptible haplotypes were distributed worldwide. Novel missense mutations were discovered in the signal peptide (A13V and the extracellular domains (E31Q, I74F, and I102T of TMEM154. A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS assay was developed to detect these and six previously reported missense and two deletion mutations in TMEM154. In blinded trials, the call rate for the eight most common coding polymorphisms was 99.4% for 499 sheep tested and 96.0% of the animals were assigned paired TMEM154 haplotypes (i.e., diplotypes. The widespread distribution of highly-susceptible TMEM154 alleles suggests that genetic testing and selection may improve the health and productivity of infected flocks.

  11. Higher quality of molecular testing, an unfulfilled priority: Results from external quality assessment for KRAS mutation testing in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembuyser, Lien; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Normanno, Nicola; Delen, Sofie; van Krieken, J Han; Dequeker, Elisabeth M C

    2014-05-01

    Precision medicine is now a key element in clinical oncology. RAS mutational status is a crucial predictor of responsiveness to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor agents in metastatic colorectal cancer. In an effort to guarantee high-quality testing services in molecular pathology, the European Society of Pathology has been organizing an annual KRAS external quality assessment program since 2009. In 2012, 10 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples, of which 8 from invasive metastatic colorectal cancer tissue and 2 artificial samples of cell line material, were sent to more than 100 laboratories from 26 countries with a request for routine KRAS testing. Both genotyping and clinical reports were assessed independently. Twenty-seven percent of the participants genotyped at least 1 of 10 samples incorrectly. In total, less than 5% of the distributed specimens were genotyped incorrectly. Genotyping errors consisted of false negatives, false positives, and incorrectly genotyped mutations. Twenty percent of the laboratories reported a technical error for one or more samples. A review of the written reports showed that several essential elements were missing, most notably a clinical interpretation of the test result, the method sensitivity, and the use of a reference sequence. External quality assessment serves as a valuable educational tool in assessing and improving molecular testing quality and is an important asset for monitoring quality assurance upon incorporation of new biomarkers in diagnostic services. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. KRAS mutation: should we test for it, and does it matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Patrick J; Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2013-03-10

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Previously, lung cancer was simplistically divided into non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer. However, in the last decade, we have gone from a simplistic binary system of classifying lung cancer to defining NSCLC on the basis of molecular subsets. KRAS mutations represent the most common molecular change in NSCLC. The presence of KRAS mutation has been shown to be associated with a poor prognosis in NSCLC, but this is of little clinical utility. More important is determining the clinical utility of KRAS mutational analysis for predicting benefit of chemotherapy, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies, or other novel therapeutics. Current data does not support the routine use of KRAS mutational analysis for predicting chemotherapy benefit. Additionally, there was significant interest in using KRAS status to select patients for EGFR TKI and anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However, the EGFR mutational status has demonstrated significant predictive value in the selection of patients for EGFR TKI therapy and is now the preferred test. An association between KRAS mutational status and benefit of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies has not been demonstrated in NSCLC. Here we review, in the context of NSCLC, the underlying biology of KRAS mutations, the predictive value of KRAS mutations for therapeutic intervention, and the integration of KRAS mutational testing into our current clinical paradigms.

  13. TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Remke (Marc); E.A. Ramaswamy; M. Peacock (Munro); D.J.H. Shih (David J.); C. Koelsche (Christian); P.A. Northcott (Paul A.); N. Hill (Nadia); S. Cavalli (Silvia); M. Kool (Marcel); X. Wang (Xin); S. Mack (Stephen); M. Barszczyk (Mark); A.S. Morrissy (A. Sorana); X. Wu (Xiaochong); S. Agnihotri (Sameer); P. Luu (Phan); D. Jones (David); L. Garzia (Livia); A.M. Dubuc (Adrian); N. Zhukova (Nataliya); R. Vanner (Robert); J.M. Kros (Johan); P.J. French (Pim); E.G. van Meir (Erwin); R. Vibhakar (Rajeev); K. Zitterbart (Karel); J.A. Chan (Jennifer); L. Bognár (László); A. Klekner (Almos); B. Lach (Boleslaw); S. Jung (Shin); F. Saad (Fred); L.M. Liau (Linda); S. Albrecht (Steffen); M. Zollo (Maurizio); M.K. Cooper (Michael); R.C. Thompson (Reid); O. Delattre (Olivier); F. Bourdeaut (Franck); F.F. Doz (François); M. Garami (Miklós); P. Hauser (Peter); C.G. Carlotti (Carlos); T.E. Van Meter (Timothy); L. Massimi (Luca); D. Fults (Daniel); L.W. Pomeroy (Laura); T. Kumabe (Toshiro); Y.S. Ra (Young Shin); J.R. Leonard (Jeffrey); S.K. Elbabaa (Samer); J. Mora (Jaume); J.B. Rubin (Joshua); Y.-J. Cho (Yoon-Jae); R.E. McLendon (Roger); D.D. Bigner (Darell); C.G. Eberhart (Charles); M. Fouladi (Maryam); R.J. Wechsler-Reya (Robert); R. Faria (Rui); S.E. Croul (Sidney); A. Huang (Anding); E. Bouffet (Eric); C.E. Hawkins (Cynthia); M. Dirks (Maaike); W.A. Weiss (William); U. Schüller (Ulrich); A. Pollack (Aaron); P. Rutkowski (Piotr); D. Meyronet (David); A. Jouvet (Anne); M. Fèvre-Montange (Michelle); N. Jabado (Nada); M. Perek-Polnik (Marta); W.A. Grajkowska (Wieslawa); S.-K. Kim (Seung-Ki); J.T. Rutka (James); E. Malkin (Elissa); U. Tabori (Uri); S.M. Pfister (Stefan); A. Korshunov (Andrey); A. von Deimling (Andreas); M.D. Taylor (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTelomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations were recently shown to drive telomerase activity in various cancer types, including medulloblastoma. However, the clinical and biological implications of TERT mutations in medulloblastoma have not been described. Hence, we sought

  14. Mutations to Less-Preferred Synonymous Codons in a Highly Expressed Gene of Escherichia coli: Fitness and Epistatic Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hauber

    Full Text Available Codon-tRNA coevolution to maximize protein production has been, until recently, the dominant hypothesis to explain codon-usage bias in highly expressed bacterial genes. Two predictions of this hypothesis are 1 selection is weak; and 2 similar silent replacements at different codons should have similar fitness consequence. We used an allele-replacement strategy to change five specific 3rd-codon-position (silent sites in the highly expressed Escherichia coli ribosomal protein gene rplQ from the wild type to a less-preferred alternative. We introduced the five mutations within a 10-codon region. Four of the silent sites were chosen to test the second prediction, with a CTG to CTA mutation being introduced at two closely linked leucine codons and an AAA to AAG mutation being introduced at two closely linked lysine codons. We also introduced a fifth silent mutation, a GTG to GTA mutation at a valine codon in the same genic region. We measured the fitness effect of the individual mutations by competing each single-mutant strain against the parental wild-type strain, using a disrupted form of the araA gene as a selectively neutral phenotypic marker to distinguish between strains in direct competition experiments. Three of the silent mutations had a fitness effect of |s| > 0.02, which is contradictory to the prediction that selection will be weak. The two leucine mutations had significantly different fitness effects, as did the two lysine mutations, contradictory to the prediction that similar mutations at different codons should have similar fitness effects. We also constructed a strain carrying all five silent mutations in combination. Its fitness effect was greater than that predicted from the individual fitness values, suggesting that negative synergistic epistasis acts on the combination allele.

  15. High Frequency of Alkaptonuria in Slovakia: Evidence for the Appearance of Multiple Mutations in HGO Involving Different Mutational Hot Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatková, Andrea; de Bernabé, Daniel Beltrán Valero; Poláková, Helena; Zvarík, Marek; Feráková, Eva; Bošák, Vladimir; Ferák, Vladimír; Kádasi, L'udovít; de Córdoba , Santiago Rodríguez

    2000-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGO) activity. AKU shows a very low prevalence (1:100,000–250,000) in most ethnic groups. One notable exception is in Slovakia, where the incidence of AKU rises to 1:19,000. This high incidence is difficult to explain by a classical founder effect, because as many as 10 different AKU mutations have been identified in this relatively small country. We have determined the allelic associations of 11 HGO intragenic polymorphisms for 44 AKU chromosomes from 20 Slovak pedigrees. These data were compared to the HGO haplotype data available in our laboratory for >80 AKU chromosomes from different European and non-European countries. The results show that common European AKU chromosomes have had only a marginal contribution to the Slovak AKU gene pool. Six of the ten Slovak AKU mutations, including the prevalent G152fs, G161R, G270R, and P370fs mutations, most likely originated in Slovakia. Data available for 17 Slovak AKU pedigrees indicate that most of the AKU chromosomes have their origins in a single very small region in the Carpathian mountains, in the northwestern part of the country. Since all six Slovak AKU mutations are associated with HGO mutational hot spots, we suggest that an increased mutation rate at the HGO gene is responsible for the clustering of AKU mutations in such a small geographical region. PMID:11017803

  16. Should EGFR mutations be tested in advanced lung squamous cell carcinomas to guide frontline treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chao-Hua; Chou, Teh-Ying; Chiang, Chi-Lu; Tsai, Chun-Ming

    2014-10-01

    There is no argument over using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status to guide the frontline treatment for advanced lung adenocarcinoma (LADC); however, the role of the testing in lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSQC) remains controversial. Currently, the guidelines/consensus statements regarding EGFR mutation testing in LSQC are not consistent among different oncology societies. American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends performing EGFR mutation testing in all patients; European Society for Medical Oncology, College of American Pathologists/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/Association for Molecular Pathology, and National Comprehensive Cancer Network suggest for some selected group. EGFR mutation is rarely found in LSQC; however, more importantly, it is not a valid predictive biomarker for EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI) in LSQC as it has been shown in LADC. Available data showed that the response rate and progression-free survival in EGFR mutant LSQC patients treated with EGFR-TKI are not better than that observed in patients treated with platinum-doublet chemotherapy in the first-line setting. Therefore, in contrast to advanced LADC, EGFR mutation testing may not be necessarily performed upfront in advanced LSQC because not only the mutation rate is low, but also the predictive value is insufficient. For LSQC patients with known sensitizing-EGFR mutations, both conventional chemotherapy and EGFR-TKI are acceptable frontline treatment options.

  17. High mutation rates limit evolutionary adaptation in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Sprouffske

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutation is fundamental to evolution, because it generates the genetic variation on which selection can act. In nature, genetic changes often increase the mutation rate in systems that range from viruses and bacteria to human tumors. Such an increase promotes the accumulation of frequent deleterious or neutral alleles, but it can also increase the chances that a population acquires rare beneficial alleles. Here, we study how up to 100-fold increases in Escherichia coli's genomic mutation rate affect adaptive evolution. To do so, we evolved multiple replicate populations of asexual E. coli strains engineered to have four different mutation rates for 3000 generations in the laboratory. We measured the ability of evolved populations to grow in their original environment and in more than 90 novel chemical environments. In addition, we subjected the populations to whole genome population sequencing. Although populations with higher mutation rates accumulated greater genetic diversity, this diversity conveyed benefits only for modestly increased mutation rates, where populations adapted faster and also thrived better than their ancestors in some novel environments. In contrast, some populations at the highest mutation rates showed reduced adaptation during evolution, and failed to thrive in all of the 90 alternative environments. In addition, they experienced a dramatic decrease in mutation rate. Our work demonstrates that the mutation rate changes the global balance between deleterious and beneficial mutational effects on fitness. In contrast to most theoretical models, our experiments suggest that this tipping point already occurs at the modest mutation rates that are found in the wild.

  18. Induction of rice mutations by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xuncheng; Zheng, Feng; Zeng, Songjun; Wu, Kunlin; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Duan, Jun

    2013-09-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is an extreme thermo-physical factor that affects the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins and induces mutagenesis in microorganisms. Our previous studies showed that exposure to 25-100 MPa HHP for 12 h retarded the germination and affected the viability of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seeds, increased the tolerance of rice plants to cold stress and altered gene expression patterns in germinating rice seeds. However, the mutagenic effect of HHP on rice remains unknown. In this study, exposure to 25, 50, 75 or 100 MPa for 12 h HHP could efficiently induce variation in rice plants. Furthermore, presoaking time and HHP strength during HHP treatment affected the efficiency of mutation. In addition, the Comet assay revealed that exposure to 25-100 MPa HHP for 12 h induced DNA strand breakage in germinating seeds and may have been the source of mutations. Our results suggest that HHP is a promising physical mutagen in rice breeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The complete linkage disequilibrium test: a test that points to causative mutations underlying quantitative traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uleberg Eivind

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically, SNP that are in complete linkage disequilibrium with the causative SNP cannot be distinguished from the causative SNP. The Complete Linkage Disequilibrium (CLD test presented here tests whether a SNP is in complete LD with the causative mutation or not. The performance of the CLD test is evaluated in 1000 simulated datasets. Methods The CLD test consists of two steps i.e. analysis I and analysis II. Analysis I consists of an association analysis of the investigated region. The log-likelihood values from analysis I are next ranked in descending order and in analysis II the CLD test evaluates differences in log-likelihood ratios between the best and second best markers. Under the null-hypothesis distribution, the best SNP is in greater LD with the QTL than the second best, while under the alternative-CLD-hypothesis, the best SNP is alike-in-state with the QTL. To find a significance threshold, the test was also performed on data excluding the causative SNP. The 5th, 10th and 50th highest TCLD value from 1000 replicated analyses were used to control the type-I-error rate of the test at p = 0.005, p = 0.01 and p = 0.05, respectively. Results In a situation where the QTL explained 48% of the phenotypic variance analysis I detected a QTL in 994 replicates (p = 0.001, where 972 were positioned in the correct QTL position. When the causative SNP was excluded from the analysis, 714 replicates detected evidence of a QTL (p = 0.001. In analysis II, the CLD test confirmed 280 causative SNP from 1000 simulations (p = 0.05, i.e. power was 28%. When the effect of the QTL was reduced by doubling the error variance, the power of the test reduced relatively little to 23%. When sequence data were used, the power of the test reduced to 16%. All SNP that were confirmed by the CLD test were positioned in the correct QTL position. Conclusions The CLD test can provide evidence for a causative SNP, but its power may be low in situations

  20. High mutation rates limit evolutionary adaptation in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Mutation is fundamental to evolution, because it generates the genetic variation on which selection can act. In nature, genetic changes often increase the mutation rate in systems that range from viruses and bacteria to human tumors. Such an increase promotes the accumulation of frequent deleterious or neutral alleles, but it can also increase the chances that a population acquires rare beneficial alleles. Here, we study how up to 100-fold increases in Escherichia coli’s genomic mutation rate affect adaptive evolution. To do so, we evolved multiple replicate populations of asexual E. coli strains engineered to have four different mutation rates for 3000 generations in the laboratory. We measured the ability of evolved populations to grow in their original environment and in more than 90 novel chemical environments. In addition, we subjected the populations to whole genome population sequencing. Although populations with higher mutation rates accumulated greater genetic diversity, this diversity conveyed benefits only for modestly increased mutation rates, where populations adapted faster and also thrived better than their ancestors in some novel environments. In contrast, some populations at the highest mutation rates showed reduced adaptation during evolution, and failed to thrive in all of the 90 alternative environments. In addition, they experienced a dramatic decrease in mutation rate. Our work demonstrates that the mutation rate changes the global balance between deleterious and beneficial mutational effects on fitness. In contrast to most theoretical models, our experiments suggest that this tipping point already occurs at the modest mutation rates that are found in the wild. PMID:29702649

  1. [Views of Icelandic women towards genetic counseling - and testing of BRCA2 mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Thordis; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Lund, Sigrun Helga; Thordardottir, Marianna; Magnusson, Magnus Karl; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to explore the attitudes of Icelandic women towards existing genetic information, genetic counseling and genetic testing for BRCA mutations which dramatically increase risk for aggressive cancers. Materials and methods Women attending the cancer prevention clinic in Reykjavik, capital of Iceland, from October 12th until November 20th 2015 received an invitation to participate. Participation involved answering a short online questionnaire about background, family history of cancer as well as attitudes towards genetic counseling, BRCA testing and preventive use of such information. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests were used to describe differences in attitudes towards those questions between subgroups of women. Results 1129 women (69% response rate) answered the questionnaire. Mean age was 47 years (span 21-76 years). Around half (47%) had heard fairly much about the mutations. Independent of family history of cancer, the majority of women were positive towards receiving genetic counseling (79%) and to undergo genetic testing (83%) for BRCA mutation with younger women being more interested than older women. On the other hand, only 4% of the women had already received genetic counseling and 7% undergone genetic testing. Women with family history of cancer were more knowledgeable about BRCA mutations (pcounseling and testing for BRCA mutations although half of them worry that a positive result might affect their health insurance. Nevertheless, almost all women believe that existing genetic information should be used to inform carriers for preventive purposes.

  2. High-throughput genotyping in metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma identifies phosphoinositide-3-kinase and BRAF mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Hoon Maeng

    Full Text Available Given the high incidence of metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, especially in Asia, we screened for the presence of somatic mutations using OncoMap platform with the aim of defining subsets of patients who may be potential candidate for targeted therapy.We analyzed 87 tissue specimens obtained from 80 patients who were pathologically confirmed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and received 5-fluoropyrimidine/platinum-based chemotherapy. OncoMap 4.0, a mass-spectrometry based assay, was used to interrogate 471 oncogenic mutations in 41 commonly mutated genes. Tumor specimens were prepared from primary cancer sites in 70 patients and from metastatic sites in 17 patients. In order to test the concordance between primary and metastatic sites from the patient for mutations, we analyzed 7 paired (primary-metastatic specimens. All specimens were formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues and tumor content was >70%.In total, we have detected 20 hotspot mutations out of 80 patients screened. The most frequent mutation was PIK3CA mutation (four E545K, five H1047R and one H1047L (N = 10, 11.5% followed by MLH1 V384D (N = 7, 8.0%, TP53 (R306, R175H and R273C (N = 3, 3.5%, BRAF V600E (N = 1, 1.2%, CTNNB1 D32N (N = 1, 1.2%, and EGFR P733L (N = 1, 1.2%. Distributions of somatic mutations were not different according to anatomic sites of esophageal cancer (cervical/upper, mid, lower. In addition, there was no difference in frequency of mutations between primary-metastasis paired samples.Our study led to the detection of potentially druggable mutations in esophageal SCC which may guide novel therapies in small subsets of esophageal cancer patients.

  3. EGFR mutation testing in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a comprehensive evaluation of real-world practice in an East Asian tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-La; Sun, Jong-Mu; Cho, Juhee; Rampal, Sanjay; Han, Joungho; Parasuraman, Bhash; Guallar, Eliseo; Lee, Genehee; Lee, Jeeyun; Shim, Young Mog

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) strongly recommend EGFR mutation testing. These recommendations are particularly relevant in Asians that have higher EGFR mutation prevalence. This study aims to explore current testing practices, logistics of testing, types of EGFR mutation, and prevalence of EGFR mutations in patients with advanced NSCLC in a large comprehensive cancer center in Korea. Our retrospective cohort included 1,503 NSCLC patients aged ≥18 years, with stage IIIB/IV disease, who attended the Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, from January 2007 through July 2010. Trained oncology nurses reviewed and abstracted data from electronic medical records. This cohort had a mean age (SD) of 59.6 (11.1) years, 62.7% were males, and 52.9% never-smokers. The most common NSCLC histological types were adenocarcinoma (70.5%) and squamous cell carcinoma (18.0%). Overall, 39.5% of patients were tested for EGFR mutations. The proportion of patients undergoing EGFR testing during January 2007 through July 2008, August 2008 through September 2009, and October 2009 through July 2010 were 23.3%, 38.3%, and 63.5%, respectively (Pwomen, younger patients, stage IV disease, non-smokers, and adenocarcinoma histology. Of 586 cases successfully tested for EGFR mutations, 209 (35.7%) were positive, including 118 cases with exon 19 deletions and 62 with L858R mutations. EGFR mutation positive patients were more likely to be female, never-smokers, never-drinkers and to have adenocarcinoma. In a large cancer center in Korea, the proportion of EGFR testing increased from 2007 through 2010. The high frequency of EGFR mutation positive cases warrants the need for generalized testing in Asian NSCLC patients.

  4. The use of high resolution melting analysis to detect Fabry mutations in heterozygous females via dry bloodspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chang-Long; Liu, Mei-Ying; Yu, Hsiao-Chi; Chiang, Chiang-Chuan; Chiang, Hung; Suen, Jeng-Hung; Kao, Shu-Min; Huang, Yu-Hsiu; Wu, Tina Jui-Ting; Yang, Chia-Feng; Tsai, Fang-Chih; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Chen, Hong-Duo; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2012-02-18

    As an X-linked genetic disorder, Fabry disease was first thought to affect males only, and females were generally considered to be asymptomatic carriers. However, recent research suggests that female carriers of Fabry disease may still develop vital organ damage causing severe morbidity and mortality. In the previous newborn screening, from 299,007 newborns, we identified a total of 20 different Fabry mutations and 121 newborns with Fabry mutations. However, we found that most female carriers are not detected by enzyme assays. A streamlined method for high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was designed to screen for GLA gene mutations using a same PCR and melting program. Primer sets were designed to cover the 7 exons and the Chinese common intronic mutation, IVS4+919G>A of GLA gene. The HRM analysis was successful in identifying heterozygous and hemizygous patients with the 20 surveyed mutations. We were also successful in using this method to test dry blood spots of newborns afflicted with Fabry mutations without having to determine DNA concentration before PCR amplification. The results of this study show that HRM could be a reliable and sensitive method for use in the rapid screening of females for GLA mutations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ethnic Lebanese Arab women with high hereditary risk breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Saghir, Nagi S; Zgheib, Nathalie K; Assi, Hussein A; Khoury, Katia E; Bidet, Yannick; Jaber, Sara M; Charara, Raghid N; Farhat, Rania A; Kreidieh, Firas Y; Decousus, Stephanie; Romero, Pierre; Nemer, Georges M; Salem, Ziad; Shamseddine, Ali; Tfayli, Arafat; Abbas, Jaber; Jamali, Faek; Seoud, Muhieddine; Armstrong, Deborah K; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in Lebanon and in Arab countries, with 50% of cases presenting before the age of 50 years. Between 2009 and 2012, 250 Lebanese women with breast cancer who were considered to be at high risk of carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations because of presentation at young age and/or positive family history (FH) of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited. Clinical data were analyzed statistically. Coding exons and intron-exon boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were sequenced from peripheral blood DNA. All patients were tested for BRCA1 rearrangements using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). BRCA2 MLPA was done in selected cases. Overall, 14 of 250 patients (5.6%) carried a deleterious BRCA mutation (7 BRCA1, 7 BRCA2) and 31 (12.4%) carried a variant of uncertain significance. Eight of 74 patients (10.8%) aged ≤40 years with positive FH and only 1 of 74 patients (1.4%) aged ≤40 years without FH had a mutated BRCA. Four of 75 patients (5.3%) aged 41-50 years with FH had a deleterious mutation. Only 1 of 27 patients aged >50 years at diagnosis had a BRCA mutation. All seven patients with BRCA1 mutations had grade 3 infiltrating ductal carcinoma and triple-negative breast cancer. Nine BRCA1 and 17 BRCA2 common haplotypes were observed. Prevalence of deleterious BRCA mutations is lower than expected and does not support the hypothesis that BRCA mutations alone cause the observed high percentage of breast cancer in young women of Lebanese and Arab descent. Studies to search for other genetic mutations are recommended. ©AlphaMed Press.

  6. Cumulative BRCA mutation analysis in the Greek population confirms that homogenous ethnic background facilitates genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigginou, Alexandra; Vlachopoulos, Fotios; Arzimanoglou, Iordanis; Zagouri, Flora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Screening for BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations has long moved from the research lab to the clinic as a routine clinical genetic testing. BRCA molecular alteration pattern varies among ethnic groups which makes it already a less straightforward process to select the appropriate mutations for routine genetic testing on the basis of known clinical significance. The present report comprises an in depth literature review of the so far reported BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 molecular alterations in Greek families. Our analysis of Greek cumulative BRCA 1 and 2 molecular data, produced by several independent groups, confirmed that six recurrent deleterious mutations account for almost 60 % and 70 % of all BRCA 1 and 2 and BRCA 1 mutations, respectively. As a result, it makes more sense to perform BRCA mutation analysis in the clinic in two sequential steps, first conventional analysis for the six most prevalent pathogenic mutations and if none identified, a second step of New Generation Sequencing-based whole genome or whole exome sequencing would follow. Our suggested approach would enable more clinically meaningful, considerably easier and less expensive BRCA analysis in the Greek population which is considered homogenous.

  7. Visualizing the origins of selfish de novo mutations in individual seminiferous tubules of human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Geoffrey J; McGowan, Simon J; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Verrill, Clare; Goriely, Anne; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2016-03-01

    De novo point mutations arise predominantly in the male germline and increase in frequency with age, but it has not previously been possible to locate specific, identifiable mutations directly within the seminiferous tubules of human testes. Using microdissection of tubules exhibiting altered expression of the spermatogonial markers MAGEA4, FGFR3, and phospho-AKT, whole genome amplification, and DNA sequencing, we establish an in situ strategy for discovery and analysis of pathogenic de novo mutations. In 14 testes from men aged 39-90 y, we identified 11 distinct gain-of-function mutations in five genes (fibroblast growth factor receptors FGFR2 and FGFR3, tyrosine phosphatase PTPN11, and RAS oncogene homologs HRAS and KRAS) from 16 of 22 tubules analyzed; all mutations have known associations with severe diseases, ranging from congenital or perinatal lethal disorders to somatically acquired cancers. These results support proposed selfish selection of spermatogonial mutations affecting growth factor receptor-RAS signaling, highlight its prevalence in older men, and enable direct visualization of the microscopic anatomy of elongated mutant clones.

  8. A novel approach to detect KRAS/BRAF mutation for colon cancer: Highly sensitive simultaneous detection of mutations and simple pre-treatment without DNA extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shun-Ichi; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Hirai, Mitsuharu; Shibata, Harumi; Takagi, Koichi; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Hatake, Kiyohiko

    2015-07-01

    It has been reported that colon cancer patients with KRAS and BRAF mutations that lie downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) acquire resistance against therapy with anti‑EGFR antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab. On the other hand, some reports say KRAS codon 13 mutation (p.G13D) has lower resistance against anti-EGFR antibodies, thus there is a substantial need for detection of specific KRAS mutations. We have established a state-of-the-art measurement system using QProbe (QP) method that allows simultaneous measurement of KRAS codon 12/13, p.G13D and BRAF mutation, and compared this method against Direct Sequencing (DS) using 182 specimens from colon cancer patients. In addition, 32 biopsy specimens were processed with a novel pre-treatment method without DNA purification in order to detect KRAS/BRAF. As a result of KRAS mutation measurement, concordance rate between the QP method and DS method was 81.4% (144/177) except for the 5 specimens that were undeterminable. Among them, 29 specimens became positive with QP method and negative with DS method. BRAF was measured with QP method only, and the mutation detection rate was 3.9% (6/153). KRAS measurement using a simple new pre-treatment method without DNA extraction resulted in 31 good results out of 32, all of them matching with the DS method. We have established a simple but highly sensitive simultaneous detection system for KRAS/BRAF. Moreover, introduction of the novel pre-treatment technology eliminated the inconvenient DNA extraction process. From this research achievement, we not only anticipate quick and accurate results returned in the clinical field but also contribution in improving the test quality and work efficiency.

  9. Cost effectiveness of population based BRCA1 founder mutation testing in Sephardi Jewish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shreeya; Legood, Rosa; Evans, D Gareth; Turnbull, Clare; Antoniou, Antonis C; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian; Manchanda, Ranjit

    2018-04-01

    Population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 founder-mutation testing has been demonstrated as cost effective compared with family history based testing in Ashkenazi Jewish women. However, only 1 of the 3 Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations (185delAG[c.68_69delAG]), 5382insC[c.5266dupC]), and 6174delT[c.5946delT]) is found in the Sephardi Jewish population (185delAG[c.68_69delAG]), and the overall prevalence of BRCA mutations in the Sephardi Jewish population is accordingly lower (0.7% compared with 2.5% in the Ashkenazi Jewish population). Cost-effectiveness analyses of BRCA testing have not previously been performed at these lower BRCA prevalence levels seen in the Sephardi Jewish population. Here we present a cost-effectiveness analysis for UK and US populations comparing population testing with clinical criteria/family history-based testing in Sephardi Jewish women. A Markov model was built comparing the lifetime costs and effects of population-based BRCA1 testing, with testing using family history-based clinical criteria in Sephardi Jewish women aged ≥30 years. BRCA1 carriers identified were offered magnetic resonance imaging/mammograms and risk-reducing surgery. Costs are reported at 2015 prices. Outcomes include breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and excess deaths from heart disease. All costs and outcomes are discounted at 3.5%. The time horizon is lifetime, and perspective is payer. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio per quality-adjusted life-year was calculated. Parameter uncertainty was evaluated through 1-way and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Population testing resulted in gain in life expectancy of 12 months (quality-adjusted life-year = 1.00). The baseline discounted incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for UK population-based testing was £67.04/quality-adjusted life-year and for US population was $308.42/quality-adjusted life-year. Results were robust in the 1-way sensitivity analysis. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed 100% of

  10. [The quantitative testing of V617F mutation in gen JAK2 using pyrosequencing technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaeva, E A; Mironov, K O; Dribnokhodova, T E; Subbotina, E E; Bashmakova; Ol'hovskiĭ, I A; Shipulin, G A

    2014-11-01

    The somatic mutation V617F in gen JAK2 is a frequent cause of chronic myeloprolific diseases not conditioned by BCR/ABL mutation. The quantitative testing of relative percentage of mutant allele can be used in establishing severity of disease and its prognosis and in prescription of remedy inhibiting activity of JAK2. To quantitatively test mutation the pyrosequencing technique was applied. The developed technique permits detecting and quantitatively, testing percentage of mutation fraction since 7%. The "gray zone" is presented by samples with percentage of mutant allele from 4% to 7%. The dependence of expected percentage of mutant fraction in analyzed sample from observed value of signal is described by equation of line with regression coefficients y = - 0.97, x = -1.32 and at that measurement uncertainty consists ± 0.7. The developed technique is approved officially on clinical material from 192 patients with main forms of myeloprolific diseases not conditioned by BCR/ABL mutation. It was detected 64 samples with mautant fraction percentage from 13% to 91%. The developed technique permits implementing monitoring of therapy of myeloprolific diseases and facilitates to optimize tactics of treatment.

  11. Mutation breeding of Bacillus subtilis YTB4 with high yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    2012-07-17

    Jul 17, 2012 ... Helium-neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation is a highly efficient mutation breeding technology and is widely applied to various fields of biological science. Using Bacillus subtilis YTB4 with high yield of multienzyme complex as original strain, mutation breeding was carried out by He-Ne laser irradiation in.

  12. Mutation breeding of Bacillus subtilis YTB4 with high yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helium-neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation is a highly efficient mutation breeding technology and is widely applied to various fields of biological science. Using Bacillus subtilis YTB4 with high yield of multienzyme complex as original strain, mutation breeding was carried out by He-Ne laser irradiation in this study. Based on the ...

  13. Frequency of CDH1 germline mutations in gastric carcinoma coming from high- and low-risk areas: metanalysis and systematic review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corso, Giovanni; Marrelli, Daniele; Pascale, Valeria; Vindigni, Carla; Roviello, Franco

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of E-cadherin germline mutations in countries with different incidence rates for gastric carcinoma has not been well established. The goal of this study was to assess the worldwide frequency of CDH1 germline mutations in gastric cancers coming from low- and high-risk areas. English articles using MEDLINE access (from 1998 to 2011). Search terms included CDH1, E-cadherin, germline mutation, gastric cancer, hereditary, familial and diffuse histotype. The study included all E-cadherin germline mutations identified in gastric cancer patients; somatic mutations and germline mutations reported in other tumors were excluded. The method of this study was scheduled in accordance with the 'PRISMA statement for reporting systematic reviews and meta-analyses'. Countries were classified as low- or middle/high risk-areas for gastric carcinoma incidence. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate the CDH1 mutation frequency with gastric cancer incidence areas. A total of 122 E-cadherin germline mutations have been identified; the majority (87.5%) occurred in gastric cancers coming from low-risk areas. In high-risk areas, we identified 16 mutations in which missense mutations were predominant. (68.8%). We verified a significant association between the mutation frequency and the gastric cancer risk area (p < 0.001: overall identified mutations in low- vs. middle/high-risk areas). E-cadherin genetic screenings performed in low-risk areas for gastric cancer identified a higher frequency of CDH1 germline mutations. This data could open new approaches in the gastric cancer prevention test; before proposing a proband candidate for the CDH1 genetic screening, geographic variability, alongside the family history should be considered

  14. Mutation Detection in Patients With Advanced Cancer by Universal Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes in Tumor and Normal DNA vs Guideline-Based Germline Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelker, Diana; Zhang, Liying; Kemel, Yelena; Stadler, Zsofia K; Joseph, Vijai; Zehir, Ahmet; Pradhan, Nisha; Arnold, Angela; Walsh, Michael F; Li, Yirong; Balakrishnan, Anoop R; Syed, Aijazuddin; Prasad, Meera; Nafa, Khedoudja; Carlo, Maria I; Cadoo, Karen A; Sheehan, Meg; Fleischut, Megan H; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Trottier, Magan; Lipkin, Steven M; Lincoln, Anne; Mukherjee, Semanti; Ravichandran, Vignesh; Cambria, Roy; Galle, Jesse; Abida, Wassim; Arcila, Marcia E; Benayed, Ryma; Shah, Ronak; Yu, Kenneth; Bajorin, Dean F; Coleman, Jonathan A; Leach, Steven D; Lowery, Maeve A; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Kantoff, Philip W; Sawyers, Charles L; Dickler, Maura N; Saltz, Leonard; Motzer, Robert J; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Scher, Howard I; Baselga, Jose; Klimstra, David S; Solit, David B; Hyman, David M; Berger, Michael F; Ladanyi, Marc; Robson, Mark E; Offit, Kenneth

    2017-09-05

    Guidelines for cancer genetic testing based on family history may miss clinically actionable genetic changes with established implications for cancer screening or prevention. To determine the proportion and potential clinical implications of inherited variants detected using simultaneous sequencing of the tumor and normal tissue ("tumor-normal sequencing") compared with genetic test results based on current guidelines. From January 2014 until May 2016 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 10 336 patients consented to tumor DNA sequencing. Since May 2015, 1040 of these patients with advanced cancer were referred by their oncologists for germline analysis of 76 cancer predisposition genes. Patients with clinically actionable inherited mutations whose genetic test results would not have been predicted by published decision rules were identified. Follow-up for potential clinical implications of mutation detection was through May 2017. Tumor and germline sequencing compared with the predicted yield of targeted germline sequencing based on clinical guidelines. Proportion of clinically actionable germline mutations detected by universal tumor-normal sequencing that would not have been detected by guideline-directed testing. Of 1040 patients, the median age was 58 years (interquartile range, 50.5-66 years), 65.3% were male, and 81.3% had stage IV disease at the time of genomic analysis, with prostate, renal, pancreatic, breast, and colon cancer as the most common diagnoses. Of the 1040 patients, 182 (17.5%; 95% CI, 15.3%-19.9%) had clinically actionable mutations conferring cancer susceptibility, including 149 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations; 101 patients tested (9.7%; 95% CI, 8.1%-11.7%) would not have had these mutations detected using clinical guidelines, including 65 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations. Frequency of inherited mutations was related to case mix, stage, and founder mutations. Germline findings led to discussion or initiation of

  15. ERBB2 mutations associated with solid variant of high-grade invasive lobular breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniziaut, Gabrielle; Tille, Jean Christophe; Bidard, François-Clément; Vacher, Sophie; Schnitzler, Anne; Chemlali, Walid; Trémoulet, Laurence; Fuhrmann, Laetitia; Cottu, Paul; Rouzier, Roman; Bièche, Ivan; Vincent-Salomon, Anne

    2016-11-08

    ERBB2 and ERBB3 somatic gain-of-function mutations, which may be targeted by anti-ERBB2 therapies, were reported by high-throughput sequencing studies in 1% and 2% of invasive breast cancers respectively. Our study aims to determine ERBB2 and ERBB3 mutations frequencies in grade 3 and/or ERBB2-positive invasive lobular breast carcinomas (ILC). All the 529 ILC surgically-excised registered at Institut Curie in the years 2005 to 2008 were reviewed. Thirty-nine grade 3 ERBB2-negative ILC and 16 ERBB2-positive ILC were retrieved and subjected to Sanger sequencing of the ERBB2 and ERBB3 activation mutation hotspots (ERBB2: exons 8, 17, 19, 20, 21; ERBB3: exons 3, 6, 7, 8). Among the 39 grade 3 ERBB2-negative ILC, six tumors were found to have at least one detectable ERBB2 activating mutation (incidence rate: 15%, 95%CI [4%-27%]). No ERBB2 mutation was found among the 16 ERBB2-positive ILC. No ERBB3 mutation was found in any of the 55 ILC. ERBB2 mutations were statistically associated with solid ILC features (p=0.01). Survival analyses showed no significant prognostic impact of ERBB2 mutations. Our study demonstrates that high grade ERBB2-negative ILC display a high frequency of ERBB2 mutations, and should be subjected to systematic genetic screening.

  16. Mutagenicity of Flavonoids Assayed by Bacterial Reverse Mutation (Ames Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aparecida Varanda

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The mutagenicity of ten flavonoids was assayed by the Ames test, in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA100 and TA102, with the aim of establishing hydroxylation pattern-mutagenicity relationship profiles. The compounds assessed were: quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, fisetin, chrysin, galangin, flavone, 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone and 7-hydroxyflavone. In the Ames assay, quercetin acted directly and its mutagenicity increased with metabolic activation. In the presence of S9 mix, kaempferol and galangin were mutagenic in the TA98 strain and kaempferol showed signs of mutagenicity in the other strains. The absence of hydroxyl groups, as in flavone, only signs of mutagenicity were shown in strain TA102, after metabolization and, among monohydroxylated flavones (3-hydroxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone and 7-hydroxyflavone, the presence of hydroxyl groups only resulted in minor changes. Luteolin and fisetin also showed signs of mutagenicity in strain TA102. Finally, chrysin, which has only two hydroxy groups, at the 5-OH and 7-OH positions, also did not induce mutagenic activity in any of the bacterial strains used, under either activation condition. All the flavonoids were tested at concentrations varying from 2.6 to 30.7 nmol/plate for galangin and 12.1 to 225.0 nmol/plate for other flavonoids. In light of the above, it is necessary to clarify the conditions and the mechanisms that mediate the biological effects of flavonoids before treating them as therapeutical agents, since some compounds can be biotransformed into more genotoxic products; as is the case for galangin, kaempferol and quercetin.

  17. Induced mutations in highly heterozygous vegetatively propagated grasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    Experience with mutation induction of turf and forage grasses indicates that much progress can be achieved by this method. More than 300 mutations have been produced in our laboratory in the cultivars Tifgreen and Tifdwarf bermudagrass (Cynodon sp.). In the Tifway and Tifcote bermudagrasses we have demonstrated similar mutation responses. The first three clones are triploids and Tifcote is a probable tetraploid. No seeds are set on these clones. Two clones of bermudagrass, Coastal and Coastcross-1, occupy millions of hectares in the USA. Both are mutable and are known to be hybrids with 36 chromosomes. Biotypes of dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum Poir.) exist with 40 and 50 chromosomes and reproduce as sexual and obligate apomictic forms. Gamma-ray and thermal-neutron treatment of seed of these biotypes produced mutants that maintained the maternal characteristics in subsequent generations. Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Fluegge) also has sexual and apomictic biotypes. Some success was indicated for increased seed set by mutagen treatment. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) is a facultative apomict with varying numbers of chromosomes in different cultivars. Gamma-ray mutagen treatment of rhizomes produced numerous mutations for plant type and disease reaction. Most mutations perpetuate themselves through the seed. The characteristic in common with all these grasses is their heterozygosity, which is maintained by the vegetative propagation or apomictic mode of reproduction. The experience in using ionizing radiation to induce heritable changes in these vegetatively propagated grasses is one of considerable success. Mutation rates in some of these irradiated grasses exceeded 65% and aberrant plants with characteristics previously never observed were found. Numerous hemizygous and heterozygous loci seem to be a sensitive target for mutagens. (author)

  18. Pitfalls in genetic testing : the story of missed SCN1A mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djémié, Tania; Weckhuysen, Sarah; von Spiczak, Sarah; Carvill, Gemma L; Jaehn, Johanna; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Brilstra, Eva; Caglayan, Hande S; de Kovel, Carolien G; Depienne, Christel; Gaily, Eija; Gennaro, Elena; Giraldez, Beatriz G; Gormley, Padhraig; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Guerrini, Renzo; Hämäläinen, Eija; Hartmann, Corinna; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Hjalgrim, Helle; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R; Leu, Costin; Marini, Carla; McMahon, Jacinta M; Mei, Davide; Møller, Rikke S; Muhle, Hiltrud; Myers, Candace T; Nava, Caroline; Serratosa, Jose M; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Stephani, Ulrich; Striano, Pasquale; van Kempen, Marjan J A; Verbeek, Nienke E; Usluer, Sunay; Zara, Federico; Palotie, Aarno; Mefford, Heather C; Scheffer, Ingrid E; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Suls, Arvid

    BACKGROUND: Sanger sequencing, still the standard technique for genetic testing in most diagnostic laboratories and until recently widely used in research, is gradually being complemented by next-generation sequencing (NGS). No single mutation detection technique is however perfect in identifying

  19. A GYS1 gene mutation is highly associated with polysaccharide storage myopathy in Cob Normand draught horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herszberg, B; McCue, M E; Larcher, T; Mata, X; Vaiman, A; Chaffaux, S; Chérel, Y; Valberg, S J; Mickelson, J R; Guérin, G

    2009-02-01

    Glycogen storage diseases or glycogenoses are inherited diseases caused by abnormalities of enzymes that regulate the synthesis or degradation of glycogen. Deleterious mutations in many genes of the glyco(geno)lytic or the glycogenesis pathways can potentially cause a glycogenosis, and currently mutations in fourteen different genes are known to cause animal or human glycogenoses, resulting in myopathies and/or hepatic disorders. The genetic bases of two forms of glycogenosis are currently known in horses. A fatal neonatal polysystemic type IV glycogenosis, inherited recessively in affected Quarter Horse foals, is due to a mutation in the glycogen branching enzyme gene (GBE1). A second type of glycogenosis, termed polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM), is observed in adult Quarter Horses and other breeds. A severe form of PSSM also occurs in draught horses. A mutation in the skeletal muscle glycogen synthase gene (GYS1) was recently reported to be highly associated with PSSM in Quarter Horses and Belgian draught horses. This GYS1 point mutation appears to cause a gain-of-function of the enzyme and to result in the accumulation of a glycogen-like, less-branched polysaccharide in skeletal muscle. It is inherited as a dominant trait. The aim of this work was to test for possible associations between genetic polymorphisms in four candidate genes of the glycogen pathway or the GYS1 mutation in Cob Normand draught horses diagnosed with PSSM by muscle biopsy.

  20. Detection of BRAF V600 mutations in melanoma: evaluation of concordance between the Cobas® 4800 BRAF V600 mutation test and the methods used in French National Cancer Institute (INCa) platforms in a real-life setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourah, Samia; Denis, Marc G; Narducci, Fabienne Escande; Solassol, Jérôme; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Emile, Jean-François; Heller, Remy; Souvignet, Claude; Bergougnoux, Loïc; Merlio, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Vemurafenib is approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma in patients with BRAF V600 mutation. In pivotal clinical trials, BRAF testing has always been done with the approved cobas 4800 BRAF test. In routine practice, several methods are available and are used according to the laboratories usual procedures. A national, multicenter, non-interventional study was conducted with prospective and consecutive collection of tumor samples. A parallel evaluation was performed in routine practice between the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 mutation test and home brew methods (HBMs) of 12 national laboratories, labelled and funded by the French National Cancer Institute (INCa). For 420 melanoma samples tested, the cobas method versus HBM showed a high concordance (93.3%; kappa = 0.86) in BRAF V600 genotyping with similar mutation rates (34.0% versus 35.7%, respectively). Overall, 97.4% and 98.6% of samples gave valid results using the cobas and HBM, respectively. Of the 185 samples strictly fulfilling the cobas guidelines, the concordance rate was even higher (95.7%; kappa = 0.91; 95%CI [0.85; 0.97]). Out of the 420 samples tested, 28 (6.7%) showed discordance between HBM and cobas. This prospective study shows a high concordance rate between the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 test and home brew methods in the routine detection of BRAF V600E mutations.

  1. Detection of BRAF V600 Mutations in Melanoma: Evaluation of Concordance between the Cobas® 4800 BRAF V600 Mutation Test and the Methods Used in French National Cancer Institute (INCa) Platforms in a Real-Life Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourah, Samia; Denis, Marc G.; Narducci, Fabienne Escande; Solassol, Jérôme; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Emile, Jean-François; Heller, Remy; Souvignet, Claude; Bergougnoux, Loïc; Merlio, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Vemurafenib is approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma in patients with BRAF V600 mutation. In pivotal clinical trials, BRAF testing has always been done with the approved cobas 4800 BRAF test. In routine practice, several methods are available and are used according to the laboratories usual procedures. A national, multicenter, non-interventional study was conducted with prospective and consecutive collection of tumor samples. A parallel evaluation was performed in routine practice between the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 mutation test and home brew methods (HBMs) of 12 national laboratories, labelled and funded by the French National Cancer Institute (INCa). For 420 melanoma samples tested, the cobas method versus HBM showed a high concordance (93.3%; kappa = 0.86) in BRAF V600 genotyping with similar mutation rates (34.0% versus 35.7%, respectively). Overall, 97.4% and 98.6% of samples gave valid results using the cobas and HBM, respectively. Of the 185 samples strictly fulfilling the cobas guidelines, the concordance rate was even higher (95.7%; kappa = 0.91; 95%CI [0.85; 0.97]). Out of the 420 samples tested, 28 (6.7%) showed discordance between HBM and cobas. This prospective study shows a high concordance rate between the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 test and home brew methods in the routine detection of BRAF V600E mutations. PMID:25789737

  2. Detection of BRAF V600 mutations in melanoma: evaluation of concordance between the Cobas® 4800 BRAF V600 mutation test and the methods used in French National Cancer Institute (INCa platforms in a real-life setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Mourah

    Full Text Available Vemurafenib is approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma in patients with BRAF V600 mutation. In pivotal clinical trials, BRAF testing has always been done with the approved cobas 4800 BRAF test. In routine practice, several methods are available and are used according to the laboratories usual procedures. A national, multicenter, non-interventional study was conducted with prospective and consecutive collection of tumor samples. A parallel evaluation was performed in routine practice between the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 mutation test and home brew methods (HBMs of 12 national laboratories, labelled and funded by the French National Cancer Institute (INCa. For 420 melanoma samples tested, the cobas method versus HBM showed a high concordance (93.3%; kappa = 0.86 in BRAF V600 genotyping with similar mutation rates (34.0% versus 35.7%, respectively. Overall, 97.4% and 98.6% of samples gave valid results using the cobas and HBM, respectively. Of the 185 samples strictly fulfilling the cobas guidelines, the concordance rate was even higher (95.7%; kappa = 0.91; 95%CI [0.85; 0.97]. Out of the 420 samples tested, 28 (6.7% showed discordance between HBM and cobas. This prospective study shows a high concordance rate between the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 test and home brew methods in the routine detection of BRAF V600E mutations.

  3. Shared Decision Making in women testing for a BRCA 1/2 mutation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosmalen, M.S van

    2005-01-01

    Women with a BRCA1/2 mutation have a high genetic risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. They face the difficult choice between screening and prophylactic surgery for the breasts and ovaries. We have developed a shared decision making program to prepare these women for decision making. The

  4. High temperature high vacuum creep testing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Creep is the term used to describe time-dependent plastic flow of metals under conditions of constant load or stress at constant high temperature. Creep has an important considerations for materials operating under stresses at high temperatures for long time such as cladding materials, pressure vessels, steam turbines, boilers,...etc. These two creep machines measures the creep of materials and alloys at high temperature under high vacuum at constant stress. By the two chart recorders attached to the system one could register time and temperature versus strain during the test . This report consists of three chapters, chapter I is the introduction, chapter II is the technical description of the creep machines while chapter III discuss some experimental data on the creep behaviour. Of helium implanted stainless steel. 13 fig., 3 tab

  5. Simplifying the detection of MUTYH mutations by high resolution melting analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Villar, Isabel; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Ayala, Rosa; Wesselink, Jan; Morillas, Juan Diego; López, Elena; Marín, José Carlos; Díaz-Tasende, José; González, Sara; Robles, Luis

    2010-01-01

    MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) is a disorder caused by bi-allelic germline MUTYH mutation, characterized by multiple colorectal adenomas. In order to identify mutations in MUTYH gene we applied High Resolution Melting (HRM) genotyping. HRM analysis is extensively employed as a scanning method for the detection of heterozygous mutations. Therefore, we applied HRM to show effectiveness in detecting homozygous mutations for these clinically important and frequent patients. In this study, we analyzed phenotype and genotype data from 82 patients, with multiple (>= 10) synchronous (19/82) or metachronous (63/82) adenomas and negative APC study (except one case). Analysis was performed by HRM-PCR and direct sequencing, in order to identify mutations in MUTYH exons 7, 12 and 13, where the most prevalent mutations are located. In monoallelic mutation carriers, we evaluated entire MUTYH gene in search of another possible alteration. HRM-PCR was performed with strict conditions in several rounds: the first one to discriminate the heteroduplex patterns and homoduplex patterns and the next ones, in order to refine and confirm parameters. The genotypes obtained were correlated to phenotypic features (number of adenomas (synchronous or metachronous), colorectal cancer (CRC) and family history). MUTYH germline mutations were found in 15.8% (13/82) of patients. The hot spots, Y179C (exon 7) and G396D (exon 13), were readily identified and other mutations were also detected. Each mutation had a reproducible melting profile by HRM, both heterozygous mutations and homozygous mutations. In our study of 82 patients, biallelic mutation is associated with being a carrier of ≥10 synchronous polyps (p = 0.05) and there is no association between biallelic mutation and CRC (p = 0.39) nor family history (p = 0.63). G338H non-pathogenic polymorphism (exon 12) was found in 23.1% (19/82) of patients. In all cases there was concordance between HRM (first and subsequent rounds) and sequencing

  6. High-resolution melting (HRM) assay for the detection of recurrent BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations in Tunisian breast/ovarian cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Aouatef; Kharrat, Maher; Lariani, Imen; Chaabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba

    2014-12-01

    Germline deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes are associated with an increased risk for the development of breast and ovarian cancer. Given the large size of these genes the detection of such mutations represents a considerable technical challenge. Therefore, the development of cost-effective and rapid methods to identify these mutations became a necessity. High resolution melting analysis (HRM) is a rapid and efficient technique extensively employed as high-throughput mutation scanning method. The purpose of our study was to assess the specificity and sensitivity of HRM for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes scanning. As a first step we estimate the ability of HRM for detection mutations in a set of 21 heterozygous samples harboring 8 different known BRCA1/BRCA2 variations, all samples had been preliminarily investigated by direct sequencing, and then we performed a blinded analysis by HRM in a set of 68 further sporadic samples of unknown genotype. All tested heterozygous BRCA1/BRCA2 variants were easily identified. However the HRM assay revealed further alteration that we initially had not searched (one unclassified variant). Furthermore, sequencing confirmed all the HRM detected mutations in the set of unknown samples, including homozygous changes, indicating that in this cohort, with the optimized assays, the mutations detections sensitivity and specificity were 100 %. HRM is a simple, rapid and efficient scanning method for known and unknown BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations. Consequently the method will allow for the economical screening of recurrent mutations in Tunisian population.

  7. Exome sequencing identifies highly recurrent MED12 somatic mutations in breast fibroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Weng Khong; Ong, Choon Kiat; Tan, Jing; Thike, Aye Aye; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Myint, Swe Swe; Nagarajan, Sanjanaa; Nasir, Nur Diyana Md; McPherson, John R; Cutcutache, Ioana; Poore, Gregory; Tay, Su Ting; Ooi, Wei Siong; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Hartman, Mikael; Ong, Kong Wee; Tan, Benita K T; Rozen, Steven G; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean

    2014-08-01

    Fibroadenomas are the most common breast tumors in women under 30 (refs. 1,2). Exome sequencing of eight fibroadenomas with matching whole-blood samples revealed recurrent somatic mutations solely in MED12, which encodes a Mediator complex subunit. Targeted sequencing of an additional 90 fibroadenomas confirmed highly frequent MED12 exon 2 mutations (58/98, 59%) that are probably somatic, with 71% of mutations occurring in codon 44. Using laser capture microdissection, we show that MED12 fibroadenoma mutations are present in stromal but not epithelial mammary cells. Expression profiling of MED12-mutated and wild-type fibroadenomas revealed that MED12 mutations are associated with dysregulated estrogen signaling and extracellular matrix organization. The fibroadenoma MED12 mutation spectrum is nearly identical to that of previously reported MED12 lesions in uterine leiomyoma but not those of other tumors. Benign tumors of the breast and uterus, both of which are key target tissues of estrogen, may thus share a common genetic basis underpinned by highly frequent and specific MED12 mutations.

  8. Identification and Functional Testing of ERCC2 Mutations in a Multi-national Cohort of Patients with Familial Breast- and Ovarian Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rump

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing application of gene panels for familial cancer susceptibility disorders will probably lead to an increased proposal of susceptibility gene candidates. Using ERCC2 DNA repair gene as an example, we show that proof of a possible role in cancer susceptibility requires a detailed dissection and characterization of the underlying mutations for genes with diverse cellular functions (in this case mainly DNA repair and basic cellular transcription. In case of ERCC2, panel sequencing of 1345 index cases from 587 German, 405 Lithuanian and 353 Czech families with breast and ovarian cancer (BC/OC predisposition revealed 25 mutations (3 frameshift, 2 splice-affecting, 20 missense, all absent or very rare in the ExAC database. While 16 mutations were unique, 9 mutations showed up repeatedly with population-specific appearance. Ten out of eleven mutations that were tested exemplarily in cell-based functional assays exert diminished excision repair efficiency and/or decreased transcriptional activation capability. In order to provide evidence for BC/OC predisposition, we performed familial segregation analyses and screened ethnically matching controls. However, unlike the recently published RECQL example, none of our recurrent ERCC2 mutations showed convincing co-segregation with BC/OC or significant overrepresentation in the BC/OC cohort. Interestingly, we detected that some deleterious founder mutations had an unexpectedly high frequency of > 1% in the corresponding populations, suggesting that either homozygous carriers are not clinically recognized or homozygosity for these mutations is embryonically lethal. In conclusion, we provide a useful resource on the mutational landscape of ERCC2 mutations in hereditary BC/OC patients and, as our key finding, we demonstrate the complexity of correct interpretation for the discovery of "bonafide" breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  9. RBE-LET relationships of high-LET radiations in drosophila mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Isao; Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Nagano, Masaaki; Takada, Jun; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    1999-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 252 Cf neutrons and synchrotron-generated high-energy charged particles for mutation induction was evaluated as a function of linear energy transfer (LET), using the loss of heterozygosity for wing-hair mutations and the reversion of the mutant white-ivory eye-color in Drosophila melanogaster. Loss of heterozygosity for wing-hair mutations results predominantly from mitotic crossing over induced in wing anlage cells of larvae, while the reverse mutation of eye-color is due to an intragenic structural change (2.96 kb-DNA excision) in the white locus on the X-chromosome. The measurements were performed in a combined mutation assay system so that induced mutant wing-hair clones as well as revertant eye-color clone can be detected simultaneously in the same individual. Larvae were irradiated at the age of 3 days post oviposition with 252 Cf neutrons, carbon beam or neon beam. For the neutron irradiation, the RBE values for wing-hair mutations were larger than that for eye-color mutation by about 7 fold. The RBE of carbon ions for producing the wing-hair mutations increased with increase in LET. The estimated RBE values were found to be in the range 2 to 6.5 for the wing-hair. For neon beam irradiation, the RBE values for wing-hair mutations peak near 150 keV/μm and decrease with further increase in LET. On the other hand, the RBE values for the induction of the eye-color mutation are nearly unity in 252 Cf neutrons and both ions throughout the LET range irradiated. We discuss the relationships between the initial DNA damage and LET in considering the mechanism of somatic mutation induction. (author)

  10. Breeding high yielding varieties of pigeon pea, mungbean and black gram using induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, S.E.; Wanjari, K.B.

