WorldWideScience

Sample records for testing global identifiability

  1. Examples of testing global identifiability of biological and biomedical models with the DAISY software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomani, Maria Pia; Audoly, Stefania; Bellu, Giuseppina; D'Angiò, Leontina

    2010-04-01

    DAISY (Differential Algebra for Identifiability of SYstems) is a recently developed computer algebra software tool which can be used to automatically check global identifiability of (linear and) nonlinear dynamic models described by differential equations involving polynomial or rational functions. Global identifiability is a fundamental prerequisite for model identification which is important not only for biological or medical systems but also for many physical and engineering systems derived from first principles. Lack of identifiability implies that the parameter estimation techniques may not fail but any obtained numerical estimates will be meaningless. The software does not require understanding of the underlying mathematical principles and can be used by researchers in applied fields with a minimum of mathematical background. We illustrate the DAISY software by checking the a priori global identifiability of two benchmark nonlinear models taken from the literature. The analysis of these two examples includes comparison with other methods and demonstrates how identifiability analysis is simplified by this tool. Thus we illustrate the identifiability analysis of other two examples, by including discussion of some specific aspects related to the role of observability and knowledge of initial conditions in testing identifiability and to the computational complexity of the software. The main focus of this paper is not on the description of the mathematical background of the algorithm, which has been presented elsewhere, but on illustrating its use and on some of its more interesting features. DAISY is available on the web site http://www.dei.unipd.it/ approximately pia/. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Global Microbial Identifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielinga, Peter; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2017-01-01

    -source systems. There is therefore an obvious need to develop a global system of whole microbial genome databases to aggregate, share, mine and use microbiological genomic data, to address global public health and clinical challenges, and most importantly to identify and diagnose infectious diseases. The global...... of microorganisms, for the identification of relevant genes and for the comparison of genomes to detect outbreaks and emerging pathogens. To harness the full potential of WGS, a shared global database of genomes linked to relevant metadata and the necessary software tools needs to be generated, hence the global...... microbial identifier (GMI) initiative. This tool will ideally be used in amongst others in the diagnosis of infectious diseases in humans and animals, in the identification of microorganisms in food and environment, and to track and trace microbial agents in all arenas globally. This will require...

  3. The HepTestContest: a global innovation contest to identify approaches to hepatitis B and C testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Tucker

    2017-11-01

    support targeted testing (n = 8; decentralization (n = 8; and task shifting (n = 7. Conclusion The global innovation contest identified a range of local hepatitis testing approaches that can be used to inform the development of testing strategies in different settings and populations. Further implementation and evaluation of different testing approaches is needed.

  4. The HepTestContest: a global innovation contest to identify approaches to hepatitis B and C testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joseph D; Meyers, Kathrine; Best, John; Kaplan, Karyn; Pendse, Razia; Fenton, Kevin A; Andrieux-Meyer, Isabelle; Figueroa, Carmen; Goicochea, Pedro; Gore, Charles; Ishizaki, Azumi; Khwairakpam, Giten; Miller, Veronica; Mozalevskis, Antons; Ninburg, Michael; Ocama, Ponsiano; Peeling, Rosanna; Walsh, Nick; Colombo, Massimo G; Easterbrook, Philippa

    2017-11-01

    ); decentralization (n = 8); and task shifting (n = 7). The global innovation contest identified a range of local hepatitis testing approaches that can be used to inform the development of testing strategies in different settings and populations. Further implementation and evaluation of different testing approaches is needed.

  5. Identifying external influences on global precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvel, K.; Bonfils, C.

    2013-11-11

    Changes in global (ocean and land) precipitation are among the most important and least well-understood consequences of climate change. Increasing greenhouse gas concentrations are thought to affect the zonal-mean distribution of precipitation through two basic mechanisms. First, increasing temperatures will lead to an intensification of the hydrological cycle (“thermodynamic” changes). Second, changes in atmospheric circulation patterns will lead to poleward displacement of the storm tracks and subtropical dry zones and to a widening of the tropical belt (“dynamic” changes). We demonstrate that both these changes are occurring simultaneously in global precipitation, that this behavior cannot be explained by internal variability alone, and that external influences are responsible for the observed precipitation changes. Whereas existing model experiments are not of sufficient length to differentiate between natural and anthropogenic forcing terms at the 95% confidence level, we present evidence that the observed trends result from human activities.

  6. Identifying the Molecular Origin of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Partha P.; Francisco, Joseph S.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the physical characteristics of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to assess which properties are most important in determining the efficiency of a GHG. Chlorofluorcarbons (CFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), nitrogen fluorides, and various other known atmospheric trace molecules have been included in this study. Compounds containing the halogens F or Cl have in common very polar X-F or X-Cl bonds, particularly the X-F bonds. It is shown that as more F atoms bond to the same central atom, the bond dipoles become larger as a result of the central atom becoming more positive. This leads to a linear increase in the total or integrated XF bond dipole derivatives for the molecule, which leads to a non-linear (quadratic) increase in infrared (IR) intensity. Moreover, virtually all of the X-F bond stretches occur in the atmospheric IR window as opposed to X-H stretches, which do not occur in the atmospheric window. It is concluded that molecules possessing several F atoms will always have a large radiative forcing parameter in the calculation of their global warming potential. Some of the implications for global warming and climate change are discussed.

  7. Global identifiability of linear compartmental models--a computer algebra algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audoly, S; D'Angiò, L; Saccomani, M P; Cobelli, C

    1998-01-01

    A priori global identifiability deals with the uniqueness of the solution for the unknown parameters of a model and is, thus, a prerequisite for parameter estimation of biological dynamic models. Global identifiability is however difficult to test, since it requires solving a system of algebraic nonlinear equations which increases both in nonlinearity degree and number of terms and unknowns with increasing model order. In this paper, a computer algebra tool, GLOBI (GLOBal Identifiability) is presented, which combines the topological transfer function method with the Buchberger algorithm, to test global identifiability of linear compartmental models. GLOBI allows for the automatic testing of a priori global identifiability of general structure compartmental models from general multi input-multi output experiments. Examples of usage of GLOBI to analyze a priori global identifiability of some complex biological compartmental models are provided.

  8. Testing times: identifying puberty in an identified skeletal sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Charlotte Y; Padez, Cristina

    2017-06-01

    Identifying the onset of puberty in skeletal remains can provide evidence of social changes associated with the onset of adulthood. This paper presents the first test of a skeletal method for identifying stages of development associated with the onset of puberty in a skeletal sample of known age and cause of death. Skeletal methods for assessing skeletal development associated with changes associated with puberty were recorded in the identified skeletal collection in Coimbra, Portugal. Historical data on the onset of menarche in this country are used to test the method. As expected, females mature faster than their male counterparts. There is some side asymmetry in development. Menarche was found to have been achieved by an average age of 15. Asymmetry must be taken into account when dealing with partially preserved skeletons. Age of menarche is consistent, although marginally higher, than the age expected based on historical data for this time and location. Skeletal development in males could not be tested against historical data, due to the lack of counterpart historical data. The ill health known to be present in this prematurely deceased population may have delayed skeletal development and the onset of puberty.

  9. Medical Student Perceptions of Global Surgery at an Academic Institution: Identifying Gaps in Global Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ambar; Xu, Tim; Murray, Matthew; Casey, Kathleen M

    2017-12-01

    Robust global health demands access to safe, affordable, timely surgical care for all. The long-term success of global surgery requires medical students to understand and engage with this emerging field. The authors characterized medical students' perceptions of surgical care relative to other fields within global health. An optional, anonymous survey was given to all Johns Hopkins medical students from February to March 2016 to assess perceptions of surgical care and its role in global health. Of 480 students, 365 (76%) completed the survey, with 150 (41%) reporting global health interests. One-third (34%) of responding students felt that surgical care is one of two fields with the greatest potential global health impact in the future, second to infectious disease (49%). A minority (28%) correctly identified that trauma results in more deaths worldwide than obstetric complications or HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. Relative to other examined fields, students perceived surgical care as the least preventive and cost-effective, and few students (3%) considered adequate surgical care the best indicator of a robust health care system. Students believed that practicing in a surgical field was least amenable to pursuing a global health career, citing several barriers. Medical students have several perceptions of global surgery that contradict current evidence and literature, which may have implications for their career choices. Opportunities to improve students' global health knowledge and awareness of global surgery career paths include updating curricula, fostering meaningful international academic opportunities, and creating centers of global surgery and global health consortia.

  10. Global Envelope Tests for Spatial Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myllymäki, Mari; Mrkvička, Tomáš; Grabarnik, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Envelope tests are a popular tool in spatial statistics, where they are used in goodness-of-fit testing. These tests graphically compare an empirical function T(r) with its simulated counterparts from the null model. However, the type I error probability α is conventionally controlled for a fixed d......) the construction of envelopes for a deviation test. These new tests allow the a priori selection of the global α and they yield p-values. We illustrate these tests using simulated and real point pattern data....

  11. Global envelope tests for spatial processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myllymäki, Mari; Mrkvička, Tomáš; Grabarnik, Pavel

    Envelope tests are a popular tool in spatial statistics, where they are used in goodness-of-fit testing. These tests graphically compare an empirical function T(r) with its simulated counterparts from the null model. However, the type I error probability α is conventionally controlled for a fixed......) the construction of envelopes for a deviation test. These new tests allow the a priori selection of the global α and they yield p-values. We illustrate these tests using simulated and real point pattern data....

  12. Test systems to identify reproductive toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecke, K; Stahlmann, R

    2000-09-01

    Experience with drugs and other xenobiotics indicates that both animal testing and epidemiological studies are necessary to provide adequate data for an estimation of risks that might be associated with exposure to a chemical substance. In this review, the pros and cons of test systems for reproductive toxicity are discussed. Usually, several studies are performed to cover the different phases of the reproductive cycle. In the preclinical development of drugs, the three so-called 'segment testing protocols' have been used for several decades now. More recently, new testing concepts have been accepted internationally which include more flexibility in implementation. Several examples of compounds with the potential for reproductive toxicity are presented in more detail in a discussion of some pitfalls of the tests for fertility (phthalates and fluoroquinolones), teratogenicity (acyclovir and protease inhibitors) and postnatal developmental toxicity (fluoroquinolones). In addition, important aspects of kinetics and metabolism as a prerequisite for a rational interpretation of results from toxicological studies are briefly discussed. In vitro assays are useful for supplementing the routinely used in vivo approaches or for studying an expected or defined effect, but they are not suitable for revealing an unknown effect of a chemical on the complex reproductive process.

  13. Can teachers' global ratings identify children with academic problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glascoe, F P

    2001-06-01

    Physicians often elicit ratings from teachers when making diagnostic, treatment, or referral decisions. The purpose of this study was to view the relationship between teachers' ratings and children's academic skills, assess the utility of teacher ratings in detecting academic problems, and thus determine whether physicians can depend on teacher ratings when making decisions about patients' needs. Subjects were a national sample of 80 teachers and 934 children between 6 and 13 years of age participating in a test standardization study. Families were representative of United States demographics in terms of parental level of education, income, and ethnicity, and sites were geographically diverse elementary schools. Children were administered the Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills--Revised (CIBS-R), a diagnostic academic achievement test. Teachers rated children's academic performance on a five-point scale ranging from far above average to far below average and were blinded to the results of the CIBS-R. Teacher ratings varied significantly with children's performance for all academic domains. Logistic regression revealed that teacher ratings were best predicted by children's performance in basic reading skills, followed by math skills, and were not influenced by race, parents' level of education, history of retention, or gender. Participation in Title I services, testing in winter or spring, and parents who spoke a language other than English produced significantly lower ratings. Nevertheless, teachers rated as average many students with mild to moderate academic difficulties. School system personnel and health care providers should avoid sole dependence on global teacher ratings when deciding which students need special education referrals or other services. Supplementing teacher ratings with standardized screening test results is needed to ensure accurate decision-making.

  14. Healthcare hashtag index development: Identifying global impact in social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Costa, Luís; Yakubu, Kenneth; Hoedebecke, Kyle; Laranjo, Liliana; Reichel, Christofer Patrick; Colon-Gonzalez, Maria Del C; Neves, Ana Luísa; Errami, Hassna

    2016-10-01

    Create an index of global reach for healthcare hashtags and tweeters therein, filterable by topic of interest. For this proof-of-concept study we focused on the field of Primary Care and Family Medicine. Six hashtags were selected based on their importance, from the ones included in the 'Healthcare Hashtag Project'. Hashtag Global Reach (HGR) was calculated using the additive aggregation of five weighted, normalized indicator variables: number of impressions, tweets, tweeters, user locations, and user languages. Data were obtained for the last quarter of 2014 and first quarter of 2015 using Symplur Signals. Topic-specific HGR were calculated for the top 10 terms and for sets of quotes mapped after a thematic analysis. Individual Global Reach, IGR, was calculated across hashtags as additive indexes of three indicators: replies, retweets and mentions. Using the HGR score we were able to rank six selected hashtags and observe their performance throughout the study period. We found that #PrimaryCare and #FMRevolution had the highest HGR score in both quarters; interestingly, #FMChangeMakers experienced a marked increase in its global visibility during the study period. "Health Policy" was the commonest theme, while "Care", "Family" and "Health" were the most common terms. This is the first study describing an altmetric hashtag index. Assuming analytical soundness, the Index might prove generalizable to other healthcare hashtags. If released as a real-time business intelligence tool with customizable settings, it could aid publishing and strategic decisions by netizens, organizations, and analysts. IGR could also serve to augment academic evaluation and professional development. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using an index on the global reach of healthcare hashtags and tweeters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gen...

  16. Identifying the potential wintering sites of the globally threatened ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Aquatic Warbler is a threatened Afro-Palaearctic migrant with a largely unknown distribution in the winter (non-breeding) season. Protection of wintering sites may be crucial for the conservation of the species. Previous studies have identified extensive areas of north-western sub-Saharan Africa that could potentially be ...

  17. Global Locator, Local Locator, and Identifier Split (GLI-Split

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Menth

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The locator/identifier split is an approach for a new addressing and routing architecture to make routing in the core of the Internet more scalable. Based on this principle, we developed the GLI-Split framework, which separates the functionality of current IP addresses into a stable identifier and two independent locators, one for routing in the Internet core and one for edge networks. This makes routing in the Internet more stable and provides more flexibility for edge networks. GLI-Split can be incrementally deployed and it is backward-compatible with the IPv6 Internet. We describe its architecture, compare it to other approaches, present its benefits, and finally present a proof-of-concept implementation of GLI-Split.

  18. Software testing and global industry future paradigms

    CERN Document Server

    Casey, Valentine; Richardson, Ita

    2009-01-01

    Today software development has truly become a globally sourced commodity. This trend has been facilitated by the availability of highly skilled software professionals in low cost locations in Eastern Europe, Latin America and the Far East. Organisations

  19. Identifying hubs and spokes in global supply chains using redirected trade in value added

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lejour, Arjan; Rojas-Romagosa, Hugo; Veenendaal, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The increasing importance of global supply chains has prompted the use of analytical tools based on trade in value added - instead of traditional measures in gross value. We use this analytical framework to develop indicators that identify production hubs and supply spokes in global supply chains.

  20. Polynomial cointegration tests of anthropogenic impact on global warming

    OpenAIRE

    Beenstock, M.; Reingewertz, Y.; Paldor, N.

    2012-01-01

    We use statistical methods for nonstationary time series to test the anthropogenic interpretation of global warming (AGW), according to which an increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations raised global temperature in the 20th century. Specifically, the methodology of polynomial cointegration is used to test AGW since during the observation period (1880–2007) global temperature and solar irradiance are stationary in 1st differences, whereas greenhouse gas and aerosol forcings are st...

  1. Identification of significant features by the Global Mean Rank test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Klammer

    Full Text Available With the introduction of omics-technologies such as transcriptomics and proteomics, numerous methods for the reliable identification of significantly regulated features (genes, proteins, etc. have been developed. Experimental practice requires these tests to successfully deal with conditions such as small numbers of replicates, missing values, non-normally distributed expression levels, and non-identical distributions of features. With the MeanRank test we aimed at developing a test that performs robustly under these conditions, while favorably scaling with the number of replicates. The test proposed here is a global one-sample location test, which is based on the mean ranks across replicates, and internally estimates and controls the false discovery rate. Furthermore, missing data is accounted for without the need of imputation. In extensive simulations comparing MeanRank to other frequently used methods, we found that it performs well with small and large numbers of replicates, feature dependent variance between replicates, and variable regulation across features on simulation data and a recent two-color microarray spike-in dataset. The tests were then used to identify significant changes in the phosphoproteomes of cancer cells induced by the kinase inhibitors erlotinib and 3-MB-PP1 in two independently published mass spectrometry-based studies. MeanRank outperformed the other global rank-based methods applied in this study. Compared to the popular Significance Analysis of Microarrays and Linear Models for Microarray methods, MeanRank performed similar or better. Furthermore, MeanRank exhibits more consistent behavior regarding the degree of regulation and is robust against the choice of preprocessing methods. MeanRank does not require any imputation of missing values, is easy to understand, and yields results that are easy to interpret. The software implementing the algorithm is freely available for academic and commercial use.

  2. Identifying interprofessional global health competencies for 21st-century health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogerst, Kristen; Callender, Brian; Adams, Virginia; Evert, Jessica; Fields, Elise; Hall, Thomas; Olsen, Jody; Rowthorn, Virginia; Rudy, Sharon; Shen, Jiabin; Simon, Lisa; Torres, Herica; Velji, Anvar; Wilson, Lynda L

    2015-01-01

    At the 2008 inaugural meeting of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH), participants discussed the rapid expansion of global health programs and the lack of standardized competencies and curricula to guide these programs. In 2013, CUGH appointed a Global Health Competency Subcommittee and charged this subcommittee with identifying broad global health core competencies applicable across disciplines. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Subcommittee's work and proposed list of interprofessional global health competencies. After agreeing on a definition of global health to guide the Subcommittee's work, members conducted an extensive literature review to identify existing competencies in all fields relevant to global health. Subcommittee members initially identified 82 competencies in 12 separate domains, and proposed four different competency levels. The proposed competencies and domains were discussed during multiple conference calls, and subcommittee members voted to determine the final competencies to be included in two of the four proposed competency levels (global citizen and basic operational level - program oriented). The final proposed list included a total of 13 competencies across 8 domains for the Global Citizen Level and 39 competencies across 11 domains for the Basic Operational Program-Oriented Level. There is a need for continued debate and dialog to validate the proposed set of competencies, and a need for further research to identify best strategies for incorporating these competencies into global health educational programs. Future research should focus on implementation and evaluation of these competencies across a range of educational programs, and further delineating the competencies needed across all four proposed competency levels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Identifying fMRI Model Violations with Lagrange Multiplier Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Ben; Long, Christopher J; Rae, Caroline; Solo, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The standard modeling framework in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is predicated on assumptions of linearity, time invariance and stationarity. These assumptions are rarely checked because doing so requires specialised software, although failure to do so can lead to bias and mistaken inference. Identifying model violations is an essential but largely neglected step in standard fMRI data analysis. Using Lagrange Multiplier testing methods we have developed simple and efficient procedures for detecting model violations such as non-linearity, non-stationarity and validity of the common Double Gamma specification for hemodynamic response. These procedures are computationally cheap and can easily be added to a conventional analysis. The test statistic is calculated at each voxel and displayed as a spatial anomaly map which shows regions where a model is violated. The methodology is illustrated with a large number of real data examples. PMID:22542665

  4. Testing Convergence for Global Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, John F.; Richers, Sherwood A.; Guan, Xiaoyue; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-08-01

    Global disk simulations provide a powerful tool for investigating accretion and the underlying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by magneto-rotational instability (MRI). Using them to accurately predict quantities such as stress, accretion rate, and surface brightness profile requires that purely numerical effects, arising from both resolution and algorithm, be understood and controlled. We use the flux-conservative Athena code to conduct a series of experiments on disks having a variety of magnetic topologies to determine what constitutes adequate resolution. We develop and apply several resolution metrics: langQz rang and langQ phirang, the ratio of the grid zone size to the characteristic MRI wavelength, αmag, the ratio of the Maxwell stress to the magnetic pressure, and \\langle B_R^2\\rangle /\\langle B_\\phi ^2\\rangle, the ratio of radial to toroidal magnetic field energy. For the initial conditions considered here, adequate resolution is characterized by langQz rang >= 15, langQ phirang >= 20, αmag ≈ 0.45, and \\langle B_R^2\\rangle /\\langle B_\\phi ^2\\rangle \\approx 0.2. These values are associated with >=35 zones per scaleheight H, a result consistent with shearing box simulations. Numerical algorithm is also important. Use of the Harten-Lax-van Leer-Einfeldt flux solver or second-order interpolation can significantly degrade the effective resolution compared to the Harten-Lax-van Leer discontinuities flux solver and third-order interpolation. Resolution at this standard can be achieved only with large numbers of grid zones, arranged in a fashion that matches the symmetries of the problem and the scientific goals of the simulation. Without it, however, quantitative measures important to predictions of observables are subject to large systematic errors.

  5. Tree-Based Global Model Tests for Polytomous Rasch Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komboz, Basil; Strobl, Carolin; Zeileis, Achim

    2018-01-01

    Psychometric measurement models are only valid if measurement invariance holds between test takers of different groups. Global model tests, such as the well-established likelihood ratio (LR) test, are sensitive to violations of measurement invariance, such as differential item functioning and differential step functioning. However, these…

  6. Polynomial cointegration tests of anthropogenic impact on global warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Beenstock

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We use statistical methods for nonstationary time series to test the anthropogenic interpretation of global warming (AGW, according to which an increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations raised global temperature in the 20th century. Specifically, the methodology of polynomial cointegration is used to test AGW since during the observation period (1880–2007 global temperature and solar irradiance are stationary in 1st differences, whereas greenhouse gas and aerosol forcings are stationary in 2nd differences. We show that although these anthropogenic forcings share a common stochastic trend, this trend is empirically independent of the stochastic trend in temperature and solar irradiance. Therefore, greenhouse gas forcing, aerosols, solar irradiance and global temperature are not polynomially cointegrated, and the perceived relationship between these variables is a spurious regression phenomenon. On the other hand, we find that greenhouse gas forcings might have had a temporary effect on global temperature.

  7. Testing the developed world: Global CAPM vs. Local CAPM

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, John

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the extent to which the developed world is integrated that the pricing difference between using the local CAPM and the global CAPM is not relevant. This paper has analysed the twenty developed countries which have been classified as such in the MSCI global index. The paper breaks down the country and stock to identify where there is a significant difference in the pricing of assets between the local and global CAPM, and the significance of the result.

  8. Alternative approaches for identifying acute systemic toxicity: Moving from research to regulatory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jon; Sullivan, Kristie; Clippinger, Amy J; Strickland, Judy; Bell, Shannon; Bhhatarai, Barun; Blaauboer, Bas; Casey, Warren; Dorman, David; Forsby, Anna; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gehen, Sean; Graepel, Rabea; Hotchkiss, Jon; Lowit, Anna; Matheson, Joanna; Reaves, Elissa; Scarano, Louis; Sprankle, Catherine; Tunkel, Jay; Wilson, Dan; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao; Allen, David

    2017-06-01

    Acute systemic toxicity testing provides the basis for hazard labeling and risk management of chemicals. A number of international efforts have been directed at identifying non-animal alternatives for in vivo acute systemic toxicity tests. A September 2015 workshop, Alternative Approaches for Identifying Acute Systemic Toxicity: Moving from Research to Regulatory Testing, reviewed the state-of-the-science of non-animal alternatives for this testing and explored ways to facilitate implementation of alternatives. Workshop attendees included representatives from international regulatory agencies, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Resources identified as necessary for meaningful progress in implementing alternatives included compiling and making available high-quality reference data, training on use and interpretation of in vitro and in silico approaches, and global harmonization of testing requirements. Attendees particularly noted the need to characterize variability in reference data to evaluate new approaches. They also noted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of acute toxicity, which could be facilitated by the development of adverse outcome pathways. Workshop breakout groups explored different approaches to reducing or replacing animal use for acute toxicity testing, with each group crafting a roadmap and strategy to accomplish near-term progress. The workshop steering committee has organized efforts to implement the recommendations of the workshop participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A predicted protein interactome identifies conserved global networks and disease resistance subnetworks in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt eGeisler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactomes are genome-wide roadmaps of protein-protein interactions. They have been produced for humans, yeast, the fruit fly, and Arabidopsis thaliana and have become invaluable tools for generating and testing hypotheses. A predicted interactome for Zea mays (PiZeaM is presented here as an aid to the research community for this valuable crop species. PiZeaM was built using a proven method of interologs (interacting orthologs that were identified using both one-to-one and many-to-many orthology between genomes of maize and reference species. Where both maize orthologs occurred for an experimentally determined interaction in the reference species, we predicted a likely interaction in maize. A total of 49,026 unique interactions for 6,004 maize proteins were predicted. These interactions are enriched for processes that are evolutionarily conserved, but include many otherwise poorly annotated proteins in maize. The predicted maize interactions were further analyzed by comparing annotation of interacting proteins, including different layers of ontology. A map of pairwise gene co-expression was also generated and compared to predicted interactions. Two global subnetworks were constructed for highly conserved interactions. These subnetworks showed clear clustering of proteins by function. Another subnetwork was created for disease response using a bait and prey strategy to capture interacting partners for proteins that respond to other organisms. Closer examination of this subnetwork revealed the connectivity between biotic and abiotic hormone stress pathways. We believe PiZeaM will provide a useful tool for the prediction of protein function and analysis of pathways for Z. mays researchers and is presented in this paper as a reference tool for the exploration of protein interactions in maize.

  10. Methods for simultaneously identifying coherent local clusters with smooth global patterns in gene expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yun-Shien

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hierarchical clustering tree (HCT with a dendrogram 1 and the singular value decomposition (SVD with a dimension-reduced representative map 2 are popular methods for two-way sorting the gene-by-array matrix map employed in gene expression profiling. While HCT dendrograms tend to optimize local coherent clustering patterns, SVD leading eigenvectors usually identify better global grouping and transitional structures. Results This study proposes a flipping mechanism for a conventional agglomerative HCT using a rank-two ellipse (R2E, an improved SVD algorithm for sorting purpose seriation by Chen 3 as an external reference. While HCTs always produce permutations with good local behaviour, the rank-two ellipse seriation gives the best global grouping patterns and smooth transitional trends. The resulting algorithm automatically integrates the desirable properties of each method so that users have access to a clustering and visualization environment for gene expression profiles that preserves coherent local clusters and identifies global grouping trends. Conclusion We demonstrate, through four examples, that the proposed method not only possesses better numerical and statistical properties, it also provides more meaningful biomedical insights than other sorting algorithms. We suggest that sorted proximity matrices for genes and arrays, in addition to the gene-by-array expression matrix, can greatly aid in the search for comprehensive understanding of gene expression structures. Software for the proposed methods can be obtained at http://gap.stat.sinica.edu.tw/Software/GAP.

  11. Use of patch testing for identifying allergen causing chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Ashimav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this present study was to evaluate the role of patch testing for the etiological diagnosis of chronic urticaria (CU by using the Indian standard battery of patch test allergens approved by Contact and Occupational Dermatitis Forum of India (CODFI. Methods: A total of 57 cases with chronic urticaria were tested with the Indian standard battery of allergens. All those cases that showed allergy to patch test allergens were advised to avoid contact with the allergen(s to whom they had allergy; they were also advised to avoid/restrict allergens in the diet. This avoidance/restriction was advised for a period of six weeks. During this period, clinical improvement of each patient was evaluated and recorded at weekly intervals. Results: Out of the 57 cases of CU, 11 patients showed positive reactions to one or more patch test allergens. Nine out of eleven showed complete disappearance of CU by 2-3 weeks on avoidance of the allergen and this improvement continued till the end of six weeks. The remaining two cases showed partial recovery from CU during the same period. Conclusion: Patch testing is a safe, simple and inexpensive alternative that can be used for the etiological diagnosis of chronic urticaria before undertaking expensive investigations.

  12. Performance testing to identify climate-ready trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.Gregory McPherson; Alison M. Berry; Natalie S. van Doorn

    2018-01-01

    Urban forests produce ecosystem services that can benefit city dwellers, but are especially vulnerable to climate change stressors such as heat, drought, extreme winds and pests. Tree selection is an important decision point for managers wanting to transition to a more stable and resilient urban forest structure. This study describes a five-step process to identify and...

  13. A data-driven approach to identify controls on global fire activity from satellite and climate observations (SOFIA V1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, Matthias; Dorigo, Wouter; Lasslop, Gitta; Teubner, Irene; Chuvieco, Emilio; Thonicke, Kirsten

    2017-12-01

    Vegetation fires affect human infrastructures, ecosystems, global vegetation distribution, and atmospheric composition. However, the climatic, environmental, and socioeconomic factors that control global fire activity in vegetation are only poorly understood, and in various complexities and formulations are represented in global process-oriented vegetation-fire models. Data-driven model approaches such as machine learning algorithms have successfully been used to identify and better understand controlling factors for fire activity. However, such machine learning models cannot be easily adapted or even implemented within process-oriented global vegetation-fire models. To overcome this gap between machine learning-based approaches and process-oriented global fire models, we introduce a new flexible data-driven fire modelling approach here (Satellite Observations to predict FIre Activity, SOFIA approach version 1). SOFIA models can use several predictor variables and functional relationships to estimate burned area that can be easily adapted with more complex process-oriented vegetation-fire models. We created an ensemble of SOFIA models to test the importance of several predictor variables. SOFIA models result in the highest performance in predicting burned area if they account for a direct restriction of fire activity under wet conditions and if they include a land cover-dependent restriction or allowance of fire activity by vegetation density and biomass. The use of vegetation optical depth data from microwave satellite observations, a proxy for vegetation biomass and water content, reaches higher model performance than commonly used vegetation variables from optical sensors. We further analyse spatial patterns of the sensitivity between anthropogenic, climate, and vegetation predictor variables and burned area. We finally discuss how multiple observational datasets on climate, hydrological, vegetation, and socioeconomic variables together with data

  14. A data-driven approach to identify controls on global fire activity from satellite and climate observations (SOFIA V1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Forkel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation fires affect human infrastructures, ecosystems, global vegetation distribution, and atmospheric composition. However, the climatic, environmental, and socioeconomic factors that control global fire activity in vegetation are only poorly understood, and in various complexities and formulations are represented in global process-oriented vegetation-fire models. Data-driven model approaches such as machine learning algorithms have successfully been used to identify and better understand controlling factors for fire activity. However, such machine learning models cannot be easily adapted or even implemented within process-oriented global vegetation-fire models. To overcome this gap between machine learning-based approaches and process-oriented global fire models, we introduce a new flexible data-driven fire modelling approach here (Satellite Observations to predict FIre Activity, SOFIA approach version 1. SOFIA models can use several predictor variables and functional relationships to estimate burned area that can be easily adapted with more complex process-oriented vegetation-fire models. We created an ensemble of SOFIA models to test the importance of several predictor variables. SOFIA models result in the highest performance in predicting burned area if they account for a direct restriction of fire activity under wet conditions and if they include a land cover-dependent restriction or allowance of fire activity by vegetation density and biomass. The use of vegetation optical depth data from microwave satellite observations, a proxy for vegetation biomass and water content, reaches higher model performance than commonly used vegetation variables from optical sensors. We further analyse spatial patterns of the sensitivity between anthropogenic, climate, and vegetation predictor variables and burned area. We finally discuss how multiple observational datasets on climate, hydrological, vegetation, and socioeconomic variables together with

  15. Cheap and Nasty? The Potential Perils of Using Management Costs to Identify Global Conservation Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreless, Erin; Visconti, Piero; Carwardine, Josie; Wilcox, Chris; Smith, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The financial cost of biodiversity conservation varies widely around the world and such costs should be considered when identifying countries to best focus conservation investments. Previous global prioritizations have been based on global models for protected area management costs, but this metric may be related to other factors that negatively influence the effectiveness and social impacts of conservation. Here we investigate such relationships and first show that countries with low predicted costs are less politically stable. Local support and capacity can mitigate the impacts of such instability, but we also found that these countries have less civil society involvement in conservation. Therefore, externally funded projects in these countries must rely on government agencies for implementation. This can be problematic, as our analyses show that governments in countries with low predicted costs score poorly on indices of corruption, bureaucratic quality and human rights. Taken together, our results demonstrate that using national-level estimates for protected area management costs to set global conservation priorities is simplistic, as projects in apparently low-cost countries are less likely to succeed and more likely to have negative impacts on people. We identify the need for an improved approach to develop global conservation cost metrics that better capture the true costs of avoiding or overcoming such problems. Critically, conservation scientists must engage with practitioners to better understand and implement context-specific solutions. This approach assumes that measures of conservation costs, like measures of conservation value, are organization specific, and would bring a much-needed focus on reducing the negative impacts of conservation to develop projects that benefit people and biodiversity. PMID:24260502

  16. Cheap and nasty? The potential perils of using management costs to identify global conservation priorities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin McCreless

    Full Text Available The financial cost of biodiversity conservation varies widely around the world and such costs should be considered when identifying countries to best focus conservation investments. Previous global prioritizations have been based on global models for protected area management costs, but this metric may be related to other factors that negatively influence the effectiveness and social impacts of conservation. Here we investigate such relationships and first show that countries with low predicted costs are less politically stable. Local support and capacity can mitigate the impacts of such instability, but we also found that these countries have less civil society involvement in conservation. Therefore, externally funded projects in these countries must rely on government agencies for implementation. This can be problematic, as our analyses show that governments in countries with low predicted costs score poorly on indices of corruption, bureaucratic quality and human rights. Taken together, our results demonstrate that using national-level estimates for protected area management costs to set global conservation priorities is simplistic, as projects in apparently low-cost countries are less likely to succeed and more likely to have negative impacts on people. We identify the need for an improved approach to develop global conservation cost metrics that better capture the true costs of avoiding or overcoming such problems. Critically, conservation scientists must engage with practitioners to better understand and implement context-specific solutions. This approach assumes that measures of conservation costs, like measures of conservation value, are organization specific, and would bring a much-needed focus on reducing the negative impacts of conservation to develop projects that benefit people and biodiversity.

  17. Cheap and nasty? The potential perils of using management costs to identify global conservation priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreless, Erin; Visconti, Piero; Carwardine, Josie; Wilcox, Chris; Smith, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The financial cost of biodiversity conservation varies widely around the world and such costs should be considered when identifying countries to best focus conservation investments. Previous global prioritizations have been based on global models for protected area management costs, but this metric may be related to other factors that negatively influence the effectiveness and social impacts of conservation. Here we investigate such relationships and first show that countries with low predicted costs are less politically stable. Local support and capacity can mitigate the impacts of such instability, but we also found that these countries have less civil society involvement in conservation. Therefore, externally funded projects in these countries must rely on government agencies for implementation. This can be problematic, as our analyses show that governments in countries with low predicted costs score poorly on indices of corruption, bureaucratic quality and human rights. Taken together, our results demonstrate that using national-level estimates for protected area management costs to set global conservation priorities is simplistic, as projects in apparently low-cost countries are less likely to succeed and more likely to have negative impacts on people. We identify the need for an improved approach to develop global conservation cost metrics that better capture the true costs of avoiding or overcoming such problems. Critically, conservation scientists must engage with practitioners to better understand and implement context-specific solutions. This approach assumes that measures of conservation costs, like measures of conservation value, are organization specific, and would bring a much-needed focus on reducing the negative impacts of conservation to develop projects that benefit people and biodiversity.

  18. Principal curves for identifying outsiders in experimental tests with calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Da Silva, P V M

    2003-01-01

    Principal curves are used for particle discrimination. They are developed for application in calibration tests of the hadronic calorimeter (Tilecal) of the ATLAS detector. Defining principal curves for electrons, pions and muons, a discrimination efficiency better than 92.4% can be achieved, even when high particle contamination is observed in the experimental data sets.

  19. Testing of Candidate Icons to Identify Acetaminophen-Containing Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Saul; Cotton, Helene; Jessurun, Christina; Sembower, Mark A; Pype, Steve; Phillips, Jerry

    2016-01-27

    Adding icons on labels of acetaminophen-containing medicines could help users identify the active ingredient and avoid concomitant use of multiple medicines containing acetaminophen. We evaluated five icons for communication effectiveness. Adults ( n = 300) were randomized to view a prescription container label or over-the-counter labels with either one or two icons. Participants saw two icon candidates, and reported their interpretation; experts judged whether these reflected critical confusions that might cause harm. Participants rated how effectively each icon communicated key messages. Icons based on abbreviations of "acetaminophen" ("Ac", "Ace", "Acm") were rated less confusing and more effective in communicating the active ingredient than icons based on "APAP" or an abstract symbol. Icons did not result in critical confusion when seen on a readable medicine label. Icon implementation on prescription labels was more effective at communicating the warning against concomitant use than implementation on over-the-counter (OTC) labels. Adding an icon to a second location on OTC labels did not consistently enhance this communication, but reduced rated effectiveness of acetaminophen ingredient communication among participants with limited health literacy. The abbreviation-based icons seem most suitable for labeling acetaminophen-containing medications to enable users to identify acetaminophen-containing products.

  20. Testing of Candidate Icons to Identify Acetaminophen-Containing Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Shiffman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adding icons on labels of acetaminophen-containing medicines could help users identify the active ingredient and avoid concomitant use of multiple medicines containing acetaminophen. We evaluated five icons for communication effectiveness. Adults (n = 300 were randomized to view a prescription container label or over-the-counter labels with either one or two icons. Participants saw two icon candidates, and reported their interpretation; experts judged whether these reflected critical confusions that might cause harm. Participants rated how effectively each icon communicated key messages. Icons based on abbreviations of “acetaminophen” (“Ac”, “Ace”, “Acm” were rated less confusing and more effective in communicating the active ingredient than icons based on “APAP” or an abstract symbol. Icons did not result in critical confusion when seen on a readable medicine label. Icon implementation on prescription labels was more effective at communicating the warning against concomitant use than implementation on over-the-counter (OTC labels. Adding an icon to a second location on OTC labels did not consistently enhance this communication, but reduced rated effectiveness of acetaminophen ingredient communication among participants with limited health literacy. The abbreviation-based icons seem most suitable for labeling acetaminophen-containing medications to enable users to identify acetaminophen-containing products.

  1. Winter color polymorphisms identify global hot spots for evolutionary rescue from climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, L Scott; Bragina, Eugenia V; Kumar, Alexander V; Zimova, Marketa; Lafferty, Diana J R; Feltner, Jennifer; Davis, Brandon M; Hackländer, Klaus; Alves, Paulo C; Good, Jeffrey M; Melo-Ferreira, José; Dietz, Andreas; Abramov, Alexei V; Lopatina, Natalia; Fay, Kairsten

    2018-03-02

    Maintenance of biodiversity in a rapidly changing climate will depend on the efficacy of evolutionary rescue, whereby population declines due to abrupt environmental change are reversed by shifts in genetically driven adaptive traits. However, a lack of traits known to be under direct selection by anthropogenic climate change has limited the incorporation of evolutionary processes into global conservation efforts. In 21 vertebrate species, some individuals undergo a seasonal color molt from summer brown to winter white as camouflage against snow, whereas other individuals remain brown. Seasonal snow duration is decreasing globally, and fitness is lower for winter white animals on snowless backgrounds. Based on 2713 georeferenced samples of known winter coat color-from eight species across trophic levels-we identify environmentally driven clinal gradients in winter coat color, including polymorphic zones where winter brown and white morphs co-occur. These polymorphic zones, underrepresented by existing global protected area networks, indicate hot spots for evolutionary rescue in a changing climate. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. A SPICE Blind Test to Benchmark Global Tomographic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y.; Capdeville, Y.; Maupin, V.; Montagner, J.

    2006-12-01

    The different existing global tomographic methods result in different models of the Earth. In order to test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and the inadequacy of data quality and coverage, we are undertaking a blind test of global inversion algorithms using complete 3D synthetic seismograms within SPICE (Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network). First, a complex global anisotropic anelastic model has been constructed by summing the 1D reference model, deterministic and random anomalies and anisotropic crystal. This model includes 3D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy and attenuation at different scales in the whole mantle, as well as topography and crustal structure. In addition, the rotation and ellipticity are also included. Synthetic seismograms were generated using the Coupling Spectral Element Method with a minimum period of 32s, for a realistic distribution of 29 events and 256 stations. The synthetic seismograms have been made available to the scientific community worldwide at the IPGP website http://www.ipgp.jussieu.fr/~qyl/. Any group willing to test his tomographic technique is encouraged to download the synthetic dataset.g

  3. Utilization of half-embryo test to identify irradiated beans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mancini-Filho, Jorge [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Delincee, Henry [Federal Research Centre for Nutrition - BFE, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1996-07-01

    Germination tests were carried out in irradiated and non-irradiated bean seeds which allow to observe characteristically variations on the shoots and roots. The methodology used in this work, is based upon biological changes which occur in two Brazilian beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. carioca and Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp, var. macacar, irradiated in a {sup 60} Co source, with doses of 0,0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 kGy. The shoots and roots were observed during 3 days of culturing period under specified conditions. The differences observed in these two varieties were analysed immediately after irradiation and after 6 months of storage period at room temperature. Irradiated half-embryos showed markedly reduced root grow and almost totally retarded shoot elongation. Differences between irradiated and nonirradiated half-embryo could be observed after irradiation when different beans and storage time were varied. The shoots of half-embryos irradiated with more than 2.5 kGy did not undergo any elongation, whereas, the shoots of non-irradiated or those beans irradiated under 1.0 kGy elongated significantly within the 3 day test period. (author)

  4. Utilization of half-embryo test to identify irradiated beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.; Mancini-Filho, Jorge

    1996-01-01

    Germination tests were carried out in irradiated and non-irradiated bean seeds which allow to observe characteristically variations on the shoots and roots. The methodology used in this work, is based upon biological changes which occur in two Brazilian beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. carioca and Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp, var. macacar, irradiated in a 60 Co source, with doses of 0,0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 kGy. The shoots and roots were observed during 3 days of culturing period under specified conditions. The differences observed in these two varieties were analysed immediately after irradiation and after 6 months of storage period at room temperature. Irradiated half-embryos showed markedly reduced root grow and almost totally retarded shoot elongation. Differences between irradiated and nonirradiated half-embryo could be observed after irradiation when different beans and storage time were varied. The shoots of half-embryos irradiated with more than 2.5 kGy did not undergo any elongation, whereas, the shoots of non-irradiated or those beans irradiated under 1.0 kGy elongated significantly within the 3 day test period. (author)

  5. Integrated genomics identifies convergence of ankylosing spondylitis with global immune mediated disease pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammed; Codner, Dianne; Hasan, S M Mahmud; Scherer, Stephen W; O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2015-05-18

    Ankylosing spondylitis(AS), a highly heritable complex inflammatory arthritis. Although, a handful of non-HLA risk loci have been identified, capturing the unexplained genetic contribution to AS pathogenesis remains a challenge attributed to additive, pleiotropic and epistatic-interactions at the molecular level. Here, we developed multiple integrated genomic approaches to quantify molecular convergence of non-HLA loci with global immune mediated diseases. We show that non-HLA genes are significantly sensitive to deleterious mutation accumulation in the general population compared with tolerant genes. Human developmental proteomics (prenatal to adult) analysis revealed that proteins encoded by non-HLA AS risk loci are 2-fold more expressed in adult hematopoietic cells.Enrichment analysis revealed AS risk genes overlap with a significant number of immune related pathways (p pathways with other immune mediated diseases. This information will be pivotal to fully explain AS pathogenesis and identify new therapeutic targets.

  6. Global Ocean Forecast System 3.1 Validation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-04

    Ocean Forecast System 3.1 Validation Testing E. JosEph MEtzgEr robErt W. hElbEr patrick J. hogan paMEla g. posEy prasad g. thoppil taMara l...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Global Ocean Forecast System 3.1 Validation Test E. Joseph Metzger, Robert W. Helber, Patrick J. Hogan, Pamela G. Posey, Prasad G...26.3 8 Sea of Okhotsk 18.9 21.9 14 Bering/Chukchi/Beaufort Seas 21.1 25.5 17 Canadian Archipelago 23.8 24.0 1 “ Wins ” 6 0 Table 1: Mean 24-hour

  7. A multiplex PCR mini-barcode assay to identify processed shark products in the global trade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Cardeñosa

    Full Text Available Protecting sharks from overexploitation has become global priority after widespread population declines have occurred. Tracking catches and trade on a species-specific basis has proven challenging, in part due to difficulties in identifying processed shark products such as fins, meat, and liver oil. This has hindered efforts to implement regulations aimed at promoting sustainable use of commercially important species and protection of imperiled species. Genetic approaches to identify shark products exist but are typically based on sequencing or amplifying large DNA regions and may fail to work on heavily processed products in which DNA is degraded. Here, we describe a novel multiplex PCR mini-barcode assay based on two short fragments of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI gene. This assay can identify to species all sharks currently listed on the Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES and most shark species present in the international trade. It achieves species diagnosis based on a single PCR and one to two downstream DNA sequencing reactions. The assay is capable of identifying highly processed shark products including fins, cooked shark fin soup, and skin-care products containing liver oil. This is a straightforward and reliable identification method for data collection and enforcement of regulations implemented for certain species at all governance levels.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of the Amontons-Coulomb's Model using Local and Global Friction Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Menezes, L. F.; Ramalho, A.; Alves, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the abundant number of experimental friction tests that have been reported, the contact with friction modeling persists to be one of the factors that determine the effectiveness of sheet metal forming simulation. This difficulty can be understood due to the nature of the friction phenomena, which comprises the interaction of different factors connected to both sheet and tools' surfaces. Although in finite element numerical simulations friction models are commonly applied at the local level, they normally rely on parameters identified based on global experimental tests results. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the Amontons-Coulomb's friction coefficient identified using complementary tests: (i) load-scanning, at the local level and (ii) draw-bead, at the global level; to the numerical simulation of sheet metal forming processes.