    1994-01-01

    The present communication emphasis the developing of high yielding varieties of pigeon pea, mungbean and black gram using induced mutation with disease resistance in these crops. This would help in stabilisation of the higher yield potential

  11. Improvement of cassava for high dry matter, starch and low cyanogenic glucoside content by mutation induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nwachukwu, E C; Mbanaso, E N.A.; Ene, L S.O. [Plant Breeding Div., National Root Crops Research Inst., Umudike, Umuahia (Nigeria)

    1997-07-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important food in Nigeria. One drawback in its use as a staple food is the presence of cyanogenic glucosides which on hydrolysis produce the very toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN). To reduce the cyanogenic levels by mutation induction, three locally adopted and high yielding varieties of cassava, TMS 30572, NR 8817 and NR 84111 were irradiated with 20, 25 and 30 Gy gamma rays. There were a wide variation in HCN, dry matter and starch content of irradiated cassava plants, screened in the MV{sub 2} propagation. Fourteen cassavavariant lines were selected for low HCN content, and 22 lines for high dry matter content. These will be further tested for yield in replicated field trials. (author). 7 refs, 3 tabs.

  12. Improvement of cassava for high dry matter, starch and low cyanogenic glucoside content by mutation induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwachukwu, E.C.; Mbanaso, E.N.A.; Ene, L.S.O.

    1997-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important food in Nigeria. One drawback in its use as a staple food is the presence of cyanogenic glucosides which on hydrolysis produce the very toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN). To reduce the cyanogenic levels by mutation induction, three locally adopted and high yielding varieties of cassava, TMS 30572, NR 8817 and NR 84111 were irradiated with 20, 25 and 30 Gy gamma rays. There were a wide variation in HCN, dry matter and starch content of irradiated cassava plants, screened in the MV 2 propagation. Fourteen cassavavariant lines were selected for low HCN content, and 22 lines for high dry matter content. These will be further tested for yield in replicated field trials. (author). 7 refs, 3 tabs

  13. EGFR Mutation Testing in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Real-World Practice in an East Asian Tertiary Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Juhee; Rampal, Sanjay; Han, Joungho; Parasuraman, Bhash; Guallar, Eliseo; Lee, Genehee; Lee, Jeeyun; Shim, Young Mog

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Guidelines for management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) strongly recommend EGFR mutation testing. These recommendations are particularly relevant in Asians that have higher EGFR mutation prevalence. This study aims to explore current testing practices, logistics of testing, types of EGFR mutation, and prevalence of EGFR mutations in patients with advanced NSCLC in a large comprehensive cancer center in Korea. Methods Our retrospective cohort included 1,503 NSCLC patients aged ≥18 years, with stage IIIB/IV disease, who attended the Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, from January 2007 through July 2010. Trained oncology nurses reviewed and abstracted data from electronic medical records. Results This cohort had a mean age (SD) of 59.6 (11.1) years, 62.7% were males, and 52.9% never-smokers. The most common NSCLC histological types were adenocarcinoma (70.5%) and squamous cell carcinoma (18.0%). Overall, 39.5% of patients were tested for EGFR mutations. The proportion of patients undergoing EGFR testing during January 2007 through July 2008, August 2008 through September 2009, and October 2009 through July 2010 were 23.3%, 38.3%, and 63.5%, respectively (P<0.001). The median time elapsed between cancer diagnoses and receiving EGFR testing results was 21 days. EGFR testing was most frequently ordered by oncologists (57.7%), pulmonologists (31.9%), and thoracic surgeons (6.6%). EGFR testing was more commonly requested for women, younger patients, stage IV disease, non-smokers, and adenocarcinoma histology. Of 586 cases successfully tested for EGFR mutations, 209 (35.7%) were positive, including 118 cases with exon 19 deletions and 62 with L858R mutations. EGFR mutation positive patients were more likely to be female, never-smokers, never-drinkers and to have adenocarcinoma. Conclusions In a large cancer center in Korea, the proportion of EGFR testing increased from 2007 through 2010. The high frequency of EGFR mutation positive cases warrants

  14. EGFR mutation testing in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a comprehensive evaluation of real-world practice in an East Asian tertiary hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-La Choi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Guidelines for management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC strongly recommend EGFR mutation testing. These recommendations are particularly relevant in Asians that have higher EGFR mutation prevalence. This study aims to explore current testing practices, logistics of testing, types of EGFR mutation, and prevalence of EGFR mutations in patients with advanced NSCLC in a large comprehensive cancer center in Korea. METHODS: Our retrospective cohort included 1,503 NSCLC patients aged ≥18 years, with stage IIIB/IV disease, who attended the Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, from January 2007 through July 2010. Trained oncology nurses reviewed and abstracted data from electronic medical records. RESULTS: This cohort had a mean age (SD of 59.6 (11.1 years, 62.7% were males, and 52.9% never-smokers. The most common NSCLC histological types were adenocarcinoma (70.5% and squamous cell carcinoma (18.0%. Overall, 39.5% of patients were tested for EGFR mutations. The proportion of patients undergoing EGFR testing during January 2007 through July 2008, August 2008 through September 2009, and October 2009 through July 2010 were 23.3%, 38.3%, and 63.5%, respectively (P<0.001. The median time elapsed between cancer diagnoses and receiving EGFR testing results was 21 days. EGFR testing was most frequently ordered by oncologists (57.7%, pulmonologists (31.9%, and thoracic surgeons (6.6%. EGFR testing was more commonly requested for women, younger patients, stage IV disease, non-smokers, and adenocarcinoma histology. Of 586 cases successfully tested for EGFR mutations, 209 (35.7% were positive, including 118 cases with exon 19 deletions and 62 with L858R mutations. EGFR mutation positive patients were more likely to be female, never-smokers, never-drinkers and to have adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: In a large cancer center in Korea, the proportion of EGFR testing increased from 2007 through 2010. The high frequency of EGFR mutation positive

  15. Comprehensive RNA Analysis of the NF1 Gene in Classically Affected NF1 Affected Individuals Meeting NIH Criteria has High Sensitivity and Mutation Negative Testing is Reassuring in Isolated Cases With Pigmentary Features Only

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    D.G. Evans

    2016-05-01

    Interpretation: RNA analysis in individuals with presumed NF1 has high sensitivity and includes a small subset with DNET without an NF1 variant. Furthermore negative analysis for NF1/SPRED1 provides strong reassurance to children with ≥6 CAL that they are unlikely to have NF1.

  16. Use of Mycobacterium smegmatis deficient in ADP-ribosyltransferase as surrogate for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in drug testing and mutation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Priyanka; Miryala, Sandeep; Varshney, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Rifampicin (Rif) is a first line drug used for tuberculosis treatment. However, the emergence of drug resistant strains has necessitated synthesis and testing of newer analogs of Rif. Mycobacterium smegmatis is often used as a surrogate for M. tuberculosis. However, the presence of an ADP ribosyltransferase (Arr) in M. smegmatis inactivates Rif, rendering it impractical for screening of Rif analogs or other compounds when used in conjunction with them (Rif/Rif analogs). Rifampicin is also used in studying the role of various DNA repair enzymes by analyzing mutations in RpoB (a subunit of RNA polymerase) causing Rif resistance. These analyses use high concentrations of Rif when M. smegmatis is used as model. Here, we have generated M. smegmatis strains by deleting arr (Δarr). The M. smegmatis Δarr strains show minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Rif which is similar to that for M. tuberculosis. The MICs for isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, ciprofloxacin and streptomycin were essentially unaltered for M. smegmatis Δarr. The growth profiles and mutation spectrum of Δarr and, Δarr combined with ΔudgB (udgB encodes a DNA repair enzyme that excises uracil) strains were similar to their counterparts wild-type for arr. However, the mutation spectrum of ΔfpgΔarr strain differed somewhat from that of the Δfpg strain (fpg encodes a DNA repair enzyme that excises 8-oxo-G). Our studies suggest M. smegmatis Δarr strain as an ideal model system in drug testing and mutation spectrum determination in DNA repair studies.

  17. Use of Mycobacterium smegmatis deficient in ADP-ribosyltransferase as surrogate for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in drug testing and mutation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Agrawal

    Full Text Available Rifampicin (Rif is a first line drug used for tuberculosis treatment. However, the emergence of drug resistant strains has necessitated synthesis and testing of newer analogs of Rif. Mycobacterium smegmatis is often used as a surrogate for M. tuberculosis. However, the presence of an ADP ribosyltransferase (Arr in M. smegmatis inactivates Rif, rendering it impractical for screening of Rif analogs or other compounds when used in conjunction with them (Rif/Rif analogs. Rifampicin is also used in studying the role of various DNA repair enzymes by analyzing mutations in RpoB (a subunit of RNA polymerase causing Rif resistance. These analyses use high concentrations of Rif when M. smegmatis is used as model. Here, we have generated M. smegmatis strains by deleting arr (Δarr. The M. smegmatis Δarr strains show minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for Rif which is similar to that for M. tuberculosis. The MICs for isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, ciprofloxacin and streptomycin were essentially unaltered for M. smegmatis Δarr. The growth profiles and mutation spectrum of Δarr and, Δarr combined with ΔudgB (udgB encodes a DNA repair enzyme that excises uracil strains were similar to their counterparts wild-type for arr. However, the mutation spectrum of ΔfpgΔarr strain differed somewhat from that of the Δfpg strain (fpg encodes a DNA repair enzyme that excises 8-oxo-G. Our studies suggest M. smegmatis Δarr strain as an ideal model system in drug testing and mutation spectrum determination in DNA repair studies.

  18. Mutation induction and evaluation of high yield rice mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Rahim Harun; Sobri Husein; Rusli Ibrahim

    2006-01-01

    The successful use of plant breeding for improving crops requires the existence of genetic variation of useful traits. Unfortunately, the desired variation is often lacking. However, radiation has been used to induce mutations and thereby generate genetic variation from which desired mutants may be selected. Mutation induction has become a proven way of creating variation within a crop variety. It offers the possibility of inducing desired attributes that either cannot be expressed in nature or have been lost during evolution. Rice is security food crop in Malaysia. Efforts were undertaken to enhance rice yield from 4.0 tones per hectare in 1995 to 5.5 tones per hectare in 2010. Proper management and good varieties are two factors that require for enhancing yield of rice. In this research, purified seeds of MR211 and MR219 were gamma irradiated at 100 to 400 Gray and sown for planting as M1 generation at MARDI experimental plot. The M2 population was sown in bulk with population size around 15,000 to 20,000 plants. Individual plant selection was carried out at maturity and each selected plant became a mutant line of M3 generation. Agronomic trial of M3 mutants lines were conducted in Mardi, Tanjung Karang, Selangor. About 115 of selected mutant lines were evaluated. Each row of those mutant lines were planted in two rows at planting distance of 25cm within and between rows. These mutant lines were visually observed and data were recorded in each of every mutant line. (Author)

  19. New MCM8 mutation associated with premature ovarian insufficiency and chromosomal instability in a highly consanguineous Tunisian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouali, Nouha; Francou, Bruno; Bouligand, Jérôme; Imanci, Dilek; Dimassi, Sarra; Tosca, Lucie; Zaouali, Monia; Mougou, Soumaya; Young, Jacques; Saad, Ali; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne

    2017-10-01

    To identify the gene(s) involved in the etiology of premature ovarian insufficiency in a highly consanguineous Tunisian family. Genetic analysis of a large consanguineous family with several affected siblings. University hospital-based cytogenetics and molecular genetics laboratories. A highly consanguineous Tunisian family with several affected siblings born to healthy second-degree cousins. None. Targeted exome sequencing was performed by next-generation sequencing for affected family members. Mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing. Functional experiments were performed to explore the deleterious effects of the identified mutation. DNA damage was induced by increasing mitomycin C (MMC) concentrations on cultured peripheral lymphocytes. Analysis of the next-generation sequencing data revealed a new homozygous missense mutation in the minichromosome maintenance 8 gene (MCM8).This homozygous mutation (c. 482A>C; p.His161Pro) was predicted to be deleterious and segregated with the disease in the family. MCM8 participates in homologous recombination during meiosis and DNA double-stranded break repair by dimerizing with MCM9. Mcm8 knock out results in an early block in follicle development and small gonads. Given this, we tested the chromosomal breakage repair capacity of homozygous and heterozygous MCM8 p.His161Pro mutation on cultured peripheral lymphocytes exposed to increasing MMC concentrations. We found that chromosomal breakage after MMC exposure was significantly higher in cells from homozygously affected individuals than in those from a healthy control. Our findings provide additional support to the view that MCM8 mutations are involved in the primary ovarian insufficiency phenotype. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficient detection of factor IX mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography in Taiwanese hemophilia B patients, and the identification of two novel mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chin Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia B (HB is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by mutations in the clotting factor IX (FIX gene that result in FIX deficiency. Previous studies have shown a wide variation of FIX gene mutations in HB. Although the quality of life in HB has greatly improved mainly because of prophylactic replacement therapy with FIX concentrates, there exists a significant burden on affected families and the medical care system. Accurate detection of FIX gene mutations is critical for genetic counseling and disease prevention in HB. In this study, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC, which has proved to be a highly informative and practical means of detecting mutations, for the molecular diagnosis of our patients with HB. Ten Taiwanese families affected by HB were enrolled. We used the DHPLC technique followed by direct sequencing of suspected segments to detect FIX gene mutations. In all, 11 FIX gene mutations (8 point mutations, 2 small deletions/insertions, and 1 large deletion, including two novel mutations (exon6 c.687–695, del 9 mer and c.460–461, ins T were found. According to the HB pedigrees, 25% and 75% of our patients were defined as familial and sporadic HB cases, respectively. We show that DHPLC is a highly sensitive and cost-effective method for FIX gene analysis and can be used as a convenient system for disease prevention.

  1. Parallel Evolution of High-Level Aminoglycoside Resistance in Escherichia coli Under Low and High Mutation Supply Rates

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    Claudia Ibacache-Quiroga

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a major concern in public health worldwide, thus there is much interest in characterizing the mutational pathways through which susceptible bacteria evolve resistance. Here we use experimental evolution to explore the mutational pathways toward aminoglycoside resistance, using gentamicin as a model, under low and high mutation supply rates. Our results show that both normo and hypermutable strains of Escherichia coli are able to develop resistance to drug dosages > 1,000-fold higher than the minimal inhibitory concentration for their ancestors. Interestingly, such level of resistance was often associated with changes in susceptibility to other antibiotics, most prominently with increased resistance to fosfomycin. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that all resistant derivatives presented diverse mutations in five common genetic elements: fhuA, fusA and the atpIBEFHAGDC, cyoABCDE, and potABCD operons. Despite the large number of mutations acquired, hypermutable strains did not pay, apparently, fitness cost. In contrast to recent studies, we found that the mutation supply rate mainly affected the speed (tempo but not the pattern (mode of evolution: both backgrounds acquired the mutations in the same order, although the hypermutator strain did it faster. This observation is compatible with the adaptive landscape for high-level gentamicin resistance being relatively smooth, with few local maxima; which might be a common feature among antibiotics for which resistance involves multiple loci.

  2. Minisatellite mutations and retrospective biodosimetry of population living close to the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, C.; Bersimbacv, R. I.; Dubrova, Y. E.; Hulten, M.; Bigbee, W. I.; Murphy, B. P.; Koivistoinen, A.; Tankimonova, M.; Mamyrbaeva, Z.; Djansugarova, L.; Mustonen, R.; Salomaa, S.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine minisatellite mutation rates in families in three generations and to perform retrospective biodosimetry of individuals in these families living close to the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan. The oldes generation (Po) lived in the area at the time of the first Soviet nuclear test in 1949 whereas the younger generations (F1,F2) were exposed to smaller doses from the residual fallout and later tests. Matched control families in three generations living in non-contamianted areas were analysed in parallel. The retrospective biodosimetry comprehended two endpoints; chromosomal translocations determined by FISH chromosome painting and the glycophorin A (GPA) somatic mutation assay. The minisatellite mutation rate in the cohort of P0 parents was 1-8-fold higher than in the control non-exposed population. Moreover, the minisatellite mutatin rate in the cohort of f1 parents from the exposed area showed a significant negative correlation with with the year of birth, fully consistent with the decay of radioisotopes after the cessation of surface and atmospheric nuclear tests. The results from the FISH painting analysis showed similar translocation frequencies in the Semipalatinsk cohort and the control group. Based on the FISH results it can be concluded that the P0 generation has received a cumulative mean dose of less than 0.5 Gy. The GPA assay did not reveal significant diffrences in the variant cell frequencies for all subjects from the Semipalatinsk area compared with the matched controls. However, a significant increase (P<0.05) of the mean allele-loss φN variant frequency was observed among the exposed P0 generation in comparison to controls. Considering the sensitivity of the GPA assay, the results suggest that the mean dose to the P0 generation of the affected villages was relatively low and in accordance to the results obtained using FISH. (Author) 17 refs

  3. Minisatellite mutations and retrospective biodosimetry of population living close to the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, C.; Bersimbacv, R. I.; Dubrova, Y. E.; Hulten, M.; Bigbee, W. I.; Murphy, B. P.; Koivistoinen, A.; Tankimonova, M.; Mamyrbaeva, Z.; Djansugarova, L.; Mustonen, R.; Salomaa, S.

    2004-07-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine minisatellite mutation rates in families in three generations and to perform retrospective biodosimetry of individuals in these families living close to the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan. The oldes generation (Po) lived in the area at the time of the first Soviet nuclear test in 1949 whereas the younger generations (F1,F2) were exposed to smaller doses from the residual fallout and later tests. Matched control families in three generations living in non-contamianted areas were analysed in parallel. The retrospective biodosimetry comprehended two endpoints; chromosomal translocations determined by FISH chromosome painting and the glycophorin A (GPA) somatic mutation assay. The minisatellite mutation rate in the cohort of P0 parents was 1-8-fold higher than in the control non-exposed population. Moreover, the minisatellite mutatin rate in the cohort of f1 parents from the exposed area showed a significant negative correlation with with the year of birth, fully consistent with the decay of radioisotopes after the cessation of surface and atmospheric nuclear tests. The results from the FISH painting analysis showed similar translocation frequencies in the Semipalatinsk cohort and the control group. Based on the FISH results it can be concluded that the P0 generation has received a cumulative mean dose of less than 0.5 Gy. The GPA assay did not reveal significant diffrences in the variant cell frequencies for all subjects from the Semipalatinsk area compared with the matched controls. However, a significant increase (P<0.05) of the mean allele-loss {phi}N variant frequency was observed among the exposed P0 generation in comparison to controls. Considering the sensitivity of the GPA assay, the results suggest that the mean dose to the P0 generation of the affected villages was relatively low and in accordance to the results obtained using FISH. (Author) 17 refs.

  4. Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa is highly prevalent in the Jerusalem region with a high frequency of founder mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Dror; Banin, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common inherited retinal degeneration, and prevalence of the disease has been reported in populations of American and European origin with a relatively low consanguinity rate. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in the Jerusalem region, which has a population of about 1 million individuals with a high rate of consanguinity. The patients' clinical data included eye exam findings (visual acuity, anterior segment, and funduscopy) as well as electroretinographic (ERG) testing results under scotopic and photopic conditions. Mutation analysis on a subgroup of patients was performed mainly with candidate gene analysis and homozygosity mapping. We evaluated the medical records of patients with degenerative retinal diseases residing in the Jerusalem region who were examined over the past 20 years in a large tertiary medical center. A total of 453 individuals affected with nonsyndromic RP were diagnosed at our center, according to funduscopic findings and ERG testing. Based on the estimated population size of 945,000 individuals who reside in the vicinity of Jerusalem, the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in this region is 1:2,086. The prevalence of RP was higher among Arab Muslims (1:1,798) compared to Jews (1:2,230), mainly due to consanguineous marriages that are more common in the Arab Muslim population. To identify the genetic causes of RP in our cohort, we recruited 383 patients from 183 different families for genetic analysis: 70 with autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance, 15 with autosomal dominant, 86 isolate cases, and 12 with an X-linked inheritance pattern. In 64 (35%) of the families, we identified the genetic cause of the disease, and we revised the inheritance pattern of 20 isolate cases to the AR pattern; 49% of the families in our cohort had AR inheritance. Interestingly, in 42 (66%) of the genetically identified families, the cause of disease was a founder mutation. Previous studies

  5. High Mutation Levels are Compatible with Normal Embryonic Development in Mlh1-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoyan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yulong; Sang, Meixiang; Cai, Jianhui; Li, Qiaoxia; Ozaki, Toshinori; Ono, Tetsuya; He, Dongwei

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the role of the mismatch repair gene Mlh1 in genome instability during the fetal stage, spontaneous mutations were studied in Mlh1-deficient lacZ-transgenic mouse fetuses. Mutation levels were high at 9.5 days post coitum (dpc) and gradually increased during the embryonic stage, after which they remained unchanged. In addition, mutations that were found in brain, liver, spleen, small intestine and thymus showed similar levels and no statistically significant difference was found. The molecular nature of mutations at 12.5 dpc in fetuses of Mlh1 +/+ and Mlh1 -/- mice showed their own unique spectra, suggesting that deletion mutations were the main causes in the deficiency of the Mlh1 gene. Of note, fetuses of irradiated mice exhibited marked differences such as post-implantation loss and Mendelian distribution. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that high mutation ofMlh1 -/- -deficient fetuses has little effect on the fetuses during their early developmental stages, whereas Mlh1 -/- -deficient fetuses from X-ray irradiated mothers are clearly effected.

  6. The induction of somatic mutations by high-LET radiation observed using the Drosophila assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Isao; Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Nagano, Masaaki; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Endo, Satoru

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the mutagenic potential of high-LET radiation, an analysis was made on the production of somatic mutations by 252 Cf fission neutron s and heavy particle ions accelerated by a synchrotron. A Drosophila strain that allows simultaneous detection of two types of mutations in an identical fly was constructed. One was a wing-hair mutation and the other was an eye-color mosaic spot mutation. Measurements were made using a combined assay system of both mutation assays. Larvae were exposed to radiation at the age of post-ovipositional day-3. The efficiency of 252 Cf neutrons for inducing wing-hair mosaic spots was very high, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) = 8.5, but the efficiency for eye-color mosaic spot was nearly equal (RBE = 1.2) to that of 137 Cs γ-rays. The RBE of carbon ions for inducing wing-hair mosaic spots increased as an increase in LET values. The RBE for the induction of eye-color mutants did not change with LET. These relationships suggest that more complex types of DNA damages such as non-rejoinable strand break or clustered double strand break, which increase with LET may be responsible for the induction of wing-hair mutation, while simpler forms of molecular damage may induce a reversion in the white-ivory allele. (M.N.)

  7. Highly sensitive detection of ESR1 mutations in cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic breast cancer using molecular barcode sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Nanae; Kagara, Naofumi; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Miyake, Tomohiro; Tanei, Tomonori; Naoi, Yasuto; Shimoda, Masafumi; Shimazu, Kenzo; Kim, Seung Jin; Noguchi, Shinzaburo

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to develop a highly sensitive method to detect ESR1 mutations in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) using next-generation sequencing with molecular barcode (MB-NGS) targeting the hotspot segment (c.1600-1713). The sensitivity of MB-NGS was tested using serially diluted ESR1 mutant DNA and then cfDNA samples from 34 patients with metastatic breast cancer were analyzed with MB-NGS. The results of MB-NGS were validated in comparison with conventional NGS and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). MB-NGS showed a higher sensitivity (0.1%) than NGS without barcode (1%) by reducing background errors. Of the cfDNA samples from 34 patients with metastatic breast cancer, NGS without barcode revealed seven mutations in six patients (17.6%) and MB-NGS revealed six additional mutations including three mutations not reported in the COSMIC database of breast cancer, resulting in total 13 ESR1 mutations in ten patients (29.4%). Regarding the three hotspot mutations, all the patients with mutations detected by MB-NGS had identical mutations detected by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and mutant allele frequency correlated very well between both (r = 0.850, p < 0.01). Moreover, all the patients without these mutations by MB-NGS were found to have no mutations by ddPCR. In conclusion, MB-NGS could successfully detect ESR1 mutations in cfDNA with a higher sensitivity of 0.1% than conventional NGS and was considered as clinically useful as ddPCR.

  8. Extremely high Tp53 mutation load in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Golestan Province, Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnoush Abedi-Ardekani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Golestan Province in northeastern Iran has one of the highest incidences of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC in the world with rates over 50 per 100,000 person-years in both sexes. We have analyzed TP53 mutation patterns in tumors from this high-risk geographic area in search of clues to the mutagenic processes involved in causing ESCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biopsies of 119 confirmed ESCC tumor tissue from subjects enrolled in a case-control study conducted in Golestan Province were analyzed by direct sequencing of TP53 exons 2 through 11. Immunohistochemical staining for p53 was carried out using two monoclonal antibodies, DO7 and 1801. A total of 120 TP53 mutations were detected in 107/119 cases (89.9%, including 11 patients with double or triple mutations. The mutation pattern was heterogeneous with infrequent mutations at common TP53 "hotspots" but frequent transversions potentially attributable to environmental carcinogens forming bulky DNA adducts, including 40% at bases known as site of mutagenesis by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Mutations showed different patterns according to the reported temperature of tea consumption, but no variation was observed in relation to ethnicity, tobacco or opium use, and alcoholic beverage consumption or urban versus rural residence. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: ESCC tumors in people from Golestan Province show the highest rate of TP53 mutations ever reported in any cancer anywhere. The heterogeneous mutation pattern is highly suggestive of a causative role for multiple environmental carcinogens, including PAHs. The temperature and composition of tea may also influence mutagenesis.

  9. Analysis of genotoxic activity of ketamine and rocuronium bromide using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koksal, Pakize Muge; Gürbüzel, Mehmet

    2015-03-01

    The present study evaluated the mutagenic and recombinogenic effects of two commonly used anesthetic agents, ketamine and rocuronium bromide, in medicine using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila. The standard (ST) cross and the high-bioactivation (HB) cross with high sensitivity to procarcinogens and promutagens were used. The SMART test is based on the loss of heterozygosity, which occurs via various mechanisms, such as chromosome loss and deletion, half-translocation, mitotic recombination, mutation, and non-disjunction. Genetic alterations occurring in the somatic cells of the wing's imaginal discs result in mutant clones in the wing blade. Three-day-old trans-heterozygous larvae with two recessive markers, multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare (flr(3)), were treated with ketamine and rocuronium bromide. Analysis of the ST cross indicated that ketamine exhibited genotoxicity activity and that this activity was particularly dependent on homologous mitotic recombination at concentrations of 250 μg/ml and above. Rocuronium bromide did not exert mutagenic and/or recombinogenic effects. In the HB cross, ketamine at a concentration of 1000 μg/ml and rocuronium bromide at all concentrations, with the exception of 250 μg/ml (inconclusive), exerted genotoxic effects, which could also be associated with the increase in mitotic recombination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The use of a mutationally unstable X-chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster for mutagenicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmuson, B.; Svahlin, H.; Rasmuson, A.; Montell, I.; Olofsson, H.

    1978-01-01

    Somatic eye-colour mutations in an unstable genetic system, caused by a transposable element in the white locus of the X-chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster, is suggested as an assay system for mutagenicity testing. The system is evaluated by comparison with a corresponding system in a stable X-chromosome. Its sensitivity is confirmed with X-ray and EMS treatment, and it is found to be confined to the specific segment of the X-chromosome where the transposable element is localized. (Auth.)

  11. A New Generalizable Test for Detection of Mutations Affecting Tn10 Transposition

    OpenAIRE

    Huisman, Olivier; Kleckner, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    We describe here a new rapid screen that allows easy detection of transposon or host mutations that affect Tn10 transposition in Escherichia coli. This test involves a new Tn10 derivative called the "mini-lacZ-kanR fusion hopper" or mini-Tn10-LK for short. This element does not direct expression of β-galactosidase when present at its original starting location on a suitably engineered plasmid or phage genome because it lacks appropriate transcription and translation start signals. However, t...

  12. High mitochondrial mutation rates estimated from deep-rooting Costa Rican pedigrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal, Lorena; Melendez-Obando, Mauricio; Villegas-Palma, Ramon; Barrantes, Ramiro; Raventos, Henrieta; Pereira, Reynaldo; Luiselli, Donata; Pettener, Davide; Barbujani, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of mutation rates for the noncoding hypervariable Region I (HVR-I) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) vary widely, depending on whether they are inferred from phylogenies (assuming that molecular evolution is clock-like) or directly from pedigrees. All pedigree-based studies so far were conducted on populations of European origin. In this paper we analyzed 19 deep-rooting pedigrees in a population of mixed origin in Costa Rica. We calculated two estimates of the HVR-I mutation rate, one considering all apparent mutations, and one disregarding changes at sites known to be mutational hot spots and eliminating genealogy branches which might be suspected to include errors, or unrecognized adoptions along the female lines. At the end of this procedure, we still observed a mutation rate equal to 1.24 × 10−6, per site per year, i.e., at least three-fold as high as estimates derived from phylogenies. Our results confirm that mutation rates observed in pedigrees are much higher than estimated assuming a neutral model of long-term HVRI evolution. We argue that, until the cause of these discrepancies will be fully understood, both lower estimates (i.e., those derived from phylogenetic comparisons) and higher, direct estimates such as those obtained in this study, should be considered when modeling evolutionary and demographic processes. PMID:22460349

  13. High prevalence of drug-resistance mutations in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löscher Thomas

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Ethiopia, malaria is caused by both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Drug resistance of P. falciparum to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and chloroquine (CQ is frequent and intense in some areas. Methods In 100 patients with uncomplicated malaria from Dilla, southern Ethiopia, P. falciparum dhfr and dhps mutations as well as P. vivax dhfr polymorphisms associated with resistance to SP and P. falciparum pfcrt and pfmdr1 mutations conferring CQ resistance were assessed. Results P. falciparum and P. vivax were observed in 69% and 31% of the patients, respectively. Pfdhfr triple mutations and pfdhfr/pfdhps quintuple mutations occurred in 87% and 86% of P. falciparum isolates, respectively. Pfcrt T76 was seen in all and pfmdr1 Y86 in 81% of P. falciparum. The P. vivax dhfr core mutations N117 and R58 were present in 94% and 74%, respectively. Conclusion These data point to an extraordinarily high frequency of drug-resistance mutations in both P. falciparum and P. vivax in southern Ethiopia, and strongly support that both SP and CQ are inadequate drugs for this region.

  14. Deleterious mutations can surf to high densities on the wave front of an expanding population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Justin M J; Münkemüller, Tamara; Burton, Olivia J; Best, Alex; Dytham, Calvin; Johst, Karin

    2007-10-01

    There is an increasing recognition that evolutionary processes play a key role in determining the dynamics of range expansion. Recent work demonstrates that neutral mutations arising near the edge of a range expansion sometimes surf on the expanding front leading them rather than that leads to reach much greater spatial distribution and frequency than expected in stationary populations. Here, we extend this work and examine the surfing behavior of nonneutral mutations. Using an individual-based coupled-map lattice model, we confirm that, regardless of its fitness effects, the probability of survival of a new mutation depends strongly upon where it arises in relation to the expanding wave front. We demonstrate that the surfing effect can lead to deleterious mutations reaching high densities at an expanding front, even when they have substantial negative effects on fitness. Additionally, we highlight that this surfing phenomenon can occur for mutations that impact reproductive rate (i.e., number of offspring produced) as well as mutations that modify juvenile competitive ability. We suggest that these effects are likely to have important consequences for rates of spread and the evolution of spatially expanding populations.

  15. High-throughput mutational analysis of TOR1A in primary dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong Daniel D

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the c.904_906delGAG mutation in Exon 5 of TOR1A typically manifests as early-onset generalized dystonia, DYT1 dystonia is genetically and clinically heterogeneous. Recently, another Exon 5 mutation (c.863G>A has been associated with early-onset generalized dystonia and some ΔGAG mutation carriers present with late-onset focal dystonia. The aim of this study was to identify TOR1A Exon 5 mutations in a large cohort of subjects with mainly non-generalized primary dystonia. Methods High resolution melting (HRM was used to examine the entire TOR1A Exon 5 coding sequence in 1014 subjects with primary dystonia (422 spasmodic dysphonia, 285 cervical dystonia, 67 blepharospasm, 41 writer's cramp, 16 oromandibular dystonia, 38 other primary focal dystonia, 112 segmental dystonia, 16 multifocal dystonia, and 17 generalized dystonia and 250 controls (150 neurologically normal and 100 with other movement disorders. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were evaluated in an additional 8 subjects with known ΔGAG DYT1 dystonia and 88 subjects with ΔGAG-negative dystonia. Results HRM of TOR1A Exon 5 showed high (100% diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. HRM was rapid and economical. HRM reliably differentiated the TOR1A ΔGAG and c.863G>A mutations. Melting curves were normal in 250/250 controls and 1012/1014 subjects with primary dystonia. The two subjects with shifted melting curves were found to harbor the classic ΔGAG deletion: 1 a non-Jewish Caucasian female with childhood-onset multifocal dystonia and 2 an Ashkenazi Jewish female with adolescent-onset spasmodic dysphonia. Conclusion First, HRM is an inexpensive, diagnostically sensitive and specific, high-throughput method for mutation discovery. Second, Exon 5 mutations in TOR1A are rarely associated with non-generalized primary dystonia.

  16. Novel mutations in scavenger receptor BI associated with high HDL cholesterol in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunham, Liam R.; Tietjen, Ian; Bochem, Andrea E.; Singaraja, Roshni R.; Franchini, Patrick L.; Radomski, Chris; Mattice, Maryanne; Legendre, Annick; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kastelein, John J. P.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor class B, member 1 (SR-BI), is a key cellular receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in mice, but its relevance to human physiology has not been well established. Recently a family was reported with a mutation in the gene encoding SR-BI and high HDL cholesterol (HDL-C).

  17. Selection of the Mutants with High Hydroquinone Degradation Ability of Serratia Marcesscen by Plasma Mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Risheng; You Qidong; He Weijing; Zhu Huixia

    2009-01-01

    In this study, an efficient way by plasma induced mutation was applied to improve the hydroquinone degradation capacity of Serratia marcescens AB 90027 (SM27). The results showed that combined with the selection of hydroquinone tolerance, the mutant with high hydroquinone degradation ability induced by plasma could be achieved. The best dose for plasma mutation was 15 s, which showed a 47.0% higher positive mutation ratio. Besides, the aimed mutant was markedly different from the parent strain (SM27) in colonial traits while cultivated on Kings media. Finally, the hydroquinone degradation ratio reached 70.5% using the induced mutant strain with 1500 mg/L hydroquinone (HQ) after 15 days of cultivation as the selective conditions; however, it was only 46.7% for SM27. The improvement of the degradation capacity by the induced mutant with a high concentration of HQ selection was attributed to its faster growth and higher hydroquinone tolerance compared with that of the parent strain.

  18. High frequency of PTEN mutations in nevi and melanomas from xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Taro; Wang, Yun; DiGiovanna, John J; Khan, Sikandar G; Raffeld, Mark; Beltaifa, Senda; Hornyak, Thomas J; Darling, Thomas N; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2014-05-01

    We examined nevi and melanomas in 10 xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients with defective DNA repair. The lesions had a lentiginous appearance with markedly increased numbers of melanocytes. Using laser capture microdissection, we performed DNA sequencing of 18 benign and atypical nevi and 75 melanomas (melanoma in situ and invasive melanomas). The nevi had a similar high frequency of PTEN mutations as melanomas [61% (11/18) versus 53% (39/73)]. Both had a very high proportion of UV-type mutations (occurring at adjacent pyrimidines) [91% (10/11) versus 92% (36/39)]. In contrast to melanomas in the general population, the frequency of BRAF mutations (11%, 7/61), NRAS mutations (21%, 13/62), and KIT mutations (21%, 6/28) in XP melanomas was lower than for PTEN. Phospho-S6 immunostaining indicated activation of the mTOR pathway in the atypical nevi and melanomas. Thus, the clinical and histological appearances and the molecular pathology of these UV-related XP nevi and melanomas were different from nevi and melanomas in the general population. © 2014 Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Highly preferential association of NonF508del CF mutations with the M470 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciminelli, B M; Bonizzato, A; Bombieri, C; Pompei, F; Gabaldo, M; Ciccacci, C; Begnini, A; Holubova, A; Zorzi, P; Piskackova, T; Macek, M; Castellani, C; Modiano, G; Pignatti, P F

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of previous findings on random individuals, we hypothesized a preferential association of CF causing mutations with the M allele of the M470V polymorphic site of the CFTR gene. We have determined the M/V-CF mutation haplotype in a series of 201 North East Italian and 73 Czech CF patients who were not F508del homozygotes, as F508del was already known to be fully associated with the M allele. Out of 358 not F508del CF genes, 84 carried the V allele and 274 the less common M allele. In the N-E Italian population, MM subjects have a risk of carrying a CF causing mutation 6.9x greater than VV subjects when F508del is excluded and 15.4x when F508del is included. In the Czech population a similar, although less pronounced, association is observed. Besides the possible biological significance of this association, the possibility of exploiting it for a pilot screening program has been explored in a local North East Italian population for which CF patients were characterized for their CF mutation. General M470V genotyping followed by common CF mutation screening limited to couples in which each partner carries at least one M allele would need testing only 39% of the couples, which contribute 89% of the total risk, with a cost benefit.

  20. Effects of chronic low level radiation in the population residing in the high level natural radiation area in Kerala, India: employing heritable DNA mutation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shazia; Koya, P K M; Seshadri, M

    2013-03-18

    To study the effect of chronic low level radiation, 4040 meiosis were screened at eight microsatellite and five minisatellite (2485 and 1555 meiosis respectively) marker loci in people residing in high and normal level natural radiation areas of Kerala. Variants in the repeat length of allele were considered as mutants. Mutation rates (expressed as the number of mutations observed in the total number of meiosis) were 6.4×10(-3) (16/2485) and 2.6×10(-3) (4/1555) at microsatellite and minisatellite respectively. The germline microsatellite mutation frequency of father was 1.78 times higher at 7.52×10(-3) (8/1064) compared to 4.22×10(-3) (6/1421) of mother (P=0.292, Fisher's Exact two-sided test). The paternal and maternal mutation rates at minisatellite loci were more or less similar at 2.78×10(-3) (2/719) and 2.39×10(-3) (2/836), respectively (P=1.0, Fisher's Exact two-sided test). Higher but statistically non-significant microsatellite mutation frequency was observed in HLNRA compared to NLNRA (7.25×10(-3) vs 3.64×10(-3); P=0.547). The apparent increase in the mutation rate of microsatellite loci with the increase in radiation dose was also not statistically significant. All the four minisatellite mutation observed were from HLNRA (1198 meiosis) and no mutation was observed among 357 meiosis screened from NLNRA families. All the markers used in the present study were in the non-coding region and hence mutations in these regions may not cause adverse health effects, but the study is important in understanding the effect of chronic low level radiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High frequency of mutation G377S in Brazilian type 3 Gaucher disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rozenberg

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD, the most prevalent lysosome storage disorder, presents an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. It is a paradigm for therapeutic intervention in medical genetics due to the existence of effective enzyme replacement therapy. We report here the analysis of GD in 262 unrelated Brazilian patients, carried out in order to establish the frequency of the most common mutations and to provide prognostic information based on genotype-phenotype correlations. Among 247 type 1 GD patients, mutation N370S was detected in 47% of all the alleles, but N370S/N370S homozygosity was found in only 10% of the patients, a much lower frequency than expected, suggesting that most individuals presenting this genotype may not receive medical attention. Recombinant alleles were detected at a high frequency: 44% of the chromosomes bearing mutation L444P had other mutations derived from the pseudogene sequence, present in 25% of patients. Three neuronopathic type 2 patients were homozygous for L444P, all presenting additional mutations (E326K or recombinant alleles that probably lead to the more severe phenotypes. Six children, classified as type 1 GD patients, had a L444P/L444P genotype, showing that neuronopathic symptoms may only manifest later in life. This would indicate the need for a higher treatment dose during enzyme replacement therapy. Finally, mutation G377S was present in 4 homozygous type 1 patients and also in compound heterozygosity in 5 (42% type 3 patients. These findings indicate that G377S cannot be unambiguously classified as mild and suggest an allele-dose effect for this mutation.

  2. Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Israel: High Proportion of Founder Mutations in MMR Genes and Consanguinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Hagit N; Barnes-Kedar, Inbal; Toledano, Helen; Halpern, Marisa; Hershkovitz, Dov; Lossos, Alexander; Lerer, Israela; Peretz, Tamar; Kariv, Revital; Cohen, Shlomi; Half, Elizabeth E; Magal, Nurit; Drasinover, Valerie; Wimmer, Katharina; Goldberg, Yael; Bercovich, Dani; Levi, Zohar

    2016-03-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in any of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, cause Lynch syndrome (LS), an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome conferring a high risk of colorectal, endometrial, and other cancers in adulthood. Offspring of couples where both spouses have LS have a 1:4 risk of inheriting biallelic MMR gene mutations. These cause constitutional MMR deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome, a severe recessively inherited cancer syndrome with a broad tumor spectrum including mainly hematological malignancies, brain tumors, and colon cancer in childhood and adolescence. Many CMMRD children also present with café au lait spots and axillary freckling mimicking neurofibromatosis type 1. We describe our experience in seven CMMRD families demonstrating the role and importance of founder mutations and consanguinity on its prevalence. Clinical presentations included brain tumors, colon cancer, lymphoma, and small bowel cancer. In children from two nonconsanguineous Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families, the common Ashkenazi founder mutations were detected; these were homozygous in one family and compound heterozygous in the other. In four consanguineous families of various ancestries, different homozygous mutations were identified. In a nonconsanguineous Caucasus/AJ family, lack of PMS2 was demonstrated in tumor and normal tissues; however, mutations were not identified. CMMRD is rare, but, especially in areas where founder mutations for LS and consanguinity are common, pediatricians should be aware of it since they are the first to encounter these children. Early diagnosis will enable tailored cancer surveillance in the entire family and a discussion regarding prenatal genetic diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Quantitative PCR high-resolution melting (qPCR-HRM) curve analysis, a new approach to simultaneously screen point mutations and large rearrangements: application to MLH1 germline mutations in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Etienne; Lefol, Cédrick; Bourdon, Violaine; Coulet, Florence; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Soubrier, Florent; Bièche, Ivan; Olschwang, Sylviane; Sobol, Hagay; Lidereau, Rosette

    2009-06-01

    Several techniques have been developed to screen mismatch repair (MMR) genes for deleterious mutations. Until now, two different techniques were required to screen for both point mutations and large rearrangements. For the first time, we propose a new approach, called "quantitative PCR (qPCR) high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis (qPCR-HRM)," which combines qPCR and HRM to obtain a rapid and cost-effective method suitable for testing a large series of samples. We designed PCR amplicons to scan the MLH1 gene using qPCR HRM. Seventy-six patients were fully scanned in replicate, including 14 wild-type patients and 62 patients with known mutations (57 point mutations and five rearrangements). To validate the detected mutations, we used sequencing and/or hybridization on a dedicated MLH1 array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). All point mutations and rearrangements detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC)+multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were successfully detected by qPCR HRM. Three large rearrangements were characterized with the dedicated MLH1 array-CGH. One variant was detected with qPCR HRM in a wild-type patient and was located within the reverse primer. One variant was not detected with qPCR HRM or with dHPLC due to its proximity to a T-stretch. With qPCR HRM, prescreening for point mutations and large rearrangements are performed in one tube and in one step with a single machine, without the need for any automated sequencer in the prescreening process. In replicate, its reagent cost, sensitivity, and specificity are comparable to those of dHPLC+MLPA techniques. However, qPCR HRM outperformed the other techniques in terms of its rapidity and amount of data provided.

  4. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jett, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  5. Minisatellite mutations and retrospective biodosimetry of population living close to the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, C.; Bersimbaev, R.I.; Dubrova, Y.E. EI KAUP; EI MAATA

    2003-01-01

    During the period between 1949 and 1989 nuclear weapon testing carried out at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (STS) resulted in local fallout affecting the residents of Semipalatinsk, East Kazakhstan and Pavlodar districts of Kazakhstan and Altai region of Russia. The Semipalatinsk nuclear polygon in Kazakhstan has been the site for 470 nuclear tests, including 26 tests performed on the ground and 87 in the atmosphere. More than 1.5 million people living in the vicinity of the test site were repeatedly exposed to ionizing radiation. The paper reviews the study where the main objectives are: (1) to establish a biosample database of blood samples of families in three generations living close to the STS and control families in three generations from clean areas, (2) to determine the minisatellite mutation rates in the three generations of exposed people and the control families of the same ethinic origin living in non-contaminated areas, and (3) to determine the chromosomal translocation frequencies by FISH chromosome painting in the lymphocytes of the exposed and the control people in order to determine the radiation exposure. The aim of the study was to select the population living near to the STS and subjected to the greatest radiation exposure. Of particular interest was the first test of 29th of August 1949, as this was reported to have caused heavy fallout along a narrow trajectory extending north-east from Polygon, also covering parts of the Altai region of Russia and parts of Pavlodar and Karaganda regions in Kazakhstan

  6. RFLP analysis of rice semi-dwarf mutation induced by high energy argon ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Chuxiong; Hu Weimin; Mei Mantong

    1997-01-01

    Two Indica rice varieties, Bianpizhan and Xiangzhan, and their semi-dwarf mutants induced by high energy argon ion radiation, Ar-10, and Xiang-Ar-1, were examined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis by using 97 rice single copy genomic clones mapped on 12 chromosomes of molecular genetic map, combined with 5 restriction enzymes. Among the markers screened, 9 detected polymorphism were between Bianpizhen and Ar-10, and 11 detected polymorphism were between Xiangzhan and Xiang-Ar-1. Moreover, two or more restriction enzymes could generate RFLP patterns when screened with a given marker for several polymorphic markers. Based on the polymorphic allelic loci, the mutation frequencies were estimated as 5.15% and 6.39% for Ar-10 and Xiang-Ar-1 respectively. These results suggested that the nature of mutation on the DNA level was probably large genetic changes rather than point mutation. Genetic analysis and gene tagging of semi-dwarf mutation in one of the mutant line, Ar-10, indicated that this mutation was controlled by a major recessive gene, which was preliminary located on chromosome 4

  7. RFLP Analysis of rice semi dwarf mutation induced by high energy argon ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Chuxiong; Hu Weimin; Mei Mantong

    1997-01-01

    Two Indica rice varieties, Bianpizhan and Xiangzhan, and their semi dwarf mutants induced by high energy argon ion radiation, Ar 10, and Xiang Ar 1, were examined with restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP)analysis by using 97 rice single copy genomic clones mapped on 12 chromosomes of molecular genetic map, combined with 5 restriction enzymes.Among the markers screened, 9 detected polymorphism were between Bianpizhan and Ar 10, and 11 detected polymorphism were between Xiangzhan and Xiang Ar 1.Moreover, two or more restriction enzymes could generate RFLP patterns when screened with a given marker for several polymorphic markers. Based on the polymorphic allelic loci, the mutation frequencies were estimated as 5 15% and 6 39% for Ar 10 and Xiang Ar 1 respectively.These results suggested that the nature of mutation on the DNA level was probably large genetic changes rather than point mutation.Genetic analysis and gene tagging of semi dwarf mutation in one of the mutant line, Ar 10, indicated that this mutation was controlled by a major recessive gene, which was preliminary located on chromosome 4. (author)

  8. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Detecting p53 Gene Mutations in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong CHEN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that p53 gene was related to many human cancers. The mutations in p53 gene play an important role in carcinogensis and mostly happened in exon 5-8. The aim of this study is to establish a high resolution melting (HRM assay to detect p53 mutations from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, to investigate the characteristics of p53 gene mutations, and to analyze the relationship between p53 mutations and evolution regularity of pathogenesis. Methods p53 mutations in exon 5-8 were detected by HRM assay on DNA insolated from 264 NSCLC samples derived from tumor tissues and 54 control samples from pericancerous pulmonary tissues. The mutation samples by the HRM assay were confirmed by sequencing technique. Samples which were positive by HRM but wild type by sequencing were further confirmed by sub-clone and sequencing. Results No mutation was found in 54 pericancerous pulmonary samples by HRM assay. 104 of the 264 tumor tissues demonstrated mutation curves by HRM assay, 102 samples were confirmed by sequencing, including 95 point mutations and 7 frame shift mutations by insertion or deletion. The mutation rate of p53 gene was 39.4%. The mutation rate from exon 5-8 were 11.7%, 8%, 12.5% and 10.6%, respectively and there was no statistically significant difference between them (P=0.35. p53 mutations were significantly more frequent in males than that in females, but not related to the other clinicopathologic characteristics. Conclusion The results indicate that HRM is a sensitive in-tube methodology to detect for mutations in clinical samples. The results suggest that the arising p53 mutations in NSCLC may be due to spontaneous error in DNA synthesis and repair.

  9. Genetic Testing and Post-Testing Decision Making among BRCA-Positive Mutation Women: A Psychosocial Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene; An, Chen

    2016-10-01

    Through an analysis of an online survey of women who tested positive for the BRCA genetic mutation for breast cancer, this research uses a social constructionist and feminist standpoint lens to understand the decision-making process that leads BRCA-positive women to choose genetic testing. Additionally, this research examines how they socially construct and understand their risk for developing breast cancer, as well as which treatment options they undergo post-testing. BRCA-positive women re-frame their statistical medical risk for developing cancer and their post-testing treatment choices through a broad psychosocial context of engagement that also includes their social networks. Important psychosocial factors drive women's medical decisions, such as individual feelings of guilt and vulnerability, and the degree of perceived social support. Women who felt guilty and fearful that they might pass the BRCA gene to their children were more likely to undergo risk reducing surgery. Women with at least one daughter and women without children were more inclined toward the risk reducing surgery compared to those with only sons. These psychosocial factors and social network engagements serve as a "nexus of decision making" that does not, for the most part, mirror the medical assessments of statistical odds for hereditary cancer development, nor the specific treatment protocols outlined by the medical establishment.

  10. Ultra-rare mutation in long-range enhancer predisposes to thyroid carcinoma with high penetrance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiling He

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer shows high heritability but causative genes remain largely unknown. According to a common hypothesis the genetic predisposition to thyroid cancer is highly heterogeneous; being in part due to many different rare alleles. Here we used linkage analysis and targeted deep sequencing to detect a novel single-nucleotide mutation in chromosome 4q32 (4q32A>C in a large pedigree displaying non-medullary thyroid carcinoma (NMTC. This mutation is generally ultra-rare; it was not found in 38 NMTC families, in 2676 sporadic NMTC cases or 2470 controls. The mutation is located in a long-range enhancer element whose ability to bind the transcription factors POU2F and YY1 is significantly impaired, with decreased activity in the presence of the C- allele compared with the wild type A-allele. An enhancer RNA (eRNA is transcribed in thyroid tissue from this region and is greatly downregulated in NMTC tumors. We suggest that this is an example of an ultra-rare mutation predisposing to thyroid cancer with high penetrance.

  11. The studies on radiation mutation breeding of Bacillus subtilis with high-yield of amylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoming; Zhang Liang; Zhang Jianguo; Zhou Liwei

    2008-01-01

    The mutagenesis effects on the yield of amylase have been investigated with Bacillus subtilis irradiated by γ-rays and fast neutrons in once or twice irradiation at various dose rates and total irradiation doses. Several parameters such as flat transparent circle, colony diameter, transparent circle diameter and the ratio of flat transparent circle to colony diameter (HC) are used to estimate the radiation mutation of Bacillus subtilis. A series of results has been obtained as (1) Irradiation both with neutrons and γ-rays could make Bacillus subtilis mutationed to produce high-yield amylase effectively. (2) The average colony diameter of Bacillus subtilis irradiated by γ-rays or fast neutrons is smaller than that of control group at various total doses and dose rates. And their colony diameter becomes smaller slightly with the increment of γ-rays irradiation dose. (3) After the second neutrons irradiation, the values of average colony diameter, the biggest colony diameter, average transparent circle diameter and the biggest transparent circle diameter of all mutationed Bacillus subtilis exceed that of original strains greatly. (4) Three kinds of mutationed Bacillus subtilis strains with high-yield amylase have been screened out, in which two strains can produce high-yield amylase steadily after 15 times breeding. Their biggest colony diameter, the biggest transparent circle diameter and the biggest HC value are up to 8.32 mm, 22.38 mm and 5.39 respectively. (authors)

  12. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    of more sensitive methods including real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry with mutation-specific antibodies might be a promising detection method. We evaluated 210 samples with NSCLC from an unselected Caucasian population. Extracted DNA was analyzed for EGFR mutations by RT-PCR (Therascreen EGFR......, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94...... was demonstrated. However, sensitivity was low, especially for exon19 deletions, and thus these antibodies cannot yet be used as screening method for EGFR mutations in NSCLC. Refinement of sensitivity for the mutation-specific antibodies is warranted to improve molecular diagnosis using EGFR immunohistochemistry....

  13. The combination of heteroduplex analysis and protein truncation test for exact detection of the APC gene mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomka, M.; Kirchhoff, T.; Stefurkova, V.; Zajac, V.; Kulcsar, L.

    1998-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is usually associated with mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. To examine the occurrence of these mutations in the number of FAP suspected families from the whole Slovakia effectively, we have applied heteroduplex analysis (HDA) and protein truncation test (PTT) for the analyses of 2-5 base pair deletions and point mutations of the APC gene. In the analyzed exon 15 of the APC gene determined by the primers 15Efor-15Grev for HDA and 15ET7-15J3 for PTT more than 70% of mutations should be deletions [3, 12], which are detectable by HDA. In our collection of 5 FAP families mutations in the APC gene were found in families 10, 27 and 41 using HDA. By PTT test the formation of truncated APC protein in FAP families 2, 10, 16 and 27 were revealed. The necessity of combination of at least HDA and PTT techniques for exact detection of APC mutations in analyzed APC region is discussed. (authors)

  14. Genomic Profiling on an Unselected Solid Tumor Population Reveals a Highly Mutated Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway Associated with Oncogenic EGFR Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingrui Jiang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs can recruit key effectors in diverse cellular processes to propagate oncogenic signals. Targeted and combinational therapeutic strategies have been successfully applied for treating EGFR-driven cancers. However, a main challenge in EGFR therapies is drug resistance due to mutations, oncogenic shift, alternative signaling, and other potential mechanisms. To further understand the genetic alterations associated with oncogenic EGFRs and to provide further insight into optimal and personalized therapeutic strategies, we applied a proprietary comprehensive next-generation sequencing (NGS-based assay of 435 genes to systematically study the genomic profiles of 1565 unselected solid cancer patient samples. We found that activating EGFR mutations were predominantly detected in lung cancer, particularly in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The mutational landscape of EGFR-driven tumors covered most key signaling pathways and biological processes. Strikingly, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway was highly mutated (48 variants detected in 46% of the EGFR-driven tumors, and its variant number topped that in the TP53/apoptosis and PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathways. Furthermore, an analysis of mutation distribution revealed a differential association pattern of gene mutations between EGFR exon 19del and EGFR L858R. Our results confirm the aggressive nature of the oncogenic EGFR-driven tumors and reassure that a combinational strategy should have advantages over an EGFR-targeted monotherapy and holds great promise for overcoming drug resistance.

  15. Breeding sesame for diseases and shatter resistant high yielding varieties with induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.W.