  9. Identifying Priority Areas for Conservation: A Global Assessment for Forest-Dependent Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Graeme M.; Donald, Paul F.; Butchart, Stuart H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Limited resources are available to address the world's growing environmental problems, requiring conservationists to identify priority sites for action. Using new distribution maps for all of the world's forest-dependent birds (60.6% of all bird species), we quantify the contribution of remaining forest to conserving global avian biodiversity. For each of the world's partly or wholly forested 5-km cells, we estimated an impact score of its contribution to the distribution of all the forest bird species estimated to occur within it, and so is proportional to the impact on the conservation status of the world's forest-dependent birds were the forest it contains lost. The distribution of scores was highly skewed, a very small proportion of cells having scores several orders of magnitude above the global mean. Ecoregions containing the highest values of this score included relatively species-poor islands such as Hawaii and Palau, the relatively species-rich islands of Indonesia and the Philippines, and the megadiverse Atlantic Forests and northern Andes of South America. Ecoregions with high impact scores and high deforestation rates (2000–2005) included montane forests in Cameroon and the Eastern Arc of Tanzania, although deforestation data were not available for all ecoregions. Ecoregions with high impact scores, high rates of recent deforestation and low coverage by the protected area network included Indonesia's Seram rain forests and the moist forests of Trinidad and Tobago. Key sites in these ecoregions represent some of the most urgent priorities for expansion of the global protected areas network to meet Convention on Biological Diversity targets to increase the proportion of land formally protected to 17% by 2020. Areas with high impact scores, rapid deforestation, low protection and high carbon storage values may represent significant opportunities for both biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation, for example through Reducing Emissions from

  10. Identifying priority areas for conservation: a global assessment for forest-dependent birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme M Buchanan

    Full Text Available Limited resources are available to address the world's growing environmental problems, requiring conservationists to identify priority sites for action. Using new distribution maps for all of the world's forest-dependent birds (60.6% of all bird species, we quantify the contribution of remaining forest to conserving global avian biodiversity. For each of the world's partly or wholly forested 5-km cells, we estimated an impact score of its contribution to the distribution of all the forest bird species estimated to occur within it, and so is proportional to the impact on the conservation status of the world's forest-dependent birds were the forest it contains lost. The distribution of scores was highly skewed, a very small proportion of cells having scores several orders of magnitude above the global mean. Ecoregions containing the highest values of this score included relatively species-poor islands such as Hawaii and Palau, the relatively species-rich islands of Indonesia and the Philippines, and the megadiverse Atlantic Forests and northern Andes of South America. Ecoregions with high impact scores and high deforestation rates (2000-2005 included montane forests in Cameroon and the Eastern Arc of Tanzania, although deforestation data were not available for all ecoregions. Ecoregions with high impact scores, high rates of recent deforestation and low coverage by the protected area network included Indonesia's Seram rain forests and the moist forests of Trinidad and Tobago. Key sites in these ecoregions represent some of the most urgent priorities for expansion of the global protected areas network to meet Convention on Biological Diversity targets to increase the proportion of land formally protected to 17% by 2020. Areas with high impact scores, rapid deforestation, low protection and high carbon storage values may represent significant opportunities for both biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation, for example through Reducing

  11. Identifying priority areas for conservation: a global assessment for forest-dependent birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Graeme M; Donald, Paul F; Butchart, Stuart H M

    2011-01-01

    Limited resources are available to address the world's growing environmental problems, requiring conservationists to identify priority sites for action. Using new distribution maps for all of the world's forest-dependent birds (60.6% of all bird species), we quantify the contribution of remaining forest to conserving global avian biodiversity. For each of the world's partly or wholly forested 5-km cells, we estimated an impact score of its contribution to the distribution of all the forest bird species estimated to occur within it, and so is proportional to the impact on the conservation status of the world's forest-dependent birds were the forest it contains lost. The distribution of scores was highly skewed, a very small proportion of cells having scores several orders of magnitude above the global mean. Ecoregions containing the highest values of this score included relatively species-poor islands such as Hawaii and Palau, the relatively species-rich islands of Indonesia and the Philippines, and the megadiverse Atlantic Forests and northern Andes of South America. Ecoregions with high impact scores and high deforestation rates (2000-2005) included montane forests in Cameroon and the Eastern Arc of Tanzania, although deforestation data were not available for all ecoregions. Ecoregions with high impact scores, high rates of recent deforestation and low coverage by the protected area network included Indonesia's Seram rain forests and the moist forests of Trinidad and Tobago. Key sites in these ecoregions represent some of the most urgent priorities for expansion of the global protected areas network to meet Convention on Biological Diversity targets to increase the proportion of land formally protected to 17% by 2020. Areas with high impact scores, rapid deforestation, low protection and high carbon storage values may represent significant opportunities for both biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation, for example through Reducing Emissions from

  12. Ask an anatomist: Identifying global trends, topics and themes of academic anatomists using twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, Madeleine J; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2017-10-04

    Social media (SoMe) is increasingly used in higher education (HE) to access knowledge and enable global communication. The SoMe platform Twitter ® is particularly beneficial in these contexts because it is readily accessible, easily searchable (via hashtags) and global. Given these advantages, the twitter platform @AskAnatomist was created to foster a global weekly tweet chat, where students and academics can ask and address anatomy-related questions. The aim of this study was to identify themes arising in the early stages of the @AskAnatomy Twitter community to gain insights into current needs/key areas for academic anatomists, students, and other followers. A qualitative analysis of tweets including the hashtag #AnatQ, (the associated @AskAnatomist hashtag), was undertaken to achieve this aim. Thematic analysis revealed three core themes arising in the formative stages of the @AskAnatomist Twitter site: (1) anatomical education modalities, (2) specific anatomy content, and (3) research motivations. These themes reveal controversies within the field of anatomical sciences, areas for potential education resource improvement and research, as well as the humor of anatomists. Though the original intent of the @AskAnatomist site was to engage the general public in anatomy content and knowledge, tweet analysis suggests that academic anatomists were the primary active "tweeters". Interestingly, this analysis reveals that the @AskAnatomist site progressed into a web-based community of practice (CoP), suggesting an additional benefit of SoMe communities in the field of anatomy. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  13. Global analysis of p53-regulated transcription identifies its direct targets and unexpected regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mary Ann; Andrysik, Zdenek; Dengler, Veronica L; Mellert, Hestia S; Guarnieri, Anna; Freeman, Justin A; Sullivan, Kelly D; Galbraith, Matthew D; Luo, Xin; Kraus, W Lee; Dowell, Robin D; Espinosa, Joaquin M

    2014-05-27

    The p53 transcription factor is a potent suppressor of tumor growth. We report here an analysis of its direct transcriptional program using Global Run-On sequencing (GRO-seq). Shortly after MDM2 inhibition by Nutlin-3, low levels of p53 rapidly activate ∼200 genes, most of them not previously established as direct targets. This immediate response involves all canonical p53 effector pathways, including apoptosis. Comparative global analysis of RNA synthesis vs steady state levels revealed that microarray profiling fails to identify low abundance transcripts directly activated by p53. Interestingly, p53 represses a subset of its activation targets before MDM2 inhibition. GRO-seq uncovered a plethora of gene-specific regulatory features affecting key survival and apoptotic genes within the p53 network. p53 regulates hundreds of enhancer-derived RNAs. Strikingly, direct p53 targets harbor pre-activated enhancers highly transcribed in p53 null cells. Altogether, these results enable the study of many uncharacterized p53 target genes and unexpected regulatory mechanisms.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02200.001. Copyright © 2014, Allen et al.

  14. Identifying species at extinction risk using global models of anthropogenic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Howard; O'Leary, Bethan C; Hawkins, Julie P; Roberts, Callum M

    2015-02-01

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Endangered Species employs a robust, standardized approach to assess extinction threat focussed on taxa approaching an end-point in population decline. Used alone, we argue this enforces a reactive approach to conservation. Species not assessed as threatened but which occur predominantly in areas with high levels of anthropogenic impact may require proactive conservation management to prevent loss. We matched distribution and bathymetric range data from the global Red List assessment of 632 species of marine cone snails with human impacts and projected ocean thermal stress and aragonite saturation (a proxy for ocean acidification). Our results show 67 species categorized as 'Least Concern' have 70% or more of their occupancy in places subject to high and very high levels of human impact with 18 highly restricted species (range human impact, declining aragonite saturation levels and elevated thermal stress. Our approach reinforces Red List threatened status, highlights candidate species for reassessment, contributes important evidential data to minimize data deficiency and identifies regions and species for proactive conservation. © 2014 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Pathfinder Technology Demonstrator: GlobalStar Testing and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Vanessa; Limes, Gregory L.; Han, Shi Lei; Hanson, John Eric; Christa, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    The communications subsystem of a spacecraft is typically a SWaP (size, weight, and power) intensive subsystem in a SWaP constrained environment such as a CubeSat. Use of a satellite-based communication system, such as GlobalStars duplex GSP-1720 radio is a low SWaP potentially game-changing low-cost communication subsystem solution that was evaluated for feasibility for the NASA Pathfinder Technology Demonstrator (PTD) project. The PTD project is a series of 6U CubeSat missions to flight demonstrate and characterize novel small satellite payloads in low Earth orbit. GlobalStar is a low Earth orbit satellite constellation for satellite phone and low-speed data communications, and the GSP-1720 is their single board duplex radio most commonly used in satellite phones and shipment tracking devices. The PTD project tested the GSP-1720 to characterize its viability for flight using NASA GEVS (General Environmental Verification Standard) vibration and thermal vacuum levels, as well as testing the uplink-downlink connectivity, data throughput, and file transfer capabilities. This presentation will present the results of the environmental and capability testing of the GSP-1720 performed at NASA Ames Research Center, as well as the viability for CubeSat use in LEO.

  16. Global hemostasis testing thromboelastography: old technology, new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alice; Teruya, Jun

    2009-06-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) as a method of assessing global hemostatic and fibrinolytic function has existed for more than 60 years. Improvements in TEG technology have led to increased reliability and thus increased usage. The TEG has been used primarily in the settings of liver transplant and cardiac surgery, with proven utility for monitoring hemostatic and fibrinolytic derangements. In recent years, indications for TEG testing have expanded to include managing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy, assessing bleeding of unclear etiology, and assessing hypercoagulable states. In addition, TEG platelet mapping has been utilized to monitor antiplatelet therapy. Correlation between TEG platelet mapping and other platelet function tests such as the PFA-100 or platelet aggregation studies, however, has not been evaluated fully for clinical outcomes, and results may not be comparable. In general, the advantages of the TEG include evaluation of global hemostatic function using whole blood, a quick turn-around-time, the possibility of both point-of-care-testing and performance in central laboratories, the ability to detect hyperfibrinolysis, monitoring therapy with recombinant activated factor VII, and detection of low factor XIII activity. Potential applications include polycythemia and dysfibrinogenemia. Disadvantages of TEG include a relatively high coefficient of variation, poorly standardized methodologies, and limitations on specimen stability of native whole blood samples. In the pediatric setting, an additional advantage of the TEG is a relatively small sample volume, but a disadvantage is the difference in normal ranges between infants, especially newborns, and adults. In summary, TEG is an old concept with new applications that may provide a unique perspective on global hemostasis in various clinical settings.

  17. Humane Society International's global campaign to end animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidle, Troy

    2013-12-01

    The Research & Toxicology Department of Humane Society International (HSI) operates a multifaceted and science-driven global programme aimed at ending the use of animals in toxicity testing and research. The key strategic objectives include: a) ending cosmetics animal testing worldwide, via the multinational Be Cruelty-Free campaign; b) achieving near-term reductions in animal testing requirements through revision of product sector regulations; and c) advancing humane science by exposing failing animal models of human disease and shifting science funding toward human biology-based research and testing tools fit for the 21st century. HSI was instrumental in ensuring the implementation of the March 2013 European sales ban for newly animal-tested cosmetics, in achieving the June 2013 cosmetics animal testing ban in India as well as major cosmetics regulatory policy shifts in China and South Korea, and in securing precedent-setting reductions in in vivo data requirements for pesticides in the EU through the revision of biocides and plant protection product regulations, among others. HSI is currently working to export these life-saving measures to more than a dozen industrial and emerging economies. 2013 FRAME.

  18. Identifying novel targets of oncogenic EGF receptor signaling in lung cancer through global phosphoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Belkina, Natalya; Jacob, Harrys Kishore Charles; Maity, Tapan; Biswas, Romi; Venugopalan, Abhilash; Shaw, Patrick G; Kim, Min-Sik; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Pandey, Akhilesh; Guha, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain occur in 10-30% of lung adenocarcinoma and are associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sensitivity. We sought to identify the immediate direct and indirect phosphorylation targets of mutant EGFRs in lung adenocarcinoma. We undertook SILAC strategy, phosphopeptide enrichment, and quantitative MS to identify dynamic changes of phosphorylation downstream of mutant EGFRs in lung adenocarcinoma cells harboring EGFR(L858R) and EGFR(L858R/T790M) , the TKI-sensitive, and TKI-resistant mutations, respectively. Top canonical pathways that were inhibited upon erlotinib treatment in sensitive cells, but not in the resistant cells include EGFR, insulin receptor, hepatocyte growth factor, mitogen-activated protein kinase, mechanistic target of rapamycin, ribosomal protein S6 kinase beta 1, and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling. We identified phosphosites in proteins of the autophagy network, such as ULK1 (S623) that is constitutively phosphorylated in these lung adenocarcinoma cells; phosphorylation is inhibited upon erlotinib treatment in sensitive cells, but not in resistant cells. Finally, kinase-substrate prediction analysis from our data indicated that substrates of basophilic kinases from, AGC and Calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinase groups, as well as STE group kinases were significantly enriched and those of proline-directed kinases from, CMGC and Casein kinase groups were significantly depleted among substrates that exhibited increased phosphorylation upon EGF stimulation and reduced phosphorylation upon TKI inhibition. This is the first study to date to examine global phosphorylation changes upon erlotinib treatment of lung adenocarcinoma cells and results from this study provide new insights into signaling downstream of mutant EGFRs in lung adenocarcinoma. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001101 (http

  19. Identifying the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles in nonlinear kinetic metabolic models via multiobjective global optimization and Pareto filters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Pozo

    Full Text Available Optimization models in metabolic engineering and systems biology focus typically on optimizing a unique criterion, usually the synthesis rate of a metabolite of interest or the rate of growth. Connectivity and non-linear regulatory effects, however, make it necessary to consider multiple objectives in order to identify useful strategies that balance out different metabolic issues. This is a fundamental aspect, as optimization of maximum yield in a given condition may involve unrealistic values in other key processes. Due to the difficulties associated with detailed non-linear models, analysis using stoichiometric descriptions and linear optimization methods have become rather popular in systems biology. However, despite being useful, these approaches fail in capturing the intrinsic nonlinear nature of the underlying metabolic systems and the regulatory signals involved. Targeting more complex biological systems requires the application of global optimization methods to non-linear representations. In this work we address the multi-objective global optimization of metabolic networks that are described by a special class of models based on the power-law formalism: the generalized mass action (GMA representation. Our goal is to develop global optimization methods capable of efficiently dealing with several biological criteria simultaneously. In order to overcome the numerical difficulties of dealing with multiple criteria in the optimization, we propose a heuristic approach based on the epsilon constraint method that reduces the computational burden of generating a set of Pareto optimal alternatives, each achieving a unique combination of objectives values. To facilitate the post-optimal analysis of these solutions and narrow down their number prior to being tested in the laboratory, we explore the use of Pareto filters that identify the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by means of a case study

  20. Identifying the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles in nonlinear kinetic metabolic models via multiobjective global optimization and Pareto filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Carlos; Guillén-Gosálbez, Gonzalo; Sorribas, Albert; Jiménez, Laureano

    2012-01-01

    Optimization models in metabolic engineering and systems biology focus typically on optimizing a unique criterion, usually the synthesis rate of a metabolite of interest or the rate of growth. Connectivity and non-linear regulatory effects, however, make it necessary to consider multiple objectives in order to identify useful strategies that balance out different metabolic issues. This is a fundamental aspect, as optimization of maximum yield in a given condition may involve unrealistic values in other key processes. Due to the difficulties associated with detailed non-linear models, analysis using stoichiometric descriptions and linear optimization methods have become rather popular in systems biology. However, despite being useful, these approaches fail in capturing the intrinsic nonlinear nature of the underlying metabolic systems and the regulatory signals involved. Targeting more complex biological systems requires the application of global optimization methods to non-linear representations. In this work we address the multi-objective global optimization of metabolic networks that are described by a special class of models based on the power-law formalism: the generalized mass action (GMA) representation. Our goal is to develop global optimization methods capable of efficiently dealing with several biological criteria simultaneously. In order to overcome the numerical difficulties of dealing with multiple criteria in the optimization, we propose a heuristic approach based on the epsilon constraint method that reduces the computational burden of generating a set of Pareto optimal alternatives, each achieving a unique combination of objectives values. To facilitate the post-optimal analysis of these solutions and narrow down their number prior to being tested in the laboratory, we explore the use of Pareto filters that identify the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by means of a case study that optimizes the

  1. Testing the woman abuse screening tool to identify intimate partner violence in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Livia; Braun, Kathryn L; Katz, Alan R

    2015-04-01

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a global public health problem. IPV prevalence in Indonesia has been estimated to be less than 1%, based on reported cases. It is likely that IPV prevalence is underreported in Indonesia, as it is in many other countries. Screening for IPV has been found to increase IPV identification, but no screening tools are in use in Indonesia. The aim of this study was to test the translated Woman Abuse Screening Tool (WAST) for detecting IPV in Indonesia. The WAST was tested against a diagnostic interview by a trained psychologist on 240 women attending two Primary Health Centers in Jakarta. IPV prevalence and the reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of the WAST were estimated. Prevalence of IPV by diagnostic interview was 36.3%, much higher than published estimates. The most common forms of IPV identified were psychological (85%) and physical abuse (24%). Internal reliability of the WAST was high (α = .801). A WAST score of 13 (out of 24) is the recommended cutoff for identifying IPV, but only 17% of the Indonesian sample scored 13 or higher. Test sensitivity of the WAST with a cutoff score of 13 was only 41.9%, with a specificity of 96.8%. With a cutoff score of 10, the sensitivity improved to 84.9%, while the specificity decreased to 61.0%. Use of the WAST with a cutoff score of 10 provides good sensitivity and reasonable specificity and would provide a much-needed screening tool for use in Indonesia. Although a lower cutoff would yield a greater proportion of false positives, most of the true cases would be identified, increasing the possibility that women experiencing abuse would receive needed assistance. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Identifying Key Proteins in Hg Methylation Pathways of Desulfovibrio by Global Proteomics, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, Anne O. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology; Miller, Susan M. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Chemistry; Wall, Judy [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-18

    Elemental mercury, Hg(0) is a contaminant at many DOE sites, especially at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where the spread of spilled Hg and its effects on microbial populations have been monitored for decades. To explore the microbial interactions with Hg, we have devised a global proteomic approach capable of directly detecting Hg-adducts of proteins. This technique developed in the facultative anaerobe, Escherichia coli, allows us to identify the proteins most vulnerable to acute exposure to organomercurials phenyl- and ethyl-mercury (as surrogates for the highly neurotoxic methyl-Hg) (Polacco, et al, 2011). We have found >300 such proteins in all metabolic functional groups and cellular compartments; most are highly conserved and can serve as markers for acute Hg exposure (Zink, et al. 2016, in preparation). We have also discovered that acute Hg exposure severely disrupts thiol, iron and redox homeostases, and electrolyte balance (LaVoie, et al., 2015) Thus, we proposed to bring these techniques to bear on the central problem of identifying the cellular proteins involved in bacterial uptake and methylation of mercury and its release from the cell.

  3. Seasonal range test run with Global Eta Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Latinović

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Global Eta Framework (GEF is a global atmospheric model developed in general curvilinear coordinates and capable of running on arbitrary rectangular quasi-uniform spherical grids, using stepwise (Eta representation of the terrain. In this study, the model is run on a cubed-sphere grid topology, in a version with uniform Jacobians (UJ, which provides equal-area grid cells, and a smooth transition of coordinate lines across the edges of the cubed-sphere. Within a project at the Brazilian Center for Weather Forecasts and Climate Studies (CPTEC, a nonhydrostatic version of this model is under development and will be applied for seasonal prediction studies. This note describes preliminary tests with the GEF on the UJ cubed-sphere in which model performance is evaluated in seasonal simulations at a horizontal resolution of approximately 25 km, running in the hydrostatic mode. Comparison of these simulations with the ERA-Interim reanalyses shows that the 850 hPa temperature is underestimated, while precipitation pattern is mostly underestimated in tropical continental regions and overestimated in tropical oceanic regions. Nevertheless, the model is still able to well capture the main seasonal climate characteristics. These results will be used as a control run in further tests with the nonhydrostatic version of the model.

  4. Novel Host Proteins and Signaling Pathways in Enteropathogenic E. coli Pathogenesis Identified by Global Phosphoproteome Analysis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Scott, Nichollas E.; Trimble, William S.; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to directly translocate effector proteins into host cells where they play a pivotal role in subverting host cell signaling needed for disease. However, our knowledge of how EPEC affects host protein phosphorylation is limited to a few individual protein studies. We employed a quantitative proteomics approach to globally map alterations in the host phosphoproteome during EPEC infection. By characterizing host phosphorylation events at various time points throughout infection, we examined how EPEC dynamically impacts the host phosphoproteome over time. This experimental setup also enabled identification of T3SS-dependent and -independent changes in host phosphorylation. Specifically, T3SS-regulated events affected various cellular processes that are known EPEC targets, including cytoskeletal organization, immune signaling, and intracellular trafficking. However, the involvement of phosphorylation in these events has thus far been poorly studied. We confirmed the MAPK family as an established key host player, showed its central role in signal transduction during EPEC infection, and extended the repertoire of known signaling hubs with previously unrecognized proteins, including TPD52, CIN85, EPHA2, and HSP27. We identified altered phosphorylation of known EPEC targets, such as cofilin, where the involvement of phosphorylation has so far been undefined, thus providing novel mechanistic insights into the roles of these proteins in EPEC infection. An overlap of regulated proteins, especially those that are cytoskeleton-associated, was observed when compared with the phosphoproteome of Shigella-infected cells. We determined the biological relevance of the phosphorylation of a novel protein in EPEC pathogenesis, septin-9 (SEPT9). Both siRNA knockdown and a phosphorylation-impaired SEPT9 mutant decreased bacterial adherence and EPEC-mediated cell death. In contrast, a phosphorylation

  5. Global Fitness Profiling Identifies Arsenic and Cadmium Tolerance Mechanisms in Fission Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Guo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals and metalloids such as cadmium [Cd(II] and arsenic [As(III] are widespread environmental toxicants responsible for multiple adverse health effects in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying metal-induced cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis, as well as the detoxification and tolerance pathways, are incompletely understood. Here, we use global fitness profiling by barcode sequencing to quantitatively survey the Schizosaccharomyces pombe haploid deletome for genes that confer tolerance of cadmium or arsenic. We identified 106 genes required for cadmium resistance and 110 genes required for arsenic resistance, with a highly significant overlap of 36 genes. A subset of these 36 genes account for almost all proteins required for incorporating sulfur into the cysteine-rich glutathione and phytochelatin peptides that chelate cadmium and arsenic. A requirement for Mms19 is explained by its role in directing iron–sulfur cluster assembly into sulfite reductase as opposed to promoting DNA repair, as DNA damage response genes were not enriched among those required for cadmium or arsenic tolerance. Ubiquinone, siroheme, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate biosynthesis were also identified as critical for Cd/As tolerance. Arsenic-specific pathways included prefoldin-mediated assembly of unfolded proteins and protein targeting to the peroxisome, whereas cadmium-specific pathways included plasma membrane and vacuolar transporters, as well as Spt–Ada–Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA transcriptional coactivator that controls expression of key genes required for cadmium tolerance. Notable differences are apparent with corresponding screens in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, underscoring the utility of analyzing toxic metal defense mechanisms in both organisms.

  6. Global transcriptome sequencing identifies chlamydospore specific markers in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Palige

    Full Text Available Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are pathogenic fungi that are highly related but differ in virulence and in some phenotypic traits. During in vitro growth on certain nutrient-poor media, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis are the only yeast species which are able to produce chlamydospores, large thick-walled cells of unknown function. Interestingly, only C. dubliniensis forms pseudohyphae with abundant chlamydospores when grown on Staib medium, while C. albicans grows exclusively as a budding yeast. In order to further our understanding of chlamydospore development and assembly, we compared the global transcriptional profile of both species during growth in liquid Staib medium by RNA sequencing. We also included a C. albicans mutant in our study which lacks the morphogenetic transcriptional repressor Nrg1. This strain, which is characterized by its constitutive pseudohyphal growth, specifically produces masses of chlamydospores in Staib medium, similar to C. dubliniensis. This comparative approach identified a set of putatively chlamydospore-related genes. Two of the homologous C. albicans and C. dubliniensis genes (CSP1 and CSP2 which were most strongly upregulated during chlamydospore development were analysed in more detail. By use of the green fluorescent protein as a reporter, the encoded putative cell wall related proteins were found to exclusively localize to C. albicans and C. dubliniensis chlamydospores. Our findings uncover the first chlamydospore specific markers in Candida species and provide novel insights in the complex morphogenetic development of these important fungal pathogens.

  7. Global Transcriptome Sequencing Identifies Chlamydospore Specific Markers in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palige, Katja

    2013-04-15

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are pathogenic fungi that are highly related but differ in virulence and in some phenotypic traits. During in vitro growth on certain nutrient-poor media, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis are the only yeast species which are able to produce chlamydospores, large thick-walled cells of unknown function. Interestingly, only C. dubliniensis forms pseudohyphae with abundant chlamydospores when grown on Staib medium, while C. albicans grows exclusively as a budding yeast. In order to further our understanding of chlamydospore development and assembly, we compared the global transcriptional profile of both species during growth in liquid Staib medium by RNA sequencing. We also included a C. albicans mutant in our study which lacks the morphogenetic transcriptional repressor Nrg1. This strain, which is characterized by its constitutive pseudohyphal growth, specifically produces masses of chlamydospores in Staib medium, similar to C. dubliniensis. This comparative approach identified a set of putatively chlamydospore-related genes. Two of the homologous C. albicans and C. dubliniensis genes (CSP1 and CSP2) which were most strongly upregulated during chlamydospore development were analysed in more detail. By use of the green fluorescent protein as a reporter, the encoded putative cell wall related proteins were found to exclusively localize to C. albicans and C. dubliniensis chlamydospores. Our findings uncover the first chlamydospore specific markers in Candida species and provide novel insights in the complex morphogenetic development of these important fungal pathogens.

  8. Influence of blood lipids on global coagulation test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Ji-Eun; Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    High levels of blood lipids have been associated with high levels of coagulation factors. We investigated whether blood lipids influence the results of global coagulation tests, including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and thrombin generation assay (TGA). PT, aPTT, and TGA, along with procoagulant and anticoagulant factors, were measured in 488 normal individuals. Vitamin K status was assessed with prothrombin-induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II). The procoagulant factors II, VII, IX, X, and XI and anticoagulant factors protein C and protein S showed significant correlations with triglyceride, and the procoagulant factors II, V, VII, IX, X, XI, and XII and anticoagulant factors antithrombin and protein C correlated with total cholesterol. There were no correlations of blood lipid levels with PIVKA-II levels. Subjects with high triglyceride levels (≥200 mg/dL) showed shorter PT values than those with lower triglyceride levels. However, aPTT value was not changed in terms of blood lipid levels. In both 1 and 5 pM tissue factor-induced TGAs, subjects in the high-triglyceride or high-cholesterol groups (≥240 mg/dL) had high levels of lag time, time-to-peak, and endogenous thrombin potential. Total cholesterol was a significant determinant of PT and TGA values. High blood lipids were related with increased coagulation activity in a normal population. Our findings are expected to help interpret the global coagulation test results in individuals with high lipid levels.

  9. Novel Host Proteins and Signaling Pathways in Enteropathogenic E. coli Pathogenesis Identified by Global Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Scott, Nichollas E; Trimble, William S; Foster, Leonard J; Finlay, B Brett

    2015-07-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to directly translocate effector proteins into host cells where they play a pivotal role in subverting host cell signaling needed for disease. However, our knowledge of how EPEC affects host protein phosphorylation is limited to a few individual protein studies. We employed a quantitative proteomics approach to globally map alterations in the host phosphoproteome during EPEC infection. By characterizing host phosphorylation events at various time points throughout infection, we examined how EPEC dynamically impacts the host phosphoproteome over time. This experimental setup also enabled identification of T3SS-dependent and -independent changes in host phosphorylation. Specifically, T3SS-regulated events affected various cellular processes that are known EPEC targets, including cytoskeletal organization, immune signaling, and intracellular trafficking. However, the involvement of phosphorylation in these events has thus far been poorly studied. We confirmed the MAPK family as an established key host player, showed its central role in signal transduction during EPEC infection, and extended the repertoire of known signaling hubs with previously unrecognized proteins, including TPD52, CIN85, EPHA2, and HSP27. We identified altered phosphorylation of known EPEC targets, such as cofilin, where the involvement of phosphorylation has so far been undefined, thus providing novel mechanistic insights into the roles of these proteins in EPEC infection. An overlap of regulated proteins, especially those that are cytoskeleton-associated, was observed when compared with the phosphoproteome of Shigella-infected cells. We determined the biological relevance of the phosphorylation of a novel protein in EPEC pathogenesis, septin-9 (SEPT9). Both siRNA knockdown and a phosphorylation-impaired SEPT9 mutant decreased bacterial adherence and EPEC-mediated cell death. In contrast, a phosphorylation

  10. Do Methods Matter in Global Leadership Development? Testing the Global Leadership Development Ecosystem Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennie L.

    2018-01-01

    As world communication, technology, and trade become increasingly integrated through globalization, multinational corporations seek employees with global leadership skills. However, the demand for these skills currently outweighs the supply. Given the rarity of globally ready leaders, global competency development should be emphasized in business…

  11. Baseline Testing of the EV Global E-Bike SX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenherg, Dennis J.; Kolacz, John S.; Tavernelli, Paul F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center initiated baseline testing of the EV Global E-Bike SX as an update of the state of the art in hybrid electric bicycles. The E-bike is seen as a way to reduce pollution in urban areas, reduce fossil fuel consumption, and reduce operating costs for transportation systems. The work was done under the Hybrid Power Management (HPM) Program, which includes the Hybrid Electric Transit Bus (HETB). The SX is a high performance, state of the art, ground up, hybrid electric bicycle. Unique features of the SX's 36 V power system include the use of an efficient, 400 W, electric hub motor, and a seven-speed derailleur system that permits operation as fully electric, fully pedal, or a combination of the two. Other innovative features, such as regenerative braking through ultracapacitor energy storage, are planned. Regenerative braking recovers much of the kinetic energy of the vehicle during deceleration. The E-Bike is an inexpensive approach to advance the state of the art in hybrid technology in a practical application. The project transfers space technology to terrestrial use via nontraditional partners, and provides power system data valuable for future space applications. A description of the SX, the results of performance testing, and future vehicle development plans are given in this report. The report concludes that the SX provides excellent performance, and that the implementation of ultracapacitors in the power system can provide significant performance improvements.

  12. Baseline Testing of The EV Global E-Bike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Kolacz, John S.; Tavernelli, Paul F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center initiated baseline testing of the EV Global E-Bike as a way to reduce pollution in urban areas, reduce fossil fuel consumption and reduce Operating costs for transportation systems. The work was done Linder the Hybrid Power Management (HPM) Program, which includes the Hybrid Electric Transit Bus (HETB). The E-Bike is a state of the art, ground up, hybrid electric bicycle. Unique features of the vehicle's power system include the use of an efficient, 400 W. electric hub motor and a 7-speed derailleur system that permits operation as fully electric, fully pedal, or a combination of the two. Other innovative features, such as regenerative braking through ultracapacitor energy storage are planned. Regenerative braking recovers much of the kinetic energy of the vehicle during deceleration. The E-Bike is an inexpensive approach to advance the state of the art in hybrid technology in a practical application. The project transfers space technology to terrestrial use via nontraditional partners, and provides power system data valuable for future space applications. A description of the E-bike, the results of performance testing, and future vehicle development plans is the subject of this report. The report concludes that the E-Bike provides excellent performance, and that the implementation of ultracapacitors in the power system can provide significant performance improvements.

  13. A Global Clustering Algorithm to Identify Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA - with Applications in Mouse Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Garmire, Lana X.; Garmire, David G.; Huang, Wendy; Yao, Joyee; Glass, Christopher K.; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Identification of diffuse signals from the chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology poses significant computational challenges, and there are few methods currently available. We present a novel global clustering approach to enrich diffuse CHIP-Seq signals of RNA polymerase II and histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4Me3) and apply it to identify putative long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) in macrophage cells. Our global cl...

  14. Identifying breast cancer risk loci by global differential allele-specific expression (DASE analysis in mammary epithelial transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Chuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The significant mortality associated with breast cancer (BCa suggests a need to improve current research strategies to identify new genes that predispose women to breast cancer. Differential allele-specific expression (DASE has been shown to contribute to phenotypic variables in humans and recently to the pathogenesis of cancer. We previously reported that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD could lead to DASE of BRCA1/2, which is associated with elevated susceptibility to breast cancer. In addition to truncation mutations, multiple genetic and epigenetic factors can contribute to DASE, and we propose that DASE is a functional index for cis-acting regulatory variants and pathogenic mutations, and that global analysis of DASE in breast cancer precursor tissues can be used to identify novel causative alleles for breast cancer susceptibility. Results To test our hypothesis, we employed the Illumina® Omni1-Quad BeadChip in paired genomic DNA (gDNA and double-stranded cDNA (ds-cDNA samples prepared from eight BCa patient-derived normal mammary epithelial lines (HMEC. We filtered original array data according to heterozygous genotype calls and calculated DASE values using the Log ratio of cDNA allele intensity, which was normalized to the corresponding gDNA. We developed two statistical methods, SNP- and gene-based approaches, which allowed us to identify a list of 60 candidate DASE loci (DASE ≥ 2.00, P ≤ 0.01, FDR ≤ 0.05 by both methods. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of DASE loci revealed one major breast cancer-relevant interaction network, which includes two known cancer causative genes, ZNF331 (DASE = 2.31, P = 0.0018, FDR = 0.040 and USP6 (DASE = 4.80, P = 0.0013, FDR = 0.013, and a breast cancer causative gene, DMBT1 (DASE=2.03, P = 0.0017, FDR = 0.014. Sequence analysis of a 5′ RACE product of DMBT1 demonstrated that rs2981745, a putative breast cancer risk locus, appears to be one of the causal variants leading to DASE

  15. Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project, Version 1 (GRUMPv1): National Identifier Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project, Version 1 (GRUMPv1) consists of estimates of human population for the years 1990, 1995, and 2000 by 30 arc-second (1km) grid...

  16. Managing Identifiers for Elements of Provenance of the Third National Climate Assessment in the Global Change Information System (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, C.; Aulenbach, S.; Duggan, B.; Goldstein, J.

    2013-12-01

    A Federal Advisory Committee (The "National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee" or NCADAC) has overseen the development of a draft climate report that after extensive review will be considered by the Federal Government in the Third National Climate Assessment (NCA). This comprehensive report (1) Integrates, evaluates, and interprets the findings of the Program and discusses the scientific uncertainties associated with such findings; (2) Analyzes the effects of global change on the natural environment, agriculture, energy production and use, land and water resources, transportation, human health and welfare, human social systems, and biological diversity; and (3) Analyzes current trends in global change, both human-induced and natural, and projects major trends for the subsequent 25 to 100 years. The U.S. Global Change Program (USGCRP), composed of the 13 federal agencies most concerned with global change, is building a Global Change Information System (GCIS) that will ultimately organize access to all of the research, data, and information about global change from across the system. A prototype of the system has been constructed that captures and presents all of the elements of provenance of the NCA through a coherent data model and friendly front end web site. This work will focus on the globally unique and persistent identifiers used to reference and organize those items. These include externally referenced items, such as DOIs used by scientific journal publishers for research articles or by agencies as dataset identifiers, as well as our own internal approach to identifiers, our overall data model and experiences managing persistent identifiers within the GCIS.

  17. Parameter screening: the use of a dummy parameter to identify non-influential parameters in a global sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorashadi Zadeh, Farkhondeh; Nossent, Jiri; van Griensven, Ann; Bauwens, Willy

    2017-04-01

    ' method. A formal statistical test validates these parameter screening results. Based on the dummy parameter screening, 11 model parameters are identified as influential. Therefore, it can be denoted that the "dummy parameter approach" can facilitate the parameter screening process and provide guidance for GSA users to define a screening-threshold, with only limited additional resources. Key words: Parameter screening, Global sensitivity analysis, Dummy parameter, Variance-based method, Moment-independent method

  18. Queries of MALDI-imaging global datasets identifying ion mass signatures associated with tissue compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehniger, Thomas E.; Suits, Frank; Vegvari, Akos; Horvatovich, Peter; Foster, Martyn; Marko-Varga, Gyorgy

    Scanning MS by MALDI MS imaging (MALDI-MSI) creates large volumetric global datasets that describe the location and identity of ions registered at each sampling location. While thousands of ion peaks are recorded in a typical whole-tissue analysis, only a fraction of these measured molecules are

  19. Experimental studies of dead-wood biodiversity - A review identifying global gaps in knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian Seibold; Claus Bässler; Roland Brandl; Martin M. Gossner; Simon Thorn; Michael D. Ulyshen; Jörg Müller

    2015-01-01

    The importance of dead wood for biodiversity is widely recognized but strategies for conservation exist only in some regions worldwide. Most strategies combine knowledge from observational and experimental studies but remain preliminary as many facets of the complex relationships are unstudied. In this first global review of 79 experimental studies addressing...

  20. Identifying and Characterizing Discrepancies Between Test and Analysis Results of Compression-Loaded Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2005-01-01

    Results from a study to identify and characterize discrepancies between validation tests and high-fidelity analyses of compression-loaded panels are presented. First, potential sources of the discrepancies in both the experimental method and corresponding high-fidelity analysis models were identified. Then, a series of laboratory tests and numerical simulations were conducted to quantify the discrepancies and develop test and analysis methods to account for the discrepancies. The results indicate that the discrepancies between the validation tests and high-fidelity analyses can be attributed to imperfections in the test fixture and specimen geometry; test-fixture-induced changes in specimen geometry; and test-fixture-induced friction on the loaded edges of the test specimen. The results also show that accurate predictions of the panel response can be obtained when these specimen imperfections and edge conditions are accounted for in the analysis. The errors in the tests and analyses, and the methods used to characterize these errors are presented.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bovine digital dermatitis treponemes identifies macrolides for in vivo efficacy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, N J; Brown, J M; Hartley, C; Smith, R F; Carter, S D

    2012-12-07

    Digital dermatitis (DD) is a major infectious lameness of dairy cattle and sheep considered to be caused by treponemes. The aim of this study was to identify antibiotics effective against DD treponemes that might be useful in the treatment of ruminant DD in the future or to identify antibiotics useful in isolation studies. Here, a microdilution method was used to identify in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of treponemes cultured from DD lesions to eight relevant antibiotics. DD treponemes exhibited highest susceptibility to amoxicillin, azithromycin and gamithromycin. Unfortunately, amoxicillin whilst having potential for DD treatment in other animals (e.g. sheep) would require milk withhold periods in dairy cattle. DD treponemes were not particularly susceptible to two cephalosporins: cefalexin and ceftiofur, which do not require milk withhold. The bacteria demonstrated low susceptibility to trimethoprim and especially colistin suggesting these antimicrobials may be particularly useful in isolation of DD treponemes. The most promising high susceptibility results for macrolides indicate a rationale to consider veterinary licensed macrolides as DD treatments. Furthermore, given the DD treponeme antibiotic susceptibility similarities to established treatments for human treponematoses, identification of treponemacidal, long acting β-lactam analogues not requiring milk withhold may allow for development of a successful treatment for dairy cattle DD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Identifying Pressurise and Threatful Tourism Products In Relation To Global Warming and Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Dr. Anupama; Sharma, Dr Anjana

    2013-01-01

    Tourism Industry in India is contributing a lot towards improving the financial position of the country directly or indirectly and satisfying the needs of tourist by providing good services, comforts, and luxries at a very reasonable cost. Travel and Tourism contributes to be one of the worlds largest industries. 2011 was one of the most challenging years ever experienced by the global travel & tourism industry.Despite political upheaval,economic uncertainity and natural disasters,the industr...

  3. Identifying grain-size dependent errors on global forest area estimates and carbon studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolan Zheng; Linda S. Heath; Mark J. Ducey

    2008-01-01

    Satellite-derived coarse-resolution data are typically used for conducting global analyses. But the forest areas estimated from coarse-resolution maps (e.g., 1 km) inevitably differ from a corresponding fine-resolution map (such as a 30-m map) that would be closer to ground truth. A better understanding of changes in grain size on area estimation will improve our...

  4. Identifying drivers of greenhouse gas flux feedback responses to global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Carreira Martins, Catarina

    Since the start of the industrial era human activities have been impacting climate with increasing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), altering the Earth's energy balance. Nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), together with carbon dioxide (CO2) are the principal GHGs with increasing concentration in the atmosphere. The global warming potential (GWP) of N2O is 298 times and CH4 is 34 times higher relative to that of CO2 on a 100?year time horizon. Global changes, including climate change, are known to impact GHG fluxes but a mechanistic understanding of what drives feedback responses is not fully known. For example, major pathways of GHG production and consumption in terrestrial ecosystems are microbial processes. However, the response of functional microbial groups associated with GHG fluxes to global change conditions and its consequences for GHG feedback responses remains largely unknown. In fact, most field studies addressing GHG emissions fail to include all three GHGs and microbial communities present in the soil. In this study, I aimed to improve projections of GHG emissions under current management practices and future climatic conditions and to further improve the mechanistic and regulatory understanding of soil GHG fluxes to the atmosphere. My study provides a strong framework for future studies on feedback responses of GHG fluxes under current and future climate conditions and proposes biological (functional microbes) variables should be explicitly considered when developing mechanistic understanding regulating feedback responses. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  5. A global test of the pollination syndrome hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, Jeff; Alarcón, Ruben; Waser, Nickolas M; Price, Mary V; Watts, Stella; Cranmer, Louise; Hingston, Andrew; Peter, Craig I; Rotenberry, John

    2009-06-01

    'Pollination syndromes' are suites of phenotypic traits hypothesized to reflect convergent adaptations of flowers for pollination by specific types of animals. They were first developed in the 1870s and honed during the mid 20th Century. In spite of this long history and their central role in organizing research on plant-pollinator interactions, the pollination syndromes have rarely been subjected to test. The syndromes were tested here by asking whether they successfully capture patterns of covariance of floral traits and predict the most common pollinators of flowers. Flowers in six communities from three continents were scored for expression of floral traits used in published descriptions of the pollination syndromes, and simultaneously the pollinators of as many species as possible were characterized. Ordination of flowers in a multivariate 'phenotype space' defined by the syndromes showed that almost no plant species fall within the discrete syndrome clusters. Furthermore, in approximately two-thirds of plant species, the most common pollinator could not be successfully predicted by assuming that each plant species belongs to the syndrome closest to it in phenotype space. The pollination syndrome hypothesis as usually articulated does not successfully describe the diversity of floral phenotypes or predict the pollinators of most plant species. Caution is suggested when using pollination syndromes for organizing floral diversity, or for inferring agents of floral adaptation. A fresh look at how traits of flowers and pollinators relate to visitation and pollen transfer is recommended, in order to determine whether axes can be identified that describe floral functional diversity more successfully than the traditional syndromes.

  6. Global Environmental Micro Sensors Test Operations in the Natural Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark L.; Buza, Matthew; Manobianco, John; Merceret, Francis J.

    2007-01-01

    ENSCO, Inc. is developing an innovative atmospheric observing system known as Global Environmental Micro Sensors (GEMS). The GEMS concept features an integrated system of miniaturized in situ, airborne probes measuring temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and vector wind velocity. In order for the probes to remain airborne for long periods of time, their design is based on a helium-filled super-pressure balloon. The GEMS probes are neutrally buoyant and carried passively by the wind at predetermined levels. Each probe contains onboard satellite communication, power generation, processing, and geolocation capabilities. ENSCO has partnered with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for a project called GEMS Test Operations in the Natural Environment (GEMSTONE) that will culminate with limited prototype flights of the system in spring 2007. By leveraging current advances in micro and nanotechnology, the probe mass, size, cost, and complexity can be reduced substantially so that large numbers of probes could be deployed routinely to support ground, launch, and landing operations at KSC and other locations. A full-scale system will improve the data density for the local initialization of high-resolution numerical weather prediction systems by at least an order of magnitude and provide a significantly expanded in situ data base to evaluate launch commit criteria and flight rules. When applied to launch or landing sites, this capability will reduce both weather hazards and weather-related scrubs, thus enhancing both safety and cost-avoidance for vehicles processed by the Shuttle, Launch Services Program, and Constellation Directorates. The GEMSTONE project will conclude with a field experiment in which 10 to 15 probes are released over KSC in east central Florida. The probes will be neutrally buoyant at different altitudes from 500 to 3000 meters and will report their position, speed, heading, temperature, humidity, and

  7. THE USEFULNESS OF USER TESTING METHODS IN IDENTIFYING PROBLEMS ON UNIVERSITY WEBSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Hasan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the usefulness of three user testing methods (observation, and using both quantitative and qualitative data from a post-test questionnaire in terms of their ability or inability to find specific usability problems on university websites. The results showed that observation was the best method, compared to the other two, in identifying large numbers of major and minor usability problems on university websites. The results also showed that employing qualitative data from a post-test questionnaire was a useful complementary method since this identified additional usability problems that were not identified by the observation method. However, the results showed that the quantitative data from the post-test questionnaire were inaccurate and ineffective in terms of identifying usability problems on such websites.

  8. The global equilibrium method and its hybrid implementation for identifying heterogeneous elastic material parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles

    2011-04-01

    New identification strategies have to be developed in order to perform the identification quickly and at very-low cost. A popular class of approaches relies on full-field measurement obtained through digital image correlation. We propose here a global equilibrium approach. It is based on the virtual field method in case specific virtual fields are used. It can also be seen as a generalization of the equilibrium gap method. This approach is easy to implement and we prove that it provides better or comparable results to the constitutive equation gap method that is known to be a very accurate reference. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Minority stress in people who identify as transgender: testing the minority stress model

    OpenAIRE

    Stennett, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: People who identify as transgender are reported to experience high levels of mental health problems in comparison to people who do not identify as transgender. The minority stress model has been used to explain these high prevalence rates. But this model was designed to be used in lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations (Meyer, 1995, 2003). Researchers have applied some of the hypothesised processes of the model to people who identify as transgender. However, evidence testing ...

  10. The Use of a Standarized Language Test to Identify College Students with Deficient Writing Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Roy A.; Ziegler, Edward W.

    1978-01-01

    The writing samples of high school and college students were scored using objective indices. The relationships between these indices and the scores earned on a standarized English test were determined. The results support the contention that a standarized test could identify college students who have difficulty writing. (Author)

  11. Alternative approaches for identifying acute systemic toxicity : Moving from research to regulatory testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamm, Jon; Sullivan, Kristie; Clippinger, Amy J; Strickland, Judy; Bell, Shannon; Bhhatarai, Barun; Blaauboer, B; Casey, Warren; Dorman, David; Forsby, Anna; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gehen, Sean; Graepel, Rabea; Hotchkiss, Jon; Lowit, Anna; Matheson, Joanna; Reaves, Elissa; Scarano, Louis; Sprankle, Catherine; Tunkel, Jay; Wilson, Dan; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao; Allen, David

    Acute systemic toxicity testing provides the basis for hazard labeling and risk management of chemicals. A number of international efforts have been directed at identifying non-animal alternatives for in vivo acute systemic toxicity tests. A September 2015 workshop, Alternative Approaches for

  12. Gender Fair Efficacy of Concept Mapping Tests in Identifying Students' Difficulties in High School Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Shilna, V.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the perceived difficulty of organic chemistry unit for high schools students, this study examined the usefulness of concept mapping as a testing device to assess students' difficulty in the select areas. Since many tests used for identifying students misconceptions and difficulties in school subjects are observed to favour one or the…

  13. Rapid slide coagglutination test for identifying and typing group B streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegaard, M K; Field, C R

    1977-09-01

    A Cowan I strain of Staphylococcus aureus was labeled with either group B streptococcal grouping or typing antiserum. These antibody-labeled reagent cells (ARC) were used in a slide coagglutination test to identify and type group B streptococci from blood agar plates. All streptococci were also identified by the standard Lancefield capillary precipitin test. In a blind study, all 141 group B streptococci were correctly identified by the coagglutination grouping test. None of the 148 non-group B streptococci caused agglutination of ARC. The coagglutination grouping test required an acid extract prepared from only four colonies and could be completed less than 30 min after colonies were removed from plates. The coagglutination typing test correctly identified 98.6% of the types of the 141 group B streptococcal strains tested. At least 88.6% of these streptococci could be typed directly from blood agar plates within 5 min by the coagglutination typing test. The remaining 11.4% of the group B streptococci were acid extracted (less than a 30-min procedure), and the extract was used for coagglutination typing. Coagglutination typing can be performed with only four colonies. The coagglutination grouping and typing tests are inexpensive, rapid, reliable, and easy to perform.

  14. Unique features of a global human ectoparasite identified through sequencing of the bed bug genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Joshua B; Adelman, Zach N; Reinhardt, Klaus; Dolan, Amanda; Poelchau, Monica; Jennings, Emily C; Szuter, Elise M; Hagan, Richard W; Gujar, Hemant; Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Zhu, Fang; Mohan, M; Nelson, David R; Rosendale, Andrew J; Derst, Christian; Resnik, Valentina; Wernig, Sebastian; Menegazzi, Pamela; Wegener, Christian; Peschel, Nicolai; Hendershot, Jacob M; Blenau, Wolfgang; Predel, Reinhard; Johnston, Paul R; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Waterhouse, Robert M; Nauen, Ralf; Schorn, Corinna; Ott, Mark-Christoph; Maiwald, Frank; Johnston, J Spencer; Gondhalekar, Ameya D; Scharf, Michael E; Peterson, Brittany F; Raje, Kapil R; Hottel, Benjamin A; Armisén, David; Crumière, Antonin Jean Johan; Refki, Peter Nagui; Santos, Maria Emilia; Sghaier, Essia; Viala, Sèverine; Khila, Abderrahman; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Childers, Christopher; Lee, Chien-Yueh; Lin, Han; Hughes, Daniel S T; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Murali, Shwetha C; Qu, Jiaxin; Dugan, Shannon; Lee, Sandra L; Chao, Hsu; Dinh, Huyen; Han, Yi; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Wheeler, David; Panfilio, Kristen A; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M; Vargo, Edward L; Booth, Warren; Friedrich, Markus; Weirauch, Matthew T; Anderson, Michelle A E; Jones, Jeffery W; Mittapalli, Omprakash; Zhao, Chaoyang; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Evans, Jay D; Attardo, Geoffrey M; Robertson, Hugh M; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Gibbs, Richard A; Werren, John H; Palli, Subba R; Schal, Coby; Richards, Stephen

    2016-02-02

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has re-established itself as a ubiquitous human ectoparasite throughout much of the world during the past two decades. This global resurgence is likely linked to increased international travel and commerce in addition to widespread insecticide resistance. Analyses of the C. lectularius sequenced genome (650 Mb) and 14,220 predicted protein-coding genes provide a comprehensive representation of genes that are linked to traumatic insemination, a reduced chemosensory repertoire of genes related to obligate hematophagy, host-symbiont interactions, and several mechanisms of insecticide resistance. In addition, we document the presence of multiple putative lateral gene transfer events. Genome sequencing and annotation establish a solid foundation for future research on mechanisms of insecticide resistance, human-bed bug and symbiont-bed bug associations, and unique features of bed bug biology that contribute to the unprecedented success of C. lectularius as a human ectoparasite.

  15. Comparison of Statistical Data Models for Identifying Differentially Expressed Genes Using a Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Yong Seng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, statistical techniques for analysis of microarray-generated data sets have deficiencies due to limited understanding of errors inherent in the data. A generalized likelihood ratio (GLR test based on an error model has been recently proposed to identify differentially expressed genes from microarray experiments. However, the use of different error structures under the GLR test has not been evaluated, nor has this method been compared to commonly used statistical tests such as the parametric t-test. The concomitant effects of varying data signal-to-noise ratio and replication number on the performance of statistical tests also remain largely unexplored. In this study, we compared the effects of different underlying statistical error structures on the GLR test’s power in identifying differentially expressed genes in microarray data. We evaluated such variants of the GLR test as well as the one sample t-test based on simulated data by means of receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. Further, we used bootstrapping of ROC curves to assess statistical significance of differences between the areas under the curves. Our results showed that i the GLR tests outperformed the t-test for detecting differential gene expression, ii the identity of the underlying error structure was important in determining the GLR tests’ performance, and iii signal-to-noise ratio was a more important contributor than sample replication in identifying statistically significant differential gene expression.

  16. Identifying like-minded audiences for global warming public engagement campaigns: an audience segmentation analysis and tool development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, Edward W; Leiserowitz, Anthony; Roser-Renouf, Connie; Mertz, C K

    2011-03-10

    Achieving national reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will require public support for climate and energy policies and changes in population behaviors. Audience segmentation--a process of identifying coherent groups within a population--can be used to improve the effectiveness of public engagement campaigns. In Fall 2008, we conducted a nationally representative survey of American adults (n = 2,164) to identify audience segments for global warming public engagement campaigns. By subjecting multiple measures of global warming beliefs, behaviors, policy preferences, and issue engagement to latent class analysis, we identified six distinct segments ranging in size from 7 to 33% of the population. These six segments formed a continuum, from a segment of people who were highly worried, involved and supportive of policy responses (18%), to a segment of people who were completely unconcerned and strongly opposed to policy responses (7%). Three of the segments (totaling 70%) were to varying degrees concerned about global warming and supportive of policy responses, two (totaling 18%) were unsupportive, and one was largely disengaged (12%), having paid little attention to the issue. Certain behaviors and policy preferences varied greatly across these audiences, while others did not. Using discriminant analysis, we subsequently developed 36-item and 15-item instruments that can be used to categorize respondents with 91% and 84% accuracy, respectively. In late 2008, Americans supported a broad range of policies and personal actions to reduce global warming, although there was wide variation among the six identified audiences. To enhance the impact of campaigns, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses seeking to engage the public can selectively target one or more of these audiences rather than address an undifferentiated general population. Our screening instruments are available to assist in that process.

  17. Identifying like-minded audiences for global warming public engagement campaigns: an audience segmentation analysis and tool development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W Maibach

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Achieving national reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will require public support for climate and energy policies and changes in population behaviors. Audience segmentation--a process of identifying coherent groups within a population--can be used to improve the effectiveness of public engagement campaigns.In Fall 2008, we conducted a nationally representative survey of American adults (n = 2,164 to identify audience segments for global warming public engagement campaigns. By subjecting multiple measures of global warming beliefs, behaviors, policy preferences, and issue engagement to latent class analysis, we identified six distinct segments ranging in size from 7 to 33% of the population. These six segments formed a continuum, from a segment of people who were highly worried, involved and supportive of policy responses (18%, to a segment of people who were completely unconcerned and strongly opposed to policy responses (7%. Three of the segments (totaling 70% were to varying degrees concerned about global warming and supportive of policy responses, two (totaling 18% were unsupportive, and one was largely disengaged (12%, having paid little attention to the issue. Certain behaviors and policy preferences varied greatly across these audiences, while others did not. Using discriminant analysis, we subsequently developed 36-item and 15-item instruments that can be used to categorize respondents with 91% and 84% accuracy, respectively.In late 2008, Americans supported a broad range of policies and personal actions to reduce global warming, although there was wide variation among the six identified audiences. To enhance the impact of campaigns, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses seeking to engage the public can selectively target one or more of these audiences rather than address an undifferentiated general population. Our screening instruments are available to assist in that process.

  18. Identifying Like-Minded Audiences for Global Warming Public Engagement Campaigns: An Audience Segmentation Analysis and Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, Edward W.; Leiserowitz, Anthony; Roser-Renouf, Connie; Mertz, C. K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Achieving national reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will require public support for climate and energy policies and changes in population behaviors. Audience segmentation – a process of identifying coherent groups within a population – can be used to improve the effectiveness of public engagement campaigns. Methodology/Principal Findings In Fall 2008, we conducted a nationally representative survey of American adults (n = 2,164) to identify audience segments for global warming public engagement campaigns. By subjecting multiple measures of global warming beliefs, behaviors, policy preferences, and issue engagement to latent class analysis, we identified six distinct segments ranging in size from 7 to 33% of the population. These six segments formed a continuum, from a segment of people who were highly worried, involved and supportive of policy responses (18%), to a segment of people who were completely unconcerned and strongly opposed to policy responses (7%). Three of the segments (totaling 70%) were to varying degrees concerned about global warming and supportive of policy responses, two (totaling 18%) were unsupportive, and one was largely disengaged (12%), having paid little attention to the issue. Certain behaviors and policy preferences varied greatly across these audiences, while others did not. Using discriminant analysis, we subsequently developed 36-item and 15-item instruments that can be used to categorize respondents with 91% and 84% accuracy, respectively. Conclusions/Significance In late 2008, Americans supported a broad range of policies and personal actions to reduce global warming, although there was wide variation among the six identified audiences. To enhance the impact of campaigns, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses seeking to engage the public can selectively target one or more of these audiences rather than address an undifferentiated general population. Our screening instruments are

  19. Software Test Description (STD) for the Globally Relocatable Navy Tide/Atmospheric Modeling System (PCTides)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Posey, Pamela

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Software Test Description (STD) is to establish formal test cases to be used by personnel tasked with the installation and verification of the Globally Relocatable Navy Tide/Atmospheric Modeling System (PCTides...

  20. Global tests of P-values for multifactor dimensionality reduction models in selection of optimal number of target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongying; Bhandary, Madhusudan; Becker, Mara; Leeder, J Steven; Gaedigk, Roger; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A

    2012-05-22

    Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) is a popular and successful data mining method developed to characterize and detect nonlinear complex gene-gene interactions (epistasis) that are associated with disease susceptibility. Because MDR uses a combinatorial search strategy to detect interaction, several filtration techniques have been developed to remove genes (SNPs) that have no interactive effects prior to analysis. However, the cutoff values implemented for these filtration methods are arbitrary, therefore different choices of cutoff values will lead to different selections of genes (SNPs). We suggest incorporating a global test of p-values to filtration procedures to identify the optimal number of genes/SNPs for further MDR analysis and demonstrate this approach using a ReliefF filter technique. We compare the performance of different global testing procedures in this context, including the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the inverse chi-square test, the inverse normal test, the logit test, the Wilcoxon test and Tippett's test. Additionally we demonstrate the approach on a real data application with a candidate gene study of drug response in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Extensive simulation of correlated p-values show that the inverse chi-square test is the most appropriate approach to be incorporated with the screening approach to determine the optimal number of SNPs for the final MDR analysis. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test has high inflation of Type I errors when p-values are highly correlated or when p-values peak near the center of histogram. Tippett's test has very low power when the effect size of GxG interactions is small. The proposed global tests can serve as a screening approach prior to individual tests to prevent false discovery. Strong power in small sample sizes and well controlled Type I error in absence of GxG interactions make global tests highly recommended in epistasis studies.

  1. Global tests of P-values for multifactor dimensionality reduction models in selection of optimal number of target genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Hongying

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR is a popular and successful data mining method developed to characterize and detect nonlinear complex gene-gene interactions (epistasis that are associated with disease susceptibility. Because MDR uses a combinatorial search strategy to detect interaction, several filtration techniques have been developed to remove genes (SNPs that have no interactive effects prior to analysis. However, the cutoff values implemented for these filtration methods are arbitrary, therefore different choices of cutoff values will lead to different selections of genes (SNPs. Methods We suggest incorporating a global test of p-values to filtration procedures to identify the optimal number of genes/SNPs for further MDR analysis and demonstrate this approach using a ReliefF filter technique. We compare the performance of different global testing procedures in this context, including the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the inverse chi-square test, the inverse normal test, the logit test, the Wilcoxon test and Tippett’s test. Additionally we demonstrate the approach on a real data application with a candidate gene study of drug response in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Results Extensive simulation of correlated p-values show that the inverse chi-square test is the most appropriate approach to be incorporated with the screening approach to determine the optimal number of SNPs for the final MDR analysis. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test has high inflation of Type I errors when p-values are highly correlated or when p-values peak near the center of histogram. Tippett’s test has very low power when the effect size of GxG interactions is small. Conclusions The proposed global tests can serve as a screening approach prior to individual tests to prevent false discovery. Strong power in small sample sizes and well controlled Type I error in absence of GxG interactions make global tests highly recommended in epistasis studies.

  2. Evaluation and Utility of a Family Information Table to Identify and Test Children at Risk for HIV in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Meyer, BA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective strategies to identify and screen children at risk for HIV are needed. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the utilization of a family information table (FIT to identify and test at-risk children in Kenya and identify factors associated with child testing. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV-infected adults with children at five Kenyan clinics. HIV testing status for children aged ≤18 years was gathered from the patients’ FITs and compared to reports from in-person clinic visits as the gold standard. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess predictors for HIV testing of children adjusted for confounders and within parent correlation. Results: Our sample included 384 HIV-infected adults enrolled in care with 933 reported children. Overall, 323 FITs (84% correctly listed all children in the family and 340 (89% documented an HIV testing status (including untested for all children. Seventy-five percent of parents verbally reported all children tested, compared to only 46% of FITs (OR=13.5, 95% CI 6.5-27.8. Verbal reports identified 739 (79% children tested, with 55 (7.4% HIV-positive and 17 (2.3% HIV-exposed infants (HEI. Of 63 adults with HIV-positive children or HEI, 60 (95% reported enrolling children into care. Likelihood that children had been tested was higher for younger children (≤4y vs. > 4y, aOR=2.0; 95% CI 1.4-2.9 and lower if the partner’s serostatus was unknown vs. seropositive (aOR=0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-0.8. Conclusions: Although the FIT may be a useful tool to identify children at risk for HIV, this study found underutilization by providers. To maximize impact of this tool, documentation of follow-up for untested and positive children is essential. Global Health Implications: Through early documentation of at-risk children and follow up of untested and infected children, the FIT may serve as an effective resource for improving HIV testing and linkage to care.

  3. The Space-Time Variation of Global Crop Yields, Detecting Simultaneous Outliers and Identifying the Teleconnections with Climatic Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, E.; Devineni, N.; Pal, I.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2017-12-01

    An understanding of the climate factors that influence the space-time variability of crop yields is important for food security purposes and can help us predict global food availability. In this study, we address how the crop yield trends of countries globally were related to each other during the last several decades and the main climatic variables that triggered high/low crop yields simultaneously across the world. Robust Principal Component Analysis (rPCA) is used to identify the primary modes of variation in wheat, maize, sorghum, rice, soybeans, and barley yields. Relations between these modes of variability and important climatic variables, especially anomalous sea surface temperature (SSTa), are examined from 1964 to 2010. rPCA is also used to identify simultaneous outliers in each year, i.e. systematic high/low crop yields across the globe. The results demonstrated spatiotemporal patterns of these crop yields and the climate-related events that caused them as well as the connection of outliers with weather extremes. We find that among climatic variables, SST has had the most impact on creating simultaneous crop yields variability and yield outliers in many countries. An understanding of this phenomenon can benefit global crop trade networks.

  4. Global Sensitivity Analysis for Identifying Important Parameters of Nitrogen Nitrification and Denitrification under Model and Scenario Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, M.; Chen, Z.; Shi, L.; Zhu, Y.; Yang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen reactive transport modeling is subject to uncertainty in model parameters, structures, and scenarios. While global sensitivity analysis is a vital tool for identifying the parameters important to nitrogen reactive transport, conventional global sensitivity analysis only considers parametric uncertainty. This may result in inaccurate selection of important parameters, because parameter importance may vary under different models and modeling scenarios. By using a recently developed variance-based global sensitivity analysis method, this paper identifies important parameters with simultaneous consideration of parametric uncertainty, model uncertainty, and scenario uncertainty. In a numerical example of nitrogen reactive transport modeling, a combination of three scenarios of soil temperature and two scenarios of soil moisture leads to a total of six scenarios. Four alternative models are used to evaluate reduction functions used for calculating actual rates of nitrification and denitrification. The model uncertainty is tangled with scenario uncertainty, as the reduction functions depend on soil temperature and moisture content. The results of sensitivity analysis show that parameter importance varies substantially between different models and modeling scenarios, which may lead to inaccurate selection of important parameters if model and scenario uncertainties are not considered. This problem is avoided by using the new method of sensitivity analysis in the context of model averaging and scenario averaging. The new method of sensitivity analysis can be applied to other problems of contaminant transport modeling when model uncertainty and/or scenario uncertainty are present.

  5. Comparative transcriptomics of the nematode gut identifies global shifts in feeding mode and pathogen susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, James W; Chauhan, Veeren M; Aylott, Jonathan W; Rödelsperger, Christian

    2016-03-05

    The nematode Pristionchus pacificus has been established as a model for comparative studies using the well known Caenorhabditis elegans as a reference. Despite their relatedness, previous studies have revealed highly divergent development and a number of morphological differences including the lack of a pharyngal structure, the grinder, used to physically lyse the ingested bacteria in C. elegans. To complement current knowledge about developmental and ecological differences with a better understanding of their feeding modes, we have sequenced the intestinal transcriptomes of both nematodes. In total, we found 464 intestine-enriched genes in P. pacificus and 724 in C. elegans, of which the majority (66%) has been identified by previous studies. Interestingly, only 15 genes could be identified with shared intestinal enrichment in both species, of which three genes are Hedgehog signaling molecules supporting a highly conserved role of this pathway for intestinal development across all metazoa. At the level of gene families, we find similar divergent trends with only five families displaying significant intestinal enrichment in both species. We compared our data with transcriptomic responses to various pathogens. Strikingly, C. elegans intestine-enriched genes showed highly significant overlaps with pathogen response genes whereas this was not the case for P. pacificus, indicating shifts in pathogen susceptibility that might be explained by altered feeding modes. Our study reveals first insights into the evolution of feeding systems and the associated changes in intestinal gene expression that might have facilitated nematodes of the P. pacificus lineage to colonize new environments. These findings deepen our understanding about how morphological and genomic diversity is created during the course of evolution.

  6. Using the Integrated Vehicle Health Management Research Test and Integration Plan Wiki to Identify Synergistic Test Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Faber, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the aviation industry have recognized a need for developing a method to identify and combine resources to carry out research and testing more efficiently. The Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Research Test and Integration Plan (RTIP) Wiki is a tool that is used to visualize, plan, and accomplish collaborative research and testing. Synergistic test opportunities are developed using the RTIP Wiki, and include potential common resource testing that combines assets and personnel from NASA, industry, academia, and other government agencies. A research scenario is linked to the appropriate IVHM milestones and resources detailed in the wiki, reviewed by the research team members, and integrated into a collaborative test strategy. The scenario is then implemented by creating a test plan when appropriate and the research is performed. The benefits of performing collaborative research and testing are achieving higher Technology Readiness Level (TRL) test opportunities with little or no additional cost, improved quality of research, and increased communication among researchers. In addition to a description of the method of creating these joint research scenarios, examples of the successful development and implementation of cooperative research using the IVHM RTIP Wiki are given.

  7. A test of a global seismic system for monitoring earthquakes and underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.R.; Muirhead, K.; Spiliopoulos, S.; Jepsen, D.; Leonard, M.

    1993-01-01

    Australia is a member of the Group of Scientific Experts (GSE) to consider international cooperative measures to detect and identify events, an ad hoc group of the United Nations Conference on Disarmament. The GSE conducted a large-scale technical test (GSETT-2) from 22 April to 9 June 1991 that focused on the exchange and analysis of seismic parameter and waveform data. Thirty-four countries participated in GSETT-2, and data were contributed from 60 stations on all continents. GSETT-2 demonstrated the feasibility of collecting and transmitting large volumes (around 1 giga-byte) of digital data around the world, and of producing a preliminary bulletin of global seismicity within 48 hours and a final bulletin within 7 days. However, the experiment also revealed the difficulty of keeping up with the flow of data and analysis with existing resources. The Final Event Bulletins listed 3715 events for the 42 recording days of the test, about twice the number reported routinely by another international agency 5 months later. The quality of the Final Event Bulletin was limited by the uneven spatial distribution of seismic stations that contributed to GSETT-2 and by the ambiguity of associating phases detected by widely separated stations to form seismic events. A monitoring system similar to that used in GSETT-2 could provide timely and accurate reporting of global seismicity. It would need an improved distribution of stations, application of more conservative event formation rules and further development of analysis software. 8 refs., 9 figs

  8. Methodology to identify risk-significant components for inservice inspection and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.T.; Hartley, R.S.; Jones, J.L. Jr.; Kido, C.; Phillips, J.H.

    1992-08-01

    Periodic inspection and testing of vital system components should be performed to ensure the safe and reliable operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear processing facilities. Probabilistic techniques may be used to help identify and rank components by their relative risk. A risk-based ranking would allow varied DOE sites to implement inspection and testing programs in an effective and cost-efficient manner. This report describes a methodology that can be used to rank components, while addressing multiple risk issues

  9. Global phosphotyrosine proteomics identifies PKCδ as a marker of responsiveness to Src inhibition in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot T McKinley

    Full Text Available Sensitive and specific biomarkers of protein kinase inhibition can be leveraged to accelerate drug development studies in oncology by associating early molecular responses with target inhibition. In this study, we utilized unbiased shotgun phosphotyrosine (pY proteomics to discover novel biomarkers of response to dasatinib, a small molecule Src-selective inhibitor, in preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC. We performed unbiased mass spectrometry shotgun pY proteomics to reveal the pY proteome of cultured HCT-116 colonic carcinoma cells, and then extended this analysis to HCT-116 xenograft tumors to identify pY biomarkers of dasatinib-responsiveness in vivo. Major dasatinib-responsive pY sites in xenograft tumors included sites on delta-type protein kinase C (PKCδ, CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1, Type-II SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2, and receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPα. The pY313 site PKCδ was further supported as a relevant biomarker of dasatinib-mediated Src inhibition in HCT-116 xenografts by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with a phosphospecific antibody. Reduction of PKCδ pY313 was further correlated with dasatinib-mediated inhibition of Src and diminished growth as spheroids of a panel of human CRC cell lines. These studies reveal PKCδ pY313 as a promising readout of Src inhibition in CRC and potentially other solid tumors and may reflect responsiveness to dasatinib in a subset of colorectal cancers.

  10. Covariance Association Test (CVAT) Identifies Genetic Markers Associated with Schizophrenia in Functionally Associated Biological Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Castro Dias Cuyabano, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    power to detect genetic markers with small effects. Instead, aggregating genetic markers based on biological information might increase the power to identify sets of genetic markers of etiological significance. Several set test methods have been proposed: Here we propose a new set test derived from......Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder with large personal and social costs, and understanding the genetic etiology is important. Such knowledge can be obtained by testing the association between a disease phenotype and individual genetic markers; however, such single-marker methods have limited...

  11. Analogue particle identifier and test unit for automatic measuring of errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boden, A.; Lauch, J.

    1979-04-01

    A high accuracy analogue particle identifier is described. The unit is used for particle identification or data correction of experimental based errors in magnetic spectrometers. Signals which are proportional to the energy, the time-of-flight or the position of absorption of the particles are supplied to an analogue computation circuit (multifunction converter). Three computation functions are available for different applications. The output of the identifier produces correction signals or pulses whose amplitudes are proportional to the mass of the particles. Particle identification and data correction can be optimized by the adjustment of variable parameters. An automatic test unit has been developed for adjustment and routine checking of particle identifiers. The computation functions can be tested by this unit with an accuracy of 1%. (orig.) [de

  12. Nuclear weapons tests and environmental consequences: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prăvălie, Remus

    2014-10-01

    The beginning of the atomic age marked the outset of nuclear weapons testing, which is responsible for the radioactive contamination of a large number of sites worldwide. The paper aims to analyze nuclear weapons tests conducted in the second half of the twentieth century, highlighting the impact of radioactive pollution on the atmospheric, aquatic, and underground environments. Special attention was given to the concentration of main radioactive isotopes which were released, such as ¹⁴C, ¹³⁷Cs, and ⁹⁰Sr, generally stored in the atmosphere and marine environment. In addition, an attempt was made to trace the spatial delimitation of the most heavily contaminated sites worldwide, and to note the human exposure which has caused a significantly increased incidence of thyroidal cancer locally and regionally. The United States is one of the important examples of assessing the correlation between the increase in the thyroid cancer incidence rate and the continental-scale radioactive contamination with ¹³¹I, a radioactive isotope which was released in large amounts during the nuclear tests carried out in the main test site, Nevada.

  13. IDENTIFYING FRACTURE ORIGIN IN CERAMICS BY COMBINATION OF NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING AND DISCRETE ELEMENT ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senapati, Rajeev; Zhang Jianmei

    2010-01-01

    Advanced ceramic materials have been extensively applied in aerospace, automobile and other industries. However, the reliability of the advanced ceramics is a major concern because of the brittle nature of the materials. In this paper, combination of nondestructive testing and numerical modeling Discrete Element Method is proposed to identify the fracture origin in ceramics. The nondestructive testing--laser scattering technology is first performed on the ceramic components to reveal the machining-induced damage such as cracks and the material-inherent flaws such as voids, then followed by the four point bending test. Discrete Element software package PFC 2D is used to simulate the four point bending test and try to identify where the fractures start. The numerical representation of the ceramic materials is done by generating a densely packed particle system using the specimen genesis procedure and then applying the suitable microparameters to the particle system. Simulation of four point bending test is performed on materials having no defects, materials having manufacturing-induced defects like cracks, and materials having material-inherent flaws like voids. The initiation and propagation of defects is modeled and the mean contact force on the loading ball is also plotted. The simulation prediction results are well in accordance with the nondestructive testing results.

  14. King-Devick Test identifies real-time concussion and asymptomatic concussion in youth athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Priya S; Leong, Danielle; Tapsell, Lisa; Starling, Amaal J; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Overall, Trenton L; Adler, Jennifer S; Halker-Singh, Rashmi B; Vargas, Bert B; Dodick, David

    2017-12-01

    Sports concussion has an annual incidence of approximately 3.8 million. Over half go unreported and a substantial number may be asymptomatic. A rapid, cost-effective, and reliable tool that facilitates diagnosis of concussion is needed. The King-Devick (K-D) test is a vision-based tool of rapid number naming for assessment of concussion. In this study, we evaluated the utility of the K-D test in real time for identification of symptomatic concussion in youth athletes and to determine if similar impairment (subclinical concussion) exists in youth athletes without an obvious head injury or symptoms. Youth hockey players underwent K-D testing preseason, postseason, and immediately after suspected concussion. Additional testing was performed in a subgroup of nonconcussed athletes immediately before and after a game to determine effects of fatigue on K-D scores. Among 141 players tested, 20 had clinically diagnosed concussion. All 20 had immediate postconcussion K-D times >5 seconds from baseline (average 7.3 seconds) and all but 2 had worse postseason scores (46.4 seconds vs 52.4 seconds, p < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Nonconcussed athletes saw minimal improvement postseason (43.9 seconds vs 42.1 seconds, p < 0.05) and 51 nonconcussed players assessed before and after a game revealed no significant time change as a result of fatigue. Rapid number naming using the K-D test accurately identifies real-time, symptomatic concussion in youth athletes. Scores in concussed players may remain abnormal over time. Athletes should undergo preseason and postseason K-D testing, with additional evaluation real time to inform the assessment of suspected concussion. This study provides Class III evidence that the K-D test accurately identifies real-time concussions in youth athletes.

  15. Development and pilot test of a process to identify research needs from a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Ian J; Wilson, Lisa M; Bennett, Wendy L; Nicholson, Wanda K; Robinson, Karen A

    2013-05-01

    To ensure appropriate allocation of research funds, we need methods for identifying high-priority research needs. We developed and pilot tested a process to identify needs for primary clinical research using a systematic review in gestational diabetes mellitus. We conducted eight steps: abstract research gaps from a systematic review using the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcomes, and Settings (PICOS) framework; solicit feedback from the review authors; translate gaps into researchable questions using the PICOS framework; solicit feedback from multidisciplinary stakeholders at our institution; establish consensus among multidisciplinary external stakeholders on the importance of the research questions using the Delphi method; prioritize outcomes; develop conceptual models to highlight research needs; and evaluate the process. We identified 19 research questions. During the Delphi method, external stakeholders established consensus for 16 of these 19 questions (15 with "high" and 1 with "medium" clinical benefit/importance). We pilot tested an eight-step process to identify clinically important research needs. Before wider application of this process, it should be tested using systematic reviews of other diseases. Further evaluation should include assessment of the usefulness of the research needs generated using this process for primary researchers and funders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Advancing Global Precision Medicine: An Overview of Genomic Testing and Counseling Services in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasopoulou, Angeliki; Mooy, Foong-Ming; Baker, Darrol J; Mitropoulou, Christina; Skoufas, Efthymios; Bulgiba, Awang; Katsila, Theodora; Patrinos, George P

    2017-12-01

    Precision medicine, genomic and diagnostic services are no longer limited to developed countries. This broadening in geography of biomarker applications and omics diagnostics also demands empirical study of implementation, diagnostic testing, and counseling practices in the field. For example, the Malaysian population has large ethnic diversity and high prevalence of genetic disorders such as hemoglobinopathies and metabolic disorders. Increased morbidity and mortality from such diseases have a direct impact on society and health system sustainability and for this, decision-making becomes of outmost importance. We report here on our findings on the landscape of genomic testing and genetic counseling services in Malaysia. We first defined the framework of all Malaysian stakeholders that offer genomics services and next, we identified the related information gaps, as depicted through the service providers' online websites. Our research framework revealed that there is a very diverse spectrum of genomics services in Malaysia, in which wet- and dry-laboratory services integrate. Moreover, we identify the current gaps and possible remedies to improve the quality of genomic and predictive analytics, not to mention considerations to ensure robust ethics and responsible innovation. To our knowledge, this is the first such study to be performed for a Southeast Asian country. Our genomics and precision medicine services mapping strategy presented in this study may serve as a model for field assessment at regional, national, and international levels as precision medicine is expanding globally and new governance challenges and opportunities continue to emerge for smart implementation science.

  17. Global optimization of maintenance and surveillance testing based on reliability and probabilistic safety assessment. Research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martorell, S.; Serradell, V.; Munoz, A.; Sanchez, A.

    1997-01-01

    Background, objective, scope, detailed working plan and follow-up and final product of the project ''Global optimization of maintenance and surveillance testing based on reliability and probabilistic safety assessment'' are described

  18. The Global Modeling Test Bed - Building a New National Capability for Advancing Operational Global Modeling in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toepfer, F.; Cortinas, J. V., Jr.; Kuo, W.; Tallapragada, V.; Stajner, I.; Nance, L. B.; Kelleher, K. E.; Firl, G.; Bernardet, L.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA develops, operates, and maintains an operational global modeling capability for weather, sub seasonal and seasonal prediction for the protection of life and property and fostering the US economy. In order to substantially improve the overall performance and accelerate advancements of the operational modeling suite, NOAA is partnering with NCAR to design and build the Global Modeling Test Bed (GMTB). The GMTB has been established to provide a platform and a capability for researchers to contribute to the advancement primarily through the development of physical parameterizations needed to improve operational NWP. The strategy to achieve this goal relies on effectively leveraging global expertise through a modern collaborative software development framework. This framework consists of a repository of vetted and supported physical parameterizations known as the Common Community Physics Package (CCPP), a common well-documented interface known as the Interoperable Physics Driver (IPD) for combining schemes into suites and for their configuration and connection to dynamic cores, and an open evidence-based governance process for managing the development and evolution of CCPP. In addition, a physics test harness designed to work within this framework has been established in order to facilitate easier like-to-like comparison of physics advancements. This paper will present an overview of the design of the CCPP and test platform. Additionally, an overview of potential new opportunities of how physics developers can engage in the process, from implementing code for CCPP/IPD compliance to testing their development within an operational-like software environment, will be presented. In addition, insight will be given as to how development gets elevated to CPPP-supported status, the pre-cursor to broad availability and use within operational NWP. An overview of how the GMTB can be expanded to support other global or regional modeling capabilities will also be presented.

  19. Tests of two methods for identifying founder effects in metapopulations reveal substantial type II error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R Graham; Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M

    2013-03-01

    Genetic analysis has been promoted as a way to reconstruct recent historical dynamics ("historical demography") by screening for signatures of events, such as bottlenecks, that disrupt equilibrium patterns of variation. Such analyses might also identify "metapopulation" processes like extinction and recolonization or source-sink dynamics, but this potential remains largely unrealized. Here we use simulations to test the ability of two currently used strategies to distinguish between a set of interconnected subpopulations (demes) that have undergone bottlenecks or extinction and recolonization events (metapopulation dynamics) from a set of static demes. The first strategy, decomposed pairwise regression, provides a holistic test for heterogeneity among demes in their patterns of isolation-by-distance. This method suffered from a type II error rate of 59-100 %, depending on parameter conditions. The second strategy tests for deviations from mutation-drift equilibrium on a deme-by-deme basis to identify sites likely to have experienced recent bottlenecks or founder effects. Although bottleneck tests have good statistical power for single populations with recent population declines, their validity in structured populations has been called into question, and they have not been tested in a metapopulation context with immigration (or colonization) and population recovery. Our simulations of hypothetical metapopulations show that population recovery can rapidly eliminate the statistical signature of a bottleneck, and that moderate levels of gene flow can generate a false signal of recent population growth for demes in equilibrium. Although we did not cover all possible metapopulation scenarios, the performance of the tests was disappointing. Our results indicate that these methods might often fail to identify population bottlenecks and founder effects if population recovery and/or gene flow are influential demographic features of the study system.

  20. Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  1. Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-01-01

    There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  2. Use of rapid carbohydrate utilisation test for identifying "Streptococcus milleri group".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, J M; Ross, P W; Poxton, I R

    1991-01-01

    A short series of biochemical and serological tests were developed for the rapid presumptive identification of "Streptococcus milleri group" isolates. One hundred and seventy seven streptococcal isolates were recovered from the mouths of 10 out of 12 healthy adult volunteers by use of a simple sampling procedure and a single selective medium. In all, 127 oral "S milleri group" isolates were identified by biochemical and serological tests, confirming the indigenous nature of these streptococci in the mouth. Most (70.1%) of "S milleri group" isolates were non-haemolytic, 26% were alpha-haemolytic, and 3.9% beta-haemolytic. Fifty four (42.5%) were serologically typable, of which 46 were Lancefield group F, suggesting that the mouth is an important source of Lancefield group F streptococci. A collection of group F streptococci from a range of sources was indistinguishable from a collection of oral "S milleri group" isolates on the basis of the tests used, supporting the general synonymity of group F streptococcus with the broader "S milleri group". The battery of tests was cheap and simple to perform, and was capable of identifying "S milleri group" isolates from a range of sources, including variants with wide sugar fermentation patterns. PMID:2030154

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Slump Test for Identifying Neuropathic Pain in the Lower Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Lawrence M; MacNeil, Brian J

    2015-08-01

    Diagnostic accuracy study with nonconsecutive enrollment. To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the slump test for neuropathic pain (NeP) in those with low to moderate levels of chronic low back pain (LBP), and to determine whether accuracy of the slump test improves by adding anatomical or qualitative pain descriptors. Neuropathic pain has been linked with poor outcomes, likely due to inadequate diagnosis, which precludes treatment specific for NeP. Current diagnostic approaches are time consuming or lack accuracy. A convenience sample of 21 individuals with LBP, with or without radiating leg pain, was recruited. A standardized neurosensory examination was used to determine the reference diagnosis for NeP. Afterward, the slump test was administered to all participants. Reports of pain location and quality produced during the slump test were recorded. The neurosensory examination designated 11 of the 21 participants with LBP/sciatica as having NeP. The slump test displayed high sensitivity (0.91), moderate specificity (0.70), a positive likelihood ratio of 3.03, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.13. Adding the criterion of pain below the knee significantly increased specificity to 1.00 (positive likelihood ratio = 11.9). Pain-quality descriptors did not improve diagnostic accuracy. The slump test was highly sensitive in identifying NeP within the study sample. Adding a pain-location criterion improved specificity. Combining the diagnostic outcomes was very effective in identifying all those without NeP and half of those with NeP. Limitations arising from the small and narrow spectrum of participants with LBP/sciatica sampled within the study prevent application of the findings to a wider population. Diagnosis, level 4-.

  4. Identifiability in N-mixture models: a large-scale screening test with bird data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéry, Marc

    2018-02-01

    Binomial N-mixture models have proven very useful in ecology, conservation, and monitoring: they allow estimation and modeling of abundance separately from detection probability using simple counts. Recently, doubts about parameter identifiability have been voiced. I conducted a large-scale screening test with 137 bird data sets from 2,037 sites. I found virtually no identifiability problems for Poisson and zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) binomial N-mixture models, but negative-binomial (NB) models had problems in 25% of all data sets. The corresponding multinomial N-mixture models had no problems. Parameter estimates under Poisson and ZIP binomial and multinomial N-mixture models were extremely similar. Identifiability problems became a little more frequent with smaller sample sizes (267 and 50 sites), but were unaffected by whether the models did or did not include covariates. Hence, binomial N-mixture model parameters with Poisson and ZIP mixtures typically appeared identifiable. In contrast, NB mixtures were often unidentifiable, which is worrying since these were often selected by Akaike's information criterion. Identifiability of binomial N-mixture models should always be checked. If problems are found, simpler models, integrated models that combine different observation models or the use of external information via informative priors or penalized likelihoods, may help. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  5. Developing and testing an instrument for identifying performance incentives in the Greek health care sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleologou Victoria

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the era of cost containment, managers are constantly pursuing increased organizational performance and productivity by aiming at the obvious target, i.e. the workforce. The health care sector, in which production processes are more complicated compared to other industries, is not an exception. In light of recent legislation in Greece in which efficiency improvement and achievement of specific performance targets are identified as undisputable health system goals, the purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and valid instrument for investigating the attitudes of Greek physicians, nurses and administrative personnel towards job-related aspects, and the extent to which these motivate them to improve performance and increase productivity. Methods A methodological exploratory design was employed in three phases: a content development and assessment, which resulted in a 28-item instrument, b pilot testing (N = 74 and c field testing (N = 353. Internal consistency reliability was tested via Cronbach's alpha coefficient and factor analysis was used to identify the underlying constructs. Tests of scaling assumptions, according to the Multitrait-Multimethod Matrix, were used to confirm the hypothesized component structure. Results Four components, referring to intrinsic individual needs and external job-related aspects, were revealed and explain 59.61% of the variability. They were subsequently labeled: job attributes, remuneration, co-workers and achievement. Nine items not meeting item-scale criteria were removed, resulting in a 19-item instrument. Scale reliability ranged from 0.782 to 0.901 and internal item consistency and discriminant validity criteria were satisfied. Conclusion Overall, the instrument appears to be a promising tool for hospital administrations in their attempt to identify job-related factors, which motivate their employees. The psychometric properties were good and warrant administration to a larger

  6. Tumor testing to identify lynch syndrome in two Australian colorectal cancer cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Eriksen, Stine V; Walsh, Michael D; Walters, Rhiannon J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Stewart, Jenna; Preston, Susan; Win, Aung Ko; Flander, Louisa; Ouakrim, Driss Ait; Macrae, Finlay A; Boussioutas, Alex; Winship, Ingrid M; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; English, Dallas; Jenkins, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    Tumor testing of colorectal cancers (CRC) for mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency is an effective approach to identify carriers of germline MMR gene mutation (Lynch syndrome). The aim of this study was to identify MMR gene mutation carriers in two cohorts of population-based CRC utilizing a combination of tumor and germline testing approaches. Colorectal cancers from 813 patients diagnosed with CRC Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (ACCFR) and from 826 patients from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (MCCS) were tested for MMR protein expression using immunohistochemistry, microsatellite instability (MSI), BRAF V600E somatic mutation, and for MLH1 methylation. MMR gene mutation testing (Sanger sequencing and Multiplex Ligation Dependent Probe Amplification) was performed on germline DNA of patients with MMR-deficient tumors and a subset of MMR-proficient CRCs. Of the 813 ACCFR probands, 90 probands demonstrated tumor MMR deficiency (11.1%), and 42 had a MMR gene germline mutation (5.2%). For the MCCS, MMR deficiency was identified in the tumors of 103 probands (12.5%) and seven had a germline mutation (0.8%). All the mutation carriers were diagnosed prior to 70 years of age. Probands with a MMR-deficient CRC without MLH1 methylation and a gene mutation were considered Lynch-like and comprised 41.1% and 25.2% of the MMR-deficient CRCs for the ACCFR and MCCS, respectively. Identification of MMR gene mutation carriers in Australian CRC-affected patients is optimized by immunohistochemistry screening of CRC diagnosed before 70 years of age. A significant proportion of MMR-deficient CRCs will have unknown etiology (Lynch-like) proving problematic for clinical management. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Tumour testing to identify Lynch syndrome in two Australian colorectal cancer cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Stine V.; Walsh, Michael D.; Walters, Rhiannon J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Stewart, Jenna; Preston, Susan; Win, Aung Ko; Flander, Louisa; Ouakrim, Driss Ait; Macrae, Finlay A.; Boussioutas, Alex; Winship, Ingrid M.; Giles, Graham G.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Tumour testing of colorectal cancers (CRC) for mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency is an effective approach to identify carriers of germline MMR gene mutation (Lynch syndrome). The aim of this study was to identify MMR gene mutation carriers in two cohorts of population-based CRC utilising a combination of tumour and germline testing approaches. Methods CRCs from 813 patients diagnosed with CRC Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (ACCFR) and from 826 patients from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (MCCS) were tested for MMR protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC), microsatellite instability (MSI), BRAFV600E somatic mutation and for MLH1 methylation. MMR gene mutation testing (Sanger sequencing and MLPA) was performed on germline DNA of patients with MMR-deficient tumours and a subset of MMR-proficient CRCs. Results Of the 813 ACCFR probands, 90 probands demonstrated tumour MMR-deficiency (11.1%) and 42 had a MMR gene germline mutation (5.2%). For the MCCS, MMR-deficiency was identified in the tumours of 103 probands (12.5%) and 7 had a germline mutation (0.8%). All the mutation carriers were diagnosed prior to 70 years of age. Probands with a MMR-deficient CRC without MLH1 methylation and a gene mutation were considered Lynch-like and comprised 41.1% and 22.3% of the MMR-deficient CRCs for the ACCFR and MCCS, respectively. Conclusions Identification of MMR gene mutation carriers in Australian CRC-affected patients is optimised by IHC screening of CRC diagnosed before 70 years. A significant proportion of MMR-deficient CRCs will have unknown aetiology (Lynch-like) proving problematic for clinical management. PMID:27273229

  8. Incidental copy-number variants identified by routine genome testing in a clinical population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Philip M.; Soens, Zachry T.; Campbell, Ian M.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Cheung, Sau Wai; Patel, Ankita; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Plon, Sharon E.; Shaw, Chad A.; McGuire, Amy L.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mutational load of susceptibility variants has not been studied on a genomic scale in a clinical population, nor has the potential to identify these mutations as incidental findings during clinical testing been systematically ascertained. Methods Array comparative genomic hybridization, a method for genome-wide detection of DNA copy-number variants, was performed clinically on DNA from 9,005 individuals. Copy-number variants encompassing or disrupting single genes were identified and analyzed for their potential to confer predisposition to dominant, adult-onset disease. Multigene copy-number variants affecting dominant, adult-onset cancer syndrome genes were also assessed. Results In our cohort, 83 single-gene copy-number variants affected 40 unique genes associated with dominant, adult-onset disorders and unrelated to the patients’ referring diagnoses (i.e., incidental) were found. Fourteen of these copy-number variants are likely disease-predisposing, 25 are likely benign, and 44 are of unknown clinical consequence. When incidental copy-number variants spanning up to 20 genes were considered, 27 copy-number variants affected 17 unique genes associated with dominant, adult-onset cancer predisposition. Conclusion Copy-number variants potentially conferring susceptibility to adult-onset disease can be identified as incidental findings during routine genome-wide testing. Some of these mutations may be medically actionable, enabling disease surveillance or prevention; however, most incidentally observed single-gene copy-number variants are currently of unclear significance to the patient. PMID:22878507

  9. Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Andru?cã Maria Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The field of globalization has highlighted an interdependence implied by a more harmonious understanding determined by the daily interaction between nations through the inducement of peace and the management of streamlining and the effectiveness of the global economy. For the functioning of the globalization, the developing countries that can be helped by the developed ones must be involved. The international community can contribute to the institution of the development environment of the gl...

  10. Link System Performance at the First Global Test of the CMS Alignment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce, P.; Calvo, E.; Figueroa, C.F.; Rodrigo, T.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Universidad de Cantabria (Spain); Barcala, J.M.; Fernandez, M.G.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Oller, J.C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    A test of components and a global test of the CMS alignment system was performed at the 14 hall of the ISR tunnel at CERN along Summer 2000. Positions are reconstructed and compared to survey measurements. The obtained results from the measurements of the Link System are presented here. (Author) 12 refs.