    2001-01-01

    ''Suwon 144'', derived from the cross between ''Danbaeckkae'' and mutant MY-74-2 and in spite of its higher yield and quality compared to the check variety, did not pass the nomination to the Committee of Main Crops New Varieties under the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, due to the decision of the committee to limit the number of new varieties in sesame as a minor crop in Korea. ''Suwon 144'' will be released again for a fifth year to RYT in 1998. 5,282 cross combinations and 4,341 lines including 1,388 crossings of F 1 were crossed and released to the experimental field of NCES in 1997. Mutants and their cross combinations were released and constituted more than half among them. Seeds of ''Suwon 152'' were treated with NaN 3 and tested for germinability. The other seeds were released and harvested in the experimental field and 419 mutant lines were selected among all the mutant lines. Mutants or materials from cross breeding with mutants occupied 71% (675) among a total of 952 promising lines in yield trials of OYT, PYT, AYT and RYT. For variability of NaN 3 induced genetic male sterile (GMS) mutants and development of restorer/s of GMS, GMS lines were planted, and male sterility (MS) expression evaluated on each line. The selected 4 MS lines with 50% MS were crossed in 22 combinations with 7 recommended varieties. For development of genic-cytoplasmic MS (GCMS) using NaN 3 induced GMS mutants, 40 recommended local Korean and introduced cultivars were crossed in 57 combinations with 4 selected GMS lines expressing 50% male sterility. Various and many sources of unique characteristics have been continuously created through induced mutations, such as determinate; dwarf, lodging,- Phytophthora blight- and shatter- resistant; indehiscent, seamless, taller, stronger thick stems, dense capsule bearing type, semi-dwarf, better maturity, male sterility, smaller seeds, pure white seed coat color and high yields. Lines with these induced desirable characteristics were

  16. Two novel mutations in seven Czech and Slovak kindreds with familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus-benefit of genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrčková, Gabriela; Jankó, Viktor; Kytnarová, Jitka; Čižmárová, Michaela; Tesařová, Markéta; Košťálová, Ľudmila; Virgová, Daniela; Dallos, Tomáš; Hána, Václav; Lebl, Jan; Zeman, Jiří; Kovács, László

    2016-09-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is a rare hereditary disorder with unknown prevalence characterized by arginine-vasopressin hormone (AVP) deficiency resulting in polyuria and polydipsia from early childhood. We report the clinical manifestation and genetic test results in seven unrelated kindreds of Czech or Slovak origin with FNDI phenotype. The age of the sign outset ranged from 2 to 17 years with remarkable interfamilial and intrafamilial variability. Inconclusive result of the fluid deprivation test in three children aged 7 and 17 years old might cause misdiagnosis; however, the AVP gene analysis confirmed the FNDI. The seven families segregated together five different mutations, two of them were novel (c.164C > A, c.298G > C). In addition, DNA analysis proved mutation carrier status in one asymptomatic 1-year-old infant. The present study together with previously published data identified 38 individuals with FNDI in the studied population of 16 million which predicts a disease prevalence of 1:450,000 for the Central European region. The paper underscores that diagnostic water deprivation test may be inconclusive in polyuric children with partial diabetes insipidus and points to the clinical importance and feasibility of molecular genetic testing for AVP gene mutations in the proband and her/his first degree relatives. • At least 70 different mutations were reported to date in about 100 families with neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI), and new mutations appear sporadically. What is New: • Two novel mutations of the AVP gene are reported • The importance of molecular testing in children with polyuria and inconclusive water deprivation test is emphasized.

  17. Genetic Testing for Wolfram Syndrome Mutations in a Sample of 71 Patients with Hereditary Optic Neuropathy and Negative Genetic Test Results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia; Schatz, Patrik

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the authors present a sample of 71 patients with hereditary optic neuropathy and negative genetic test results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON. All of these patients later underwent genetic testing to rule out WFS. As a result, 53 patients (74.7%) were negative and 18 patients (25.3%) were positive for some type of mutation or variation in the WFS gene. The authors believe that this study is interesting because it shows that a sizeable percentage (25.3%) of patients with hereditary optic 25 neuropathy and negative genetic test results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON had WFS mutations or variants.

  18. DHPLC technology for high-throughput detection of mutations in a durum wheat TILLING population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasuonno, Pasqualina; Incerti, Ornella; Lozito, Maria Luisa; Simeone, Rosanna; Gadaleta, Agata; Blanco, Antonio

    2016-02-17

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L.) is a cereal crop widely grown in the Mediterranean regions; the amber grain is mainly used for the production of pasta, couscous and typical breads. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection technologies and high-throughput mutation induction represent a new challenge in wheat breeding to identify allelic variation in large populations. The TILLING strategy makes use of traditional chemical mutagenesis followed by screening for single base mismatches to identify novel mutant loci. Although TILLING has been combined to several sensitive pre-screening methods for SNP analysis, most rely on expensive equipment. Recently, a new low cost and time saving DHPLC protocol has been used in molecular human diagnostic to detect unknown mutations. In this work, we developed a new durum wheat TILLING population (cv. Marco Aurelio) using 0.70-0.85% ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS). To investigate the efficiency of the mutagenic treatments, a pilot screening was carried out on 1,140 mutant lines focusing on two target genes (Lycopene epsilon-cyclase, ε-LCY, and Lycopene beta-cyclase, β-LCY) involved in carotenoid metabolism in wheat grains. We simplify the heteroduplex detection by two low cost methods: the enzymatic cleavage (CelI)/agarose gel technique and the denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). The CelI/agarose gel approach allowed us to identify 31 mutations, whereas the DHPLC procedure detected a total of 46 mutations for both genes. All detected mutations were confirmed by direct sequencing. The estimated overall mutation frequency for the pilot assay by the DHPLC methodology resulted to be of 1/77 kb, representing a high probability to detect interesting mutations in the target genes. We demonstrated the applicability and efficiency of a new strategy for the detection of induced variability. We produced and characterized a new durum wheat TILLING population useful for a better understanding of key gene functions

  19. A comparison of EGFR mutation testing methods in lung carcinoma: direct sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Angulo

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to compare two EGFR testing methodologies (a commercial real-time PCR kit and a specific EGFR mutant immunohistochemistry, with direct sequencing and to investigate the limit of detection (LOD of both PCR-based methods. We identified EGFR mutations in 21 (16% of the 136 tumours analyzed by direct sequencing. Interestingly, the Therascreen EGFR Mutation Test kit was able to characterize as wild-type one tumour that could not be analyzed by direct sequencing of the PCR product. We then compared the LOD of the kit and that of direct sequencing using the available mutant tumours. The kit was able to detect the presence of a mutation in a 1% dilution of the total DNA in nine of the 18 tumours (50%, which tested positive with the real-time quantitative PCR method. In all cases, EGFR mutation was identified at a dilution of 5%. Where the mutant DNA represented 30% of the total DNA, sequencing was able to detect mutations in 12 out of 19 cases (63%. Additional experiments with genetically defined standards (EGFR ΔE746-A750/+ and EGFR L858R/+ yielded similar results. Immunohistochemistry (IHC staining with exon 19-specific antibody was seen in eight out of nine cases with E746-A750del detected by direct sequencing. Neither of the two tumours with complex deletions were positive. Of the five L858R-mutated tumours detected by the PCR methods, only two were positive for the exon 21-specific antibody. The specificity was 100% for both antibodies. The LOD of the real-time PCR method was lower than that of direct sequencing. The mutation specific IHC produced excellent specificity.

  20. Using iron studies to predict HFE mutations in New Zealand: implications for laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Rebecca; Romeril, Kenneth; Bromhead, Collette

    2017-04-01

    The diagnosis of hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) is not straightforward because symptoms are often absent or non-specific. Biochemical markers of iron-overloading may be affected by other conditions. To measure the correlation between iron studies and HFE genotype to inform evidence-based recommendations for laboratory testing in New Zealand. Results from 2388 patients genotyped for C282Y, H63D and S65C in Wellington, New Zealand from 2007 to 2013 were compared with their biochemical phenotype as quantified by serum ferritin (SF), transferrin saturation (TS), serum iron (SI) and serum transferrin (ST). The predictive power of these markers was evaluated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and if a statistically significant association for a variable was seen, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated. Test ordering patterns showed that 62% of HFE genotyping tests were ordered because of an elevated SF alone and only 11% of these had a C-reactive protein test to rule out an acute phase reaction. The association between SF and significant HFE genotypes SF was low. However, TS values ≥45% predicted HH mutations with the highest sensitivity and specificity. A SF of >1000 µg/L was found in one at-risk patient (C282Y homozygote) who had a TS <45%. Our analysis highlights the need for clear guidelines for investigation of hyperferritinaemia and HH in New Zealand. Using our findings, we developed an evidence-based laboratory testing algorithm based on a TS ≥45%, a SF ≥1000 µg/L and/or a family history of HH which identified all C282Y homozygotes in this study. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  1. Epitope-positive truncating MLH1 mutation and loss of PMS2: implications for IHC-directed genetic testing for Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zighelboim, Israel; Powell, Matthew A; Babb, Sheri A; Whelan, Alison J; Schmidt, Amy P; Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Thibodeau, Stephen N; de la Chapelle, Albert; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    We assessed mismatch repair by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis in an early onset endometrial cancer and a sister's colon cancer. We demonstrated high-level MSI and normal expression for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. PMS2 failed to stain in both tumors, strongly implicating a PMS2 defect. This family did not meet clinical criteria for Lynch syndrome. However, early onset endometrial cancers in the proband and her sister, a metachronous colorectal cancer in the sister as well as MSI in endometrial and colonic tumors suggested a heritable mismatch repair defect. PCR-based direct exonic sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were undertaken to search for PMS2 mutations in the germline DNA from the proband and her sister. No mutation was identified in the PMS2 gene. However, PMS2 exons 3, 4, 13, 14, 15 were not evaluated by MLPA and as such, rearrangements involving those exons cannot be excluded. Clinical testing for MLH1 and MSH2 mutation revealed a germline deletion of MLH1 exons 14 and 15. This MLH1 germline deletion leads to an immunodetectable stable C-terminal truncated MLH1 protein which based on the IHC staining must abrogate PMS2 stabilization. To the best of our knowledge, loss of PMS2 in MLH1 truncating mutation carriers that express MLH1 in their tumors has not been previously reported. This family points to a potential limitation of IHC-directed gene testing for suspected Lynch syndrome and the need to consider comprehensive MLH1 testing for individuals whose tumors lack PMS2 but for whom PMS2 mutations are not identified.

  2. High-resolution mutational profiling suggests the genetic validity of glioblastoma patient-derived pre-clinical models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn E Yost

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the ability to efficiently characterize tumor genomes is enabling targeted drug development, which requires rigorous biomarker-based patient selection to increase effectiveness. Consequently, representative DNA biomarkers become equally important in pre-clinical studies. However, it is still unclear how well these markers are maintained between the primary tumor and the patient-derived tumor models. Here, we report the comprehensive identification of somatic coding mutations and copy number aberrations in four glioblastoma (GBM primary tumors and their matched pre-clinical models: serum-free neurospheres, adherent cell cultures, and mouse xenografts. We developed innovative methods to improve the data quality and allow a strict comparison of matched tumor samples. Our analysis identifies known GBM mutations altering PTEN and TP53 genes, and new actionable mutations such as the loss of PIK3R1, and reveals clear patient-to-patient differences. In contrast, for each patient, we do not observe any significant remodeling of the mutational profile between primary to model tumors and the few discrepancies can be attributed to stochastic errors or differences in sample purity. Similarly, we observe ∼96% primary-to-model concordance in copy number calls in the high-cellularity samples. In contrast to previous reports based on gene expression profiles, we do not observe significant differences at the DNA level between in vitro compared to in vivo models. This study suggests, at a remarkable resolution, the genome-wide conservation of a patient's tumor genetics in various pre-clinical models, and therefore supports their use for the development and testing of personalized targeted therapies.

  3. The role of weak selection and high mutation rates in nearly neutral evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Daniel John; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2009-04-21

    Neutral dynamics occur in evolution if all types are 'effectively equal' in their reproductive success, where the definition of 'effectively equal' depends on the population size and the details of mutations. Empirically observed neutral genetic evolution in extremely large clonal populations can only be explained under current models if selection is completely absent. Such models typically consider the case where population dynamics occurs on a different timescale to evolution. However, this assumption is invalid when mutations are not rare in a whole population. We show that this has important consequences for the occurrence of neutral evolution in clonal populations. In highly connected type spaces, neutral dynamics can occur for all population sizes despite significant selective differences, via the forming of effectively neutral networks connecting rare neutral types. Biological implications include an explanation for the high diversity of rare types that survive in large clonal populations, and a theoretical justification for the use of neutral null models.

  4. Identification of novel mutations in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa families and implications for diagnostic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaus, Esther; Lorenz, Birgit; Netzer, Christian; Li, Yün; Schambeck, Maria; Wittmer, Mariana; Feil, Silke; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Rosenberg, Thomas; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Bergen, Arthur A.B.; Barthelmes, Daniel; Baraki, Husnia; Schmid, Fabian; Tanner, Gaby; Fleischhauer, Johannes; Orth, Ulrike; Becker, Christian; Wegscheider, Erika; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Gal, Andreas; Berger, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to identify mutations in X-chromosomal genes associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in patients from Germany, The Netherlands, Denmark, and Switzerland. Methods In addition to all coding exons of RP2, exons 1 through 15, 9a, ORF15, 15a and 15b of RPGR were screened for mutations. PCR products were amplified from genomic DNA extracted from blood samples and analyzed by direct sequencing. In one family with apparently dominant inheritance of RP, linkage analysis identified an interval on the X chromosome containing RPGR, and mutation screening revealed a pathogenic variant in this gene. Patients of this family were examined clinically and by X-inactivation studies. Results This study included 141 RP families with possible X-chromosomal inheritance. In total, we identified 46 families with pathogenic sequence alterations in RPGR and RP2, of which 17 mutations have not been described previously. Two of the novel mutations represent the most 3’-terminal pathogenic sequence variants in RPGR and RP2 reported to date. In exon ORF15 of RPGR, we found eight novel and 14 known mutations. All lead to a disruption of open reading frame. Of the families with suggested X-chromosomal inheritance, 35% showed mutations in ORF15. In addition, we found five novel mutations in other exons of RPGR and four in RP2. Deletions in ORF15 of RPGR were identified in three families in which female carriers showed variable manifestation of the phenotype. Furthermore, an ORF15 mutation was found in an RP patient who additionally carries a 6.4 kbp deletion downstream of the coding region of exon ORF15. We did not identify mutations in 39 sporadic male cases from Switzerland. Conclusions RPGR mutations were confirmed to be the most frequent cause of RP in families with an X-chromosomal inheritance pattern. We propose a screening strategy to provide molecular diagnostics in these families. PMID:18552978

  5. The induction of somatic mutations by high-LET radiations using the drosophila assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Isao; Takatsuji, Toshihiro

    2004-01-01

    Two types of somatic mutation in Drosophila melanogaster were examined to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 252 Cf neutrons and heavy ions (carbon ions and neon ions) accelerated with a synchrotron for inducing mutations as a function of linear energy transfer (LET). One is the loss of heterozygosity for wing-hair mutations and the other the reversion of the mutant white-ivory. The measurements were made using a combined mutation assay system; so that induced mutant wing-hair clones as well as revertant eye-color clones could be detected simultaneously in the same fly. Larvae were irradiated at the age of 3 days post-oviposition. The efficiency of 252 Cf neutrons for inducing wing-hair mosaic spots is very high, RBE=8.5, but that for eye-color mosaic spot is almost equal (RBE=1.2) to that of 137 Cs γ-rays. RBE-LET relationships were obtained for the induction of wing-hair and eye-color mosaic spots. The RBE of carbon and neon ions for producing wing-hair mosaic spots increased with increasing LET values. The RBE for the induction of eye-color mutants did not change with LET. These relationships suggest that more complex types of DNA damage such as non-rejoinable strand breaks or clustered double strand breaks that increase with LET may be responsible for inducing the wing-hair mutation, while simpler forms of molecular damage may induce reversion in the white-ivory allele. (author)

  6. Computationally optimized deimmunization libraries yield highly mutated enzymes with low immunogenicity and enhanced activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvat, Regina S; Verma, Deeptak; Parker, Andrew S; Kirsch, Jack R; Brooks, Seth A; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2017-06-27

    Therapeutic proteins of wide-ranging function hold great promise for treating disease, but immune surveillance of these macromolecules can drive an antidrug immune response that compromises efficacy and even undermines safety. To eliminate widespread T-cell epitopes in any biotherapeutic and thereby mitigate this key source of detrimental immune recognition, we developed a Pareto optimal deimmunization library design algorithm that optimizes protein libraries to account for the simultaneous effects of combinations of mutations on both molecular function and epitope content. Active variants identified by high-throughput screening are thus inherently likely to be deimmunized. Functional screening of an optimized 10-site library (1,536 variants) of P99 β-lactamase (P99βL), a component of ADEPT cancer therapies, revealed that the population possessed high overall fitness, and comprehensive analysis of peptide-MHC II immunoreactivity showed the population possessed lower average immunogenic potential than the wild-type enzyme. Although similar functional screening of an optimized 30-site library (2.15 × 10 9 variants) revealed reduced population-wide fitness, numerous individual variants were found to have activity and stability better than the wild type despite bearing 13 or more deimmunizing mutations per enzyme. The immunogenic potential of one highly active and stable 14-mutation variant was assessed further using ex vivo cellular immunoassays, and the variant was found to silence T-cell activation in seven of the eight blood donors who responded strongly to wild-type P99βL. In summary, our multiobjective library-design process readily identified large and mutually compatible sets of epitope-deleting mutations and produced highly active but aggressively deimmunized constructs in only one round of library screening.

  7. Rapid detection of RB1 recurrent mutations in retinoblastoma by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In about half of the patients, one mutation is inherited via the germinal cells, while in the .... mutational hot spots in the RB1 gene, making genetic testing complex and challenging ... by direct sequencing. High normal background in sequenc-.

  8. Optimal selection for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing using a combination of ' easy to apply ' probability models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodmer, D.; Ligtenberg, M. J. L.; van der Hout, A. H.; Gloudemans, S.; Ansink, K.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2006-01-01

    To establish an efficient, reliable and easy to apply risk assessment tool to select families with breast and/or ovarian cancer patients for BRCA mutation testing, using available probability models. In a retrospective study of 263 families with breast and/or ovarian cancer patients, the utility of

  9. KRAS mutation testing of tumours in adults with metastatic colorectal cancer: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Marie; van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Whiting, Penny; Joore, Manuela; Armstrong, Nigel; Noake, Caro; Ross, Janine; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    2014-10-01

    Bowel cancer is the third most common cancer in the UK. Most bowel cancers are initially treated with surgery, but around 17% spread to the liver. When this happens, sometimes the liver tumour can be treated surgically, or chemotherapy may be used to shrink the tumour to make surgery possible. Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene (KRAS) mutations make some tumours less responsive to treatment with biological therapies such as cetuximab. There are a variety of tests available to detect these mutations. These vary in the specific mutations that they detect, the amount of mutation they detect, the amount of tumour cells needed, the time to give a result, the error rate and cost. To compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of KRAS mutation tests in differentiating adults with metastatic colorectal cancer whose metastases are confined to the liver and are unresectable and who may benefit from first-line treatment with cetuximab in combination with standard chemotherapy from those who should receive standard chemotherapy alone. Thirteen databases, including MEDLINE and EMBASE, research registers and conference proceedings were searched to January 2013. Additional data were obtained from an online survey of laboratories participating in the UK National External Quality Assurance Scheme pilot for KRAS mutation testing. A systematic review of the evidence was carried out using standard methods. Randomised controlled trials were assessed for quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Diagnostic accuracy studies were assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. There were insufficient data for meta-analysis. For accuracy studies we calculated sensitivity and specificity together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Survival data were summarised as hazard ratios and tumour response data were summarised as relative risks, with 95% CIs. The health economic analysis considered the long-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years associated with different tests followed by treatment

  10. Induction of mutations in Thai rice varieties and subsequent selection and testing of beneficial mutant lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasananda, S; Khambanonda, P [Ministry of Agriculture, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1970-03-01

    Ionizing radiations were first used in the Thailand Rice Breeding Program in 1955 when seeds of two recommended varieties were sent to the United States of America for treatment. As a result, five promising mutant lines are at present in regional yield tests where they are being considered for recommendation to rice growers. During the period 1960-1961 an unsuccessful attempt was made to induce resistance to blast in three susceptible varieties by exposing seeds to a local source of ionizing radiation In 1964, after an elapse of about 4 years, another attempt was made to utilize ionizing radiations in the breeding program by treating seeds of two recommended varieties. In 1965, a co-ordinated rice mutation breeding program was initiated under the auspices of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture which resulted in treating seeds of twelve different rice varieties with both ethyl methane sulphonate and gamma rays from a {sup 60}Co gamma cell. The results so far indicate that mutagenic agents have been successful in producing genetic variability. Differences in heading date, mature plant height and plant type are frequently observed in the M{sub 2} and M{sub 3} generations. Several lines obtained from two of the irradiated varieties have exhibited a higher degree of resistance to blast than the parental material. From 15-kR treatments of non-glutinous varieties, mutants with glutinous endosperm have been obtained. Not all varieties gave the same response to treatment. (author)

  11. Towards Measuring the Abstractness of State Machines based on Mutation Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Baar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The notation of state machines is widely adopted as a formalism to describe the behaviour of systems. Usually, multiple state machine models can be developed for the very same software system. Some of these models might turn out to be equivalent, but, in many cases, different state machines describing the same system also differ in their level of abstraction. In this paper, we present an approach to actually measure the abstractness level of state machines w.r.t. a given implemented software system. A state machine is considered to be less abstract when it is conceptionally closer to the implemented system. In our approach, this distance between state machine and implementation is measured by applying coverage criteria known from software mutation testing. Abstractness of state machines can be considered as a new metric. As for other metrics as well, a known value for the abstractness of a given state machine allows to assess its quality in terms of a simple number. In model-based software development projects, the abstract metric can help to prevent model degradation since it can actually measure the semantic distance from the behavioural specification of a system in form of a state machine to the current implementation of the system. In contrast to other metrics for state machines, the abstractness cannot be statically computed based on the state machine’s structure, but requires to execute both state machine and corresponding system implementation. The article is published in the author’s wording. 

  12. EZH2 and CD79B mutational status over time in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas detected by high-throughput sequencing using minimal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saieg, Mauro Ajaj; Geddie, William R; Boerner, Scott L; Bailey, Denis; Crump, Michael; da Cunha Santos, Gilda

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous genomic abnormalities in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) have been revealed by novel high-throughput technologies, including recurrent mutations in EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) and CD79B (B cell antigen receptor complex-associated protein beta chain) genes. This study sought to determine the evolution of the mutational status of EZH2 and CD79B over time in different samples from the same patient in a cohort of B-cell NHLs, through use of a customized multiplex mutation assay. METHODS: DNA that was extracted from cytological material stored on FTA cards as well as from additional specimens, including archived frozen and formalin-fixed histological specimens, archived stained smears, and cytospin preparations, were submitted to a multiplex mutation assay specifically designed for the detection of point mutations involving EZH2 and CD79B, using MassARRAY spectrometry followed by Sanger sequencing. RESULTS: All 121 samples from 80 B-cell NHL cases were successfully analyzed. Mutations in EZH2 (Y646) and CD79B (Y196) were detected in 13.2% and 8% of the samples, respectively, almost exclusively in follicular lymphomas and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. In one-third of the positive cases, a wild type was detected in a different sample from the same patient during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Testing multiple minimal tissue samples using a high-throughput multiplex platform exponentially increases tissue availability for molecular analysis and might facilitate future studies of tumor progression and the related molecular events. Mutational status of EZH2 and CD79B may vary in B-cell NHL samples over time and support the concept that individualized therapy should be based on molecular findings at the time of treatment, rather than on results obtained from previous specimens. Cancer (Cancer Cytopathol) 2013;121:377–386. © 2013 American Cancer Society. PMID:23361872

  13. The Norwegian PMS2 founder mutation c.989-1G > T shows high penetrance of microsatellite instable cancers with normal immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindedal, Eli Marie; Aarset, Harald; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Røyset, Elin; Mæhle, Lovise; Stormorken, Astrid; Heramb, Cecilie; Medvik, Heidi; Møller, Pål; Sjursen, Wenche

    2014-01-01

    Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) to select cases for mismatch repair (MMR) genetic testing, we failed to identify a large kindred with the deleterious PMS2 mutation c.989-1G > T. The purpose of the study was to examine the sensitivity of IHC and microsatellite instability-analysis (MSI) to identify carriers of the mutation, and to estimate its penetrance and expressions. All carriers and obligate carriers of the mutation were identified. All cancer diagnoses were confirmed. IHC and MSI-analysis were performed on available tumours. Penetrances of cancers included in the Amsterdam and the Bethesda Criteria, for MSI-high tumours and MSI-high and low tumours were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier algorithm. Probability for co-segregation of the mutation and cancers by chance was 0.000004. Fifty-six carriers or obligate carriers were identified. There was normal staining for PMS2 in 15/18 (83.3%) of tumours included in the AMS1/AMS2/Bethesda criteria. MSI-analysis showed that 15/21 (71.4%) of tumours were MSI-high and 4/21 (19.0%) were MSI-low. Penetrance at 70 years was 30.6% for AMS1 cancers (colorectal cancers), 42.8% for AMS2 cancers, 47.2% for Bethesda cancers, 55.6% for MSI-high and MSI-low cancers and 52.2% for MSI-high cancers. The mutation met class 5 criteria for pathogenicity. IHC was insensitive in detecting tumours caused by the mutation. Penetrance of cancers that displayed MSI was 56% at 70 years. Besides colorectal cancers, the most frequent expressions were carcinoma of the endometrium and breast in females and stomach and prostate in males.

  14. [Rapid detection of hot spot mutations of FGFR3 gene with PCR-high resolution melting assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Wang, Han; Su, Hua; Gao, Jinsong; Zhao, Xiuli

    2017-08-10

    To identify the causative mutations in five individuals affected with dyschondroplasia and develop an efficient procedure for detecting hot spot mutations of the FGFR3 gene. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples with a standard phenol/chloroform method. PCR-Sanger sequencing was used to analyze the causative mutations in the five probands. PCR-high resolution melting (HRM) was developed to detect the identified mutations. A c.1138G>A mutation in exon 8 was found in 4 probands, while a c.1620C>G mutation was found in exon 11 of proband 5 whom had a mild phenotype. All patients were successfully distinguished from healthy controls with the PCR-HRM method. The results of HRM analysis were highly consistent with that of Sanger sequencing. The Gly380Arg and Asn540Lys are hot spot mutations of the FGFR3 gene among patients with ACH/HCH. PCR-HRM analysis is more efficient for detecting hot spot mutations of the FGFR3 gene.

  15. Automated System Tests High-Power MOSFET's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Steven W.; Wendt, Isabel O.

    1994-01-01

    Computer-controlled system tests metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) at high voltages and currents. Measures seven parameters characterizing performance of MOSFET, with view toward obtaining early indication MOSFET defective. Use of test system prior to installation of power MOSFET in high-power circuit saves time and money.

  16. Two-miRNA classifiers differentiate mutation-negative follicular thyroid carcinomas and follicular thyroid adenomas in fine needle aspirations with high specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokowy, Tomasz; Wojtas, Bartosz; Jarzab, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of thyroid by fine needle aspiration is challenging for the "indeterminate" category and can be supported by molecular testing. We set out to identify miRNA markers that could be used in a diagnostic setting to improve the discrimination of mutation-negative indeterminate fine needle...... aspirations. miRNA high-throughput sequencing was performed for freshly frozen tissue samples of 19 RAS and PAX8/PPARG mutation-negative follicular thyroid carcinomas, and 23 RAS and PAX8/PPARG mutation-negative follicular adenomas. Differentially expressed miRNAs were validated by quantitative polymerase...... chain reaction in a set of 44 fine needle aspiration samples representing 24 follicular thyroid carcinomas and 20 follicular adenomas. Twenty-six miRNAs characterized by a significant differential expression between follicular thyroid carcinomas and follicular adenomas were identified. Nevertheless...

  17. Pitfalls in genetic testing: the story of missed SCN1A mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Jennings, Lawrence J.; Kirschmann, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from the EuroEPINOMICS rare epilepsy syndromes Dravet working group performed whole-exome sequencing on 31 trios that had been reported negative for SCN1A mutations by Sanger sequencing.

  18. High mutation rates explain low population genetic divergence at copy-number-variable loci in Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin-Sheng; Yeh, Francis C; Hu, Yang; Deng, Li-Ting; Ennos, Richard A; Chen, Xiaoyang

    2017-02-22

    Copy-number-variable (CNV) loci differ from single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) sites in size, mutation rate, and mechanisms of maintenance in natural populations. It is therefore hypothesized that population genetic divergence at CNV loci will differ from that found at SNP sites. Here, we test this hypothesis by analysing 856 CNV loci from the genomes of 1184 healthy individuals from 11 HapMap populations with a wide range of ancestry. The results show that population genetic divergence at the CNV loci is generally more than three times lower than at genome-wide SNP sites. Populations generally exhibit very small genetic divergence (G st  = 0.05 ± 0.049). The smallest divergence is among African populations (G st  = 0.0081 ± 0.0025), with increased divergence among non-African populations (G st  = 0.0217 ± 0.0109) and then among African and non-African populations (G st  = 0.0324 ± 0.0064). Genetic diversity is high in African populations (~0.13), low in Asian populations (~0.11), and intermediate in the remaining 11 populations. Few significant linkage disequilibria (LDs) occur between the genome-wide CNV loci. Patterns of gametic and zygotic LDs indicate the absence of epistasis among CNV loci. Mutation rate is about twice as large as the migration rate in the non-African populations, suggesting that the high mutation rates play dominant roles in producing the low population genetic divergence at CNV loci.

  19. High terbinafine resistance in Trichophyton interdigitale isolates in Delhi, India harbouring mutations in the squalene epoxidase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Masih, Aradhana; Khurana, Ananta; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Gupta, Meenakshi; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2018-03-25

    In the last few years, infections caused by dermatophytes along with a concomitant increase in the number of difficult to treat cases have increasingly been recognised, indicating that dermatophytosis remains a challenging public health problem. The majority of infections are caused by Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex. Terbinafine, an allylamine antifungal used orally and topically is considered to be a first-line drug in the therapy of dermatophyte infections. Terbinafine resistance has been predominately attributed to point mutations in the squalene epoxidase (SQLE) target gene a key enzyme in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway leading to single amino acid substitutions. Here, we report the largest series of 20 terbinafine-resistant Trichophyton interdigitale isolates obtained predominately from cases of tinea corporis/cruris in three hospitals in Delhi, India exhibiting elevated MICs (4 to ≥32 μg/mL) to terbinafine and all harbouring single-point mutations Leu393Phe or Phe397Leu in the SQLE gene. In 12 (60%) T. interdigitale isolates, the Phe397Leu substitution was observed, whereas in the remaining 8 (40%) isolates the substitution Leu393Phe was reported for the first time in T. interdigitale. Furthermore, 10 susceptible T. interdigitale isolates (0.125-2 μg/mL) had a wild-type genotype. Remarkably, considerably high terbinafine resistance rate of 32% was observed among 63 T. interdigitale isolates identified by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region. This high level of terbinafine resistance of Indian dermatophyte isolates is worrisome warranting antifungal susceptibility testing and mutation analysis for monitoring this emerging resistance. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. High Myopia Caused by a Mutation in LEPREL1, Encoding Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordechai, Shikma; Gradstein, Libe; Pasanen, Annika; Ofir, Rivka; El Amour, Khalil; Levy, Jaime; Belfair, Nadav; Lifshitz, Tova; Joshua, Sara; Narkis, Ginat; Elbedour, Khalil; Myllyharju, Johanna; Birk, Ohad S.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive high-grade axial myopia was diagnosed in Bedouin Israeli consanguineous kindred. Some affected individuals also had variable expressivity of early-onset cataracts, peripheral vitreo-retinal degeneration, and secondary sight loss due to severe retinal detachments. Through genome-wide linkage analysis, the disease-associated gene was mapped to ∼1.7 Mb on chromosome 3q28 (the maximum LOD score was 11.5 at θ = 0 for marker D3S1314). Sequencing of the entire coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of the six genes within the defined locus identified a single mutation (c.1523G>T) in exon 10 of LEPREL1, encoding prolyl 3-hydroxylase 2 (P3H2), a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase that hydroxylates collagens. The mutation affects a glycine that is conserved within P3H isozymes. Analysis of wild-type and p.Gly508Val (c.1523G>T) mutant recombinant P3H2 polypeptides expressed in insect cells showed that the mutation led to complete inactivation of P3H2. PMID:21885030

  1. High-quality Thermodynamic Data on the Stability Changes of Proteins Upon Single-site Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pucci, Fabrizio, E-mail: fapucci@ulb.ac.be; Bourgeas, Raphaël, E-mail: rbourgeas@ulb.ac.be; Rooman, Marianne, E-mail: mrooman@ulb.ac.be [Department of BioModeling, BioInformatics and BioProcesses, Université Libre de Bruxelles, CP 165/61, Roosevelt Avenue 50, 1050 Brussels, Belgium and Interuniversity Institute of Bioinformatics in Brussels, CP 263, Triumph Bld, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    We have set up and manually curated a dataset containing experimental information on the impact of amino acid substitutions in a protein on its thermal stability. It consists of a repository of experimentally measured melting temperatures (T{sub m}) and their changes upon point mutations (ΔT{sub m}) for proteins having a well-resolved x-ray structure. This high-quality dataset is designed for being used for the training or benchmarking of in silico thermal stability prediction methods. It also reports other experimentally measured thermodynamic quantities when available, i.e., the folding enthalpy (ΔH) and heat capacity (ΔC{sub P}) of the wild type proteins and their changes upon mutations (ΔΔH and ΔΔC{sub P}), as well as the change in folding free energy (ΔΔG) at a reference temperature. These data are analyzed in view of improving our insights into the correlation between thermal and thermodynamic stabilities, the asymmetry between the number of stabilizing and destabilizing mutations, and the difference in stabilization potential of thermostable versus mesostable proteins.

  2. Testing of high-impedance fault relays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, M. [Powertech Labs., Inc., Surrey, BC (Canada)

    1995-11-01

    A test system and protocol was developed for the testing of high-impedance fault (HIF) detection devices. A technique was established for point-by-point addition of fault and load currents, the resultant was used for testing the performance of the devices in detecting HIFs in the presence of load current. The system used digitized data from recorded faults and normal currents to generate analog test signals for high-impedance fault detection relays. A test apparatus was built with a 10 kHz band-width and playback duration of 30 minutes on 6 output channels for testing purposes. Three devices which have recently become available were tested and their performance was evaluated based on their respective test results.

  3. Biological and clinical evidence for somatic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 as predictive markers for olaparib response in high-grade serous ovarian cancers in the maintenance setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Brian A; Lai, Zhongwu; Hodgson, Darren R; Orr, Maria C M; Hawryluk, Matthew; Sun, James; Yelensky, Roman; Spencer, Stuart K; Robertson, Jane D; Ho, Tony W; Fielding, Anitra; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Barrett, J Carl

    2017-07-04

    To gain a better understanding of the role of somatic mutations in olaparib response, next-generation sequencing (NGS) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was performed as part of a planned retrospective analysis of tumors from a randomized, double-blind, Phase II trial (Study 19; D0810C00019; NCT00753545) in 265 patients with platinum-sensitive high-grade serous ovarian cancer. BRCA1/2 loss-of-function mutations were found in 55% (114/209) of tumors, were mutually exclusive, and demonstrated high concordance with Sanger-sequenced germline mutations in matched blood samples, confirming the accuracy (97%) of tumor BRCA1/2 NGS testing. Additionally, NGS identified somatic mutations absent from germline testing in 10% (20/209) of the patients. Somatic mutations had >80% biallelic inactivation frequency and were predominantly clonal, suggesting that BRCA1/2 loss occurs early in the development of these cancers. Clinical outcomes between placebo- and olaparib-treated patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations were similar to those with germline BRCA1/2 mutations, indicating that patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations benefit from treatment with olaparib.

  4. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian H; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Berglund, Agnethe; Jensen, Henrik K; Andersen, Niels H; Gravholt, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype. Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88) were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%), and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc) and Hodges's formula (hQTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms) compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms) was prolonged (pTurner syndrome karyotypes (418.2 ± 24.8 vs. 407.6 ± 25.5 ms; p = 0.055). In women with Turner syndrome and a bQTc >432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2) and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2). There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women. NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  5. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trolle

    Full Text Available QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype.Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88 were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%, and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc and Hodges's formula (hQTc. The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms. Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done.The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms was prolonged (p432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2 and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2.There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women.NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  6. Prevalence of H63D, S65C and C282Y hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations in Slovenian population by an improved high-throughput genotyping assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupreht Ruth

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is a common genetic disease characterized by excessive iron overload that leads to multi-organ failure. Although the most prevalent genotype in HH is homozygosity for C282Y mutation of the HFE gene, two additional mutations, H63D and S65C, appear to be associated with a milder form of HH. The aim of this study was to develop a high-throughput assay for HFE mutations screening based on TaqMan technology and to determine the frequencies of HFE mutations in the Slovenian population. Methods Altogether, 1282 randomly selected blood donors from different Slovenian regions and 21 HH patients were analyzed for the presence of HFE mutations by an in-house developed real-time PCR assay based on TaqMan technology using shorter non-interfering fluorescent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-specific MGB probes. The assay was validated by RFLP analysis and DNA sequencing. Results The genotyping assay of the H63D, S65C and C282Y mutations in the HFE gene, based on TaqMan technology proved to be fast, reliable, with a high-throughput capability and 100% concordant with genotypes obtained by RFLP and DNA sequencing. The observed frequency of C282Y homozygotes in the group of HH patients was only 48%, others were of the heterogeneous HFE genotype. Among 1282 blood donors tested, the observed H63D, S65C and C282Y allele frequency were 12.8% (95% confidence interval (CI 11.5 – 14.2%, 1.8% (95% CI 1.4 – 2.5% and 3.6% (95% CI 3.0 – 4.5%, respectively. Approximately 33% of the tested subjects had at least one of the three HH mutations, and 1% of them were C282Y homozygotes or compound heterozygotes C282Y/H63D or C282Y/S65C, presenting an increased risk for iron overload disease. A significant variation in H63D allele frequency was observed for one of the Slovenian regions. Conclusion The improved real-time PCR assay for H63D, S65C and C282Y mutations detection is accurate, fast, cost-efficient and ready for

  7. The identification of point mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients by using reverse-transcription PCR and the protein truncation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, R.J.; Bobrow, M.; Roberts, R.G. [St. Thomas`s Hospitals, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-08-01

    The protein truncation test (PTT) is a mutation-detection method that monitors the integrity of the open reading frame (ORF). More than 60% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) result from gross frameshifting deletions in the dystrophin gene that are detectable by multiplex PCR system. It has become apparent that virtually all of the remaining DMD mutations also disrupt the translational reading frame, making the PTT a logical next step toward a comprehensive strategy for the identification of all DMD mutations. We report here a pilot study involving 22 patients and describe the mutations characterized. These constitute 12 point mutations or small insertions/deletions and 4 gross rearrangements. We also have a remaining five patients in whom there does not appear to be mutation in the ORF. We believe that reverse-transcription-PCR/PTT is an efficient method by which to screen for small mutations in DMD patients with no deletion. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Mutational influences of low-dose and high let ionizing radiation in drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huang; Fanjun, Kong; Sun, Yeqing

    For cosmic environment consists of a varying kinds of radiation particles including high Z and energy ions which was charactered with low-dose and high RBE, it is important to determine the possible biofuctions of high LET radiation on human beings. To analyse the possible effectes of mutational influences of low-dose and high-LET ionizing radiation, wild fruit flies drosophila melanogaster were irradiated by 12C6+ ions in two LET levels (63.3 and 30 keV/µum) with different low doses from 2mGy to 2000mGy (2, 20, 200, 2000mGy) in HIRFL (Heavy ion radiation facility laboratory, lanzhou, China).In the same LET value group, the average polymorphic frequency was elevated along with adding doses of irradation, the frequency in 2000 mGy dose samples was significantly higher than other samples (p<0.01).These results suggest that genomic DNA sequence could be effected by low-dose and high-LET ionizing radiation, the irradiation dose is an important element in genomic mutation frequency origination.

  9. Development and applications of Bacillus subtilis test systems for mutagens, involving DNA-repair deficiency and suppressible auxotrophic mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanooka, H.

    1977-01-01

    A mutagen-tester of Bacillus subtilis was constructed and tested with known carcinogens. The parental strain HA101 of Okubo and Yanagida carrying suppressible nonsense mutations in his and met genes was transformed to carry an excision-repair deficiency mutation. The constructed strain TKJ5211 showed a 20-30-fold higher sensitivity for His + reversion than the parental strain when treated with UV and UV-mimetic chemicals but unchanged mutation frequency with X-rays and methyl methanesulfonate. The tester strain was used in a spot test of 30 selected chemicals and also for testing with liver homogenate activation. The results showed an almost equivalent but somewhat broader detection spectrum than the Salmonella typhimurium TA100 system. Another test method used a pair of B. subtilis strains differing in their DNA-repair capacity, i.e. the most UV-sensitive mutant HJ-15 and a wild-type strain, to detect repair-dependent DNA damage produced by chemicals. Spores could be used in either test

  10. High-incidence of PTEN mutations in Chinese patients with primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Wang, Ge; Xiao, Hualiang; Xie, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Chuan; Xiao, He; Yang, Zhenzhou; Wang, Dong; Li, Zengpeng

    2014-01-01

    Primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus (PSCCE) is a rare and aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA and PTEN mutations in PSCCE. Clinical–pathological data and paraffin-embedded specimens were collected from 38 patients. Exons 18 to 21 of EGFR, KRAS and PIK3CA status were analyzed by real-time PCR based on ARMS and Scorpion technology in all patients, and the PTEN gene was also screened using real-time PCR and high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA). Only 1 (2.63%) out of 38 patients had EGFR mutations in L858R missense, and KRAS and PIK3CA were not found in the mutational spot in all patients. However, PTEN mutations presented in 14 (36.84%) out of 38 patients, including exon 5 coding for PTEN missense mutation (n =4, 10.53%), exon 6 (n =7, 18.42%), concurrent exon 5 and exon 6 (n =2, 5.26%), and exon 8 (n =1, 2.63%). Concurrent mutations of these genes were not detected in all samples. No statistically significant associations were found between the clinicopathological features and the mutation status of PTEN. The incidence of PTEN mutations in Chinese patients with PSCCE was higher than that of previous reports in other histological subtypes of esophageal cancer

  11. High Pressure Quick Disconnect Particle Impact Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact testing to determine whether there is a particle impact ignition hazard in the quick disconnects (QDs) in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Testing included standard supersonic and subsonic particle impact tests on 15-5 PH stainless steel, as well as tests performed on a QD simulator. This paper summarizes the particle impact tests completed at WSTF. Although there was an ignition in Test Series 4, it was determined the ignition was caused by the presence of a machining imperfection. The sum of all the test results indicates that there is no particle impact ignition hazard in the ISS ECLSS QDs. KEYWORDS: quick disconnect, high pressure, particle impact testing, stainless steel

  12. High LET radiation enhances apoptosis in mutated p53 cancer cells through Caspase-9 activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Nobuhiro; Takahashi, Akihisa; Mori, Eiichiro; Imai, Yuichiro; Ohnishi, Ken; Kirita, Tadaaki; Ohnishi, Takeo; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2008-01-01

    Although mutations in the p53 gene can lead to resistance to radiotherapy, chemotherapy and thermotherapy, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induces apoptosis regardless of p53 gene status in cancer cells. The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanisms involved in high LET radiation-induced apoptosis. Human gingival cancer cells (Ca9-22 cells) containing a mutated p53 (mp53) gene were irradiated with X-rays, C-ion (13-100 KeV/μm), or Fe-ion beams (200 KeV/μm). Cellular sensitivities were determined using colony forming assays. Apoptosis was detected and quantified with Hoechst 33342 staining. The activity of Caspase-3 was analyzed with Western blotting and flow cytometry. Cells irradiated with high LET radiation showed a high sensitivity with a high frequency of apoptosis induction. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for the surviving fraction and apoptosis induction increased in a LET-dependent manner. Both RBE curves reached a peak at 100 KeV/μm, and then decreased at values over 100 KeV/μm. When cells were irradiated with high LET radiation, Caspase-3 was cleaved and activated, leading to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. In addition, Caspase-9 inhibitor suppressed Caspase-3 activation and apoptosis induction resulting from high LET radiation to a greater extent than Caspase-8 inhibitor. These results suggest that high LET radiation enhances apoptosis by activation of Caspase-3 through Caspase-9, even in the presence of mp53. (author)

  13. High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis for mutation screening of RGSL1,RGS16 and RGS8 in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiechec, Emilia; Wiuf, Carsten Henrik; Overgaard, Jens

    2011-01-01

    coding exons of RGSL1, RGS16, and RGS8 in tumors from 200 breast cancer patients. All sequence variants detected by HRM resulted in abnormal shape of the melting curves. The identified mutations and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were subsequently confirmed by sequencing, and distribution...... cancer patients. In addition, a total of seven known SNPs were identified in this study. Genotype distributions were not significantly different between breast cancer patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPACT: Identification of novel mutations within RGSL1 provides a new insight...... into the pathophysiology of breast cancer. Moreover, the HRM analysis represents a reliable and highly sensitive method for mutation scanning of multiple exons....

  14. Isolation of chromosomal mutations in Drosophila melanogaster by the nondisjunction test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadov, B.F.; Ivanov, Yu.N.; Artemova, E.V.

    1986-01-01

    The females carrying the combination of metacentric autosome 2 with two acrocentrics, F(2L) and F(2R), produce aneuploid egg cells 2/F(2L) and F(2R)(2-F(2L) nondisjunction) as well as egg cells 2/F(2R) and F(2L) (2-F(2R) nondisjunction). The frequency of nondisjunction 2-F(2L) sharply increases in the presence of inversion in the left arm of metacentric 2, and the frequency of nondisjunction 2-F(2R) increases when the right arm of the metacentric carries the inversion. The presence of the rearrangement in the left arm can be detected by the unusually high progeny size in the cross between 2/F(2L);F(2R) females, and C(2L);F(2R)/F(2R) males, and the presence of rearrangement in the right arm of the metacentric is inferred from a large progeny in the cross of similar females with F(2L)/F(2L);C(2R) males. The SPx 2 /F(2L);F(2R) daughters were obtained from SPx 2 /+ males irradiated with the dose of 3000R. Out of these, 972 daughters were individually crossed with F(2L)/F(2L); C(2R) males. Fifty-two cultures with large progeny size were identified by visual observation. Preparations of polytene chromsomes were made from the larvae. Twenty-six cultures had arrangements in 2 R: eight carried rearrangement In (2R), six In(2LR), ten T(2R; 3) and T(2R; X), and two Tp (2). The method can be used effective to detect chromosomal mutations, especially inversions in large samples

  15. Comprehensive molecular diagnosis of 67 Chinese Usher syndrome probands: high rate of ethnicity specific mutations in Chinese USH patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lichun; Liang, Xiaofang; Li, Yumei; Wang, Jing; Zaneveld, Jacques Eric; Wang, Hui; Xu, Shan; Wang, Keqing; Wang, Binbin; Chen, Rui; Sui, Ruifang

    2015-09-04

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common disease causing combined deafness and blindness. It is predominantly an autosomal recessive genetic disorder with occasionally digenic cases. Molecular diagnosis of USH patients is important for disease management. Few studies have tried to find the genetic cause of USH in Chinese patients. This study was designed to determine the mutation spectrum of Chinese USH patients. We applied next generation sequencing to characterize the mutation spectrum in 67 independent Chinese families with at least one member diagnosed with USH. Blood was collected at Peking Union Medical College Hospital. This cohort is one of the largest USH cohorts reported. We utilized customized panel and whole exome sequencing, variant analysis, Sanger validation and segregation tests to find disease causing mutations in these families. We identified biallelic disease causing mutations in known USH genes in 70 % (49) of our patients. As has been previously reported, MYO7A is the most frequently mutated gene in our USH type I patients while USH2A is the most mutated gene in our USH type II patients. In addition, we identify mutations in CLRN1, DFNB31, GPR98 and PCDH15 for the first time in Chinese USH patients. Together, mutations in CLRN1, DNFB31, GPR98 and PCDH15 account for 11.4 % of disease in our cohort. Interestingly, although the spectrum of disease genes is quite similar between our Chinese patient cohort and other patient cohorts from different (and primarily Caucasian) ethnic backgrounds, the mutations themselves are dramatically different. In particular, 76 % (52/68) of alleles found in this study have never been previously reported. Interestingly, we observed a strong enrichment for severe protein truncating mutations expected to have severe functional consequence on the protein in USH II patients compared to the reported mutation spectrum in RP patients, who often carry partial protein truncating mutations. Our study provides the first

  16. Value of TIRADS, BSRTC and FNA-BRAF V600E mutation analysis in differentiating high-risk thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-zhi; Xu, Ting; Cui, Dai; Li, Xiao; Yao, Qing; Gong, Hai-yan; Liu, Xiao-yun; Chen, Huan-huan; Jiang, Lin; Ye, Xin-hua; Zhang, Zhi-hong; Shen, Mei-ping; Duan, Yu; Yang, Tao; Wu, Xiao-hong

    2015-11-24

    The thyroid imaging reporting and data system (TIRADS) and Bethesda system for reporting thyroid cytopathology (BSRTC) have been used for interpretation of ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) results of thyroid nodules. BRAF(V600E) mutation analysis is a molecular tool in diagnosing thyroid carcinoma. Our objective was to compare the diagnostic value of these methods in differentiating high-risk thyroid nodules. Total 220 patients with high-risk thyroid nodules were recruited in this prospective study. They all underwent ultrasound, FNAC and BRAF(V600E) mutation analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of TIRADS were 73.1% and 88.4%. BSRTC had higher specificity (97.7%) and similar sensitivity (77.6%) compared with TIRADS. The sensitivity and specificity of BRAF(V600E) mutation (85.1%, 100%) were the highest. The combination of BSRTC and BRAF(V600E) mutation analysis significantly increased the efficiency, with 97.8% sensitivity, 97.7% specificity. In patients with BSRTC I-III, the mutation rate of BRAF(V600E) was 64.5% in nodules with TIRADS 4B compared with 8.4% in nodules with TIRADS 3 or 4A (P value in differentiating high-risk thyroid nodules. The TIRADS is useful in selecting high-risk patients for FNAB and patients with BSRTC I-III for BRAF(V600E) mutation analysis.

  17. Ultra-deep sequencing reveals high prevalence and broad structural diversity of hepatitis B surface antigen mutations in a global population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencay, Mikael; Hübner, Kirsten; Gohl, Peter; Seffner, Anja; Weizenegger, Michael; Neofytos, Dionysios; Batrla, Richard; Woeste, Andreas; Kim, Hyon-Suk; Westergaard, Gaston; Reinsch, Christine; Brill, Eva; Thu Thuy, Pham Thi; Hoang, Bui Huu; Sonderup, Mark; Spearman, C Wendy; Pabinger, Stephan; Gautier, Jérémie; Brancaccio, Giuseppina; Fasano, Massimo; Santantonio, Teresa; Gaeta, Giovanni B; Nauck, Markus; Kaminski, Wolfgang E

    2017-01-01

    The diversity of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has a significant impact on the performance of diagnostic screening tests and the clinical outcome of hepatitis B infection. Neutralizing or diagnostic antibodies against the HBsAg are directed towards its highly conserved major hydrophilic region (MHR), in particular towards its "a" determinant subdomain. Here, we explored, on a global scale, the genetic diversity of the HBsAg MHR in a large, multi-ethnic cohort of randomly selected subjects with HBV infection from four continents. A total of 1553 HBsAg positive blood samples of subjects originating from 20 different countries across Africa, America, Asia and central Europe were characterized for amino acid variation in the MHR. Using highly sensitive ultra-deep sequencing, we found 72.8% of the successfully sequenced subjects (n = 1391) demonstrated amino acid sequence variation in the HBsAg MHR. This indicates that the global variation frequency in the HBsAg MHR is threefold higher than previously reported. The majority of the amino acid mutations were found in the HBV genotypes B (28.9%) and C (25.4%). Collectively, we identified 345 distinct amino acid mutations in the MHR. Among these, we report 62 previously unknown mutations, which extends the worldwide pool of currently known HBsAg MHR mutations by 22%. Importantly, topological analysis identified the "a" determinant upstream flanking region as the structurally most diverse subdomain of the HBsAg MHR. The highest prevalence of "a" determinant region mutations was observed in subjects from Asia, followed by the African, American and European cohorts, respectively. Finally, we found that more than half (59.3%) of all HBV subjects investigated carried multiple MHR mutations. Together, this worldwide ultra-deep sequencing based genotyping study reveals that the global prevalence and structural complexity of variation in the hepatitis B surface antigen have, to date, been significantly underappreciated.

  18. Highly sensitive chemiluminescent point mutation detection by circular strand-displacement amplification reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Ge, Yujie; Gu, Hongxi; Ma, Cuiping

    2011-08-15

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is attracting extensive attentions owing to its direct connections with human diseases including cancers. Here, we have developed a highly sensitive chemiluminescence biosensor based on circular strand-displacement amplification and the separation by magnetic beads reducing the background signal for point mutation detection at room temperature. This method took advantage of both the T4 DNA ligase recognizing single-base mismatch with high selectivity and the strand-displacement reaction of polymerase to perform signal amplification. The detection limit of this method was 1.3 × 10(-16)M, which showed better sensitivity than that of most of those reported detection methods of SNP. Additionally, the magnetic beads as carrier of immobility was not only to reduce the background signal, but also may have potential apply in high through-put screening of SNP detection in human genome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High rate of mutation K103N causing resistance to nevirapine in Indian children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In north India the number of paediatric cases with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is on the rise. Most drug combinations used for treatment of AIDS incorporate nevirapine, resistance to which develops very fast if given singly or because of unplanned interruptions. This paper investigates presence of mutations at codon 103 and codon 215 of the HIV pol gene causing resistance to nevirapine and zidovudine (AZT respectively in 25 children with AIDS. Mutations T215Y and K103N were detected by a nested cum amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS PCR and the results were confirmed by direct sequencing in five randomly selected cases. Nineteen patients had received nevirapine containing regimen and six were drug naive. Mutation K103N was observed in 56% (14/25 of the children while mutation T215Y was found in none. Two of the six drug naοve children also showed K103N mutation. Thus, Indian children drug naοve or treated with nevirapine containing regimens show a high rate of mutation conferring resistance to nevirapine which calls for a judicious use of nevirapine both in antenatal and postnatal setting.

  20. High-voltage engineering and testing

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Hugh M

    2013-01-01

    This 3rd edition of High Voltage Engineering Testing describes strategic developments in the field and reflects on how they can best be managed. All the key components of high voltage and distribution systems are covered including electric power networks, UHV and HV. Distribution systems including HVDC and power electronic systems are also considered.

  1. Novel glucokinase gene mutation in the first Macedonian family tested for MODY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocova, M; Elblova, L; Pruhova, S; Lebl, J; Dusatkova, P

    2017-08-01

    We present a boy with mild hyperglycemia detected during an upper respiratory infection. Novel splicing mutation in the intron 1 of the GCK gene (c.45+1G>A) was detected, and was subsequently confirmed in his father. This is the first case of genetically confirmed Macedonian family with MODY. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in cancer escape purifying selection and high pathogenicity mutations lead to the oncocytic phenotype: pathogenicity analysis of reported somatic mtDNA mutations in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Luísa; Soares, Pedro; Máximo, Valdemar; Samuels, David C

    2012-01-01

    The presence of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in cancer cells has been interpreted in controversial ways, ranging from random neutral accumulation of mutations, to positive selection for high pathogenicity, or conversely to purifying selection against high pathogenicity variants as occurs at the population level. Here we evaluated the predicted pathogenicity of somatic mtDNA mutations described in cancer and compare these to the distribution of variations observed in the global human population and all possible protein variations that could occur in human mtDNA. We focus on oncocytic tumors, which are clearly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The protein variant pathogenicity was predicted using two computational methods, MutPred and SNPs&GO. The pathogenicity score of the somatic mtDNA variants were significantly higher in oncocytic tumors compared to non-oncocytic tumors. Variations in subunits of Complex I of the electron transfer chain were significantly more common in tumors with the oncocytic phenotype, while variations in Complex V subunits were significantly more common in non-oncocytic tumors. Our results show that the somatic mtDNA mutations reported over all tumors are indistinguishable from a random selection from the set of all possible amino acid variations, and have therefore escaped the effects of purifying selection that act strongly at the population level. We show that the pathogenicity of somatic mtDNA mutations is a determining factor for the oncocytic phenotype. The opposite associations of the Complex I and Complex V variants with the oncocytic and non-oncocytic tumors implies that low mitochondrial membrane potential may play an important role in determining the oncocytic phenotype

  3. High-voltage test stand at Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the present design and future capability of the high-voltage test stand for neutral-beam sources at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The stand's immediate use will be for testing the full-scale sources (120 kV, 65 A) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. It will then be used to test parts of the sustaining source system (80 kV, 85 A) being designed for the Magnetic Fusion Test Facility. Following that will be an intensive effort to develop beams of up to 200 kV at 20 A by accelerating negative ions. The design of the test stand features a 5-MVA power supply feeding a vacuum tetrode that is used as a switch and regulator. The 500-kW arc supply and the 100-kW filament supply for the neutral-beam source are battery powered, thus eliminating one or two costly isolation transformers

  4. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  5. The use of induced mutation combined with crossing in high quality rice breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do Huu At; Bui Huy Thuy; Nguyen Van Bich; Tran Duy Quy [Agricultural Genetics Institute, Division of Genetics and Hybrid Rice Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Nguyen Minh Cong [Hanoi No. 1 Teacher Training Univ., Department of Genetics (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    The high quality rice varieties: Tam thom mutant rice Var., DT17 rice Var, DT21 glutinous rice Var were formed by induced mutation combined with crossing. Tam thom mutant rice Var. lost photosensitivity, could be planted 2 crops/year. DT17 rice Var with high yielding capacity, suitable for growth on lowland in summer crop, is replacing step-by-step Moctuyen rice Var. in North Vietnam. DT21 glutinous rice Var. could be planted 2 crops/year and had short growth duration, average yield was 4.0-4.5 tons/ha. These three ones had good quality, soft and scent cooked rice, suitable for customers and export requirements. Tam thom mutant rice Var. DT17 rice Var., DT21 and glutinous rice Var. were adopted for regional production by Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and allowed to be in trial production. (author)

  6. The use of induced mutation combined with crossing in high quality rice breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do Huu At; Bui Huy Thuy; Nguyen Van Bich; Tran Duy Quy; Nguyen Minh Cong

    2001-01-01

    The high quality rice varieties: Tam thom mutant rice Var., DT17 rice Var, DT21 glutinous rice Var were formed by induced mutation combined with crossing. Tam thom mutant rice Var. lost photosensitivity, could be planted 2 crops/year. DT17 rice Var with high yielding capacity, suitable for growth on lowland in summer crop, is replacing step-by-step Moctuyen rice Var. in North Vietnam. DT21 glutinous rice Var. could be planted 2 crops/year and had short growth duration, average yield was 4.0-4.5 tons/ha. These three ones had good quality, soft and scent cooked rice, suitable for customers and export requirements. Tam thom mutant rice Var. DT17 rice Var., DT21 and glutinous rice Var. were adopted for regional production by Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and allowed to be in trial production. (author)

  7. A novel loss-of-function mutation in GPR54/KISS1R leads to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in a highly consanguineous family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimri, Revital; Lebenthal, Yael; Lazar, Liora; Chevrier, Lucie; Phillip, Moshe; Bar, Meytal; Hernandez-Mora, Eva; de Roux, Nicolas; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2011-03-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54), the kisspeptin receptor, is essential for stimulation of GnRH secretion and induction of puberty. Recently loss-of-function mutations of the GPR54 have been implicated as a cause of isolated idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). The objective of the study was to identify the genetic cause of IHH in a consanguineous pedigree and to characterize the phenotypic features from infancy through early adulthood. In six patients with normosmic IHH belonging to two families of Israeli Muslim-Arab origin highly related to one another, DNA was analyzed for mutations in the GnRHR and GPR54 genes, with functional analysis of the mutation found. The five males underwent comprehensive endocrine evaluation and were under longitudinal follow-up; the one female presented in early adulthood. A new homozygous mutation (c.T815C) in GPR54 leading to a phenylalanine substitution by serine (p.F272S) was detected in all patients. Functional analysis showed an almost complete inhibition of kisspeptin-induced GPR54 signaling and a dramatic decrease of the mutated receptor expression at the cell surface. The males exhibited the same clinical features from infancy to adulthood, characterized by cryptorchidism, a relatively short penis, and no spontaneous pubertal development. The female patient presented at 18 yr with impuberism and primary amenorrhea. Repeated stimulation tests demonstrated complete gonadotropin deficiency throughout follow-up. A novel loss-of-function mutation (p.F272S) in the GPR54 gene is associated with familial normosmic IHH. Underdeveloped external genitalia and impuberism point to the major role of GPR54 in the activation of the gonadotropic axis from intrauterine life to adulthood.

  8. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  9. ACIGA's high optical power test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, L; Aoun, M; Barriga, P

    2004-01-01

    Advanced laser interferometer detectors utilizing more than 100 W of laser power and with ∼10 6 W circulating laser power present many technological problems. The Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy (ACIGA) is developing a high power research facility in Gingin, north of Perth, Western Australia, which will test techniques for the next generation interferometers. In particular it will test thermal lensing compensation and control strategies for optical cavities in which optical spring effects and parametric instabilities may present major difficulties

  10. The Human Gene Mutation Database: building a comprehensive mutation repository for clinical and molecular genetics, diagnostic testing and personalized genomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, Peter D; Mort, Matthew; Ball, Edward V; Shaw, Katy; Phillips, Andrew; Cooper, David N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD®) is a comprehensive collection of germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie, or are associated with, human inherited disease. By June 2013, the database contained over 141,000 different lesions detected in over 5,700 different genes, with new mutation entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 10,000 per annum. HGMD was originally established in 1996 for the scientific study of mutational mechanisms in human genes. However, it has since acquired a much broader utility as a central unified disease-oriented mutation repository utilized by human molecular geneticists, genome scientists, molecular biologists, clinicians and genetic counsellors as well as by those specializing in biopharmaceuticals, bioinformatics and personalized genomics. The public version of HGMD (http://www.hgmd.org) is freely available to registered users from academic institutions/non-profit organizations whilst the subscription version (HGMD Professional) is available to academic, clinical and commercial users under license via BIOBASE GmbH.

  11. High-voltage test and measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Hauschild, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    It is the intent of this book to combine high-voltage (HV) engineering with HV testing technique and HV measuring technique. Based on long-term experience gained by the authors as lecturer and researcher as well as member in international organizations, such as IEC and CIGRE, the book will reflect the state of the art as well as the future trends in testing and diagnostics of HV equipment to ensure a reliable generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy. The book is intended not only for experts but also for students in electrical engineering and high-voltage engineering.

  12. High-stakes educational testing and democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the relation between high-stakes educational testing and democracy drawn from the experiences of 20th-century high-stakes educational testing practices in the Danish history of education. The article presents various concepts of democracy using leading propositions within...... the field of education. Then a sample of relevant historic case studies are examined in light of these definitions. Among other things, the article concludes that a combination of different evaluation technologies – some formative and some summative – might be the safest way to go from a democratic...

  13. The high level vibration test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmayer, C.H.; Curreri, J.R.; Park, Y.J.; Kato, W.Y.; Kawakami, S.

    1989-01-01

    As part of cooperative agreements between the US and Japan, tests have been performed on the seismic vibration table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC) in Japan. The objective of the test program was to use the NUPEC vibration table to drive large diameter nuclear power piping to substantial plastic strain with an earthquake excitation and to compare the results with state-of-the-art analysis of the problem. The test model was subjected to a maximum acceleration well beyond what nuclear power plants are designed to withstand. A modified earthquake excitation was applied and the excitation level was increased carefully to minimize the cumulative fatigue damage due to the intermediate level excitations. Since the piping was pressurized, and the high level earthquake excitation was repeated several times, it was possible to investigate the effects of ratchetting and fatigue as well. Elastic and inelastic seismic response behavior of the test model was measured in a number of test runs with an increasing excitation input level up to the limit of the vibration table. In the maximum input condition, large dynamic plastic strains were obtained in the piping. Crack initiation was detected following the second maximum excitation run. Crack growth was carefully monitored during the next two additional maximum excitation runs. The final test resulted in a maximum crack depth of approximately 94% of the wall thickness. The HLVT (high level vibration test) program has enhanced understanding of the behavior of piping systems under severe earthquake loading. As in other tests to failure of piping components, it has demonstrated significant seismic margin in nuclear power plant piping

  14. High prevalence of mutations affecting the splicing process in a Spanish cohort with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Anasagasti, Ander; Irigoyen, Cristina; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most frequent group of inherited retinal dystrophies. It is highly heterogeneous, with more than 80 disease-causing genes 27 of which are known to cause autosomal dominant RP (adRP), having been identified. In this study a total of 29 index cases were ascertained based on a family tree compatible with adRP. A custom panel of 31 adRP genes was analysed by targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion PGM platform in combination with Sanger sequencing. This allowed us to detect putative disease-causing mutations in 14 out of the 29 (48.28%) families analysed. Remarkably, around 38% of all adRP cases analysed showed mutations affecting the splicing process, mainly due to mutations in genes coding for spliceosome factors (SNRNP200 and PRPF8) but also due to splice-site mutations in RHO. Twelve of the 14 mutations found had been reported previously and two were novel mutations found in PRPF8 in two unrelated patients. In conclusion, our results will lead to more accurate genetic counselling and will contribute to a better characterisation of the disease. In addition, they may have a therapeutic impact in the future given the large number of studies currently underway based on targeted RNA splicing for therapeutic purposes. PMID:28045043

  15. High resolution melting curve analysis, a rapid and affordable method for mutation analysis in childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin eLiu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular genetic alterations with prognostic significance have been described in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The aim of this study was to establish cost-effective techniques to detect mutations of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3, Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1, and a partial tandem duplication within the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-PTD genes in childhood AML. Procedure: Ninety-nine children with newly diagnosed AML were included in this study. We developed a fluoresent dye SYTO-82 based high resolution melting curve (HRM anaylsis to detect FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD, FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain (FLT3-TKD and NPM1 mutations. MLL-PTD was screened by real-time quantitative PCR. Results: The HRM methodology correlated well with gold standard Sanger sequencing with less cost. Among the 99 patients studied, the FLT3-ITD mutation was associated with significantly worse event free survival (EFS. Patients with the NPM1 mutation had significantly better EFS and overall survival. However, HRM was not sensitive enough for minimal residual disease monitoring. Conclusions: HRM was a rapid and efficient method for screening of FLT3 and NPM1 gene mutations. It was both affordable and accurate, especially in resource underprivileged regions. Our results indicated that HRM could be a useful clinical tool for rapid and cost effective screening of the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in AML patients.

  16. High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR), Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    After conversion to burnable poison fuel elements, the High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR) Petten (Netherlands), operated through 1974 for 280 days at 45 MW. Equipment for irradiation experiments has been replaced and extended. The average annual occupation by experiments was 55% as compared to 38% in 1973. Work continued on thirty irradiation projects and ten development activities

  17. Validating High-Stakes Testing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Makes the point that the interpretations and use of high-stakes test scores rely on policy assumptions about what should be taught and the content standards and performance standards that should be applied. The assumptions built into an assessment need to be subjected to scrutiny and criticism if a strong case is to be made for the validity of the…

  18. Reliability of kinetic visual field testing in children with mutation-proven retinal dystrophies: Implications for therapeutic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedania, Vaidehi S; Liu, Jerry Y; Schlegel, Dana; Andrews, Chris A; Branham, Kari; Khan, Naheed W; Musch, David C; Heckenlively, John R; Jayasundera, K Thiran

    2018-01-01

    Kinetic visual field testing is used to monitor disease course in retinal dystrophy clinical care and treatment response in treatment trials, which are increasingly recruiting children. This study investigates Goldmann visual field (GVF) changes in young children with mutation-proven retinal dystrophies as they age and with progression of the retinal degeneration. Retrospective review of children ≤ 17 years old with a mutation-proven retinal dystrophy. Objective clinical disease activity was assessed by a retinal degeneration specialist masked to GVF results. Digital quantification of GVF area was performed. Twenty-nine children (58 eyes), ages 5-16, were identified. GVF area increased with age despite progression in 20 children and clinical stability in nine children. Mean ± standard error increase in GVF area/year was 333 ± 130 mm 2 (I4e, p = 0.012), 720 ± 155 mm 2 (III4e, p children with mutation-proven retinal dystrophies, there is a significant increase in GVF area with age, particularly those children with retinal dystrophies can be an unreliable measure of response to treatment and on which to base appropriate counseling about visual impairment.

  19. Acceptance of, inclination for, and barriers in genetic testing for gene mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers among female residents of Warsaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Olejniczak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : To check the degree of acceptance of, inclination for, and barriers in genetic testing for gene mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers among female residents of Warsaw Material and methods : This study involved 562 women between 20 and 77 years of age, all of whom were patients visiting gynaecologists practising in clinics in the City of Warsaw. The studied population was divided into six age categories. The study method was a diagnostic poll conducted with the use of an original questionnaire containing 10 multiple-choice questions. Results: Nearly 70% of the women showed an interest in taking a test to detect predispositions to develop breast and ovarian cancer. More than 10% did not want to take such a test, while every fifth women was undecided. No statistically significant differences between the respondents’ willingness to pay and education were found (p = 0.05. The most frequent answer given by women in all groups was that the amount to pay was too high. Such an answer was given by 52.17% of women with primary education, 65.22% of women with vocational education, 58.61% of women with secondary education, and 41.62% of women with higher education. Conclusions : Women with a confirmed increased risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer due to inter alia the presence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations should pay particular attention to 1 st and 2 nd level prophylaxis.

  20. Acceptance of, inclination for, and barriers in genetic testing for gene mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers among female residents of Warsaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dera, Paulina; Religioni, Urszula; Duda-Zalewska, Aneta; Deptała, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To check the degree of acceptance of, inclination for, and barriers in genetic testing for gene mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers among female residents of Warsaw Material and methods This study involved 562 women between 20 and 77 years of age, all of whom were patients visiting gynaecologists practising in clinics in the City of Warsaw. The studied population was divided into six age categories. The study method was a diagnostic poll conducted with the use of an original questionnaire containing 10 multiple-choice questions. Results Nearly 70% of the women showed an interest in taking a test to detect predispositions to develop breast and ovarian cancer. More than 10% did not want to take such a test, while every fifth women was undecided. No statistically significant differences between the respondents’ willingness to pay and education were found (p = 0.05). The most frequent answer given by women in all groups was that the amount to pay was too high. Such an answer was given by 52.17% of women with primary education, 65.22% of women with vocational education, 58.61% of women with secondary education, and 41.62% of women with higher education. Conclusions Women with a confirmed increased risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer due to inter alia the presence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations should pay particular attention to 1st and 2nd level prophylaxis. PMID:27095945

  1. Peptide bond-forming reagents HOAt and HATU are not mutagenic in the bacterial reverse mutation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolette, John; Neft, Robin E; Vanosdol, Jessica; Murray, Joel

    2016-04-01

    The peptide bond-forming reagents 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole (HOAt, CAS 39968-33-7) and O-(7-Azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (HATU, CAS 148893-10-1) either have structural alerts, unclassified features or are considered out of domain when evaluated for potential mutagenicity with in silico programs DEREK and CaseUltra. Since they are commonly used reagents in pharmaceutical drug syntheses, they may become drug substance or drug product impurities and would need to be either controlled to appropriately safe levels or tested for mutagenicity. Both reagents were tested in the bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) test at Covance, under GLP conditions, following the OECD test guideline and ICH S2(R1) recommendations and found to be negative. Our data show that HOAt and HATU-common pharmaceutical synthesis reagents-are not mutagenic, and can be treated as ordinary drug impurities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A Statistical Perspective on Highly Accelerated Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Edward V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Highly accelerated life testing has been heavily promoted at Sandia (and elsewhere) as a means to rapidly identify product weaknesses caused by flaws in the product's design or manufacturing process. During product development, a small number of units are forced to fail at high stress. The failed units are then examined to determine the root causes of failure. The identification of the root causes of product failures exposed by highly accelerated life testing can instigate changes to the product's design and/or manufacturing process that result in a product with increased reliability. It is widely viewed that this qualitative use of highly accelerated life testing (often associated with the acronym HALT) can be useful. However, highly accelerated life testing has also been proposed as a quantitative means for "demonstrating" the reliability of a product where unreliability is associated with loss of margin via an identified and dominating failure mechanism. It is assumed that the dominant failure mechanism can be accelerated by changing the level of a stress factor that is assumed to be related to the dominant failure mode. In extreme cases, a minimal number of units (often from a pre-production lot) are subjected to a single highly accelerated stress relative to normal use. If no (or, sufficiently few) units fail at this high stress level, some might claim that a certain level of reliability has been demonstrated (relative to normal use conditions). Underlying this claim are assumptions regarding the level of knowledge associated with the relationship between the stress level and the probability of failure. The primary purpose of this document is to discuss (from a statistical perspective) the efficacy of using accelerated life testing protocols (and, in particular, "highly accelerated" protocols) to make quantitative inferences concerning the performance of a product (e.g., reliability) when in fact there is lack-of-knowledge and uncertainty concerning

  3. High frequency of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance marker (pfcrt T76 mutation) in Yemen: an urgent need to re-examine malaria drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Azazy, Ahmed A; Fong, Mun Yik

    2011-05-27

    Malaria remains a significant health problem in Yemen with Plasmodium falciparum being the predominant species which is responsible for 90% of the malaria cases. Despite serious concerns regarding increasing drug resistance, chloroquine is still used for the prevention and treatment of malaria in Yemen. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of choloroquine resistance (CQR) of P. falciparum isolated from Yemen based on the pfcrt T76 mutation. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 511 participants from four governorates in Yemen. Blood samples were screened using microscopic and species-specific nested PCR based on the 18S rRNA gene to detect and identify Plasmodium species. Blood samples positive for P. falciparum were used for detecting the pfcrt T76 mutation using nested-PCR. The prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation was 81.5% (66 of 81 isolates). Coastal areas/foothills had higher prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation compared to highland areas (90.5% vs 71.8%) (p = 0.031). The pfcrt T76 mutation had a significant association with parasitaemia (p = 0.045). Univariate analysis shows a significant association of pfcrt T76 mutation with people aged > 10 years (OR = 9, 95% CI = 2.3 - 36.2, p = 0.001), low household income (OR = 5, 95% CI = 1.3 - 19.5, p = 0.027), no insecticide spray (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.16 - 11.86, p = 0.025) and not sleeping under insecticide treated nets (ITNs) (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.38 - 16.78, p = 0.01). Logistic regression model confirmed age > 10 years and low household income as predictors of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen P. falciparum isolates. The high prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen could be a predictive marker for the prevalence of P. falciparum CQR. This finding shows the necessity for an in-vivo therapeutic efficacy test for CQ. P. falciparum CQR should be addressed in the national strategy to control malaria.

  4. IPNV with high and low virulence: host immune responses and viral mutations during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skjesol Astrid

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV is an aquatic member of the Birnaviridae family that causes widespread disease in salmonids. IPNV is represented by multiple strains with markedly different virulence. Comparison of isolates reveals hyper variable regions (HVR, which are presumably associated with pathogenicity. However little is known about the rates and modes of sequence divergence and molecular mechanisms that determine virulence. Also how the host response may influence IPNV virulence is poorly described. Methods In this study we compared two field isolates of IPNV (NFH-Ar and NFH-El. The sequence changes, replication and mortality were assessed following experimental challenge of Atlantic salmon. Gene expression analyses with qPCR and microarray were applied to examine the immune responses in head kidney. Results Significant differences in mortality were observed between the two isolates, and viral load in the pancreas at 13 days post infection (d p.i. was more than 4 orders of magnitude greater for NFH-Ar in comparison with NFH-El. Sequence comparison of five viral genes from the IPNV isolates revealed different mutation rates and Ka/Ks ratios. A strong tendency towards non-synonymous mutations was found in the HRV of VP2 and in VP3. All mutations in VP5 produced precocious stop codons. Prior to the challenge, NFH-Ar and NFH-El possessed high and low virulence motifs in VP2, respectively. Nucleotide substitutions were noticed already during passage of viruses in CHSE-214 cells and their accumulation continued in the challenged fish. The sequence changes were notably directed towards low virulence. Co-ordinated activation of anti-viral genes with diverse functions (IFN-a1 and c, sensors - Rig-I, MDA-5, TLR8 and 9, signal transducers - Srk2, MyD88, effectors - Mx, galectin 9, galectin binding protein, antigen presentation - b2-microglobulin was observed at 13 d p.i. (NFH-Ar and 29 d p.i. (both isolates

  5. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-01-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs

  6. High prevalence of BRCA1 founder mutations in Greek breast/ovarian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulou, I; Tsitlaidou, M; Fostira, F; Pertesi, M; Stavropoulou, A-V; Triantafyllidou, O; Tsotra, E; Tsiftsoglou, A P; Tsionou, C; Droufakou, S; Dimitrakakis, C; Fountzilas, G; Yannoukakos, D

    2014-01-01

    We have screened 473 breast/ovarian cancer patients with family history, aiming to define the prevalence and enrich the spectrum of BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations occurring in the Greek population. An overall mutation prevalence of 32% was observed. Six BRCA1 recurrent/founder mutations dominate the observed spectrum (58.5% of all mutations found). These include three mutations in exon 20 and three large genomic deletions. Of the 44 different deleterious mutations found in both genes, 16 are novel and reported here for the first time. Correlation with available histopathology data showed that 80% of BRCA1 carriers presented a triple-negative breast cancer phenotype while 82% of BRCA2 carriers had oestrogen receptor positive tumours. This study provides a comprehensive view of the frequency, type and distribution of BRCA1/2 mutations in the Greek population as well as an insight of the screening strategy of choice for patients of Greek origin. We conclude that the Greek population has a diverse mutation spectrum influenced by strong founder effects. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. High temperature tests for graphite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed within the framework of the EURISOL for facilities SPIRAL-II (GANIL, France) and SPES (LNL, Italy), and aims to investigate the anticipated strength properties of fine-grained graphite at elevated temperatures. It appears that the major parameters that affect to the lifetime of a graphite target of this IP are the temperature and heating time. High temperature tests were conducted to simulate the heating under the influence of a beam of heavy particles by passing thro...

  8. Rapid screening of rpoB and katG mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by high-resolution melting curve analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Haeili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is essential to prevent its transmission in the community and initiate effective anti-TB treatment regimen. Materials and Methods: High-resolution melting curve (HRM analysis was evaluated for rapid detection of resistance conferring mutations in rpoB and katG genes. We screened 95 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates including 20 rifampin resistant (RIF-R, 21 isoniazid resistant (INH-R and 54 fully susceptible (S isolates determined by proportion method of drug susceptibility testing. Nineteen M. tuberculosis isolates with known drug susceptibility genotypes were used as references for the assay validation. The nucleotide sequences of the target regions rpoB and katG genes were determined to investigate the frequency and type of mutations and to confirm HRM results. Results: HRM analysis of a 129-bp fragment of rpoB allowed correct identification of 19 of the 20 phenotypically RIF-R and all RIF-S isolates. All INH-S isolates generated wild-type HRM curves and 18 out of 21 INH-R isolates harboured any mutation in 109-bp fragment of katG exhibited mutant type HRM curves. However, 1 RIF-R and 3 INH-R isolates were falsely identified as susceptible which were confirmed for having no mutation in their target regions by sequencing. The main mutations involved in RIF and INH resistance were found at codons rpoB531 (60% of RIF-R isolates and katG315 (85.7% of INH-R isolates, respectively. Conclusion: HRM was found to be a reliable, rapid and low cost method to characterise drug susceptibility of clinical TB isolates in resource-limited settings.

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of EGFR mutation testing in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with gefitinib or carboplatin-paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Anaya, Pablo; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Ramírez-Tirado, Laura Alejandra; Polanco, Ana C

    2016-09-01

    Assess the cost-effectiveness of an EGFR-mutation testing strategy for advanced NSCLC in first-line therapy with either gefitinib or carboplatin-paclitaxel in Mexican institutions. Cost-effectiveness analysis using a discrete event simulation (DES) model to simulate two therapeutic strategies in patients with advanced NSCLC. Strategy one included patients tested for EGFR-mutation and therapy given accordingly. Strategy two included chemotherapy for all patients without testing. All results are presented in 2014 US dollars. The analysis was made with data from the Mexican frequency of EGFR-mutation. A univariate sensitivity analysis was conducted on EGFR prevalence. Progression-free survival (PFS) transition probabilities were estimated on data from the IPASS and simulated with a Weibull distribution, run with parallel trials to calculate a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. PFS of patients in the testing strategy was 6.76 months (95 % CI 6.10-7.44) vs 5.85 months (95 % CI 5.43-6.29) in the non-testing group. The one-way sensitivity analysis showed that PFS has a direct relationship with EGFR-mutation prevalence, while the ICER and testing cost have an inverse relationship with EGFR-mutation prevalence. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that all iterations had incremental costs and incremental PFS for strategy 1 in comparison with strategy 2. There is a direct relationship between the ICER and the cost of EGFR testing, with an inverse relationship with the prevalence of EGFR-mutation. When prevalence is >10 % ICER remains constant. This study could impact Mexican and Latin American health policies regarding mutation detection testing and treatment for advanced NSCLC.

  10. Preappointment testing for BRAF/KIT mutation in advanced melanoma: a model in molecular data delivery for individualized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounajjed, Taofic; Brown, Char L; Stern, Therese K; Bjorheim, Annette M; Bridgeman, Andrew J; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; McWilliams, Robert R; Flotte, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    The emergence of individualized medicine is driven by developments in precision diagnostics, epitomized by molecular testing. Because treatment decisions are being made based on such molecular data, data management is gaining major importance. Among data management challenges, creating workflow solutions for timely delivery of molecular data has become pivotal. This study aims to design and implement a scalable process that permits preappointment BRAF/KIT mutation analysis in melanoma patients, allowing molecular results necessary for treatment plans to be available before the patient's appointment. Process implementation aims to provide a model for efficient molecular data delivery for individualized medicine. We examined the existing process of BRAF/KIT testing in melanoma patients visiting our institution for oncology consultation. We created 5 working groups, each designing a specific segment of an alternative process that would allow preappointment BRAF/KIT testing and delivery of results. Data were captured and analyzed to evaluate the success of the alternative process. For 1 year, 35 (59%) of 55 patients had prior BRAF/KIT testing. The remaining 20 patients went through the new process of preappointment testing; results were available at the time of appointment for 12 patients (overall preappointment results availability, 85.5%). The overall process averaged 13.4 ± 4.7 days. In conclusion, we describe the successful implementation of a scalable workflow solution that permits preappointment BRAF/KIT mutation analysis and result delivery in melanoma patients. This sets the stage for further applications of this model to other conditions, answering an increasing demand for robust delivery of molecular data for individualized medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High prevalence of impaired glucose homeostasis and myopathy in asymptomatic and oligosymptomatic 3243A>G mitochondrial DNA mutation-positive subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, A.L.; Jeppesen, T.D.; Vissing, J.

    2009-01-01

    controls were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test. Twenty-six adult 3243A>G carriers with unknown myopathy status and 17 healthy controls had a maximal cycle test and a muscle biopsy performed. The mutation loads were quantified in blood and muscle biopsies and correlated to the clinical......INTRODUCTION: The point mutation of 3243A>G mtDNA is the most frequent cause of mitochondrial diabetes, often presenting as the syndrome maternally inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD). The mutation may also cause myopathy, ataxia, strokes, ophthalmoplegia, epilepsy, and cardiomyopathy in various...... combinations. Consequently, it is difficult to predict the "phenotypic risk profile" of 3243A>G mutation-positive subjects. The 3243A>G mutation coexists in cells with wild-type mtDNA, a phenomenon called heteroplasmy. The marked variability in mutation loads in different tissues is the main explanation...

  12. Evidence in Latin America of recurrence of V388M, a phenylketonuria mutation with high in vitro residual activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desviat, L.R.; Perez, B.; De Lucca, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, (Spain)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Phenylketonuria mutation V388M is frequent in the Iberian Peninsula. In vitro, the V388M mutant enzyme has similar immunoreactive protein and phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA and had 43% residual activity, which correlates well with the mild phenotype exhibited by the homozygous patients. In Spain it has been detected in 5.7% of the mutant alleles and is always associated with haplotype 1.7. This mutation is also present in high frequency in some Latin American countries (Brazil, 9% Chile, 13%). It is interesting that in Chile most of the alleles bearing this mutation carry haplotype 4.3, although in Brazil it is found only on the background of haplotype 1.7. The origin of V388M in Spain on haplotype 1.7 and in Chile on haplotype 4.3 is clearly different. Recurrence is the most plausible explanation, because the mutation involves a CpG dinucleotide, and a recombination event transferring the mutation from haplotype 1 to 4 is unlikely. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. RAD51C germline mutations in breast and ovarian cancer cases from high-risk families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Clague

    Full Text Available BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most well-known breast cancer susceptibility genes. Additional genes involved in DNA repair have been identified as predisposing to breast cancer. One such gene, RAD51C, is essential for homologous recombination repair. Several likely pathogenic RAD51C mutations have been identified in BRCA1- and BRCA2-negative breast and ovarian cancer families. We performed complete sequencing of RAD51C in germline DNA of 286 female breast and/or ovarian cancer cases with a family history of breast and ovarian cancers, who had previously tested negative for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. We screened 133 breast cancer cases, 119 ovarian cancer cases, and 34 with both breast and ovarian cancers. Fifteen DNA sequence variants were identified; including four intronic, one 5' UTR, one promoter, three synonymous, and six non-synonymous variants. None were truncating. The in-silico SIFT and Polyphen programs were used to predict possible pathogenicity of the six non-synonomous variants based on sequence conservation. G153D and T287A were predicted to be likely pathogenic. Two additional variants, A126T and R214C alter amino acids in important domains of the protein such that they could be pathogenic. Two-hybrid screening and immunoblot analyses were performed to assess the functionality of these four non-synonomous variants in yeast. The RAD51C-G153D protein displayed no detectable interaction with either XRCC3 or RAD51B, and RAD51C-R214C displayed significantly decreased interaction with both XRCC3 and RAD51B (p<0.001. Immunoblots of RAD51C-Gal4 activation domain fusion peptides showed protein levels of RAD51C-G153D and RAD51C-R214C that were 50% and 60% of the wild-type, respectively. Based on these data, the RAD51C-G153D variant is likely to be pathogenic, while the RAD51C- R214C variant is hypomorphic of uncertain pathogenicity. These results provide further support that RAD51C is a rare breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene.

  14. TP53 mutations in serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma and concurrent pelvic high-grade serous carcinoma—evidence supporting the clonal relationship of the two lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Elisabetta; Kurman, Robert J; Vang, Russell; Sehdev, Ann Smith; Han, Guangming; Soslow, Robert; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs) have been proposed to be the most likely precursor of ovarian, tubal and ‘primary peritoneal’ (pelvic) high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC). As somatic mutation of TP53 is the most common molecular genetic change of ovarian HGSC, occurring in more than 95% of cases, we undertook a mutational analysis of 29 pelvic HGSCs that had concurrent STICs to demonstrate the clonal relationship of STICs and HGSCs. In addition, we correlated the mutational data with p53 immunostaining to determine the role of p53 immunoreactivity as a surrogate for TP53 mutations in histological diagnosis. Somatic TP53 mutations were detected in all 29 HGSCs analysed and the identical mutations were detected in 27 of 29 pairs of STICs and concurrent HGSCs. Missense mutations were observed in 61% of STICs and frameshift/splicing junction/nonsense mutations in 39%. Interestingly, there were two HGSCs with two distinctly different TP53 mutations each, but only one of the mutations was detected in the concurrent STICs. Missense mutations were associated with intense and diffuse (≥ 60%) p53 nuclear immunoreactivity, while most of the null mutations were associated with complete loss of p53 staining (p STIC and pelvic HGSC and demonstrate the utility of p53 immunostaining as a surrogate for TP53 mutation in the histological diagnosis of STIC. In this regard, it is important to appreciate the significance of different staining patterns. Specifically, strong diffuse staining correlates with a missense mutation, whereas complete absence of staining correlates with null mutations. PMID:21990067

  15. TP53 mutations in serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma and concurrent pelvic high-grade serous carcinoma--evidence supporting the clonal relationship of the two lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Elisabetta; Kurman, Robert J; Vang, Russell; Sehdev, Ann Smith; Han, Guangming; Soslow, Robert; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2012-02-01

    Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs) have been proposed to be the most likely precursor of ovarian, tubal and 'primary peritoneal' (pelvic) high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC). As somatic mutation of TP53 is the most common molecular genetic change of ovarian HGSC, occurring in more than 95% of cases, we undertook a mutational analysis of 29 pelvic HGSCs that had concurrent STICs to demonstrate the clonal relationship of STICs and HGSCs. In addition, we correlated the mutational data with p53 immunostaining to determine the role of p53 immunoreactivity as a surrogate for TP53 mutations in histological diagnosis. Somatic TP53 mutations were detected in all 29 HGSCs analysed and the identical mutations were detected in 27 of 29 pairs of STICs and concurrent HGSCs. Missense mutations were observed in 61% of STICs and frameshift/splicing junction/nonsense mutations in 39%. Interestingly, there were two HGSCs with two distinctly different TP53 mutations each, but only one of the mutations was detected in the concurrent STICs. Missense mutations were associated with intense and diffuse (≥ 60%) p53 nuclear immunoreactivity, while most of the null mutations were associated with complete loss of p53 staining (p STIC and pelvic HGSC and demonstrate the utility of p53 immunostaining as a surrogate for TP53 mutation in the histological diagnosis of STIC. In this regard, it is important to appreciate the significance of different staining patterns. Specifically, strong diffuse staining correlates with a missense mutation, whereas complete absence of staining correlates with null mutations. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. High frequency of the recurrent c.1310_1313delAAGA BRCA2 mutation in the North-East of Morocco and implication for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarabi, Fatima-Zahra; Ratbi, Ilham; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Mezzouar, Loubna; Doubaj, Yassamine; Bouguenouch, Laila; Ouldim, Karim; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2017-06-02

    To date, a limited number of BRCA1/2 germline mutations have been reported in hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer in the Moroccan population. Less than 20 different mutations of these two genes have been identified in Moroccan patients, and recently we reported a further BRCA2 mutation (c.1310_1313delAAGA; p.Lys437IlefsX22) in three unrelated patients, all from the North-East of the country. We aimed in this study to evaluate the frequency and geographic distribution of this BRCA2 frameshift mutation, in order to access its use as the first-line BRCA genetic testing strategy for Moroccan patients. We enrolled in this study 122 patients from different regions of Morocco, with suggestive inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancers. All subjects gave written informed consent to BRCA1/2 genetic testing. According to available resources of our lab and enrolled families, 51 patients were analyzed by the conventional individual exon-by-exon Sanger sequencing, 23 patients were able to benefit from a BRCA next generation sequencing and a target screening for exon 10 of BRCA2 gene was performed in 48 patients. Overall, and among the 122 patients analyzed for at least the exon 10 of the BRCA2 gene, the c.1310_1313delAAGA frameshift mutation was found in 14 patients. Genealogic investigation revealed that all carriers of this mutation shared the same geographic origin and were descendants of the North-East of Morocco. In this study, we highlighted that c.1310_1313delAAGA mutation of BRCA2 gene is recurrent with high frequency in patients from the North-East region of Morocco. Therefore, we propose to use, in public health strategies, the detection of this mutation as the first-line screening tests in patients with breast and ovarian cancer originated from this region.

  17. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 ◦C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive...... media, as well as localized sampling of gas evolved at the electrodes for gas analysis. A number of safety and engineering design challenges have been addressed. Furthermore, we present a series of electrochemical cell holders that have been constructed in order to accommodate different types of cells...... and facilitate different types of electrochemical measurements. Selected examples of materials and electrochemical cells examined in the test station are provided, ranging from the evaluation of the ionic conductivity of liquid electrolytic solutions immobilized in mesoporous ceramic structures...

  18. Testing waste forms containing high radionuclide loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is obtaining information on radioactive waste during NRC-prescribed tests and in a disposal environment. This paper describes the resin solidification task of that program, including the present status and results to date. An unusual aspect of this investigation is the use of commercial grade, ion exchange resins that have been loaded with over five times the radioactivity normally seen in a commercial application. That dramatically increases the total radiation dose to the resins. The objective of the resin solidification task is to determine the adequacy of test procedures specified by NRC for ion exchange resins having high radionuclide loadings

  19. Test of high temperature fuel element, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Norio; Shiina, Yasuaki; Nekoya, Shin-ichi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Emori, Koichi

    1980-11-01

    Heat transfer experiment to measure the characteristics of a VHTR fuel in the same condition of the reactor core was carried out using HTGL (High Temperature Helium Gas Loop) and its test section. In this report, the details of the test section, related problems of construction and some typical results are described. The newly developed heater with graphite heat transfer surface was used as a simulated fuel element to determine the heat transfer characteristics. Following conclusions were obtained; (1) Reynolds number between turbulent and transitional region is about 2600. (2) Reynolds number between transitional and laminar region is about 4800. (3) The laminarization phenomena have not been observed and are hardly occurred in annular tubes comparing with round tube. (4) Measured Nusselt numbers agree to the established correlations in turbulent and laminar regions. (author)

  20. IGF-I generation test in prepubertal children with Noonan syndrome due to mutations in the PTPN11 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelloni, Silvano; Baroncelli, Giampiero I; Dati, Eleonora; Ghione, Silvia; Baldinotti, Fulvia; Toschi, Benedetta; Simi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Short stature represents one of the main features of children with Noonan syndrome. The reason for impaired growth remains largely unknown. To assess GH and IGF1 secretion in children with Noonan syndrome. 12 prepubertal children with Noonan syndrome due to mutations in the PTPN11 gene [7 males, 6 females; median age, years: 8.6 (range 5.1-13.4)] were studied; 12 prepubertal children with short stature (SS) [7 males, 5 females; median age, years: 8.1 (range 4.8-13.1)] served as the control group. GH secretion after arginine stimulation test; IGF1 generation test by measurement of IGF1 levels before and after recombinant GH (rGH) administration (0.05 mg/kg/day for 4 days). Baseline and stimulated peak values of GH were not significantly different between the two groups. At +120 minutes, GH levels remained significantly higher (p = 0.0121) in comparison with baseline values in children with Noonan syndrome. Baseline IGFI levels in patients and in SS controls were not significantly different, in contrast to values after the rGH generation test [205 ng/mL (interquartiles 138.2-252.5 ng/mL) and 284.5 ng/mL (interquartiles 172-476 ng/mL), respectively; p = 0.0248]. IGF1 values were significantly related to height (baseline: r = 773, p = 0.0320; peak: r = 0.591, p = 0.0428) in children with Noonan syndrome. Blunted increase of IGF1 after the rGH generation test was present in children with Noonan syndrome due to mutations in the PTPN11 gene in comparison with SS children. This finding may be due to partial GH resistance in the former likely related to altered Ras-MAPK signaling pathway.

  1. Hit-size effectiveness theory applied to high doses of low LET radiation for pink mutations in Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, M.N.; Bond, V.P.; Matthews, G.

    1985-01-01

    A hit-size effectiveness function which represents the probability of inducing a pink mutation in Tradescantia as a function of lineal energy density has been obtained (1) using observed pink mutation data for seven different radiation qualities and their respective single event microdosimetric spectra. In obtaining this function only the linear portions of dose-response curves were used. A significant improvement of the concepts embodied in the proposed hit-size effectiveness theory would be the demonstration of its applicability at high doses (where multiple hits are produced) and high dose rates (at which no significant biological repair takes place). In this article details are given on preliminary calculations of the pink mutation frequency in Tradescantia at 1, 5, 10, 20, and 60 rads for 250 kVp x rays, using the multi-hit spectra and the hit-size effectiveness function obtained on the basis of single hit microdosimetric spectra as outline in (1). A comparison of the calculated and observed pink mutation frequencies indicate excellent agreement and suggests the possibility of obtaining the hit-size effectiveness function from high dose biological-effect data obtained using low-LET radiations. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  2. High frequency of potentially pathogenic SORL1 mutations in autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, C; Hannequin, D; Coutant, S; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Wallon, D; Rousseau, S; Legallic, S; Paquet, C; Bombois, S; Pariente, J; Thomas-Anterion, C; Michon, A; Croisile, B; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Berr, C; Dartigues, J-F; Amouyel, P; Dauchel, H; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, C; Thauvin, C; Frebourg, T; Lambert, J-C; Campion, D

    2012-09-01

    Performing exome sequencing in 14 autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) index cases without mutation on known genes (amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin1 (PSEN1) and presenilin2 (PSEN2)), we found that in five patients, the SORL1 gene harbored unknown nonsense (n=1) or missense (n=4) mutations. These mutations were not retrieved in 1500 controls of same ethnic origin. In a replication sample, including 15 ADEOAD cases, 2 unknown non-synonymous mutations (1 missense, 1 nonsense) were retrieved, thus yielding to a total of 7/29 unknown mutations in the combined sample. Using in silico predictions, we conclude that these seven private mutations are likely to have a pathogenic effect. SORL1 encodes the Sortilin-related receptor LR11/SorLA, a protein involved in the control of amyloid beta peptide production. Our results suggest that besides the involvement of the APP and PSEN genes, further genetic heterogeneity, involving another gene of the same pathway is present in ADEOAD.

  3. Mutational breeding and genetic engineering in the development of high grain protein content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenefrida, Ida; Utomo, Herry S; Linscombe, Steve D

    2013-12-04

    Cereals are the most important crops in the world for both human consumption and animal feed. Improving their nutritional values, such as high protein content, will have significant implications, from establishing healthy lifestyles to helping remediate malnutrition problems worldwide. Besides providing a source of carbohydrate, grain is also a natural source of dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, specific oils, and other disease-fighting phytocompounds. Even though cereal grains contain relatively little protein compared to legume seeds, they provide protein for the nutrition of humans and livestock that is about 3 times that of legumes. Most cereal seeds lack a few essential amino acids; therefore, they have imbalanced amino acid profiles. Lysine (Lys), threonine (Thr), methionine (Met), and tryptophan (Trp) are among the most critical and are a limiting factor in many grain crops for human nutrition. Tremendous research has been put into the efforts to improve these essential amino acids. Development of high protein content can be outlined in four different approaches through manipulating seed protein bodies, modulating certain biosynthetic pathways to overproduce essential and limiting amino acids, increasing nitrogen relocation to the grain through the introduction of transgenes, and exploiting new genetic variance. Various technologies have been employed to improve protein content including conventional and mutational breeding, genetic engineering, marker-assisted selection, and genomic analysis. Each approach involves a combination of these technologies. Advancements in nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics continue to improve public knowledge at a rapid pace on the importance of specific aspects of food nutrition for optimum fitness and health. An understanding of the molecular basis for human health and genetic predisposition to certain diseases through human genomes enables individuals to personalize their nutritional requirements. It is critically important

  4. Co-inheritance of HNF1a and GCK mutations in a family with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY): implications for genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Garrido, M P; Herranz-Antolín, S; Alija-Merillas, M J; Giralt, P; Escribano, J

    2013-09-01

    To determine the genetic basis of dominant early-onset diabetes mellitus in two families. Molecular analysis by PCR sequencing of the promoter, the 5' untranslated region (UTR) and exons of both GCK and HNF1A genes was carried out in two families with clinically diagnosed dominant diabetes mellitus. The novel HNF1A c.-154_-160TGGGGGT mutation, located in the 5' UTR, was present in several members of the two families in the heterozygous state. Interestingly, the GCK p.Y61X mutation was also identified in three members of one of the families, and two of them carried both mutations in heterozygosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the co-inheritance of GCK and HNF1A mutations and the coexistence of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) 2, MODY 3 and unusual MODY 2-3 genotypes in the same family. Carriers of both GCK and HNF1A mutations manifested a typical MODY 3 phenotype and showed that the presence of a second mutation in the GCK gene apparently did not modify the clinical outcome, at least at the time of this study. Our data show that co-inheritance of MODY 2 and MODY 3 mutations should be considered, at least in some cases, for accurate genetic testing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The strains recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471) can be certified as non-genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Yamada, Masami; Awogi, Takumi; Hakura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial reverse mutation test, commonly called Ames test, is used worldwide. In Japan, the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are regulated under the Cartagena Domestic Law, and organisms obtained by self-cloning and/or natural occurrence would be exempted from the law case by case. The strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471), have been considered as non-GMOs because they can be constructed by self-cloning or naturally occurring bacterial strains, or do not disturb the biological diversity. The present article explains the reasons why these tester strains should be classified as non-GMOs.

  6. The Alzheimer's prevention initiative composite cognitive test score: sample size estimates for the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer's disease treatments in presenilin 1 E280A mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Langbaum, Jessica B S; Hendrix, Suzanne B; Chen, Kewei; Fleisher, Adam S; Friesenhahn, Michel; Ward, Michael; Aguirre, Camilo; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Madrigal, Lucìa; Muñoz, Claudia; Tirado, Victoria; Moreno, Sonia; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M

    2014-06-01

    To identify a cognitive composite that is sensitive to tracking preclinical Alzheimer's disease decline to be used as a primary end point in treatment trials. We capitalized on longitudinal data collected from 1995 to 2010 from cognitively unimpaired presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers from the world's largest known early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease kindred to identify a composite cognitive test with the greatest statistical power to track preclinical Alzheimer's disease decline and estimate the number of carriers age 30 years and older needed to detect a treatment effect in the Alzheimer's Prevention Initiative's (API) preclinical Alzheimer's disease treatment trial. The mean-to-standard-deviation ratios (MSDRs) of change over time were calculated in a search for the optimal combination of 1 to 7 cognitive tests/subtests drawn from the neuropsychological test battery in cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers during a 2- and 5-year follow-up period (n = 78 and 57), using data from noncarriers (n = 31 and 56) during the same time period to correct for aging and practice effects. Combinations that performed well were then evaluated for robustness across follow-up years, occurrence of selected items within top-performing combinations, and representation of relevant cognitive domains. The optimal test combination included Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) Word List Recall, CERAD Boston Naming Test (high frequency items), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) Orientation to Time, CERAD Constructional Praxis, and Raven's Progressive Matrices (Set A), with an MSDR of 1.62. This composite is more sensitive than using either the CERAD Word List Recall (MSDR = 0.38) or the entire CERAD-Col battery (MSDR = 0.76). A sample size of 75 cognitively normal PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers aged 30 years and older per treatment arm allows for a detectable treatment effect of 29% in a 60-month trial (80% power, P = .05). We

  7. Mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA A1555G mutation associated with cardiomyopathy and hearing loss following high-dose chemotherapy and repeated aminoglycoside exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Anne-Sofie; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Jensen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    A 19-month-old girl with the A1555G mitochondrial mutation in the 12S ribosomal RNA gene and acute myelogenous leukemia developed dilated cardiomyopathy and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss before undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. She had received gentamicin during episodes of ...... of febrile neutropenia. Testing for the A1555G mutation is recommended in patients frequently treated with aminoglycosides....

  8. Applications of Logic Coverage Criteria and Logic Mutation to Software Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Garrett K.

    2011-01-01

    Logic is an important component of software. Thus, software logic testing has enjoyed significant research over a period of decades, with renewed interest in the last several years. One approach to detecting logic faults is to create and execute tests that satisfy logic coverage criteria. Another approach to detecting faults is to perform mutation…

  9. Genetic Counseling and Cardiac Care in Predictively Tested Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers: The Patients' Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be

  10. 76 FR 65385 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Third Group of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-21

    ... Mutations: Bacterial Reverse Mutation Test (in vitro): 40 CFR 799.9510. b. Chromosomal Damage: In Vitro... alternate test. 6. Mammalian Toxicity--Repeated Dose/Reproduction/Developmental--a. Combined Repeated Dose Toxicity Study with the Reproduction/ Developmental Toxicity Screening Test: 40 CFR 799.9365. b...

  11. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    with 3 cm diameter graphite-based fuel pebbles slowly circulating up through the core. Molten salt coolant (FLiBe) at 700°C flows concurrently (at significantly higher velocity) with the pebbles and is used to remove heat generated in the reactor core (approximately 1280 W/pebble), and supply it to a power conversion system. Refueling equipment continuously sorts spent fuel pebbles and replaces spent or damaged pebbles with fresh fuel. By combining greater or fewer numbers of pebble channel assemblies, multiple reactor designs with varying power levels can be offered. The PB-AHTR design is discussed in detail in Reference [1] and is shown schematically in Fig. 1. Fig. 1. PB-AHTR concept (drawing taken from Peterson et al., Design and Development of the Modular PB-AHTR Proceedings of ICApp 08). Pebble behavior within the core is a key issue in proving the viability of this concept. This includes understanding the behavior of the pebbles thermally, hydraulically, and mechanically (quantifying pebble wear characteristics, flow channel wear, etc). The experiment being developed is an initial step in characterizing the pebble behavior under realistic PB-AHTR operating conditions. It focuses on thermal and hydraulic behavior of a static pebble bed using a convective salt loop to provide prototypic fluid conditions to the bed, and a unique inductive heating technique to provide prototypic heating in the pebbles. The facility design is sufficiently versatile to allow a variety of other experimentation to be performed in the future. The facility can accommodate testing of scaled reactor components or sub-components such as flow diodes, salt-to-salt heat exchangers, and improved pump designs as well as testing of refueling equipment, high temperature instrumentation, and other reactor core designs.

  12. Intra-tumoral Heterogeneity of KRAS and BRAF Mutation Status in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer (aCRC and Cost-Effectiveness of Multiple Sample Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D. Richman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available KRAS mutation status is established as a predictive biomarker of benefit from anti-EGFr therapies. Mutations are normally assessed using DNA extracted from one formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tumor block. We assessed heterogeneity of KRAS and BRAF mutation status intra-tumorally (multiple blocks from the same primary tumor. We also investigated the utility and efficiency of genotyping a ‘DNA cocktail’ prepared from multiple blocks. We studied 68 consenting patients in two randomized clinical trials. DNA was extracted, from ≥2 primary tumor FFPE blocks per patient. DNA was genotyped by pyrosequencing for KRAS codons 12, 13 and 61 and BRAF codon 600. In patients with heterogeneous mutation status, DNA cocktails were prepared and genotyped. Among 69 primary tumors in 68 patients, 7 (10.1% showed intratumoral heterogeneity; 5 (7.2% at KRAS codons 12, 13 and 2 (2.9% at BRAF codon 600. In patients displaying heterogeneity, the relevant KRAS or BRAF mutation was also identified in ‘DNA cocktail’ samples when including DNA from mutant and wild-type blocks. Heterogeneity is uncommon but not insignificant. Testing DNA from a single block will wrongly assign wild-type status to 10% patients. Testing more than one block, or preferably preparation of a ‘DNA cocktail’ from two or more tumor blocks, improves mutation detection at minimal extra cost.

  13. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  14. Detection of high frequency of mutations in a breast and/or ovarian cancer cohort: implications of embracing a multi-gene panel in molecular diagnosis in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Ashraf U; Singh, Jaya; Lakshmikeshava, Ravikiran; Thota, Nishita; Singh, Suhasini; Sowmya, T S; Mishra, Avshesh; Sinha, Aditi; Deshwal, Shivani; Soni, Megha R; Chandrasekar, Anbukayalvizhi; Ramesh, Bhargavi; Ramamurthy, Bharat; Padhi, Shila; Manek, Payal; Ramalingam, Ravi; Kapoor, Suman; Ghosh, Mithua; Sankaran, Satish; Ghosh, Arunabha; Veeramachaneni, Vamsi; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Hariharan, Ramesh; Subramanian, Kalyanasundaram

    2016-06-01

    Breast and/or ovarian cancer (BOC) are among the most frequently diagnosed forms of hereditary cancers and leading cause of death in India. This emphasizes on the need for a cost-effective method for early detection of these cancers. We sequenced 141 unrelated patients and families with BOC using the TruSight Cancer panel, which includes 13 genes strongly associated with risk of inherited BOC. Multi-gene sequencing was done on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Genetic variations were identified using the Strand NGS software and interpreted using the StrandOmics platform. We were able to detect pathogenic mutations in 51 (36.2%) cases, out of which 19 were novel mutations. When we considered familial breast cancer cases only, the detection rate increased to 52%. When cases were stratified based on age of diagnosis into three categories, ⩽40 years, 40-50 years and >50 years, the detection rates were higher in the first two categories (44.4% and 53.4%, respectively) as compared with the third category, in which it was 26.9%. Our study suggests that next-generation sequencing-based multi-gene panels increase the sensitivity of mutation detection and help in identifying patients with a high risk of developing cancer as compared with sequential tests of individual genes.

  15. High Power Alternator Test Unit (ATU) Electrical System Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, Arthur; Hervol, David

    2007-01-01

    The Alternator Test Unit (ATU) in the Lunar Power System Facility (LPSF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH was used to simulate the operating conditions and evaluate the performance of the ATU and it s interaction with various LPSF components in accordance with the JIMO AC Power System Requirements. The testing was carried out at the breadboard development level. Results of these tests will be used for the development and validation of analytical models for performance and lifetime prediction.

  16. Ultrasonic test of highly stressed gear shafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiner, T. [Siemens AG, Power Generation, KWU, Muelheim (Germany); Heinrich, W. [Siemens AG, Power Generation, KWU, Berlin (Germany); Achtzehn, J. [Siemens AG, Power Generation, ICVW, Erlangen (Germany); Hensley, H. [Siemens Power Generation (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In the power plant industry, gears are used for increasingly higher turbine capacities. Efficiency enhancements, particularly for the combined gas and steam turbine process, lead to an increase in stresses, even for high-performance gears. Consequently, the requirements for non-destructive material testing are on the increase as well. At Siemens KWU, high-performance gears are used so far only for gas turbines with lower rating (65 MW) to adapt the gas turbine speed (5413 rpm) to the generator speed (3000 rpm/ 50 Hz or 3600 rpm/60 Hz). The gear train consists of a forged and case-hardened wheel shaft and pinion shaft made of material 17 CrNiMo 6, where the wheel shaft can be either a solid or a hollow shaft. Dimensions are typically 2.3 m length and 1 m diameter. As a rule, pinion shafts are solid. The gear design, calling for an additional torsion shaft turning inside the hollow wheel shaft, can absorb more torsional load surges and is more tolerant of deviations during gear train alignment. This design requires two additional forgings (torsion shaft and hub) and an additional bearing 2 refs.

  17. Ultrasonic test of highly stressed gear shafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiner, T [Siemens AG, Power Generation, KWU, Muelheim (Germany); Heinrich, W [Siemens AG, Power Generation, KWU, Berlin (Germany); Achtzehn, J [Siemens AG, Power Generation, ICVW, Erlangen (Germany); Hensley, H [Siemens Power Generation (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    In the power plant industry, gears are used for increasingly higher turbine capacities. Efficiency enhancements, particularly for the combined gas and steam turbine process, lead to an increase in stresses, even for high-performance gears. Consequently, the requirements for non-destructive material testing are on the increase as well. At Siemens KWU, high-performance gears are used so far only for gas turbines with lower rating (65 MW) to adapt the gas turbine speed (5413 rpm) to the generator speed (3000 rpm/ 50 Hz or 3600 rpm/60 Hz). The gear train consists of a forged and case-hardened wheel shaft and pinion shaft made of material 17 CrNiMo 6, where the wheel shaft can be either a solid or a hollow shaft. Dimensions are typically 2.3 m length and 1 m diameter. As a rule, pinion shafts are solid. The gear design, calling for an additional torsion shaft turning inside the hollow wheel shaft, can absorb more torsional load surges and is more tolerant of deviations during gear train alignment. This design requires two additional forgings (torsion shaft and hub) and an additional bearing 2 refs.

  18. Physiochemical and Thermodynamic Characterization of Highly Active Mutated Aspergillus niger β-glucosidase for Lignocellulose Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad Rizwan; Rashid, Muhammad Hamid; Riaz, Muhammad; Nadeem, Habibullah; Qasim, Muhammad; Ashiq, Nourin

    2018-01-01

    Cellulose represents a major source of fermentable sugars in lignocellulosic biomass and a combined action of hydrolytic enzymes (exoglucanases , endoglucanases and β-glucosidases) is required to effectively convert cellulose to glucose that can be fermented to bio-ethanol. However, in-order to make the production of bio-ethanol an economically feasible process, the costs of the enzymes to be used for hydrolysis of the raw material need to be reduced and an increase in specific activity or production efficiency of cellulases is required. Among the cellulases, β-glucosidase not only hydrolyzes cellobiose to glucose but it also reduces the cellobiose inhibition, resulting in efficient functioning of endo- and exo-glucanases. Therefore, in the current study kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of highly active β-glucosidase from randomly mutated Aspergillus niger NIBGE-06 have been evaluated for its industrial applications. The main objective of this study was the identification of mutations and determination of their effect on the physiochemical, kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of β-glucosidase activity and stability. Pure cultures of Aspergillus niger NIBGE and its 2-Deoxy-D-glucose resistant γ-rays mutant Aspergillus niger NIBGE-06 were grown on Vogel's medium containing wheat bran (3% w/v), at 30±1 °C for 96-108 h. Crude enzymes from both strains were subjected to ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatography on Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC) system. The purified β-glucosidases from both fungal sources were characterized for their native and subunit molecular mass through FPLC and SDS-PAGE, respectively. The purified enzymes were then comparatively characterized for their optimum temperature, activation energy (Ea), temperature quotient (Q10), Optimum pH, Heat of ionization (ΔHI) of active site residues , Michaelis-Menten constants (Vmax, Km, kcat and kcat/Km) and thermodynamics of irreversible inactivation through

  19. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome: a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian

    Objective: QT interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome (TS). This study set out to explore the presence of known pathogenic long QT (LQT) mutations in TS and to examine the corrected QT interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the TS phenotype. Methods......QTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome (LQTS) was determined in females with TS and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. Results: The mean hQTc in females with TS (414.0±25.5 ms...