  11. Quantitative group testing-based overlapping pool sequencing to identify rare variant carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang-Chang; Li, Cheng; Sun, Xiao

    2014-06-17

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed that rare variants are responsible for a large portion of the heritability of some complex human diseases. This highlights the increasing importance of detecting and screening for rare variants. Although the massively parallel sequencing technologies have greatly reduced the cost of DNA sequencing, the identification of rare variant carriers by large-scale re-sequencing remains prohibitively expensive because of the huge challenge of constructing libraries for thousands of samples. Recently, several studies have reported that techniques from group testing theory and compressed sensing could help identify rare variant carriers in large-scale samples with few pooled sequencing experiments and a dramatically reduced cost. Based on quantitative group testing, we propose an efficient overlapping pool sequencing strategy that allows the efficient recovery of variant carriers in numerous individuals with much lower costs than conventional methods. We used random k-set pool designs to mix samples, and optimized the design parameters according to an indicative probability. Based on a mathematical model of sequencing depth distribution, an optimal threshold was selected to declare a pool positive or negative. Then, using the quantitative information contained in the sequencing results, we designed a heuristic Bayesian probability decoding algorithm to identify variant carriers. Finally, we conducted in silico experiments to find variant carriers among 200 simulated Escherichia coli strains. With the simulated pools and publicly available Illumina sequencing data, our method correctly identified the variant carriers for 91.5-97.9% variants with the variant frequency ranging from 0.5 to 1.5%. Using the number of reads, variant carriers could be identified precisely even though samples were randomly selected and pooled. Our method performed better than the published DNA Sudoku design and compressed sequencing, especially in reducing

  12. Testing for causality among globalization, institution and financial development: Further evidence from three economic blocs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Muhammad Muye

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper employs several techniques to study the dynamic effect and causality among globalization, institutions and financial development. Specifically, we use the panel cointegration technique by Pedroni (1999, 2004; the DOLS approach by Kao and Chiang (1999; the FMOLS; the PMG technique of Pesaran et al. (1999 and the panel VECM causality approach. The panel cointegration test shows the existence of cointegration among our dataset. The Granger causality test demonstrates that causality runs from globalization to institutions, and institutions in turn Granger cause financial development specifically in the banking sector in the BRICS and MINT blocs. Globalization is further found to have a causal impact on the stock market, although bypassing the institutions channel. For the PMG, DOLS and FMOLS results, there is evidence of a positive long run relationship among globalization, institutions and financial development.

  13. Estimation of Uncertainties in the Global Distance Test (GDT_TS for CASP Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlin Li

    Full Text Available The Critical Assessment of techniques for protein Structure Prediction (or CASP is a community-wide blind test experiment to reveal the best accomplishments of structure modeling. Assessors have been using the Global Distance Test (GDT_TS measure to quantify prediction performance since CASP3 in 1998. However, identifying significant score differences between close models is difficult because of the lack of uncertainty estimations for this measure. Here, we utilized the atomic fluctuations caused by structure flexibility to estimate the uncertainty of GDT_TS scores. Structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance are deposited as ensembles of alternative conformers that reflect the structural flexibility, whereas standard X-ray refinement produces the static structure averaged over time and space for the dynamic ensembles. To recapitulate the structural heterogeneous ensemble in the crystal lattice, we performed time-averaged refinement for X-ray datasets to generate structural ensembles for our GDT_TS uncertainty analysis. Using those generated ensembles, our study demonstrates that the time-averaged refinements produced structure ensembles with better agreement with the experimental datasets than the averaged X-ray structures with B-factors. The uncertainty of the GDT_TS scores, quantified by their standard deviations (SDs, increases for scores lower than 50 and 70, with maximum SDs of 0.3 and 1.23 for X-ray and NMR structures, respectively. We also applied our procedure to the high accuracy version of GDT-based score and produced similar results with slightly higher SDs. To facilitate score comparisons by the community, we developed a user-friendly web server that produces structure ensembles for NMR and X-ray structures and is accessible at http://prodata.swmed.edu/SEnCS. Our work helps to identify the significance of GDT_TS score differences, as well as to provide structure ensembles for estimating SDs of any scores.

  14. SVD identifies transcript length distribution functions from DNA microarray data and reveals evolutionary forces globally affecting GBM metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Bertagnolli

    Full Text Available To search for evolutionary forces that might act upon transcript length, we use the singular value decomposition (SVD to identify the length distribution functions of sets and subsets of human and yeast transcripts from profiles of mRNA abundance levels across gel electrophoresis migration distances that were previously measured by DNA microarrays. We show that the SVD identifies the transcript length distribution functions as "asymmetric generalized coherent states" from the DNA microarray data and with no a-priori assumptions. Comparing subsets of human and yeast transcripts of the same gene ontology annotations, we find that in both disparate eukaryotes, transcripts involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism are significantly shorter than typical, and in particular, significantly shorter than those involved in glucose metabolism. Comparing the subsets of human transcripts that are overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM or normal brain tissue samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we find that GBM maintains normal brain overexpression of significantly short transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism, but suppresses normal overexpression of significantly longer transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in glucose metabolism and brain activity. These global relations among transcript length, cellular metabolism and tumor development suggest a previously unrecognized physical mode for tumor and normal cells to differentially regulate metabolism in a transcript length-dependent manner. The identified distribution functions support a previous hypothesis from mathematical modeling of evolutionary forces that act upon transcript length in the manner of the restoring force of the harmonic oscillator.

  15. High Resolution Downscaling For Mesoamerica And The Caribbean Of CMIP5 Global Model Simulations: Identifying Vulnerability And Adaptation Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, R. J.; Rowe, C. M.; Hays, C.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution (4-12 km) dynamical downscaling simulations of future climate change between now and 2060 have been made for Mesoamerica and the Caribbean. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional climate model to downscale results from the NCAR CCSM4 CMIP5 RCP8.5 global simulation. The entire region is covered at 12 km horizontal spatial resolution, with as much as possible (especially in mountainous regions) at 4 km. We compare a control period (2006-2010) with 50 years into the future (2056-2060). The motivation for making these computationally-demanding model simulations is to better define local and regional climate change effects so as to better identify and quantify impacts and associated vulnerabilities. This is an essential precursor to developing robust adaptation strategies. These simulations have been made in conjunction with our partners from the countries involved. As expected, all areas warm, with the warming in general largest in inland regions, and less towards coastal regions. Higher elevation regions also tend to warm somewhat more than lower elevation regions, a result that could not be reliably obtained, in detail, from coarse-scale global models. The precipitation signal is much more mixed, and demonstrates more clearly the need for high resolution. The effects of changes in the large-scale trade wind regime tend to be restricted to the immediate Atlantic coast, while the interior is less-well posed, with some indication of a northward shift in precipitation regime, due to changes both in the large-scale ITCZ, and the regional scale Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico low-level jets. Topographic resolution continues to play a key role. The new results are currently being used by both climate scientists and policy makers to evaluate vulnerabilities, and hence develop adaptation strategies for the affected countries.

  16. Utility of quantitative sensory testing and screening tools in identifying HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy in Western Kenya: pilot testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna Cettomai

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathy is the most common neurologic complication of HIV but is widely under-diagnosed in resource-constrained settings. We aimed to identify tools that accurately distinguish individuals with moderate/severe peripheral neuropathy and can be administered by non-physician healthcare workers (HCW in resource-constrained settings.We enrolled a convenience sample of 30 HIV-infected outpatients from a Kenyan HIV-care clinic. A HCW administered the Neuropathy Severity Score (NSS, Single Question Neuropathy Screen (Single-QNS, Subjective Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (Subjective-PNS, and Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (Brief-PNS. Monofilament, graduated tuning fork, and two-point discrimination examinations were performed. Tools were validated against a neurologist's clinical assessment of moderate/severe neuropathy.The sample was 57% male, mean age 38.6 years, and mean CD4 count 324 cells/µL. Neurologist's assessment identified 20% (6/30 with moderate/severe neuropathy. Diagnostic utilities for moderate/severe neuropathy were: Single-QNS--83% sensitivity, 71% specificity; Subjective-PNS-total--83% sensitivity, 83% specificity; Subjective-PNS-max and NSS--67% sensitivity, 92% specificity; Brief-PNS--0% sensitivity, 92% specificity; monofilament--100% sensitivity, 88% specificity; graduated tuning fork--83% sensitivity, 88% specificity; two-point discrimination--75% sensitivity, 58% specificity.Pilot testing suggests Single-QNS, Subjective-PNS, and monofilament examination accurately identify HIV-infected patients with moderate/severe neuropathy and may be useful diagnostic tools in resource-constrained settings.

  17. Identifying At-Risk Individuals for Insomnia Using the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, David A; Pillai, Vivek; Arnedt, J Todd; Drake, Christopher L

    2016-02-01

    A primary focus of the National Institute of Mental Health's current strategic plan is "predicting" who is at risk for disease. As such, the current investigation examined the utility of premorbid sleep reactivity in identifying a specific and manageable population at elevated risk for future insomnia. A community-based sample of adults (n = 2,892; 59.3% female; 47.9 ± 13.3 y old) with no lifetime history of insomnia or depression completed web-based surveys across three annual assessments. Participants reported parental history of insomnia, demographic characteristics, sleep reactivity on the Ford Insomnia in Response to Stress Test (FIRST), and insomnia symptoms. DSM-IV diagnostic criteria were used to determine insomnia classification. Baseline FIRST scores were used to predict incident insomnia at 1-y follow-up. Two clinically meaningful FIRST cutoff values were identified: FIRST ≥ 16 (sensitivity 77%; specificity 50%; odds ratio [OR] = 2.88, P insomnia onset, even after controlling for stress exposure and demographic characteristics. Of the incident cases, insomniacs with highly reactive sleep systems reported longer sleep onset latencies (FIRST ≥ 16: 65 min; FIRST ≥ 18: 68 min) than participants with nonreactive insomnia (FIRST insomnia based on trait sleep reactivity. The FIRST accurately identifies a focused target population in which the psychobiological processes complicit in insomnia onset and progression can be better investigated, thus improving future preventive efforts. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  18. Influence of tribological test on the global conversion of natural composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Correa

    Full Text Available Abstract The vinyl ester resins and natural composites have emerged as a suitable alternative in tribological application due to mechanical behavior, which relates to the conversion of the double bonds. During tribological test the permanent contact between polymeric sample and counterpart can increase the temperature affecting the crosslinking of the samples. These variations have direct implications in the curing rate and the global conversion. In this work, the FTIR evaluation is used to evaluate possible changes on the global conversion of vinyl ester and their composites reinforced with Musaceae fiber bundles and cured using two hardeners, after a specific tribological test. Increments around 15% on global conversion of styrene double bonds were observed for neat matrix and composites using both hardeners, suggesting that during tribology test some alterations on resin structure takes place. These results open alternatives to manipulate the curing conditions in order to control the tribological behavior.

  19. Computerized Adaptive Test vs. decision trees: Development of a support decision system to identify suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Gomez, D; Baca-Garcia, E; Aguado, D; Courtet, P; Lopez-Castroman, J

    2016-12-01

    Several Computerized Adaptive Tests (CATs) have been proposed to facilitate assessments in mental health. These tests are built in a standard way, disregarding useful and usually available information not included in the assessment scales that could increase the precision and utility of CATs, such as the history of suicide attempts. Using the items of a previously developed scale for suicidal risk, we compared the performance of a standard CAT and a decision tree in a support decision system to identify suicidal behavior. We included the history of past suicide attempts as a class for the separation of patients in the decision tree. The decision tree needed an average of four items to achieve a similar accuracy than a standard CAT with nine items. The accuracy of the decision tree, obtained after 25 cross-validations, was 81.4%. A shortened test adapted for the separation of suicidal and non-suicidal patients was developed. CATs can be very useful tools for the assessment of suicidal risk. However, standard CATs do not use all the information that is available. A decision tree can improve the precision of the assessment since they are constructed using a priori information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The diagnostic value of a modified Neer test in identifying subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guosheng, Yu; Chongxi, Ren; Guoqing, Cui; Junling, Xu; Hailong, Ji

    2017-12-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) is characterized by pain experienced through an arc of elevation as the shoulder abducts and diagnosed commonly by Neer test (NT). However, the diagnostic accuracy of NT for SAIS is still limited. Here, a modified Neer test (MNT) was introduced to improve the accuracy of the clinical examination in diagnosing SAIS and differentiating it from frozen shoulder. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic values of MNT in diagnosing SAIS and differentiating it from frozen shoulder. Between January 2015 and June 2015, a prospective study assessed 85 shoulders among 82 patients with shoulder joint disease; 42 patients underwent arthroscopic surgery, and all 82 patients received X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or MRI contrast examinations. The diagnostic criteria are based on arthroscopy and MRI scanning. Using clinical epidemiology and diagnostic tests, we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and degree of accuracy of MNT in diagnosing SAIS. The diagnostic accuracy rate of MNT in identifying shoulder SAIS was 90.59%, and the specificity was 95.56%. In the diagnosis of SAIS, MNT is a reliable and highly accurate maneuver and seems useful to distinguish this syndrome from frozen shoulder.

  1. Using information theory to identify redundancy in common laboratory tests in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon; Maslove, David M

    2015-07-31

    Clinical workflow is infused with large quantities of data, particularly in areas with enhanced monitoring such as the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Information theory can quantify the expected amounts of total and redundant information contained in a given clinical data type, and as such has the potential to inform clinicians on how to manage the vast volumes of data they are required to analyze in their daily practice. The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to quantify the amounts of redundant information associated with common ICU lab tests. We analyzed the information content of 11 laboratory test results from 29,149 adult ICU admissions in the MIMIC II database. Information theory was applied to quantify the expected amount of redundant information both between lab values from the same ICU day, and between consecutive ICU days. Most lab values showed a decreasing trend over time in the expected amount of novel information they contained. Platelet, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine measurements exhibited the most amount of redundant information on days 2 and 3 compared to the previous day. The creatinine-BUN and sodium-chloride pairs had the most redundancy. Information theory can help identify and discourage unnecessary testing and bloodwork, and can in general be a useful data analytic technique for many medical specialties that deal with information overload.

  2. Properties of global- and local-ancestry adjustments in genetic association tests in admixed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Eden R; Tunc, Ilker; Liu, Zhi; Slifer, Susan H; Beecham, Ashley H; Beecham, Gary W

    2018-03-01

    Population substructure can lead to confounding in tests for genetic association, and failure to adjust properly can result in spurious findings. Here we address this issue of confounding by considering the impact of global ancestry (average ancestry across the genome) and local ancestry (ancestry at a specific chromosomal location) on regression parameters and relative power in ancestry-adjusted and -unadjusted models. We examine theoretical expectations under different scenarios for population substructure; applying different regression models, verifying and generalizing using simulations, and exploring the findings in real-world admixed populations. We show that admixture does not lead to confounding when the trait locus is tested directly in a single admixed population. However, if there is more complex population structure or a marker locus in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the trait locus is tested, both global and local ancestry can be confounders. Additionally, we show the genotype parameters of adjusted and unadjusted models all provide tests for LD between the marker and trait locus, but in different contexts. The local ancestry adjusted model tests for LD in the ancestral populations, while tests using the unadjusted and the global ancestry adjusted models depend on LD in the admixed population(s), which may be enriched due to different ancestral allele frequencies. Practically, this implies that global-ancestry adjustment should be used for screening, but local-ancestry adjustment may better inform fine mapping and provide better effect estimates at trait loci. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  3. Refurbish research and test reactors corresponding to global age of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Oyama, Yukio; Okamoto, Koji; Yamana, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2011-01-01

    This special article featured arguments for refurbishment of research and test reactors corresponding to global age of nuclear energy, based on the report: 'Investigation of research facilities necessary for future joint usage' issued by the special committee of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) in September 2010. It consisted of six papers titled as 'Introduction-establishment of AESJ special committee for investigation', 'State of research and test reactors in Japan', 'State of overseas research and test reactors', 'Needs analysis for research and test reactors', 'Proposal of AESJ special committee' and 'Summary and future issues'. In order to develop human resources and promote research and development needed in global age of nuclear energy, research and test reactors would be refurbished as an Asian regional center of excellence. (T. Tanaka)

  4. Asthma in pregnancy: association between the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and comparisons with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Georgia Véras; Leite, Débora F B; Rizzo, José A; Sarinho, Emanuel S C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a possible association between the assessment of clinical asthma control using the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) classification and to perform comparisons with values of spirometry. Through this cross-sectional study, 103 pregnant women with asthma were assessed in the period from October 2010 to October 2013 in the asthma pregnancy clinic at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Pernambuco. Questionnaires concerning the level of asthma control were administered using the Global Initiative for Asthma classification, the Asthma Control Test validated for asthmatic expectant mothers and spirometry; all three methods of assessing asthma control were performed during the same visit between the twenty-first and twenty-seventh weeks of pregnancy. There was a significant association between clinical asthma control assessment using the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification (pspirometry. This study shows that both the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and the Asthma Control Test can be used for asthmatic expectant mothers to assess the clinical control of asthma, especially at the end of the second trimester, which is assumed to be the period of worsening asthma exacerbations during pregnancy. We highlight the importance of the Asthma Control Test as a subjective instrument with easy application, easy interpretation and good reproducibility that does not require spirometry to assess the level of asthma control and can be used in the primary care of asthmatic expectant mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Portable penetrometer for agricultural soil: sensitivity test to identify critical compaction depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Medeiros

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To express the negative effects of soil compaction, some researchers use critical values for soil mechanical strength that severely impair plant growth. The aim of this study was to identify this critical compaction depth, to test the functionality of a new, portable penetrometer developed from a spring dynamometer, and compare it to an electronic penetrometer traditionally used in compaction studies of agricultural soils. Three soils with distinct texture were conventionally tilled using a disk plow, and cultivated with different plant species. The critical soil resistance defined to establish critical compaction depth was equal to 1.5 MPa. The results of the new equipment were similar to the electronic penetrometer, indicating its viability as a tool for assessing the soil physical conditions for plant growth.

  6. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling in Lead Optimization. 2. Rational Bioavailability Design by Global Sensitivity Analysis To Identify Properties Affecting Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Pankaj R; Bolger, Michael B; Haworth, Ian S; Clark, Robert D; Martin, Eric J

    2018-03-05

    When medicinal chemists need to improve oral bioavailability (%F) during lead optimization, they systematically modify compound properties mainly based on their own experience and general rules of thumb. However, at least a dozen properties can influence %F, and the difficulty of multiparameter optimization for such complex nonlinear processes grows combinatorially with the number of variables. Furthermore, strategies can be in conflict. For example, adding a polar or charged group will generally increase solubility but decrease permeability. Identifying the 2 or 3 properties that most influence %F for a given compound series would make %F optimization much more efficient. We previously reported an adaptation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) simulations to predict %F for lead series from purely computational inputs within a 2-fold average error. Here, we run thousands of such simulations to generate a comprehensive "bioavailability landscape" for each series. A key innovation was recognition that the large and variable number of p K a 's in drug molecules could be replaced by just the two straddling the isoelectric point. Another was use of the ZINC database to cull out chemically inaccessible regions of property space. A quadratic partial least squares regression (PLS) accurately fits a continuous surface to these thousands of bioavailability predictions. The PLS coefficients indicate the globally sensitive compound properties. The PLS surface also displays the %F landscape in these sensitive properties locally around compounds of particular interest. Finally, being quick to calculate, the PLS equation can be combined with models for activity and other properties for multiobjective lead optimization.

  7. Identifying fallers with Parkinson's disease using home-based tests: who is at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Inge; van Wegen, Erwin; Jones, Diana; Rochester, Lynn; Nieuwboer, Alice; Willems, Anne Marie; Baker, Katherine; Hetherington, Vicki; Kwakkel, Gert

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this work is to determine risk factors for falling in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) using home-based assessments and develop a prediction model. Data on falls, balance, gait-related activities, and nonmotor symptoms were obtained from 153 PD patients (Hoehn-Yahr 2-4) in their home. Fifty-one candidate determinants for falling were independently tested using bivariate logistic regression analysis. A multivariate logistic regression model was developed to identify patients susceptible to falls. Sixty-six subjects (43%) were classified as fallers. Eighteen determinants for falling were selected. The final multivariate model showed an accuracy of 74% and included: (1) Freezing of Gait Questionnaire, (2) Timed Get Up and Go (TGUG) score, (3) disease duration, (4) item 15 of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Based on disease duration, freezing symptoms, walking problems, and a prolonged TGUG duration, assessed in the home situation, it was possible to accurately identify 74% of PD patients as fallers. (c) 2008 Movement Disorder Society.

  8. The "hierarchical" Scratch Collapse Test for identifying multilevel ulnar nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, Kristen M; Gontre, Gil; Tang, David; Boyd, Kirsty U; Yee, Andrew; Damiano, Marci S; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-09-01

    The Scratch Collapse Test (SCT) is used to assist in the clinical evaluation of patients with ulnar nerve compression. The purpose of this study is to introduce the hierarchical SCT as a physical examination tool for identifying multilevel nerve compression in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome. A prospective cohort study (2010-2011) was conducted of patients referred with primary cubital tunnel syndrome. Five ulnar nerve compression sites were evaluated with the SCT. Each site generating a positive SCT was sequentially "frozen out" with a topical anesthetic to allow determination of both primary and secondary ulnar nerve entrapment points. The order or "hierarchy" of compression sites was recorded. Twenty-five patients (mean age 49.6 ± 12.3 years; 64 % female) were eligible for inclusion. The primary entrapment point was identified as Osborne's band in 80 % and the cubital tunnel retinaculum in 20 % of patients. Secondary entrapment points were also identified in the following order in all patients: (1) volar antebrachial fascia, (2) Guyon's canal, and (3) arcade of Struthers. The SCT is useful in localizing the site of primary compression of the ulnar nerve in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome. It is also sensitive enough to detect secondary compression points when primary sites are sequentially frozen out with a topical anesthetic, termed the hierarchical SCT. The findings of the hierarchical SCT are in keeping with the double crush hypothesis described by Upton and McComas in 1973 and the hypothesis of multilevel nerve compression proposed by Mackinnon and Novak in 1994.

  9. Predischarge maximal exercise test identifies risk for cardiac death in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Mickley, H; Damsgaard, E M

    1990-01-01

    subjects was 143 watts. A maximal work capacity half this (less than or equal to 72 watts) predicted long-term mortality in AMI patients (p less than 0.001). In addition a low increase in systolic blood pressure (less than 30 mm Hg) also predicted long-term mortality (p less than 0.005), whereas ST shifts...... were of no significant value. In this study maximal work capacity turned out to be the best single exercise variable for identifying groups of AMI patients with very low and relative high risk of cardiac death. When all 3 exercise variables were combined, the predischarge maximal exercise test......A maximal exercise test was performed in 54 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) before discharge and in 49 age-matched control subjects. The long-term prognosis was assessed after an average follow-up of 7.6 years in AMI patients and 5.8 years in control subjects. The maximal work...

  10. Development and Application of Diagnostic Test to Identify Students' Misconceptions of Quantum Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halim, A.A.; Meerah, T.S.; Lilia Halim

    2009-01-01

    A study on students' misconceptions on quantum physics is rarely being done, because the target audience is quite small. It is important to understand quantum physics concepts correctly especially for science students. This study was under taken to help students identify their misconceptions at the early stage. The aim of this study is to develop a diagnostic test which can access the students' misconceptions, and use the findings for the benefits of quantum physics courses. A multiple-choice Quantum Physics Diagnostic Test (QPDT), that involves concepts of light, atomic model, particle-wave dualism, wave function, and potential energy, was administered to 200 university students. The results shows that many students use the classical concepts to describe the quantum phenomenon. For example students describe light only as a wave, an electron only as a particle, and that the atomic structure is parallel to the solar system. To overcome these problems, it is suggested that lecturers spend more time in explaining the basic definitions and using analogies in quantum physics teaching. (author)

  11. Genetic testing in infantile spasms identifies a chromosome 13q deletion and retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin; Minassian, Berge A

    2014-05-01

    Infantile spasms is an epileptic encephalopathy and the common final manifestation of numerous disparate insults to the developing brain during infancy. The varied etiologies may be structural, metabolic, genetic, or unknown. Etiological diagnosis is important as it may lead to specific therapy, which may affect developmental outcome. We report a case of infantile spasms of unknown etiology with dysmorphic features, in which genetic copy number variation microarray testing was included in the investigation of the cause of the disease. A large deletion of chromosome 13 was identified in the region 13q13 to 13q21.3 encompassing the retinoblastoma gene (13q14.2). Urgent ophthalmological evaluation revealed an asymptomatic retinoblastoma of the left eye, leading to early treatment. This is the first case report of infantile spasms specifically associated with a chromosome 13q deletion. Chromosomal region 13q13 to 13q21.3 may contain one or more genes whose hemizygous loss leads to infantile spasms. Copy number variation testing for cryptogenic infantile spasms led to the discovery of a mutation responsible for retinoblastoma, enabling early diagnosis and treatment of a potentially life-threatening cancer. High-sensitivity molecular diagnosis improves health care and substantially reduces expenses. This shift in diagnostic evaluation is broadly relevant to health care. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Microarray as a First Genetic Test in Global Developmental Delay: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakadis, Yannis; Shevell, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Microarray technology has a significantly higher clinical yield than karyotyping in individuals with global developmental delay (GDD). Despite this, it has not yet been routinely implemented as a screening test owing to the perception that this approach is more expensive. We aimed to evaluate the effect that replacing karyotype with…

  13. Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Maja

    Globalization is often referred to as external to education - a state of affair facing the modern curriculum with numerous challenges. In this paper it is examined as internal to curriculum; analysed as a problematization in a Foucaultian sense. That is, as a complex of attentions, worries, ways...... of reasoning, producing curricular variables. The analysis is made through an example of early childhood curriculum in Danish Pre-school, and the way the curricular variable of the pre-school child comes into being through globalization as a problematization, carried forth by the comparative practices of PISA...

  14. Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    F. Gerard Adams

    2008-01-01

    The rapid globalization of the world economy is causing fundamental changes in patterns of trade and finance. Some economists have argued that globalization has arrived and that the world is “flat†. While the geographic scope of markets has increased, the author argues that new patterns of trade and finance are a result of the discrepancies between “old†countries and “new†. As the differences are gradually wiped out, particularly if knowledge and technology spread worldwide, the t...

  15. Identifying the interacting roles of stressors in driving the global loss of canopy-forming to mat-forming algae in marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Elisabeth M A; Thomson, Russell J; Micheli, Fiorenza; Mancuso, Francesco P; Airoldi, Laura

    2014-11-01

    Identifying the type and strength of interactions between local anthropogenic and other stressors can help to set achievable management targets for degraded marine ecosystems and support their resilience by identifying local actions. We undertook a meta-analysis, using data from 118 studies to test the hypothesis that ongoing global declines in the dominant habitat along temperate rocky coastlines, forests of canopy-forming algae and/or their replacement by mat-forming algae are driven by the nonadditive interactions between local anthropogenic stressors that can be addressed through management actions (fishing, heavy metal pollution, nutrient enrichment and high sediment loads) and other stressors (presence of competitors or grazers, removal of canopy algae, limiting or excessive light, low or high salinity, increasing temperature, high wave exposure and high UV or CO2 ), not as easily amenable to management actions. In general, the cumulative effects of local anthropogenic and other stressors had negative effects on the growth and survival of canopy-forming algae. Conversely, the growth or survival of mat-forming algae was either unaffected or significantly enhanced by the same pairs of stressors. Contrary to our predictions, the majority of interactions between stressors were additive. There were however synergistic interactions between nutrient enrichment and heavy metals, the presence of competitors, low light and increasing temperature, leading to amplified negative effects on canopy-forming algae. There were also synergistic interactions between nutrient enrichment and increasing CO2 and temperature leading to amplified positive effects on mat-forming algae. Our review of the current literature shows that management of nutrient levels, rather than fishing, heavy metal pollution or high sediment loads, would provide the greatest opportunity for preventing the shift from canopy to mat-forming algae, particularly in enclosed bays or estuaries because of the

  16. Sport-specific endurance plank test for evaluation of global core muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tom K; Wu, Shing; Nie, Jinlei

    2014-02-01

    To examine the validity and reliability of a sports-specific endurance plank test for the evaluation of global core muscle function. Repeated-measures study. Laboratory environment. Twenty-eight male and eight female young athletes. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of selected trunk flexors and extensors, and an intervention of pre-fatigue core workout were applied for test validation. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (CV), and the measurement bias ratio */÷ ratio limits of agreement (LOA) were calculated to assess reliability and measurement error. Test validity was shown by the sEMG of selected core muscles, which indicated >50% increase in muscle activation during the test; and the definite discrimination of the ∼30% reduction in global core muscle endurance subsequent to a pre-fatigue core workout. For test-retest reliability, when the first attempt of three repeated trials was considered as familiarisation, the ICC was 0.99 (95% CI: 0.98-0.99), CV was 2.0 ± 1.56% and the measurement bias ratio */÷ ratio LOA was 0.99 */÷ 1.07. The findings suggest that the sport-specific endurance plank test is a valid, reliable and practical method for assessing global core muscle endurance in athletes given that at least one familiarisation trial takes place prior to measurement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Global tyrosine kinome profiling of human thyroid tumors identifies Src as a promising target for invasive cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nancy L.; Lin, Chi-Iou; Du, Jinyan; Whang, Edward E.; Ito, Hiromichi; Moore, Francis D.; Ruan, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Kinome profiling is a novel technique for identifying activated kinases in human cancers. ► Src activity is increased in invasive thyroid cancers. ► Inhibition of Src activity decreased proliferation and invasion in vitro. ► Further investigation of Src targeted therapies in thyroid cancer is warranted. -- Abstract: Background: Novel therapies are needed for the treatment of invasive thyroid cancers. Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases plays an important role in thyroid oncogenesis. Because current targeted therapies are biased toward a small subset of tyrosine kinases, we conducted a study to reveal novel therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer using a bead-based, high-throughput system. Methods: Thyroid tumors and matched normal tissues were harvested from twenty-six patients in the operating room. Protein lysates were analyzed using the Luminex immunosandwich, a bead-based kinase phosphorylation assay. Data was analyzed using GenePattern 3.0 software and clustered according to histology, demographic factors, and tumor status regarding capsular invasion, size, lymphovascular invasion, and extrathyroidal extension. Survival and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of Src inhibition in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. Results: Tyrosine kinome profiling demonstrated upregulation of nine tyrosine kinases in tumors relative to matched normal thyroid tissue: EGFR, PTK6, BTK, HCK, ABL1, TNK1, GRB2, ERK, and SRC. Supervised clustering of well-differentiated tumors by histology, gender, age, or size did not reveal significant differences in tyrosine kinase activity. However, supervised clustering by the presence of invasive disease showed increased Src activity in invasive tumors relative to non-invasive tumors (60% v. 0%, p < 0.05). In vitro, we found that Src inhibition in PTC cells decreased cell invasion and proliferation. Conclusion: Global kinome analysis enables the discovery of novel targets for thyroid cancer

  18. Global dose to man from proposed NNTRP high altitude nuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.R.

    1975-05-01

    Radionuclide measurements from past high altitude nuclear testing have enabled development of a model to estimate surface deposition and doses from 400 kt of fission products injected in winter within the Pacific Test Area at altitudes in excess of 50 km. The largest 30-year average dose to man is about 10 millirem and occurs at 30 0 to 50 0 N latitude. The principal contributor to this dose is external gamma radiation from gross fission products. Individual doses from 90 Sr via the forage-cow-milk pathway and 137 Cs via the pasture-meat pathway are about 1/5 the gross fission product doses. The global 30-year population dose is 3 x 10 7 person-rem, which compares with a 30-year natural background population dose of 1 X 10 10 person-rem. Due in large part to the global distribution of population, over 98 percent of the global person-rem from the proposed high altitude tests is received in the Northern Hemisphere, while about 75 percent of the total population dose occurs within the 30 0 --50 0 N latitude belt. Detonations in summer would decrease the global dose by about a factor of three. (U.S.)

  19. Usefulness of clinical data and rapid diagnostic tests to identify bacterial etiology in adult respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Toledano-Sierra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections are a common complaint and most of them, such as common cold and laryngitis, are viral in origin, so antibiotic use should be exceptional. However, there are other respiratory tract infections (sinusitis, pharyngitis, lower respiratory tract infections, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where a bacterial etiology is responsible for a non-negligible percentage, and antibiotics are often empirically indicated. The aim of the study is to identify the strength of the data obtained from the symptoms, physical examination and rapid diagnostic methods in respiratory infections in which antibiotic use is frequently proposed in order to improve diagnosis and influence the decision to prescribe these drugs. The review concludes that history, physical examination and rapid tests are useful to guide the need for antibiotic treatment in diseases such as acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, exacerbation of lower respiratory tract infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, no isolated data is accurate enough by itself to confirm or rule out the need for antibiotics. Therefore, clinical prediction rules bring together history and physical examination, thereby improving the accuracy of the decision to indicate or not antibiotics.

  20. New approaches for identifying and testing potential new anti-asthma agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Amelia; Castagnoli, Riccardo; Brambilla, Ilaria; Marseglia, Alessia; Tosca, Maria Angela; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Ciprandi, Giorgio

    2018-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease with significant heterogeneity in clinical features, disease severity, pattern of underlying disease mechanisms, and responsiveness to specific treatments. While the majority of asthmatic patients are controlled by standard pharmacological strategies, a significant subgroup has limited therapeutic options representing a major unmet need. Ongoing asthma research aims to better characterize distinct clinical phenotypes, molecular endotypes, associated reliable biomarkers, and also to develop a series of new effective targeted treatment modalities. Areas covered: The expanding knowledge on the pathogenetic mechanisms of asthma has allowed researchers to investigate a range of new treatment options matched to patient profiles. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive and updated overview of the currently available, new and developing approaches for identifying and testing potential treatment options for asthma management. Expert opinion: Future therapeutic strategies for asthma require the identification of reliable biomarkers that can help with diagnosis and endotyping, in order to determine the most effective drug for the right patient phenotype. Furthermore, in addition to the identification of clinical and inflammatory phenotypes, it is expected that a better understanding of the mechanisms of airway remodeling will likely optimize asthma targeted treatment.

  1. PEDS and ASQ developmental screening tests may not identify the same children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sices, Laura; Stancin, Terry; Kirchner, Lester; Bauchner, Howard

    2009-10-01

    In analyzing data from a larger study, we noticed significant disagreement between results of 2 commonly used developmental screening tools (Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status [PEDS; parent concern questionnaire] and Ages & Stages Questionnaires [ASQ; parent report of developmental skills]) delivered to children at the same visit in primary care. The screens have favorable reported psychometric properties and can be efficient to use in practice; however, there is little comparative information about the relative performance of these tools in primary care. We sought to describe the agreement between the 2 screens in this setting. Parents of 60 children aged 9 to 31 months completed PEDS and ASQ screens at the same visit. Concordance (PEDS and ASQ results agree) and discordance (results differ) for the 2 screens were determined. The mean age of children was 17.6 months, 77% received Medicaid, and 50% of parents had a high school education or less. Overall, 37% failed the PEDS and 27% failed the ASQ. Thirty-one children passed (52%) both screens; 9 (15%) failed both; and 20 (33%) failed 1 but not the other (13 PEDS and 7 ASQ). Agreement between the 2 screening tests was only fair, statistically no different from agreement by chance. There was substantial discordance between PEDS and ASQ developmental screens. Although these are preliminary data, clinicians need to be aware that in implementing revised American Academy of Pediatrics screening guidelines, the choice of screening instrument may affect which children are likely to be identified for additional evaluation.

  2. Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Maja

    Globalization is often referred to as external to education - a state of affair facing the modern curriculum with numerous challenges. In this paper it is examined as internal to curriculum; analysed as a problematization in a Foucaultian sense. That is, as a complex of attentions, worries, ways...... of reasoning, producing curricular variables. The analysis is made through an example of early childhood curriculum in Danish Pre-school, and the way the curricular variable of the pre-school child comes into being through globalization as a problematization, carried forth by the comparative practices of PISA....... It thus explores the systems of reason that educational comparative practices carry through time; focusing on the way configurations are reproduced and transformed, forming the pre-school child as a central curricular variable....

  3. 77 FR 41406 - Evaluation of In Vitro Tests for Identifying Eye Injury Hazard Potential of Chemicals and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ...-animal testing strategies proposed for identifying eye injury hazard potential of chemicals and products.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The development of in vitro alternatives to animals for eye safety... new, revised, and alternative safety testing methods and integrated testing strategies with regulatory...

  4. Global Gene-Expression Analysis to Identify Differentially Expressed Genes Critical for the Heat Stress Response in Brassica rapa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangshu Dong

    Full Text Available Genome-wide dissection of the heat stress response (HSR is necessary to overcome problems in crop production caused by global warming. To identify HSR genes, we profiled gene expression in two Chinese cabbage inbred lines with different thermotolerances, Chiifu and Kenshin. Many genes exhibited >2-fold changes in expression upon exposure to 0.5- 4 h at 45°C (high temperature, HT: 5.2% (2,142 genes in Chiifu and 3.7% (1,535 genes in Kenshin. The most enriched GO (Gene Ontology items included 'response to heat', 'response to reactive oxygen species (ROS', 'response to temperature stimulus', 'response to abiotic stimulus', and 'MAPKKK cascade'. In both lines, the genes most highly induced by HT encoded small heat shock proteins (Hsps and heat shock factor (Hsf-like proteins such as HsfB2A (Bra029292, whereas high-molecular weight Hsps were constitutively expressed. Other upstream HSR components were also up-regulated: ROS-scavenging genes like glutathione peroxidase 2 (BrGPX2, Bra022853, protein kinases, and phosphatases. Among heat stress (HS marker genes in Arabidopsis, only exportin 1A (XPO1A (Bra008580, Bra006382 can be applied to B. rapa for basal thermotolerance (BT and short-term acquired thermotolerance (SAT gene. CYP707A3 (Bra025083, Bra021965, which is involved in the dehydration response in Arabidopsis, was associated with membrane leakage in both lines following HS. Although many transcription factors (TF genes, including DREB2A (Bra005852, were involved in HS tolerance in both lines, Bra024224 (MYB41 and Bra021735 (a bZIP/AIR1 [Anthocyanin-Impaired-Response-1] were specific to Kenshin. Several candidate TFs involved in thermotolerance were confirmed as HSR genes by real-time PCR, and these assignments were further supported by promoter analysis. Although some of our findings are similar to those obtained using other plant species, clear differences in Brassica rapa reveal a distinct HSR in this species. Our data could also provide a

  5. Synergy testing of FDA-approved drugs identifies potent drug combinations against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D Planer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 8 million persons, mainly in Latin America, are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Existing antiparasitic drugs for Chagas disease have significant toxicities and suboptimal effectiveness, hence new therapeutic strategies need to be devised to address this neglected tropical disease. Due to the high research and development costs of bringing new chemical entities to the clinic, we and others have investigated the strategy of repurposing existing drugs for Chagas disease. Screens of FDA-approved drugs (described in this paper have revealed a variety of chemical classes that have growth inhibitory activity against mammalian stage Trypanosoma cruzi parasites. Aside from azole antifungal drugs that have low or sub-nanomolar activity, most of the active compounds revealed in these screens have effective concentrations causing 50% inhibition (EC50's in the low micromolar or high nanomolar range. For example, we have identified an antihistamine (clemastine, EC50 of 0.4 µM, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, EC50 of 4.4 µM, and an antifolate drug (pyrimethamine, EC50 of 3.8 µM and others. When tested alone in the murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, most compounds had insufficient efficacy to lower parasitemia thus we investigated using combinations of compounds for additive or synergistic activity. Twenty-four active compounds were screened in vitro in all possible combinations. Follow up isobologram studies showed at least 8 drug pairs to have synergistic activity on T. cruzi growth. The combination of the calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, plus the antifungal drug, posaconazole, was found to be more effective at lowering parasitemia in mice than either drug alone, as was the combination of clemastine and posaconazole. Using combinations of FDA-approved drugs is a promising strategy for developing new treatments for Chagas disease.

  6. Saltelli Global Sensitivity Analysis and Simulation Modelling to Identify Intervention Strategies to Reduce the Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157 Contaminated Beef Carcasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J Brookes

    Full Text Available Strains of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli O157 (STEC O157 are important foodborne pathogens in humans, and outbreaks of illness have been associated with consumption of undercooked beef. Here, we determine the most effective intervention strategies to reduce the prevalence of STEC O157 contaminated beef carcasses using a modelling approach.A computational model simulated events and processes in the beef harvest chain. Information from empirical studies was used to parameterise the model. Variance-based global sensitivity analysis (GSA using the Saltelli method identified variables with the greatest influence on the prevalence of STEC O157 contaminated carcasses. Following a baseline scenario (no interventions, a series of simulations systematically introduced and tested interventions based on influential variables identified by repeated Saltelli GSA, to determine the most effective intervention strategy.Transfer of STEC O157 from hide or gastro-intestinal tract to carcass (improved abattoir hygiene had the greatest influence on the prevalence of contaminated carcases. Due to interactions between inputs (identified by Saltelli GSA, combinations of interventions based on improved abattoir hygiene achieved a greater reduction in maximum prevalence than would be expected from an additive effect of single interventions. The most effective combination was improved abattoir hygiene with vaccination, which achieved a greater than ten-fold decrease in maximum prevalence compared to the baseline scenario.Study results suggest that effective interventions to reduce the prevalence of STEC O157 contaminated carcasses should initially be based on improved abattoir hygiene. However, the effect of improved abattoir hygiene on the distribution of STEC O157 concentration on carcasses is an important information gap-further empirical research is required to determine whether reduced prevalence of contaminated carcasses is likely to result in reduced

  7. Saltelli Global Sensitivity Analysis and Simulation Modelling to Identify Intervention Strategies to Reduce the Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157 Contaminated Beef Carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Victoria J.; Jordan, David; Davis, Stephen; Ward, Michael P.; Heller, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Strains of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli O157 (STEC O157) are important foodborne pathogens in humans, and outbreaks of illness have been associated with consumption of undercooked beef. Here, we determine the most effective intervention strategies to reduce the prevalence of STEC O157 contaminated beef carcasses using a modelling approach. Method A computational model simulated events and processes in the beef harvest chain. Information from empirical studies was used to parameterise the model. Variance-based global sensitivity analysis (GSA) using the Saltelli method identified variables with the greatest influence on the prevalence of STEC O157 contaminated carcasses. Following a baseline scenario (no interventions), a series of simulations systematically introduced and tested interventions based on influential variables identified by repeated Saltelli GSA, to determine the most effective intervention strategy. Results Transfer of STEC O157 from hide or gastro-intestinal tract to carcass (improved abattoir hygiene) had the greatest influence on the prevalence of contaminated carcases. Due to interactions between inputs (identified by Saltelli GSA), combinations of interventions based on improved abattoir hygiene achieved a greater reduction in maximum prevalence than would be expected from an additive effect of single interventions. The most effective combination was improved abattoir hygiene with vaccination, which achieved a greater than ten-fold decrease in maximum prevalence compared to the baseline scenario. Conclusion Study results suggest that effective interventions to reduce the prevalence of STEC O157 contaminated carcasses should initially be based on improved abattoir hygiene. However, the effect of improved abattoir hygiene on the distribution of STEC O157 concentration on carcasses is an important information gap—further empirical research is required to determine whether reduced prevalence of contaminated carcasses is

  8. The diagnostic value of three sacroiliac joint pain provocation tests for sacroiliitis identified by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnbak, Bodil Al-Mashhadi; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Jensen, Rikke Krüger

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to investigate the diagnostic value of three sacroiliac (SI) joint pain provocation tests for sacroiliitis identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and stratified by gender. METHOD: Patients without clinical signs of nerve root compression were...... selected from a cohort of patients with persistent low back pain referred to an outpatient spine clinic. Data from Gaenslen's test, the thigh thrust test, and the long dorsal sacroilia ligament test and sacroiliitis identified by MRI were analysed. RESULTS: The median age of the 454 included patients......-79), and specificity 81% (95% CI 77-85)]. In women, no significant associations were observed between the SI joint tests and sacroiliitis. CONCLUSIONS: Only in men were the SI joint tests found to be associated with sacroiliitis identified by MRI. Although, the diagnostic value was relatively low, the results indicate...

  9. Genetic testing in patients with global developmental delay / intellectual disabilities. A review

    OpenAIRE

    MICLEA, DIANA; PECA, LOREDANA; CUZMICI, ZINA; POP, IOAN VICTOR

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors are responsible for up to 40% developmental disability cases, such as global developmental delay/intellectual disability (GDD/DI). The American and more recently the European guidelines on this group of diseases state that genetic testing is essential and should become a standardized diagnostic practice. The main arguments for the necessity of implementing such a practice are: (1) the high prevalence of developmental disabilities (3% of the population); (2) the high genetic co...

  10. Beyond the BICs: identifying the ‘emerging middle powers’ and understanding their role in global poverty reduction

    OpenAIRE

    James Scott; Matthias vom Hau; David Hulme

    2010-01-01

    Much attention has been focused on the BICs (that is, Brazil, India and China) and how they are changing global politics and economics. However, there is also a further tier of emerging, or new, middle powers ‘beyond the BICs’ that are playing a more prominent role in regional and global arenas. They tend to be active only within certain policy areas, since these new middle powers lack the economic and demographic weight of the BICs. In this paper we set out why it is necessary to recognise t...

  11. Testing the performance of a Dynamic Global Ecosystem Model: Water balance, carbon balance, and vegetation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharik, Christopher J.; Foley, Jonathan A.; Delire, Christine; Fisher, Veronica A.; Coe, Michael T.; Lenters, John D.; Young-Molling, Christine; Ramankutty, Navin; Norman, John M.; Gower, Stith T.

    2000-09-01

    While a new class of Dynamic Global Ecosystem Models (DGEMs) has emerged in the past few years as an important tool for describing global biogeochemical cycles and atmosphere-biosphere interactions, these models are still largely untested. Here we analyze the behavior of a new DGEM and compare the results to global-scale observations of water balance, carbon balance, and vegetation structure. In this study, we use version 2 of the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS), which includes several major improvements and additions to the prototype model developed by Foley et al. [1996]. IBIS is designed to be a comprehensive model of the terrestrial biosphere; the model represents a wide range of processes, including land surface physics, canopy physiology, plant phenology, vegetation dynamics and competition, and carbon and nutrient cycling. The model generates global simulations of the surface water balance (e.g., runoff), the terrestrial carbon balance (e.g., net primary production, net ecosystem exchange, soil carbon, aboveground and belowground litter, and soil CO2 fluxes), and vegetation structure (e.g., biomass, leaf area index, and vegetation composition). In order to test the performance of the model, we have assembled a wide range of continental and global-scale data, including measurements of river discharge, net primary production, vegetation structure, root biomass, soil carbon, litter carbon, and soil CO2 flux. Using these field data and model results for the contemporary biosphere (1965-1994), our evaluation shows that simulated patterns of runoff, NPP, biomass, leaf area index, soil carbon, and total soil CO2 flux agree reasonably well with measurements that have been compiled from numerous ecosystems. These results also compare favorably to other global model results.