  20. Social contract theory and just decision making: lessons from genetic testing for the BRCA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Jones, Bryn; Burgess, Michael M

    2004-06-01

    Decisions about funding health services are crucial to controlling costs in health care insurance plans, yet they encounter serious challenges from intellectual property protection--e.g., patents--of health care services. Using Myriad Genetics' commercial genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer (BRCA testing) in the context of the Canadian health insurance system as a case study, this paper applies concepts from social contract theory to help develop more just and rational approaches to health care decision making. Specifically, Daniel's and Sabin's "accountability for reasonableness" is compared to broader notions of public consultation, demonstrating that expert assessments in specific decisions must be transparent and accountable and supplemented by public consultation.

  1. High purity microfluidic sorting and analysis of circulating tumor cells: towards routine mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autebert, Julien; Coudert, Benoit; Champ, Jérôme; Saias, Laure; Guneri, Ezgi Tulukcuoglu; Lebofsky, Ronald; Bidard, François-Clément; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Farace, Françoise; Descroix, Stéphanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2015-05-07

    A new generation of the Ephesia cell capture technology optimized for CTC capture and genetic analysis is presented, characterized in depth and compared with the CellSearch system as a reference. This technology uses magnetic particles bearing tumour-cell specific EpCAM antibodies, self-assembled in a regular array in a microfluidic flow cell. 48,000 high aspect-ratio columns are generated using a magnetic field in a high throughput (>3 ml h(-1)) device and act as sieves to specifically capture the cells of interest through antibody-antigen interactions. Using this device optimized for CTC capture and analysis, we demonstrated the capture of epithelial cells with capture efficiency above 90% for concentrations as low as a few cells per ml. We showed the high specificity of capture with only 0.26% of non-epithelial cells captured for concentrations above 10 million cells per ml. We investigated the capture behavior of cells in the device, and correlated the cell attachment rate with the EpCAM expression on the cell membranes for six different cell lines. We developed and characterized a two-step blood processing method to allow for rapid processing of 10 ml blood tubes in less than 4 hours, and showed a capture rate of 70% for as low as 25 cells spiked in 10 ml blood tubes, with less than 100 contaminating hematopoietic cells. Using this device and procedure, we validated our system on patient samples using an automated cell immunostaining procedure and a semi-automated cell counting method. Our device captured CTCs in 75% of metastatic prostate cancer patients and 80% of metastatic breast cancer patients, and showed similar or better results than the CellSearch device in 10 out of 13 samples. Finally, we demonstrated the possibility of detecting cancer-related PIK3CA gene mutation in 20 cells captured in the chip with a good correlation between the cell count and the quantitation value Cq of the post-capture qPCR.

  2. Tumor mismatch repair immunohistochemistry and DNA MLH1 methylation testing of patients with endometrial cancer diagnosed at age younger than 60 years optimizes triage for population-level germline mismatch repair gene mutation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Daniel D; Tan, Yen Y; Walsh, Michael D; Clendenning, Mark; Metcalf, Alexander M; Ferguson, Kaltin; Arnold, Sven T; Thompson, Bryony A; Lose, Felicity A; Parsons, Michael T; Walters, Rhiannon J; Pearson, Sally-Ann; Cummings, Margaret; Oehler, Martin K; Blomfield, Penelope B; Quinn, Michael A; Kirk, Judy A; Stewart, Colin J; Obermair, Andreas; Young, Joanne P; Webb, Penelope M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2014-01-10

    Clinicopathologic data from a population-based endometrial cancer cohort, unselected for age or family history, were analyzed to determine the optimal scheme for identification of patients with germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Endometrial cancers from 702 patients recruited into the Australian National Endometrial Cancer Study (ANECS) were tested for MMR protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and for MLH1 gene promoter methylation in MLH1-deficient cases. MMR mutation testing was performed on germline DNA of patients with MMR-protein deficient tumors. Prediction of germline mutation status was compared for combinations of tumor characteristics, age at diagnosis, and various clinical criteria (Amsterdam, Bethesda, Society of Gynecologic Oncology, ANECS). Tumor MMR-protein deficiency was detected in 170 (24%) of 702 cases. Germline testing of 158 MMR-deficient cases identified 22 truncating mutations (3% of all cases) and four unclassified variants. Tumor MLH1 methylation was detected in 99 (89%) of 111 cases demonstrating MLH1/PMS2 IHC loss; all were germline MLH1 mutation negative. A combination of MMR IHC plus MLH1 methylation testing in women younger than 60 years of age at diagnosis provided the highest positive predictive value for the identification of mutation carriers at 46% versus ≤ 41% for any other criteria considered. Population-level identification of patients with MMR mutation-positive endometrial cancer is optimized by stepwise testing for tumor MMR IHC loss in patients younger than 60 years, tumor MLH1 methylation in individuals with MLH1 IHC loss, and germline mutations in patients exhibiting loss of MSH6, MSH2, or PMS2 or loss of MLH1/PMS2 with absence of MLH1 methylation.

  3. Energy Systems High-Pressure Test Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility | NREL Energy Systems High-Pressure Test Laboratory Energy Systems High-Pressure Test Laboratory In the Energy Systems Integration Facility's High-Pressure Test Laboratory, researchers can safely test high-pressure hydrogen components. Photo of researchers running an experiment with a hydrogen fuel

  4. Electiveness of photorepair, influence of dark-repair on shape of dose-response curves, and high-dose decline, in UV-induced colour mutations of Serratia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Strain CV of Serratia marcescens mutates by UV with high frequency to 3 groups of mutants (w, h, s) differing in colour from the red wild-type. The mutational dose-response curve has a curvature corresponding to about 3 hits. It reaches a peak and declines at high doses. Inactivation curves have a broad shoulder and mostly, but not always, a break to a lesser slope at UV doses near the peak of mutations. Photo reactivation (PR) gives a dose reduction of about 2 for both inactivation and mutation including the break and peak. The dose curve with PR for w-mutations shows 1 hit-, the other types 2-hit curvature leading to a change of mutation spectrum with dose due to PR. The UV-sensitive mutant uvs21 of CV has a survival curve with a small shoulder and a long upward concavity without a break, and the mutation curve is of the one-hit type without a peak and decline. PR gives a dose reduction of 12 for inactivation and of 7.5 for mutation. The 3-hit mutation curve of CV is interpreted by assuming that 2 further hits are required to protect the 1-hit pre-mutations from being abolished by the repair lacking in uvs21. UV induction of SOS repair cannot be responsible for the 3-hit curvature because UVR of phages and induction of prophage are already saturated at rather low doses. As high-dose decline is not observed in uvs21, possibly the non-mutagenic repair lacking from uvs21 interferes with the mutation finishing processes at high doses in the repair-proficient strain CV. However, UV induction of this interference cannot be a one-hit process but requires a very large number of hits. (Auth.)

  5. Protein truncation test: analysis of two novel point mutations at the carboxy-terminus of the human dystrophin gene associated with mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffery, S; Lenk, U; Roberts, R G; Coubes, C; Demaille, J; Claustres, M

    1995-01-01

    Approximately one-third of the mutations responsible for Duchenne muscular dytrophy (DMD) do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. Methods for intensive mutation screening have recently been applied to this immense gene, which resulted in the identification of a number of point mutations in DMD patients, mostly translation-terminating mutations. A number of data raised the possibility that the C-terminal region of dystrophin might be involved in some cases of mental retardation associated with DMD. Using single-strand conformation analysis of products amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-SSCA) to screen the terminal domains of the dystrophin gene (exons 60-79) of 20 unrelated patients with DMD or BMD, we detected two novel point mutations in two mentally retarded DMD patients: a 1-bp deletion in exon 70 (10334delC) and a 5' splice donor site alteration in intron 69 (10294 + 1G-->T). Both mutations should result in a premature translation termination of dystrophin. The possible effects on the reading frame were analyzed by the study of reverse transcripts amplified from peripheral blood lymphocytes mRNA and by the protein truncation test.

  6. Effects of genetic mutations and chemical exposures on Caenorhabditis elegans feeding: evaluation of a novel, high-throughput screening assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windy A Boyd

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Government agencies have defined a need to reduce, refine or replace current mammalian-based bioassays with testing methods that use alternative species. Invertebrate species, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, provide an attractive option because of their short life cycles, inexpensive maintenance, and high degree of evolutionary conservation with higher eukaryotes. The C. elegans pharynx is a favorable model for studying neuromuscular function, and the effects of chemicals on neuromuscular activity, i.e., feeding. Current feeding methodologies, however, are labor intensive and only semi-quantitative.Here a high-throughput assay is described that uses flow cytometry to measure C. elegans feeding by determining the size and intestinal fluorescence of hundreds of nematodes after exposure to fluorescent-labeled microspheres. This assay was validated by quantifying fluorescence in feeding-defective C. elegans (eat mutants, and by exposing wild-type nematodes to the neuroactive compounds, serotonin and arecoline. The eat mutations previously determined to cause slow pumping rates exhibited the lowest feeding levels with our assay. Concentration-dependent increases in feeding levels after serotonin exposures were dependent on food availability, while feeding levels decreased in arecoline-exposed nematodes regardless of the presence of food. The effects of the environmental contaminants, cadmium chloride and chlorpyrifos, on wild-type C. elegans feeding were then used to demonstrate an application of the feeding assay. Cadmium exposures above 200 microM led to a sharp drop in feeding levels. Feeding of chlorpyrifos-exposed nematodes decreased in a concentration-dependent fashion with an EC(50 of 2 microM.The C. elegans fluorescence microsphere feeding assay is a rapid, reliable method for the assessment of neurotoxic effects of pharmaceutical drugs, industrial chemicals or environmental agents. This assay may also be applicable to large scale genetic or

  7. High prevalence of DUOX2 mutations in Japanese patients with permanent congenital hypothyroidism or transient hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kumihiro; Tanahashi, Yusuke; Mukai, Tokuo; Suzuki, Shigeru; Tajima, Toshihiro; Azuma, Hiroshi; Fujieda, Kenji

    2016-07-01

    Dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) mutations are a cause of dyshormonogenesis (DH) and have been identified in patients with permanent congenital hypothyroidism (PH) and with transient hypothyroidism (TH). We aimed to elucidate the prevalence and phenotypical variations of DUOX2 mutations. Forty-eight Japanese DH patients were enroled and analysed for sequence variants of DUOX2, DUOXA2, and TPO using polymerase chain reaction-amplified direct sequencing. Fourteen sequence variants of DUOX2, including 10 novel variants, were identified in 11 patients. DUOX2 variants were more prevalent (11/48, 22.9%) than TPO (3/48, 6.3%) (p=0.020). The prevalence of DUOX2 variants in TH was slightly, but not significantly, higher than in PH. Furthermore, one patient had digenic heterozygous sequence variants of both DUOX2 and TPO. Our results suggest that DUOX2 mutations might be the most common cause of both PH and TH, and that phenotypes of these mutations might be milder than those of other causes.

  8. High prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum pfcrt K76T mutation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the prevalence of malaria in SCD patients and mutations associated with CQ resistance. Children diagnosed with sickle cell disease attending both outpatient clinic and those admitted at Bugando Medical Centre in north-western Tanzania were screened for malaria using thick blood smear. A dried ...

  9. MT-ND5 Mutation Exhibits Highly Variable Neurological Manifestations at Low Mutant Load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, Y.S.; Lax, N.Z.; Maddison, P.; Alston, C.L.; Blakely, E.L.; Hepplewhite, P.D.; Riordan, G.; Meldau, S.; Chinnery, P.F.; Pierre, G.; Chronopoulou, E.; Du, A.; Hughes, I.; Morris, A.A.; Kamakari, S.; Chrousos, G.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Saris, C.G.J.; Feeney, C.; Hardy, S.A.; Sakakibara, T.; Sudo, A.; Okazaki, Y.; Murayama, K.; Mundy, H.; Hanna, M.G.; Ohtake, A.; Schaefer, A.M.; Champion, M.P.; Turnbull, D.M.; Taylor, R.W.; Pitceathly, R.D.S.; McFarland, R.; Gorman, G.S.

    2018-01-01

    Mutations in the m.13094T>C MT-ND5 gene have been previously described in three cases of Leigh Syndrome (LS). In this retrospective, international cohort study we identified 20 clinically affected individuals (13 families) and four asymptomatic carriers. Ten patients were deceased at the time of

  10. High Level Architecture Runtime Infrastructure Test Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wright, Darrell

    1998-01-01

    Joint Advanced Distributed Simulation Joint Test and Evaluation is an Office of the Secretary of Defense-sponsored joint test force chartered to determine the utility of advanced distributed simulation (ADS...

  11. Efficient molecular screening of Lynch syndrome by specific 3' promoter methylation of the MLH1 or BRAF mutation in colorectal cancer with high-frequency microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Cullings, Harry M; Notohara, Kenji; Hoshijima, Naoko; Young, Joanne; Lynch, Henry T; Tanaka, Noriaki; Matsubara, Nagahide

    2009-06-01

    It is sometimes difficult to diagnose Lynch syndrome by the simple but strict clinical criteria, or even by the definitive genetic testing for causative germline mutation of mismatch repair genes. Thus, some practical and efficient screening strategy to select highly possible Lynch syndrome patients is exceedingly desirable. We performed a comprehensive study to evaluate the methylation status of whole MLH1 promoter region by direct bisulfite sequencing of the entire MLH1 promoter regions on Lynch and non-Lynch colorectal cancers (CRCs). Then, we established a convenient assay to detect methylation in key CpG islands responsible for the silencing of MLH1 expression. We studied the methylation status of MLH1 as well as the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and immunohistochemical analysis of mismatch repair proteins on 16 cases of Lynch CRC and 19 cases of sporadic CRCs with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H). Sensitivity to detect Lynch syndrome by MLH1 (CCAAT) methylation was 88% and the specificity was 84%. Positive likelihood ratio (PLR) was 5.5 and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) was 0.15. Sensitivity by mutational analysis of BRAF was 100%, specificity was 84%, PLR was 6.3 and NLR was zero. By CIMP analysis; sensitivity was 88%, specificity was 79%, PLR was 4.2, and NLR was 0.16. BRAF mutation or MLH1 methylation analysis combined with MSI testing could be a good alternative to screen Lynch syndrome patients in a cost effective manner. Although the assay for CIMP status also showed acceptable sensitivity and specificity, it may not be practical because of its rather complicated assay.

  12. High-speed Stochastic Fatigue Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1990-01-01

    Good stochastic fatigue tests are difficult to perform. One of the major reasons is that ordinary servohydraulic loading systems realize the prescribed load history accurately at very low testing speeds only. If the speeds used for constant amplitude testing are applied to stochastic fatigue...

  13. Survey of familial glaucoma shows a high incidence of cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (CYP1B1) mutations in non-consanguineous congenital forms in a Spanish population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millá, Elena; Mañé, Begoña; Duch, Susana; Hernan, Imma; Borràs, Emma; Planas, Ester; Dias, Miguel de Sousa; Carballo, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify myocilin (MYOC) and cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (CYP1B1) mutations in a Spanish population with different clinical forms of familial glaucoma or ocular hypertension (OHT). Methods Index patients from 226 families participated in this study. Patients were diagnosed with familial glaucoma or OHT by complete ophthalmologic examination. Screening for MYOC mutations was performed in 207 index patients: 96 with adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), 21 with primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), 18 with juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG), five with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS), and 67 with other types of glaucoma. One hundred two of the families (including all those in whom a MYOC mutation was detected) were also screened for CYP1B1 mutations: 45 POAG, 25 PCG, 21 JOAG, four ARS, and seven others. Results We examined 292 individuals (patients and relatives) with a positive family history of glaucoma or OHT. We identified two novel MYOC variants, p.Lys39Arg and p.Glu218Lys, in two families with POAG, and six previously reported MYOC mutations in seven families with POAG (four), JOAG (one), PCG (one), and normotensive glaucoma (one). CYP1B1 mutations were found in 16 index patients with PCG (nine), POAG (three), JOAG (two), and ARS (two). Conclusions The high percentage (9/25=36%) of mutations in CYP1B1 found in non-consanguineous patients with congenital glaucoma mandates genetic testing. However, the percentage of mutations (9/207=4.4%) in MYOC associated with glaucoma is relatively low in our population. The variable phenotype expression of glaucoma, even in families, cannot be explained with a digenic mechanism between MYOC and CYP1B1. PMID:23922489

  14. Germline mutation rates in families residing in high level natural radiation areas of Kerala coast in southwest India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Birajalaxmi; Ghosh, Anu; Ahmad, Shazia; Saini, DivyaIakshmi; Chauhan, P.S.; Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    For this study, 200 nuclear families have been analyzed using over 40 mini- and microsatellite markers. Cord blood samples for the child and peripheral blood samples for the parent(s) were collected in EDTA vacuutainers from the hospital units located in High Level Natural Radiation Areas (HLNRA) and Normal Level Natural Radiation Areas (NLNRA). Both the parents of the newborn were exposed to the background dose. The families were grouped into four distinct dose groups - NLNRA group 5.00 mGy/year. An overall mutation rate of 2.08 X 10 -3 per cell per generation was observed for NLNRA and 2.12 X 10 -3 per cell per generation for HLNRA families. No radiation induced dose response was observed for the stratified groups. Thus, this study shows that mutation rates at mini- and microsatellites in the off springs of the parents living in the high background radiation areas of Kerala does not vary with radiation exposure. This is the first report to understand germline mutation rates at hypervariable loci in families residing in high level natural radiation areas of the world

  15. Dimethyl fumarate is highly cytotoxic in KRAS mutated cancer cells but spares non-tumorigenic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett Saidu, Nathaniel Edward; Bretagne, Marie; Mansuet, Audrey Lupo; Just, Pierre-Alexandre; Leroy, Karen; Cerles, Olivier; Chouzenoux, Sandrine; Nicco, Carole; Damotte, Diane; Alifano, Marco; Borghese, Bruno; Goldwasser, François; Batteux, Frédéric; Alexandre, Jérôme

    2018-01-01

    KRAS mutation, one of the most common molecular alterations observed in adult carcinomas, was reported to activate the anti-oxidant program driven by the transcription factor NRF2 (Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2). We previously observed that the antitumoral effect of Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is dependent of NRF2 pathway inhibition. We used in vitro methods to examine the effect of DMF on cell death and the activation of the NRF2/DJ-1 antioxidant pathway. We report here that DMF is preferentially cytotoxic against KRAS mutated cancer cells. This effect was observed in patient-derived cancer cell lines harbouring a G12V KRAS mutation, compared with cell lines without such a mutation. In addition, KRAS*G12V over-expression in the human Caco-2 colon cancer cell line significantly promoted DMF-induced cell death, as well as DMF-induced- reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and -glutathione (GSH) depletion. Moreover, in contrast to malignant cells, our data confirms that the same concentration of DMF has no significant cytotoxic effects on non-tumorigenic human ARPE-19 retinal epithelial, murine 3T3 fibroblasts and primary mice bone marrow cells; but is rather associated with NRF2 activation, decreased ROS and increased GSH levels. Furthermore, DJ-1 down-regulation experiments showed that this protein does not play a protective role against NRF2 in non-tumorigenic cells, as it does in malignant ones. This, interestingly, could be at the root of the differential effect of DMF observed between malignant and non-tumorigenic cells. Our results suggest for the first time that the dependence on NRF2 observed in mutated KRAS malignant cells makes them more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of DMF, which thus opens up new prospects for the therapeutic applications of DMF. PMID:29507676

  16. Dimethyl fumarate is highly cytotoxic in KRAS mutated cancer cells but spares non-tumorigenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett Saidu, Nathaniel Edward; Bretagne, Marie; Mansuet, Audrey Lupo; Just, Pierre-Alexandre; Leroy, Karen; Cerles, Olivier; Chouzenoux, Sandrine; Nicco, Carole; Damotte, Diane; Alifano, Marco; Borghese, Bruno; Goldwasser, François; Batteux, Frédéric; Alexandre, Jérôme

    2018-02-06

    KRAS mutation, one of the most common molecular alterations observed in adult carcinomas, was reported to activate the anti-oxidant program driven by the transcription factor NRF2 (Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2). We previously observed that the antitumoral effect of Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is dependent of NRF2 pathway inhibition. We used in vitro methods to examine the effect of DMF on cell death and the activation of the NRF2/DJ-1 antioxidant pathway. We report here that DMF is preferentially cytotoxic against KRAS mutated cancer cells. This effect was observed in patient-derived cancer cell lines harbouring a G12V KRAS mutation, compared with cell lines without such a mutation. In addition, KRAS*G12V over-expression in the human Caco-2 colon cancer cell line significantly promoted DMF-induced cell death, as well as DMF-induced- reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and -glutathione (GSH) depletion. Moreover, in contrast to malignant cells, our data confirms that the same concentration of DMF has no significant cytotoxic effects on non-tumorigenic human ARPE-19 retinal epithelial, murine 3T3 fibroblasts and primary mice bone marrow cells; but is rather associated with NRF2 activation, decreased ROS and increased GSH levels. Furthermore, DJ-1 down-regulation experiments showed that this protein does not play a protective role against NRF2 in non-tumorigenic cells, as it does in malignant ones. This, interestingly, could be at the root of the differential effect of DMF observed between malignant and non-tumorigenic cells. Our results suggest for the first time that the dependence on NRF2 observed in mutated KRAS malignant cells makes them more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of DMF, which thus opens up new prospects for the therapeutic applications of DMF.

  17. The High Level Vibration Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmayer, C.H.; Curreri, J.R.; Park, Y.J.; Kato, W.Y.; Kawakami, S.

    1989-01-01

    As part of cooperative agreements between the United States and Japan, tests have been performed on the seismic vibration table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC) in Japan. The objective of the test program was to use the NUPEC vibration table to drive large diameter nuclear power piping to substantial plastic strain with an earthquake excitation and to compare the results with state-of-the-art analysis of the problem. The test model was designed by modifying the 1/2.5 scale model of the PWR primary coolant loop. Elastic and inelastic seismic response behavior of the test model was measured in a number of test runs with an increasing excitation input level up to the limit of the vibration table. In the maximum input condition, large dynamic plastic strains were obtained in the piping. Crack initiation was detected following the second maximum excitation run. The test model was subjected to a maximum acceleration well beyond what nuclear power plants are designed to withstand. This paper describes the overall plan, input motion development, test procedure, test results and comparisons with pre-test analysis. 4 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  18. The High Level Vibration Test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmayer, C.H.; Curreri, J.R.; Park, Y.J.; Kato, W.Y.; Kawakami, S.

    1990-01-01

    As part of cooperative agreements between the United States and Japan, tests have been performed on the seismic vibration table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC) in Japan. The objective of the test program was to use the NUPEC vibration table to drive large diameter nuclear power piping to substantial plastic strain with an earthquake excitation and to compare the results with state-of-the-art analysis of the problem. The test model was designed by modifying the 1/2.5 scale model of the pressurized water reactor primary coolant loop. Elastic and inelastic seismic response behavior of the test model was measured in a number of test runs with an increasing excitation input level up to the limit of the vibration table. In the maximum input condition, large dynamic plastic strains were obtained in the piping. Crack initiation was detected following the second maximum excitation run. The test model was subjected to a maximum acceleration well beyond what nuclear power plants are designed to withstand. This paper describes the overall plan, input motion development, test procedure, test results and comparisons with pre-test analysis

  19. Evaluating the genotoxic effects of workers exposed to lead using micronucleus assay, comet assay and TCR gene mutation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhijian; Lou Jianlin; Chen Shijie; Zheng Wei; Wu Wei; Jin Lifen; Deng Hongping; He Jiliang

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the genotoxic effects of lead (Pb) exposure, 25 workers in a workplace producing storage battery were monitored for three genetic end-points using micronucleus (MN) assay, comet assay and TCR gene mutation test. Twenty-five controls were matched with workers according to age, gender and smoking. The air Pb concentration in the workplace was 1.26 mg/m 3 . All subjects were measured for Pb concentration of blood by atom absorption spectrophotometry. The mean Pb concentration of blood in workers (0.32 mg/l) was significantly higher than that in controls (0.02 mg/l). The results of MN test showed that the mean micronuclei rate (MNR) and mean micronucleated cells rate (MCR) in workers were 9.04 ± 1.51 per mille and 7.76 ± 1.23 per mille , respectively, which were significantly higher than those (2.36 ± 0.42 per mille and 1.92 ± 0.31 per mille ) in controls (P -4 and 1.74 ± 0.17 x 10 -4 , respectively, there was no significant difference between workers and controls (P > 0.05). The results of our study indicated that the genetic damage was detectable in 25 workers occupationally exposed to lead

  20. Androgen receptor mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome: a high content analysis approach leading to personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is a rare disease associated with inactivating mutations of AR that disrupt male sexual differentiation, and cause a spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities having as a common denominator loss of reproductive viability. No established treatment exists for these conditions, however there are sporadic reports of patients (or recapitulated mutations in cell lines that respond to administration of supraphysiologic doses (or pulses of testosterone or synthetic ligands. Here, we utilize a novel high content analysis (HCA approach to study AR function at the single cell level in genital skin fibroblasts (GSF. We discuss in detail findings in GSF from three historical patients with AIS, which include identification of novel mechanisms of AR malfunction, and the potential ability to utilize HCA for personalized treatment of patients affected by this condition.

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation (EGFR) Testing for Prediction of Response to EGFR-Targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI) Drugs in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Evidence-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    sensitivity of the mutation assay. Some technologies such as single-stranded conformational polymorphism, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and high-resolution melting analysis have the advantage of facilitating rapid mutation screening of large numbers of samples with high measurement sensitivity but require direct sequencing to confirm the identity of the detected mutations. Other techniques have been developed for the simple, but highly sensitive detection of specific EGFR mutations, such as the amplification refractory mutations system (ARMS) and the peptide nucleic acid-locked PCR clamping. Others selectively digest wild-type DNA templates with restriction endonucleases to enrich mutant alleles by PCR. Experts in the province of Ontario have commented that currently PCR fragment analysis for deletion and point mutation conducts in Ontario, with measurement sensitivity of 1% to 5%. In patients with locally-advanced or metastatic NSCLC, what is the clinical effectiveness of EGFR mutation testing for prediction of response to treatment with TKIs (gefitinib, erlotinib) in terms of progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rates (ORR), overall survival (OS), and quality of life (QoL)?What is the impact of EGFR mutation testing on overall clinical decision-making for patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC?What is the cost-effectiveness of EGFR mutation testing in selecting patients with advanced NSCLC for treatment with gefitinib or erlotinib in the first-line setting?What is the budget impact of EGFR mutation testing in selecting patients with advanced NSCLC for treatment with gefitinib or erlotinib in the second- or third-line setting? A literature search was performed on March 9, 2010 using OVID MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, Wiley Cochrane, CINAHL, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination/International Agency for Health Technology Assessment for studies published from January 1, 2004 until February 28

  2. Consensus for EGFR mutation testing in non-small cell lung cancer: results from a European workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirker, Robert; Herth, Felix J F; Kerr, Keith M

    2010-01-01

    Activating somatic mutations of the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have recently been characterized in a subset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients harboring these mutations in their tumors show excellent response to EGFR tyros...

  3. Rapid screening of ASXL1, IDH1, IDH2, and c-CBL mutations in de novo acute myeloid leukemia by high-resolution melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Mariam; Such, Esperanza; Cervera, José; Luna, Irene; Gómez-Seguí, Inés; López-Pavía, María; Dolz, Sandra; Barragán, Eva; Fuster, Oscar; Llop, Marta; Rodríguez-Veiga, Rebeca; Avaria, Amparo; Oltra, Silvestre; Senent, M Leonor; Moscardó, Federico; Montesinos, Pau; Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Martín, Guillermo; Sanz, Miguel A

    2012-11-01

    Recently, many novel molecular abnormalities were found to be distinctly associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, their clinical relevance and prognostic implications are not well established. We developed a new combination of high-resolution melting assays on a LightCycler 480 and direct sequencing to detect somatic mutations of ASXL1 (exon 12), IDH1 (exon 4), IDH2 (exon 4), and c-CBL (exons 8 and 9) genes to know their incidence and prognostic effect in a cohort of 175 patients with de novo AML: 16 patients (9%) carried ASXL1 mutations, 16 patients had IDH variations (3% with IDH1(R132) and 6% with IDH2(R140)), and none had c-CBL mutations. Patients with ASXL1 mutations did not harbor IDH1, [corrected] or CEBPA mutations, and a combination of ASXL1 and IDH2 mutations was found only in one patient. In addition, we did not find IDH1 and FLT3 or CEBPA mutations concurrently or IDH2 with CEBPA. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations were mutually exclusive. Alternatively, NPM1 mutations were concurrently found with ASXL1, IDH1, or IDH2 with a variable incidence. Mutations were not significantly correlated with any of the clinical and biological features studied. High-resolution melting is a reliable, rapid, and efficient screening technique for mutation detection in AML. The incidence for the studied genes was in the range of those previously reported. We were unable to find an effect on the outcome. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutation direction by irradiation in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei; Lu Yimei

    2001-01-01

    The mutation directions of rice were studied. The results indicated that the mutation directions of rice induced by 14 C were invert correlation to their genetic backgrounds of tested rice varieties, i.e. early mature and short stem varieties produced later mature and higher stem mutation; late mature and high stem varieties produced earlier mature and shorter stem mutation; the varieties of middle maturity and height produced both direction mutations of earlier and later maturity or shorter and higher stem. The mutation directions induced by 14 C were also related to treated doses and stages. Frequency of earlier maturity mutation by protons treatment were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of later maturity by γ-rays were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of short stem mutation by synchronous irradiation (soft X-rays) were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of beneficial mutation induced by proton treatment were higher than those induced by γ-rays

  5. Advanced method for high-throughput expression of mutated eukaryotic membrane proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Keisuke; Sugawara, Taishi; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Tokuda, Natsuko; Kurokawa, Azusa; Misaka, Takumi; Makyio, Hisayoshi; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Nomura, Norimichi; Murata, Takeshi; Abe, Keiko; Iwata, So

    2008-01-01

    Crystallization of eukaryotic membrane proteins is a challenging, iterative process. The protein of interest is often modified in an attempt to improve crystallization and diffraction results. To accelerate this process, we took advantage of a GFP-fusion yeast expression system that uses PCR to direct homologous recombination and gene cloning. We explored the possibility of employing more than one PCR fragment to introduce various mutations in a single step, and found that when up to five PCR fragments were co-transformed into yeast, the recombination frequency was maintained as the number of fragments was increased. All transformants expressed the model membrane protein, while the resulting plasmid from each clone contained the designed mutations only. Thus, we have demonstrated a technique allowing the expression of mutant membrane proteins within 5 days, combining a GFP-fusion expression system and yeast homologous recombination

  6. Mutations in the evolutionarily highly conserved KEOPS complex genes cause nephrotic syndrome with microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Daniela A.; Rao, Jia; Mollet, Geraldine; Schapiro, David; Daugeron, Marie-Claire; Tan, Weizhen; Gribouval, Olivier; Boyer, Olivia; Revy, Patrick; Jobst-Schwan, Tilman; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Schanze, Denny; Ashraf, Shazia; Boddaert, Nathalie; Collinet, Bruno; Martin, Gaëlle; Liger, Dominique; Lovric, Svjetlana; Furlano, Monica; Guerrera, I. Chiara; Sanchez-Ferras, Oraly; Menten, Björn; Vergult, Sarah; De Rocker, Nina; Airik, Merlin; Hermle, Tobias; Shril, Shirlee; Widmeier, Eugen; Gee, Heon Yung; Choi, Won-Il; Sadowski, Carolin E.; Pabst, Werner L.; Warejko, Jillian; Daga, Ankana; LeBerre, Tamara Basta; Matejas, Verena; Behnam, Babak; Beeson, Brendan; Begtrup, Amber; Bruce, Malcolm; Ch'ng, Gaik-Siew; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Chen, Chao-Huei; Cho, Megan T.; Gipson, Patrick E.; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Kari, Jameela A.; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Lai, Wai-ming; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okasha; Masri, Amira; Moghtaderi, Mastaneh; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Praet, Marleen; Prasad, Chitra; Prytula, Agnieszka; Roeder, Elizabeth; Rump, Patrick; Schnur, Rhonda E.; Shiihara, Takashi; Sinha, Manish; Soliman, Neveen A; Soulami, Kenza; Sweetser, David A.; Tsai, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Vester, Udo; Viskochil, David H.; Vatanavicharn, Nithiwat; Waxler, Jessica L.; Wolf, Matthias T.F.; Wong, Sik-Nin; Poduri, Annapurna; Truglio, Gessica; Mane, Shrikant; Lifton, Richard P.; Bouchard, Maxime; Kannu, Peter; Chitayat, David; Magen, Daniella; Calleweart, Bert; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Zenker, Martin; Antignac, Corinne; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2018-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GAMOS) is a severe autosomal-recessive disease characterized by the combination of early-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and microcephaly with brain anomalies. To date, mutations of WDR73 are the only known monogenic cause of GAMOS and in most affected individuals the molecular diagnosis remains elusive. We here identify recessive mutations of OSGEP, TP53RK, TPRKB, or LAGE3, encoding the 4 subunits of the KEOPS complex in 33 individuals of 30 families with GAMOS. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout in zebrafish and mice recapitulates the human phenotype of microcephaly and results in early lethality. Knockdown of OSGEP, TP53RK, or TPRKB inhibits cell proliferation, which human mutations fail to rescue, and knockdown of either gene activates DNA damage response signaling and induces apoptosis. OSGEP and TP53RK molecularly interact and co-localize with the actin-regulating ARP2/3 complex. Furthermore, knockdown of OSGEP and TP53RK induces defects of the actin cytoskeleton and reduces migration rate of human podocytes, an established intermediate phenotype of SRNS. We thus identify 4 novel monogenic causes of GAMOS, describe the first link between KEOPS function and human disease, and delineate potential pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:28805828

  7. A double EPSPS gene mutation endowing glyphosate resistance shows a remarkably high resistance cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heping; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Jalaludin, Adam; Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2017-12-01

    A novel glyphosate resistance double point mutation (T102I/P106S, TIPS) in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene has been recently identified for the first time only in the weed species Eleusine indica. Quantification of plant resistance cost associated with the TIPS and the often reported glyphosate resistance single P106S mutation was performed. A significant resistance cost (50% in seed number currency) associated with the homozygous TIPS but not the homozygous P106S EPSPS variant was identified in E. indica plants. The resistance cost associated with the TIPS mutation escalated to 85% in plants under resource competition with rice crops. The resistance cost was not detected in nonhomozygous TIPS plants denoting the recessive nature of the cost associated with the TIPS allele. An excess of 11-fold more shikimate and sixfold more quinate in the shikimate pathway was detected in TIPS plants in the absence of glyphosate treatment compared to wild type, whereas no changes in these compounds were observed in P106S plants when compared to wild type. TIPS plants show altered metabolite levels in several other metabolic pathways that may account for the expression of the observed resistance cost. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Fanconi anemia in Tunisia: high prevalence of group A and identification of new FANCA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchlaka, Chiraz; Abdelhak, Sonia; Amouri, Ahlem; Ben Abid, Hela; Hadiji, Sondes; Frikha, Mounir; Ben Othman, Tarek; Amri, Fethi; Ayadi, Hammadi; Hachicha, Mongia; Rebaï, Ahmed; Saad, Ali; Dellagi, Koussay

    2003-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive pancytopenia, congenital malformations, and predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia. Fanconi anemia is genetically heterogeneous, with at least eight distinct complementation groups of FA (A, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, and G) having been defined by somatic cell fusion studies. Six genes (FANCA, FANCC, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCG, and FANCF) have been cloned. Mutations of the seventh Fanconi anemia gene, BRCA2, have been shown to lead to FAD1 and probably FAB groups. In order to characterize the molecular defects underlying FA in Tunisia, 39 families were genotyped with microsatellite markers linked to known FA gene. Haplotype analysis and homozygosity mapping assigned 43 patients belonging to 34 families to the FAA group, whereas one family was probably not linked to the FANCA gene or to any known FA genes. For patients belonging to the FAA group, screening for mutations revealed four novel mutations: two small homozygous deletions 1693delT and 1751-1754del, which occurred in exon 17 and exon 19, respectively, and two transitions, viz., 513G-->A in exon 5 and A-->G at position 166 (IVS24+166A-->G) of intron 24. Two new polymorphisms were also identified in intron 24 (IVS24-5G/A and IVS24-6C/G).

  9. High Pressure Soxhlet Type Leachability testing device and leaching test of simulated high-level waste glass at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senoo, Muneaki; Banba, Tsunetaka; Tashiro, Shingo; Shimooka, Kenji; Araki, Kunio

    1979-11-01

    A High Pressure Soxhlet Type Leachability Testing Device (HIPSOL) was developed to evaluate long-period stability of high-level waste (HLW) solids. For simulated HLW solids, temperature dependency of the leachability was investigated at higher temperatures from 100 0 C to 300 0 C at 80 atm. Leachabilities of cesium and sodium at 295 0 C were 20 and 7 times higher than at 100 0 C, respectively. In the repository, the temperatures around solidified products may be hundred 0 C. It is essential to test them at such elevated temperatures. HIPSOL is also usable for accelerated test to evaluate long-period leaching behavior of HLW products. (author)

  10. A Low Speed BIST Framework for High Speed Circuit Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speek, H.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Shashaani, M.; Sachdev, M.

    2000-01-01

    Testing of high performance integrated circuits is becoming increasingly a challenging task owing to high clock frequencies. Often testers are not able to test such devices due to their limited high frequency capabilities. In this article we outline a design-for-test methodology such that high

  11. Eddy current testing with high penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.; Kroening, M.

    1999-01-01

    The low-frequency eddy current testing method is used when penetration into very deep layers is required. The achievable penetration depth is determined among other parameters by the lowest testing frequency that can be realised together with the eddy current sensor. When using inductive sensors, the measuring effect declines proportional to the lowering frequency (induction effect). Further reduction of testing frequency requires other types of sensors, as e.g. the GMR (Giant Magnetic Resistance), which achieves a constant measuring sensitivity down to the steady field. The multi-frequency eddy current testing method MFEC 3 of IZFP described here can be operated using three different scanning frequencies at a time. Two variants of eddy current probes are used in this case. Both have an inductive winding at their emitters, of the type of a measuring probe. The receiver end is either also an inductive winding, or a magnetic field-responsive resistance (GMR). (orig./CB) [de

  12. Experimental tests of pretensioned high strength tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajutin, J.G.; Kriczewskij, A.Z.

    1977-01-01

    The tests carried out to estimate the losses of the prestressing force and the real bearing capacity of the parallel wire tendons and seven-wire strands are described. The practical experiences in tenden anchoring etc. are also received. (author)

  13. Limited copy number-high resolution melting (LCN-HRM) enables the detection and identification by sequencing of low level mutations in cancer biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hongdo; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2009-10-08

    Mutation detection in clinical tumour samples is challenging when the proportion of tumour cells, and thus mutant alleles, is low. The limited sensitivity of conventional sequencing necessitates the adoption of more sensitive approaches. High resolution melting (HRM) is more sensitive than sequencing but identification of the mutation is desirable, particularly when it is important to discriminate false positives due to PCR errors or template degradation from true mutations.We thus developed limited copy number - high resolution melting (LCN-HRM) which applies limiting dilution to HRM. Multiple replicate reactions with a limited number of target sequences per reaction allow low level mutations to be detected. The dilutions used (based on Ct values) are chosen such that mutations, if present, can be detected by the direct sequencing of amplicons with aberrant melting patterns. Using cell lines heterozygous for mutations, we found that the mutations were not readily detected when they comprised 10% of total alleles (20% tumour cells) by sequencing, whereas they were readily detectable at 5% total alleles by standard HRM. LCN-HRM allowed these mutations to be identified by direct sequencing of those positive reactions.LCN-HRM was then used to review formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) clinical samples showing discordant findings between sequencing and HRM for KRAS exon 2 and EGFR exons 19 and 21. Both true mutations present at low levels and sequence changes due to artefacts were detected by LCN-HRM. The use of high fidelity polymerases showed that the majority of the artefacts were derived from the damaged template rather than replication errors during amplification. LCN-HRM bridges the sensitivity gap between HRM and sequencing and is effective in distinguishing between artefacts and true mutations.

  14. Mutation in the peroxin-coding gene PEX22 contributing to high malate production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoro, Hiroaki; Sakamoto, Mitsuru; Kotaka, Atsushi; Matsumura, Kengo; Hata, Yoji

    2018-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces organic acids such as succinate, acetate, and malate during alcoholic fermentation. Since malate contributes to the pleasant taste of sake (a Japanese alcoholic beverage), various methods for breeding high-malate-producing yeast strains have been developed. Here, a high-malate-producing yeast strain F-701H was isolated. This mutant was sensitive to dimethyl succinate (DMS) and harbored a nonsense mutation in the peroxin gene PEX22, which was identified as the cause of high malate production by comparative genome analysis. This mutation, which appeared to cause Pex22p dysfunction, was sufficient to confer increased malate productivity and DMS sensitivity to yeast cells. Next, we investigated the mechanism by which this mutation led to high malate production in yeast cells. Peroxins, such as Pex22p, maintain peroxisomal biogenesis. Analysis of 29 PEX disruptants revealed an increased malate production by deletion of the genes encoding peroxins responsible for importing proteins (containing peroxisomal targeting signal 1, PTS1) into the peroxisomal matrix, and those responsible for the assembly of peroxins themselves in the peroxisomal membrane. A defect in peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase (Mdh3p), harboring endogenous PTS1, inhibited the high malate-producing phenotype in the PEX22 mutant. Moreover, Mdh3p, which was normally sorted to the peroxisomal matrix, was potentially mislocalized to the cytosol in the PEX22 mutant. This suggested that an increase in malate production resulted from the mislocalization of Mdh3p from the peroxisome to the cytoplasm due to the loss of peroxin-mediated transportation. Thus, the present study revealed a novel mechanism for organic acid productions in yeast during sake brewing. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Westwood, Marie; Joore, Manuela; Whiting, Penny; Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Armstrong, Nigel; Misso, Kate; Severens, Hans; Kleijnen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer. Some epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutations make tumours responsive to treatment with EGFR-TK inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) but less responsive to treatment with standard chemotherapy. Patients with NSCLC are therefore tested for EGFR-TK tumour gene mutations to inform treatment decisions. There are a variety of tests available to detect these mutations. T...

  16. Direct stacking of sequence-specific nuclease-induced mutations to produce high oleic and low linolenic soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Zachary L; Coffman, Andrew; Baltes, Nicholas J; Stoddard, Thomas J; Clasen, Benjamin M; Luo, Song; Retterath, Adam; Yabandith, Ann; Gamo, Maria Elena; Bissen, Jeff; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; Zhang, Feng

    2016-10-13

    The ability to modulate levels of individual fatty acids within soybean oil has potential to increase shelf-life and frying stability and to improve nutritional characteristics. Commodity soybean oil contains high levels of polyunsaturated linoleic and linolenic acid, which contribute to oxidative instability - a problem that has been addressed through partial hydrogenation. However, partial hydrogenation increases levels of trans-fatty acids, which have been associated with cardiovascular disease. Previously, we generated soybean lines with knockout mutations within fatty acid desaturase 2-1A (FAD2-1A) and FAD2-1B genes, resulting in oil with increased levels of monounsaturated oleic acid (18:1) and decreased levels of linoleic (18:2) and linolenic acid (18:3). Here, we stack mutations within FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B with mutations in fatty acid desaturase 3A (FAD3A) to further decrease levels of linolenic acid. Mutations were introduced into FAD3A by directly delivering TALENs into fad2-1a fad2-1b soybean plants. Oil from fad2-1a fad2-1b fad3a plants had significantly lower levels of linolenic acid (2.5 %), as compared to fad2-1a fad2-1b plants (4.7 %). Furthermore, oil had significantly lower levels of linoleic acid (2.7 % compared to 5.1 %) and significantly higher levels of oleic acid (82.2 % compared to 77.5 %). Transgene-free fad2-1a fad2-1b fad3a soybean lines were identified. The methods presented here provide an efficient means for using sequence-specific nucleases to stack quality traits in soybean. The resulting product comprised oleic acid levels above 80 % and linoleic and linolenic acid levels below 3 %.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms and expression of minisatellite mutations in a 3-generation population around the Semipalatinsk nuclear explosion test-site, Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolegenova, N K; Bekmanov, B O; Djansugurova, L B; Bersimbaev, R I; Salama, S A; Au, W W

    2009-11-01

    We have reported previously that a population near the Semipalatinsk nuclear explosion test site had significantly increased minisatellite mutations (MM), suggesting increased germ-line mutation rates from the exposure in 3 generations. We hypothesize that the MM can be used as a surrogate biomarker for functional genetic alterations, e.g. gene mutations and chromosome aberrations. Therefore, we have investigated the influence of polymorphisms in genes on the expression of MM in the same two populations (247 and 172 individuals, for exposed and control, respectively, in 3 generations), and their relationships with radiation exposure. We have chosen the analyses of three polymorphic DNA - repair genes (XRCC1, XRCC1 and XRCC3) and two xenobiotic detoxification genes (GSTT1 and GSTM1). Among the exposed and in comparison with the wild-type gene, the functionally active XRCC1 Arg194Trp was significantly associated with low MM and over-represented in the exposed compared with the control populations. In a similar analysis, the functionally deficient XRCC1 Arg399Glu and XRCC3 Trp241Met were associated with increased and significantly reduced MM, respectively, but these variant genes were under-represented in the exposed population. Both GSTT1 and GSTM1 nulls were significantly associated with increased MM. The former was under-represented but the latter was significantly over-represented in the exposed compared with the control populations. In summary, the data indicate that the expected enzymatic functions of the polymorphic genes are consistent with the MM expression, except the XRCC1 Arg399Glu variant gene. In addition, the variant genes were retained in the three generations in association with their useful function, except for the GSTM1 null. However, the MM frequencies in the exposed were not consistently and significantly higher than those in the control populations, radiation exposure may therefore not have been the only cause for the high MM frequency among the

  18. The Prognostic Impact of K-RAS Mutations in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Treated with High Dose Cytarabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, E.I.; Gawish, H.H.; Al-Azizi, N.M.A.; El-Hefni, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Activating point mutation of the RAS gene has been generally accepted as an oncogenic event in a variety of malignancies. It represents one of the most common genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However there is still controversy about its clinical relevance on the treatment outcome of this leukemia. Objective: This study aimed to clarify the biologic and prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in relation to the dose of cytarabine (ara-C) used in post induction consolidation chemotherapy in adult AML patients. Patients and Methods: The study comprised 71de novo AML patients with a male: Female ratio of 1.4: 1; their ages ranged from 21-59 years with a median of 37 years. They were subjected to full clinical evaluation, routine laboratory investigations, cytogenetic studies by G banding and K-RAS mutation detection using realtime PCR. The patients were randomized into 2 groups (gps) according to the ara-C dose used in consolidation treatment, HDAC gp receiving 400 mg ara-C and LDAC gp receiving 100 mg ara-C. They were followed over a period of 5 years. Results: Mutations in the K-RAS gene (mutRAS) were detected in 23 patients (32%) with the remaining 48 patients (68%) having wild type RAS (wtRAS). Blast cell percentage was significantly lower in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (p=<0.001). The M4 subtype of AML and cases with Inv 16 showed significantly higher frequencies in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients, (p=0.015, 0.003, respectively). The patients were followed up for a median of 43 months (range 11-57 months). There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS) between mutRAS and wtRAS patients (p=0.326). Within the mutRAS patients treated with HDAC, cumulative OS was significantly higher than those treated with LDAC (p=0.001). This was not the case in the wtRAS group (p=0.285). There was no significant difference in disease The Prognostic Impact of K-RAS Mutations in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Treated with High Dose

  19. High-speed and intercity passenger rail testing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This high-speed and intercity passenger rail (HSIPR) testing strategy addresses the requirements for testing of high-speed train sets and technology before introduction to the North American railroad system. The report documents the results of a surv...

  20. A Comparison Between Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography in Detecting Mutations in Genes Associated with Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and the Identification of 9 New Mutations Previously Unidentified by DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meldrum Cliff J

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is a relatively new method by which heteroduplex structures formed during the PCR amplification of heterozygote samples can be rapidly identified. The use of this technology for mutation detection in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC has the potential to appreciably shorten the time it takes to analyze genes associated with this disorder. Prior to acceptance of this method for screening genes associated with HNPCC, assessment of the reliability of this method should be performed. In this report we have compared mutation and polymorphism detection by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC in a set of 130 families. All mutations/polymorphisms representing base substitutions, deletions, insertions and a 23 base pair inversion were detected by DHPLC whereas DGGE failed to identify four single base substitutions and a single base pair deletion. In addition, we show that DHPLC has been used for the identification of 5 different mutations in exon 7 of hMSH2 that could not be detected by DGGE. From this study we conclude that DHPLC is a more effective and rapid alternative to the detection of mutations in hMSH2 and hMLH1 with the same or better accuracy than DGGE. Furthermore, this technique offers opportunities for automation, which have not been realised for the majority of other methods of gene analysis.

  1. Later Onset Fabry Disease, Cardiac Damage Progress in Silence: Experience With a Highly Prevalent Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ting-Rong; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chang, Fu-Pang; Yu, Wen-Chung; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Dzhagalov, Ivan; Yang, Chia-Feng; Chu, Tzu-Hung; Lee, Han-Jui; Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Chang, Sheng-Kai; Liao, Hsuan-Chieh; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Liao, Tsan-Chieh; Lee, Pi-Chang; Li, Hsing-Yuan; Yang, An-Hang; Ho, Hui-Chen; Chiang, Chuan-Chi; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Desnick, Robert J; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2016-12-13

    Recently, several studies revealed a much higher prevalence of later onset Fabry disease (FD) than previously expected. It suggested that later onset FD might present as an important hidden health issue in certain ethnic or demographic populations in the world. However, the natural history of its phenotype has not been systemically investigated, especially the cardiac involvement. The study analyzed a large-scale newborn screening program for FD to understand the natural course of later onset FD. To date, 916,383 newborns have been screened for FD in Taiwan, including more than 1,200 individuals with the common, later onset IVS4+919G>A (IVS4) mutation. Echocardiography was performed in 620 adults with the IVS4 mutation to analyze the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 129 patients with FD, including 100 IVS4 adults. LVH was observed in 67% of men and 32% of women older than 40 years. Imaging evidenced significant late gadolinium enhancement in 38.1% of IVS4 men and 16.7% of IVS4 women with the IVS4 mutation but without LVH. Seventeen patients underwent endomyocardial biopsies, which revealed significant globotriaosylceramide substrate accumulation in their cardiomyocytes. Significant cardiomyocyte substrate accumulation in IVS4 patients led to severe and irreversible cardiac fibrosis before development of LVH or other significant cardiac manifestations. Thus, it might be too late to start enzyme replacement therapy after the occurrence of LVH or other significant cardiac manifestations in patients with later onset FD. This study also indicated the importance of newborn screening for early detection of the insidious, ongoing, irreversible cardiac damage in patients with later onset FD. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Test of High-Order Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libresco, Andrea S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a case study of three fourth grade teachers in New York, a state that administers an elementary social studies test, constructed by teachers, that relies on the use of documents in the majority of its questions. Throughout the 2002-2003 school year, the three teachers were observed during every unit of social…

  3. Testing waste forms containing high radionuclide loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is obtaining information on radioactive waste during NRC-prescribed tests and in a disposal environment. This paper describes the resin solidification task of that program, including the present status and results to date

  4. Evolution of high yielding chickpea varieties, having improved plant type and disease resistance, through induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.; Hussan, M.; Haq, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The breeding programme on the use of induced mutations, in chickpea for genetic variability for better plant type, grain yield and disease resistance has been started. The chickpea mutant variety is one of the leading varieties being extensively grown throughout Pakistan and has played its role in stabilizing the chickpea production in the country. Four chickpea varieties were treated, each with two dosed of gamma rays. The main purpose of the mutagenic treatment of these varieties/cultivars, was induce multiple resistance. (A.B.)

  5. Mitochondrial DNA depletion, mitochondrial mutations and high TFAM expression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Lihua; Ru, Guoqing; Mao, Zhuochao; Wang, Chenghui; Nie, Zhipeng; Li, Qiang; Huang-yang, Yiyi; Zhu, Ling; Liang, Xiaoyang; Yu, Jialing; Jiang, Pingping

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the role of mitochondrial genetic alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma by directly comparing the mitochondrial genomes of 86 matched pairs of HCC and non-tumor liver samples. Substitutions in 637 mtDNA sites were detected, comprising 89.80% transitions and 6.60% transversions. Forty-six somatic variants, including 15 novel mutations, were identified in 40.70% of tumor tissues. Of those, 21 were located in the non-coding region and 25 in the protein-coding region. Twenty-two...

  6. A high proportion of ADA point mutations associated with a specific alanine-to-valine substitution.

    OpenAIRE

    Markert, M L; Norby-Slycord, C; Ward, F E

    1989-01-01

    In 15%-20% of children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), the underlying defect is adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency. The overall goal of our research has been to identify the precise molecular defects in patients with ADA-deficient SCID. In this study, we focused on a patient whom we found to have normal sized ADA mRNA by Northern analysis and an intact ADA structural gene by Southern analysis. By cloning and sequencing this patient's ADA cDNA, we found a C-to-T point mutation ...

  7. High Power Fiber Laser Test Bed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility, unique within DoD, power-combines numerous cutting-edge fiber-coupled laser diode modules (FCLDM) to integrate pumping of high power rare earth-doped...

  8. Gingin High Optical Power Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, C; Blair, D G; Barrigo, P

    2006-01-01

    The Australian Consortium for Gravitational Wave Astronomy (ACIGA) in collaboration with LIGO is developing a high optical power research facility at the AIGO site, Gingin, Western Australia. Research at the facility will provide solutions to the problems that advanced gravitational wave detectors will encounter with extremely high optical power. The problems include thermal lensing and parametric instabilities. This article will present the status of the facility and the plan for the future experiments

  9. Capture-based next-generation sequencing reveals multiple actionable mutations in cancer patients failed in traditional testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Lu, Xiongxiong; Wu, Xue; Lin, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Chao; Huang, Xiaofang; Chang, Zhili; Wang, Xinjing; Wen, Chenlei; Tang, Xiaomei; Shi, Minmin; Zhan, Qian; Chen, Hao; Deng, Xiaxing; Peng, Chenghong; Li, Hongwei; Fang, Yuan; Shao, Yang; Shen, Baiyong

    2016-05-01

    Targeted therapies including monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors have dramatically changed the treatment of cancer over past 10 years. Their therapeutic advantages are more tumor specific and with less side effects. For precisely tailoring available targeted therapies to each individual or a subset of cancer patients, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been utilized as a promising diagnosis tool with its advantages of accuracy, sensitivity, and high throughput. We developed and validated a NGS-based cancer genomic diagnosis targeting 115 prognosis and therapeutics relevant genes on multiple specimen including blood, tumor tissue, and body fluid from 10 patients with different cancer types. The sequencing data was then analyzed by the clinical-applicable analytical pipelines developed in house. We have assessed analytical sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the NGS-based molecular diagnosis. Also, our developed analytical pipelines were capable of detecting base substitutions, indels, and gene copy number variations (CNVs). For instance, several actionable mutations of EGFR,PIK3CA,TP53, and KRAS have been detected for indicating drug susceptibility and resistance in the cases of lung cancer. Our study has shown that NGS-based molecular diagnosis is more sensitive and comprehensive to detect genomic alterations in cancer, and supports a direct clinical use for guiding targeted therapy.

  10. Application of gene targeting to designed mutation breeding of high-tryptophan rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saika, Hiroaki; Oikawa, Akira; Matsuda, Fumio; Onodera, Haruko; Saito, Kazuki; Toki, Seiichi

    2011-07-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis via gene targeting (GT) based on homologous recombination is the ultimate mutation breeding technology because it enables useful information acquired from structural- and computational-based protein engineering to be applied directly to molecular breeding, including metabolic engineering, of crops. Here, we employed this rationale to introduce precise mutations in OASA2--an α-subunit of anthranilate synthase that is a key enzyme of tryptophan (Trp) biosynthesis in rice (Oryza sativa)--via GT, with subsequent selection of GT cells using a Trp analog. The expression level of OASA2 in plants homozygous and heterozygous for modified OASA2 was similar to that of nontransformants, suggesting that OASA2 transcription in GT plants was controlled in the same manner as endogenous OASA2, and that GT could lead to a lower risk of gene silencing than in conventional overexpression approaches. Moreover, we showed that enzymatic properties deduced from protein engineering or in vitro analysis could be reproduced in GT plants as evidenced by Trp accumulation levels. Interestingly, mature seeds of homozygous GT plants accumulated Trp levels 230-fold higher than in nontransformants without any apparent morphological or developmental changes. Thus, we have succeeded in producing a novel rice plant of great potential nutritional benefit for both man and livestock that could not have been selected using conventional mutagenesis approaches. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of directed crop improvement by combining precision mutagenesis via GT with a knowledge of protein engineering.