  12. Michelson Interferometer for Global High-Resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI): Monolithic Interferometer Design and Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlander, John M.; Englert, Christoph R.; Brown, Charles M.; Marr, Kenneth D.; Miller, Ian J.; Zastera, Vaz; Bach, Bernhard W.; Mende, Stephen B.

    2017-10-01

    The design and laboratory tests of the interferometers for the Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI) instrument which measures thermospheric wind and temperature for the NASA-sponsored Ionospheric Connection (ICON) Explorer mission are described. The monolithic interferometers use the Doppler Asymmetric Spatial Heterodyne (DASH) Spectroscopy technique for wind measurements and a multi-element photometer approach to measure thermospheric temperatures. The DASH technique and overall optical design of the MIGHTI instrument are described in an overview followed by details on the design, element fabrication, assembly, laboratory tests and thermal control of the interferometers that are the heart of MIGHTI.

  13. Identify the Tests to Measure Physical Characteristics and Basic Skills for the Football Players in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothna Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Basic skills specification and physical characteristics are the most significant factors for Football players. Objective: This research aims to determine the most relevant tests to examine the basic skills and physical characteristics for the football coaches in Karbala. Methods: The participants of this study includes 92 Football player (body weight 68±16 kg (mean±SD, height 172.5±17.5 cm, age 21±3 year who were chosen from the 4 clubs in Karbala, Iraq. Methods: To choose the appropriate tests for basic skills and physical characteristics the opinion of the experts was used followed by 2 questionnaires, scored from 1 to 5. The tests were recommended for this study and the questionnaire consisted of seven items.  The researcher adapted the questionnaires from previous studies. Results: The findings of questionnaires revealed that vertical jump and dribbling 25 m, sit down and stand up, Nelson reaction, 30 m sprint, passing with wall and Shuttle test are chosen to test the Physical characteristics in football, whereas, accuracy test for shooting, heading the ball, competitor evasion, receiving ball, zigzag dribbling and passing accuracy are chosen to test basic skills in football. Conclusion: The tests which were chosen in this study can be adopted by coaches as a practical way in Karbala and other regions in Iraq and also in other countries. The experts can use the findings of these tests and compare professional athletes and other football players. Keywords: physical characteristics; anthropometric parameters; Basic skills; football

  14. Architecture of the global land acquisition system: applying the tools of network science to identify key vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaquist, J. W.; Li Johansson, Emma; Nicholas, Kimberly A.

    2014-11-01

    Global land acquisitions, often dubbed ‘land grabbing’ are increasingly becoming drivers of land change. We use the tools of network science to describe the connectivity of the global acquisition system. We find that 126 countries participate in this form of global land trade. Importers are concentrated in the Global North, the emerging economies of Asia, and the Middle East, while exporters are confined to the Global South and Eastern Europe. A small handful of countries account for the majority of land acquisitions (particularly China, the UK, and the US), the cumulative distribution of which is best described by a power law. We also find that countries with many land trading partners play a disproportionately central role in providing connectivity across the network with the shortest trading path between any two countries traversing either China, the US, or the UK over a third of the time. The land acquisition network is characterized by very few trading cliques and therefore characterized by a low degree of preferential trading or regionalization. We also show that countries with many export partners trade land with countries with few import partners, and vice versa, meaning that less developed countries have a large array of export partnerships with developed countries, but very few import partnerships (dissassortative relationship). Finally, we find that the structure of the network is potentially prone to propagating crises (e.g., if importing countries become dependent on crops exported from their land trading partners). This network analysis approach can be used to quantitatively analyze and understand telecoupled systems as well as to anticipate and diagnose the potential effects of telecoupling.

  15. An Investigation of Adolescent Girls' Global Self-Concept, Physical Self-Concept, Identified Regulation, and Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Emily Kristin; Garn, Alex C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among identified regulation, physical self-concept, global self-concept, and leisure-time physical activity with a sample of middle and high school girls (N = 319) enrolled in physical education. Based on Marsh's theory of self-concept, it was hypothesized that a) physical self-concept would mediate the…

  16. Identifying Language Impairment in Children: Combining Language Test Scores with Parental Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Dorothy V. M.; McDonald, David

    2009-01-01

    Background: Children who meet language test criteria for specific language impairment (SLI) are not necessarily the same as those who are referred to a speech and language therapist. Aims: To consider how far this discrepancy reflects insensitivity of traditional language tests to clinically important features of language impairment. Methods &…

  17. Laboratory tests and identified diagnoses in patients with physical and chronic urticaria and angioedema: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozel, Martina M. A.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Mekkes, Jan R.; Bos, Jan D.

    2003-01-01

    Background : The value of laboratory tests in chronic urticaria is still controversial. Objective: Our aim was to assess this value in clinical studies, and to identify factors explaining the variation in the number of identified causes. Methods: A total of 4 electronic databases were searched, and

  18. Identify Normative Values of Balance Tests Toward Neurological Assessment of Sports Related Concussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Eimanipure

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Deterioration in postural control mechanisms is termed postural instability and results increased postural sway and many laboratory techniques and instruments are characterized by a wide range of neurological signs and symptoms to the medical management. Thus the current study designed to assess the reliability of commonly used clinical measures of balance and determined normal values. Also, the second purpose was scrutiny of effect age, length weight and body mass index (BMI on perform clinical balance tests. Methods: One hundred and thirty three participants (18-59 years, that have at least three time sports activity in one week, performed three timed tests: Time- up and Go (TUG, Tandem Gait (TG, and Walking on Balance Beam (WOBB on firm surface. Results: Reliability data were produced for each tests of motor performance. We found that the first performance of three trials was slower, and the relationship between some factors and these battery tests were examined. Means(±SD for each measure were averaged across three trials. Time to complete TG was 13.6±1.1s. TUG value was 6.9±1.03 and WOBB was 6.9±1.03s. Discussion: our results revealed that three clinical balance test batteries-TUG, TG and WOBB tests are the stability measures to assess of sports related concussion. Also, the results of current study appeared that the time to perform these tests was slower than the other studies.

  19. Inter-examiner reproducibility of clinical tests and criteria to identify subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Mikkel; Bogh, Søren Bie; Larsen, Camilla Marie

    2011-01-01

    impingement symptoms (SIS) are not available. Objective To test the inter-examiner reproducibility of selected tests and criteria suggested for classifying SIS and the mutual dependencies of each of the individual tests and SIS. Method A standardised three-phase protocol for clinical reproducibility studies...... was followed, consisting of a training, an overall agreement and a study phase. To proceed to the study phase, an overall agreement of 0.80 was required. In total 10, 20 and 44 subjects were included in the three phases, respectively. The case prevalence in the study phase was 50%. The inclusion criterion...

  20. Identifying genetic marker sets associated with phenotypes via an efficient adaptive score test

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, T.

    2012-06-25

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and gene-expression profiling have generated a large number of valuable datasets for assessing how genetic variations are related to disease outcomes. With such datasets, it is often of interest to assess the overall effect of a set of genetic markers, assembled based on biological knowledge. Genetic marker-set analyses have been advocated as more reliable and powerful approaches compared with the traditional marginal approaches (Curtis and others, 2005. Pathways to the analysis of microarray data. TRENDS in Biotechnology 23, 429-435; Efroni and others, 2007. Identification of key processes underlying cancer phenotypes using biologic pathway analysis. PLoS One 2, 425). Procedures for testing the overall effect of a marker-set have been actively studied in recent years. For example, score tests derived under an Empirical Bayes (EB) framework (Liu and others, 2007. Semiparametric regression of multidimensional genetic pathway data: least-squares kernel machines and linear mixed models. Biometrics 63, 1079-1088; Liu and others, 2008. Estimation and testing for the effect of a genetic pathway on a disease outcome using logistic kernel machine regression via logistic mixed models. BMC bioinformatics 9, 292-2; Wu and others, 2010. Powerful SNP-set analysis for case-control genome-wide association studies. American Journal of Human Genetics 86, 929) have been proposed as powerful alternatives to the standard Rao score test (Rao, 1948. Large sample tests of statistical hypotheses concerning several parameters with applications to problems of estimation. Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, 44, 50-57). The advantages of these EB-based tests are most apparent when the markers are correlated, due to the reduction in the degrees of freedom. In this paper, we propose an adaptive score test which up- or down-weights the contributions from each member of the marker-set based on the Z-scores of

  1. The HIT study: Hymenoptera Identification Test--how accurate are people at identifying stinging insects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Troy W; Forester, Joseph P; Johnson, Monica L; Stolfi, Adrienne; Stahl, Mark C

    2014-09-01

    Stinging insects in the order Hymenoptera include bees, wasps, yellow jackets, hornets, and ants. Hymenoptera sting injuries range from localized swelling to rarely death. Insect identification is helpful in the management of sting injuries. To determine the accuracy of adults in identifying stinging insects and 2 insect nests. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study using a picture-based survey to evaluate an individual's success at identifying honeybees, wasps, bald-face hornets, and yellow jackets. Bald-face hornet and paper wasp nest identification also was assessed in this study. Six hundred forty participants completed the questionnaire. Overall, the mean number of correct responses was 3.2 (SD 1.3) of 6. Twenty participants (3.1%) correctly identified all 6 stinging insects and nests and only 10 (1.6%) were unable to identify any of the pictures correctly. The honeybee was the most accurately identified insect (91.3%) and the paper wasp was the least correctly identified insect (50.9%). For the 6 questions regarding whether the participant had been stung in the past by any of the insects (including an unidentified insect), 91% reported being stung by at least 1. Men were more successful at identify stinging insects correctly (P = .002), as were participants stung by at least 4 insects (P = .018). This study supports the general perception that adults are poor discriminators in distinguishing stinging insects and nests with the exception of the honeybee. Men and those participants who reported multiple stings to at least 4 insects were more accurate overall in insect identification. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. USING THE PARENT-INFANT RELATIONSHIP GLOBAL ASSESSMENT SCALE TO IDENTIFY CAREGIVER-INFANT/TODDLER DYADS WITH ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIP PATTERNS IN SIX EUROPEAN COUNTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzinikolaou, Kornilia; Karveli, Vassiliki; Skoubourdi, Aggeliki; Zarokosta, Foteini; Antonucci, Gianluca; Visci, Giovanni; Calheiros, Maria Manuela; MagalhÃes, Eunice; Essau, Cecilia; Allan, Sharon; Pithia, Jayshree; Walji, Fahreen; Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Perez-Robles, Ruth; Fanti, Kostas A; Katsimicha, Evita; Hadjicharambous, Maria-Zoe; Nikolaidis, George; Reddy, Vasudevi

    2016-07-01

    The study examined whether the Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders of Infancy and Early Childhood, Revised Edition (DC: 0-3R; ZERO TO THREE, 2005) Parent-Infant Relationship Global Assessment Scale (PIR-GAS) is applicable to six European countries and contributes to the identification of caregiver-infant/toddler dyads with abusive relationship patterns. The sample consisted of 115 dyads with children's ages ranging from 1 to 47 months. Sixty-four dyads were recruited from community settings without known violence problems, and 51 dyads were recruited from clinical settings and already had been identified with violence problems or as being at risk for violence problems. To classify the dyads on the PIR-GAS categories, caregiver-child interactions were video-recorded and coded with observational scales appropriate for child age. To test whether the PIR-GAS allows for reliable identification of dyads with abusive relationship patterns, PIR-GAS ratings were compared with scores on the the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect's (ISPCAN) Child Abuse Screening Tool-Parental Version (ICAST-P; D.K. Runyan et al., ), a questionnaire measuring abusive parental disciplinary practices. It was found that PIR-GAS ratings differentiated between the general and the clinical sample, and the dyads with abusive patterns of relationship were identified by both the PIR-GAS and the ICAST-P. Interrater reliability for the PIR-GAS ranged from moderate to excellent. The value of a broader use of tools such as the DC: 0-3R to promote early identification of families at risk for infant and toddler abuse and neglect is discussed. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  3. Global patterns of extreme drought-induced loss in land primary production: Identifying ecological extremes from rain-use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ling; Mikle, Nathaniel; Zou, Zhenhua; Huang, Yuanyuan; Shi, Zheng; Jiang, Lifen; McCarthy, Heather R; Liang, Junyi; Luo, Yiqi

    2018-02-14

    Quantifying the ecological patterns of loss of ecosystem function in extreme drought is important to understand the carbon exchange between the land and atmosphere. Rain-use efficiency [RUE; gross primary production (GPP)/precipitation] acts as a typical indicator of ecosystem function. In this study, a novel method based on maximum rain-use efficiency (RUE max ) was developed to detect losses of ecosystem function globally. Three global GPP datasets from the MODIS remote sensing data (MOD17), ground upscaling FLUXNET observations (MPI-BGC), and process-based model simulations (BESS), and a global gridded precipitation product (CRU) were used to develop annual global RUE datasets for 2001-2011. Large, well-known extreme drought events were detected, e.g. 2003 drought in Europe, 2002 and 2011 drought in the U.S., and 2010 drought in Russia. Our results show that extreme drought-induced loss of ecosystem function could impact 0.9% ± 0.1% of earth's vegetated land per year and was mainly distributed in semi-arid regions. The reduced carbon uptake caused by functional loss (0.14 ± 0.03 PgC/yr) could explain >70% of the interannual variation in GPP in drought-affected areas (p ≤ 0.001). Our results highlight the impact of ecosystem function loss in semi-arid regions with increasing precipitation variability and dry land expansion expected in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sustainability Performance of Scandinavian Corporations and their Value Chains assessed by UN Global Compact and Global Reporting Initiative standards - a way to identify superior performers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Strategies & Policies, Management Systems, Monitoring and Evaluation Mechanisms and Key Outcomes on sustainability defined broadly as the Human Rights, Labour, Environment and Anti-Corruption issues by the UN Global Compact. The study firmly concludes that Scandinavian corporations on average......The purpose of this study was to introduce a combination of the two most adopted multi- stakeholder standards for sustainability reporting as an alternate framework for assessing sustainability performance in Scandinavian corporations. This novel approach leverages numeric measures on the criteria...... are not performing on higher levels concerning their implementation of these issues. The generalization of the results is moderated by the study's limitations concerning the framework and data sources used, sample size and the indirect use of GRI indicators. The uniqueness of the sustainability practice by two...

  5. Identifying strategies for mitigating the global warming impact of the EU-25 economy using a multi-objective input–output approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortés-Borda, D.; Ruiz-Hernández, A.; Guillén-Gosálbez, G.; Llop, M.; Guimerà, R.; Sales-Pardo, M.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming mitigation has recently become a priority worldwide. A large body of literature dealing with energy related problems has focused on reducing greenhouse gases emissions at an engineering scale. In contrast, the minimization of climate change at a wider macroeconomic level has so far received much less attention. We investigate here how to mitigate global warming by performing changes in an economy. To this end, we make use of a systematic tool that combines three methods: linear programming, environmentally extended input output models, and life cycle assessment principles. The problem of identifying key economic sectors that contribute significantly to global warming is posed in mathematical terms as a bi-criteria linear program that seeks to optimize simultaneously the total economic output and the total life cycle CO 2 emissions. We have applied this approach to the European Union economy, finding that significant reductions in global warming potential can be attained by regulating specific economic sectors. Our tool is intended to aid policy makers in the design of more effective public policies for achieving the environmental and economic targets sought. - Highlights: • We minimize climate change by performing small changes in the consumption habits. • We propose a tool that combines multiobjective optimization and macroeconomic models. • Identifying key sectors allows improving the environmental performance significantly with little impact to the economy. • Significant reductions in global warming potential are attained by regulating sectors. • Our tool aids policy makers in the design of effective sustainability policies

  6. Application of Geophysical Techniques in Identifying UNE Signatures at Semipalatinsk Test Site (for OSI Purposes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyashov, A.; Shaitorov, V.; Yefremov, M.

    2014-03-01

    This article describes geological and geophysical studies of an underground nuclear explosion area in one of the boreholes at the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan. During these studies, the typical elements of mechanical impact of the underground explosion on the host medium—fracturing of rock, spall zones, faults, cracks, etc., were observed. This information supplements to the database of underground nuclear explosion phenomenology and can be applied in fulfilling on-site inspection tasks under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

  7. Pendulum Test: A Highly Accurate and Simple Physical Examination Maneuver to Identify Hip Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Oshima

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with hip pathology often complain of various symptoms, e.g. pain or discomfort of low back, lower extremity, hip, groin, thigh, buttock or knee. Physicians may be distracted by these complaints, and misdiagnose and mistreat hip pathology. To avoid this, the pendulum test, which is performed with a patient seated on the examination table and hips and knees are flexed at 90 degrees, while the examiner passively swings the patient's lower extremity in and out as a pendulum, has been employed for all patients with the complaint of low back, hip and knee. Objective: The efficacy and the accuracy of the pendulum test were evaluated. Patients and methods: Consecutive 40 patients, who had complained pain or discomfort of low back, lower extremity, hip, groin, thigh, buttock and knee were examined by the pendulum test. Results: Eighteen patients were positive for the pendulum test, and all of them correlated to the hip pathology. Conclusions: The pendulum test was confirmed to be easily performed and reliable in detecting the hip pathology. Therefore, this test is highly recommended for the differentiation of patients with low back, hip and knee complaints.

  8. Tuning and Test of Fragmentation Models Based on Identified Particles and Precision Event Shape Data

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; Naughton, J M; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    Event shape and charged particle inclusive distributions are measured using 750000 decays of the $Z$ to hadrons from the DELPHI detector at LEP. These precise data allow a decisive confrontation with models of the hadronization process. Improved tunings of the JETSET ARIADNE and HERWIG parton shower models and the JETSET matrix element model are obtained by fitting the models to these DELPHI data as well as to identified particle distributions from all LEP experiments. The description of the data distributions by the models is critically reviewed with special importance attributed to identified particles.

  9. Identifying metabolic syndrome without blood tests in young adults: The Terneuzen Birth Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.L.A. de; Renders, C.M.; Kuipers, E.C.C.; Wouwe, J.P. van; Buuren, S. van; Jonge, G.A. de; Hirasing, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Within the context of the obesity epidemic identifying young adults at risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease is important. A practical approach is based on the identification of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Our objective was to develop a simple and efficient stepwise strategy

  10. Pegvisomant-primed growth hormone (GH) stimulation test is useful in identifying true GH deficient children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radetti, Giorgio; Elsedfy, Heba H; Khalaf, Randa; Meazza, Cristina; Pagani, Sara; El Kholy, Mohamed; Albertini, Riccardo; De Stefano, Anna Maria; Navarra, Antonella; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Bozzola, Mauro

    2017-07-01

    Provocative stimulation tests for growth hormone (GH) assessment have poor reproducibility and can often elicit false positive results in normal children. The aim of our study was to confirm the capability of pegvisomant as an enhancer of GH secretion in unmasking false-positive results in short children (height GH testing. A prospective study was conducted between March and August 2016. Twenty short children (10 males and 10 females), aged 4.6-13.4 years, previously diagnosed as GH deficient (GHD) were included in the study. All subjects received 1 mg/kg of pegvisomant subcutaneously; three days later an insulin tolerance test (ITT) was performed. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was evaluated before and three days after pegvisomant administration. After pegvisomant priming and the ITT stimulation test, 12 out of the 20 children initially classified as GHD showed a GH peak of more than 10 ng/ml and were thus reclassified as short normal. Furthermore, a significant reduction of IGF-I was observed in the GHD group (pre IGF-I: median (IQR) 144.0 (109-248) ng/ml, post IGF-I: 98 (49-165) ng/ml; pGH stimulation tests can be used to improve the reliability of the diagnostic work-up in GH deficiency.

  11. A test apparatus and facility to identify the rotordynamic coefficients of high-speed hydrostatic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Dara; Hale, Keith

    1994-01-01

    A facility and apparatus are described which determine stiffness, damping, and added-mass rotordynamic coefficients plus steady-state operating characteristics of high speed hydrostatic journal bearings. The apparatus has a current top speed of 29,800 rpm with a bearing diameter of 7.62 cm (3 in.). Purified warm water, 55 C (130 F), is used as a test fluid to achieve elevated Reynolds numbers during operation. The test-fluid pump yields a bearing maximum inlet pressure of 6.9 Mpa (1000 psi). Static load on the bearing is independently controlled and measured. Orthogonally mounted external shakers are used to excite the test stator in the direction of, and perpendicular to, the static load. The apparatus can independently calculate all rotordynamic coefficients at a given operating condition.

  12. Use of the Cognitive Performance Test for Identifying Deficits in Hospitalized Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The Cognitive Performance Test (CPT is a functional assessment for persons with dementia. The study purpose was to evaluate the reliability, discriminant, and concurrent validity of the CPT. Method. The CPT was tested against other measures of cognition (Standardized Mini Mental Status Exam (SMMSE and Assessment of Motor and Process Skills-Process scale (AMPS-Process. Participants were persons 65 years and older admitted to a geriatric rehabilitation unit (n=47. Results. The CPT correlated moderately with measures of cognition (SMMSE r=0.47, AMPS-Process r=0.53, P<0.01, and ADL burden of care (FIM r=0.32, P<0.05. Scores were not affected by age, sex, years of education, motor skills, or comorbidities. The CPT differentiated between impaired and unimpaired individuals differently from other measures. Conclusion. While CPT appears related to other measures of cognition, test interpretation requires noting the variability between CPT scores and those measures.

  13. Development and validation of a highly sensitive urine-based test to identify patients with colonic adenomatous polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haili; Tso, Victor; Wong, Clarence; Sadowski, Dan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2014-03-20

    Adenomatous polyps are precursors of colorectal cancer; their detection and removal is the goal of colon cancer screening programs. However, fecal-based methods identify patients with adenomatous polyps with low levels of sensitivity. The aim or this study was to develop a highly accurate, prototypic, proof-of-concept, spot urine-based diagnostic test using metabolomic technology to distinguish persons with adenomatous polyps from those without polyps. Prospective urine and stool samples were collected from 876 participants undergoing colonoscopy examination in a colon cancer screening program, from April 2008 to October 2009 at the University of Alberta. Colonoscopy reference standard identified 633 participants with no colonic polyps and 243 with colonic adenomatous polyps. One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of urine metabolites were analyzed to define a diagnostic metabolomic profile for colonic adenomas. A urine metabolomic diagnostic test for colonic adenomatous polyps was established using 67% of the samples (un-blinded training set) and validated using the other 33% of the samples (blinded testing set). The urine metabolomic diagnostic test's specificity and sensitivity were compared with those of fecal-based tests. Using a two-component, orthogonal, partial least-squares model of the metabolomic profile, the un-blinded training set identified patients with colonic adenomatous polyps with 88.9% sensitivity and 50.2% specificity. Validation using the blinded testing set confirmed sensitivity and specificity values of 82.7% and 51.2%, respectively. Sensitivities of fecal-based tests to identify colonic adenomas ranged from 2.5 to 11.9%. We describe a proof-of-concept spot urine-based metabolomic diagnostic test that identifies patients with colonic adenomatous polyps with a greater level of sensitivity (83%) than fecal-based tests.

  14. An Evaluation of Computerized Tests as Predictors of Job Performance: II. Differential Validity for Global and Job Element Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    provide more reliable and valid measures of performance than the commonly used global marks (Lawshe, 1952; Guion , 1965; Mecham & McCormick, 1969). Thus...Memory Test Radio Code Aptitude Test Electronic Technician Selection Test Shop Practices AFOT GCT ARI MECH CLER SONR RADO ETST SHOP...multiple regression for a global criterion were carried out using a modification of the methodology used in a study by Guion (1965). The

  15. Fitting the Mixed Rasch Model to a Reading Comprehension Test: Identifying Reader Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Purya; Carstensen, Claus H.

    2013-01-01

    Standard unidimensional Rasch models assume that persons with the same ability parameters are comparable. That is, the same interpretation applies to persons with identical ability estimates as regards the underlying mental processes triggered by the test. However, research in cognitive psychology shows that persons at the same trait level may…

  16. Specimen Provenance Testing Identifies Contamination That Affects Molecular Prognostic Assay Results in Prostate Cancer Biopsy Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojno, Lathem; Minutella, Caitlyn; Moylan, Donald; Bush, Arla; Wojno, Kirk

    2018-02-21

    To determine if tissue contamination in histologic specimens can significantly affect the results of prognostic molecular markers that are routinely used as confirmatory tests to safely assign appropriate candidates to prostate cancer active surveillance protocols. This study evaluates 2,134 cases from a single, large urology practice that were successfully tested for DNA specimen provenance verification using short tandem repeat analysis for the presence of a significant level of contaminating DNA. After removal of the contamination, five of the samples were retested, and the results of the molecular diagnostic test were compared. 49 of the 2,134 cases (2.3%) sent for DNA provenance analysis were found to possess significant levels of contamination. Of these 49 cases, seven of them were resent for a repeat molecular diagnostic test after being decontaminated. Five of these prostate cancer specimens had sufficient tissue and RNA to give a more accurate cell cycle progression (CCP) score. The average absolute change in these patient's CCP scores was 0.48, with a low of a 0.1-unit and a high of a 1.0-unit difference. These changes in CCP scores are significant enough to cause meaningful alterations in a patient's calculated 10-year mortality rate, as defined by their combined risk score (CRS). DNA contamination in unstained tissue sections sent for prognostic prostate cancer molecular diagnostic testing occurs on 2.3% of cases, and can be of a magnitude that affects the results and subsequent clinical decision of appropriateness for active surveillance. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Identifying interactions in the time and frequency domains in local and global networks - A Granger Causality Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Shuixia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse-engineering approaches such as Bayesian network inference, ordinary differential equations (ODEs and information theory are widely applied to deriving causal relationships among different elements such as genes, proteins, metabolites, neurons, brain areas and so on, based upon multi-dimensional spatial and temporal data. There are several well-established reverse-engineering approaches to explore causal relationships in a dynamic network, such as ordinary differential equations (ODE, Bayesian networks, information theory and Granger Causality. Results Here we focused on Granger causality both in the time and frequency domain and in local and global networks, and applied our approach to experimental data (genes and proteins. For a small gene network, Granger causality outperformed all the other three approaches mentioned above. A global protein network of 812 proteins was reconstructed, using a novel approach. The obtained results fitted well with known experimental findings and predicted many experimentally testable results. In addition to interactions in the time domain, interactions in the frequency domain were also recovered. Conclusions The results on the proteomic data and gene data confirm that Granger causality is a simple and accurate approach to recover the network structure. Our approach is general and can be easily applied to other types of temporal data.

  18. Synthesis of evidence of diagnostic tests and preventive programs identifying pre-diabetes type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Tučková

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D has become the main type of diabetes in children and it is expected that in countries with high income diabetes it is projected to be one of the leading causes of death by 2030. Another fact is that programs and tests diagnosing pre-diabetes type 2 (T2P-DMC are missing. Methods: The aim of the paper is to present the steps for the synthesis of the evidence within the brand new type of the systematic review (SR: SR of diagnostic test accuracy (DTA. Using the acronym PIRD it was developed a review question, search strategy and inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: The initial search was done in two databases (MedLine and Cinahl with 2 025 results. The second search after the improvement of the sensitivity and the specificity was done in 15 databases with 3 681 results. Conclusion: This methodological paper introduces how to conduct the systematic review protocols of diagnostic test accuracy on the example of T2P-DMC.

  19. Testing job typologies and identifying at-risk subpopulations using factor mixture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Anita C; Igic, Ivana; Meier, Laurenz L; Semmer, Norbert K; Schaubroeck, John M; Brunner, Beatrice; Elfering, Achim

    2017-10-01

    Research in occupational health psychology has tended to focus on the effects of single job characteristics or various job characteristics combined into 1 factor. However, such a variable-centered approach does not account for the clustering of job attributes among groups of employees. We addressed this issue by using a person-centered approach to (a) investigate the occurrence of different empirical constellations of perceived job stressors and resources and (b) validate the meaningfulness of profiles by analyzing their association with employee well-being and performance. We applied factor mixture modeling to identify profiles in 4 large samples consisting of employees in Switzerland (Studies 1 and 2) and the United States (Studies 3 and 4). We identified 2 profiles that spanned the 4 samples, with 1 reflecting a combination of relatively low stressors and high resources (P1) and the other relatively high stressors and low resources (P3). The profiles differed mainly in terms of their organizational and social aspects. Employees in P1 reported significantly higher mean levels of job satisfaction, performance, and general health, and lower means in exhaustion compared with P3. Additional analyses showed differential relationships between job attributes and outcomes depending on profile membership. These findings may benefit organizational interventions as they show that perceived work stressors and resources more strongly influence satisfaction and well-being in particular profiles. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Shortened Time to Identify Staphylococcus Species from Blood Cultures and Methicillin Resistance Testing Using CHROMAgar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Chihara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to rapidly differentiate coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS from Staphylococcus aureus and to determine methicillin resistance is important as it affects the decision to treat empiric antibiotic selection. The objective of this study was to evaluate CHROMagar S. aureus and CHROMagar MRSA (Becton Dickinson for rapid identification of Staphylococcus spp. directly from blood cultures. Consecutive blood culture bottles (BacT Alert 3D SA and SN, bioMérieux growing gram-positive cocci in clusters were evaluated. An aliquot was plated onto CHROMagar MRSA (C-MRSA and CHROMagar S. aureus (C-SA plates, which were read at 12 to 16 hours. C-SA correctly identified 147/147 S. aureus (100% sensitivity; 2 CoNS were misidentified as S. aureus (98% specificity. C-MRSA correctly identified 74/77 MRSA (96% sensitivity. None of the MSSA isolates grew on C-MRSA (100% specificity. In conclusion, CHROMagar is a rapid and sensitive method to distinguish MRSA, MSSA, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and may decrease time of reporting positive results.

  1. Economics of resynchronization strategies including chemical tests to identify nonpregnant cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, J O; Fricke, P M; Cabrera, V E

    2013-02-01

    Our objectives were to assess (1) the economic value of decreasing the interval between timed artificial insemination (TAI) services when using a pregnancy test that allows earlier identification of nonpregnant cows; and (2) the effect of pregnancy loss and inaccuracy of a chemical test (CT) on the economic value of a pregnancy test for dairy farms. Simulation experiments were performed using a spreadsheet-based decision support tool. In experiment 1, we assessed the effect of changing the interbreeding interval (IBI) for cows receiving TAI on the value of reproductive programs by simulating a 1,000-cow dairy herd using a combination of detection of estrus (30 to 80% of cows detected in estrus) and TAI. The IBI was incremented by 7d from 28 to 56 d to reflect intervals either observed (35 to 56 d) or potentially observed (28 d) in dairy operations. In experiment 2, we evaluated the effect of accuracy of the CT and additional pregnancy loss due to earlier testing on the value of reproductive programs. The first scenario compared the use of a CT 31 ± 3 d after a previous AI with rectal palpation (RP) 39 ± 3 d after AI. The second scenario used a CT 24 ± 3 d after AI or transrectal ultrasound (TU) 32 d after AI. Parameters evaluated included sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), questionable diagnosis (Qd), cost of the CT, and expected pregnancy loss. Sensitivity analysis was performed for all possible combinations of parameter values to determine their relative importance on the value of the CT. In experiment 1, programs with a shorter IBI had greater economic net returns at all levels of detection of estrus, and use of chemical tests available on the market today might be beneficial compared with RP. In experiment 2, the economic value of programs using a CT could be either greater or less than that of RP and TU, depending on the value for each of the parameters related to the CT evaluated. The value of the program using the CT was affected (in order) by (1) Se, (2

  2. The use of pooled viral load testing to identify antiretroviral treatment failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Davey M.; May, Susanne J.; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Strain, Matthew C.; Ignacio, Caroline C.; Haubrich, Richard H.; Richman, Douglas D.; Benson, Constance A.; Little, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    Background To develop less costly methods to virologically monitor patients receiving antiretroviral therapy, we evaluated methods that use pooled blood samples and quantitative information available from viral load assays to monitor a cohort of patients on first-line antiretroviral therapy for virologic failure. Methods We evaluated 150 blood samples collected after 6 months of therapy from participants enrolled in a San Diego primary infection program between January 1998 and January 2007. Samples were screened for virologic failure with individual viral load testing, 10 × 10 matrix pools and minipools of five samples. For the pooled platforms (matrix and minipools), we used a search and retest algorithm based on the quantitative viral load data to resolve samples that remained ambiguous for virologic failure. Viral load thresholds were more than 500 and more than 1500 copies/ml for the matrix and more than 250 and more than 500 copies/ml for the minipool. Efficiency, accuracy and result turnaround times were evaluated. Results Twenty-three percent of cohort samples were detectable at more than 50 HIV RNA copies/ml. At an algorithm threshold of more than 500 HIV RNA copies/ml, both minipool and matrix methods used less than half the number of viral load assays to screen the cohort, compared with testing samples individually. Both pooling platforms had negative predictive values of 100% for viral loads of more than 500 HIV RNA copies/ml and at least 94% for viral loads of more than 250 HIV RNA copies/ml. Conclusion In this cohort, both pooling methods improved the efficiency of virologic monitoring over individual testing with a minimal decrease in accuracy. These methods may allow for the induction and sustainability of the virologic monitoring of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings. PMID:19730348

  3. [Study on the Fast Testing Strategy for identifying the wild poliovirus I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Cheng; Luo, Ming; Chen, Meng; Zhang, Tie-Gang; Zhang, He-Run; Wang, Yu-Mei; Li, Ren-Qing; Dong, Mei; Chen, Wei-Xin; Chen, Li-Juan

    2012-07-01

    To explore the Fast Testing Sstrategy (FTS) for wild poliovirus I (WP1). Epidemiological investigations were carried out on 671 students from WP1 epidemic areas in China. A set of real time RT-PCR assays, including panenterovirus testings (PE) assay, poliovirus serotypings (PS) assay and the assay distinguishing wild strain from vaccine strain of poliovirus I (DWV) were introduced into the screening program for WPV1 to replace the conventional RT-PCR, recommended by the China National Polio Laboratory (GNPL). Additionally, sensitivities of all the assays were assessed by poliovirus type I to III (Sabin stain) and the isolated WPV1. (1) 33 non-poliovirus enterovirus (NPEV) cases were detected, with 16 polio vaccine-related cases including 5 polio I, 1 polio II, 3 polio III, 1 polio I + II, 4 polio I + III and 2 polio I + II + III. Three WPV1 cases were also detected in this study and confirmed by CNPL. (2) For polio virus vaccine strain, sensitivities of the set of real time RT-PCR assays ranged from 1 to 100 times than that of the in-house RT-PCR assay. The sensitivities of PE and PS assays for the detection of polio II were 100 times than that of the RT-PCR assay and the sensitivity of DWV assay used for the detection of polio I were 10 times than that of the RT-PCR assay. For WPV1, the sensitivity of three real time RT-PCR was 10 times hight than that of the RT-PCR assay. The novel FTS for WPV1 suggested by this study would include PE, PS and DWV. It not only could greatly shorten the testing time but also more sensitive than the RT-PCR and suited for emergency detection for WPV1.

  4. Extrapolation of model tests measurements of whipping to identify the dimensioning sea states for container ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storhaug, Gaute; Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent

    2015-01-01

    to small storms. Model tests of three container ships have been carried out in different sea states under realistic assumptions. Preliminary extrapolation of the measured data suggested that moderate storms are dimensioning when whipping is included due to higher maximum speed in moderate storms......Whipping can contribute to increased fatigue and extreme loading of container ships, and guidelines have been made available by the leading class societies. Reports concerning the hogging collapse of MSC Napoli and MOL Comfort suggest that whipping contributed. The accidents happened in moderate...

  5. Application of half-embryo test to identify irradiated fresh fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelbary, N.A.; EL agamawy, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    Some countries already permit the irradiation of foods to extend its storage life and to control pests, therefore, a faster and significantly more uniform identification method are needed. Half-embryo test is based on the inhibition of shooting due to gamma irradiation since biological systems are sensitive to low doses of gamma irradiation. The intact fruits, apples, lemons, oranges and watermelons were obtained from the local market and irradiated directly with doses of 0.5, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 KGy. Shooting was defined as the elongation of the shoot to the extent of at least 1 mm length in apples and watermelon, while 0.5 mm length in citrus fruits. Root and shoot growth was stimulated most strongly by the addition of benzyladenine (2.5 mg/l) as a growth hormone. Shooting started after 1-3 days and reached to 90 % after 4 days. A long lasting half-embryo test (4-5 days) was capable to discriminate between irradiated and non-irradiated fruits. Growth of half-embryo and the changes were almost the same in all non-irradiated fruits under study. Growth of half-embryo irradiated with a dose of 0.5 KGy or more almost has totally retarded elongation of both root and shoot. Practically, it was observed that small-developed shoots showed slight elongation and afterward they were decayed. If shooting percentage after 1-3 days is less than 20% in apples, 40% in oranges and 30% in lemons and watermelons, the fruits are classified as i rradiated u nder 0.5 KGy as a detection limit dose of the irradiation. Irradiation caused obvious changes in root and shoot growth of half-embryos studied. Roots of non-irradiated half-embryos grew well in all fruits under study and those irradiated with 0.5 KGy or more were obviously reduced. In the same way, shoots of non-irradiated half-embryo grew well and shooting percentage reached to 50 % after 1-2 days and those fruits irradiated with 0.5 KGy or more were reduced. It is recommended to employ the half-embryo test as a practical technique

  6. A preliminary guidebook for identifying stratigraphic contacts at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawloski, G.A.; McKague, H.L.; Wagoner, J.L.; McKinnis, W.B.

    1992-01-01

    Lithologic variation, regional depositional trends, and the lack of written guidelines have resulted in inconsistencies in the recognition of stratigraphic contacts in drill holes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Stratigraphic identification, based on mineralogy of discrete samples, can be augmented by geophysical logs and downhole movies to more accurately and consistently locate contacts between units. Criteria are established for locating the base of the Pahute Mesa ash-flow tuff, the top of the Ammonia Tanks ash-flow tuff, the top of the Ammonia Tanks bedded tuff, and the top and the base of the Rainier Mesa Tuff

  7. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and Its Relevance for the Global Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dáša ADAŠKOVÁ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT is one of important international nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament measures. One of its pillars is the verification mechanism that has been built as an international system of nuclear testing detection to enable the control of observance of the obligations anchored in the CTBT. Despite the great relevance to the global non-proliferation and disarmament efforts, the CTBT is still not in force. The main aim of the article is to summarize the importance of the CTBT and its entry into force not only from the international relations perspective but also from the perspective of the technical implementation of the monitoring system.

  8. American Bird conservancy's approach to the U.S. Important Bird Area Program - identifying the top 500 global sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert M. Chipley

    2005-01-01

    The idea for the Important Bird Area Program originated in a series of studies in the early 1980s conducted by BirdLife International. Recognizing that these studies could become a powerful tool for conservation, BirdLife International began an effort to identify and gather data regarding the most important areas for birds in Europe and to make this information...

  9. Global Environmental Micro Sensors Test Operations in the Natural Environment (GEMSTONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark ADAMS

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available ENSCO, Inc. is developing an innovative atmospheric observing system known as Global Environmental Micro Sensors (GEMS. The GEMS concept features an integrated system of miniaturized in situ, airborne probes measuring temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and vector wind velocity. In order for the probes to remain airborne for long periods of time, their design is based on a helium-filled super-pressure balloon. The GEMS probes are neutrally buoyant and carried passively by the wind at predetermined levels. Each probe contains on-board satellite communication, power generation, processing, and geolocation capabilities. ENSCO has partnered with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC Weather Office for a project called GEMS Test Operations in the Natural Environment (GEMSTONE. The goal of the GEMSTONE project was to build and field-test a small system of prototype probes in the Earth’s atmosphere. This paper summarizes the 9-month GEMSTONE project (Sep 2006 – May 2007 including probe and system engineering as well as experiment design and data analysis from laboratory and field tests. These tests revealed issues with reliability, sensor accuracy, electronics miniaturization, and sub-system optimization. Nevertheless, the success of the third and final free flight test provides a solid foundation to move forward in follow on projects addressing these issues as highlighted in the technology roadmap for future GEMS development.

  10. Genetic testing in patients with global developmental delay / intellectual disabilities. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclea, Diana; Peca, Loredana; Cuzmici, Zina; Pop, Ioan Victor

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors are responsible for up to 40% developmental disability cases, such as global developmental delay/intellectual disability (GDD/DI). The American and more recently the European guidelines on this group of diseases state that genetic testing is essential and should become a standardized diagnostic practice. The main arguments for the necessity of implementing such a practice are: (1) the high prevalence of developmental disabilities (3% of the population); (2) the high genetic contribution to this type of pathology; (3) insufficient referral for genetic consultation. In an attempt to address these issues, the purpose of this paper is to present the genetic etiology of global developmental delay / intellectual disability with emphasis on the need to implement a genetic testing protocol for the patients with GDD/DI, as indicated by the current guidelines. Chromosomal abnormalities and fragile X syndrome are the most frequent causes of developmental disabilities and the techniques employed to detect such genetic disorders should be used as first line investigations of GDD/DI.

  11. Role of diagnostic testing in identifying and resolving dimensional-stability problems in electroplated laser mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, R.L.; Hogan, B.

    1982-01-01

    The metal mirrors which are the subject of this discussion are to be used in the Antares inertial fusion laser system. Antares is a high-power (40 TW), high-energy (35 to 40 kJ), pulsed CO 2 laser system for the investigation of inertial confinement fusion. The system contains more than four hundred small and large diamond-turned and conventionally polished mirrors. The largest mirrors are trapezoidal in shape with the longest dimension being 16 to 18 inches. The substrates are type 2124 aluminum for most large mirrors, and aluminum bronze, oxygen-free copper or a copper-zirconium alloy for most of the smaller mirrors. The optical surface is electro-deposited copper 20 to 40 mils thick. After nondestructive testing and rough machining, the electroplated surface is single-point diamond machined or conventionally polished

  12. Cardiac imaging and stress testing asymptomatic athletes to identify those at risk of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Gerche, Andre; Baggish, Aaron L; Knuuti, Juhani; Prior, David L; Sharma, Sanjay; Heidbuchel, Hein; Thompson, Paul D

    2013-09-01

    Sudden cardiac death in young athletes is rare but tragic. The cardiology community is faced with the challenge of providing a sensible strategy for the prevention of SCD while simultaneously reaffirming that the benefits of regular exercise far outweigh potential risks. At present, there is a broad range of screening recommendations dependent upon country, sporting discipline, and competition level. While much recent debate has focused on the efficacy of screening with electrocardiography, a number of sporting bodies also mandate the inclusion of exercise testing and echocardiography in screening protocols. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, coronary calcium scoring and computed tomography coronary angiography have also been promoted as potentially valuable screening tools for competitive athletes. This review will examine the controversial topic of utilizing cardiac imaging for athlete pre-participation screening. Specifically, the limitations of screening for relatively rare disorders using imaging tools with uncertain or imperfect accuracy will be addressed. Current evidence suggests that the accuracy of all cardiac imaging modalities is insufficient to justify their use as primary screening modalities in athletes. Atypical findings such as marked cardiac dilation, reduced deformation, or small patches of delayed gadolinium enhancement may be commonly encountered in well-trained athletes, but, at present, the prognostic significance of such findings is unknown. Resulting uncertainty for the clinician and athlete has the potential for psychological stress, further testing, and unnecessary exclusions from competition. However, these concerns must not be confused with the extremely useful applications of cardiac imaging for the assessment of athletes with symptoms, an abnormal electrocardiogram or a positive family history. As modern imaging further enhances our understanding of the spectrum of athlete's heart, its role may expand from the assessment of athletes

  13. Evaluation of ability of reference toxicity tests to identify stress in laboratory populations of the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, E.W.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Greer, E.I.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Rabeni, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    Standard methods for conducting toxicity tests imply that the condition of test organisms can be established using reference toxicity tests. However, only a limited number of studies have evaluated whether reference toxicity tests can actually be used to determine if organisms are in good condition at the start of a test. We evaluated the ability of reference toxicants to identify stress associated with starvation in laboratory populations of the amphipod Hyalella azteca using acute toxicity tests and four reference toxicants: KCl, CdCl2, sodium pentachlorophenate (NaPCP), and carbaryl. Stress associated with severe starvation was observed with exposure of amphipods to carbaryl or NaPCP but not with exposure to KCl or CdCl2 (i.e., lower LC50 with severe starvation). Although the LC50s for NaPCP and carbaryl were statistically different between starved and fed amphipods, this difference may not be biologically significant given the variability expected in acute lethality tests. Stress associated with sieving, heat shock, or cold shock of amphipods before the start of a test was not evident with exposure to carbaryl or KCl as reference toxicants. The chemicals evaluated in this study provided minimal information about the condition of the organisms used to start a toxicity test. Laboratories should periodically perform reference toxicity tests to assess the sensitivity of life stages or strains of test organisms. However, use of other test acceptability criteria required in standard methods such as minimum survival, growth, or reproduction of organisms in the control treatment at the end of a test, provides more useful information about the condition of organisms used to start a test compared to data generated from reference toxicity tests.

  14. A Novel Battery of Graded Word and Non-Word Reading Tests to Identify Sub-Lexical Dyslexia in Kannada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kiran

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sub-lexical dyslexia is characterized by difficulty in reading non-words relative to true words. Identification of this impairment requires tests assessing word and non-word reading performances. No such tests are available in Kannada, a South-Indian language. Objectives: a to develop and validate: Graded word and Graded non-word reading tests in Kannada b to standardize the tests by administering on 100 children each from Grades III to VII and to establish grade-wise criteria to identify sub-lexical dyslexia. Methods: The Graded Word Reading Test was developed separately for Grades III-VII by compiling 30 words each from Kannada textbook of the specific grade. The Graded Non-word Reading Test was developed by creating 70 randomized non-words. It was then given to 10 Kannada teachers to opine on the pronounceability and suitability of items for target Grades. The test battery was later administered on 25 children with good oral reading skills and subsequently standardized on a cross-section of 500 children from four Kannada-medium schools. This data was used to establish Grade-specific criteria for reading words and non-words in Kannada. Results: The Graded-word and non-word reading test demonstrated good content and face validity. A total of 44 (8.8% children were identified to have sub-lexical dyslexia across Grades. Conclusion: This novel test battery is first of its kind which also ‘quantifies’ the ‘relative performances’ on word and non-word reading to identify sub-lexical dyslexia in Kannada from Grades III to VII.