  11. Microarray-based ultra-high resolution discovery of genomic deletion mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Oligonucleotide microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) offers an attractive possible route for the rapid and cost-effective genome-wide discovery of deletion mutations. CGH typically involves comparison of the hybridization intensities of genomic DNA samples with microarray chip representations of entire genomes, and has widespread potential application in experimental research and medical diagnostics. However, the power to detect small deletions is low. Results Here we use a graduated series of Arabidopsis thaliana genomic deletion mutations (of sizes ranging from 4 bp to ~5 kb) to optimize CGH-based genomic deletion detection. We show that the power to detect smaller deletions (4, 28 and 104 bp) depends upon oligonucleotide density (essentially the number of genome-representative oligonucleotides on the microarray chip), and determine the oligonucleotide spacings necessary to guarantee detection of deletions of specified size. Conclusions Our findings will enhance a wide range of research and clinical applications, and in particular will aid in the discovery of genomic deletions in the absence of a priori knowledge of their existence. PMID:24655320

  12. Molecular nature of mutations induced by high-LET irradiation with argon and carbon ions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke; Ohbu, Sumie; Shirakawa, Yuki; Liu Yang; Kambara, Tadashi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Abe, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) is an important parameter to be considered in heavy-ion mutagenesis. However, in plants, no quantitative data are available on the molecular nature of the mutations induced with high-LET radiation above 101–124 keV μm −1 . In this study, we irradiated dry seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana with Ar and C ions with an LET of 290 keV μm −1 . We analyzed the DNA alterations caused by the higher-LET radiation. Mutants were identified from the M 2 pools. In total, 14 and 13 mutated genes, including bin2, egy1, gl1, gl2, hy1, hy3–5, ttg1, and var2, were identified in the plants derived from Ar- and C-ions irradiation, respectively. In the mutants from both irradiations, deletion was the most frequent type of mutation; 13 of the 14 mutated genes from the Ar ion-irradiated plants and 11 of the 13 mutated genes from the C ion-irradiated plants harbored deletions. Analysis of junction regions generated by the 2 types of irradiation suggested that alternative non-homologous end-joining was the predominant pathway of repair of break points. Among the deletions, the proportion of large deletions (>100 bp) was about 54% for Ar-ion irradiation and about 64% for C-ion irradiation. Both current results and previously reported data revealed that the proportions of the large deletions induced by 290-keV μm −1 radiations were higher than those of the large deletions induced by lower-LET radiations (6% for 22.5–30.0 keV μm −1 and 27% for 101–124 keV μm −1 ). Therefore, the 290 keV μm −1 heavy-ion beams can effectively induce large deletions and will prove useful as novel mutagens for plant breeding and analysis of gene functions, particularly tandemly arrayed genes.

  13. Molecular nature of mutations induced by high-LET irradiation with argon and carbon ions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovation Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ohbu, Sumie; Shirakawa, Yuki; Liu Yang; Kambara, Tadashi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko, E-mail: tomoabe@riken.jp [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovation Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) is an important parameter to be considered in heavy-ion mutagenesis. However, in plants, no quantitative data are available on the molecular nature of the mutations induced with high-LET radiation above 101-124 keV {mu}m{sup -1}. In this study, we irradiated dry seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana with Ar and C ions with an LET of 290 keV {mu}m{sup -1}. We analyzed the DNA alterations caused by the higher-LET radiation. Mutants were identified from the M{sub 2} pools. In total, 14 and 13 mutated genes, including bin2, egy1, gl1, gl2, hy1, hy3-5, ttg1, and var2, were identified in the plants derived from Ar- and C-ions irradiation, respectively. In the mutants from both irradiations, deletion was the most frequent type of mutation; 13 of the 14 mutated genes from the Ar ion-irradiated plants and 11 of the 13 mutated genes from the C ion-irradiated plants harbored deletions. Analysis of junction regions generated by the 2 types of irradiation suggested that alternative non-homologous end-joining was the predominant pathway of repair of break points. Among the deletions, the proportion of large deletions (>100 bp) was about 54% for Ar-ion irradiation and about 64% for C-ion irradiation. Both current results and previously reported data revealed that the proportions of the large deletions induced by 290-keV {mu}m{sup -1} radiations were higher than those of the large deletions induced by lower-LET radiations (6% for 22.5-30.0 keV {mu}m{sup -1} and 27% for 101-124 keV {mu}m{sup -1}). Therefore, the 290 keV {mu}m{sup -1} heavy-ion beams can effectively induce large deletions and will prove useful as novel mutagens for plant breeding and analysis of gene functions, particularly tandemly arrayed genes.

  14. PLA2G6, encoding a phospholipase A2, is mutated in neurodegenerative disorders with high brain iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Neil V; Westaway, Shawn K; Morton, Jenny E V; Gregory, Allison; Gissen, Paul; Sonek, Scott; Cangul, Hakan; Coryell, Jason; Canham, Natalie; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Pasha, Shanaz; Rodriguez, Diana; Desguerre, Isabelle; Mubaidin, Amar; Bertini, Enrico; Trembath, Richard C; Simonati, Alessandro; Schanen, Carolyn; Johnson, Colin A; Levinson, Barbara; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wilmot, Beth; Kramer, Patricia; Gitschier, Jane; Maher, Eamonn R; Hayflick, Susan J

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders with high brain iron include Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease and several childhood genetic disorders categorized as neuroaxonal dystrophies. We mapped a locus for infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) and neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) to chromosome 22q12-q13 and identified mutations in PLA2G6, encoding a calcium-independent group VI phospholipase A2, in NBIA, INAD and the related Karak syndrome. This discovery implicates phospholipases in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders with iron dyshomeostasis. PMID:16783378

  15. High grade leiomyosarcoma of the testes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish D. Bakhshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Testicular leiomyosarcoma is a rare tumor. It may arise secondarily following exposure to radiotherapy, chronic inflammation, or usage of high dose anabolic steroids. However, in absence of risk factors, it is rarely seen. Only 15 cases of Primary Intra testicular leiomyosarcoma have been reported in world literature. We present a case of testicular tumor in an elderly male. Preoperative work up showed raised Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH levels. He underwent high orchidectomy. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed it to be a primary intra testicular leiomyosarcoma. A brief case report with review of literature is presented.

  16. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston

  17. Mutator activity in Schizophyllum commune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shneyour, Y.; Koltin, Y. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Microbiology)

    1983-01-01

    A strain with an elevated level of spontaneous mutations and an especially high rate of reversion at a specific locus (pab/sup -/) was identified. The mutator trait is recessive. UV sensitivity and the absence of a UV-specific endonucleolytic activity were associated with the enhancement of the mutation rate in mutator strains. The endonuclease associated with the regulation of the mutation rate also acted on single-stranded DNA. The molecular weight of this enzyme is about 38,000 daltons.

  18. Gag mutations strongly contribute to HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors in highly drug-experienced patients besides compensating for fitness loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dam

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors (PI results from mutations in the viral protease (PR that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC. Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying different sequences from six patients who had failed multiple lines of treatment. Mutations in Gag strongly and directly contributed to PI resistance besides compensating for fitness loss. This effect was essentially carried by the C-terminal region of Gag (containing NC-SP2-p6 with little or no contribution from MA, CA, and SP1. The effect of Gag on resistance depended on the presence of cleavage site mutations A431V or I437V in NC-SP2-p6 and correlated with processing of the NC/SP2 cleavage site. By contrast, reverting the A431V or I437V mutation in these highly evolved sequences had little effect on RC. Mutations in the NC-SP2-p6 region of Gag can be dually selected as compensatory and as direct PI resistance mutations, with cleavage at the NC-SP2 site behaving as a rate-limiting step in PI resistance. Further compensatory mutations render viral RC independent of the A431V or I437V mutations while their effect on resistance persists.

  19. Analysis of BRAF V600E mutation in 1,320 nervous system tumors reveals high mutation frequencies in pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, ganglioglioma and extra-cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schindler, G.; Capper, D.; Meyer, J.; Janzarik, W.; Omran, H.; Herold-Mende, C.; Schmieder, K.; Wesseling, P.; Mawrin, C.; Hasselblatt, M.; Louis, D.N.; Korshunov, A.; Pfister, S.; Hartmann, C.; Paulus, W.; Reifenberger, G.; Deimling, A. Von

    2011-01-01

    Missense mutations of the V600E type constitute the vast majority of tumor-associated somatic alterations in the v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) gene. Initially described in melanoma, colon and papillary thyroid carcinoma, these alterations have also been observed in primary

  20. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational profile and prevalence in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC probands from Southern Brazil: Are international testing criteria appropriate for this specific population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Alemar

    Full Text Available Germline pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA are the main cause of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC.In this study we evaluated the mutational profile and prevalence of BRCA pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants among probands fulfilling the NCCN HBOC testing criteria. We characterized the clinical profile of these individuals and explored the performance of international testing criteria.A pathogenic/likely pathogenic variant was detected in 19.1% of 418 probands, including seven novel frameshift variants. Variants of uncertain significance were found in 5.7% of individuals. We evaluated 50 testing criteria and mutation probability algorithms. There was a significant odds-ratio (OR for mutation prediction (p ≤ 0.05 for 25 criteria; 14 of these had p ≤ 0.001. Using a cutoff point of four criteria, the sensitivity is 83.8%, and the specificity is 53.5% for being a carrier. The prevalence of pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants for each criterion ranged from 22.1% to 55.6%, and criteria with the highest ORs were those related to triple-negative breast cancer or ovarian cancer.This is the largest study of comprehensive BRCA testing among Brazilians to date, and the first to analyze clinical criteria for genetic testing. Several criteria that are not included in the NCCN achieved a higher predictive value. Identification of the most informative criteria for each population will assist in the development of a rational approach to genetic testing, and will enable the prioritization of high-risk individuals as a first step towards offering testing in low-income countries.

  1. The prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in adult acute myeloid leukemia patients treated with high-dose cytarabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad EI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebtesam I Ahmad, Heba H Gawish, Nashwa MA Al Azizi, Ashraf M ElhefniClinical Pathology Department, Hematology and Oncology Unit of Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Sharkia, EgyptBackground: Activating point mutation of the RAS gene has been generally accepted as an oncogenic event in a variety of malignancies. It represents one of the most common genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, little is known about its clinical relevance in the treatment outcome for this leukemia.Objective: This study aimed to clarify the biologic and prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in relation to the dose of cytarabine (ara-C used in postinduction consolidation chemotherapy in adult AML patients.Patients and methods: The study comprised of 71 de novo AML patients with male/female ratio 1.4:1; their ages ranged from 21–59 years with a median of 37 years. They were subjected to full clinical evaluation, routine laboratory investigations, cytogenetic studies by G-banding (Giemsa staining, and K-RAS mutation detection using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The patients were randomized into two groups according to the ara-C dose used in consolidation treatment, the high the dose ara-C (HDAC group receiving 400 mg ara-C and-low-dose ara-C (LDAC group receiving 100 mg ara-C; they were followed over a period of five years.Results: Mutations in the K-RAS gene (mutRAS were detected in 23 patients (32% with the remaining 48 patients (68% having wild-type RAS (wtRAS. The percent of blast cells was significantly lower in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P ≤ 0.001 while M4 subtype of AML and Inv(16 frequencies were significantly higher in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P = 0.015 and (P = 0.003, respectively. The patients were followed up for a median of 43 months (range 11–57 months. There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS between mutRAS and wtRAS (P = 0.326. Within the mut

  2. Highly sensitive silicon microreactor for catalyst testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Toke Riishøj; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2009-01-01

    by directing the entire gas flow through the catalyst bed to a mass spectrometer, thus ensuring that nearly all reaction products are present in the analyzed gas flow. Although the device can be employed for testing a wide range of catalysts, the primary aim of the design is to allow characterization of model...... catalysts which can only be obtained in small quantities. Such measurements are of significant fundamental interest but are challenging because of the low surface areas involved. The relationship between the reaction zone gas flow and the pressure in the reaction zone is investigated experimentally......, it is found that platinum catalysts with areas as small as 15 mu m(2) are conveniently characterized with the device. (C) 2009 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3270191]...

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of EGFR mutation testing and gefitinib as first-line therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Yusuke; Matsushima, Yukiko; Shiroiwa, Takeru; Chiba, Koji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Kurokawa, Tatsuo; Urushihara, Hisashi

    2015-10-01

    The combination use of gefitinib and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) testing is a standard first-line therapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we examined the cost-effectiveness of this approach in Japan. Our analysis compared the 'EGFR testing strategy', in which EGFR mutation testing was performed before treatment and patients with EGFR mutations received gefitinib while those without mutations received standard chemotherapy, to the 'no-testing strategy,' in which genetic testing was not conducted and all patients were treated with standard chemotherapy. A three-state Markov model was constructed to predict expected costs and outcomes for each strategy. We included only direct medical costs from the healthcare payer's perspective. Outcomes in the model were based on those reported in the Iressa Pan-Asia Study (IPASS). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated using quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. Sensitivity and scenario analyses were conducted. The incremental cost and effectiveness per patient of the 'EGFR testing strategy' compared to the 'no-testing strategy' was estimated to be approximately JP¥122,000 (US$1180; US$1=JP¥104 as of February 2014) and 0.036 QALYs. The ICER was then calculated to be around JP¥3.38 million (US$32,500) per QALY gained. These results suggest that the 'EGFR testing strategy' is cost-effective compared with the 'no-testing strategy' when JP¥5.0 million to 6.0 million per QALY gained is considered an acceptable threshold. These results were supported by the sensitivity and scenario analyses. The combination use of gefitinib and EGFR testing can be considered a cost-effective first-line therapy compared to chemotherapy such as carboplatin-paclitaxel for the treatment for NSCLC in Japan. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. DEVELOPING COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TESTS FOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Harsono

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Communicative Approach of teaching English in senior high school in Indonesia has been adopted since the implementation of The 1984 Curriculum, but the tests–the communicative language tests–(CL Tests have not been developed and used properly. The objective of the study is to develop CL Tests for senior high school. The procedure of conducting the study consists of three major steps, that is, identifying the objectives, developing the test specification, and developing the CL Tests. The development of the CL Tests in detail consists of fifteen sub-steps from determining what language skills tested, selecting the suitable source materials, up to rewriting the CL Tests to be used as CL Tests alternative for senior high school. The results of the test development reveal that there are fifteen CL Tests consisting of three tests of listening, three reading, three speaking, and three writing tests. The whole tests have construct and content validity, no complete evidence of concurrent validity with report marks and semester test scores, high to very high inter-rater reliability, and no complete practicality.

  5. Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test for analysis of ZAP-70 expression in B-CLL, compared with quantitative PCR and IgV(H) mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bockstaele, Femke; Janssens, Ann; Piette, Anne; Callewaert, Filip; Pede, Valerie; Offner, Fritz; Verhasselt, Bruno; Philippé, Jan

    2006-07-15

    ZAP-70 has been proposed as a surrogate marker for immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region (IgV(H)) mutation status, which is known as a prognostic marker in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The flow cytometric analysis of ZAP-70 suffers from difficulties in standardization and interpretation. We applied the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) statistical test to make analysis more straightforward. We examined ZAP-70 expression by flow cytometry in 53 patients with CLL. Analysis was performed as initially described by Crespo et al. (New England J Med 2003; 348:1764-1775) and alternatively by application of the KS statistical test comparing T cells with B cells. Receiver-operating-characteristics (ROC)-curve analyses were performed to determine the optimal cut-off values for ZAP-70 measured by the two approaches. ZAP-70 protein expression was compared with ZAP-70 mRNA expression measured by a quantitative PCR (qPCR) and with the IgV(H) mutation status. Both flow cytometric analyses correlated well with the molecular technique and proved to be of equal value in predicting the IgV(H) mutation status. Applying the KS test is reproducible, simple, straightforward, and overcomes a number of difficulties encountered in the Crespo-method. The KS statistical test is an essential part of the software delivered with modern routine analytical flow cytometers and is well suited for analysis of ZAP-70 expression in CLL. (c) 2006 International Society for Analytical Cytology.

  6. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghi Kim

    2015-01-01

    The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only easy to use, but also high-powered robustly across various scenarios. The usage and advantages of these novel tests are demonstrated on an Alzheimer's disease dataset and simulated data.

  7. The Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative composite cognitive test score: Sample size estimates for the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease treatments in presenilin 1 E280A mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Langbaum, Jessica B.; Hendrix, Suzanne B.; Chen, Kewei; Fleisher, Adam S.; Friesenhahn, Michel; Ward, Michael; Aguirre, Camilo; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Madrigal, Lucìa; Muñoz, Claudia; Tirado, Victoria; Moreno, Sonia; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is a need to identify a cognitive composite that is sensitive to tracking preclinical AD decline to be used as a primary endpoint in treatment trials. Method We capitalized on longitudinal data, collected from 1995 to 2010, from cognitively unimpaired presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers from the world’s largest known early-onset autosomal dominant AD (ADAD) kindred to identify a composite cognitive test with the greatest statistical power to track preclinical AD decline and estimate the number of carriers age 30 and older needed to detect a treatment effect in the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative’s (API) preclinical AD treatment trial. The mean-to-standard-deviation ratios (MSDRs) of change over time were calculated in a search for the optimal combination of one to seven cognitive tests/sub-tests drawn from the neuropsychological test battery in cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers during a two and five year follow-up period, using data from non-carriers during the same time period to correct for aging and practice effects. Combinations that performed well were then evaluated for robustness across follow-up years, occurrence of selected items within top performing combinations and representation of relevant cognitive domains. Results This optimal test combination included CERAD Word List Recall, CERAD Boston Naming Test (high frequency items), MMSE Orientation to Time, CERAD Constructional Praxis and Ravens Progressive Matrices (Set A) with an MSDR of 1.62. This composite is more sensitive than using either the CERAD Word List Recall (MSDR=0.38) or the entire CERAD-Col battery (MSDR=0.76). A sample size of 75 cognitively normal PSEN1-E280A mutation carriers age 30 and older per treatment arm allows for a detectable treatment effect of 29% in a 60-month trial (80% power, p=0.05). Conclusions We have identified a composite cognitive test score representing multiple cognitive domains that has improved power compared to the most

  8. EGFR Mutation Status in Uighur Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li SHAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a transmembrane protein, is a member of the tyrosine kinase family. Gefitinib, an EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, has shown a high response rate in the treatment of lung cancer in patients with EGFR mutation. However, significant differences in EGFR mutations exist among different ethnic groups. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of EGFR mutations in Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients by using a rapid and sensitive detection method and to analyze EGFR mutation differences compared with Han lung adenocarcinoma patients. Methods We examined lung adenocarcinoma tissues from 138 patients, including 68 Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients and 70 Han lung adenocarcinoma patients, for EGFR mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 by using the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS PCR method. The mutation differences between Uighur and Han lung adenocarcinoma were compared by using the chi-square test method. Results EGFR mutations were detected in 43 (31.2% of the 138 lung adenocarcinoma patients. EGFR mutations were detected in 11 (16.2% of the 68 Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients and in 32 (45.7% of the 70 Han lung adenocarcinoma patients. Significant differences were observed in the EGFR mutations between Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients and Han lung adenocarcinoma patients (P<0.001. Conclusion Our results indicate that the EGFR mutation in Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients (16.2% is significantly lower than that in Han lung adenocarcinoma patients (45.7%.

  9. Test of a High Power Target Design

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %IS343 :\\\\ \\\\ A high power tantalum disc-foil target (RIST) has been developed for the proposed radioactive beam facility, SIRIUS, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The yield and release characteristics of the RIST target design have been measured at ISOLDE. The results indicate that the yields are at least as good as the best ISOLDE roll-foil targets and that the release curves are significantly faster in most cases. Both targets use 20 -25 $\\mu$m thick foils, but in a different internal geometry.\\\\ \\\\Investigations have continued at ISOLDE with targets having different foil thickness and internal geometries in an attempt to understand the release mechanisms and in particular to maximise the yield of short lived isotopes. A theoretical model has been developed which fits the release curves and gives physical values of the diffusion constants.\\\\ \\\\The latest target is constructed from 2 $\\mu$m thick tantalum foils (mass only 10 mg) and shows very short release times. The yield of $^{11}$Li (half-life of ...

  10. High-risk Long QT Syndrome Mutations in the Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) Pore Disrupt the Molecular Basis for Rapid K+ Permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Don E.; Bartos, Daniel C.; Reloj, Allison R.; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Johnson, Jonathan N.; Tester, David J.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Fressart, Véronique; Denjoy, Isabelle; Guicheney, Pascale; Moss, Arthur J.; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Delisle, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 long QT syndrome (LQT1) syndrome is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the KCNQ1, which encodes the K+ channel (Kv7.1) that underlies the slowly activating delayed rectifier K+ current in the heart. Intragenic risk stratification suggests LQT1 mutations that disrupt conserved amino acid residues in the pore are an independent risk factor for LQT1-related cardiac events. The purpose of this study is to determine possible molecular mechanisms that underlie the loss-of-function for these high-risk mutations. Extensive genotype-phenotype analyses of LQT1 patients showed that T322M-, T322A-, or G325R-Kv7.1 confer a high risk for LQT1-related cardiac events. Heterologous expression of these mutations with KCNE1 revealed they generated non-functional channels and caused dominant negative suppression of WT-Kv7.1 current. Molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) of analogous mutations in KcsA (T85M-, T85A-, and G88R-KcsA) demonstrated that they disrupted the symmetrical distribution of the carbonyl oxygen atoms in the selectivity filter, which upset the balance between the strong attractive and K+-K+ repulsive forces required for rapid K+ permeation. We conclude high-risk LQT1 mutations in the pore likely disrupt the architectural and physical properties of the K+ channel selectivity filter. PMID:23092362

  11. High-risk long QT syndrome mutations in the Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) pore disrupt the molecular basis for rapid K(+) permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Don E; Bartos, Daniel C; Reloj, Allison R; Campbell, Kenneth S; Johnson, Jonathan N; Tester, David J; Ackerman, Michael J; Fressart, Véronique; Denjoy, Isabelle; Guicheney, Pascale; Moss, Arthur J; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Delisle, Brian P

    2012-11-13

    Type 1 long QT syndrome (LQT1) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the KCNQ1 gene, which encodes the K(+) channel (Kv7.1) that underlies the slowly activating delayed rectifier K(+) current in the heart. Intragenic risk stratification suggests LQT1 mutations that disrupt conserved amino acid residues in the pore are an independent risk factor for LQT1-related cardiac events. The purpose of this study is to determine possible molecular mechanisms that underlie the loss of function for these high-risk mutations. Extensive genotype-phenotype analyses of LQT1 patients showed that T322M-, T322A-, or G325R-Kv7.1 confers a high risk for LQT1-related cardiac events. Heterologous expression of these mutations with KCNE1 revealed they generated nonfunctional channels and caused dominant negative suppression of WT-Kv7.1 current. Molecular dynamics simulations of analogous mutations in KcsA (T85M-, T85A-, and G88R-KcsA) demonstrated that they disrupted the symmetrical distribution of the carbonyl oxygen atoms in the selectivity filter, which upset the balance between the strong attractive and K(+)-K(+) repulsive forces required for rapid K(+) permeation. We conclude high-risk LQT1 mutations in the pore likely disrupt the architectural and physical properties of the K(+) channel selectivity filter.

  12. SQSTM1 Mutations and Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd E Scheetz

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. One subset of glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma (NTG occurs in the absence of high intraocular pressure. Mutations in two genes, optineurin (OPTN and TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1, cause familial NTG and have known roles in the catabolic cellular process autophagy. TKB1 encodes a kinase that phosphorylates OPTN, an autophagy receptor, which ultimately activates autophagy. The sequestosome (SQSTM1 gene also encodes an autophagy receptor and also is a target of TBK1 phosphorylation. Consequently, we hypothesized that mutations in SQSTM1 may also cause NTG. We tested this hypothesis by searching for glaucoma-causing mutations in a cohort of NTG patients (n = 308 and matched controls (n = 157 using Sanger sequencing. An additional 1098 population control samples were also analyzed using whole exome sequencing. A total of 17 non-synonymous mutations were detected which were not significantly skewed between cases and controls when analyzed separately, or as a group (p > 0.05. These data suggest that SQSTM1 mutations are not a common cause of NTG.

  13. High Throughput, High Precision Hot Testing Tool for HBLED Wafer Level Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solarz, Richard [KLA-Tencor Corporation, Milpitas, CA (United States); McCord, Mark [KLA-Tencor Corporation, Milpitas, CA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    The Socrates research effort developed an in depth understanding and demonstrated in a prototype tool new precise methods for teh characterization of color characteristics and flux from individual LEDs for the production of uniform quality lighting. This effort was focused on improving the color quality and consistency of solid state lighting and potentially reducing characterization costs for all LED product types. The patented laser hot testing method was demonstrated to be far more accurate than all current state of the art color and flux characterization methods in use by the solid state lighting industry today. A seperately patented LED grouping method (statistical binning) was demonstrated to be a useful approach to improving utilization of entire lots of large color and flux distributions of manufactured LEDs for high quality color solid-state lighting. At the conclusion of the research in late 2015 the solid-state lighting industry was however generally satisfied with its existing production methods for high quality color products for the small segment of customers that demand it, albeit with added costs.

  14. Mutation and screening of high-alcoholic-yield yeast by HEPE and optimization of the fermentation condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jingjing; Lu Jiangtao; Zhang Qin; Wang Yan; Fu Yujie; Wang Shilong; Fu Haiying

    2011-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae YE0 was mutated using high-energy-pulse-electron (HEPE) beam. After ethanol stress and determination of the alcohol yield by gas chromatograph, the mutant YF1 with high alcoholic yield was obtained. The results showed that under the optimized fermentation conditions (34 degree C as the fermentation temperature, 72 h as the fermentation time and 30% as the glucose concentration), the alcoholic yield of YF1 was 15.57% which was 58.23% higher than that of the original strain YE0 (9.84%) under the same conditions. The growth rate and lethal temperature of the mutant YF1 were obviously enhanced to the original strain YE0. The mutant YF1 has a great potential application in industrial production of alcohol. And it can also be used as the original strain for further mutagenesis to get the strain of higher alcoholic yield. (authors)

  15. Group Differences in Test-Taking Behaviour: An Example from a High-Stakes Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Eklöf, Hanna; Lyrén, Per-Erik

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether different groups of test-takers vary in their reported test-taking behaviour in a high-stakes test situation. A between-group design (N = 1129) was used to examine whether high and low achievers, as well as females and males, differ in their use of test-taking strategies, and in level of reported test anxiety and…

  16. Predicting Freshman Grade Point Average From College Admissions Test Scores and State High School Test Scores

    OpenAIRE

    Koretz, Daniel; Yu, C; Mbekeani, Preeya Pandya; Langi, M.; Dhaliwal, Tasminda Kaur; Braslow, David Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The current focus on assessing “college and career readiness” raises an empirical question: How do high school tests compare with college admissions tests in predicting performance in college? We explored this using data from the City University of New York and public colleges in Kentucky. These two systems differ in the choice of college admissions test, the stakes for students on the high school test, and demographics. We predicted freshman grade point average (FGPA) from high school GPA an...

  17. MT-ND5 Mutation Exhibits Highly Variable Neurological Manifestations at Low Mutant Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shiau Ng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the m.13094T>C MT-ND5 gene have been previously described in three cases of Leigh Syndrome (LS. In this retrospective, international cohort study we identified 20 clinically affected individuals (13 families and four asymptomatic carriers. Ten patients were deceased at the time of analysis (median age of death was 10 years (range: 5·4 months−37 years, IQR = 17·9 years. Nine patients manifested with LS, one with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS, and one with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. The remaining nine patients presented with either overlapping syndromes or isolated neurological symptoms. Mitochondrial respiratory chain activity analysis was normal in five out of ten muscle biopsies. We confirmed maternal inheritance in six families, and demonstrated marked variability in tissue segregation, and phenotypic expression at relatively low blood mutant loads. Neuropathological studies of two patients manifesting with LS/MELAS showed prominent capillary proliferation, microvacuolation and severe neuronal cell loss in the brainstem and cerebellum, with conspicuous absence of basal ganglia involvement. These findings suggest that whole mtDNA genome sequencing should be considered in patients with suspected mitochondrial disease presenting with complex neurological manifestations, which would identify over 300 known pathogenic variants including the m.13094T>C. Keywords: Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, Lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS, Leigh syndrome (LS, Mitochondrial DNA, Heteroplasmy, Neuropathology

  18. Molecular imaging with {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI and molecular testing for mutations in differentiating benign from malignant follicular neoplasm: a prospective comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanella, L.; Treglia, G.; Ceriani, L. [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Thyroid Centre, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Campenni, A. [Policlinico Universitario, Istituto di Medicina Nucleare, Messina (Italy); Verburg, F.A. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Trimboli, P. [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Thyroid Centre, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Ospedale Israelitico, Sezione di Endocrinologia e Diabetologia, Roma (Italy); Bongiovanni, M. [Centre Hopitalier Universitaire Vaudouise, Institut de Pathologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    To compare mutation analysis of cytology specimens and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI thyroid scintigraphy for differentiating benign from malignant thyroid nodules in patients with a cytological reading of follicular neoplasm. Patients ≥18 years of age with a solitary hypofunctioning thyroid nodule (≥10 mm), normal thyrotropin and calcitonin levels, and a cytological diagnosis of follicular neoplasm were prospectively enrolled. Mutation analysis and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI scintigraphy were performed and patients were subsequently operated on to confirm or exclude a malignant lesion. Mutations for KRAS, HRAS and NRAS and for BRAF and translocations of PAX8/PPARγ, RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 were investigated. Static thyroid scintigraphic images were acquired 10 and 60 min after intravenous injection of 200 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI and visually assessed. Additionally, the MIBI washout index was calculated using a semiquantitative method. In our series, 26 % of nodules with a follicular pattern on cytology were malignant with a prevalence of follicular carcinomas. {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI scintigraphy was found to be significantly more accurate (positive likelihood ratio 4.56 for visual assessment and 12.35 for semiquantitative assessment) than mutation analysis (positive likelihood ratio 1.74). A negative {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI scan reliably excluded malignancy. In patients with a thyroid nodule cytologically diagnosed as a follicular proliferation, semiquantitative analysis of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI scintigraphy should be the preferred method for differentiating benign from malignant nodules. It is superior to molecular testing for the presence of differentiated thyroid cancer-associated mutations in fine-needle aspiration cytology sample material. (orig.)

  19. Molecular imaging with (99m)Tc-MIBI and molecular testing for mutations in differentiating benign from malignant follicular neoplasm: a prospective comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanella, L; Campenni, A; Treglia, G; Verburg, F A; Trimboli, P; Ceriani, L; Bongiovanni, M

    2016-06-01

    To compare mutation analysis of cytology specimens and (99m)Tc-MIBI thyroid scintigraphy for differentiating benign from malignant thyroid nodules in patients with a cytological reading of follicular neoplasm. Patients ≥18 years of age with a solitary hypofunctioning thyroid nodule (≥10 mm), normal thyrotropin and calcitonin levels, and a cytological diagnosis of follicular neoplasm were prospectively enrolled. Mutation analysis and (99m)Tc-MIBI scintigraphy were performed and patients were subsequently operated on to confirm or exclude a malignant lesion. Mutations for KRAS, HRAS and NRAS and for BRAF and translocations of PAX8/PPARγ, RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 were investigated. Static thyroid scintigraphic images were acquired 10 and 60 min after intravenous injection of 200 MBq of (99m)Tc-MIBI and visually assessed. Additionally, the MIBI washout index was calculated using a semiquantitative method. In our series, 26 % of nodules with a follicular pattern on cytology were malignant with a prevalence of follicular carcinomas. (99m)Tc-MIBI scintigraphy was found to be significantly more accurate (positive likelihood ratio 4.56 for visual assessment and 12.35 for semiquantitative assessment) than mutation analysis (positive likelihood ratio 1.74). A negative (99m)Tc-MIBI scan reliably excluded malignancy. In patients with a thyroid nodule cytologically diagnosed as a follicular proliferation, semiquantitative analysis of (99m)Tc-MIBI scintigraphy should be the preferred method for differentiating benign from malignant nodules. It is superior to molecular testing for the presence of differentiated thyroid cancer-associated mutations in fine-needle aspiration cytology sample material.

  20. Stability of transmembrane amyloid β-peptide and membrane integrity tested by molecular modeling of site-specific Aβ42 mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Poojari

    Full Text Available Interactions of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ with neuronal cell membranes, leading to the disruption of membrane integrity, are considered to play a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Natural mutations in Aβ42, such as the Arctic mutation (E22G have been shown to increase Aβ42 aggregation and neurotoxicity, leading to the early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. A correlation between the propensity of Aβ42 to form protofibrils and its effect on neuronal dysfunction and degeneration has been established. Using rational mutagenesis of the Aβ42 peptide it was further revealed that the aggregation of different Aβ42 mutants in lipid membranes results in a variety of polymorphic aggregates in a mutation dependent manner. The mutant peptides also have a variable ability to disrupt bilayer integrity. To further test the connection between Aβ42 mutation and peptide-membrane interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of membrane-inserted Aβ42 variants (wild-type and E22G, D23G, E22G/D23G, K16M/K28M and K16M/E22G/D23G/K28M mutants as β-sheet monomers and tetramers. The effects of charged residues on transmembrane Aβ42 stability and membrane integrity are analyzed at atomistic level. We observe an increased stability for the E22G Aβ42 peptide and a decreased stability for D23G compared to wild-type Aβ42, while D23G has the largest membrane-disruptive effect. These results support the experimental observation that the altered toxicity arising from mutations in Aβ is not only a result of the altered aggregation propensity, but also originates from modified Aβ interactions with neuronal membranes.

  1. Mutation induction, evaluation and utilization for development of high yielding varieties in Indian mustard and sunflower: an overview of BARC work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jambhulkar, S.J.; Shitre, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Mutation breeding programme in Indian mustard and sunflower at BARC has resulted into the development of wide spectrum of mutations for seed coat colour, chlorophyll, plant height, maturity, flower morphology, seed weight and oil content. In Indian mustard, TM1 and TM50 are high yielding yellow seed coat mutants, which were exploited in hybridisation to develop bold, yellow seed coat and high yielding genotypes. Light green leaf and variegated leaf are novel mutation in mustard. Putative mutants for drought tolerance have been isolated. Variability for zero erucic acid and zero glucosinolates genotypes have been developed in B. napus and B. juncea. In sunflower, high yielding black seed coat mutant were isolated. Extreme dwarf measuring only 11 cm is novel. Three high yielding varieties namely TM2, TM4, and TPM1 in mustard and one i.e.TAS82 in sunflower have been released for cultivation in collaboration with state agricultural universities. (author)

  2. Highly prevalent LIPH founder mutations causing autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis in Japan and the genotype/phenotype correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Tanahashi

    Full Text Available Mutations in LIPH cause of autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH, and the 2 missense mutations c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser and c.742C>A (p.His248Asn are considered prevalent founder mutations for ARWH in the Japanese population. To reveal genotype/phenotype correlations in ARWH cases in Japan and the haplotypes in 14 Japanese patients from 14 unrelated Japanese families. 13 patients had woolly hair, and 1 patient had complete baldness since birth. An LIPH mutation search revealed homozygous c.736T>A mutations in 10 of the patients. Compound heterozygous c.736T>A and c.742C>A mutations were found in 3 of the patients, and homozygous c.742C>A mutation in 1 patient. The phenotype of mild hypotrichosis with woolly hair was restricted to the patients with the homozygous c.736T>A mutation. The severe phenotype of complete baldness was seen in only 1 patient with homozygous c.742C>A. Haplotype analysis revealed that the alleles containing the LIPH c.736T>A mutation had a haplotype identical to that reported previously, although 4 alleles out of 5 chromosomes containing the LIPH c.742C>A mutation had a different haplotype from the previously reported founder allele. These alleles with c.742C>A are thought to be the third founder LIPH mutation causing ARWH. To accurately determine the prevalence of the founder mutations, we investigated allele frequencies of those mutations in 819 Japanese controls. Heterozygous c.736T>A mutations were found in 13 controls (allele frequency: 0.0079; carrier rate: 0.016, and heterozygous c.742C>A mutations were found in 2 controls (allele frequency: 0.0012; carrier rate: 0.0024. In conclusion, this study confirms the more accurate allele frequencies of the pathogenic founder mutations of LIPH and shows that there is a third founder mutation in Japan. In addition, the present findings suggest that the mutation patterns of LIPH might be associated with hypotrichosis severity in ARWH.

  3. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagel, Z.; Tutluer, M. I.; Peskircioglu, H.; Kantoglu, Y.; Kunter, B.

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parent varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 had been used in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 and 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. As a result of these experiments, two promising mutant lines were chosen and given to the Seed Registration and Certification Center for official registration These two promising mutants were tested at five different locations of Turkey, in 2004 and 2005 years. After 2 years of registration experiments one of outstanding mutants was officially released as mutant chickpea variety under the name TAEK-SAGEL, in 2006. Some basic characteristics of this mutant are; earliness (95-100 day), high yield capacity (180-220 kg/da), high seed protein (22-25 %), first pot height (20-25 cm), 100 seeds weight (42-48 g), cooking time (35-40 min) and resistance to Ascochyta blight.

  4. High resolution melting curve analysis targeting the HBB gene mutational hot-spot offers a reliable screening approach for all common as well as most of the rare beta-globin gene mutations in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Tarikul; Sarkar, Suprovath Kumar; Sultana, Nusrat; Begum, Mst Noorjahan; Bhuyan, Golam Sarower; Talukder, Shezote; Muraduzzaman, A K M; Alauddin, Md; Islam, Mohammad Sazzadul; Biswas, Pritha Promita; Biswas, Aparna; Qadri, Syeda Kashfi; Shirin, Tahmina; Banu, Bilquis; Sadya, Salma; Hussain, Manzoor; Sarwardi, Golam; Khan, Waqar Ahmed; Mannan, Mohammad Abdul; Shekhar, Hossain Uddin; Chowdhury, Emran Kabir; Sajib, Abu Ashfaqur; Akhteruzzaman, Sharif; Qadri, Syed Saleheen; Qadri, Firdausi; Mannoor, Kaiissar

    2018-01-02

    Bangladesh lies in the global thalassemia belt, which has a defined mutational hot-spot in the beta-globin gene. The high carrier frequencies of beta-thalassemia trait and hemoglobin E-trait in Bangladesh necessitate a reliable DNA-based carrier screening approach that could supplement the use of hematological and electrophoretic indices to overcome the barriers of carrier screening. With this view in mind, the study aimed to establish a high resolution melting (HRM) curve-based rapid and reliable mutation screening method targeting the mutational hot-spot of South Asian and Southeast Asian countries that encompasses exon-1 (c.1 - c.92), intron-1 (c.92 + 1 - c.92 + 130) and a portion of exon-2 (c.93 - c.217) of the HBB gene which harbors more than 95% of mutant alleles responsible for beta-thalassemia in Bangladesh. Our HRM approach could successfully differentiate ten beta-globin gene mutations, namely c.79G > A, c.92 + 5G > C, c.126_129delCTTT, c.27_28insG, c.46delT, c.47G > A, c.92G > C, c.92 + 130G > C, c.126delC and c.135delC in heterozygous states from the wild type alleles, implying the significance of the approach for carrier screening as the first three of these mutations account for ~85% of total mutant alleles in Bangladesh. Moreover, different combinations of compound heterozygous mutations were found to generate melt curves that were distinct from the wild type alleles and from one another. Based on the findings, sixteen reference samples were run in parallel to 41 unknown specimens to perform direct genotyping of the beta-thalassemia specimens using HRM. The HRM-based genotyping of the unknown specimens showed 100% consistency with the sequencing result. Targeting the mutational hot-spot, the HRM approach could be successfully applied for screening of beta-thalassemia carriers in Bangladesh as well as in other countries of South Asia and Southeast Asia. The approach could be a useful supplement of hematological and

  5. Genetic study of the BRAF gene reveals new variants and high frequency of the V600E mutation among Iranian ameloblastoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Mohsenifar, Zhaleh; Pourreza, Mohammad Reza; Moridnia, Abbas; Shariati, Laleh; Razavi, Seyyed Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign, slow-growing and locally invasive tumor. It is one of the most prevalent odontogenic tumors, with an incidence rate of 1% of all oral tumors and approximately 18% of odontogenic tumors. A group of genes have been investigated in patients with ameloblastoma. The BRAF V600E mutation has been implicated as the most common mutation in ameloblastoma. The presence or absence of this mutation has been associated with several clinicopathological properties, including location, age at diagnosis, histology, and prognosis. Although some populations have been investigated so far, little data are available on the Iranian population. The current research was launched to study the BRAF V600E mutation among a cohort of Iranian patients with ameloblastoma. In this clinicopathological and molecular biology study, a total of 19 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were studied. DNA extraction was performed, followed by PCR-sequencing of exons 10 and 15 of the BRAF gene to identify mutations. In silico analysis was performed for the identified variants. Results were analyzed by T test, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact test. Totally, 12 of 19 samples (63%) harbored the p. V600E hotspot mutation. In addition, we identified several variants, two of which were novel. The c.1769T>G (p. V590G) and c.1751C>T (p.L584F) as the novel variants showed a possible damaging effect by in silico analysis. No variant was found within exon 10. Our study confirms the role of BRAF mutations in ameloblastoma in the Iranian patients studied. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A switch from high-fidelity to error-prone DNA double-strand break repair underlies stress-induced mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Rebecca G; Fonville, Natalie C; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2005-09-16

    Special mechanisms of mutation are induced in microbes under growth-limiting stress causing genetic instability, including occasional adaptive mutations that may speed evolution. Both the mutation mechanisms and their control by stress have remained elusive. We provide evidence that the molecular basis for stress-induced mutagenesis in an E. coli model is error-prone DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). I-SceI-endonuclease-induced DSBs strongly activate stress-induced mutations near the DSB, but not globally. The same proteins are required as for cells without induced DSBs: DSBR proteins, DinB-error-prone polymerase, and the RpoS starvation-stress-response regulator. Mutation is promoted by homology between cut and uncut DNA molecules, supporting a homology-mediated DSBR mechanism. DSBs also promote gene amplification. Finally, DSBs activate mutation only during stationary phase/starvation but will during exponential growth if RpoS is expressed. Our findings reveal an RpoS-controlled switch from high-fidelity to mutagenic DSBR under stress. This limits genetic instability both in time and to localized genome regions, potentially important evolutionary strategies.

  7. Patients with primary breast and primary female genital tract diffuse large B cell lymphoma have a high frequency of MYD88 and CD79B mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xin-Xin; Li, Jian; Cai, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Duan, Ming-Hui; Zhou, Dao-Bin

    2017-11-01

    This study is to retrospectively evaluate the prevalence of MYD88 and CD79B mutations and the clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with primary diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the female genital tract and breast. The characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of 19 patients diagnosed with primary DLBCL of the female genital tract and breast, who had formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from diagnostic samples diagnosed between January 2004 and June 2016, were analyzed retrospectively. Nineteen female patients (7 with primary breast and 12 with primary female genital tract DLBCL) were included in this retrospective study. Eleven patients (57.9%) carried a MYD88 mutation, including 10 with MYD8 L265P and 1 with the MYD88 L265S mutation. Seven patients (36.8%) harbored a CD79B mutation, which included two cases with CD79B Y196H, two cases with CD79B Y196N, one case with CD79B Y196D, one case with CD79B Y196F, and one case with CD79B Y196X. Four cases had both MYD88 and CD79B mutations. The clinicopathologic parameters, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) of the MYD88 mutation-carrying group were not significantly different from those of the MYD88 wild-type group except for higher LDH levels. Six patients received cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP), while 13 patients received rituximab plus CHOP, and 13 patients received central nervous system prophylaxis. The median OS and PFS were 73 and 56 months, respectively. Patients with primary breast and primary female genital tract DLBCL have a high frequency of MYD88 and CD79B mutations. The presence of these mutations does not affect survival but may offer additional therapeutic options.

  8. High-precision performance testing of the LHC power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Bastos, M; Dreesen, P; Fernqvist, G; Fournier, O; Hudson, G

    2007-01-01

    The magnet power converters for LHC were procured in three parts, power part, current transducers and control electronics, to enable a maximum of industrial participation in the manufacturing and still guarantee the very high precision (a few parts in 10-6) required by LHC. One consequence of this approach was several stages of system tests: factory reception tests, CERN reception tests, integration tests , short-circuit tests and commissioning on the final load in the LHC tunnel. The majority of the power converters for LHC have now been delivered, integrated into complete converter and high-precision performance testing is well advanced. This paper presents the techniques used for high-precision testing and the results obtained.

  9. Loss of function JAK1 mutations occur at high frequency in cancers with microsatellite instability and are suggestive of immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albacker, Lee A; Wu, Jeremy; Smith, Peter; Warmuth, Markus; Stephens, Philip J; Zhu, Ping; Yu, Lihua; Chmielecki, Juliann

    2017-01-01

    Immune evasion is a well-recognized hallmark of cancer and recent studies with immunotherapy agents have suggested that tumors with increased numbers of neoantigens elicit greater immune responses. We hypothesized that the immune system presents a common selective pressure on high mutation burden tumors and therefore immune evasion mutations would be enriched in high mutation burden tumors. The JAK family of kinases is required for the signaling of a host of immune modulators in tumor, stromal, and immune cells. Therefore, we analyzed alterations in this family for the hypothesized signature of an immune evasion mutation. Here, we searched a database of 61,704 unique solid tumors for alterations in the JAK family kinases (JAK1/2/3, TYK2). We used The Cancer Genome Atlas and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data to confirm and extend our findings by analyzing gene expression patterns. Recurrent frameshift mutations in JAK1 were associated with high mutation burden and microsatellite instability. These mutations occurred in multiple tumor types including endometrial, colorectal, stomach, and prostate carcinomas. Analyzing gene expression signatures in endometrial and stomach adenocarcinomas revealed that tumors with a JAK1 frameshift exhibited reduced expression of interferon response signatures and multiple anti-tumor immune signatures. Importantly, endometrial cancer cell lines exhibited similar gene expression changes that were expected to be tumor cell intrinsic (e.g. interferon response) but not those expected to be tumor cell extrinsic (e.g. NK cells). From these data, we derive two primary conclusions: 1) JAK1 frameshifts are loss of function alterations that represent a potential pan-cancer adaptation to immune responses against tumors with microsatellite instability; 2) The mechanism by which JAK1 loss of function contributes to tumor immune evasion is likely associated with loss of the JAK1-mediated interferon response.

  10. Functions and Design Scheme of Tibet High Altitude Test Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yongqing; Guo Jian; Yin Yu; Mao Yan; Li Guangfan; Fan Jianbin; Lu Jiayu; Su Zhiyi; Li Peng; Li Qingfeng; Liao Weiming; Zhou Jun

    2010-01-01

    @@ The functional orientation of the Tibet High Altitude Test Base, subordinated to the State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC), is to serve power transmission projects in high altitude areas, especially to provide technical support for southwestern hydropower delivery projects by UHVDC transmission and Qinghai-Tibet grid interconnection project. This paper presents the matters concerned during siting and planning, functions,design scheme, the main performances and parameters of the test facilities, as well as the tests and research tasks already carried out.

  11. Integration testing through reusing representative unit test cases for high-confidence medical software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Youngsul; Choi, Yunja; Lee, Woo Jin

    2013-06-01

    As medical software is getting larger-sized, complex, and connected with other devices, finding faults in integrated software modules gets more difficult and time consuming. Existing integration testing typically takes a black-box approach, which treats the target software as a black box and selects test cases without considering internal behavior of each software module. Though it could be cost-effective, this black-box approach cannot thoroughly test interaction behavior among integrated modules and might leave critical faults undetected, which should not happen in safety-critical systems such as medical software. This work anticipates that information on internal behavior is necessary even for integration testing to define thorough test cases for critical software and proposes a new integration testing method by reusing test cases used for unit testing. The goal is to provide a cost-effective method to detect subtle interaction faults at the integration testing phase by reusing the knowledge obtained from unit testing phase. The suggested approach notes that the test cases for the unit testing include knowledge on internal behavior of each unit and extracts test cases for the integration testing from the test cases for the unit testing for a given test criteria. The extracted representative test cases are connected with functions under test using the state domain and a single test sequence to cover the test cases is produced. By means of reusing unit test cases, the tester has effective test cases to examine diverse execution paths and find interaction faults without analyzing complex modules. The produced test sequence can have test coverage as high as the unit testing coverage and its length is close to the length of optimal test sequences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reliability of a Computerized Neurocognitive Test in Baseline Concussion Testing of High School Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James; Duerson, Drew

    2015-07-01

    Baseline assessments using computerized neurocognitive tests are frequently used in the management of sport-related concussions. Such testing is often done on an annual basis in a community setting. Reliability is a fundamental test characteristic that should be established for such tests. Our study examined the test-retest reliability of a computerized neurocognitive test in high school athletes over 1 year. Repeated measures design. Two American high schools. High school athletes (N = 117) participating in American football or soccer during the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 academic years. All study participants completed 2 baseline computerized neurocognitive tests taken 1 year apart at their respective schools. The test measures performance on 4 cognitive tasks: identification speed (Attention), detection speed (Processing Speed), one card learning accuracy (Learning), and one back speed (Working Memory). Reliability was assessed by measuring the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between the repeated measures of the 4 cognitive tasks. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated as a secondary outcome measure. The measure for identification speed performed best (ICC = 0.672; 95% confidence interval, 0.559-0.760) and the measure for one card learning accuracy performed worst (ICC = 0.401; 95% confidence interval, 0.237-0.542). All tests had marginal or low reliability. In a population of high school athletes, computerized neurocognitive testing performed in a community setting demonstrated low to marginal test-retest reliability on baseline assessments 1 year apart. Further investigation should focus on (1) improving the reliability of individual tasks tested, (2) controlling for external factors that might affect test performance, and (3) identifying the ideal time interval to repeat baseline testing in high school athletes. Computerized neurocognitive tests are used frequently in high school athletes, often within a model of baseline testing

  13. Detection of sdhB Gene Mutations in SDHI-Resistant Isolates of Botrytis cinerea Using High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Anastasios; Madesis, Panagiotis; Karaoglanidis, George S

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea , is a high risk pathogen for fungicide resistance development. Pathogen' resistance to SDHIs is associated with several mutations in sdh gene. The diversity of mutations and their differential effect on cross-resistance patterns among SDHIs and the fitness of resistant strains necessitate the availability of a tool for their rapid identification. This study was initiated to develop and validate a high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the identification of P225H/F/L//T, N230I, and H272L/R/Y mutations. Based on the sequence of sdh B subunit of resistant and sensitive isolates, a universal primer pair was designed. The specificity of the HRM analysis primers was verified to ensure against the cross-reaction with other fungal species and its sensitivity was evaluated using concentrations of known amounts of mutant's DNA. The melting curve analysis generated nine distinct curve profiles, enabling the discrimination of all the four mutations located at codon 225, the N230I mutation, the three mutations located in codon 272, and the non-mutated isolates (isolates of wild-type sensitivity). Similar results were obtained when DNA was extracted directly from artificially inoculated strawberry fruit. The method was validated by monitoring the presence of sdh B mutations in samples of naturally infected strawberry fruits and stone fruit rootstock seedling plants showing damping-off symptoms. HRM analysis data were compared with a standard PIRA-PCR technique and an absolute agreement was observed suggesting that in both populations the H272R mutation was the predominant one, while H272Y, N230I, and P225H were detected in lower frequencies. The results of the study suggest that HRM analysis can be a useful tool for sensate, accurate, and rapid identification of several sdh B mutations in B. cinerea and it is expected to contribute in routine fungicide resistance monitoring or assessments of the effectiveness of anti-resistance strategies implemented in

  14. Detection of sdhB gene mutations in SDHI-resistant isolates of Botrytis cinerea using high resolution melting (HRM analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Samaras

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea, is a high-risk pathogen for fungicide resistance development. Pathogen` resistance to SDHIs is associated with several mutations in sdh gene. The diversity of mutations and their differential effect on cross-resistance patterns among SDHIs and the fitness of resistant strains necessitate the availability of a tool for their rapid identification. This study was initiated to develop and validate a high-resolution melting (HRM analysis for the identification of P225H/F/L//T, N230I and H272L/R/Y mutations. Based on the sequence of sdhB subunit of resistant and sensitive isolates, a universal primer pair was designed. The specificity of the HRM analysis primers was verified to ensure against the cross-reaction with other fungal species and its sensitivity was evaluated using concentrations of known amounts of mutant`s DNA. The melting curve analysis generated nine distinct curve profiles, enabling the discrimination of all the 4 mutations located at codon 225, the N230I mutation, the 3 mutations located in codon 272 and the non mutated isolates (isolates of wild type sensitivity. Similar results were obtained when DNA was extracted directly from artificially inoculated strawberry fruit. The method was validated by monitoring the presence of sdhB mutations in samples of naturally infected strawberry fruits and stone fruit rootstock seedling plants showing damping off symptoms. HRM analysis data were compared with a standard PIRA-PCR technique and an absolute agreement was observed suggesting that in both populations the H272R mutation was the predominant one, while H272Y, N230I and P225H were detected in lower frequencies. The results of the study suggest that HRM analysis can be a useful tool for sensate, accurate and rapid identification of several sdhB mutations in B. cinerea and it is expected to contribute in routine fungicide resistance monitoring or assessments of the effectiveness of antiresistance strategies implemented in

  15. High-voltage terminal test of a test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Yu-Seok

    2015-10-01

    The Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex has been developing a 300-kV test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator ion source. The ion source and accelerating tube will be installed in a high-pressure vessel. The ion source in the high-pressure vessel is required to have a high reliability. The test stand has been proposed and developed to confirm the stable operating conditions of the ion source. The ion source will be tested at the test stand to verify the long-time operating conditions. The test stand comprises a 300-kV high-voltage terminal, a battery for the ion-source power, a 60-Hz inverter, 200-MHz radio-frequency power supply, a 5-kV extraction power supply, a 300-kV accelerating tube, and a vacuum system. The results of the 300-kV high-voltage terminal tests are presented in this paper.

  16. Highly sensitive detection of the PIK3CAH1047R mutation in colorectal cancer using a novel PCR-RFLP method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wan-Ming; Hu, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Lin-Lin; Feng, Yi-Ming; Wang, Yun-Yi; Fang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The PIK3CA H1047R mutation is considered to be a potential predictive biomarker for EGFR-targeted therapies. In this study, we developed a novel PCR-PFLP approach to detect the PIK3CA H1047R mutation in high effectiveness. A 126-bp fragment of PIK3CA exon-20 was amplified by PCR, digested with FspI restriction endonuclease and separated by 3 % agarose gel electrophoresis for the PCR-RFLP analysis. The mutant sequence of the PIK3CA H1047R was spiked into the corresponding wild-type sequence in decreasing ratios for sensitivity analysis. Eight-six cases of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens were subjected to PCR-RFLP to evaluate the applicability of the method. The PCR-RFLP method had a capability to detect as litter as 0.4 % of mutation, and revealed 16.3 % of the PIK3CA H1047R mutation in 86 CRC tissues, which was significantly higher than that discovered by DNA sequencing (9.3 %). A positive association between the PIK3CA H1047R mutation and the patients’ age was first found, except for the negative relationship with the degree of tumor differentiation. In addition, the highly sensitive detection of a combinatorial mutation of PIK3CA, KRAS and BRAF was achieved using individual PCR-RFLP methods. We developed a sensitive, simple and rapid approach to detect the low-abundance PIK3CA H1047R mutation in real CRC specimens, providing an effective tool for guiding cancer targeted therapy

  17. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography mutation analysis in patients with reduced Protein S levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bathum, Lise; Münster, Anna-Marie; Nybo, Mads

    2008-01-01

    diagnosis and risk estimation. The aim was to design a high-throughput genetic analysis based on denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography to identify sequence variations in the gene coding for Protein S. PATIENTS: In total, 55 patients referred to the Section of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Odense......BACKGROUND: Patients with congenital Protein S deficiency have increased risk of venous thromboembolism. However, Protein S levels show large intra-individual variation and the biochemical assays have low accuracy and a high interlaboratory variability. Genetic analysis might aid in a more precise......, giving a precise diagnosis and subsequently a better risk estimation....