  15. Identifying temporal and causal contributions of neural processes underlying the Implicit Association Test (IAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Edward Forbes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Implicit Association Test (IAT is a popular behavioral measure that assesses the associative strength between outgroup members and stereotypical and counterstereotypical traits. Less is known, however, about the degree to which the IAT reflects automatic processing. Two studies examined automatic processing contributions to a gender-IAT using a data driven, social neuroscience approach. Performance on congruent (e.g., categorizing male names with synonyms of strength and incongruent (e.g., categorizing female names with synonyms of strength IAT blocks were separately analyzed using EEG (event-related potentials, or ERPs, and coherence; Study 1 and lesion (Study 2 methodologies. Compared to incongruent blocks, performance on congruent IAT blocks was associated with more positive ERPs that manifested in frontal and occipital regions at automatic processing speeds, occipital regions at more controlled processing speeds and was compromised by volume loss in the anterior temporal lobe, insula and medial PFC. Performance on incongruent blocks was associated with volume loss in supplementary motor areas, cingulate gyrus and a region in medial PFC similar to that found for congruent blocks. Greater coherence was found between frontal and occipital regions to the extent individuals exhibited more bias. This suggests there are separable neural contributions to congruent and incongruent blocks of the IAT but there is also a surprising amount of overlap. Given the temporal and regional neural distinctions, these results provide converging evidence that stereotypic associative strength assessed by the IAT indexes automatic processing to a degree.

  16. Identifying cardiac syncope based on clinical history: a literature-based model tested in four independent datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; Sheldon, Aaron; Wieling, Wouter; van Dijk, Nynke; Costantino, Giorgio; Furlan, Raffaello; Shen, Win-Kuang; Sheldon, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to develop and test a literature-based model for symptoms that associate with cardiac causes of syncope. Seven studies (the derivation sample) reporting ≥2 predictors of cardiac syncope were identified (4 Italian, 1 Swiss, 1 Canadian, and 1 from the United States). From these, 10 criteria

  17. Using Two-Tier Test to Identify Primary Students' Conceptual Understanding and Alternative Conceptions in Acid Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, Beyza Karadeniz

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify primary students' conceptual understanding and alternative conceptions in acid-base. For this reason, a 15 items two-tier multiple choice test administered 56 eighth grade students in spring semester 2009-2010. Data for this study were collected using a conceptual understanding scale prepared to include…

  18. Global grid of master events for waveform cross-correlation: from testing to real time processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, Dmitry; Rozhkov, Mikhail; Kitov, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Seismic monitoring of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) requires a globally uniform detection threshold, which is provided by geographical distribution of the Primary Seismic Network of the International Monitoring System (IMS). This detection threshold has to be as low as allowed by the entire set of real time and historical data recorded by the IMS. The International Data Centre (IDC) analyzes all relevant data in automatic processing and interactive review to issue a Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB), which includes all qualified events as obtained for the purpose of nuclear test monitoring. Since 2000, raw data, individual detections, and created events are saved in the IDC archive currently reaching tens of terabyte. In order to effectively use this archive in global monitoring we introduced the waveform cross correlation (matched filter) technique. Cross correlation between real time records at IMS stations and template waveforms is calculated for a dense (spacing of ~ 140 km) and regular grid of master events uniformly covering the globe. There are approximately 25,000 master events with 3 to 10 templates at IMS stations. In seismically active zones, we populate masters with real waveforms. For aseismic zones, we develop an extended set of synthetic templates for virtual master events. For optimal performance of cross correlation, the Principal and Independent Component Analysis are applied to the historical (from earthquakes and underground nuclear tests) and synthetic waveforms. Real waveform templates and selected PCA/ICA components are used in automatic processing for the production of a tentative cross-correlation standard event list (XSEL).

  19. Common Allergens Identified Based on Patch Test Results in Patients with Suspected Contact Dermatitis of the Scalp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleid, Nouf M; Fertig, Raymond; Maddy, Austin; Tosti, Antonella

    2017-03-01

    Contact dermatitis of the scalp is common and might be caused by many chemicals including metals, ingredients of shampoos and conditioners, dyes, or other hair treatments. Eliciting a careful history and patch tests are necessary to identify the responsible allergen and prevent relapses. To identify allergens that may cause contact dermatitis of the scalp by reviewing patch test results. We reviewed the records of 1,015 patients referred for patch testing at the Dermatology Department of the University of Miami. A total of 226 patients (205 females and 21 males) with suspected scalp contact dermatitis were identified, and the patch test results and clinical data for those patients were analyzed. Most patients were referred for patch testing from a specialized hair clinic at our institution. The most common allergens in our study population were nickel (23.8%), cobalt (21.0%), balsam of Peru (18.2%), fragrance mix (14.4%), carba mix (11.6%), and propylene glycol (PG) (8.8%). The majority of patients were females aged 40-59 years, and scalp itching or burning were reported as the most common symptom. Frequent sources of allergens for metals include hair clasps, pins, and brushes, while frequent sources of allergens for preservatives, fragrance mix, and balsam of Peru include shampoos, conditioners, and hair gels. Frequent sources of allergens for PG include topical medications.

  20. Global transcriptome analysis identifies regulated transcripts and pathways activated during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in Atlantic cod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleppe, Lene; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Furmanek, Tomasz; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Wargelius, Anna

    2014-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying oogenesis and maternally controlled embryogenesis in fish are not fully understood, especially in marine species. Our aim was to study the egg and embryo transcriptome during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in Atlantic cod. Follicles from oogenesis stages (pre-, early-, and late-vitellogenic), ovulated eggs, and two embryonic stages (blastula, gastrula) were collected from broodstock fish and fertilized eggs. Gene expression profiles were measured in a 44 K oligo microarray consisting of 23,000 cod genes. Hundreds of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the follicle stages investigated, implicating a continuous accumulation and degradation of polyadenylated transcripts throughout oogenesis. Very few DEGs were identified from ovulated egg to blastula, showing a more stable maternal RNA pool in early embryonic stages. The highest induction of expression was observed between blastula and gastrula, signifying the onset of zygotic transcription. During early vitellogenesis, several of the most upregulated genes are linked to nervous system signaling, suggesting increasing requirements for ovarian synaptic signaling to stimulate the rapid growth of oocytes. Highly upregulated genes during late vitellogenesis are linked to protein processing, fat metabolism, osmoregulation, and arrested meiosis. One of the genes with the highest upregulation in the ovulated egg is involved in oxidative phosphorylation, reflecting increased energy requirements during fertilization and the first rapid cell divisions of early embryogenesis. In conclusion, this study provides a large-scale presentation of the Atlantic cod's maternally controlled transcriptome in ovarian follicles through oogenesis, ovulated eggs, and early embryos. Published 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Fine-mapping of lipid regions in global populations discovers ethnic-specific signals and refines previously identified lipid loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Niha; Luis Ambite, Jose; Bush, William S.; Kichaev, Gleb; Lu, Yingchang; Manichaikul, Ani; Sheu, Wayne H-H.; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Buzkova, Petra; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chung, Ren-Hua; Cochran, Barbara; Dumitrescu, Logan; Gottesman, Omri; Haessler, Jeffrey W.; Haiman, Christopher; Heiss, Gerardo; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hung, Yi-Jen; Hwu, Chii-Min; Juang, Jyh-Ming J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lin, Li-An; Lin, Danyu; Lin, Shih-Yi; Mackey, Rachel H.; Martin, Lisa W.; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Peters, Ulrike; Predazzi, Irene; Quertermous, Thomas; Reiner, Alex P.; Robinson, Jennifer; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ryckman, Kelli K.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Stahl, Eli; Tao, Ran; Tsai, Michael Y.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Buyske, Steven; Ida Chen, Yii-Der; Cheng, Iona; Crawford, Dana C.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Rich, Stephen S.; Fornage, Myriam; North, Kari E.; Kooperberg, Charles; Carty, Cara L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Genome-wide association studies have identified over 150 loci associated with lipid traits, however, no large-scale studies exist for Hispanics and other minority populations. Additionally, the genetic architecture of lipid-influencing loci remains largely unknown. We performed one of the most racially/ethnically diverse fine-mapping genetic studies of HDL-C, LDL-C, and triglycerides to-date using SNPs on the MetaboChip array on 54,119 individuals: 21,304 African Americans, 19,829 Hispanic Americans, 12,456 Asians, and 530 American Indians. The majority of signals found in these groups generalize to European Americans. While we uncovered signals unique to racial/ethnic populations, we also observed systematically consistent lipid associations across these groups. In African Americans, we identified three novel signals associated with HDL-C (LPL, APOA5, LCAT) and two associated with LDL-C (ABCG8, DHODH). In addition, using this population, we refined the location for 16 out of the 58 known MetaboChip lipid loci. These results can guide tailored screening efforts, reveal population-specific responses to lipid-lowering medications, and aid in the development of new targeted drug therapies. PMID:28426890

  2. Global transcriptome profiling identifies KLF15 and SLC25A10 as modifiers of adipocytes insulin sensitivity in obese women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agné Kulyté

    Full Text Available Although the mechanisms linking obesity to insulin resistance (IR and type 2 diabetes (T2D are not entirely understood, it is likely that alterations of adipose tissue function are involved. The aim of this study was to identify new genes controlling insulin sensitivity in adipocytes from obese women with either insulin resistant (OIR or sensitive (OIS adipocytes. Insulin sensitivity was first determined by measuring lipogenesis in isolated adipocytes from abdominal subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT in a large observational study. Lipogenesis was measured under conditions where glucose transport was the rate limiting step and reflects in vivo insulin sensitivity. We then performed microarray-based transcriptome profiling on subcutaneous WAT specimen from a subgroup of 9 lean, 21 OIS and 18 obese OIR women. We could identify 432 genes that were differentially expressed between the OIR and OIS group (FDR ≤5%. These genes are enriched in pathways related to glucose and amino acid metabolism, cellular respiration, and insulin signaling, and include genes such as SLC2A4, AKT2, as well as genes coding for enzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain. Two IR-associated genes, KLF15 encoding a transcription factor and SLC25A10 encoding a dicarboxylate carrier, were selected for functional evaluation in adipocytes differentiated in vitro. Knockdown of KLF15 and SLC25A10 using siRNA inhibited insulin-stimulated lipogenesis in adipocytes. Transcriptome profiling of siRNA-treated cells suggested that KLF15 might control insulin sensitivity by influencing expression of PPARG, PXMP2, AQP7, LPL and genes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Knockdown of SLC25A10 had only modest impact on the transcriptome, suggesting that it might directly influence insulin sensitivity in adipocytes independently of transcription due to its important role in fatty acid synthesis. In summary, this study identifies novel genes associated with insulin sensitivity in

  3. Nacelle Chine Installation Based on Wind-Tunnel Test Using Efficient Global Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazaki, Masahiro; Yokokawa, Yuzuru; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Ito, Takeshi; Jeong, Shinkyu; Yamamoto, Kazuomi

    Design exploration of a nacelle chine installation was carried out. The nacelle chine improves stall performance when deploying multi-element high-lift devices. This study proposes an efficient design process using a Kriging surrogate model to determine the nacelle chine installation point in wind-tunnel tests. The design exploration was conducted in a wind-tunnel using the JAXA high-lift aircraft model at the JAXA Large-scale Low-speed Wind Tunnel. The objective was to maximize the maximum lift. The chine installation points were designed on the engine nacelle in the axial and chord-wise direction, while the geometry of the chine was fixed. In the design process, efficient global optimization (EGO) which includes Kriging model and genetic algorithm (GA) was employed. This method makes it possible both to improve the accuracy of the response surface and to explore the global optimum efficiently. Detailed observations of flowfields using the Particle Image Velocimetry method confirmed the chine effect and design results.

  4. Some tests of wet tropospheric calibration for the CASA Uno Global Positioning System experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, T. H.; Wolf, S. Kornreich

    1990-01-01

    Wet tropospheric path delay can be a major error source for Global Positioning System (GPS) geodetic experiments. Strategies for minimizing this error are investigted using data from CASA Uno, the first major GPS experiment in Central and South America, where wet path delays may be both high and variable. Wet path delay calibration using water vapor radiometers (WVRs) and residual delay estimation is compared with strategies where the entire wet path delay is estimated stochastically without prior calibration, using data from a 270-km test baseline in Costa Rica. Both approaches yield centimeter-level baseline repeatability and similar tropospheric estimates, suggesting that WVR calibration is not critical for obtaining high precision results with GPS in the CASA region.

  5. A quadratically regularized functional canonical correlation analysis for identifying the global structure of pleiotropy with NGS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nan; Zhu, Yun; Fan, Ruzong; Xiong, Momiao

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the pleiotropic effects of genetic variants can increase statistical power, provide important information to achieve deep understanding of the complex genetic structures of disease, and offer powerful tools for designing effective treatments with fewer side effects. However, the current multiple phenotype association analysis paradigm lacks breadth (number of phenotypes and genetic variants jointly analyzed at the same time) and depth (hierarchical structure of phenotype and genotypes). A key issue for high dimensional pleiotropic analysis is to effectively extract informative internal representation and features from high dimensional genotype and phenotype data. To explore correlation information of genetic variants, effectively reduce data dimensions, and overcome critical barriers in advancing the development of novel statistical methods and computational algorithms for genetic pleiotropic analysis, we proposed a new statistic method referred to as a quadratically regularized functional CCA (QRFCCA) for association analysis which combines three approaches: (1) quadratically regularized matrix factorization, (2) functional data analysis and (3) canonical correlation analysis (CCA). Large-scale simulations show that the QRFCCA has a much higher power than that of the ten competing statistics while retaining the appropriate type 1 errors. To further evaluate performance, the QRFCCA and ten other statistics are applied to the whole genome sequencing dataset from the TwinsUK study. We identify a total of 79 genes with rare variants and 67 genes with common variants significantly associated with the 46 traits using QRFCCA. The results show that the QRFCCA substantially outperforms the ten other statistics.

  6. Next generation sequencing identifies mutations in Atonal homolog 7 (ATOH7) in families with global eye developmental defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kamron; Logan, Clare V.; McKibbin, Martin; Sheridan, Eamonn; Elçioglu, Nursel H.; Yenice, Ozlem; Parry, David A.; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Abdelhamed, Zakia I.A.; Al-Maskari, Ahmed; Poulter, James A.; Mohamed, Moin D.; Carr, Ian M.; Morgan, Joanne E.; Jafri, Hussain; Raashid, Yasmin; Taylor, Graham R.; Johnson, Colin A.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Toomes, Carmel; Ali, Manir

    2012-01-01

    The atonal homolog 7 (ATOH7) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in determining the fate of retinal progenitor cells and is particularly required for optic nerve and ganglion cell development. Using a combination of autozygosity mapping and next generation sequencing, we have identified homozygous mutations in this gene, p.E49V and p.P18RfsX69, in two consanguineous families diagnosed with multiple ocular developmental defects, including severe vitreoretinal dysplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia, persistent fetal vasculature, microphthalmia, congenital cataracts, microcornea, corneal opacity and nystagmus. Most of these clinical features overlap with defects in the Norrin/β-catenin signalling pathway that is characterized by dysgenesis of the retinal and hyaloid vasculature. Our findings document Mendelian mutations within ATOH7 and imply a role for this molecule in the development of structures at the front as well as the back of the eye. This work also provides further insights into the function of ATOH7, especially its importance in retinal vascular development and hyaloid regression. PMID:22068589

  7. Comparing Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria with the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and Asthma Control Test (ACT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, B.B.; Pijnenburg, M.W.; Brackel, H.J.; Landstra, A.M.; Berg, N.J. van den; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Hop, W.C.J.; Vaessen-Verberne, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Several tools are useful in detecting uncontrolled asthma in children. The aim of this study was to compare Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines with the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and the Asthma Control Test (ACT) in detecting uncontrolled asthma in children. 145 children with

  8. An investigation to validate the grammar and phonology screening (GAPS test to identify children with specific language impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather K J van der Lely

    Full Text Available The extraordinarily high incidence of grammatical language impairments in developmental disorders suggests that this uniquely human cognitive function is "fragile". Yet our understanding of the neurobiology of grammatical impairments is limited. Furthermore, there is no "gold-standard" to identify grammatical impairments and routine screening is not undertaken. An accurate screening test to identify grammatical abilities would serve the research, health and education communities, further our understanding of developmental disorders, and identify children who need remediation, many of whom are currently un-diagnosed. A potential realistic screening tool that could be widely administered is the Grammar and Phonology Screening (GAPS test--a 10 minute test that can be administered by professionals and non-professionals alike. Here we provide a further step in evaluating the validity and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity of the GAPS test in identifying children who have Specific Language Impairment (SLI.We tested three groups of children; two groups aged 3;6-6:6, a typically developing (n = 30 group, and a group diagnosed with SLI: (n = 11 (Young (Y-SLI, and a further group aged 6;9-8;11 with SLI (Older (O-SLI (n = 10 who were above the test age norms. We employed a battery of language assessments including the GAPS test to assess the children's language abilities. For Y-SLI children, analyses revealed a sensitivity and specificity at the 5(th and 10(th percentile of 1.00 and 0.98, respectively, and for O-SLI children at the 10(th and 15(th percentile .83 and .90, respectively.The findings reveal that the GAPS is highly accurate in identifying impaired vs. non-impaired children up to 6;8 years, and has moderate-to-high accuracy up to 9 years. The results indicate that GAPS is a realistic tool for the early identification of grammatical abilities and impairment in young children. A larger investigation is warranted in children with SLI

  9. An Investigation to Validate the Grammar and Phonology Screening (GAPS) Test to Identify Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lely, Heather K. J.; Payne, Elisabeth; McClelland, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Background The extraordinarily high incidence of grammatical language impairments in developmental disorders suggests that this uniquely human cognitive function is “fragile”. Yet our understanding of the neurobiology of grammatical impairments is limited. Furthermore, there is no “gold-standard” to identify grammatical impairments and routine screening is not undertaken. An accurate screening test to identify grammatical abilities would serve the research, health and education communities, further our understanding of developmental disorders, and identify children who need remediation, many of whom are currently un-diagnosed. A potential realistic screening tool that could be widely administered is the Grammar and Phonology Screening (GAPS) test – a 10 minute test that can be administered by professionals and non-professionals alike. Here we provide a further step in evaluating the validity and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of the GAPS test in identifying children who have Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Methods and Findings We tested three groups of children; two groups aged 3;6–6:6, a typically developing (n = 30) group, and a group diagnosed with SLI: (n = 11) (Young (Y)-SLI), and a further group aged 6;9–8;11 with SLI (Older (O)-SLI) (n = 10) who were above the test age norms. We employed a battery of language assessments including the GAPS test to assess the children's language abilities. For Y-SLI children, analyses revealed a sensitivity and specificity at the 5th and 10th percentile of 1.00 and 0.98, respectively, and for O-SLI children at the 10th and 15th percentile .83 and .90, respectively. Conclusions The findings reveal that the GAPS is highly accurate in identifying impaired vs. non-impaired children up to 6;8 years, and has moderate-to-high accuracy up to 9 years. The results indicate that GAPS is a realistic tool for the early identification of grammatical abilities and impairment in young children. A larger

  10. Global analysis of WRKY transcription factor superfamily in Setaria identifies potential candidates involved in abiotic stress signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehanathan eMuthamilarasan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs are major players in stress signalling and constitute an integral part of signalling networks. Among the major TFs, WRKY proteins play pivotal roles in regulation of transcriptional reprogramming associated with stress responses. In view of this, genome- and transcriptome-wide identification of WRKY TF family was performed in the C4 model plants, Setaria italica (SiWRKY and S. viridis (SvWRKY, respectively. The study identified 105 SiWRKY and 44 SvWRKY proteins that were computationally analysed for their physicochemical properties. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis classified these proteins into three major groups, namely I, II and III with majority of WRKY proteins belonging to group II (53 SiWRKY and 23 SvWRKY, followed by group III (39 SiWRKY and 11 SvWRKY and group I (10 SiWRKY and 6 SvWRKY. Group II proteins were further classified into 5 subgroups (IIa to IIe based on their phylogeny. Domain analysis showed the presence of WRKY motif and zinc finger-like structures in these proteins along with additional domains in a few proteins. All SiWRKY genes were physically mapped on the S. italica genome and their duplication analysis revealed that 10 and 8 gene pairs underwent tandem and segmental duplications, respectively. Comparative mapping of SiWRKY and SvWRKY genes in related C4 panicoid genomes demonstrated the orthologous relationships between these genomes. In silico expression analysis of SiWRKY and SvWRKY genes showed their differential expression patterns in different tissues and stress conditions. Expression profiling of candidate SiWRKY genes in response to stress (dehydration and salinity and hormone treatments (abscisic acid, salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate suggested the putative involvement of SiWRKY066 and SiWRKY082 in stress and hormone signalling. These genes could be potential candidates for further characterization to delineate their functional roles in abiotic stress signalling.

  11. Development and testing of a medline search filter for identifying patient and public involvement in health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Morwenna; Bethel, Alison; Boddy, Kate

    2017-06-01

    Research involving the public as partners often proves difficult to locate due to the variations in terms used to describe public involvement, and inability of medical databases to index this concept effectively. To design a search filter to identify literature where patient and public involvement (PPI) was used in health research. A reference standard of 172 PPI papers was formed. The references were divided into a development set and a test set. Search terms were identified from common words, phrases and synonyms in the development set. These terms were combined as a search strategy for medline via OvidSP, which was then tested for sensitivity against the test set. The resultant search filter was then assessed for sensitivity, specificity and precision using a previously published systematic review. The search filter was found to be highly sensitive 98.5% in initial testing. When tested against results generated by a 'real-life' systematic review, the filter had a specificity of 81%. However, sensitivity dropped to 58%. Adjustments to the population group of terms increased the sensitivity to 73%. The PPI filter designed for medline via OvidSP could aid information specialists and researchers trying to find literature specific to PPI. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  12. Validity and Relative Ability of 4 Balance Tests to Identify Fall Status of Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Alda; Silva, Alexandre; Oliveira, Ana; Cruz, Joana; Machado, Ana; Jácome, Cristina

    The Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest), the Mini-BESTest, and the Brief-BESTest are useful tests to assess balance; however, their clinimetric properties have not been studied well in older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study compared the validity and relative ability of the BBS, BESTest, Mini-BESTest, and Brief-BESTest to identify fall status in older adults with T2D. This study involved a cross-sectional design. Sixty-six older adults with T2D (75 ± 7.6 years) were included and asked to report the number of falls during the previous 12 months and to complete the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. The BBS and the BESTest were administered, and the Mini-BESTest and Brief-BESTest scores were computed based on the BESTest performance. Receiver operating characteristics were used to assess the ability of each balance test to differentiate between participants with and without a history of falls. The 4 balance tests were able to identify fall status (areas under the curve = 0.74-0.76), with similar sensitivity (60%-67%) and specificity (71%-76%). The 4 balance tests were able to differentiate between older adults with T2D with and without a history of falls. As the BBS and the BESTest require longer application time, the Brief-BESTest may be an appropriate choice to use in clinical practice to detect fall risk.

  13. Do swingers self-identify as swingers when attending STI services for testing? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spauwen, Laura W L; Niekamp, Anne-Marie; Hoebe, Christian J P A; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole H T M

    2018-01-30

    Swingers, that is, members of a heterosexual couple who, as a couple, had sex with other couples and/or singles within the swinger's subculture, are a hidden population with substantial rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and high-risk sexual behaviour. Information on swingers' self-identification to be a swinger, their risk perception and attitudes about STI testing and safe sex will help to reveal swingers who are hidden while in care, to address them with targeted strategies. We used data from a convenience sample of 289 swingers from our Dutch STI clinic patient registry between 2009 and 2012 (median age 45 years; 49% women; STI positivity 13%, no condom in vaginal sex: 57%). Participants filled in a self-administered questionnaire on sexual behaviour and answered statements about self-identification, risk perception and attitudes about STI testing and safe sex. Of all participating registered swingers, 56% self-identified as a swinger. Safe sex was reportedly deemed important (77%). Overall, 72%, 62% and 56% reported that STI testing, partner notification and condom use is the norm in the swinger community. The latter was reported more often by self-identified swingers compared with non-self-identified swingers. Self-identified swingers further swinged more often, had more partners and more often swinged at home parties than non-self-identified swingers. About half of STI clinic attending swingers whose sexual behaviour agrees with the definition of swinging are neutral/do not identify themselves to be a swinger. As many STI clinics internationally not specifically ask clients about their swinging behaviour, swingers may be a missed target population in care. Implementation of routine questions addressing behaviour (thus not only asking whether someone is a swinger) in STI clinics is feasible and facilitated by swingers' positive norm towards STI prevention and testing. Implementing routine swinger questions contribute to effective STI services

  14. Test-retest reliability of daily life gait speed as measured by smartphone global positioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, Shuichi P; Tsuchiya, Shuichi; Kawai, Hisashi

    2018-01-30

    Gait speed is useful in predicting adverse health outcomes among older adults. In previous studies, gait speed has typically been measured when subjects walk in laboratory settings, where they are able to intentionally change their gait speed. Thus, it is unclear whether the gait speed captured in a laboratory setting is representative of the subjects' actual walking pace in daily life. This study proposes using the more accurate "daily life gait speed" (DGS), measured as the subject's average gait speed over a week-long period using the global positioning system (GPS) in their smartphone. We examined the test-retest reliability of the DGS measure in the present study. Three daily life gait parameters with 186 volunteers (57 men and 129 women), aged 19 to 84 years, were measured using a smartphone application: DGS, average of daily gait cycle during a week (DCY), and average of daily cadence during a week (DCA). Test-retest reliability of the daily gait parameters between test week (T1) and retest week (T2) was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC (2,1), and systematic biases were observed via Bland-Altman plots. The ICCs between the daily gait parameters at T1 and T2 were 0.902 for DGS, 0.916 for DCY, and 0.917 for DCA. The Bland-Altman plots showed no significant fixed or proportional bias between the measurements at T1 and T2. These results verify that the test-retest reliability of the daily gait parameters in the present study was adequate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. groHMM: a computational tool for identifying unannotated and cell type-specific transcription units from global run-on sequencing data

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Minho; Danko, Charles G.; Kraus, W. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background Global run-on coupled with deep sequencing (GRO-seq) provides extensive information on the location and function of coding and non-coding transcripts, including primary microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), as well as yet undiscovered classes of transcripts. However, few computational tools tailored toward this new type of sequencing data are available, limiting the applicability of GRO-seq data for identifying novel transcription units. Res...

  16. Hydraulic analysis of harmonic pumping tests in frequency and time domains for identifying the conduits networks in a karstic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, P.; Jardani, A.; Cardiff, M.; Lecoq, N.; Jourde, H.

    2018-04-01

    In a karstic field, the flow paths are very complex as they globally follow the conduit network. The responses generated from an investigation in this type of aquifer can be spatially highly variable. Therefore, the aim of the investigation in this case is to define a degree of connectivity between points of the field, in order to understand these flow paths. Harmonic pumping tests represent a possible investigation method for characterizing the subsurface flow of groundwater. They have several advantages compared to a constant-rate pumping (more signal possibilities, ease of extracting the signal in the responses and possibility of closed loop investigation). We show in this work that interpreting the responses from a harmonic pumping test is very useful for delineating a degree of connectivity between measurement points. We have firstly studied the amplitude and phase offset of responses from a harmonic pumping test in a theoretical synthetic modeling case in order to define a qualitative interpretation method in the time and frequency domains. Three different type of responses have been separated: a conduit connectivity response, a matrix connectivity, and a dual connectivity (response of a point in the matrix, but close to a conduit). We have then applied this method to measured responses at a field research site. Our interpretation method permits a quick and easy reconstruction of the main flow paths, and the whole set of field responses appear to give a similar range of responses to those seen in the theoretical synthetic case.

  17. Baseline Testing of the EV Global E-Bike with Ultracapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Kolacz, John S.; Tavernelli, Paul F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center initiated baseline testing of the EV Global E-Bike SX with ultracapacitors as a way to reduce pollution in urban areas, reduce fossil fuel consumption, and reduce operating costs for transportation systems. The E-Bike provides an inexpensive approach to advance the state of art in hybrid technology in a practical application. The project transfers space technology to terrestrial use via nontraditional partners, and provides power system data valuable for future space applications. The work was done under the Hybrid Power Management (HPM) Program, which includes the Hybrid Electric Transit Bus (HETB). The E-Bike is a state of the art, ground up, hybrid electrical bicycle. Unique features of the vehicle's power system include the use of an efficient, 400 W electric hub motor, and a seven-speed derailleur system that permits operation as fully electric, fully pedal, or a combination of the two. Other innovative features, such as regenerative braking through ultracapacitor energy storage, are planned. Regenerative braking recovers much of the kinetic energy of the vehicle during deceleration. A description of the E-bike, the results of performance testing, and future vehicle development plans are given in this report. The report concludes that the E-Bike provides excellent performance, and that the implementation of ultracapacitors in the power system can provide significant performance improvements.

  18. Interlaboratory tests to identify irradiation treatment of various foods via gas chromatographic detection of hydrocarbons, ESR spectroscopy and TL analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, G.A.; Helle, N.; Schulzki, G.; Linke, B.; Spiegelberg, A.; Mager, M.; Boegl, K.W.

    1996-01-01

    The gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbons (HC) and 2-alkylcyclobutanones, the ESR spectroscopic detection of radiation-specific radicals and the thermoluminescence (TL) analysis of silicate mineral are the most important methods for identification of irradiated foods. After successful performance in interlaboratory studies on meat products, fish, spices, herbs and shells of nuts, all or some of these methods have been approved by national authorities in Germany and the United Kingdom. Recently, draft European Standards have been elaborated for approval by member states of the European Committee for Standardization (CEN). Several research laboratories have shown that these methods can be applied to various foods not yet tested in collaborative studies. However, for an effective application in food control it is necessary to prove their suitability in interlaboratory studies. Therefore, in 1993/94, various interlaboratory tests were organised by the BgVV. In an ESR spectroscopic test, shrimps and paprika powder were examined. Shrimps were also the subject of examination in a TL test. Finally, GC detection of radiation-induced hydrocarbons in the fat fraction of foods was used in another test to identify irradiated Camembert, avocado, papaya and mango. In the following paper, results of the interlaboratory tests are summarised. Detailed reports are published by this institute. (author)

  19. Interlaboratory tests to identify irradiation treatment of various foods via gas chromatographic detection of hydrocarbons, ESR spectroscopy and TL analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, G.A.; Helle, N.; Schulzki, G.; Linke, B.; Spiegelberg, A.; Mager, M.; Boegl, K.W. [BgVV - Federal Inst. for Health Protection of Consumers and Veterinary Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    The gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbons (HC) and 2-alkylcyclobutanones, the ESR spectroscopic detection of radiation-specific radicals and the thermoluminescence (TL) analysis of silicate mineral are the most important methods for identification of irradiated foods. After successful performance in interlaboratory studies on meat products, fish, spices, herbs and shells of nuts, all or some of these methods have been approved by national authorities in Germany and the United Kingdom. Recently, draft European Standards have been elaborated for approval by member states of the European Committee for Standardization (CEN). Several research laboratories have shown that these methods can be applied to various foods not yet tested in collaborative studies. However, for an effective application in food control it is necessary to prove their suitability in interlaboratory studies. Therefore, in 1993/94, various interlaboratory tests were organised by the BgVV. In an ESR spectroscopic test, shrimps and paprika powder were examined. Shrimps were also the subject of examination in a TL test. Finally, GC detection of radiation-induced hydrocarbons in the fat fraction of foods was used in another test to identify irradiated Camembert, avocado, papaya and mango. In the following paper, results of the interlaboratory tests are summarised. Detailed reports are published by this institute. (author).

  20. Does the medical college admission test predict global academic performance in osteopathic medical school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Paul; Wen, Frances K

    2007-04-01

    To investigate the extent to which Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) subscores predict the overall academic performance of osteopathic medical students. We examined the value of MCAT subscores in predicting students' global academic performance in osteopathic medical school, as defined by grade point average in basic science (basic GPA), clinical instruction (clinical GPA), cumulative grade point average (total GPA), and national licensing examination scores on the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination-USA (COMLEX-USA) Level 1 and Level 2. Subjects were 434 osteopathic medical students of the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Tulsa who either graduated or were expected to graduate between the years 1999 and 2003. Standard, multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted for each of the five performance variables to assess the relative importance of MCAT subtest scores and cumulative undergraduate GPA (total UGPA) in predicting academic performance. Total UGPA was the most important, significant predictor (beta=.13-.33) in overall student academic performance for all five analyzed variables. Less predictive of overall academic performance (beta=-.01-.21) were MCAT subcores. However, the MCAT biological sciences subscore was a significant predictor of basic GPA (beta=.14), the MCAT physical sciences subscore significantly predicted COMLEX-USA Level 1 scores (beta=.15), and the MCAT verbal reasoning subscore significantly predicted COMLEX-USA Level 2 scores (beta=.21). The subscore for the MCAT writing sample was not a significant predictor of overall academic performance. Total undergraduate GPA had the highest predictive value for academic performance as measured by basic GPA, clinical GPA, total GPA, and COMLEX-USA Level 1 and Level 2 scores. The present study found MCAT subscores to be of limited predictive value in determining global academic performance.

  1. The dementia cognitive fluctuation scale, a new psychometric test for clinicians to identify cognitive fluctuations in people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David R; McKeith, Ian; Mosimann, Urs; Ghosh-Nodial, Arunima; Grayson, Louise; Wilson, Barbara; Thomas, Alan J

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive fluctuation (CF) is a common feature of dementia and a core diagnostic symptom for dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). CF remains difficult to accurately and reliably detect clinically. This study aimed to develop a psychometric test that could be used by clinicians to facilitate the identification of CF and improve the recognition and diagnosis of DLB and Parkinson disease, and to improve differential diagnosis of other dementias. We compiled a 17-item psychometric test for identifying CF and applied this measure in a cross-sectional design. Participants were recruited from the North East of England, and assessments were made in individuals' homes. We recruited people with four subtypes of dementia and a healthy comparison group, and all subjects were administered this pilot scale together with other standard ratings. The psychometric properties of the scale were examined with exploratory factor analysis. We also examined the ability of individual items to identify CF to discriminate between dementia subtypes. The sensitivity and specificity of discriminating items were explored along with validity and reliability analyses. Participants comprised 32 comparison subjects, 30 people with Alzheimer disease, 30 with vascular dementia, 29 with DLB, and 32 with dementia associated with Parkinson disease. Four items significantly discriminated between dementia groups and showed good levels of sensitivity (range: 78.6%-80.3%) and specificity (range: 73.9%-79.3%). The scale had very good levels of test-retest (Cronbach's alpha: 0.82) and interrater (0.81) reliabilities. The four items loaded onto three different factors. These items were: 1) marked differences in functioning during the daytime; 2) daytime somnolence; 3) daytime drowsiness; and 4) altered levels of consciousness during the day. We identified four items that provide valid, sensitive, and specific questions for reliably identifying CF and distinguishing the Lewy body dementias from other major causes of

  2. Multivariate Analyses and Classification of Inertial Sensor Data to Identify Aging Effects on the Timed-Up-and-Go Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danique Vervoort

    Full Text Available Many tests can crudely quantify age-related mobility decrease but instrumented versions of mobility tests could increase their specificity and sensitivity. The Timed-up-and-Go (TUG test includes several elements that people use in daily life. The test has different transition phases: rise from a chair, walk, 180° turn, walk back, turn, and sit-down on a chair. For this reason the TUG is an often used test to evaluate in a standardized way possible decline in balance and walking ability due to age and or pathology. Using inertial sensors, qualitative information about the performance of the sub-phases can provide more specific information about a decline in balance and walking ability. The first aim of our study was to identify variables extracted from the instrumented timed-up-and-go (iTUG that most effectively distinguished performance differences across age (age 18-75. Second, we determined the discriminative ability of those identified variables to classify a younger (age 18-45 and older age group (age 46-75. From healthy adults (n = 59, trunk accelerations and angular velocities were recorded during iTUG performance. iTUG phases were detected with wavelet-analysis. Using a Partial Least Square (PLS model, from the 72-iTUG variables calculated across phases, those that explained most of the covariance between variables and age were extracted. Subsequently, a PLS-discriminant analysis (DA assessed classification power of the identified iTUG variables to discriminate the age groups. 27 variables, related to turning, walking and the stand-to-sit movement explained 71% of the variation in age. The PLS-DA with these 27 variables showed a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 85%. Based on this model, the iTUG can accurately distinguish young and older adults. Such data can serve as a reference for pathological aging with respect to a widely used mobility test. Mobility tests like the TUG supplemented with smart technology could be used in

  3. Use of selected ambulatory dental services in Taiwan before and after global budgeting: a longitudinal study to identify trends in hospital and clinic-based services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chienhung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Taiwan government adopted National Health Insurance (NHI in 1995, providing universal health care to all citizens. It was financed by mandatory premium contributions made by employers, employees, and the government. Since then, the government has faced increasing challenges to control NHI expenditures. The aim of this study was to determine trends in the provision of dental services in Taiwan after the implementation of global budgeting in 1998 and to identify areas of possible concern. Methods This longitudinal before/after study was based on data from the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1996 to 2001. These data were subjected to logistic regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to examine changes in delivery of specific services after global budgeting implementation. Utilization of hospital and clinic services was compared. Results Reimbursement for dental services increased significantly while the number of visits per patient remained steady in both hospitals and clinics. In hospitals, visits for root canal procedures, ionomer restoration, tooth extraction and tooth scaling increased significantly. In dental clinics, visits for amalgam restoration decreased significantly while those for ionomer restoration, tooth extraction, and tooth scaling increased significantly. After the adoption of global budgeting, expenditures for dental services increased dramatically while the number of visits per patient did not, indicating a possible shift in patients to hospital facilities that received additional National Health Insurance funding. Conclusions The identified trends indicate increased utilization of dental services and uneven distribution of care and dentists. These trends may be compromising the quality of dental care delivered in Taiwan.

  4. Identifying design parameters controlling damage behaviors of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites using micromechanics as a virtual testing tool

    KAUST Repository

    Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah

    2017-03-31

    In this paper, we propose a micromechanical approach to predict damage mechanisms and their interactions in glass fibers/polypropylene thermoplastic composites. First, a representative volume element (RVE) of such materials was rigorously determined using a geometrical two-point probability function and the eigenvalue stabilization of homogenized elastic tensor obtained by Hill-Mandel kinematic homogenization. Next, the 3D finite element models of the RVE were developed accordingly. The fibers were modeled with an isotropic linear elastic material. The matrix was modeled with an isotropic linear elastic, rate-independent hyperbolic Drucker-Prager plasticity coupled with a ductile damage model that is able to show pressure dependency of the yield and damage behavior often found in a thermoplastic material. In addition, cohesive elements were inserted into the fiber-matrix interfaces to simulate debonding. The RVE faces are imposed with periodical boundary conditions to minimize the edge effect. The RVE was then subjected to transverse tensile loading in accordance with experimental tensile tests on [90]8 laminates. The model prediction was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental results in terms of the global stress-strain curves, including the linear and nonlinear portion of the response and also the failure point, making it a useful virtual testing tool for composite material design. Furthermore, the effect of tailoring the main parameters of thermoplastic composites is investigated to provide guidelines for future improvements of these materials.

  5. An Efficient Stepwise Statistical Test to Identify Multiple Linked Human Genetic Variants Associated with Specific Phenotypic Traits.

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    Iksoo Huh

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genotyping methodologies have allowed genome-wide association studies (GWAS to accurately identify genetic variants that associate with common or pathological complex traits. Although most GWAS have focused on associations with single genetic variants, joint identification of multiple genetic variants, and how they interact, is essential for understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypic traits. Here, we propose an efficient stepwise method based on the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test (for stratified categorical data to identify causal joint multiple genetic variants in GWAS. This method combines the CMH statistic with a stepwise procedure to detect multiple genetic variants associated with specific categorical traits, using a series of associated I × J contingency tables and a null hypothesis of no phenotype association. Through a new stratification scheme based on the sum of minor allele count criteria, we make the method more feasible for GWAS data having sample sizes of several thousands. We also examine the properties of the proposed stepwise method via simulation studies, and show that the stepwise CMH test performs better than other existing methods (e.g., logistic regression and detection of associations by Markov blanket for identifying multiple genetic variants. Finally, we apply the proposed approach to two genomic sequencing datasets to detect linked genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder and obesity, respectively.

  6. Use of the complement fixation and brucellin skin tests to identify cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Massis, F; Giovannini, A; Di Emidio, B; Ronchi, G F; Tittarelli, M; Di Giannatale, E; Di Ventura, M; Nannini, D; Caporale, V

    2005-01-01

    In the European Union, RB51 vaccine can be used only under strictly controlled conditions for the immunisation of cattle at risk of infection with Brucella abortus. A test is therefore necessary to distinguish vaccinated from unvaccinated animals. The complement fixation test with RB51 antigen (RB51-CFT), dot-blot and gamma-interferon used to identify vaccinated animals have been described, but sensitivity of the tests has been poor and positivity transient after calfhood vaccination. To avail of a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool, the authors produced, controlled and evaluated an experimental brucellin prepared from strain RB51 (RB51 brucellin). The potency of this brucellin was evaluated in guinea-pigs sensitised with RB51 and compared with a commercially available brucellin. Both allergens produced similar biological activity in guinea-pigs. The RB51 brucellin skin test was performed in 10 cattle 414 days after calfhood vaccination with RB51 when they were negative to the RB51-CFT. The skin test revealed 60% sensitivity (with a confidence interval of 95%, CI 30.8%-83.3%) and 100% specificity (CI 60.7%-100%). These findings limit the use of the skin test only for screening to detect RB51 vaccinated herds, not individual animals. Nevertheless, following intradermal inoculation of RB51 brucellin, a transient antibody increase to the RB51-CFT was observed, from day 9 to day 20 post inoculation with RB51 brucellin. This transient antibody increase, when evaluated in parallel with the RB51 brucellin skin test results, enables detection of individual vaccinated animals (sensitivity 100%; CI 76.2%-100%).

  7. Survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients with tumor recurrence using global score test methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Zakiyah; Aziz, Nazrina; Ahmad, Yuhaniz; Azwan, Zairul; Raduan, Farhana; Sagap, Ismail

    2014-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third and the second most common cancer worldwide in men and women respectively, and the second in Malaysia for both genders. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the options available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. In clinical trials, the main purpose is often to compare efficacy between experimental and control treatments. Treatment comparisons often involve several responses or endpoints, and this situation complicates the analysis. In the case of colorectal cancer, sets of responses concerned with survival times include: times from tumor removal until the first, the second and the third tumor recurrences, and time to death. For a patient, the time to recurrence is correlated to the overall survival. In this study, global score test methodology is used in combining the univariate score statistics for comparing treatments with respect to each survival endpoint into a single statistic. The data of tumor recurrence and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients are taken from a Malaysian hospital. The results are found to be similar to those computed using the established Wei, Lin and Weissfeld method. Key factors such as ethnic, gender, age and stage at diagnose are also reported.

  8. Survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients with tumor recurrence using global score test methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zain, Zakiyah, E-mail: zac@uum.edu.my; Ahmad, Yuhaniz, E-mail: yuhaniz@uum.edu.my [School of Quantitative Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, UUM Sintok 06010, Kedah (Malaysia); Azwan, Zairul, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com; Raduan, Farhana, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com; Sagap, Ismail, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com [Surgery Department, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Jalan Yaacob Latif, 56000 Bandar Tun Razak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Aziz, Nazrina, E-mail: nazrina@uum.edu.my

    2014-12-04

    Colorectal cancer is the third and the second most common cancer worldwide in men and women respectively, and the second in Malaysia for both genders. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the options available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. In clinical trials, the main purpose is often to compare efficacy between experimental and control treatments. Treatment comparisons often involve several responses or endpoints, and this situation complicates the analysis. In the case of colorectal cancer, sets of responses concerned with survival times include: times from tumor removal until the first, the second and the third tumor recurrences, and time to death. For a patient, the time to recurrence is correlated to the overall survival. In this study, global score test methodology is used in combining the univariate score statistics for comparing treatments with respect to each survival endpoint into a single statistic. The data of tumor recurrence and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients are taken from a Malaysian hospital. The results are found to be similar to those computed using the established Wei, Lin and Weissfeld method. Key factors such as ethnic, gender, age and stage at diagnose are also reported.

  9. Identifying nurse staffing research in Medline: development and testing of empirically derived search strategies with the PubMed interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Michael; Hausner, Elke; Klaus, Susan F; Dunton, Nancy E

    2010-08-23

    The identification of health services research in databases such as PubMed/Medline is a cumbersome task. This task becomes even more difficult if the field of interest involves the use of diverse methods and data sources, as is the case with nurse staffing research. This type of research investigates the association between nurse staffing parameters and nursing and patient outcomes. A comprehensively developed search strategy may help identify nurse staffing research in PubMed/Medline. A set of relevant references in PubMed/Medline was identified by means of three systematic reviews. This development set was used to detect candidate free-text and MeSH terms. The frequency of these terms was compared to a random sample from PubMed/Medline in order to identify terms specific to nurse staffing research, which were then used to develop a sensitive, precise and balanced search strategy. To determine their precision, the newly developed search strategies were tested against a) the pool of relevant references extracted from the systematic reviews, b) a reference set identified from an electronic journal screening, and c) a sample from PubMed/Medline. Finally, all newly developed strategies were compared to PubMed's Health Services Research Queries (PubMed's HSR Queries). The sensitivities of the newly developed search strategies were almost 100% in all of the three test sets applied; precision ranged from 6.1% to 32.0%. PubMed's HSR queries were less sensitive (83.3% to 88.2%) than the new search strategies. Only minor differences in precision were found (5.0% to 32.0%). As with other literature on health services research, nurse staffing studies are difficult to identify in PubMed/Medline. Depending on the purpose of the search, researchers can choose between high sensitivity and retrieval of a large number of references or high precision, i.e. and an increased risk of missing relevant references, respectively. More standardized terminology (e.g. by consistent use of the

  10. Using Three-Tier Test to Identify the Quantity of Student that Having Misconception on Newton's Laws of Motion Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Sulistri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify students quantity who are having the misconception on Newton's laws of motion concept using a Three-tiered Test. The sampling technique used in this study is purposive sampling technique and has been conducted on 56 students at Senior High School. A three-tier "Newton’s Law Of Motion Test" with 10 items is using as instrument to collected date in this study. The results showed that the quantity of students who experienced misconception with the highest category is on the concept of determining the relationship between the mass of objects and the time required for free fall that is equal to 89.3%. While the lowest category is in the concept of explaining the relationship between acceleration, mass and force with the time required for the object to fall freely that is equal to 26.8%.