  18. Highly sensitive KRAS mutation detection from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies and circulating tumour cells using wild-type blocking polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meggie Mo Chao; Leong, Sai Mun; Chua, Hui Wen; Tucker, Steven; Cheong, Wai Chye; Chiu, Lily; Li, Mo-Huang; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan

    2014-08-01

    Among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), KRAS mutations were reported to occur in 30-51 % of all cases. CRC patients with KRAS mutations were reported to be non-responsive to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) treatment in many clinical trials. Hence, accurate detection of KRAS mutations would be critical in guiding the use of anti-EGFR MoAb therapies in CRC. In this study, we carried out a detailed investigation of the efficacy of a wild-type (WT) blocking real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), employing WT KRAS locked nucleic acid blockers, and Sanger sequencing, for KRAS mutation detection in rare cells. Analyses were first conducted on cell lines to optimize the assay protocol which was subsequently applied to peripheral blood and tissue samples from patients with CRC. The optimized assay provided a superior sensitivity enabling detection of as little as two cells with mutated KRAS in the background of 10(4) WT cells (0.02 %). The feasibility of this assay was further investigated to assess the KRAS status of 45 colorectal tissue samples, which had been tested previously, using a conventional PCR sequencing approach. The analysis showed a mutational discordance between these two methods in 4 of 18 WT cases. Our results present a simple, effective, and robust method for KRAS mutation detection in both paraffin embedded tissues and circulating tumour cells, at single-cell level. The method greatly enhances the detection sensitivity and alleviates the need of exhaustively removing co-enriched contaminating lymphocytes.

  19. High resolution melting analysis for the detection of EMS induced mutations in wheat SbeIIa genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botticella Ermelinda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manipulation of the amylose-amylopectin ratio in cereal starch has been identified as a major target for the production of starches with novel functional properties. In wheat, silencing of starch branching enzyme genes by a transgenic approach reportedly caused an increase of amylose content up to 70% of total starch, exhibiting novel and interesting nutritional characteristics. In this work, the functionality of starch branching enzyme IIa (SBEIIa has been targeted in bread wheat by TILLING. An EMS-mutagenised wheat population has been screened using High Resolution Melting of PCR products to identify functional SNPs in the three homoeologous genes encoding the target enzyme in the hexaploid genome. Results This analysis resulted in the identification of 56, 14 and 53 new allelic variants respectively for SBEIIa-A, SBEIIa-B and SBEIIa-D. The effects of the mutations on protein structure and functionality were evaluated by a bioinformatic approach. Two putative null alleles containing non-sense or splice site mutations were identified for each of the three homoeologous SBEIIa genes; qRT-PCR analysis showed a significant decrease of their gene expression and resulted in increased amylose content. Pyramiding of different single null homoeologous allowed to isolate double null mutants showing an increase of amylose content up to 21% compared to the control. Conclusion TILLING has successfully been used to generate novel alleles for SBEIIa genes known to control amylose content in wheat. Single and double null SBEIIa genotypes have been found to show a significant increase in amylose content.

  20. Development of Genetic Testing for Fragile X Syndrome and Associated Disorders, and Estimates of the Prevalence of FMR1 Expansion Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Macpherson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of a trinucleotide (CGG expansion as the chief mechanism of mutation in Fragile X syndrome in 1991 heralded a new chapter in molecular diagnostic genetics and generated a new perspective on mutational mechanisms in human genetic disease, which rapidly became a central paradigm (“dynamic mutation” as more and more of the common hereditary neurodevelopmental disorders were ascribed to this novel class of mutation. The progressive expansion of a CGG repeat in the FMR1 gene from “premutation” to “full mutation” provided an explanation for the “Sherman paradox,” just as similar expansion mechanisms in other genes explained the phenomenon of “anticipation” in their pathogenesis. Later, FMR1 premutations were unexpectedly found associated with two other distinct phenotypes: primary ovarian insufficiency and tremor-ataxia syndrome. This review will provide a historical perspective on procedures for testing and reporting of Fragile X syndrome and associated disorders, and the population genetics of FMR1 expansions, including estimates of prevalence and the influence of AGG interspersions on the rate and probability of expansion.

  1. Rapid detection of pathological mutations and deletions of the haemoglobin beta gene (HBB) by High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis and Gene Ratio Analysis Copy Enumeration PCR (GRACE-PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew; Sasse, Jurgen; Varadi, Aniko

    2016-10-19

    Inherited disorders of haemoglobin are the world's most common genetic diseases, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The large number of mutations associated with the haemoglobin beta gene (HBB) makes gene scanning by High Resolution Melting (HRM) PCR an attractive diagnostic approach. However, existing HRM-PCR assays are not able to detect all common point mutations and have only a very limited ability to detect larger gene rearrangements. The aim of the current study was to develop a HBB assay, which can be used as a screening test in highly heterogeneous populations, for detection of both point mutations and larger gene rearrangements. The assay is based on a combination of conventional HRM-PCR and a novel Gene Ratio Analysis Copy Enumeration (GRACE) PCR method. HRM-PCR was extensively optimised, which included the use of an unlabelled probe and incorporation of universal bases into primers to prevent interference from common non-pathological polymorphisms. GRACE-PCR was employed to determine HBB gene copy numbers relative to a reference gene using melt curve analysis to detect rearrangements in the HBB gene. The performance of the assay was evaluated by analysing 410 samples. A total of 44 distinct pathological genotypes were detected. In comparison with reference methods, the assay has a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 98 %. We have developed an assay that detects both point mutations and larger rearrangements of the HBB gene. This assay is quick, sensitive, specific and cost effective making it suitable as an initial screening test that can be used for highly heterogeneous cohorts.

  2. When knowledge of a heritable gene mutation comes out of the blue: treatment-focused genetic testing in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, B; Quinn, V F; Gleeson, M; Kirk, J; Tucker, K M; Rahman, B; Saunders, C; Watts, K J; Peate, M; Geelhoed, E; Barlow-Stewart, K; Field, M; Harris, M; Antill, Y C; Mitchell, G

    2016-11-01

    Selection of women for treatment-focused genetic testing (TFGT) following a new diagnosis of breast cancer is changing. Increasingly a patient's age and tumour characteristics rather than only their family history are driving access to TFGT, but little is known about the impact of receiving carrier-positive results in individuals with no family history of cancer. This study assesses the role of knowledge of a family history of cancer on psychosocial adjustment to TFGT in both women with and without mutation carrier-positive results. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 20 women who had undergone TFGT, and who had been purposively sampled to represent women both family history and carrier status, and subjected to a rigorous qualitative analysis. It was found that mutation carriers without a family history reported difficulties in making surgical decisions quickly, while in carriers with a family history, a decision regarding surgery, electing for bilateral mastectomy (BM), had often already been made before receipt of their result. Long-term adjustment to a mutation-positive result was hindered by a sense of isolation not only by those without a family history but also those with a family history who lacked an affected relative with whom they could identify. Women with a family history who had no mutation identified and who had not elected BM reported a lack of closure following TFGT. These findings indicate support deficits hindering adjustment to positive TFGT results for women with and without a family history, particularly in regard to immediate decision-making about risk-reducing surgery.

  3. High prevalence of exon 8 G533C mutation in apparently sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarika, H L; Papathoma, A; Garofalaki, M; Vasileiou, V; Vlassopoulou, B; Anastasiou, E; Alevizaki, M

    2012-12-01

    Genetic screening for ret mutation has become routine practice in the evaluation of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Approximately 25% of these tumours are familial, and they occur as components of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 syndromes (MEN 2A and 2B) or familial MTC. In familial cases, the majority of mutations are found in exons 10, 11, 13, 14 or 15 of the ret gene. A rare mutation involving exon 8 (G533C) has recently been reported in familial cases of MTC in Brazil and Greece; some of these cases were originally thought to be sporadic. The aim of this study was to re-evaluate a series of sporadic cases of MTC, with negative family history, and screen them for germline mutations in exon 8. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral lymphocytes in 129 unrelated individuals who had previously been characterized as 'sporadic' based on the negative family history and negative screening for ret gene mutations. Samples were analysed in Applied Biosystems 7500 real-time PCR and confirmed by sequencing. The G533C exon 8 mutation was identified in 10 of 129 patients with sporadic MTC. Asymptomatic gene carriers were subsequently identified in other family members. In our study, we found that 7·75% patients with apparently sporadic MTC do carry G533C mutation involving exon 8 of ret. We feel that there is now a need to include exon 8 mutation screening in all patients diagnosed as sporadic MTC, in Greece. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. High prevalence of arterial thrombosis in JAK2 mutated essential thrombocythaemia: independence of the V617F allele burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Pallisgaard, Niels; Møller, Michael Boe

    2008-01-01

    Approximately half of the patients with essential thrombocythaemia (ET) harbor the JAK2 V617F mutation. Despite a phenotypic mimicry of JAK2 V617F positive ET and polycythaemia vera (PV), the data on thromboembolic risk and correlation to JAK2 mutation status are ambiguous. On a strictly WHO defi...

  5. Combination of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation and podoplanin expression in brain tumors identifies patients at high or low risk of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir Seyed Nazari, Pegah; Riedl, Julia; Preusser, Matthias; Posch, Florian; Thaler, Johannes; Marosi, Christine; Birner, Peter; Ricken, Gerda; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2018-04-19

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication in primary brain tumor patients. Independent studies revealed that podoplanin expression in brain tumors is associated with increased VTE risk, while the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation is associated with very low VTE risk. To investigate the interrelation between intratumoral podoplanin expression and IDH1 mutation, and their mutual impact on VTE development. In a prospective cohort study, intratumoral IDH1 R132H mutation and podoplanin were determined in brain tumor specimens (mainly glioma) by immunohistochemistry. Primary endpoint of the study was symptomatic VTE during a 2-year follow-up. All brain tumors that expressed podoplanin to a medium-high extent showed also an IDH1 wildtype status. A score based on IDH1 status and podoplanin expression levels allowed predicting risk of VTE. Patients with wildtype IDH1 brain tumors and high podoplanin expression had a significantly increased VTE risk compared to those with mutant IDH1 tumors and no podoplanin expression (6-month risk 18.2% vs. 0%). IDH1 mutation and podoplanin overexpression seem to be exclusive. While brain tumor patients with IDH1 mutation are at very low VTE risk, the risk of VTE in patients with IDH1 wildtype tumors is strongly linked to podoplanin expression levels. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. TOCUSO: Test of Conceptual Understanding on High School Optics Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2012-01-01

    Physics educators around the world often need reliable diagnostic materials to measure students' understanding of physics concept in high school. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new diagnostic tool on High School Optics concept. Test of Conceptual Understanding on High School Optics (TOCUSO) consists of 25 conceptual items that measures…

  7. Implementation of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cell line pellets as high-quality process controls in quality assessment programs for KRAS mutation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijkstra, Jeroen R; Opdam, Frank J M; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    . We assessed a novel synthetic control for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples in a blind study conducted within nine laboratories across Europe. We show that FFPE material can, at least in part, mimic clinical samples and we demonstrate this control to be a valuable tool....... For a testing laboratory to become accredited to perform such tests, it is essential that they perform reliability testing, but it has not previously been possible to perform this kind of testing on the complete workflow on a large scale without compromising reproducibility or the mimicry of the control sample...... receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy with increased progression-free survival only if the tumor does not carry a mutation in KRAS. Many different analytical platforms, both those commercially available and those developed in house, have been used within pathology laboratories to assess KRAS mutational status...

  8. Induced mutations in wheat, Triticum aestivum L., for high protein and lysine content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga, P.; Fuentes, R.

    1984-01-01

    With the aim of producing cultivars adapted to the Lakes Region of Chile (latitude 39-44 deg. South) with better protein content and high grain yield, in 1975 spring wheat seeds of genotypes Express and UACH-2-75 were irradiated with gamma rays in doses of 15, 25 and 35 Krad. The M 1 generation was field sown and harvested individually, initiating plant selection in the M 2 generation. The selection process, through six generations, has permitted to identify some mutants of high protein content. Two mutants UACH-2-I and UACH-3-I have been included in the National Co-operative Wheat Program for yield. A second experiment was initiated in 1981 with the objective of obtaining mutants not only for high protein content but also for high lysine content. For this purpose seeds of the spring wheat genotypes Huenufen and Austral were irradiated with gamma rays in doses of 10 and 25 Krad. The M 1 generation was sown at a high density and harvested in bulk. Selection per plant will start in the M 2 generation, continuing in the following. (author)

  9. Qualification test for ITER HCCR-TBS mockups with high heat flux test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon, E-mail: skkim93@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Dae; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The test mockups for ITER HCCR (Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector) TBS (Test Blanket System) in Korea were designed and fabricated. • A thermo-hydraulic analysis was performed using a high heat flux test facility by using electron beam. • The plan for qualification tests was developed to evaluate the thermo-hydraulic efficiency in accordance with the requirements of the ITER Organization. - Abstract: The test mockups for ITER HCCR (Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector) TBS (Test Blanket System) in Korea were designed and fabricated, and an integrity and thermo-hydraulic performance test should be completed under the same or similar operation conditions of ITER. The test plan for a thermo-hydraulic analysis was developed by using a high heat flux test facility, called the Korean heat load test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB). This facility is utilized for a qualification test of the plasma facing component (PFC) for the ITER first wall and DEMO divertor, and for the thermo-hydraulic experiments. In this work, KoHLT-EB will be used for the plan of the performance qualification test of the ITER HCCR-TBS mockups. This qualification tests should be performed to evaluate the thermo-hydraulic efficiency in accordance with the requirements of the ITER Organization (IO), which describe the specifications and qualifications of the heat flux test facility and test procedure for ITER PFC.

  10. Exome sequencing in schizophrenic patients with high levels of homozygosity identifies novel and extremely rare mutations in the GABA/glutamatergic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Giacopuzzi

    Full Text Available Inbreeding is a known risk factor for recessive Mendelian diseases and previous studies have suggested that it could also play a role in complex disorders, such as psychiatric diseases. Recent inbreeding results in the presence of long runs of homozygosity (ROHs along the genome, which are also defined as autozygosity regions. Genetic variants in these regions have two alleles that are identical by descent, thus increasing the odds of bearing rare recessive deleterious mutations due to a homozygous state. A recent study showed a suggestive enrichment of long ROHs in schizophrenic patients, suggesting that recent inbreeding could play a role in the disease. To better understand the impact of autozygosity on schizophrenia risk, we selected, from a cohort of 180 Italian patients, seven subjects with extremely high numbers of large ROHs that were likely due to recent inbreeding and characterized the mutational landscape within their ROHs using Whole Exome Sequencing and, gene set enrichment analysis. We identified a significant overlap (17%; empirical p-value = 0.0171 between genes inside ROHs affected by low frequency functional homozygous variants (107 genes and the group of most promising candidate genes mutated in schizophrenia. Moreover, in four patients, we identified novel and extremely rare damaging mutations in the genes involved in neurodevelopment (MEGF8 and in GABA/glutamatergic synaptic transmission (GAD1, FMN1, ANO2. These results provide insights into the contribution of rare recessive mutations and inbreeding as risk factors for schizophrenia. ROHs that are likely due to recent inbreeding harbor a combination of predisposing low-frequency variants and extremely rare variants that have a high impact on pivotal biological pathways implicated in the disease. In addition, this study confirms that focusing on patients with high levels of homozygosity could be a useful prioritization strategy for discovering new high-impact mutations in

  11. Exome sequencing in schizophrenic patients with high levels of homozygosity identifies novel and extremely rare mutations in the GABA/glutamatergic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Gennarelli, Massimo; Minelli, Alessandra; Gardella, Rita; Valsecchi, Paolo; Traversa, Michele; Bonvicini, Cristian; Vita, Antonio; Sacchetti, Emilio; Magri, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Inbreeding is a known risk factor for recessive Mendelian diseases and previous studies have suggested that it could also play a role in complex disorders, such as psychiatric diseases. Recent inbreeding results in the presence of long runs of homozygosity (ROHs) along the genome, which are also defined as autozygosity regions. Genetic variants in these regions have two alleles that are identical by descent, thus increasing the odds of bearing rare recessive deleterious mutations due to a homozygous state. A recent study showed a suggestive enrichment of long ROHs in schizophrenic patients, suggesting that recent inbreeding could play a role in the disease. To better understand the impact of autozygosity on schizophrenia risk, we selected, from a cohort of 180 Italian patients, seven subjects with extremely high numbers of large ROHs that were likely due to recent inbreeding and characterized the mutational landscape within their ROHs using Whole Exome Sequencing and, gene set enrichment analysis. We identified a significant overlap (17%; empirical p-value = 0.0171) between genes inside ROHs affected by low frequency functional homozygous variants (107 genes) and the group of most promising candidate genes mutated in schizophrenia. Moreover, in four patients, we identified novel and extremely rare damaging mutations in the genes involved in neurodevelopment (MEGF8) and in GABA/glutamatergic synaptic transmission (GAD1, FMN1, ANO2). These results provide insights into the contribution of rare recessive mutations and inbreeding as risk factors for schizophrenia. ROHs that are likely due to recent inbreeding harbor a combination of predisposing low-frequency variants and extremely rare variants that have a high impact on pivotal biological pathways implicated in the disease. In addition, this study confirms that focusing on patients with high levels of homozygosity could be a useful prioritization strategy for discovering new high-impact mutations in genetically

  12. Mutational spectrum in a worldwide study of 29,700 families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Friedman, Eitan; Hamann, Ute; Huo, Dezheng; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Solano, Angela R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thomassen, Mads; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Chan, T L; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E; Kruse, Torben A; Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Park, Sue Kyung; Torres, Diana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; McGuffog, Lesley; Parsons, Michael T; Leslie, Goska; Aalfs, Cora M; Abugattas, Julio; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrews, Lesley; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Asseryanis, Ella; Auerbach, Leo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Blanco, Amie M; Blazer, Kathleen R; Blok, Marinus J; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caliebe, Almuth; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Caputo, Sandrine M; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Collée, J Margriet; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Velazquez, Carolina; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eason, Jacqueline; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Engert, Stefanie; Evans, D Gareth; Faivre, Laurence; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Foretova, Lenka; Fowler, Jeffrey; Frost, Debra; Galvão, Henrique C R; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Gesta, Paul; Giannini, Giuseppe; Giraud, Sophie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Henderson, Alex; Hentschel, Julia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Honisch, Ellen; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Kim, Sung-Won; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Korach, Jacob; Laitman, Yael; Lasa, Adriana; Lasset, Christine; Lázaro, Conxi; Lee, Annette; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindor, Noralane M; Longy, Michel; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen H; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mari, Véronique; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Matrai, Zoltan; Mebirouk, Noura; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Mickys, Ugnius; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Musinsky, Jacob; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ngeow, Joanne; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Öfverholm, Anna; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Papp, Janos; Pasini, Barbara; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peixoto, Ana; Peruga, Nina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pohl, Esther; Pradhan, Nisha; Prajzendanc, Karolina; Prieur, Fabienne; Pujol, Pascal; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhiem, Kerstin; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rogers, Mark T; Rudaitis, Vilius; Schmidt, Ane Y; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Senter, Leigha; Shah, Payal D; Sharma, Priyanka; Side, Lucy E; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sobol, Hagay; Southey, Melissa; Steele, Linda; Steinemann, Doris; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tan, Yen Y; Teixeira, Manuel R; Terry, Mary Beth; Teulé, Alex; Thomas, Abigail; Thull, Darcy L; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Topka, Sabine; Trainer, Alison H; Tung, Nadine; van Asperen, Christi J; van der Hout, Annemieke H; van der Kolk, Lizet E; van der Luijt, Rob B; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walker, Lisa; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Zanzottera, Cristina; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K; Hutten Selkirk, Christina G; Hulick, Peter J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Antoniou, Antonis C; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on White in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with BRCA1 mutations and 11,351 families with BRCA2 mutations ascertained from 69 centers in 49 countries on six continents. This study comprehensively describes the characteristics of the 1,650 unique BRCA1 and 1,731 unique BRCA2 deleterious (disease-associated) mutations identified in the CIMBA database. We observed substantial variation in mutation type and frequency by geographical region and race/ethnicity. In addition to known founder mutations, mutations of relatively high frequency were identified in specific racial/ethnic or geographic groups that may reflect founder mutations and which could be used in targeted (panel) first pass genotyping for specific populations. Knowledge of the population-specific mutational spectrum in BRCA1 and BRCA2 could inform efficient strategies for genetic testing and may justify a more broad-based oncogenetic testing in some populations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Disease evolution and outcomes in familial AML with germline CEBPA mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tawana, Kiran; Wang, Jun; Renneville, Aline

    2015-01-01

    collected from 10 CEBPA-mutated families, representing 24 members with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Whole-exome (WES) and deep sequencing were performed to genetically profile tumors and define patterns of clonal evolution. Germline CEBPA mutations clustered within the N-terminal and were highly penetrant......, with AML presenting at a median age of 24.5 years (range, 1.75-46 years). In all diagnostic tumors tested (n = 18), double CEBPA mutations (CEBPAdm) were detected, with acquired (somatic) mutations preferentially targeting the C-terminal. Somatic CEBPA mutations were unstable throughout the disease course...

  14. Two-Sample Tests for High-Dimensional Linear Regression with an Application to Detecting Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yin; Cai, Tianxi; Cai, T Tony

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by applications in genomics, we consider in this paper global and multiple testing for the comparisons of two high-dimensional linear regression models. A procedure for testing the equality of the two regression vectors globally is proposed and shown to be particularly powerful against sparse alternatives. We then introduce a multiple testing procedure for identifying unequal coordinates while controlling the false discovery rate and false discovery proportion. Theoretical justifications are provided to guarantee the validity of the proposed tests and optimality results are established under sparsity assumptions on the regression coefficients. The proposed testing procedures are easy to implement. Numerical properties of the procedures are investigated through simulation and data analysis. The results show that the proposed tests maintain the desired error rates under the null and have good power under the alternative at moderate sample sizes. The procedures are applied to the Framingham Offspring study to investigate the interactions between smoking and cardiovascular related genetic mutations important for an inflammation marker.

  15. Tests of the Daimler D-IVa Engine at a High Altitude Test Bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, W G

    1920-01-01

    Reports of tests of a Daimler IVa engine at the test-bench at Friedrichshafen, show that the decrease of power of that engine, at high altitudes, was established, and that the manner of its working when air is supplied at a certain pressure was explained. These tests were preparatory to the installation of compressors in giant aircraft for the purpose of maintaining constant power at high altitudes.

  16. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. The most widely known characteristic of chickpea is that it is an important vegetable protein source used in human and animal nutrition. However, the dry grains of chickpea, has 2-3 times more protein than our traditional food of wheat. In addition, cheakpea is also energy source because of its high carbohydrate content. It is very rich in some vitamin and mineral basis. In the plant breeding, mutation induction has become an effective way of supplementing existing germplasm and improving cultivars. Many successful examples of mutation induction have proved that mutation breeding is an effective and important approach to food legume improvement. The induced mutation technique in chickpea has proved successful and good results have been attained. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parents varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 (9 % seed moisture content and germination percentage 98 %) in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 500 ve 600 Gy for greenhouse experiments and 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 ve 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. One thousand seeds for per treatment were sown in the field for the M 1 . At maturity, 3500 single plants were harvested and 20 seeds were taken from each M 1 plant and planted in the following season. During plant growth

  17. JAK2, MPL, and CALR mutations in Chinese Han patients with essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Biao; Chen, Bing; Zhou, Rong-Fu; Zhang, Qi-Guo; Li, Juan; Yang, Yong-Gong; Zhou, Min; Shao, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Yong; Xu, Xi-Hui; Ouyang, Jian; Xu, Jingyan; Ye, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), myeloproliferative leukemia (MPL), and CALR are highly relevant to Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. Assessing the prevalence of molecular mutations in Chinese Han patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET), and correlating their mutational profile with disease characteristics/phenotype. Of the 110 subjects studied, 62 carried the JAK2 V617F mutation, 21 had CALR mutations, one carried an MPL (W515) mutation, and 28 had non-mutated JAK2, CALR, and MPL (so-called triple-negative ET). Mutations in JAK2 exon 12 were not detected in any patient. Two ET patients had both CALR and JAK2 V617F mutations. Comparing the hematological parameters of the patients with JAK2 mutations with those of the patients with CALR mutations showed that the ET patients with CALR mutations were younger (p = 0.045) and had higher platelet counts (p = 0.043). Genotyping for CALR could be a useful diagnostic tool for JAK2/MPL-negative ET, since the data suggest that CALR is much more prevalent than MPL, therefore testing for CALR should be considered in patients who are JAK2 negative as its frequency is almost 20 times that of MPL mutation.

  18. Molecular characterization of mutations associated with resistance to second-line tuberculosis drug among multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients from high prevalence tuberculosis city in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudghiri, Amal; Karimi, Hind; Chetioui, Fouad; Zakham, Fathiah; Bourkadi, Jamal Eddine; Elmessaoudi, My Driss; Laglaoui, Amin; Chaoui, Imane; El Mzibri, Mohammed

    2018-02-27

    The emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has raised public health concern for global TB control. Although multi drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR- TB) prevalence and associated genetic mutations in Morocco are well documented, scarce information on XDR TB is available. Hence, the evaluation of pre-XDR and XDR prevalence, as well as the mutation status of gyrA, gyrB, rrs, tlyA genes and eis promoter region, associated with resistance to second line drugs, is of great value for better management of M/XDR TB in Morocco. To evaluate pre-XDR and XDR prevalence, as well as the mutation status of gyrA, gyrB, rrs, tlyA genes and eis promoter region, associated with resistance to second line drug resistance, in 703 clinical isolates from TB patients recruited in Casablanca, and to assess the usefulness of molecular tools in clinical laboratories for better management of M/XDR TB in Morocco. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was performed by the proportional method for first line drugs, and then the selected MDR isolates were tested for second line drugs (Ofloxacin, Kanamycin, Amikacin and Capreomycin). Along with DST, all samples were subjected to rpoB, katG and p-inhA mutation analysis by PCR and DNA sequencing. MDR isolates as well as 30 pan-susceptible strains were subjected to PCR and DNA sequencing of gyrA, gyrB, rrs, tlyA genes and eis promoter, associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones and injectable drugs. Among the 703 analysed strains, 12.8% were MDR; Ser531Leu and Ser315Thr being the most common recorded mutations within rpoB and katG genes associated with RIF and INH resistance respectively. Drug susceptibility testing for second line drugs showed that among the 90 MDR strains, 22.2% (20/90) were resistant to OFX, 2.22% (2/90) to KAN, 3.33% (3/90) to AMK and 1.11% (1/90) to CAP. Genotypic analysis revealed that 19 MDR strains harbored mutations in the gyrA gene; the most recorded mutation being Asp91Ala accounting for 47.6% (10

  19. Study on the high flavonoids mutants of tartarian buckwheat by radiation induced mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guozhu; Shen Huifang

    2012-01-01

    Three different varieties of tartarian buckwheat seeds (Chuanqiao 1#, Yu-621 and KP9920) were irradiated with various doses (100∼500 Gy) of 60 Co-γ ray and sowed. Ten, eight and six high flavonoid tartary buckwheat mutants were selected from three parent materials respectively. The flavonoid content of three parent materials were 8.33%, 10.18% and 9.80%. The range of flavonoid content of high flavonoids mutants for three parent materials 11.37%∼14.91%, 10.67%∼12.46% and 11.32%∼12.95% respectively. Cluster analysis was also carried out based on the agronomic traits and flavonoid content in the 27 tartary buckwheat materials (24 mutants and 3 parent material) The 27 materials were classified into four clusters by cluster analysis based on the agronomic traits and were classified into 5 groups based on flavonoid content. (authors)

  20. Breeding for earliness, high yield and disease resistance in rice by means of induced mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haq, M S; Ali, S M; Maniruzzaman, A F.M.; Mansur, A; Islam, R [Atomic Energy Centre, Dacca (Pakistan)

    1970-03-01

    Ten varieties of Boro, Aus and Aman rice were treated with 30 kR of gamma rays from the 500-Ci {sup 60}Co source of the Atomic Energy Centre of Dacca. In addition, two rice varieties were treated with EMS and dES. To suppress tillering, the seeds were sown late and at a high seed rate. 300 normal-looking fertile M{sub 1} plants from each variety were harvested at random. The M{sub 2} progenies were sown on a plant-to-row basis to select for high yield, earliness, blast resistance and response to large doses of nitrogen fertilizer. Characters like plant height, number of tillers, fertile tillers, length of panicle and time from sowing to maturity were checked. As the results showed great variability in the mutagen-treated material the chances for successful selection are promising. (author)

  1. Rice breeding with induced mutations in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, R [Station d' Amelioration des Plantes, Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques, Montpellier (France)

    1970-03-01

    Mutation experiments with rice at Montpellier yielded strains with improved lodging resistance, grain size, maturing time, milling quality and other characters. The general performance of these mutant strains was tested in field trials. Further mutagenic treatments were made to improve the high-yielding short grain varieties with regard to grain quality and seed dormancy. (author)

  2. High-Frequency Axial Fatigue Test Procedures for Spectrum Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    cycle runout limit. PURPOSE 2. To develop the capability to perform High-Frequency (H-F) Spectrum Fatigue tests, an in- house Basic and...response of the test specimen to the command input signal for load cycling . These cycle -by- cycle errors accumulate over the life of the test specimen...fatigue life model. It is expected that the cycle -by- cycle P-V error may vary substantially depending on the load spectrum content, the compensation

  3. Present status of high temperature engineering test and research, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors have excellent features such as the generation of high temperature close to 1000degC, very high inherent safety and high fuel burnup. By the advanced basic research under high temperature irradiation condition, the creation of various new technologies which become the momentum of future technical innovation can be expected. The construction of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) was decided in 1987, which aims at the thermal output of 30 MW and the coolant temperature at reactor exit of 950degC. The initial criticality is scheduled in 1998. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the high temperature engineering test and research, and plans the safety verifying test of the HTTR, the test of connecting heat utilization plants and so on. In this report, mainly the results obtained for one year from May, 1993 are summarized. The outline of the high temperature engineering test and development of the HTTR technologies are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Microspores irradiation in anther culture: testing a new technique to obtain mutations immediatly detected and fixed (Application to Nicotiana tabacum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondeil, Fanja

    1974-01-01

    In order to consider the effects of microspores irradiation on embryo development, and in order to observe the morphological responses of haploid plantlets derived from androgenetic anthers to ionizing irradiation, 1000, 1500 and 2000r of gamma rays were delivered on anthers of Nicotiana tabacum (DL 50 range calculated: 1500r). The cytological studies of embryo development revealed an apparent increase in irradiated microspores: cell division is stimulated but followed by an early mortality. A sharp rise in lethality effects was observed when gamma rays were applied beyond the seventh day of culture, when the proembryo contains an average of 4 cells. Morphological aberrations and colour changes in the Mo progeny derived from irradiated microspores are diverse. But after chromosome doubling and mutation checking out, all the plants were not recorded to have transmitted their aberrant characters. Thus, heritable character 'mutations) and not heritable character (variations) were obtained. The variations characters include dwarfing, excessive branching, fasciation and dichotomy of the stems, altered flower form, especially of petals. As to the leaves, they usually show induced changes in their colour (chlorotic areas, mosaic-colour changes, or an over-all colour changes), in their form (irregularity in outline) and in their texture (thickening, hairless leaf). Among the mutants, a monster tobacco, with excrescences on the leaves and the flowers is certainly the most conspicuous. But mutants also include altered leaf colour (over-all pale green) and altered flower colour, (dark red, clear pink, white) [fr

  5. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  6. High Test Scores: The Wrong Road to National Economic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Keith

    2011-01-01

    A widely held view is that good schools are essential to a nation's international economic success and that high test scores on international tests of academic skills and knowledge indicate how good a nation's schools are. The widespread belief that good schools are an important contributor to a nation's economic success in the world is supported…

  7. High Stakes Testing and Its Impact on Rural Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, V. Pauline

    2002-01-01

    The movement to standardization and high-stakes testing has been driven by ideological and political concerns and has adversely affected teaching/learning, democratic discourse, and educational equity. Rural schools are hit harder because of geographic isolation and insufficient staff and resources. Testing used for purposes other than measuring…

  8. The Impact of High Stakes Testing: The Australian Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenowski, Val; Wyatt-Smith, Claire

    2012-01-01

    High stakes testing in Australia was introduced in 2008 by way of the National Assessment Program--Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). Currently, every year all students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 are assessed on the same days using national tests in Reading, Writing, Language Conventions (Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation) and Numeracy. In 2010 the…

  9. Evaluation test on stability of high temperature strain gage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Toshimi (Kyowa Electronic Instruments Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Ito, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro

    1983-08-01

    This report deals with the results on a stability test of high temperature strain gage which is utilized for development of the Stethoscope for OGL - 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Services (ab. SOCETS). The test has proved that the weldable strain gage (KHC - 20 - G5) exhibits excellent stability at 500/sup 0/C during 3000 to 4000 hours service and can be applied sufficiently to evaluate integrity of OGL - 1 high temperature pipings and others.

  10. Evaluation test on stability of high temperature strain gage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshimi; Ito, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro.

    1983-01-01

    This report deals with the results on a stability test of high temperature strain gage which is utilized for development of the Stethoscope for OGL - 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Services (ab. SOCETS). The test has proved that the weldable strain gage (KHC - 20 - G5) exhibits excellent stability at 500 0 C during 3000 to 4000 hours service and can be applied sufficiently to evaluate integrity of OGL - 1 high temperature pipings and others. (author)

  11. High Performance Computing Modernization Program Kerberos Throughput Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-26

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/5524--17-9751 High Performance Computing Modernization Program Kerberos Throughput Test ...NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 2. REPORT TYPE1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 6. AUTHOR(S) 8. PERFORMING...PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT High Performance Computing Modernization Program Kerberos Throughput Test Report Daniel G. Gdula* and

  12. Design and testing of high-pressure railguns and projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.R.; Fowler, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The results of high-pressure tests of four railgun designs and four projectile types are presented. All tests were conducted at the Los Alamos explosive magnetic-flux compression facility in Ancho Canyon. The data suggest that the high-strength projectiles have lower resistance to acceleration than the low strength projectiles, which expand against the bore during acceleration. The railguns were powered by explosive magneticflux compression generators. Calculations to predict railgun and power supply performance were performed by Kerrisk

  13. High proportion of 22q13 deletions and SHANK3 mutations in Chinese patients with intellectual disability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Gong

    Full Text Available Intellectual disability (ID is a heterogeneous disorder caused by chromosomal abnormalities, monogenic factors and environmental factors. 22q13 deletion syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by severe ID. Although the frequency of 22q13 deletions in ID is unclear, it is believed to be largely underestimated. To address this issue, we used Affymetrix Human SNP 6.0 array to detect the 22q13 deletions in 234 Chinese unexplained ID patients and 103 controls. After the Quality Control (QC test of raw data, 22q13 deletions were found in four out of 230 cases (1.7%, while absent in parents of the cases and 101 controls. A review of genome-wide microarray studies in ID was performed and the frequency of 22q13 deletions from the literatures was 0.24%, much lower than our report. The overlapping region shared by all 4 cases encompasses the gene SHANK3. A heterozygous de novo nonsense mutation Y1015X of SHANK3 was identified in one ID patient. Cortical neurons were prepared from embryonic mice and were transfected with a control plasmid, shank3 wild-type (WT or mutant plasmids. Overexpression of the Y1015 mutant in neurons significantly affected neurite outgrowth compared with shank3 WT. These findings suggest that 22q13 deletions may be a more frequent cause for Chinese ID patients than previously thought, and the SHANK3 gene is involved in the neurite development.

  14. Does the globally invasive marine angiosperm, Halophila stipulacea, have high genetic diversity or unique mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquillo, K.; Campese, L.; Barber, P. H.; Willette, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    Seagrasses are important primary producers in many marine ecosystems, and support a wide diversity of marine life. However, invasive seagrasses like Halophila stipulacea can have pronounced negative impacts on an ecosystem by displacing native seagrasses and changing the community composition of the reef. Endemic to the Red Sea, Persian Gulf and Indian Ocean, Halophila stipulacea has become invasive in the Mediterranean and Caribbean Seas, presumably as a result of the opening of the Suez Canal and international ship traffic. However, it is unclear why this marine angiosperm has become invasive in parts of its range and not others. It is hypothesized that invasive forms may have evolved rapidly in response to natural selection in new and novel environments. Alternatively, genetic variation of introduced populations may be uniquely suited to thrive in regions where it is invasive. In this study, we use RAD next-generation sequencing to screen thousands of SNPs to investigate the genetic basis of adaptation in both native and invasive populations. We test whether genes under selection in the native range are the same as in the invasive range, or whether new genes have arisen with the invasion of each marine basin. The comparison of SNP frequencies unique among basins and environmental variables will aid in predicting new areas of invasion, assisting in improved management strategies to combat this invasive seagrass.

  15. Task force for integral test of High Energy nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    According to completion of the JENDL-High Energy file for neutron nuclear cross sections up to 50 MeV, a task force for integral test of high energy nuclear data was organized to discuss a guide line for integral test activities. A status of existing differential and integral experiments and how to perform such a test were discussed in the task force. Here the purpose and outline of the task force is explained with some future problems raised in discussion among the task member. (author)

  16. Containment test in area of high latitude and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jiantao; Ni Yongsheng; Jia Wutong

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high latitude and low temperature on containment test are detailed analyzed from the view of design, equipment, construct and start-up, and the solution is put forward. The major problems resolved is as below: the effects of low temperature and high wind on defect inspection of the containment surface, the effects of test load on the affiliated equipment of containment in the condition of low temperature, and the effects of low temperature on the containment leak rate measurement. Application in Hongyanhe Unit 1 showed that the proposed scheme can effectively overcome the influence of adverse weather on the containment test. (authors)

  17. Design of a high-flux test assembly for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Material Test Facility (FMIT) will provide a high flux fusion-like neutron environment in which a variety of structural and non-structural materials irradiations can be conducted. The FMIT experiments, called test assemblies, that are subjected to the highest neutron flux magnitudes and associated heating rates will require forced convection liquid metal cooling systems to remove the neutron deposited power and maintain test specimens at uniform temperatures. A brief description of the FMIT facility and experimental areas is given with emphasis on the design, capabilities and handling of the high flux test assembly

  18. Senior-Loken syndrome: A novel NPHP5 gene mutation in a family from Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makia J Marafie

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Identification of this pathogenic mutation helped in confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in providing a proper pre-marital genetic counselling and testing for a couple embarking on marriage from this highly consanguineous high-risk family.

  19. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of 282 Pediatric Low- and High-Grade Gliomas Reveals Genomic Drivers, Tumor Mutational Burden, and Hypermutation Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Adrienne; Severson, Eric; Gay, Laurie; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Elvin, Julia; Suh, James; Daniel, Sugganth; Covert, Mandy; Frampton, Garrett M; Hsu, Sigmund; Lesser, Glenn J; Stogner-Underwood, Kimberly; Mott, Ryan T; Rush, Sarah Z; Stanke, Jennifer J; Dahiya, Sonika; Sun, James; Reddy, Prasanth; Chalmers, Zachary R; Erlich, Rachel; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Fabrizio, David; Schrock, Alexa B; Ali, Siraj; Miller, Vincent; Stephens, Philip J; Ross, Jeffrey; Crawford, John R; Ramkissoon, Shakti H

    2017-12-01

    Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death for children with cancer in the U.S. Incorporating next-generation sequencing data for both pediatric low-grade (pLGGs) and high-grade gliomas (pHGGs) can inform diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic decision-making. We performed comprehensive genomic profiling on 282 pediatric gliomas (157 pHGGs, 125 pLGGs), sequencing 315 cancer-related genes and calculating the tumor mutational burden (TMB; mutations per megabase [Mb]). In pLGGs, we detected genomic alterations (GA) in 95.2% (119/125) of tumors. BRAF was most frequently altered (48%; 60/125), and FGFR1 missense (17.6%; 22/125), NF1 loss of function (8.8%; 11/125), and TP53 (5.6%; 7/125) mutations were also detected. Rearrangements were identified in 35% of pLGGs, including KIAA1549-BRAF , QKI-RAF1 , FGFR3-TACC3 , CEP85L-ROS1 , and GOPC-ROS1 fusions. Among pHGGs, GA were identified in 96.8% (152/157). The genes most frequently mutated were TP53 (49%; 77/157), H3F3A (37.6%; 59/157), ATRX (24.2%; 38/157), NF1 (22.2%; 35/157), and PDGFRA (21.7%; 34/157). Interestingly, most H3F3A mutations (81.4%; 35/43) were the variant K28M. Midline tumor analysis revealed H3F3A mutations (40%; 40/100) consisted solely of the K28M variant. Pediatric high-grade gliomas harbored oncogenic EML4-ALK , DGKB-ETV1 , ATG7-RAF1 , and EWSR1-PATZ1 fusions. Six percent (9/157) of pHGGs were hypermutated (TMB >20 mutations per Mb; range 43-581 mutations per Mb), harboring mutations deleterious for DNA repair in MSH6, MSH2, MLH1, PMS2, POLE , and POLD1 genes (78% of cases). Comprehensive genomic profiling of pediatric gliomas provides objective data that promote diagnostic accuracy and enhance clinical decision-making. Additionally, TMB could be a biomarker to identify pediatric glioblastoma (GBM) patients who may benefit from immunotherapy. By providing objective data to support diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic decision-making, comprehensive genomic profiling is necessary for

  20. A high temperature testing system for ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, John

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic composites are presently being developed for high temperature use in heat engine and space power system applications. The operating temperature range is expected to be 1090 to 1650 C (2000 F to 3000 F). Very little material data is available at these temperatures and, therefore, it is desirable to thoroughly characterize the basic unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic composite. This includes testing mainly for mechanical material properties at high temperatures. The proper conduct of such characterization tests requires the development of a tensile testing system includes unique gripping, heating, and strain measuring devices which require special considerations. The system also requires an optimized specimen shape. The purpose of this paper is to review various techniques for measuring displacements or strains, preferably at elevated temperatures. Due to current equipment limitations it is assumed that the specimen is to be tested at a temperature of 1430 C (2600F) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For the most part, previous high temperature material characterization tests, such as flexure and tensile tests, have been performed in inert atmospheres. Due to the harsh environment in which the ceramic specimen is to be tested, many conventional strain measuring techniques can not be applied. Initially a brief description of the more commonly used mechanical strain measuring techniques is given. Major advantages and disadvantages with their application to high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites are discussed. Next, a general overview is given for various optical techniques. Advantages and disadvantages which are common to these techniques are noted. The optical methods for measuring strain or displacement are categorized into two sections. These include real-time techniques. Finally, an optical technique which offers optimum performance with the high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites is recommended.

  1. Performance test of ex-core high temperature and high pressure water loop test equipment (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Hiroko; Uehara, Toshiaki; Takeuchi, Tomoaki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Jinichi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency, we started research and development so as to monitor the situations in the Nuclear Plant Facilities during a severe accident, such as a radiation-resistant monitoring camera, a radiation-resistant transmission system for conveying the in-core information, and a heat-resistant signal cable. As a part of developments of the heat-resistant signal cable, we prepared ex-core high-temperature and high-pressure water loop test equipment, which can simulate the conditions of BWRs and PWRs, for evaluating reliability and properties of sheath materials of the cable. This equipment consists of autoclave, water conditioning tank, high-pressure metering pump, preheater, heat exchanger and water purification equipment, etc. This report describes the basic design and the performance test results of ex-core high-temperature and high-pressure water loop test equipment. (author)

  2. Predicting Freshman Grade Point Average From College Admissions Test Scores and State High School Test Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Koretz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current focus on assessing “college and career readiness” raises an empirical question: How do high school tests compare with college admissions tests in predicting performance in college? We explored this using data from the City University of New York and public colleges in Kentucky. These two systems differ in the choice of college admissions test, the stakes for students on the high school test, and demographics. We predicted freshman grade point average (FGPA from high school GPA and both college admissions and high school tests in mathematics and English. In both systems, the choice of tests had only trivial effects on the aggregate prediction of FGPA. Adding either test to an equation that included the other had only trivial effects on prediction. Although the findings suggest that the choice of test might advantage or disadvantage different students, it had no substantial effect on the over- and underprediction of FGPA for students classified by race-ethnicity or poverty.

  3. Breast Cancer Heterogeneity Examined by High-Sensitivity Quantification of PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, and BRAF Mutations in Normal Breast and Ductal Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meagan B. Myers

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to derail durable patient responses to molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics, yet the prevalence and size of such subpopulations are largely unexplored. We employed the sensitive and quantitative Allele-specific Competitive Blocker PCR approach to characterize mutant cancer subpopulations in ductal carcinomas (DCs, examining five specific hotspot point mutations (PIK3CA H1047R, KRAS G12D, KRAS G12V, HRAS G12D, and BRAF V600E. As an approach to aid interpretation of the DC results, the mutations were also quantified in normal breast tissue. Overall, the mutations were prevalent in normal breast and DCs, with 9/9 DCs having measureable levels of at least three of the five mutations. HRAS G12D was significantly increased in DCs as compared to normal breast. The most frequent point mutation reported in DC by DNA sequencing, PIK3CA H1047R, was detected in all normal breast tissue and DC samples and was present at remarkably high levels (mutant fractions of 1.1 × 10−3 to 4.6 × 10−2 in 4/10 normal breast samples. In normal breast tissue samples, PIK3CA mutation levels were positively correlated with age. However, the PIK3CA H1047R mutant fraction distributions for normal breast tissues and DCs were similar. The results suggest PIK3CA H1047R mutant cells have a selective advantage in breast, contribute to breast cancer susceptibility, and drive tumor progression during breast carcinogenesis, even when present as only a subpopulation of tumor cells.

  4. Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet

  5. Comparison of high efficiency particulate filter testing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used for the removal of submicron size particulates from air streams. In nuclear industry they are used as an important engineering safeguard to prevent the release of air borne radioactive particulates to the environment. HEPA filters used in the nuclear industry should therefore be manufactured and operated under strict quality control. There are three levels of testing HEPA filters: i) testing of the filter media; ii) testing of the assembled filter including filter media and filter housing; and iii) on site testing of the complete filter installation before putting into operation and later for the purpose of periodic control. A co-ordinated research programme on particulate filter testing methods was taken up by the Agency and contracts were awarded to the Member Countries, Belgium, German Democratic Republic, India and Hungary. The investigations carried out by the participants of the present co-ordinated research programme include the results of the nowadays most frequently used HEPA filter testing methods both for filter medium test, rig test and in-situ test purposes. Most of the experiments were carried out at ambient temperature and humidity, but indications were given to extend the investigations to elevated temperature and humidity in the future for the purpose of testing the performance of HEPA filter under severe conditions. A major conclusion of the co-ordinated research programme was that it was not possible to recommend one method as a reference method for in situ testing of high efficiency particulate air filters. Most of the present conventional methods are adequate for current requirements. The reasons why no method is to be recommended were multiple, ranging from economical aspects, through incompatibility of materials to national regulations

  6. Analysis of slug tests in formations of high hydraulic conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James J; Garnett, Elizabeth J; Healey, John M

    2003-01-01

    A new procedure is presented for the analysis of slug tests performed in partially penetrating wells in formations of high hydraulic conductivity. This approach is a simple, spreadsheet-based implementation of existing models that can be used for analysis of tests from confined or unconfined aquifers. Field examples of tests exhibiting oscillatory and nonoscillatory behavior are used to illustrate the procedure and to compare results with estimates obtained using alternative approaches. The procedure is considerably simpler than recently proposed methods for this hydrogeologic setting. Although the simplifications required by the approach can introduce error into hydraulic-conductivity estimates, this additional error becomes negligible when appropriate measures are taken in the field. These measures are summarized in a set of practical field guidelines for slug tests in highly permeable aquifers.

  7. High power rf component testing for the NLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.

    1998-09-01

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC), the high power rf components must be capable of handling peak rf power levels in excess of 600 MW. In the current view of the NLC, even the rectangular waveguide components must transmit at least 300 MW rf power. At this power level, peak rf fields can greatly exceed 100 MV/m. The authors present recent results of high power tests performed at the Accelerator Structure Test Area (ASTA) at SLAC. These tests are designed to investigate the rf breakdown limits of several new components potentially useful for the NLC. In particular, the authors tested a new TE 01 --TE 10 circular to rectangular wrap-around mode converter, a modified (internal fin) Magic Tee hybrid, and an upgraded flower petal mode converter

  8. ACIGA's high optical power test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, L [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Aoun, M [Computer and Information Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth (Australia); Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)] [and others

    2004-03-07

    Advanced laser interferometer detectors utilizing more than 100 W of laser power and with {approx}10{sup 6} W circulating laser power present many technological problems. The Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy (ACIGA) is developing a high power research facility in Gingin, north of Perth, Western Australia, which will test techniques for the next generation interferometers. In particular it will test thermal lensing compensation and control strategies for optical cavities in which optical spring effects and parametric instabilities may present major difficulties.

  9. Drilling and testing hot, high-pressure wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacAndrew, R. (Ranger Oil Ltd, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Parry, N. (Phillips Petroleum Company United Kingdom Ltd, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Prieur, J.M. (Conoco UK Ltd, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Wiggelman, J. (Shell UK Exploration and Production, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Diggins, E. (Brunei Shell Petroleum (Brunei Darussalam)); Guicheney, P. (Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France)); Cameron, D.; Stewart, A. (Dowell Schlumberger, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    Meticulous planning and careful control of operations are needed to safely drill and test high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Techniques, employed in the Central Graben in the UK sector of the North Sea, where about 50 HTHP wells have been drilled, are examined. Three main areas of activity are covered in this comprehensive review: drilling safety, casing and cementation, and testing. The three issues at the heart of HTHP drilling safety are kick prevention, kick detection and well control. Kicks are influxes of reservoir fluid into the well. Test equipment and operations are divided into three sections: downhole, subsea and surface. Also details are given of how this North Sea experience has been used to help plan a jackup rig modification for hot, high-pressure drilling off Brunei. 16 figs., 32 refs.

  10. Do Breast Cancer Patients Tested in the Oncology Care Setting Share BRCA Mutation Results with Family Members and Health Care Providers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadaparampil, S. T.; Malo, T.; Cruz, C. D. L.; Christie, J.; Vadaparampil, S. T.

    2012-01-01

    BRCA genetic test results provide important information to manage cancer risk for patients and their families. Little is known on the communication of genetic test results by mutation status with family members and physicians in the oncology care setting. As part of a longitudinal study evaluating the impact of genetic counseling and testing among recently diagnosed breast cancer patients, we collected patients' self-reported patterns of disclosure. Descriptive statistics characterized the sample and determined the prevalence of disclosure of BRCA test results to family members and physicians. Of 100 patients who completed the baseline and the 6-month followup survey, 77 reported pursuing testing. The majority shared test results with female first-degree relatives; fewer did with males. Participants were more likely to share results with oncologists compared to surgeons, primary care physicians, or other specialty physicians. These findings suggest that while breast cancer patients may communicate results to at-risk female family members and their medical oncologist, they may need education and support to facilitate communication to other first-degree relatives and providers

  11. Very high cycle fatigue testing of concrete using ultrasonic cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karr, Ulrike; Schuller, Reinhard; Fitzka, Michael; Mayer, Herwig [Univ. of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Physics and Materials Science; Denk, Andreas; Strauss, Alfred [Univ. of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-06-01

    The ultrasonic fatigue testing method has been further developed to perform cyclic compression tests with concrete. Cylindrical specimens vibrate in resonance at a frequency of approximately 20 kHz with superimposed compressive static loads. The high testing frequency allows time-saving investigations in the very high cycle fatigue regime. Fatigue tests were carried out on ''Concrete 1'' (compressive strength f{sub c} = 80 MPa) and ''Concrete 2'' (f{sub c} = 107 MPa) under purely compressive loading conditions. Experiments at maximum compressive stresses of 0.44 f{sub c} (Concrete 1) and 0.38 f{sub c} (Concrete 2) delivered specimen failures above 109 cycles, indicating that no fatigue limit exists for concrete below one billion load cycles. Resonance frequency, power required to resonate the specimen and second order harmonics of the vibration are used to monitor fatigue damage in situ. Specimens were scanned by X-ray computed tomography prior to and after testing. Fatigue cracks were produced by ultrasonic cycling in the very high cycle fatigue regime at interfaces of grains as well as in cement. The possibilities as well as limitations of ultrasonic fatigue testing of concrete are discussed.

  12. High Frequency Vibration Based Fatigue Testing of Developmental Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holycross, Casey M.; Srinivasan, Raghavan; George, Tommy J.; Tamirisakandala, Seshacharyulu; Russ, Stephan M.

    Many fatigue test methods have been previously developed to rapidly evaluate fatigue behavior. This increased test speed can come at some expense, since these methods may require non-standard specimen geometry or increased facility and equipment capability. One such method, developed by George et al, involves a base-excited plate specimen driven into a high frequency bending resonant mode. This resonant mode is of sufficient frequency (typically 1200 to 1700 Hertz) to accumulate 107 cycles in a few hours. One of the main limitations of this test method is that fatigue cracking is almost certainly guaranteed to be surface initiated at regions of high stress. This brings into question the validity of the fatigue test results, as compared to more traditional uniaxial, smooth-bar testing, since high stresses are subjecting only a small volume to fatigue damage. This limitation also brings into question the suitability of this method to screen developmental alloys, should their initiation life be governed by subsurface flaws. However, if applicable, the rapid generation of fatigue data using this method would facilitate faster design iterations, identifying more quickly, material and manufacturing process deficiencies. The developmental alloy used in this study was a powder metallurgy boron-modified Ti-6Al-4V, a new alloy currently being considered for gas turbine engine fan blades. Plate specimens were subjected to fully reversed bending fatigue. Results are compared with existing data from commercially available Ti-6Al-4V using both vibration based and more traditional fatigue test methods.

  13. Intermittent Testing and Training for High-Level Football Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen

    Football is the most popular sport in the world, played by over 400 million men and women. In addition to the wide range of sport-specific technical and tactical skills needed, several physical components have been shown to be necessary to perform at a high level. The present PhD thesis is based...... on four articles that focus on physical testing and training for elite and sub-elite football players.The first article (Study I) aims to identify and establish aerobic capacities and anthropometric characteristics of elite female football players with the use of laboratory tests, and to examine whether...... systematic differences between the playing positions can be detected. Lately, field tests have become more frequently used in football than the laboratory tests used in Study I. Study II therefore aims to assess the validity of one of them, the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery test level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2). Along...

  14. Development test procedure High Pressure Water Jet System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    Development testing will be performed on the water jet cleaning fixture to determine the most effective arrangement of water jet nozzles to remove contamination from the surfaces of canisters and other debris. The following debris may be stained with dye to simulate surface contaminates: Mark O, Mark I, and Mark II Fuel Storage Canisters (both stainless steel and aluminum), pipe of various size, (steel, stainless, carbon steel and aluminum). Carbon steel and stainless steel plate, channel, angle, I-beam and other surfaces, specifically based on the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) inventory and observations of debris within the basin. Test procedure for developmental testing of High Pressure Water Jet System

  15. High torque DC motor fabrication and test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makus, P.

    1976-01-01

    The testing of a standard iron and standard alnico permanent magnet two-phase, brushless dc spin motor for potential application to the space telescope has been concluded. The purpose of this study was to determine spin motor power losses, magnetic drag, efficiency and torque speed characteristics of a high torque dc motor. The motor was designed and built to fit an existing reaction wheel as a test vehicle and to use existing brass-board commutation and torque command electronics. The results of the tests are included in this report.

  16. Procurement specification high vacuum test chamber and pumping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The specification establishes requirements for a high-vacuum test chamber, associated vacuum pumps, valves, controls, and instrumentation that shall be designed and fabricated for use as a test chamber for testing a closed loop Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Ground Demonstration System (GDS). The vacuum system shall include all instrumentation required for pressure measurement and control of the vacuum pumping system. A general outline of the BIPS-GDS in the vacuum chamber and the preliminary piping and instrumentation interface to the vacuum chamber are shown

  17. High power testing of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Gonichon, J.

    1995-01-01

    The physics and technological issues involved in high gradient particle acceleration at high microwave (RF) frequencies are under study at MIT. The 17 GHz photocathode RF gun has a 1 1/2 cell (π mode) room temperature cooper cavity. High power tests have been conducted at 5-10 MW levels with 100 ns pulses. A maximum surface electric field of 250 MV/m was achieved. This corresponds to an average on-axis gradient of 150 MeV/m. The gradient was also verified by a preliminary electron beam energy measurement. Even high gradients are expected in our next cavity design

  18. Testing and evaluation of high temperature superconductor current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Anand; Puntambekar, Avinash; Manekar, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    National Institute for Inter-disciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Trivandrum (formerly Regional Research Laboratory) has accomplished a DAE-BRNS project with Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) as principal collaborator for the development of high temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads. These HTS current leads have self-field critical currents (Ic) ranging from 50 A to 1000 A at liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) temperature. These HTS are made out of silver sheathed Bismuth Strontium Calcium Copper Oxide (BSCCO-2223), for direct application in superconducting (SC) systems involving transportation of high electric currents from power sources at room temperature to superconducting devices at cryogenic temperatures. RRCAT has participated in this project by testing and evaluation of these HTS current leads and carried out actual load trials. In this paper, we will describe the HTS testing setup, tests performed with their testing procedure and the test results. The testing of these HTS has been done with joint effort of Materials Advanced Accelerator Science and Cryogenics Div. and Superconducting Technology Lab (SCT Lab), Advanced Accelerator Module Development Div., using the test facility available at the SCT Lab. (author)

  19. Manufacturing and thermomechanical testing of actively cooled all beryllium high heat flux test pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, N.N.; Sokolov, Yu.A.; Shatalov, G.E.