  11. Identifying cardiac syncope based on clinical history: a literature-based model tested in four independent datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; Sheldon, Aaron; Wieling, Wouter; van Dijk, Nynke; Costantino, Giorgio; Furlan, Raffaello; Shen, Win-Kuang; Sheldon, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to develop and test a literature-based model for symptoms that associate with cardiac causes of syncope. Seven studies (the derivation sample) reporting ≥2 predictors of cardiac syncope were identified (4 Italian, 1 Swiss, 1 Canadian, and 1 from the United States). From these, 10 criteria were identified as diagnostic predictors. The conditional probability of each predictor was calculated by summation of the reported frequencies. A model of conditional probabilities and a priori probabilities of cardiac syncope was constructed. The model was tested in four datasets of patients with syncope (the test sample) from Calgary (n=670; 21% had cardiac syncope), Amsterdam (n=503; 9%), Milan (n=689; 5%) and Rochester (3877; 11%). In the derivation sample ten variables were significantly associated with cardiac syncope: age, gender, structural heart disease, low number of spells, brief or absent prodrome, supine syncope, effort syncope, and absence of nausea, diaphoresis and blurred vision. Fitting the test datasets to the full model gave C-statistics of 0.87 (Calgary), 0.84 (Amsterdam), 0.72 (Milan) and 0.71 (Rochester). Model sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 68% for Calgary, 86% and 67% for Amsterdam, 76% and 59% for Milan, and 73% and 52% for Rochester. A model with 5 variables (age, gender, structural heart disease, low number of spells, and lack of prodromal symptoms) was as accurate as the total set. A simple literature-based Bayesian model of historical criteria can distinguish patients with cardiac syncope from other patients with syncope with moderate accuracy.

  12. Identifying cardiac syncope based on clinical history: a literature-based model tested in four independent datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneke Berecki-Gisolf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to develop and test a literature-based model for symptoms that associate with cardiac causes of syncope. METHODS AND RESULTS: Seven studies (the derivation sample reporting ≥2 predictors of cardiac syncope were identified (4 Italian, 1 Swiss, 1 Canadian, and 1 from the United States. From these, 10 criteria were identified as diagnostic predictors. The conditional probability of each predictor was calculated by summation of the reported frequencies. A model of conditional probabilities and a priori probabilities of cardiac syncope was constructed. The model was tested in four datasets of patients with syncope (the test sample from Calgary (n=670; 21% had cardiac syncope, Amsterdam (n=503; 9%, Milan (n=689; 5% and Rochester (3877; 11%. In the derivation sample ten variables were significantly associated with cardiac syncope: age, gender, structural heart disease, low number of spells, brief or absent prodrome, supine syncope, effort syncope, and absence of nausea, diaphoresis and blurred vision. Fitting the test datasets to the full model gave C-statistics of 0.87 (Calgary, 0.84 (Amsterdam, 0.72 (Milan and 0.71 (Rochester. Model sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 68% for Calgary, 86% and 67% for Amsterdam, 76% and 59% for Milan, and 73% and 52% for Rochester. A model with 5 variables (age, gender, structural heart disease, low number of spells, and lack of prodromal symptoms was as accurate as the total set. CONCLUSION: A simple literature-based Bayesian model of historical criteria can distinguish patients with cardiac syncope from other patients with syncope with moderate accuracy.

  13. [Diagnostic evaluation of the developmental level in children identified at risk of delay through the Child Development Evaluation Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli-Córdoba, Antonio; Campos-Maldonado, Martha Carmen; Vélez-Andrade, Víctor Hugo; Delgado-Ginebra, Ismael; Baqueiro-Hernández, César Iván; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Ojeda-Lara, Lucía; Davis-Martínez, Erika Berenice; O'Shea-Cuevas, Gabriel; Aceves-Villagrán, Daniel; Carrasco-Mendoza, Joaquín; Villagrán-Muñoz, Víctor Manuel; Halley-Castillo, Elizabeth; Sidonio-Aguayo, Beatriz; Palma-Tavera, Josuha Alexander; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    The Child Development Evaluation (or CDE Test) was developed in Mexico as a screening tool for child developmental problems. It yields three possible results: normal, slow development or risk of delay. The modified version was elaborated using the information obtained during the validation study but its properties according to the base population are not known. The objective of this work was to establish diagnostic confirmation of developmental delay in children 16- to 59-months of age previously identified as having risk of delay through the CDE Test in primary care facilities. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in one Mexican state. CDE test was administered to 11,455 children 16- to 59-months of age from December/2013 to March/2014. The eligible population represented the 6.2% of the children (n=714) who were identified at risk of delay through the CDE Test. For inclusion in the study, a block randomization stratified by sex and age group was performed. Each participant included in the study had a diagnostic evaluation using the Battelle Development Inventory, 2 nd edition. From the 355 participants included with risk of delay, 65.9% were male and 80.2% were from rural areas; 6.5% were false positives (Total Development Quotient ˃90) and 6.8% did not have any domain with delay (Domain Developmental Quotient motor 55.5%; and adaptive 41.7%. There were significant differences in the percentages of delay both by age and by domain/subdomain evaluated. In 93.2% of the participants, developmental delay was corroborated in at least one domain evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a field testing protocol for identifying Deepwater Horizon oil spill residues trapped near Gulf of Mexico beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuling

    2018-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident, one of the largest oil spills in U.S. history, contaminated several beaches located along the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) shoreline. The residues from the spill still continue to be deposited on some of these beaches. Methods to track and monitor the fate of these residues require approaches that can differentiate the DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues. This is because, historically, the crude oil released from sources such as natural seeps and anthropogenic discharges have also deposited other types of petroleum residues on GOM beaches. Therefore, identifying the origin of these residues is critical for developing effective management strategies for monitoring the long-term environmental impacts of the DWH oil spill. Advanced fingerprinting methods that are currently used for identifying the source of oil spill residues require detailed laboratory studies, which can be cost-prohibitive. Also, most agencies typically use untrained workers or volunteers to conduct shoreline monitoring surveys and these worker will not have access to advanced laboratory facilities. Furthermore, it is impractical to routinely fingerprint large volumes of samples that are collected after a major oil spill event, such as the DWH spill. In this study, we propose a simple field testing protocol that can identify DWH oil spill residues based on their unique physical characteristics. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by testing a variety of oil spill samples, and the results are verified by characterizing the samples using advanced chemical fingerprinting methods. The verification data show that the method yields results that are consistent with the results derived from advanced fingerprinting methods. The proposed protocol is a reliable, cost-effective, practical field approach for differentiating DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues. PMID:29329313

  15. Development of a field testing protocol for identifying Deepwater Horizon oil spill residues trapped near Gulf of Mexico beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuling; Clement, T Prabhakar

    2018-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident, one of the largest oil spills in U.S. history, contaminated several beaches located along the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) shoreline. The residues from the spill still continue to be deposited on some of these beaches. Methods to track and monitor the fate of these residues require approaches that can differentiate the DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues. This is because, historically, the crude oil released from sources such as natural seeps and anthropogenic discharges have also deposited other types of petroleum residues on GOM beaches. Therefore, identifying the origin of these residues is critical for developing effective management strategies for monitoring the long-term environmental impacts of the DWH oil spill. Advanced fingerprinting methods that are currently used for identifying the source of oil spill residues require detailed laboratory studies, which can be cost-prohibitive. Also, most agencies typically use untrained workers or volunteers to conduct shoreline monitoring surveys and these worker will not have access to advanced laboratory facilities. Furthermore, it is impractical to routinely fingerprint large volumes of samples that are collected after a major oil spill event, such as the DWH spill. In this study, we propose a simple field testing protocol that can identify DWH oil spill residues based on their unique physical characteristics. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by testing a variety of oil spill samples, and the results are verified by characterizing the samples using advanced chemical fingerprinting methods. The verification data show that the method yields results that are consistent with the results derived from advanced fingerprinting methods. The proposed protocol is a reliable, cost-effective, practical field approach for differentiating DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues.

  16. Testing the Efficacy of Global Biodiversity Hotspots for Insect Conservation: The Case of South African Katydids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazelet, Corinna S; Thompson, Aileen C; Naskrecki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The use of endemism and vascular plants only for biodiversity hotspot delineation has long been contested. Few studies have focused on the efficacy of global biodiversity hotspots for the conservation of insects, an important, abundant, and often ignored component of biodiversity. We aimed to test five alternative diversity measures for hotspot delineation and examine the efficacy of biodiversity hotspots for conserving a non-typical target organism, South African katydids. Using a 1° fishnet grid, we delineated katydid hotspots in two ways: (1) count-based: grid cells in the top 10% of total, endemic, threatened and/or sensitive species richness; vs. (2) score-based: grid cells with a mean value in the top 10% on a scoring system which scored each species on the basis of its IUCN Red List threat status, distribution, mobility and trophic level. We then compared katydid hotspots with each other and with recognized biodiversity hotspots. Grid cells within biodiversity hotspots had significantly higher count-based and score-based diversity than non-hotspot grid cells. There was a significant association between the three types of hotspots. Of the count-based measures, endemic species richness was the best surrogate for the others. However, the score-based measure out-performed all count-based diversity measures. Species richness was the least successful surrogate of all. The strong performance of the score-based method for hotspot prediction emphasizes the importance of including species' natural history information for conservation decision-making, and is easily adaptable to other organisms. Furthermore, these results add empirical support for the efficacy of biodiversity hotspots in conserving non-target organisms.

  17. Reverse translated and gold standard continuous performance tests predict global cognitive performance in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bismark, Andrew W; Thomas, Michael L; Tarasenko, Melissa; Shiluk, Alexandra L; Rackelmann, Sonia Y; Young, Jared W; Light, Gregory A

    2018-04-12

    Attentional dysfunction contributes to functional impairments in schizophrenia (SZ). Sustained attention is typically assessed via continuous performance tasks (CPTs), though many CPTs have limited cross-species translational validity and place demands on additional cognitive domains. A reverse-translated 5-Choice Continuous Performance Task (5C-CPT) for human testing-originally developed for use in rodents-was designed to minimize demands on perceptual, visual learning, processing speed, or working memory functions. To-date, no studies have validated the 5C-CPT against gold standard attentional measures nor evaluated how 5C-CPT scores relate to cognition in SZ. Here we examined the relationship between the 5C-CPT and the CPT-Identical Pairs (CPT-IP), an established and psychometrically robust measure of vigilance from the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) in a sample of SZ patients (n = 35). Relationships to global and individual subdomains of cognition were also assessed. 5C-CPT and CPT-IP measures of performance (d-prime) were strongly correlated (r = 0.60). In a regression model, the 5C-CPT and CPT-IP collectively accounted for 54% of the total variance in MCCB total scores, and 27.6% of overall cognitive variance was shared between the 5C-CPT and CPT-IP. These results indicate that the reverse translated 5C-CPT and the gold standard CPT-IP index a common attentional construct that also significantly overlaps with variance in general cognitive performance. The use of simple, cross-species validated behavioral indices of attentional/cognitive functioning such as the 5C-CPT could accelerate the development of novel generalized pro-cognitive therapeutics for SZ and related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  18. [Global public health: international health is tested to its limits by the human influenza A epidemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Giraldo, Alvaro; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos

    2009-06-01

    This article comes from the intense international pressure that follows a near-catastrophy, such as the human influenza A H1N1 epidemic, and the limited resources for confronting such events. The analysis covers prevailing 20th century trends in the international public health arena and the change-induced challenges brought on by globalization, the transition set in motion by what has been deemed the "new" international public health and an ever-increasing focus on global health, in the context of an international scenario of shifting risks and opportunities and a growing number of multinational players. Global public health is defined as a public right, based on a new appreciation of the public, a new paradigm centered on human rights, and altruistic philosophy, politics, and ethics that undergird the changes in international public health on at least three fronts: redefining its theoretical foundation, improving world health, and renewing the international public health system, all of which is the byproduct of a new form of governance. A new world health system, directed by new global public institutions, would aim to make public health a global public right and face a variety of staggering challenges, such as working on public policy management on a global scale, renewing and democratizing the current global governing structure, and conquering the limits and weaknesses witnessed by international health.

  19. Something That Test Scores Do Not Show: Engaging in Community Diversity as a Local Response to Global Education Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiviezo, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    At Smith Street Elementary School, the globalizing education trends that English language learner (ELL) teachers face focus on measuring student achievement through testing and the English mainstreaming of non-dominant students as opposed to the cultivation of the students' linguistic and cultural diversity. The ELL teachers at Smith Street…

  20. A Global comparison of surface soil characteristics across five cities: A test of the urban ecosystem convergence hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard V. Pouyat; Ian D. Yesilonis; Miklos Dombos; Katalin Szlavecz; Heikki Setala; Sarel Cilliers; Erzsebet Hornung; D. Johan Kotze; Stephanie. Yarwood

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Global Urban Soil Ecology and Education Network and to test the urban ecosystem convergence hypothesis, we report on soil pH, organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) measured in four soil habitat types (turfgrass, ruderal, remnant, and reference) in five metropolitan areas (Baltimore, Budapest,...

  1. HLA-DQ-Gluten Tetramer Blood Test Accurately Identifies Patients With and Without Celiac Disease in Absence of Gluten Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Vikas K; Lundin, Knut E A; Mørkrid, Lars; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Sollid, Ludvig M; Christophersen, Asbjørn

    2018-03-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by HLA-DQ2/8-restricted responses of CD4+ T cells to cereal gluten proteins. A diagnosis of celiac disease based on serologic and histologic evidence requires patients to be on gluten-containing diets. The growing number of individuals adhering to a gluten-free diet (GFD) without exclusion of celiac disease complicates its detection. HLA-DQ-gluten tetramers can be used to detect gluten-specific T cells in blood of patients with celiac disease, even if they are on a GFD. We investigated whether an HLA-DQ-gluten tetramer-based assay accurately identifies patients with celiac disease. We produced HLA-DQ-gluten tetramers and added them to peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 143 HLA-DQ2.5 + subjects (62 subjects with celiac disease on a GFD, 19 subjects without celiac disease on a GFD [due to self-reported gluten sensitivity], 10 subjects with celiac disease on a gluten-containing diet, and 52 presumed healthy individuals [controls]). T cells that bound HLA-DQ-gluten tetramers were quantified by flow cytometry. Laboratory tests and flow cytometry gating analyses were performed by researchers blinded to sample type, except for samples from subjects with celiac disease on a gluten-containing diet. Test precision analyses were performed using samples from 10 subjects. For the HLA-DQ-gluten tetramer-based assay, we combined flow-cytometry variables in a multiple regression model that identified individuals with celiac disease on a GFD with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89-1.00) vs subjects without celiac disease on a GFD. The assay detected individuals with celiac disease on a gluten-containing diet vs controls with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.95 (95% CI 0.90-1.00). Optimized cutoff values identified subjects with celiac disease on a GFD with 97% sensitivity (95% CI 0.92-1.00) and 95% specificity (95% CI 0

  2. Assessment of a travel question to identify donors with risk of Trypanosoma cruzi: operational validity and field testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sheila F; Chiavetta, Jo Anne; Fan, Wenli; Xi, Guoliang; Yi, Qi-Long; Goldman, Mindy; Scalia, Vito; Fearon, Margaret A

    2008-04-01

    Because Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection in Canada and the United States is largely contracted in endemic countries, targeted testing of blood donors with risk travel may improve safety. The operational validity of a travel question suitable for donor screening was tested, and it was field-tested. After 1331 donors completed a short travel question, operational validity was assessed by detailed travel histories in face-to-face interviews. Two nationwide donor surveys were carried out assessing donor responses to similar travel questions in 2001 (13,623 donors) and in 2006 (20,037 donors). All donors in Toronto, Ontario, answered a travel question in 1997 and those born in or who spent 6 months or more in Mexico, Central America, or South America were tested for antibody to T. cruzi. There was 97.3 percent agreement between the travel question and detailed interviews, with 15 donors (1.1%) failing to acknowledge risk travel (false-negative questioning responses). Of these, 6 donors were born there and 7 others had less than 1 year of cumulative travel. In 2001 and 2006, there were 2.1 and 2.0 percent of donors with risk travel, respectively, but 16.5 and 11.2 percent of these donors were identified only because they were born there (travel not acknowledge). There were 1337 (1.6%) donors in Toronto in 1997 with risk travel and none were positive for the presence of T. cruzi antibody. Donors can answer a short question about cumulative time in Latin America with similar accuracy to detailed questioning, but screening questions should also include country of birth.

  3. Quantitative testing of buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine to identify urine sample spiking during office-based opioid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Joji; Zinser, Jennifer; Issa, Mohammed; Rodriguez, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    though only a small number of patients were identified to have spiked their urine samples, quantitative testing may help identify urine spiking during office-based opioid treatment with buprenorphine.

  4. The Impact of Globalization on Women: Testing Vandana Shiva’s Critique of Development

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Kilby; Sally J. Scholz

    2011-01-01

    Vandana Shiva argues that through the masculinization of agriculture globalization has turned nature and women into passive fields for sowing. Shiva’s critique that international trade, and globalization more generally, has undermined the social and economic position of women in less developed countries provides a wealth of testable hypotheses. For example, Shiva’s argument implies that gender earnings inequality is higher in countries that are more integrated into the world economy, ceteris ...

  5. Using Long‐Term Satellite Observations to Identify Sensitive Regimes and Active Regions of Aerosol Indirect Effects for Liquid Clouds Over Global Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangang; Yu, Fangquan; Heidinger, Andrew K.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Long‐term (1981–2011) satellite climate data records of clouds and aerosols are used to investigate the aerosol‐cloud interaction of marine water cloud from a climatology perspective. Our focus is on identifying the regimes and regions where the aerosol indirect effects (AIEs) are evident in long‐term averages over the global oceans through analyzing the correlation features between aerosol loading and the key cloud variables including cloud droplet effective radius (CDER), cloud optical depth (COD), cloud water path (CWP), cloud top height (CTH), and cloud top temperature (CTT). An aerosol optical thickness (AOT) range of 0.13 cloud variables. The first AIE that manifests as the change of long‐term averaged CDER appears only in limited oceanic regions. The signature of aerosol invigoration of water clouds as revealed by the increase of cloud cover fraction (CCF) and CTH with increasing AOT at the middle/high latitudes of both hemispheres is identified for a pristine atmosphere (AOT  0.3) in the tropical convergence zones. The regions where the second AIE is likely to manifest in the CCF change are limited to several oceanic areas with high CCF of the warm water clouds near the western coasts of continents. The second AIE signature as represented by the reduction of the precipitation efficiency with increasing AOT is more likely to be observed in the AOT regime of 0.08 cloud interaction in cloud model simulations. PMID:29527427

  6. Using Long-Term Satellite Observations to Identify Sensitive Regimes and Active Regions of Aerosol Indirect Effects for Liquid Clouds Over Global Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuepeng; Liu, Yangang; Yu, Fangquan; Heidinger, Andrew K.

    2018-01-01

    Long-term (1981-2011) satellite climate data records of clouds and aerosols are used to investigate the aerosol-cloud interaction of marine water cloud from a climatology perspective. Our focus is on identifying the regimes and regions where the aerosol indirect effects (AIEs) are evident in long-term averages over the global oceans through analyzing the correlation features between aerosol loading and the key cloud variables including cloud droplet effective radius (CDER), cloud optical depth (COD), cloud water path (CWP), cloud top height (CTH), and cloud top temperature (CTT). An aerosol optical thickness (AOT) range of 0.13 cloud variables. The first AIE that manifests as the change of long-term averaged CDER appears only in limited oceanic regions. The signature of aerosol invigoration of water clouds as revealed by the increase of cloud cover fraction (CCF) and CTH with increasing AOT at the middle/high latitudes of both hemispheres is identified for a pristine atmosphere (AOT 0.3) in the tropical convergence zones. The regions where the second AIE is likely to manifest in the CCF change are limited to several oceanic areas with high CCF of the warm water clouds near the western coasts of continents. The second AIE signature as represented by the reduction of the precipitation efficiency with increasing AOT is more likely to be observed in the AOT regime of 0.08 cloud interaction in cloud model simulations.

  7. Using Long-Term Satellite Observations to Identify Sensitive Regimes and Active Regions of Aerosol Indirect Effects for Liquid Clouds Over Global Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuepeng; Liu, Yangang; Yu, Fangquan; Heidinger, Andrew K

    2018-01-16

    Long-term (1981-2011) satellite climate data records of clouds and aerosols are used to investigate the aerosol-cloud interaction of marine water cloud from a climatology perspective. Our focus is on identifying the regimes and regions where the aerosol indirect effects (AIEs) are evident in long-term averages over the global oceans through analyzing the correlation features between aerosol loading and the key cloud variables including cloud droplet effective radius (CDER), cloud optical depth (COD), cloud water path (CWP), cloud top height (CTH), and cloud top temperature (CTT). An aerosol optical thickness (AOT) range of 0.13 cloud variables. The first AIE that manifests as the change of long-term averaged CDER appears only in limited oceanic regions. The signature of aerosol invigoration of water clouds as revealed by the increase of cloud cover fraction (CCF) and CTH with increasing AOT at the middle/high latitudes of both hemispheres is identified for a pristine atmosphere (AOT  0.3) in the tropical convergence zones. The regions where the second AIE is likely to manifest in the CCF change are limited to several oceanic areas with high CCF of the warm water clouds near the western coasts of continents. The second AIE signature as represented by the reduction of the precipitation efficiency with increasing AOT is more likely to be observed in the AOT regime of 0.08 cloud interaction in cloud model simulations.

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Handheld Dynamometry and 1-Repetition-Maximum Tests for Identifying Meaningful Quadriceps Strength Asymmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinacore, J Anthony; Evans, Andrew M; Lynch, Brittany N; Joreitz, Richard E; Irrgang, James J; Lynch, Andrew D

    2017-02-01

    Study Design Clinical measurement, cross-sectional. Background Quadriceps deficits are common in individuals with knee joint impairments and impact functional and quality-of-life outcomes. Quadriceps strength symmetry influences clinical decisions after knee injury. Isometric electromechanical dynamometry (ISO-ED) is the gold standard for measuring symmetry, but is not available in all clinical settings. Objectives To compare concurrent validity of handheld dynamometry and 1-repetition-maximum leg press, knee extension from 90° to 0°, and knee extension from 90° to 45° to that of ISO-ED in identifying meaningful quadriceps strength deficits. Methods Fifty-six participants with knee joint impairments completed ISO-ED and 4 alternative measures of quadriceps strength symmetry in a single session. Absolute agreement of alternative measures with ISO-ED was calculated with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Clinical agreement values at thresholds of 80% and 90% symmetry were compared between the alternatives and ISO-ED. Results Knee extension from 90° to 45° (ICC = 0.67) and handheld dynamometry (ICC = 0.70) had the greatest ICCs. Clinical agreement was also best for these measures for 80% symmetry (κ = 0.56 and 0.55, respectively) and 90% symmetry (κ = 0.19 and 0.33, respectively). Conclusion Handheld dynamometry and 1-repetition-maximum testing of knee extension from 90° to 45° are fair alternatives, although symmetry is typically overestimated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis identified alternative measure thresholds that correlated with the 80% and 90% symmetry thresholds on the ISO-ED. Clinicians should use more stringent symmetry values for these alternative tests to increase the probability that individuals have a minimum ISO-ED symmetry of 80% or 90%. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(2):97-107. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6651.

  9. groHMM: a computational tool for identifying unannotated and cell type-specific transcription units from global run-on sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Minho; Danko, Charles G; Kraus, W Lee

    2015-07-16

    Global run-on coupled with deep sequencing (GRO-seq) provides extensive information on the location and function of coding and non-coding transcripts, including primary microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), as well as yet undiscovered classes of transcripts. However, few computational tools tailored toward this new type of sequencing data are available, limiting the applicability of GRO-seq data for identifying novel transcription units. Here, we present groHMM, a computational tool in R, which defines the boundaries of transcription units de novo using a two state hidden-Markov model (HMM). A systematic comparison of the performance between groHMM and two existing peak-calling methods tuned to identify broad regions (SICER and HOMER) favorably supports our approach on existing GRO-seq data from MCF-7 breast cancer cells. To demonstrate the broader utility of our approach, we have used groHMM to annotate a diverse array of transcription units (i.e., primary transcripts) from four GRO-seq data sets derived from cells representing a variety of different human tissue types, including non-transformed cells (cardiomyocytes and lung fibroblasts) and transformed cells (LNCaP and MCF-7 cancer cells), as well as non-mammalian cells (from flies and worms). As an example of the utility of groHMM and its application to questions about the transcriptome, we show how groHMM can be used to analyze cell type-specific enhancers as defined by newly annotated enhancer transcripts. Our results show that groHMM can reveal new insights into cell type-specific transcription by identifying novel transcription units, and serve as a complete and useful tool for evaluating functional genomic elements in cells.

  10. Comparison of tests for spatial heterogeneity on data with global clustering patterns and outliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hachey Mark

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to evaluate geographic heterogeneity of cancer incidence and mortality is important in cancer surveillance. Many statistical methods for evaluating global clustering and local cluster patterns are developed and have been examined by many simulation studies. However, the performance of these methods on two extreme cases (global clustering evaluation and local anomaly (outlier detection has not been thoroughly investigated. Methods We compare methods for global clustering evaluation including Tango's Index, Moran's I, and Oden's I*pop; and cluster detection methods such as local Moran's I and SaTScan elliptic version on simulated count data that mimic global clustering patterns and outliers for cancer cases in the continental United States. We examine the power and precision of the selected methods in the purely spatial analysis. We illustrate Tango's MEET and SaTScan elliptic version on a 1987-2004 HIV and a 1950-1969 lung cancer mortality data in the United States. Results For simulated data with outlier patterns, Tango's MEET, Moran's I and I*pop had powers less than 0.2, and SaTScan had powers around 0.97. For simulated data with global clustering patterns, Tango's MEET and I*pop (with 50% of total population as the maximum search window had powers close to 1. SaTScan had powers around 0.7-0.8 and Moran's I has powers around 0.2-0.3. In the real data example, Tango's MEET indicated the existence of global clustering patterns in both the HIV and lung cancer mortality data. SaTScan found a large cluster for HIV mortality rates, which is consistent with the finding from Tango's MEET. SaTScan also found clusters and outliers in the lung cancer mortality data. Conclusion SaTScan elliptic version is more efficient for outlier detection compared with the other methods evaluated in this article. Tango's MEET and Oden's I*pop perform best in global clustering scenarios among the selected methods. The use of SaTScan for

  11. Identifying crop specific signals for global agricultural monitoring based on the stability of daily multi-angular MODIS reflectance time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duveiller, G.; Lopez-Lozano, R.

    2013-12-01

    Global agricultural monitoring requires satellite Earth Observation systems that maximize the observation revisit frequency over the largest possible geographical coverage. Such compromise has thus far resulted in using a spatial resolution that is often coarser than desired. As a consequence, for many agricultural landscapes across the world, crop status can only be inferred from a mixed signal of the landscape (with a pixel size typically close to 1 km), composed of reflectance from neighbouring fields with potentially different crops, variable phenological behaviours and distinct management practices. MODIS has been providing, since 2000, a higher spatial resolution (~250m) that is closer to the size of individual fields in many agro-ecological landscapes. However, the challenge for operational crop specific monitoring remains to identify in time where a given crop has been sown during the current growing season. An innovative use of MODIS daily data is proposed for crop identification based on the stability of the multi-angular signal. MODIS is a whiskbroom sensor with a large swath. For any given place, consecutive MODIS observations are made with considerably different viewing angles according to the daily change in orbit. Consequently, the footprint of the observation varies considerably, thereby sampling the vicinity around the centre of the grid cell in which the time series is ultimately recorded in. If the consecutive observations that have sampled the vicinity provide similar NDVI values (for which BRDF effects are reduced), the resulting temporal signal is relatively stable. This stability indicated that the signal comes from a spatially homogeneous surface, such as a single large field covered by the same crop with similar agro-management practices. If the resulting temporal signal is noisy, it is probable that the consecutive daily observations have sampled different land uses, thus contaminating the signal. Such time series can therefore be

  12. A factor analysis of global GABAergic gene expression in human brain identifies specificity in response to chronic alcohol and cocaine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Baghal, Basel; Yuan, Qiaoping; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Although expression patterns of GABAergic genes in rodent brain have largely been elucidated, no comprehensive studies have been performed in human brain. The purpose of this study was to identify global patterns of GABAergic gene expression in healthy adults, including trans and cis effects in the GABAA gene clusters, before determining the effects of chronic alcohol and cocaine exposure on gene expression in the hippocampus. RNA-Seq data from 'BrainSpan' was obtained across 16 brain regions from postmortem samples from nine adults. A factor analysis was performed on global expression of 21 GABAergic pathway genes. Factor specificity for response to chronic alcohol/cocaine exposure was subsequently determined from the analysis of RNA-Seq data from postmortem hippocampus of eight alcoholics, eight cocaine addicts and eight controls. Six gene expression factors were identified. Most genes loaded (≥0.5) onto one factor; six genes loaded onto two. The largest factor (0.30 variance) included the chromosome 5 gene cluster that encodes the most common GABAA receptor, α1β2γ2, and genes encoding the α3β3γ2 receptor. Genes within this factor were largely unresponsive to chronic alcohol/cocaine exposure. In contrast, the chromosome 4 gene cluster factor (0.14 variance) encoding the α2β1γ1 receptor was influenced by chronic alcohol/cocaine exposure. Two other factors (0.17 and 0.06 variance) showed expression changes in alcoholics/cocaine addicts; these factors included genes involved in GABA synthesis and synaptic transport. Finally there were two factors that included genes with exceptionally low (0.10 variance) and high (0.09 variance) expression in the cerebellum; the former factor was unaffected by alcohol/cocaine exposure. This study has shown that there appears to be specificity of GABAergic gene groups, defined by covariation in expression, for response to chronic alcohol/cocaine exposure. These findings might have implications for combating stress

  13. HIV incidence estimate combining HIV/AIDS surveillance, testing history information and HIV test to identify recent infections in Lazio, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mammone Alessia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of serological methods in HIV/AIDS routine surveillance systems to identify persons with recently acquired HIV infection has been proposed as a tool which may provide an accurate description of the current transmission patterns of HIV. Using the information about recent infection it is possible to estimate HIV incidence, according to the model proposed by Karon et al. in 2008, that accounts for the effect of testing practices on the number of persons detected as recently infected. Methods We used data from HIV/AIDS surveillance in the period 2004-2008 to identify newly diagnosed persons. These were classified with recent/non-recent infection on the basis of an avidity index result, or laboratory evidence of recently acquired infection (i.e., previous documented negative HIV test within 6 months; or presence of HIV RNA or p24 antigen with simultaneous negative/indeterminate HIV antibody test. Multiple imputation was used to impute missing information. The incidence estimate was obtained as the number of persons detected as recently infected divided by the estimated probability of detection. Estimates were stratified by calendar year, transmission category, gender and nationality. Results During the period considered 3,633 new HIV diagnoses were reported to the regional surveillance system. Applying the model, we estimated that in 2004-2008 there were 5,465 new infections (95%CI: 4,538-6,461; stratifying by transmission category, the estimated number of infections was 2,599 among heterosexual contacts, 2,208 among men-who-have-sex-with-men, and 763 among injecting-drug-users. In 2008 there were 952 (625-1,229 new HIV infections (incidence of 19.9 per 100,000 person-years. In 2008, for men-who-have-sex-with-men (691 per 100,000 person-years and injecting drug users (577 per 100,000 person-years the incidence remained comparatively high with respect to the general population, although a decreasing pattern during

  14. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Serum Fibronectin as a Candidate Diagnostic Biomarker for Inclusion in Future Multiplex Tests for Ectopic Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeremy K.; Lauer, Katarina B.; Ironmonger, Emily L.; Inglis, Neil F.; Bourne, Tom H.; Critchley, Hilary O. D.; Horne, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) is difficult to diagnose early and accurately. Women often present at emergency departments in early pregnancy with a ‘pregnancy of unknown location’ (PUL), and diagnosis and exclusion of EP is challenging due to a lack of reliable biomarkers. The objective of this study was to identify novel diagnostic biomarkers for EP. Shotgun proteomics, incorporating combinatorial-ligand library pre-fractionation, was used to interrogate pooled sera (n = 40) from women undergoing surgery for EP, termination of viable intrauterine pregnancy and management of non-viable intrauterine pregnancy. Western blot was used to validate results in individual sera. ELISAs were developed to interrogate sera from women with PUL (n = 120). Sera were collected at time of first symptomatic presentation and categorized according to pregnancy outcome. The main outcome measures were differences between groups and area under the receiver operating curve (ROC). Proteomics identified six biomarker candidates. Western blot detected significant differences in levels of two of these candidates. ELISA of sera from second cohort revealed that these differences were only significant for one of these candidates, fibronectin. ROC analysis of ability of fibronectin to discriminate EP from other pregnancy outcomes suggested that fibronectin has diagnostic potential (ROC 0.6439; 95% CI 0.5090 to 0.7788; P>0.05), becoming significant when ‘ambiguous’ medically managed PUL excluded from analysis (ROC 0.6538; 95% CI 0.5158 to 0.7918; P<0.05). Fibronectin may make a useful adjunct to future multiplex EP diagnostic tests. PMID:23826180

  15. Testing Todd and Matching Murdock : Global Data on Historical Family Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmichael, S.G.; Rijpma, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the possibilities for the creation of a global dataset on family and household characteristics. This is done by scrutinizing and comparing two prominent data sources on family system classifications. We first focus on historical data, by comparing Emmanuel Todd's

  16. The Theatre of Competing Globally: Disguising Racial Achievement Patterns with Test-Driven Accountabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Jill P.; Cofield, Candace

    2013-01-01

    A discourse placing schools in the service of the economy has become ubiquitous in the United States (US), and current educational policies, including No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and movements, such as the Common Core Learning Standards, have been positioned as necessary in an account of global competitiveness. In this hegemonic script,…

  17. Testing hypotheses on global emissions of nitrous oxide using atmospheric models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, A.F.; Taylor, J.A.; Kroeze, C.

    2000-01-01

    The nitrous oxide (N2O) budget has been the least well constrained of the global trace gas budgets. For biogenic sources the uncertainty is caused by their extreme spatial and temporal heterogeneity. For the anthropogenic sources political, economic and cultural factors are major uncertainties

  18. Developing and testing a global-scale regression model to quantify mean annual streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, Valerio; Huijbregts, Mark A. J.; Hendriks, A. Jan; Beusen, Arthur H. W.; Clavreul, Julie; King, Henry; Schipper, Aafke M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying mean annual flow of rivers (MAF) at ungauged sites is essential for assessments of global water supply, ecosystem integrity and water footprints. MAF can be quantified with spatially explicit process-based models, which might be overly time-consuming and data-intensive for this purpose, or with empirical regression models that predict MAF based on climate and catchment characteristics. Yet, regression models have mostly been developed at a regional scale and the extent to which they can be extrapolated to other regions is not known. In this study, we developed a global-scale regression model for MAF based on a dataset unprecedented in size, using observations of discharge and catchment characteristics from 1885 catchments worldwide, measuring between 2 and 106 km2. In addition, we compared the performance of the regression model with the predictive ability of the spatially explicit global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB by comparing results from both models to independent measurements. We obtained a regression model explaining 89% of the variance in MAF based on catchment area and catchment averaged mean annual precipitation and air temperature, slope and elevation. The regression model performed better than PCR-GLOBWB for the prediction of MAF, as root-mean-square error (RMSE) values were lower (0.29-0.38 compared to 0.49-0.57) and the modified index of agreement (d) was higher (0.80-0.83 compared to 0.72-0.75). Our regression model can be applied globally to estimate MAF at any point of the river network, thus providing a feasible alternative to spatially explicit process-based global hydrological models.

  19. A Maturing Global Testing Regime Meets the World Economy: Test Scores and Economic Growth, 1960-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamens, David H.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the growth of the international testing regime. It discusses sources of growth and empirically examines two related sets of issues: (1) the stability of countries' achievement scores, and (2) the influence of those national scores on subsequent economic development over different time lags. The article suggests that…

  20. Development and validation testing of a short nutrition questionnaire to identify dietary risk factors in preschoolers aged 12–36 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niamh Rice

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although imbalances in dietary intakes can have short and longer term influences on the health of preschool children, few tools exist to quickly and easily identify nutritional risk in otherwise healthy young children. Objectives: To develop and test the validity of a parent-administered questionnaire (NutricheQ as a means of evaluating dietary risk in young children (12–36 months. Design: Following a comprehensive development process and internal reliability assessment, the NutricheQ questionnaire was validated in a cohort of 371 Irish preschool children as part of the National Preschool Nutrition Survey. Dietary risk was rated on a scale ranging from 0 to 22 from 11 questions, with a higher score indicating higher risk. Results: Children with higher NutricheQ scores had significantly (p<0.05 lower mean daily intakes of key nutrients such as iron, zinc, vitamin D, riboflavin, niacin, folate, phosphorous, potassium, carotene, retinol, and dietary fibre. They also had lower (p<0.05 intakes of vegetables, fish and fish dishes, meat and infant/toddler milks and higher intakes of processed foods and non-milk beverages, confectionery, sugars and savoury snack foods indicative of poorer dietary quality. Areas under the curve values of 84.7 and 75.6% were achieved for ‘medium’ and ‘high’ dietary risk when compared with expert risk ratings indicating good consistency between the two methods. Conclusion: NutricheQ is a valid method of quickly assessing dietary quality in preschoolers and in identifying those at increased nutritional risk.In ContextAnalysis of data from national food and nutrition surveys typically identifies shortfalls in dietary intakes or quality of young children. This can relate to intakes of micronutrients such as iron or vitamin D as well as to the balance of macronutrients they consume (e.g. fat or sugar. Alongside this lie concerns regarding overweight and obesity and physical inactivity. This combination of

  1. The Global Testing Culture: Shaping Education Policy, Perceptions, and Practice. Oxford Studies in Comparative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William C., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The past thirty years have seen a rapid expansion of testing, exposing students worldwide to tests that are now, more than ever, standardized and linked to high-stakes outcomes. The use of testing as a policy tool has been legitimized within international educational development to measure education quality in the vast majority of countries…

  2. Multivariate Analyses and Classification of Inertial Sensor Data to Identify Aging Effects on the Timed-Up-and-Go Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, Danique; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Kosse, Nienke; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Lamoth, Claudine J C

    2016-01-01

    Many tests can crudely quantify age-related mobility decrease but instrumented versions of mobility tests could increase their specificity and sensitivity. The Timed-up-and-Go (TUG) test includes several elements that people use in daily life. The test has different transition phases: rise from a

  3. Assessment of grip strength with the modified sphygmomanometer test: association between upper limb global strength and motor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Júlia C.; Aguiar, Larissa T.; Lara, Eliza M.; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F.; Faria, Christina D. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Grip strength, commonly evaluated with the handgrip dynamometer, is a good indicator of upper limb (UL) function in stroke subjects and may reflect the global strength deficits of the whole paretic UL. The Modified Sphygmomanometer Test (MST) also provides objective and adequate measures at low-cost. Objective: To assess whether grip strength values obtained by using the MST and those obtained by using a handgrip dynamometer would present similar correlations with the global strength and motor function of the paretic UL in subjects with stroke, both in the subacute and chronic phases. Method: Measures of grip strength (MST and handgrip dynamometer), UL global strength (MST and hand-held dynamometer), and UL motor function (Fugl-Meyer motor assessment scale) were obtained with 33 subacute and 44 chronic stroke subjects. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated and Stepwise multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate predictor variables of grip strength (α=0.05). Results: Significant correlations of similar magnitude were found between measures of global strength of the paretic UL and grip strength assessed with both the MST (0.66≤r≤0.78) and handgrip dynamometer (0.66≤r≤0.78) and between UL motor function and grip strength assessed with both the MST (0.50≤rs≤0.51) and hand-held dynamometer (0.50≤rs≤0.63) in subacute and chronic stroke subjects. Only global strength remained as a significant predictor variable of grip strength for the MST (0.43≤R2≤0.61) and for the handgrip dynamometer (0.44≤R2≤0.61) for both stroke subgroups. Conclusion: Grip strength assessed with the MST could be used to report paretic UL global strength. PMID:26647752

  4. Assessment of grip strength with the modified sphygmomanometer test: association between upper limb global strength and motor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia C. Martins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Grip strength, commonly evaluated with the handgrip dynamometer, is a good indicator of upper limb (UL function in stroke subjects and may reflect the global strength deficits of the whole paretic UL. The Modified Sphygmomanometer Test (MST also provides objective and adequate measures at low-cost. Objective: To assess whether grip strength values obtained by using the MST and those obtained by using a handgrip dynamometer would present similar correlations with the global strength and motor function of the paretic UL in subjects with stroke, both in the subacute and chronic phases. Method: Measures of grip strength (MST and handgrip dynamometer, UL global strength (MST and hand-held dynamometer, and UL motor function (Fugl-Meyer motor assessment scale were obtained with 33 subacute and 44 chronic stroke subjects. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated and Stepwise multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate predictor variables of grip strength (α=0.05. Results: Significant correlations of similar magnitude were found between measures of global strength of the paretic UL and grip strength assessed with both the MST (0.66≤r≤0.78 and handgrip dynamometer (0.66≤r≤0.78 and between UL motor function and grip strength assessed with both the MST (0.50≤rs≤0.51 and hand-held dynamometer (0.50≤rs≤0.63 in subacute and chronic stroke subjects. Only global strength remained as a significant predictor variable of grip strength for the MST (0.43≤R2≤0.61 and for the handgrip dynamometer (0.44≤R2≤0.61 for both stroke subgroups. Conclusion: Grip strength assessed with the MST could be used to report paretic UL global strength.

  5. Bioremediation at a global scale: from the test tube to planet Earth

    OpenAIRE

    de Lorenzo, V?ctor; Marli?re, Philippe; Sol?, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Summary Planet Earth's biosphere has evolved over billions of years as a balanced bio?geological system ultimately sustained by sunpower and the large?scale cycling of elements largely run by the global environmental microbiome. Humans have been part of this picture for much of their existence. But the industrial revolution started in the XIX century and the subsequent advances in medicine, chemistry, agriculture and communications have impacted such balances to an unprecedented degree ? and ...