    1995-01-01

    One of the problems affiliated to ITER high heat flux elements development is a problem of interface of beryllium protection with heat sink routinely made of copper alloys. To get rid of this problem all beryllium elements could be used as heat receivers in places of enhanced thermal loads. In accordance with this objectives four beryllium test pieces of two types have been manufactured in open-quotes Institute of Berylliumclose quotes for succeeding thermomechanical testing. Two of them were manufactured in accordance with JET team design; they are round open-quotes hypervapotron typeclose quotes test pieces. Another two ones are rectangular test sections with a twisted tape installed inside of the circular channel. Preliminary stress-strain analysis have been performed for both type of the test pieces. Hypervapotrons have been shipped to JET where they were tested on JET test bed. Thermomechanical testing of pieces of the type of open-quotes swirl tape inside of tubeclose quotes have been performed on Kurchatov Institute test bed. Chosen beryllium grade properties, some details of manufacturing, results of preliminary stress-strain analysis and thermomechanical testing of the test pieces open-quotes swirl tape inside of tubeclose quotes type are given in this report

  20. Phenotype comparison of MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers in a cohort of 1,914 individuals undergoing clinical genetic testing in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Kastrinos (Fay); E.M. Stoffel (Elena); J. Balmana (Judith); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); R. Mercado (Rowena); S. Syngal (Sapna)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Aims: Lynch syndrome is caused by germ-line mismatch repair gene mutations. We examined the phenotypic differences between MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutation carriers and whether mutation type (point versus large rearrangement) affected phenotypic expression. Methods: This is a

  1. The Potential Contribution of BRCA Mutations to Early Onset and Familial Breast Cancer in Uzbekistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Abdikhakimov

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: This preliminary evidence suggests a potential contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation to breast cancer development in Uzbek population. Taking into account a high disease penetrance in carriers of BRCA1 mutation, it seems reasonable to recommend inclusion of the 5382insC mutation test in future research on the development of screening programs for breast cancer prevention in Uzbekistan.

  2. Analysis of high heat flux testing of mock-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salavy, J.-F.; Giancarli, L.; Merola, M.; Picard, F.; Roedig, M.

    2003-01-01

    ITER EU Home Team is performing a large R and D effort in support of the development of high heat flux components for ITER. In this framework, this paper describes the thermal analyses, the fatigue lifetime evaluation and the transient VDE with material melting related to the high heat flux thermo-mechanical tests performed in the JUDITH facility. It reports on several mock-ups representative of different proposed component designs based on Be, W and CFC as armour materials

  3. Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    environment for several decades. Much has been learned about the impact of high in situ stress and its influence on rock bursts (violent rock ...is the possibility of evasive nuclear testing in deep mine environments where the release of high stress fields by an explosion can resemble a rock ... burst or natural earthquake. This paper provides background information on previous research in and around the deep mines of South Africa and lays

  4. Tests of ball bearing used in high-temperature and high-purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng Chengmu; Hao Shouxin.

    1987-01-01

    According to the particular conditions and the operation environments in high-temperature and high-purity water, the test content and the measurement instrumentation for the ball bearing were defined. Through various tests, operational performances of the bearing have preliminarily been understood. It provided some useful information for the engineering application of the bearing

  5. The albinism of the feral Asinara white donkeys (Equus asinus) is determined by a missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene deduced protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzeri, V J; Bertolini, F; Ribani, A; Schiavo, G; Dall'Olio, S; Fontanesi, L

    2016-02-01

    A feral donkey population (Equus asinus), living in the Asinara National Park (an island north-west of Sardinia, Italy), includes a unique white albino donkey subpopulation or colour morph that is a major attraction of this park. Disrupting mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene are known to cause recessive albinisms in humans (oculocutaneous albinism Type 1; OCA1) and other species. In this study, we analysed the donkey TYR gene as a strong candidate to identify the causative mutation of the albinism of these donkeys. The TYR gene was sequenced from 13 donkeys (seven Asinara white albino and six coloured animals). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. A missense mutation (c.604C>G; p.His202Asp) in a highly conserved amino acid position (even across kingdoms), which disrupts the first copper-binding site (CuA) of functional protein, was identified in the homozygous condition (G/G or D/D) in all Asinara white albino donkeys and in the albino son of a trio (the grey parents had genotype C/G or H/D), supporting the recessive mode of inheritance of this mutation. Genotyping 82 donkeys confirmed that Asinara albino donkeys had genotype G/G whereas all other coloured donkeys had genotype C/C or C/G. Across-population association between the c.604C>G genotypes and the albino coat colour was highly significant (P = 6.17E-18). The identification of the causative mutation of the albinism in the Asinara white donkeys might open new perspectives to study the dynamics of this putative deleterious allele in a feral population and to manage this interesting animal genetic resource. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  6. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). FY2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed at the Oarai Research Establishment of The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30MW of thermal power. Coolant of helium-gas circulates under the pressure of about 4Mpa, and the reactor inlet and outlet temperature are 395degC and 950degC (maximum), respectively coated particle fuel is used as fuel, and the HTTR core is composed of graphite prismatic blocks. The full power operation of 30MW was attained in December, 2001, and then JAERI received the commissioning license for the HTTR in March, 2002. Since 2002, we have been carrying out rated power operation, safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, etc., and conducted the high-temperature test operation of 950degC in April, 2004. This report summarizes activities and test results on HTTR operation and maintenance as well as safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year of 2003 before the high temperature test operation of 950degC. (author)

  7. Design of high temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Sudo, Yukio

    1994-09-01

    Construction of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is now underway to establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs and to conduct innovative basic research at high temperatures. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 850degC for rated operation and 950degC for high temperature test operation. It is planned to conduct various irradiation tests for fuels and materials, safety demonstration tests and nuclear heat application tests. JAERI received construction permit of HTTR reactor facility in February 1990 after 22 months of safety review. This report summarizes evaluation of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic characteristics, design outline of major systems and components, and also includes relating R and D result and safety evaluation. Criteria for judgment, selection of postulated events, major analytical conditions for anticipated operational occurrences and accidents, computer codes used in safety analysis and evaluation of each event are presented in the safety evaluation. (author)

  8. Vitamin C, added after irradiation, reduces the mutant yield and alters the spectrum of CD59- mutations in AL cells irradiated with high LET carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, A.M.; Vannais, D.B.; Lenarczyk, M.; Waldren, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Miazaki, Watanabe, Kumagai and their colleagues reported that induction of HPRT - mutants by X-rays in cultured human cells was prevented by vitamin C (ascorbate) added 30 minutes after irradiation. They provided data that mutation extinction was due to neutralization by vitamin C of radiation-induced long-lived mutagenic radicals (LLR) with half-lives of several hours. We find that post-irradiation treatment with vitamin C reduces, but does not eliminate, the induction of CD59 - mutants in human-hamster hybrid A L cells exposed to high-LET carbon ions (LET of 100 keV/μm). The lethality of the carbon ions was not altered by vitamin C. Preliminary experiments indicate that post-radiation addition of vitamin C also changes the quality of CD59 - mutations induced by the carbon beam. The change in spectrum is seen as a reduction in prevalence of small mutations (not detectable by PCR) and of mutants displaying transmissible genomic instability (TGI) measured by chromosome translocation frequencies. Our results confirm the essential effect of vitamin C on X-ray induced mutation and suggest a role for LLR in genomic instability. (author)

  9. High risk HPV testing following treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, M; Comer, R; Rogers, P; Dowling, M; Meskell, P; Asbury, K; O'Leary, M

    2016-11-01

    To determine the results of combined cytology and high-risk human papilloma virus (HR HPV) tests at 6 and 18 months postcolposcopy treatment at one Irish colposcopy centre. All women who attended the centre's colposcopy smear clinic for a co-test 6 months (initial test) posttreatment were included in the audit (n = 251). The results revealed negative HR HPV for 79 % (n = 198) of women tested 6 months after treatment and positive results for 21 % (n = 53). HR HPV testing was more sensitive than cytology and led to early detection of residual disease. No women with negative HR HPV had high-grade cytology. HR HPV is more sensitive than cytology for detection of persistent CIN. However, 19 women with positive HR HPV had normal colposcopy with no persistent CIN detected. A national cost-benefit analysis is recommended to determine the value of the second co-test.

  10. Evidence for a dualistic model of high-grade serous carcinoma: BRCA mutation status, histology, and tubal intraepithelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitt, Brooke E; Hanamornroongruang, Suchanan; Lin, Douglas I; Conner, James E; Schulte, Stephanie; Horowitz, Neil; Crum, Christopher P; Meserve, Emily E

    2015-03-01

    Most early adnexal carcinomas detected in asymptomatic women with germline BRCA mutations (BRCA) present as serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STIC). However, STICs are found in only ∼40% of symptomatic high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs) and less frequently in pseudoendometrioid variants of HGSC. Consecutive cases of untreated HGSC from BRCA and BRCA women with detailed fallopian tube examination (SEE-FIM protocol) were compared. STIC status (+/-) was determined, and tumors were classified morphologically as SET ("SET", >50% solid, pseudoendometrioid, or transitional) or classic predominate ("Classic"). SET tumors trended toward a higher frequency in BRCA versus BRCA women (50% vs. 28%, P=0.11), had a significantly younger mean age than those with classic HGSC in BRCA women (mean 56.2 vs. 64.8 y, P=0.04), and displayed a better clinical outcome in both groups combined (P=0.024). STIC was significantly more frequent in tumors from the BRCA cohort (66% vs. 31%, P=0.017) and specifically the BRCA tumors with classic morphology (83%) versus those with SET morphology (22%, P=0.003). Overall, several covariables-histology, BRCA status, age, coexisting STIC, and response to therapy-define 2 categories of HGSC with differences in precursor (STIC) frequency, morphology, and outcome. We introduce a dualistic HGSC model that could shed light on the differences in frequency of STIC between symptomatic and asymptomatic women with HGSC. This model emphasizes the need for further study of HGSC precursors to determine their relevance to the prevention of this lethal malignancy.

  11. A High-power Electric Propulsion Test Platform in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Reed, Brian; Chavers, D. Greg; Sarmiento, Charles; Cenci, Susanna; Lemmons, Neil

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the results of the preliminary phase of a NASA design study for a facility to test high-power electric propulsion systems in space. The results of this design study are intended to provide a firm foundation for subsequent detailed design and development activities leading to the deployment of a valuable space facility. The NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate is sponsoring this design project. A team from the NASA Johnson Space Center, Glenn Research Center, the Marshall Space Flight Center and the International Space Station Program Office is conducting the project. The test facility is intended for a broad range of users including government, industry and universities. International participation is encouraged. The objectives for human and robotic exploration of space can be accomplished affordably, safely and effectively with high-power electric propulsion systems. But, as thruster power levels rise to the hundreds of kilowatts and up to megawatts, their testing will pose stringent and expensive demands on existing Earth-based vacuum facilities. These considerations and the human access to near-Earth space provided by the International Space Station (ISS) have led to a renewed interest in space testing. The ISS could provide an excellent platform for a space-based test facility with the continuous vacuum conditions of the natural space environment and no chamber walls to modify the open boundary conditions of the propulsion system exhaust. The test platform could take advantage of the continuous vacuum conditions of the natural space environment. Space testing would provide open boundary conditions without walls, micro-gravity and a realistic thermal environment. Testing on the ISS would allow for direct observation of the test unit, exhaust plume and space-plasma interactions. When necessary, intervention by on-board personnel and post-test inspection would be possible. The ISS can provide electrical power, a location for

  12. The coupled process laboratory test of highly compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhenyao; Li Guoding; Li Shushen; Wang Chengzu

    2004-01-01

    Highly compacted bentonite blocks have been heated and hydrated in the laboratory in order to simulate the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled processes of buffer material in a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. The experiment facility, which is composed of experiment barrel, heated system, high pressure water input system, temperature measure system, water content measure system and swelling stress system, is introduced in this paper. The steps of the THM coupled experiment are also given out in detail. There are total 10 highly compacted bentonite blocks used in this test. Experimental number 1-4 are the tests with the heater and the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time and final moisture distribution are measured. Experimental number 5-8 are the tests with the heater and without the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time and final moisture distribution are measured. Experimental number 9-10 are the tests with the heater and the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time, final moisture distribution and the swelling stress distribution at some typical points vs. time are measured. The maximum test time is nearly 20 days and the minimum test time is only 8 hours. The results show that the temperature field is little affected by hydration process and stress condition, but moisture transport and stress distribution are a little affected by the thermal gradient. The results also show that the water head difference is the mainly driving force of hydration process and the swelling stress is mainly from hydration process. It will great help to understand better about heat and mass transfer in porous media and the THM coupled process in actual HLW disposal. (author)

  13. The high-temperature helium test facility (HHV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noack, G.; Weiskopf, H.

    1977-03-01

    The report describes the high-temperature helium test facility (HHV). Construction of this plant was started in 1972 by Messrs. BBC, Mannheim, on behalf of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich. By the end of 1976, the construction work is in its last stage, so that the plant may start operation early in 1977. First of all, the cycle system and the arrangement of components are dealt with, followed by a discussion of individual components. Here, emphasis is laid on components typical for HHT systems, while conventional components are mentioned without further structural detail. The projected test programme for the HHV facility in phase IB of the HHT project is shortly dealt with. After this, the potential of this test facility with regard to the possible use of test components and to fluid- and thermodynamic boundary conditions is pointed out. With the unique potential the facility offers here, aspects of shortened service life at higher cycle temperatures do not remain disregarded. (orig./UA) [de

  14. Combinations of mutations in envZ, ftsI, mrdA, acrB and acrR can cause high-level carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, Marlen; Anjum, Mehreen; Andersson, Dan I.

    2016-01-01

    of meropenem or ertapenem for similar to 60 generations. Isolated clones were whole-genome sequenced, and the order in which the identified mutations arose was determined in the passaged populations. Key mutations were reconstructed, and bacterial growth rates of populations and isolated clones and resistance...... levels to 23 antibiotics were measured. High-level resistance to carbapenems resulted from a combination of downstream effects of envZ mutation and target mutations in AcrAB-TolC-mediated drug export, together with PBP genes [mrdA (PBP2) after meropenem exposure or ftsI (PBP3) after ertapenem exposure...

  15. High rate loading tests and impact tests of concrete and reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, J.I.; Tachikawa, H.; Fujimoto, K.

    1982-01-01

    The responses of reinforced concrete structural members and structures subjected to impact or impulsive loadings are affected by the behavior of constituent concrete and reinforcement which are the synthesis of the rate effects and the contribution of propagating stress waves of them. The rate effects and the contribution of stress waves do not have the same tendency in the variation of magnitude of them with speed of impact or impulsive loadings. Therefore the rate effects, mentioned above, should be obtained by the tests minimized the effect of stress waves (high rate loading test). This paper deals with the testing techniques with high rate loadings and impact, and also reports the main results of these tests. (orig.) [de

  16. HELCZA-High heat flux test facility for testing ITER EU first wall components.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokůpek, J.; Samec, K.; Jílek, R.; Gavila, P.; Neufuss, S.; Entler, Slavomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, November (2017), s. 187-190 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : HELCZA * High heat flux * Electron beam testing * Test facility * Plasma facing components * First wall * Divertora Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617302818

  17. Co-Testing of Cervical Screening Tests in Detection of High Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Asthana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Co-testing performance for detection of high grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN has not been adequately addressed from Low Resource Countries (LRCs. Where isolated tests do not have adequate performance, further explorations are recommended. Aim: To evaluate the co-testing of conventional cervical screening tests such as Papanicolaou (Pap and Visual Inspection Cervix with Acetic Acid (VIA, with care HPV on Cervical Samples (CHPV or on Vaginal Samples (VHPV in the detection of high grade CIN. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted on ever married women of age 30 to 59 years in a rural community of Dadri. Women were screened by CHPV, VHPV, and Pap and VIA methods. Confirmation of screen positives was done by histology. Sensitivity, Specificity and likelihood ratios of different combinations of test determined to evaluate the performance. Results: Total eligible women, 66.2% (5032/7604 responded for screening. Analysis was performed on 4658, after excluding those who did not complete all screenings. Co-testing of CHPV (OR=246 or VHPV (OR=278 with Pap had highest association. Positive likelihood ratios of CHPV and VHPV with Pap in CIN II+ detection rates were 13.0 and 11.8 and in CIN III+ the detection rates were 18.0 and 16.0 respectively. Higher sensitivities and specificities were observed in co-testing for CIN III+ detection as against CIN II+ lesions. Conclusion: Choice of co-testing in a pair of tests for detection of high grade CIN is likely to depend on whether screening is targeted for developed or low resource country. VIA in isolation might not yield optimal results for LRCs.

  18. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). (FY2005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW of thermal power. The full power operation of 30 MW was attained in December, 2001, and then JAERI (JAEA) received the commissioning license for the HTTR in March, 2002. Since 2002, we have been carrying out rated power operation, safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, etc., and conducted the high-temperature test operation of 950degC in April, 2004. In fiscal 2005 year, periodical inspection and overhaul of reactivity control system were conducted, and safety demonstration tests were promoted. This report summarizes activities and test results on HTTR operation and maintenance as well as safety demonstration tests and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year of 2005. (author)

  19. EGFR T790M mutation testing of non-small cell lung cancer tissue and blood samples artificially spiked with circulating cell-free tumor DNA: results of a round robin trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassunke, Jana; Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Lenze, Dido; Lehmann, Annika; Hummel, Michael; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Penzel, Roland; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Endris, Volker; Jung, Andreas; Lehmann, Ulrich; Zeugner, Silke; Baretton, Gustavo; Kreipe, Hans; Schirmacher, Peter; Kirchner, Thomas; Dietel, Manfred; Büttner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2017-10-01

    The European Commision (EC) recently approved osimertinib for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR T790M mutations. Besides tissue-based testing, blood samples containing cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can be used to interrogate T790M status. Herein, we describe the conditions and results of a round robin trial (RRT) for T790M mutation testing in NSCLC tissue specimens and peripheral blood samples spiked with cell line DNA mimicking tumor-derived ctDNA. The underlying objectives of this two-staged external quality assessment (EQA) approach were (a) to evaluate the accuracy of T790M mutations testing across multiple centers and (b) to investigate if a liquid biopsy-based testing for T790M mutations in spiked blood samples is feasible in routine diagnostic. Based on a successfully completed internal phase I RRT, an open RRT for EGFR T790M mutation testing in tumor tissue and blood samples was initiated. In total, 48 pathology centers participated in the EQA. Of these, 47 (97.9%) centers submitted their analyses within the pre-defined time frame and 44 (tissue), respectively, 40 (plasma) successfully passed the test. The overall success rates in the RRT phase II were 91.7% (tissue) and 83.3% (blood), respectively. Thirty-eight out of 48 participants (79.2%) successfully passed both parts of the RRT. The RRT for blood-based EGFR testing initiated in Germany is, to the best of our knowledge, the first of his kind in Europe. In summary, our results demonstrate that blood-based genotyping for EGFR resistance mutations can be successfully integrated in routine molecular diagnostics complementing the array of molecular methods already available at pathology centers in Germany.

  20. A New High-Speed, High-Cycle, Gear-Tooth Bending Fatigue Test Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, David B.; Dykas, Brian D.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Zakrajsek, Andrew J.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    A new high-speed test capability for determining the high cycle bending-fatigue characteristics of gear teeth has been developed. Experiments were performed in the test facility using a standard spur gear test specimens designed for use in NASA Glenn s drive system test facilities. These tests varied in load condition and cycle-rate. The cycle-rate varied from 50 to 1000 Hz. The loads varied from high-stress, low-cycle loads to near infinite life conditions. Over 100 tests were conducted using AISI 9310 steel spur gear specimen. These results were then compared to previous data in the literature for correlation. Additionally, a cycle-rate sensitivity analysis was conducted by grouping the results according to cycle-rate and comparing the data sets. Methods used to study and verify load-path and facility dynamics are also discussed.

  1. LVDT Development for High Temperature Irradiation Test and Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Yong; Ban, Chae Min; Choo, Kee Nam; Jun, Byung Hyuk [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The LVDT (Linear Variable Differential Transformer) is used to measure the elongation and pressure of a nuclear fuel rod, or the creep and fatigue of the material during a reactor irradiation test. This device must be a radiation-resistant LVDT for use in a research reactor. Norway Halden has LVDTs for an irradiation test by the own development and commercialized. But Halden's LVDTs have limited the temperature of the use until to 350 .deg. C. So, KAERI has been developing a new LVDT for high temperature irradiation test. This paper describes the design of a LVDT, the fabrication process of a LVDT, and the result of the performance test. The designed LVDT uses thermocouple cable for coil wire material and one MI cable as signal cable. This LVDT for a high temperature irradiation test can be used until a maximum of 900 .deg. C. Welding is a very important factor for the fabrication of an LVDT. We are using a 150W fiber laser welding system that consists of a welding head, monitoring vision system and rotary index.

  2. Neonatal High Bone Mass With First Mutation of the NF-κB Complex: Heterozygous De Novo Missense (p.Asp512Ser) RELA (Rela/p65).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Anja L; Larsen, Martin J; Brusgaard, Klaus; Novack, Deborah V; Knudsen, Peter Juel Thiis; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Qiu, Weimin; Eckhardt, Christina; McAlister, William H; Kassem, Moustapha; Mumm, Steven; Frost, Morten; Whyte, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Heritable disorders that feature high bone mass (HBM) are rare. The etiology is typically a mutation(s) within a gene that regulates the differentiation and function of osteoblasts (OBs) or osteoclasts (OCs). Nevertheless, the molecular basis is unknown for approximately one-fifth of such entities. NF-κB signaling is a key regulator of bone remodeling and acts by enhancing OC survival while impairing OB maturation and function. The NF-κB transcription complex comprises five subunits. In mice, deletion of the p50 and p52 subunits together causes osteopetrosis (OPT). In humans, however, mutations within the genes that encode the NF-κB complex, including the Rela/p65 subunit, have not been reported. We describe a neonate who died suddenly and unexpectedly and was found at postmortem to have HBM documented radiographically and by skeletal histopathology. Serum was not available for study. Radiographic changes resembled malignant OPT, but histopathological investigation showed morphologically normal OCs and evidence of intact bone resorption excluding OPT. Furthermore, mutation analysis was negative for eight genes associated with OPT or HBM. Instead, accelerated bone formation appeared to account for the HBM. Subsequently, trio-based whole exome sequencing revealed a heterozygous de novo missense mutation (c.1534_1535delinsAG, p.Asp512Ser) in exon 11 of RELA encoding Rela/p65. The mutation was then verified using bidirectional Sanger sequencing. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of patient fibroblasts elicited impaired NF-κB responses compared with healthy control fibroblasts. Five unrelated patients with unexplained HBM did not show a RELA defect. Ours is apparently the first report of a mutation within the NF-κB complex in humans. The missense change is associated with neonatal osteosclerosis from in utero increased OB function rather than failed OC action. These findings demonstrate the importance of the Rela/p65 subunit within the NF-κB pathway for human

  3. Targeted high-throughput sequencing identifies mutations in atlastin-1 as a cause of hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelly, Christian; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Leonardis, Lea; Papić, Lea; Zidar, Janez; Schabhüttl, Maria; Strohmaier, Heimo; Weis, Joachim; Strom, Tim M; Baets, Jonathan; Willems, Jan; De Jonghe, Peter; Reilly, Mary M; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Hatz, Martina; Trajanoski, Slave; Pieber, Thomas R; Janecke, Andreas R; Blackstone, Craig; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2011-01-07

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is an axonal form of autosomal-dominant hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy distinguished by prominent sensory loss that leads to painless injuries. Unrecognized, these can result in delayed wound healing and osteomyelitis, necessitating distal amputations. To elucidate the genetic basis of an HSN I subtype in a family in which mutations in the few known HSN I genes had been excluded, we employed massive parallel exon sequencing of the 14.3 Mb disease interval on chromosome 14q. We detected a missense mutation (c.1065C>A, p.Asn355Lys) in atlastin-1 (ATL1), a gene that is known to be mutated in early-onset hereditary spastic paraplegia SPG3A and that encodes the large dynamin-related GTPase atlastin-1. The mutant protein exhibited reduced GTPase activity and prominently disrupted ER network morphology when expressed in COS7 cells, strongly supporting pathogenicity. An expanded screen in 115 additional HSN I patients identified two further dominant ATL1 mutations (c.196G>C [p.Glu66Gln] and c.976 delG [p.Val326TrpfsX8]). This study highlights an unexpected major role for atlastin-1 in the function of sensory neurons and identifies HSN I and SPG3A as allelic disorders.

  4. Mutation analysis of SLC26A4 for Pendred syndrome and nonsyndromic hearing loss by high-resolution melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Neng; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl

    2011-01-01

    Pendred syndrome and DFNB4 (autosomal recessive nonsyndromic congenital deafness, locus 4) are associated with autosomal recessive congenital sensorineural hearing loss and mutations in the SLC26A4 gene. Extensive allelic heterogeneity, however, necessitates analysis of all exons and splice sites...

  5. Development of drug resistance mutations in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy: does competitive advantage drive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Most physicians that treat individuals with HIV-1 disease are able to successfully suppress viral replication with the pharmacologic armamentarium available today. For the majority of patients this results in immune reconstitution and improved quality of life. However, a large fraction of these patients have transient elevations in their viral burden and even persistence of low-level viremia. In fact, many individuals whose viral load is suppressed to < 50 c/ml have evidence of low-level viral replication. The impact of low-level viremia and persistent viral replication is an area of significant study and interest owing to the potential for the development of drug resistance mutations. Here the fundamental question is whether and perhaps what factors provide a venue for the development of resistant virus. The concern is clearly the eventual progression of disease with the exhaustion of treatment options. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current literature regarding the effect of low-level viremia on the development of drug resistance mutations. Herein, we discuss the impact of different levels of viral suppression on the development of mutations. In addition, we look at the role that resistance and fitness play in determining the survival of a breakthrough mutation within the background of drug.

  6. Mutation-Guided Unbiased Modeling of the Fat Sensor GPR119 for High-Yield Agonist Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norn, Christoffer; Pedersen, Maria Hauge; Engelstoft, Maja S.

    2015-01-01

    and is consistent with the structure-activity relationship for a large no. of AR231453 analogs. Another key property of the refined models is their success in sepg. active ligands from decoys in a large-scale virtual screening. These results demonstrate that mutation-guided receptor modeling can provide predictions...

  7. High Yield of Pathogenic Germline Mutations Causative or Likely Causative of the Cancer Phenotype in Selected Children with Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diets, Illja J.; Waanders, Esme; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; van Bladel, Diede A. G.; Kamping, Eveline J.; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Hopman, Saskia; Olderode-Berends, Maran J.; Gerkes, Erica H.; Koolen, David A.; Marcelis, Carlo; Santen, Gijs W.; van Belzen, Martine J.; Mordaunt, Dylan; McGregor, Lesley; Thompson, Elizabeth; Kattamis, Antonis; Pastorczak, Agata; Mlynarski, Wojciech; Ilencikova, Denisa; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke; Gardeitchik, Thatjana; de Bont, Eveline S.; Loeffen, Jan; Wagner, Anja; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Kuiper, Roland P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn C.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: In many children with cancer and characteristics suggestive of a genetic predisposition syndrome, the genetic cause is still unknown. We studied the yield of pathogenic mutations by applying whole-exome sequencing on a selected cohort of children with cancer. Experimental Design: To

  8. High Yield of Pathogenic Germline Mutations Causative or Likely Causative of the Cancer Phenotype in Selected Children with Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diets, I.J.; Waanders, E.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Bladel, D.A.G. van; Kamping, E.J.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Hopman, S.; Olderode-Berends, M.J.; Gerkes, E.H.; Koolen, D.A.; Marcelis, C.L.; Santen, G.W.E.; Belzen, M.J. van; Mordaunt, D.; McGregor, L.; Thompson, E.; Kattamis, A.; Pastorczak, A.; Mlynarski, W.; Ilencikova, D.; Vulto-van Silfhout, A.T.; Gardeitchik, T.; Bont, E.S. de; Loeffen, J.; Wagner, A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Kuiper, R.P.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Jongmans, M.C.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: In many children with cancer and characteristics suggestive of a genetic predisposition syndrome, the genetic cause is still unknown. We studied the yield of pathogenic mutations by applying whole-exome sequencing on a selected cohort of children with cancer.Experimental Design: To identify

  9. New possibilities for testing local realism in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junli; Qiao Congfeng

    2009-01-01

    The three photons from the dominant ortho-positronium decay and two vector mesons from the η c exclusive decays are found to be in tripartite and high-dimensional entangled states, respectively. These two classes of entangled states possess the Hardy type nonlocality and allow a priori for quantum mechanics vs local realism test via Bell inequalities. The experimental realizations are shown to be feasible, and a concrete scheme to fulfill the test in experiment via two-vector-meson entangled state is proposed.

  10. High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O& #39; Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

    2004-02-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing

  11. Assessing high reliability via Bayesian approach and accelerated tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erto, Pasquale; Giorgio, Massimiliano

    2002-01-01

    Sometimes the assessment of very high reliability levels is difficult for the following main reasons: - the high reliability level of each item makes it impossible to obtain, in a reasonably short time, a sufficient number of failures; - the high cost of the high reliability items to submit to life tests makes it unfeasible to collect enough data for 'classical' statistical analyses. In the above context, this paper presents a Bayesian solution to the problem of estimation of the parameters of the Weibull-inverse power law model, on the basis of a limited number (say six) of life tests, carried out at different stress levels, all higher than the normal one. The over-stressed (i.e. accelerated) tests allow the use of experimental data obtained in a reasonably short time. The Bayesian approach enables one to reduce the required number of failures adding to the failure information the available a priori engineers' knowledge. This engineers' involvement conforms to the most advanced management policy that aims at involving everyone's commitment in order to obtain total quality. A Monte Carlo study of the non-asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators and a comparison with the properties of maximum likelihood estimators closes the work

  12. In-situ high efficiency filter testing at AEE Winfrith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses experience in the testing of high efficiency filters in a variety of reactor and plant installations at AEE Winfrith. There is rarely any concern about the effectiveness of the filter as supplied by any reputable manufacturer. Experience has shown there is a need to check for defects in the installation of filters which could lead to by-passing of aerosols and it is desirable to perform periodical re-tests to ensure that no subsequent deterioration occurs. It is important to use simple, portable apparatus for such tests; methods based on the use of sodium chloride aerosols, although suitable for the testing of filters prior to installation, involve apparatus which is too bulky for in-situ testing. At Winfrith a double automatic Pollak counter has been developed and used routinely since 1970. The aerosol involved has a particle size far smaller than the size most likely to penetrate intact filters, but this is irrelevant when one is primarily interested in particles which by-pass the filter. Comparisons with other methods of testing filters will be described. There is remarkably good agreement between the efficiency of the filter installation as measured by a Pollak counter compared with techniques involving aerosols of sodium chloride and Dioctyl Phthalate (DOP), presumably because the leakage around the filter is independent of particle size

  13. Development and testing of airfoils for high-altitude aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drela, Mark (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Specific tasks included airfoil design; study of airfoil constraints on pullout maneuver; selection of tail airfoils; examination of wing twist; test section instrumentation and layout; and integrated airfoil/heat-exchanger tests. In the course of designing the airfoil, specifically for the APEX test vehicle, extensive studies were made over the Mach and Reynolds number ranges of interest. It is intended to be representative of airfoils required for lightweight aircraft operating at extreme altitudes, which is the primary research objective of the APEX program. Also considered were thickness, pitching moment, and off-design behavior. The maximum ceiling parameter M(exp 2)C(sub L) value achievable by the Apex-16 airfoil was found to be a strong constraint on the pullout maneuver. The NACA 1410 and 2410 airfoils (inverted) were identified as good candidates for the tail, with predictable behavior at low Reynolds numbers and good tolerance to flap deflections. With regards to wing twist, it was decided that a simple flat wing was a reasonable compromise. The test section instrumentation consisted of surface pressure taps, wake rakes, surface-mounted microphones, and skin-friction gauges. Also, a modest wind tunnel test was performed for an integrated airfoil/heat-exchanger configuration, which is currently on Aurora's 'Theseus' aircraft. Although not directly related to the APEX tests, the aerodynamics or heat exchangers has been identified as a crucial aspect of designing high-altitude aircraft and hence is relevant to the ERAST program.

  14. Experiences of Women Who Underwent Predictive BRCA 1/2 Mutation Testing Before the Age of 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, Kate; Murray, Alexandra; McAllister, Marion

    2016-02-01

    This qualitative interview study focuses on the experiences of a sample of British female BRCA 1/2 carriers who had predictive testing before the age of 30, which is the minimum age for breast screening in the UK. Following appropriate informed consent procedures participants were recruited through the Cancer Genetics Service for Wales. Semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with seven participants, transcribed in full and analyzed using thematic analysis. The motives for testing and perceived advantages described by participants were similar to those identified in previous studies with older participants, such as increased awareness and knowledge and feeling more in control. However some of the perceived disadvantages were specific to younger women, including feeling pressured to make important life decisions earlier than they would have liked, such as about family planning and risk reducing surgery. Participants also reported feeling abandoned or forgotten because of lack of ongoing clinical contact, or feeling "stuck waiting" for screening to begin. However, none felt that these disadvantages were a reason to regret having testing. Findings in this small study suggest that having BRCA 1/2 predictive testing can have positive outcomes for young women even though they may be unable to access interventions such as breast screening. However it may be helpful to encourage young women during pre-test counseling to explore the decisions and choices they may face. These young women could benefit from ongoing support and follow up and increased interaction with healthcare professionals.

  15. Combined mutation and rearrangement screening by quantitative PCR high-resolution melting: is it relevant for hereditary recurrent Fever genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Pallares-Ruiz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent identification of genes implicated in hereditary recurrent fevers has allowed their specific diagnosis. So far however, only punctual mutations have been identified and a significant number of patients remain with no genetic confirmation of their disease after routine molecular approaches such as sequencing. The possible involvement of sequence rearrangements in these patients has only been examined in familial Mediterranean fever and was found to be unlikely. To assess the existence of larger genetic alterations in 3 other concerned genes, MVK (Mevalonate kinase, NLRP3 (Nod like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 and TNFRSF1A (TNF receptor superfamily 1A, we adapted the qPCR-HRM method to study possible intragenic deletions and duplications. This single-tube approach, combining both qualitative (mutations and quantitative (rearrangement screening, has proven effective in Lynch syndrome diagnosis. Using this approach, we studied 113 unselected (prospective group and 88 selected (retrospective group patients and identified no intragenic rearrangements in the 3 genes. Only qualitative alterations were found with a sensitivity similar to that obtained using classical molecular techniques for screening punctual mutations. Our results support that deleterious copy number alterations in MVK, NLRP3 and TNFRSF1A are rare or absent from the mutational spectrum of hereditary recurrent fevers, and demonstrate that a routine combined method such as qPCR-HRM provides no further help in genetic diagnosis. However, quantitative approaches such as qPCR or SQF-PCR did prove to be quick and effective and could still be useful after non contributory punctual mutation screening in the presence of clinically evocative signs.

  16. Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes testing designed to determine the ability of high burnup (HBU) (>45 GWd/MTU) spent fuel to maintain its integrity under normal conditions of transportation. An innovative system, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and evaluate the mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under conditions relevant to storage and transportation. The CIRFT system is composed of a U-frame equipped with load cells for imposing the pure bending loads on the SNF rod test specimen and measuring the in-situ curvature of the fuel rod during bending using a set up with three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs).

  17. High gradient tests of SLAC Linear Collider Accelerator Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.; Deruyter, H.; Eichner, J.; Fant, K.H.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Loewen, R.; Menegat, L.

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the current SLAC R ampersand D program to develop room temperature accelerator structures for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The structures are designed to operate at 11.4 GHz at an accelerating gradient in the range of 50 to 100 MV/m. In the past year a 26 cm constant-impedance traveling-wave section, a 75 cm constant-impedance traveling-wave section, and a 1.8 m traveling-wave section with detuned deflecting modes have been high-power tested. The paper presents a brief description of the RF test setup, the design and manufacturing details of the structures, and a discussion of test results including field emission, RF processing, dark current spectrum and RF breakdown

  18. High level radioactive waste vitrification process equipment component testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemens, D.H.; Heath, W.O.; Larson, D.E.; Craig, S.N.; Berger, D.N.; Goles, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    Remote operability and maintainability of vitrification equipment were assessed under shielded-cell conditions. The equipment tested will be applied to immobilize high-level and transuranic liquid waste slurries that resulted from plutonium production for defense weapons. Equipment tested included: a turntable for handling waste canisters under the melter; a removable discharge cone in the melter overflow section; a thermocouple jumper that extends into a shielded cell; remote instrument and electrical connectors; remote, mechanical, and heat transfer aspects of the melter glass overflow section; a reamer to clean out plugged nozzles in the melter top; a closed circuit camera to view the melter interior; and a device to retrieve samples of the glass product. A test was also conducted to evaluate liquid metals for use in a liquid metal sealing system

  19. Corrosion tests of high temperature alloys in impure helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Jan; Kalivodova, Jana; Vilemova, Monika; Skoumalova, Zuzana; Brabec, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Czech research organizations take part several projects concerning technologies and materials for advanced gas cooled reactors, as an example international project ARCHER supported by EU within FP7, also several national projects supported by Technology Agency of the Czech Republic are solved in cooperation with industrial and research organization. Within these projects the material testing program is performed. The results presented in these paper concerning high temperature corrosion and degradation of alloys (800 H, SS 316 and P91) in helium containing minor impurities (H_2, CO, CH_4, HZO) at temperatures up to 760°C. After corrosion tests (up to 1500 hours) the specimens was investigated by several methods (gravimetry, SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, hardness and micro-hardness testing etc. (author)

  20. Effects of Genetic Mutations and Chemical Exposures on Caenorhabditis elegans Feeding: Evaluation of a Novel, High-Throughput Screening Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Windy A.; McBride, Sandra J.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Government agencies have defined a need to reduce, refine or replace current mammalian-based bioassays with testing methods that use alternative species. Invertebrate species, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, provide an attractive option because of their short life cycles, inexpensive maintenance, and high degree of evolutionary conservation with higher eukaryotes. The C. elegans pharynx is a favorable model for studying neuromuscular function, and the effects of chemicals on neurom...

  1. Reconsidering the Impact of High-stakes Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Braun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last fifteen years, many states have implemented high-stakes tests as part of an effort to strengthen accountability for schools, teachers, and students. Predictably, there has been vigorous disagreement regarding the contributions of such policies to increasing test scores and, more importantly, to improving student learning. A recent study by Amrein and Berliner (2002a has received a great deal of media attention. Employing various databases covering the period 1990-2000, the authors conclude that there is no evidence that states that implemented high-stakes tests demonstrated improved student achievement on various external measures such as performance on the SAT, ACT, AP, or NAEP. In a subsequent study in which they conducted a more extensive analysis of state policies (Amrein & Berliner, 2002b, they reach a similar conclusion. However, both their methodology and their findings have been challenged by a number of authors. In this article, we undertake an extended reanalysis of one component of Amrein and Berliner (2002a. We focus on the performance of states, over the period 1992 to 2000, on the NAEP mathematics assessments for grades 4 and 8. In particular, we compare the performance of the high-stakes testing states, as designated by Amrein and Berliner, with the performance of the remaining states (conditioning, of course, on a state’s participation in the relevant NAEP assessments. For each grade, when we examine the relative gains of states over the period, we find that the comparisons strongly favor the high-stakes testing states. Moreover, the results cannot be accounted for by differences between the two groups of states with respect to changes in percent of students excluded from NAEP over the same period. On the other hand, when we follow a particular cohort (grade 4, 1992 to grade 8, 1996 or grade 4, 1996 to grade 8, 2000, we find the comparisons slightly favor the low-stakes testing states, although the discrepancy can

  2. High-pressure test loop design and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnette, R.D.; Graves, J.N.; Blair, P.G.; Baldwin, N.L.

    1980-07-01

    A high-pressure test loop (HPTL) has been constructed for the purpose of performing a number of chemistry experiments at simulated HTGR conditions of temperature, pressure, flow, and impurity content. The HPTL can be used to develop, modify, and verify computer codes for a variety of chemical processes involving gas phase transport in the reactor. Processes such as graphite oxidation, fission product transport, fuel reactions, purification systems, and dust entrainment can be studied at high pressure, which would largely eliminate difficulties in correlating existing laboratory data and reactor conditions

  3. Seismic test of high temperature piping for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobatake, Kiyokazu; Midoriyama, Shigeru; Ooka, Yuzi; Suzuki, Michiaki; Katsuki, Taketsugu

    1983-01-01

    Since the high temperature pipings for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor contain helium gas at 1000 deg C and 40 kgf/cm 2 , the double-walled pipe type consisting of the external pipe serving as the pressure boundary and the internal pipe with heat insulating structure was adopted. Accordingly, their aseismatic design is one of the important subjects. Recently, for the purpose of grasping the vibration characteristics of these high temperature pipings and obtaining the data required for the aseismatic design, two specimens, that is, a double-walled pipe model and a heat-insulating structure, were made, and the vibration test was carried out on them, using a 30 ton vibration table of Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. In the high temperature pipings of the primary cooling system for the multi-purpose, high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor, the external pipes of 32 B bore as the pressure boundary and the internal pipes of 26 B bore with internal heat insulation consisting of double layers of fiber and laminated metal insulators as the temperature boundary were adopted. The testing method and the results are reported. As the spring constant of spacers is larger and clearance is smaller, the earthquake wave response of double-walled pipes is smaller, and it is more advantageous. The aseismatic property of the heat insulation structure is sufficient. (Kako, I.)

  4. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga B, P.

    1984-01-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented. (Author)

  5. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga B, P. (Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia. Inst. de Produccion y Sanidad Vegetal)

    1984-10-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented.

  6. BRCA mutation carrier detection. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the traditional family history approach and the testing of all patients with breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Grindedal, Eli Marie; Heramb, Cecilie; Karsrud, Inga; Ariansen, Sarah Louise; Undlien, Dag Erik; Schlichting, Ellen; Mæhle, Lovise

    2018-01-01

    Background Identification of BRCA mutation carriers among patients with breast cancer (BC) involves costs and gains. Testing has been performed according to international guidelines, focusing on family history (FH) of breast and/or ovarian cancer. An alternative is testing all patients with BC employing sequencing of the BRCA genes and Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA). Patients and methods A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis, employing data from Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål (OUH-U) and a decision tree, was done. The societal and the healthcare perspectives were focused and a lifetime perspective employed. The comparators were the traditional FH approach used as standard of care at OUH-U in 2013 and the intervention (testing all patients with BC) performed in 2014 and 2015 at the same hospital. During the latter period, 535 patients with BC were offered BRCA testing with sequencing and MLPA. National 2014 data on mortality rates and costs were implemented, a 3% discount rate used and the costing year was 2015. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated in euros (€) per life-year gained (LYG). Results The net healthcare cost (healthcare perspective) was €40 503/LYG. Including all resource use (societal perspective), the cost was €5669/LYG. The univariate sensitivity analysis documented the unit cost of the BRCA test and the number of LYGs the prominent parameters affecting the result. Diagnostic BRCA testing of all patients with BC was superior to the FH approach and cost-effective within the frequently used thresholds (healthcare perspective) in Norway (€60 000–€80 000/LYG). PMID:29682331

  7. BRCA mutation carrier detection. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the traditional family history approach and the testing of all patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Grindedal, Eli Marie; Heramb, Cecilie; Karsrud, Inga; Ariansen, Sarah Louise; Undlien, Dag Erik; Schlichting, Ellen; Mæhle, Lovise

    2018-01-01

    Identification of BRCA mutation carriers among patients with breast cancer (BC) involves costs and gains. Testing has been performed according to international guidelines, focusing on family history (FH) of breast and/or ovarian cancer. An alternative is testing all patients with BC employing sequencing of the BRCA genes and Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA). A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis, employing data from Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål (OUH-U) and a decision tree, was done. The societal and the healthcare perspectives were focused and a lifetime perspective employed. The comparators were the traditional FH approach used as standard of care at OUH-U in 2013 and the intervention (testing all patients with BC) performed in 2014 and 2015 at the same hospital. During the latter period, 535 patients with BC were offered BRCA testing with sequencing and MLPA. National 2014 data on mortality rates and costs were implemented, a 3% discount rate used and the costing year was 2015. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated in euros (€) per life-year gained (LYG). The net healthcare cost (healthcare perspective) was €40 503/LYG. Including all resource use (societal perspective), the cost was €5669/LYG. The univariate sensitivity analysis documented the unit cost of the BRCA test and the number of LYGs the prominent parameters affecting the result.Diagnostic BRCA testing of all patients with BC was superior to the FH approach and cost-effective within the frequently used thresholds (healthcare perspective) in Norway (€60 000-€80 000/LYG).

  8. ENU mutagenesis screening for dominant behavioral mutations based on normal control data obtained in home-cage activity, open-field, and passive avoidance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yumiko; Furuse, Tamio; Yamada, Ikuko; Masuya, Hiroshi; Kushida, Tomoko; Shibukawa, Yoko; Nakai, Yuji; Kobayashi, Kimio; Kaneda, Hideki; Gondo, Yoichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Wakana, Shigeharu

    2010-01-01

    To establish the cutoff values for screening ENU-induced behavioral mutations, normal variations in mouse behavioral data were examined in home-cage activity (HA), open-field (OF), and passive-avoidance (PA) tests. We defined the normal range as one that included more than 95% of the normal control values. The cutoffs were defined to identify outliers yielding values that deviated from the normal by less than 5% for C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, DBF(1), and N(2) (DXDB) progenies. Cutoff values for G1-phenodeviant (DBF(1)) identification were defined based on values over +/- 3.0 SD from the mean of DBF(1) for all parameters assessed in the HA and OF tests. For the PA test, the cutoff values were defined based on whether the mice met the learning criterion during the 2nd (at a shock intensity of 0.3 mA) or the 3rd (at a shock intensity of 0.15 mA) retention test. For several parameters, the lower outliers were undetectable as the calculated cutoffs were negative values. Based on the cutoff criteria, we identified 275 behavioral phenodeviants among 2,646 G1 progeny. Of these, 64 were crossed with wild-type DBA/2J individuals, and the phenotype transmission was examined in the G2 progeny using the cutoffs defined for N(2) mice. In the G2 mice, we identified 15 novel dominant mutants exhibiting behavioral abnormalities, including hyperactivity in the HA or OF tests, hypoactivity in the OF test, and PA deficits. Genetic and detailed behavioral analysis of these ENU-induced mutants will provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying behavior.

  9. Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbasnik, J.P.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Jewell, A.M.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Chaplin, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is a pair of solenoids made of cryogenically-stabilized, multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn superconductor, developed for use in mirror-fusion magnets. The HFTF system is designed to be parted along the midplane to allow high-field conductors, under development for Tokamak fusion machines, to be inserted and tested. The background field coils were wound pancake-fashion, with cold-welded joints at both the inner and outer diameters. Turn-to-turn insulation was fabricated at LLNL from epoxy-fiberglass strip. The coils were assembled and tested in our 2-m-diam cryostat to verify their operation

  10. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yoon W; Campisi, Isidoro E; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark; Davis, Kirk; Drury, Michael A; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; McCarthy, Michael P; Powers, Tom; Shajedul Hasan, S M; Stirbet, Mircea; Stout, Daniel; Tang, Johnny Y; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V; Wezensky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavitites have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducti...

  11. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  12. Apparatus for Crossflow Filtration Testing of High Level Waste Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, C.

    1998-05-01

    Remotely-operated experimental apparatuses for verifying crossflow filtration of high level nuclear waste have been constructed at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These units have been used to demonstrate filtration processes at the Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The current work covers the design considerations for experimentation as well as providing results from testing at SRS

  13. Generation of a novel live rabies vaccine strain with a high level of safety by introducing attenuating mutations in the nucleoprotein and glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Kento; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Katayama, Yukie; Oba, Mami; Mitake, Hiromichi; Okada, Kazuma; Yamaoka, Satoko; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Masatani, Tatsunori; Okadera, Kota; Ito, Naoto; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Makoto

    2017-10-09

    The current live rabies vaccine SAG2 is attenuated by only one mutation (Arg-to-Glu) at position 333 in the glycoprotein (G333). This fact generates a potential risk of the emergence of a pathogenic revertant by a back mutation at this position during viral propagation in the body. To circumvent this risk, it is desirable to generate a live vaccine strain highly and stably attenuated by multiple mutations. However, the information on attenuating mutations other than that at G333 is very limited. We previously reported that amino acids at positions 273 and 394 in the nucleoprotein (N273/394) (Leu and His, respectively) of fixed rabies virus Ni-CE are responsible for the attenuated phenotype by enhancing interferon (IFN)/chemokine gene expressions in infected neural cells. In this study, we found that amino acid substitutions at N273/394 (Phe-to-Leu and Tyr-to-His, respectively) attenuated the pathogenicity of the oral live vaccine ERA, which has a virulent-type Arg at G333. Then we generated ERA-N273/394-G333 attenuated by the combination of the above attenuating mutations at G333 and N273/394, and checked its safety. Similar to the ERA-G333, which is attenuated by only the mutation at G333, ERA-N273/394-G333 did not cause any symptoms in adult mice after intracerebral inoculation, indicating a low level of residual pathogenicity of ERA-N273/394-G333. Further examination revealed that infection with ERA-N273/394-G333 induces IFN-β and CXCL10 mRNA expressions more strongly than ERA-G333 infection in a neuroblastoma cell line. Importantly, we found that the ERA-N273/394-G333 stain has a lower risk for emergence of a pathogenic revertant than does the ERA-G333. These results indicate that ERA-N273/394-G333 has a potential to be a promising candidate for a live rabies vaccine strain with a high level of safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung adenocarcinoma in Malaysian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liam, Chong-Kin; Wahid, Mohamed Ibrahim A; Rajadurai, Pathmanathan; Cheah, Yoke-Kqueen; Ng, Tiffany Shi-Yeen

    2013-06-01

    Despite available data from other Asian countries, the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations among lung adenocarcinoma patients has not been reported in Malaysia. This study sought to determine the frequency of EGFR mutations among multiethnic Malaysian patients diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma. Demographic and clinical information of patients whose lung adenocarcinoma biopsy specimens were submitted for EGFR mutation testing at Sime Darby Medical Center from 2009 to 2011 were analyzed. EGFR mutations at exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 were detected either through bidirectional sequencing or real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 812 patients in the study, 49% were female, 63.7% were ethnic Chinese, 29.4% Malay, 4.8% Indian, and 2.1% other ethnic groups. Mutations were present in the tumors of 321 patients (39.5%), with mutations at exons 19 (23.5%) and 21 (14.9%) being the most common. Mutations were significantly more frequent among women than in men (52.5% versus 27.8%, p < 0.001). Although mutations were more common among Chinese (40.8%) compared with Malay (37.2%) or Indian (33.3%) patients, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.591). Of 211 patients with smoking history records, never-smokers had a higher mutation rate compared with ever-smokers (54.8% versus 20.7%, p < 0.001). EGFR mutations were present in 39.5% of patients. Mutations were more common in women and never-smokers with no differences in mutation frequency between different ethnicities. Because of the high mutation rates, reflex testing for EGFR mutation should be a routine practice for advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients in Malaysia.

  15. High rate tests of the LHCb RICH Upgrade system

    CERN Multimedia

    Blago, Michele Piero

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges for the upgrade of the LHCb RICH detectors from 2020 is to readout the photon detectors at the full 40 MHz rate of the LHC proton-proton collisions. A test facility has been setup at CERN with the purpose to investigate the behaviour of the Multi Anode PMTs, which have been proposed for the upgrade, and their readout electronics at high trigger rates. The MaPMTs are illuminated with a monochromatic laser that can be triggered independently of the readout electronics. A first series of tests, including threshold scans, is performed at low trigger rates (20 kHz) for both the readout and the laser with the purpose to characterise the behaviour of the system under test. Then the trigger rate is increased in two separate steps. First the MaPMTs are exposed to high illumination by triggering the pulsed laser at a high (20 MHz) repetition rate while the DAQ is readout at the same low rate as before. In this way the performance of the MaPMTs and the attached electronics can be evaluated ...

  16. Performance of a 2-megawatt high voltage test load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, D.; Kustom, R.; Ferguson, M.

    1995-01-01

    A high-power, water-cooled resistive load which simulates the electrical load characteristics of a high-power klystron, capable of 2 megawatts dissipation at 95 kV DC, was built and installed at the Advanced Photon Source for use in load-testing high voltage power supplies. During this testing, the test load has logged approximately 35 hours of operation at power levels in excess of one mezawatt. Slight variations in the resistance of the load during operation indicate that leakage currents in the cooling water may be a significant factor affecting the performance of the load. Sufficient performance data have been collected to indicate that leakage current through the deionized (DI) water coolant shunts roughly 15 percent of the full-load current around the load resistor elements. The leakage current could cause deterioration of internal components of the load. The load pressure vessel was disassembled and inspected internally for any signs of significant wear and distress. Results of this inspection and possible modifications for improved performance will be discussed

  17. Multicamera High Dynamic Range High-Speed Video of Rocket Engine Tests and Launches

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-speed video recording of rocket engine tests has several challenges. The scenes that are imaged have both bright and dark regions associated with plume emission...

  18. Software for Displaying High-Frequency Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Jason L.

    2003-01-01

    An easy-to-use, intuitive computer program was written to satisfy a need of test operators and data requestors to quickly view and manipulate high-frequency test data recorded at the East and West Test Areas at Marshall Space Flight Center. By enabling rapid analysis, this program makes it possible to reduce times between test runs, thereby potentially reducing the overall cost of test operations. The program can be used to perform quick frequency analysis, using multiple fast- Fourier-transform windowing and amplitude options. The program can generate amplitude-versus-time plots with full zoom capabilities, frequency-component plots at specified time intervals, and waterfall plots (plots of spectral intensity versus frequency at successive small time intervals, showing the changing frequency components over time). There are options for printing of the plots and saving plot data as text files that can be imported into other application programs. The program can perform all of the aforementioned plotting and plot-data-handling functions on a relatively inexpensive computer; other software that performs the same functions requires computers with large amounts of power and memory.

  19. What does social research say about high-stakes tests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Feito Alonso

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available High-stake tests, which students need to pass in order to gain a Secondary education certificate, have aroused a lot of controversy whenever they have been implemented. Especially in the USA these tests have produced a dramatic shrinking of school knowledge as they have been focused into questions posed by the very tests. At the same time, there has been a critical modification of the learning processes due to the fact that these tests encourage students to pay more attention to factual knowledge, which is far away from hands-on learning, debating in class or working in teams. In spite of certain discrepancies, by and large, research casts serious doubts about whether these tests are conductive to better academic performance. Nevertheless, the dropout rate is on the rise. More often than not, school principals have been found preventing struggling students to sit the exams. A review of the research into this matter allows us to put into context the debate surrounding external exams posed by the current education law (LOMCE: Law for the Improvement of Educational Quality passed by the parliamentary majority of the Popular Party in Spain in 2013.

  20. Testing of high-level waste forms under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mc Menamin, T.

    1989-01-01

    The workshop on testing of high-level waste forms under repository conditions was held on 17 to 21 October 1988 in Cadarache, France, and sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), the Commissariat a l'energie atomique (CEA) and the Savannah River Laboratory (US DOE). Participants included representatives from Australia, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, The United Kingdom and the United States. The first part of the conference featured a workshop on in situ testing of simulated nuclear waste forms and proposed package components, with an emphasis on the materials interface interactions tests (MIIT). MIIT is a sevent-part programme that involves field testing of 15 glass and waste form systems supplied by seven countries, along with potential canister and overpack materials as well as geologic samples, in the salt geology at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, USA. This effort is still in progress and these proceedings document studies and findings obtained thus far. The second part of the meeting emphasized multinational experimental studies and results derived from repository systems simulation tests (RSST), which were performed in granite, clay and salt environments