  6. ELF-test less accurately identifies liver cirrhosis diagnosed by liver stiffness measurement in non-Asian women with chronic hepatitis B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkisoen, S.; Boland, G. J.; van den Hoek, J. A. R.; van Erpecum, K. J.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.; Arends, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    The enhanced liver fibrosis test (ELF-test) has been validated for several hepatic diseases. However, its performance in chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB) infected patients is uncertain. This study investigates the diagnostic value of the ELF test for cirrhosis identified by liver stiffness

  7. Incorporating Known Genetic Variants Does Not Improve the Accuracy of PSA Testing to Identify High Risk Prostate Cancer on Biopsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Gilbert

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA testing is a widely accepted screening method for prostate cancer, but with low specificity at thresholds giving good sensitivity. Previous research identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs principally associated with circulating PSA levels rather than with prostate cancer risk (TERT rs2736098, FGFR2 rs10788160, TBX3 rs11067228, KLK3 rs17632542. Removing the genetic contribution to PSA levels may improve the ability of the remaining biologically-determined variation in PSA to discriminate between high and low risk of progression within men with identified prostate cancer. We investigate whether incorporating information on the PSA-SNPs improves the discrimination achieved by a single PSA threshold in men with raised PSA levels.Men with PSA between 3-10 ng/mL and histologically-confirmed prostate cancer were categorised as high or low risk of progression (Low risk: Gleason score≤6 and stage T1-T2a; High risk: Gleason score 7-10 or stage T2C. We used the combined genetic effect of the four PSA-SNPs to calculate a genetically corrected PSA risk score. We calculated the Area under the Curve (AUC to determine how well genetically corrected PSA risk scores distinguished men at high risk of progression from low risk men.The analysis includes 868 men with prostate cancer (Low risk: 684 (78.8%; High risk: 184 (21.2%. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves indicate that including the 4 PSA-SNPs does not improve the performance of measured PSA as a screening tool for high/low risk prostate cancer (measured PSA level AUC = 59.5% (95% CI: 54.7,64.2 vs additionally including information from the 4 PSA-SNPs AUC = 59.8% (95% CI: 55.2,64.5 (p-value = 0.40.We demonstrate that genetically correcting PSA for the combined genetic effect of four PSA-SNPs, did not improve discrimination between high and low risk prostate cancer in men with raised PSA levels (3-10 ng/mL. Replication and gaining more accurate

  8. Incorporating Known Genetic Variants Does Not Improve the Accuracy of PSA Testing to Identify High Risk Prostate Cancer on Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Rebecca; Martin, Richard M.; Evans, David M.; Tilling, Kate; Davey Smith, George; Kemp, John P.; Lane, J. Athene; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Metcalfe, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is a widely accepted screening method for prostate cancer, but with low specificity at thresholds giving good sensitivity. Previous research identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) principally associated with circulating PSA levels rather than with prostate cancer risk (TERT rs2736098, FGFR2 rs10788160, TBX3 rs11067228, KLK3 rs17632542). Removing the genetic contribution to PSA levels may improve the ability of the remaining biologically-determined variation in PSA to discriminate between high and low risk of progression within men with identified prostate cancer. We investigate whether incorporating information on the PSA-SNPs improves the discrimination achieved by a single PSA threshold in men with raised PSA levels. Materials and Methods Men with PSA between 3-10ng/mL and histologically-confirmed prostate cancer were categorised as high or low risk of progression (Low risk: Gleason score≤6 and stage T1-T2a; High risk: Gleason score 7–10 or stage T2C). We used the combined genetic effect of the four PSA-SNPs to calculate a genetically corrected PSA risk score. We calculated the Area under the Curve (AUC) to determine how well genetically corrected PSA risk scores distinguished men at high risk of progression from low risk men. Results The analysis includes 868 men with prostate cancer (Low risk: 684 (78.8%); High risk: 184 (21.2%)). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that including the 4 PSA-SNPs does not improve the performance of measured PSA as a screening tool for high/low risk prostate cancer (measured PSA level AU C = 59.5% (95% CI: 54.7,64.2) vs additionally including information from the 4 PSA-SNPs AUC = 59.8% (95% CI: 55.2,64.5) (p-value = 0.40)). Conclusion We demonstrate that genetically correcting PSA for the combined genetic effect of four PSA-SNPs, did not improve discrimination between high and low risk prostate cancer in men with raised PSA levels (3-10ng

  9. Non-spherical surface wave amplitude radiation patterns identified from spectral ratios of the 2016 and 2013 DPRK nuclear tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, G. A.; Ford, S. R.; Myers, S.; Pasyanos, M.; Walter, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    The 6 January 2016, 12 February 2013 and 25 May 2009 declared nuclear explosions at the Punggye-ri test site in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) were all closely located providing an opportunity to perform differential analysis. We used spectral ratios of surface waves between 50 and 10 sec period between the co-located events to isolate relative explosion amplitude radiation patterns by the cancelation of propagation and site effects. We calculated the spectral ratios using a dense array of 72 NIED F-NET stations across Japan and all available IMS, IC and IU network stations. Analyses of Rayleigh waves indicated non-spherical radiation for the 2016 and 2013 tests relative to 2009. The 2016/2009 and 2013/2009 event pairs had ellipsoidal radiation patterns. The 2016/2009 pair had an ellipse major axis oriented 123 degrees from north and the 2013/2009 pair was oriented 33 degrees from north. This suggests that both 2016 and 2013 explosions have non-spherical radiation and also that the radiation between 2016 and 2013 were rotated by 90 degrees. This radiation pattern was strongest in the 20 and 33 sec period band but was also observed in the 10 and 50 sec band with higher scatter. We did not discern any Love wave radiation patterns but there is high scatter possibly due to a lower long-period signal to noise ratio on the horizontal relative to the vertical components. There are several possible source models that can theoretically cause non-spherical radiation, for example topography, spall damage, or tectonic release. One implication we have identified is that the radiation pattern makes it problematic for the use of surface waves in relative relocations, typically more robust for earthquakes. The amount of departure from purely spherical radiation is consistent with the 20-30% CLVD and 60-70% isotropic components estimated from regional long-period moment tensor solutions for the two explosions. This work performed under the auspices of the US

  10. Chromosomal microarray testing identifies a 4p terminal region associated with seizures in Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Sarah T; Lortz, Amanda; Hensel, Charles H; Sdano, Mallory R; Vanzo, Rena J; Martin, Megan M; Peiffer, Andreas; Lambert, Christophe G; Calhoun, Amy; Carey, John C; Battaglia, Agatino

    2016-01-01

    Background Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving variable size deletions of the 4p16.3 region. Seizures are frequently, but not always, associated with WHS. We hypothesised that the size and location of the deleted region may correlate with seizure presentation. Methods Using chromosomal microarray analysis, we finely mapped the breakpoints of copy number variants (CNVs) in 48 individuals with WHS. Seizure phenotype data were collected through parent-reported answers to a comprehensive questionnaire and supplemented with available medical records. Results We observed a significant correlation between the presence of an interstitial 4p deletion and lack of a seizure phenotype (Fisher's exact test p=3.59e-6). In our cohort, there were five individuals with interstitial deletions with a distal breakpoint at least 751 kbp proximal to the 4p terminus. Four of these individuals have never had an observable seizure, and the fifth individual had a single febrile seizure at the age of 1.5 years. All other individuals in our cohort whose deletions encompass the terminal 751 kbp region report having seizures typical of WHS. Additional examples from the literature corroborate these observations and further refine the candidate seizure susceptibility region to a region 197 kbp in size, starting 368 kbp from the terminus of chromosome 4. Conclusions We identify a small terminal region of chromosome 4p that represents a seizure susceptibility region. Deletion of this region in the context of WHS is sufficient for seizure occurrence. PMID:26747863

  11. Chromosomal microarray testing identifies a 4p terminal region associated with seizures in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Karen S; South, Sarah T; Lortz, Amanda; Hensel, Charles H; Sdano, Mallory R; Vanzo, Rena J; Martin, Megan M; Peiffer, Andreas; Lambert, Christophe G; Calhoun, Amy; Carey, John C; Battaglia, Agatino

    2016-04-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving variable size deletions of the 4p16.3 region. Seizures are frequently, but not always, associated with WHS. We hypothesised that the size and location of the deleted region may correlate with seizure presentation. Using chromosomal microarray analysis, we finely mapped the breakpoints of copy number variants (CNVs) in 48 individuals with WHS. Seizure phenotype data were collected through parent-reported answers to a comprehensive questionnaire and supplemented with available medical records. We observed a significant correlation between the presence of an interstitial 4p deletion and lack of a seizure phenotype (Fisher's exact test p=3.59e-6). In our cohort, there were five individuals with interstitial deletions with a distal breakpoint at least 751 kbp proximal to the 4p terminus. Four of these individuals have never had an observable seizure, and the fifth individual had a single febrile seizure at the age of 1.5 years. All other individuals in our cohort whose deletions encompass the terminal 751 kbp region report having seizures typical of WHS. Additional examples from the literature corroborate these observations and further refine the candidate seizure susceptibility region to a region 197 kbp in size, starting 368 kbp from the terminus of chromosome 4. We identify a small terminal region of chromosome 4p that represents a seizure susceptibility region. Deletion of this region in the context of WHS is sufficient for seizure occurrence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Support for children identified with acute flaccid paralysis under the global polio eradication programme in Uttar Pradesh, India: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotsu Rie R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cases of polio in India declined after the implementation of the polio eradication programme especially in these recent years. The programme includes surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP to detect and diagnose cases of polio at early stage. Under this surveillance, over 40,000 cases of AFP are reported annually since 2007 regardless of the number of actual polio cases. Yet, not much is known about these children. We conducted a qualitative research to explore care and support for children with AFP after their diagnosis. Methods The research was conducted in a district of western Uttar Pradesh classified as high-risk area for polio. In-depth interviews with parents of children with polio (17, with non-polio AFP (9, healthcare providers (40, and key informants from community including international and government officers, religious leaders, community leaders, journalists, and academics (21 were performed. Results Minimal medicine and attention were provided at government hospitals. Therefore, most parents preferred private-practice doctors for their children with AFP. Many were visited at homes to have stool samples collected by authorities. Some were visited repetitively following the sample collection, but had difficulty in understanding the reasons for these visits that pertained no treatment. Financial burden was a common concern among all families. Many parents expressed resentment for their children's disease, notably have been affected despite receiving multiple doses of polio vaccine. Both parents and healthcare providers lacked information and knowledge, furthermore poverty minimised the access to available healthcare services. Medicines, education, and transportation means were identified as foremost needs for children with AFP and residual paralysis. Conclusions Despite the high number of children diagnosed with AFP as part of the global polio eradication programme, we found they were not provided with

  13. Bioremediation at a global scale: from the test tube to planet Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Víctor; Marlière, Philippe; Solé, Ricard

    2016-09-01

    Planet Earth's biosphere has evolved over billions of years as a balanced bio-geological system ultimately sustained by sunpower and the large-scale cycling of elements largely run by the global environmental microbiome. Humans have been part of this picture for much of their existence. But the industrial revolution started in the XIX century and the subsequent advances in medicine, chemistry, agriculture and communications have impacted such balances to an unprecedented degree - and the problem has nothing but exacerbated in the last 20 years. Human overpopulation, industrial growth along with unsustainable use of natural resources have driven many sites and perhaps the planetary ecosystem as a whole, beyond recovery by spontaneous natural means, even if the immediate causes could be stopped. The most conspicuous indications of such a state of affairs include the massive change in land use, the accelerated increase in the levels of greenhouse gases, the frequent natural disasters associated to climate change and the growing non-recyclable waste (e.g. plastics and recalcitrant chemicals) that we release to the Environment. While the whole planet is afflicted at a global scale by chemical pollution and anthropogenic emissions, the ongoing development of systems and synthetic biology, metagenomics, modern chemistry and some key concepts from ecological theory allow us to tackle this phenomenal challenge and propose large-scale interventions aimed at reversing and even improving the situation. This involves (i) identification of key reactions or processes that need to be re-established (or altogether created) for ecosystem reinstallation, (ii) implementation of such reactions in natural or designer hosts able to self-replicate and deliver the corresponding activities when/where needed in a fashion guided by sound ecological modelling, (iii) dispersal of niche-creating agents at a global scale and (iv) containment, monitoring and risk assessment of the whole process

  14. Developing a workbook to support the contextualisation of global health systems guidance: a case study identifying steps and critical factors for success in this process at WHO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Elizabeth; Lavis, John N; Brouwers, Melissa; Schwartz, Lisa

    2018-03-02

    Global guidance can help countries strengthen their health systems to deliver effective interventions to their populations. However, to have an impact, guidance needs to be contextualised or adapted to local settings; this process includes consideration of health system arrangements and political system factors. To date, methods to support contextualisation do not exist. In response, a workbook was designed to provide specific methods and strategies to enable the contextualisation of WHO's 'Optimizing health worker roles to improve maternal and newborn health' (OptimizeMNH) guidance at the national or subnational level. The objective of this study was to describe the process of developing the workbook and identify key steps of the development process, barriers that arose and facilitators that helped overcome some of these barriers. A qualitative single case study design was carried out. Interviews, documents and a reflexive journal were used. Constant comparison and an edit-style of organisation were used during data analysis to develop concepts, themes, subthemes and relationships among them. Thirteen interviews were conducted and 52 documents were reviewed. Three main steps were identified in the process of developing the workbook for health systems guidance contextualisation, namely (1) determining the need for and gaining approval to develop the workbook, (2) developing the workbook (taking on the task, creating the structure of the workbook, operationalising its components, undergoing approval processes and editing it), and (3) implementing the workbook both at the WHO level and at the national/subnational level. Five barriers and/or facilitators emerged relevant to each step, namely (1) having well-placed and credible champions, (2) creating and capitalising on opportunities, (3) finding the right language to engage various actors and obtain buy-in, (4) obtaining and maintaining meaningful buy-in, and (5) ensuring access to resources. Understanding the key

  15. Global carbon cycle: A test of our knowledge of the earth

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Falkowski, P

    2000-10-13

    Full Text Available .0.CO%3B2-T This article references the following linked citations. If you are trying to access articles from an off-campus location, you may be required to first logon via your library web site to access JSTOR. Please visit your library's website...://www.jstor.org LINKED CITATIONS - Page 1 of 3 - NOTE: The reference numbering from the original has been maintained in this citation list. 33 Global Carbon Sinks and Their Variability Inferred from Atmospheric O2 and # 13 C M. Battle; M. L. Bender; P. P...

  16. Identifying gaps for research prioritisation: Global burden of external causes of injury as reflected in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimkhani, Chante; Trikha, Ritika; Aksut, Baran; Jones, Trevor; Boyers, Lindsay N; Schlichte, Megan; Pederson, Hannah; Okland, Tyler; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn; Nasser, Mona; Naghavi, Mohsen; Vos, Theo; Yoong, Sze Lin; Wolfenden, Luke; Murray, Christopher J L; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-05-01

    Burden of disease should impact research prioritisation. To analyse the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and determine whether systematic reviews and protocols accurately represent disease burden, as measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 Study. Two investigators collected GBD disability metrics for 12 external causes of injury in the GBD 2010 Study. These external causes were then assessed for systematic review and protocol representation in CDSR. Data was collected during the month of April 2015. There were no study participants aside from the researchers. Percentage of total 2010 DALYs, 2010 DALY rank, and median DALY percent change from 1990 to 2010 of the 12 external causes of injury were compared with CDSR representation of systematic reviews and protocols. Data were analysed for correlation using Spearman rank correlation. Eleven of the 12 causes were represented by at least one systematic review or protocol in CDSR; the category collective violence and legal intervention had no representation in CDSR. Correlation testing revealed a strong positive correlation that was statistically significant. Representation of road injury; interpersonal violence; fire, heat, and hot substances; mechanical forces; poisonings, adverse effect of medical treatment, and animal contact was well aligned with respect to DALY. Representation of falls was greater compared to DALY, while self-harm, exposure to forces of nature, and other transport injury representation was lower compared to DALY. CDSR representation of external causes of injury strongly correlates with disease burden. The number of systematic reviews and protocols was well aligned for seven out of 12 causes of injury. These results provide high-quality and transparent data that may guide future prioritisation decisions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. An experimental test of CSR theory using a globally calibrated ordination method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanzhi; Shipley, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Can CSR theory, in conjunction with a recently proposed globally calibrated CSR ordination ("StrateFy"), using only three easily measured leaf traits (leaf area, specific leaf area and leaf dry matter content) predict the functional signature of herbaceous vegetation along experimentally manipulated gradients of soil fertility and disturbance? To determine this, we grew 37 herbaceous species in mixture for five years in 24 experimental mesocosms differing in factorial levels of soil resources (stress) and density-independent mortality (disturbance). We measured 16 different functional traits and then ordinated the resulting vegetation within the CSR triangle using StrateFy. We then calculated community-weighted mean (CWM) values of the competitor (CCWM), stress-tolerator (SCWM) and ruderal (RCWM) scores for each mesocosm. We found a significant increase in SCWM from low to high stress mesocosms, and an increase in RCWM from lowly to highly disturbed mesocosms. However, CCWM did not decline significantly as intensity of stress or disturbance increased, as predicted by CSR theory. This last result likely arose because our herbaceous species were relatively poor competitors in global comparisons and thus no strong competitors in our species pool were selectively favoured in low stress and low disturbed mesocosms. Variation in the 13 other traits, not used by StrateFy, largely argeed with the predictions of CSR theory. StrateFy worked surprisingly well in our experimental study except for the C-dimension. Despite loss of some precision, it has great potential applicability in future studies due to its simplicity and generality.

  18. The Global Modeling Initiative Assessment Model: Model Description, Integration and Testing of the Transport Shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D.A.; Tannahill, J.R.; Kinnison, D.E.; Connell, P.S.; Bergmann, D.; Proctor, D.; Rodriquez, J.M.; Lin, S.J.; Rood, R.B.; Prather, M.J.; Rasch, P.J.; Considine, D.B.; Ramaroson, R.; Kawa, S.R.

    2000-04-25

    We describe the three dimensional global stratospheric chemistry model developed under the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) to assess the possible environmental consequences from the emissions of a fleet of proposed high speed civil transport aircraft. This model was developed through a unique collaboration of the members of the GMI team. Team members provided computational modules representing various physical and chemical processes, and analysis of simulation results through extensive comparison to observation. The team members' modules were integrated within a computational framework that allowed transportability and simulations on massively parallel computers. A unique aspect of this model framework is the ability to interchange and intercompare different submodules to assess the sensitivity of numerical algorithms and model assumptions to simulation results. In this paper, we discuss the important attributes of the GMI effort, describe the GMI model computational framework and the numerical modules representing physical and chemical processes. As an application of the concept, we illustrate an analysis of the impact of advection algorithms on the dispersion of a NO{sub y}-like source in the stratosphere which mimics that of a fleet of commercial supersonic transports (High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT)) flying between 17 and 20 kilometers.

  19. Reliability, Validity, and Ability to Identify Fall Status of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test, and Brief-Balance Evaluation Systems Test in Older People Living in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Alda; Almeida, Sara; Carvalho, Joana; Cruz, Joana; Oliveira, Ana; Jácome, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    To assess the reliability, validity, and ability to identify fall status of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest), Mini-BESTest, and Brief-BESTest, compared with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), in older people living in the community. Cross-sectional. Community centers. Older adults (N=122; mean age ± SD, 76±9y). Not applicable. Participants reported on falls history in the preceding year and completed the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale. The BBS, BESTest, and the Five Times Sit-To-Stand Test were administered. Interrater (2 physiotherapists) and test-retest relative (48-72h) and absolute reliabilities were explored with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) equation (2,1) and the Bland and Altman method. Minimal detectable changes at the 95% confidence level (MDC 95 ) were established. Validity was assessed by correlating the balance tests with each other and with the ABC Scale (Spearman correlation coefficients-ρ). Receiver operating characteristics assessed the ability of each balance test to differentiate between people with and without a history of falls. All balance tests presented good to excellent interrater (ICC=.71-.93) and test-retest (ICC=.50-.82) relative reliability, with no evidence of bias. MDC 95 values were 4.6, 9, 3.8, and 4.1 points for the BBS, BESTest, Mini-BESTest, and Brief-BESTest, respectively. All tests were significantly correlated with each other (ρ=.83-.96) and with the ABC Scale (ρ=.46-.61). Acceptable ability to identify fall status (areas under the curve, .71-.78) was found for all tests. Cutoff points were 48.5, 82, 19.5, and 12.5 points for the BBS, BESTest, Mini-BESTest, and Brief-BESTest, respectively. All balance tests are reliable, valid, and able to identify fall status in older people living in the community. Therefore, the choice of which test to use will depend on the level of balance impairment, purpose, and time availability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Performance Prediction of Centrifugal Compressor for Drop-In Testing Using Low Global Warming Potential Alternative Refrigerants and Performance Test Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hoon Park

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As environmental regulations to stall global warming are strengthened around the world, studies using newly developed low global warming potential (GWP alternative refrigerants are increasing. In this study, substitute refrigerants, R-1234ze (E and R-1233zd (E, were used in the centrifugal compressor of an R-134a 2-stage centrifugal chiller with a fixed rotational speed. Performance predictions and thermodynamic analyses of the centrifugal compressor for drop-in testing were performed. A performance prediction method based on the existing ASME PTC-10 performance test code was proposed. The proposed method yielded the expected operating area and operating point of the centrifugal compressor with alternative refrigerants. The thermodynamic performance of the first and second stages of the centrifugal compressor was calculated as the polytropic state. To verify the suitability of the proposed method, the drop-in test results of the two alternative refrigerants were compared. The predicted operating range based on the permissible deviation of ASME PTC-10 confirmed that the temperature difference was very small at the same efficiency. Because the drop-in test of R-1234ze (E was performed within the expected operating range, the centrifugal compressor using R-1234ze (E is considered well predicted. However, the predictions of the operating point and operating range of R-1233zd (E were lower than those of the drop-in test. The proposed performance prediction method will assist in understanding thermodynamic performance at the expected operating point and operating area of a centrifugal compressor using alternative gases based on limited design and structure information.

  1. Global Health Education: a cross-sectional study among German medical students to identify needs, deficits and potential benefits (Part 2 of 2: Knowledge gaps and potential benefits)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In Germany, educational deficits or potential benefits involved in global health education have not been analysed till now. Objective We assess the importance medical students place on learning about social determinants of health (SDH) and assess their knowledge of global health topics in relation to (i) mobility patterns, their education in (ii) tropical medicine or (iii) global health. Methods Cross-sectional study among medical students from all 36 medical schools in Germany using a web-based, semi-structured questionnaire. Participants were recruited via mailing-lists of students' unions, all medical students registered in 2007 were eligible to participate in the study. We captured international mobility patterns, exposure to global health learning opportunities and attitudes to learning about SDH. Both an objective and subjective knowledge assessment were performed. Results 1126 online-replies were received and analysed. International health electives in developing countries correlated significantly with a higher importance placed on all provided SDH (p ≤ 0.006). Participation in tropical medicine (p politics' was marginally significant (p = 0.053). In the knowledge assessment students achieved an average score of 3.6 (SD 1.5; Mdn 4.0), 75% achieved a score of 4.0 or less (Q25 = 3.0; Q75 = 4.0) from a maximum achievable score of 8.0. A better performance was associated with international health electives (p = 0.032), participation in tropical medicine (p = 0.038) and global health (p = 0.258) courses. Conclusion The importance medical students in our sample placed on learning about SDH strongly interacts with students' mobility, and participation in tropical medicine and global health courses. The knowledge assessment revealed deficits and outlined needs to further analyse education gaps in global health. Developing concerted educational interventions aimed at fostering students' engagement with SDH could make full use of synergy effects inherent

  2. Testing of the transionospheric radiochannel using data from the global GPS network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karachenschev

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the international ground-based network of two-frequency receivers of the GPS navigation system provides a means of carrying out a global, continuous and fully-computerized monitoring of phase fluctuations of signals from satellite-borne radio engineering systems caused by the Earth's inhomogeneous and nonstationary ionosphere. We found that during major geomagnetic storms, the errors of determination of the range, frequency Doppler shift and angles of arrival of transionospheric radio signals exceeds that for magnetically quiet days by one order of magnitude as a minimum. This can be the cause of performance degradation of current satellite radio engineering navigation, communication and radar systems as well as superlong-baseline radio interferometry systems.

  3. Real time global tests of the ALICE High Level Trigger data transport framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, B.; Cicalo, C [Univ. Monseratto, INFN, Cgliari (Italy); Chattopadhyay, S. [Saha Inst., Kolkata (India); Cleymans, J.; De Vaux, G.; Fearick, R.W.; Szostak, A.; Vilakazi, Z.Z. [Univ. Cape Town, Physics depart., 7700 (South Africa); Lindenstruth, V.; Steinbeck, T.M.; Tilsner, H.; Weis, R. [Kirchoff Inst., Heidelberg Univ., D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The High Level Trigger (HLT) system of the ALICE experiment is an online event filter and trigger system designed for input bandwidths of up to 25 GB/s at event rates of up to 1 kHz. The system is designed as a scalable PC cluster, implementing several hundred nodes. The transport of data in the system is handled by an object-oriented data flow framework operating on the basis of the publisher-subscriber principle, being designed fully pipelined with lowest processing overhead and communication latency in the cluster. In this paper, we report the latest measurements where this framework has been operated on five different sites over a global north-south link extending more than 10,000 km, processing a 'real-time' data flow. (authors)

  4. Real time global tests of the ALICE High Level Trigger data transport framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, B.; Cicalo, C; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cleymans, J.; De Vaux, G.; Fearick, R.W.; Szostak, A.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Lindenstruth, V.; Steinbeck, T.M.; Tilsner, H.; Weis, R.

    2008-01-01

    The High Level Trigger (HLT) system of the ALICE experiment is an online event filter and trigger system designed for input bandwidths of up to 25 GB/s at event rates of up to 1 kHz. The system is designed as a scalable PC cluster, implementing several hundred nodes. The transport of data in the system is handled by an object-oriented data flow framework operating on the basis of the publisher-subscriber principle, being designed fully pipelined with lowest processing overhead and communication latency in the cluster. In this paper, we report the latest measurements where this framework has been operated on five different sites over a global north-south link extending more than 10,000 km, processing a 'real-time' data flow. (authors)

  5. Can we infer plant facilitation from remote sensing? a test across global drylands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chi; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H; Maestre, Fernando T; Soliveres, Santiago; Berdugo, Miguel; Kéfi, Sonia; Marquet, Pablo A; Abades, Sebastián; Scheffer, Marten

    2015-09-01

    Facilitation is a major force shaping the structure and diversity of plant communities in terrestrial ecosystems. Detecting positive plant-plant interactions relies on the combination of field experimentation and the demonstration of spatial association between neighboring plants. This has often restricted the study of facilitation to particular sites, limiting the development of systematic assessments of facilitation over regional and global scales. Here we explore whether the frequency of plant spatial associations detected from high-resolution remotely sensed images can be used to infer plant facilitation at the community level in drylands around the globe. We correlated the information from remotely sensed images freely available through Google Earth with detailed field assessments, and used a simple individual-based model to generate patch-size distributions using different assumptions about the type and strength of plant-plant interactions. Most of the patterns found from the remotely sensed images were more right skewed than the patterns from the null model simulating a random distribution. This suggests that the plants in the studied drylands show stronger spatial clustering than expected by chance. We found that positive plant co-occurrence, as measured in the field, was significantly related to the skewness of vegetation patch-size distribution measured using Google Earth images. Our findings suggest that the relative frequency of facilitation may be inferred from spatial pattern signals measured from remotely sensed images, since facilitation often determines positive co-occurrence among neighboring plants. They pave the road for a systematic global assessment of the role of facilitation in terrestrial ecosystems.

  6. A mixed methods approach to identifying factors related to voluntary HIV testing among injection drug users in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiang; Lombardi, Christina; Evans, Elizabeth; Jiang, Haifeng; Zhao, Min; Meng, Ying-Ying

    2012-07-01

    Injection drug use is a major route of HIV transmission in China, yet relatively little is known about why so few injection drug users utilize free HIV testing services. This study aimed to examine barriers to HIV testing and voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) service utilization among injection drug users in Shanghai, China. Utilizing mixed methods, we analyzed data from a survey of 540 compulsory drug abuse treatment patients and data from focus groups with 70 service providers and patients. Only 24.4% of patients expressed willingness to be tested for HIV. Willingness to be tested was associated with younger age and more positive attitudes towards condom use. Patients reported several barriers to utilization of voluntary HIV testing services, including lack of information about these services, perceptions of no risk or low-risk for HIV infection, fear of positive results, and the stigma or discrimination that may be experienced by the patient or their family. Having limited skills related to HIV counseling was reported by service providers as the primary barrier to encouraging patients to utilize HIV testing/VCT services. Special intervention programs targeting injection drug users, their family members, and service providers may increase HIV testing in China. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MCQ testing in higher education: Yes, there are bad items and invalid scores—A case study identifying solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    This is a lecture given at Umea University, Sweden in September 2017. It is based on the published study: Brown, G. T. L., & Abdulnabi, H. (2017). Evaluating the quality of higher education instructor-constructed multiple-choice tests: Impact on student grades. Frontiers in Education: Assessment, Testing, & Applied Measurement, 2(24).. doi:10.3389/feduc.2017.00024

  8. Estrogen induces apoptosis in estrogen deprivation-resistant breast cancer through stress responses as identified by global gene expression across time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariazi, Eric A; Cunliffe, Heather E; Lewis-Wambi, Joan S; Slifker, Michael J; Willis, Amanda L; Ramos, Pilar; Tapia, Coya; Kim, Helen R; Yerrum, Smitha; Sharma, Catherine G N; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Ross, Eric A; Jordan, V Craig

    2011-11-22

    In laboratory studies, acquired resistance to long-term antihormonal therapy in breast cancer evolves through two phases over 5 y. Phase I develops within 1 y, and tumor growth occurs with either 17β-estradiol (E(2)) or tamoxifen. Phase II resistance develops after 5 y of therapy, and tamoxifen still stimulates growth; however, E(2) paradoxically induces apoptosis. This finding is the basis for the clinical use of estrogen to treat advanced antihormone-resistant breast cancer. We interrogated E(2)-induced apoptosis by analysis of gene expression across time (2-96 h) in MCF-7 cell variants that were estrogen-dependent (WS8) or resistant to estrogen deprivation and refractory (2A) or sensitive (5C) to E(2)-induced apoptosis. We developed a method termed differential area under the curve analysis that identified genes uniquely regulated by E(2) in 5C cells compared with both WS8 and 2A cells and hence, were associated with E(2)-induced apoptosis. Estrogen signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), and inflammatory response genes were overrepresented among the 5C-specific genes. The identified ERS genes indicated that E(2) inhibited protein folding, translation, and fatty acid synthesis. Meanwhile, the ERS-associated apoptotic genes Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (BIM; BCL2L11) and caspase-4 (CASP4), among others, were induced. Evaluation of a caspase peptide inhibitor panel showed that the CASP4 inhibitor z-LEVD-fmk was the most active at blocking E(2)-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, z-LEVD-fmk completely prevented poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, E(2)-inhibited growth, and apoptotic morphology. The up-regulated proinflammatory genes included IL, IFN, and arachidonic acid-related genes. Functional testing showed that arachidonic acid and E(2) interacted to superadditively induce apoptosis. Therefore, these data indicate that E(2) induced apoptosis through ERS and inflammatory responses in advanced antihormone-resistant breast cancer.

  9. Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J.; Parma, Edward J.Jr; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2007-01-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents

  10. Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2007-10-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents.

  11. Development and cross-cultural testing of the International Depression Symptom Scale (IDSS): a measurement instrument designed to represent global presentations of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroz, E E; Bass, J; Lee, C; Oo, S S; Lin, K; Kohrt, B; Michalopolous, L; Nguyen, A J; Bolton, P

    2017-01-01

    Self-report measurement instruments are commonly used to screen for mental health disorders in Low and Middle-Income Countries (LMIC). The Western origins of most depression instruments may constitute a bias when used globally. Western measures based on the DSM, do not fully capture the expression of depression globally. We developed a self-report scale design to address this limitation, the International Depression Symptom Scale-General version (IDSS-G), based on empirical evidence of the signs and symptoms of depression reported across cultures. This paper describes the rationale and process of its development and the results of an initial test among a non-Western population. We evaluated internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability of the IDSS-G in a sample N  = 147 male and female attendees of primary health clinics in Yangon, Myanmar. For criterion validity, IDSS-G scores were compared with diagnosis by local psychiatrists using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID). Construct validity was evaluated by investigating associations between the IDSS-G and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), impaired function, and suicidal ideation. The IDSS-G showed high internal consistency reliability ( α  = 0.92), test-retest reliability ( r  = 0.87), and inter-rater reliability ( ICC  = 0.90). Strong correlations between the IDSS-G and PHQ-9, functioning, and suicidal ideation supported construct validity. Criterion validity was supported for use of the IDSS-G to identify people with a SCID diagnosed depressive disorder (major depression/dysthymia). The IDSS-G also demonstrated incremental validity by predicting functional impairment beyond that predicted by the PHQ-9. Results suggest that the IDSS-G accurately assesses depression in this population. Future testing in other populations will follow.

  12. Homogenisation algorithm skill testing with synthetic global benchmarks for the International Surface Temperature Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willet, Katherine; Venema, Victor; Williams, Claude; Aguilar, Enric; joliffe, Ian; Alexander, Lisa; Vincent, Lucie; Lund, Robert; Menne, Matt; Thorne, Peter; Auchmann, Renate; Warren, Rachel; Bronniman, Stefan; Thorarinsdotir, Thordis; Easterbrook, Steve; Gallagher, Colin; Lopardo, Giuseppina; Hausfather, Zeke; Berry, David

    2015-04-01

    Our surface temperature data are good enough to give us confidence that the world has warmed since 1880. However, they are not perfect - we cannot be precise in the amount of warming for the globe and especially for small regions or specific locations. Inhomogeneity (non-climate changes to the station record) is a major problem. While progress in detection of, and adjustment for inhomogeneities is continually advancing, monitoring effectiveness on large networks and gauging respective improvements in climate data quality is non-trivial. There is currently no internationally recognised means of robustly assessing the effectiveness of homogenisation methods on real data - and thus, the inhomogeneity uncertainty in those data. Here I present the work of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI; www.surfacetemperatures.org) Benchmarking working group. The aim is to quantify homogenisation algorithm skill on the global scale against realistic benchmarks. This involves the creation of synthetic worlds of surface temperature data, deliberate contamination of these with known errors and then assessment of the ability of homogenisation algorithms to detect and remove these errors. The ultimate aim is threefold: quantifying uncertainties in surface temperature data; enabling more meaningful product intercomparison; and improving homogenisation methods. There are five components work: 1. Create 30000 synthetic benchmark stations that look and feel like the real global temperature network, but do not contain any inhomogeneities: analog clean-worlds. 2. Design a set of error models which mimic the main types of inhomogeneities found in practice, and combined them with the analog clean-worlds to give analog error-worlds. 3. Engage with dataset creators to run their homogenisation algorithms blind on the analog error-world stations as they have done with the real data. 4. Design an assessment framework to gauge the degree to which analog error-worlds are returned to

  13. A Global Comparative Evaluation of Commercial Immunochromatographic Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Visceral Leishmaniasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunningham, Jane; Hasker, Epco; Das, Pradeep; El Safi, Sayda; Goto, Hiro; Mondal, Dinesh; Mbuchi, Margaret; Mukhtar, Maowia; Rabello, Ana; Rijal, Suman; Sundar, Shyam; Wasunna, Monique; Adams, Emily; Menten, Joris; Peeling, Rosanna; Boelaert, Marleen; Khanal, Basudha; Das, Murari; Oliveira, Edward; de Assis, Tália Machado; Costa, Dorcas Lamounier; Bhaskar, Khondaker Rifathassan; Huda, M. Mamun; Hassan, Mukidul; Abdoun, Asim Osman; Awad, Aymen; Osman, Mohamed; Prajapati, Dinesh Kumar; Gidwani, Kamlesh; Tiwary, Puja; Paniago, Anamaria Mello Miranda; Sanchez, Maria Carmen Arroyo; Celeste, Beatriz Julieta; Jacquet, Diane; Magiri, Charles; Muia, A.; Kesusu, J.; Ageed, Al Farazdag; Galal, Nuha; Osman, Osman Salih; Gupta, A. K.; Bimal, Afrad S.; Das, V. N. R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Poor access to diagnosis stymies control of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Antibody-detecting rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can be performed in peripheral health settings. However, there are many brands available and published reports of variable accuracy. Methods. Commercial VL RDTs

  14. Global developmental delay in guanidionacetate methyltransferase deficiency : differences in formal testing and clinical observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen, Krijn T.; Knijff, Wilma A.; Soorani-Lunsing, Roelineke J.; Sijens, Paul E.; Verhoeven, Nanda M.; Salomons, Gajja S.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, Siena M.; van Spronsen, Francjan J.

    Guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency is a defect in the biosynthesis of creatine (Cr). So far, reports have not focused on the description of developmental abilities in this disorder. Here, we present the result of formal testing of developmental abilities in a GAMT-deficient

  15. Resolution tests of global geodynamic models by travel-time tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Běhounková, Marie; Čížková, H.; Matyska, C.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2005), s. 343-363 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/02/1306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : seismic tomography * synthetic inversion * resolution tests Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.656, year: 2005

  16. Testing the theory of emissions trading : Experimental evidence on alternative mechanisms for global carbon trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Ger; Nentjes, Andries; Smith, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Simulation models and theory prove that emission trading converges to market equilibrium. This paper sets out to test these results using experimental economics. Three experiments are conducted for the six largest carbon emitting industrialized regions. Two experiments use auctions, the first a

  17. Animal alternatives for whole effluent toxicity testing: Perspectives from a global workshop (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1940s, effluent toxicity testing has been utilized to varying degrees in many countries to assess potential ecological impacts and assist in determining necessary treatment options for environmental protection. However, it was only in the early 1980’s that toxicit...

  18. Animal alternatives for whole effluent toxicity testing: Perspectives from a global workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1940’s, effluent toxicity testing has been utilized to varying degrees in many countries to assess potential ecological impacts and assist in determining necessary treatment options for environmental protection. However, it was only in the early 1980’s that ...

  19. Central site monitoring: results from a test of accuracy in identifying trials and sites failing Food and Drug Administration inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Anne S; Manukyan, Zorayr; Purohit-Sheth, Tejashri; Gensler, Gary; Okwesili, Paul; Meeker-O'Connell, Ann; Ball, Leslie; Marler, John R

    2014-04-01

    Site monitoring and source document verification account for 15%-30% of clinical trial costs. An alternative is to streamline site monitoring to focus on correcting trial-specific risks identified by central data monitoring. This risk-based approach could preserve or even improve the quality of clinical trial data and human subject protection compared to site monitoring focused primarily on source document verification. To determine whether a central review by statisticians using data submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by clinical trial sponsors can identify problem sites and trials that failed FDA site inspections. An independent Analysis Center (AC) analyzed data from four anonymous new drug applications (NDAs) where FDA had performed site inspections overseen by FDA's Office of Scientific Investigations (OSI). FDA team members in the OSI chose the four NDAs from among all NDAs with data in Study Data Tabulation Model (SDTM) format. Two of the NDAs had data that OSI had deemed unreliable in support of the application after FDA site inspections identified serious data integrity problems. The other two NDAs had clinical data that OSI deemed reliable after site inspections. At the outset, the AC knew only that the experimental design specified two NDAs with significant problems. FDA gave the AC no information about which NDAs had problems, how many sites were inspected, or how many were found to have problems until after the AC analysis was complete. The AC evaluated randomization balance, enrollment patterns, study visit scheduling, variability of reported data, and last digit reference. The AC classified sites as 'High Concern', 'Moderate Concern', 'Mild Concern', or 'No Concern'. The AC correctly identified the two NDAs with data deemed unreliable by OSI. In addition, central data analysis correctly identified 5 of 6 (83%) sites for which FDA recommended rejection of data and 13 of 15 sites (87%) for which any regulatory deviations were

  20. A Test of Sensitivity to Convective Transport in a Global Atmospheric CO2 Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, H.; Kawa, S. R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Rasch, P.; Wu, S.

    2006-01-01

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO2 distributions. GlobalCO2 in the year 2000 is simulated using theCTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA s Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO2 by adopting the same CO2 emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection. Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO2 over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO2 difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO2 seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO2 sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO2 driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  1. The Chandra Deep Field South as a test case for Global Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portaluri, E.; Viotto, V.; Ragazzoni, R.; Gullieuszik, M.; Bergomi, M.; Greggio, D.; Biondi, F.; Dima, M.; Magrin, D.; Farinato, J.

    2017-04-01

    The era of the next generation of giant telescopes requires not only the advent of new technologies but also the development of novel methods, in order to exploit fully the extraordinary potential they are built for. Global Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics (GMCAO) pursues this approach, with the goal of achieving good performance over a field of view of a few arcmin and an increase in sky coverage. In this article, we show the gain offered by this technique to an astrophysical application, such as the photometric survey strategy applied to the Chandra Deep Field South as a case study. We simulated a close-to-real observation of a 500 × 500 arcsec2 extragalactic deep field with a 40-m class telescope that implements GMCAO. We analysed mock K-band images of 6000 high-redshift (up to z = 2.75) galaxies therein as if they were real to recover the initial input parameters. We attained 94.5 per cent completeness for source detection with SEXTRACTOR. We also measured the morphological parameters of all the sources with the two-dimensional fitting tools GALFIT. The agreement we found between recovered and intrinsic parameters demonstrates GMCAO as a reliable approach to assist extremely large telescope (ELT) observations of extragalactic interest.

  2. Flight Test Results from Real-Time Relative Global Positioning System Flight Experiment on STS-69

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young W.; Brazzel, Jack P., Jr.; Carpenter, J. Russell; Hinkel, Heather D.; Newman, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A real-time global positioning system (GPS) Kalman filter has been developed to support automated rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS). The filter is integrated with existing Shuttle rendezvous software running on a 486 laptop computer under Windows. In this work, we present real-time and postflight results achieved with the filter on STS-69. The experiment used GPS data from an Osborne/Jet propulsion Laboratory TurboRouge receiver carried on the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) free flyer and a Rockwell Collins 3M receiver carried on the Orbiter. Real time filter results, processed onboard the Shuttle and replayed in near-time on the ground, are based on single vehicle mode operation and on 5 to 20 minute snapshots of telemetry provided by WSF for dual-vehicle mode operation. The Orbiter and WSF state vectors calculated using our filter compare favorably with precise reference orbits determined by the University of Texas Center for Space Research. The lessons learned from this experiment will be used in conjunction with future experiments to mitigate the technology risk posed by automated rendezvous and docking to the ISS.

  3. Global Health Education: a cross-sectional study among German medical students to identify needs, deficits and potential benefits (Part 2 of 2: Knowledge gaps and potential benefits).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Menzel-Severing, Johannes; Schubert, Kirsten; Tinnemann, Peter

    2010-10-08

    In Germany, educational deficits or potential benefits involved in global health education have not been analysed till now. We assess the importance medical students place on learning about social determinants of health (SDH) and assess their knowledge of global health topics in relation to (i) mobility patterns, their education in (ii) tropical medicine or (iii) global health. Cross-sectional study among medical students from all 36 medical schools in Germany using a web-based, semi-structured questionnaire. Participants were recruited via mailing-lists of students' unions, all medical students registered in 2007 were eligible to participate in the study. We captured international mobility patterns, exposure to global health learning opportunities and attitudes to learning about SDH. Both an objective and subjective knowledge assessment were performed. 1126 online-replies were received and analysed. International health electives in developing countries correlated significantly with a higher importance placed on all provided SDH (p ≤ 0.006). Participation in tropical medicine (p educational system' (p = 0.007) and the 'health system structure' (p = 0.007), while the item 'politics' was marginally significant (p = 0.053).In the knowledge assessment students achieved an average score of 3.6 (SD 1.5; Mdn 4.0), 75% achieved a score of 4.0 or less (Q25 = 3.0; Q75 = 4.0) from a maximum achievable score of 8.0. A better performance was associated with international health electives (p = 0.032), participation in tropical medicine (p = 0.038) and global health (p = 0.258) courses. The importance medical students in our sample placed on learning about SDH strongly interacts with students' mobility, and participation in tropical medicine and global health courses. The knowledge assessment revealed deficits and outlined needs to further analyse education gaps in global health. Developing concerted educational interventions aimed at fostering students' engagement with SDH

  4. Using response-time latencies to measure athletes’ doping attitudes: the brief implicit attitude test identifies substance abuse in bodybuilders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowing and, if necessary, altering competitive athletes’ real attitudes towards the use of banned performance-enhancing substances is an important goal of worldwide doping prevention efforts. However athletes will not always be willing to reporting their real opinions. Reaction time-based attitude tests help conceal the ultimate goal of measurement from the participant and impede strategic answering. This study investigated how well a reaction time-based attitude test discriminated between athletes who were doping and those who were not. We investigated whether athletes whose urine samples were positive for at least one banned substance (dopers) evaluated doping more favorably than clean athletes (non-dopers). Methods We approached a group of 61 male competitive bodybuilders and collected urine samples for biochemical testing. The pictorial doping Brief Implicit Association Test (BIAT) was used for attitude measurement. This test quantifies the difference in response latencies (in milliseconds) to stimuli representing related concepts (i.e. doping–dislike/like–[health food]). Results Prohibited substances were found in 43% of all tested urine samples. Dopers had more lenient attitudes to doping than non-dopers (Hedges’s g = -0.76). D-scores greater than -0.57 (CI95 = -0.72 to -0.46) might be indicative of a rather lenient attitude to doping. In urine samples evidence of administration of combinations of substances, complementary administration of substances to treat side effects and use of stimulants to promote loss of body fat was common. Conclusion This study demonstrates that athletes’ attitudes to doping can be assessed indirectly with a reaction time-based test, and that their attitudes are related to their behavior. Although bodybuilders may be more willing to reveal their attitude to doping than other athletes, these results still provide evidence that the pictorial doping BIAT may be useful in athletes from other sports

  5. Pseudodynamic tests on a full-scale 3-storey precast concrete building: Global response

    OpenAIRE

    Negro, Paolo; Bournas, Dionysios A.; Molina, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the SAFECAST Project, a full-scale three-storey precast building was subjected to a series of pseudodynamic (PsD) tests in the European Laboratory for Structural Assessment (ELSA). The mock-up was constructed in such a way that four different structural configurations could be investigated experimentally. Therefore, the behaviour of various parameters like the types of mechanical connections (traditional as well as innovative) and the presence or absence of shear walls alo...

  6. Moving on From Representativeness: Testing the Utility of the Global Drug Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica J Barratt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A decline in response rates in traditional household surveys, combined with increased internet coverage and decreased research budgets, has resulted in increased attractiveness of web survey research designs based on purposive and voluntary opt-in sampling strategies. In the study of hidden or stigmatised behaviours, such as cannabis use, web survey methods are increasingly common. However, opt-in web surveys are often heavily criticised due to their lack of sampling frame and unknown representativeness. In this article, we outline the current state of the debate about the relevance of pursuing representativeness, the state of probability sampling methods, and the utility of non-probability, web survey methods especially for accessing hidden or minority populations. Our article has two aims: (1 to present a comprehensive description of the methodology we use at Global Drug Survey (GDS, an annual cross-sectional web survey and (2 to compare the age and sex distributions of cannabis users who voluntarily completed (a a household survey or (b a large web-based purposive survey (GDS, across three countries: Australia, the United States, and Switzerland. We find that within each set of country comparisons, the demographic distributions among recent cannabis users are broadly similar, demonstrating that the age and sex distributions of those who volunteer to be surveyed are not vastly different between these non-probability and probability methods. We conclude that opt-in web surveys of hard-to-reach populations are an efficient way of gaining in-depth understanding of stigmatised behaviours and are appropriate, as long as they are not used to estimate drug use prevalence of the general population.

  7. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO{sub 2} simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). UMBC Goddard Earth Science and Technology Center; Kawa, S.R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Rasch, P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Wu, S. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO{sub 2} distributions. Global CO{sub 2} in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO{sub 2} by adopting the same CO{sub 2} emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection.Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO{sub 2} over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO{sub 2} difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO{sub 2} seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO{sub 2} sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO{sub 2} driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  8. Moving on From Representativeness: Testing the Utility of the Global Drug Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Monica J; Ferris, Jason A; Zahnow, Renee; Palamar, Joseph J; Maier, Larissa J; Winstock, Adam R

    2017-01-01

    A decline in response rates in traditional household surveys, combined with increased internet coverage and decreased research budgets, has resulted in increased attractiveness of web survey research designs based on purposive and voluntary opt-in sampling strategies. In the study of hidden or stigmatised behaviours, such as cannabis use, web survey methods are increasingly common. However, opt-in web surveys are often heavily criticised due to their lack of sampling frame and unknown representativeness. In this article, we outline the current state of the debate about the relevance of pursuing representativeness, the state of probability sampling methods, and the utility of non-probability, web survey methods especially for accessing hidden or minority populations. Our article has two aims: (1) to present a comprehensive description of the methodology we use at Global Drug Survey (GDS), an annual cross-sectional web survey and (2) to compare the age and sex distributions of cannabis users who voluntarily completed (a) a household survey or (b) a large web-based purposive survey (GDS), across three countries: Australia, the United States, and Switzerland. We find that within each set of country comparisons, the demographic distributions among recent cannabis users are broadly similar, demonstrating that the age and sex distributions of those who volunteer to be surveyed are not vastly different between these non-probability and probability methods. We conclude that opt-in web surveys of hard-to-reach populations are an efficient way of gaining in-depth understanding of stigmatised behaviours and are appropriate, as long as they are not used to estimate drug use prevalence of the general population.

  9. Evaluation of a Fast Test to Identify the Presence of Proline Aminopeptidase in Women With Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Roberto; Gordillo, Silvia; Conde-Glez, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity of proline aminopeptidase by a rapid paper strip test in women with bacterial vaginosis (BV). Methods: Vaginal secretions of 1,387 voluntary patients attending the Obstetrics and Gynecology Infectious Diseases Clinic at Juárez Hospital of Mexico City were collected and examined. Patients were assigned into 2 groups: 483 with BV according to clinical and laboratory criteria and 604 without BV as the control group. For the purposes of this study, 300 patients with trichomonas and/or yeast were excluded from the BV group. The strips were prepared by using L-proline β-naphthylamide and L-proline p-nitroanilide as the substrates to detect proline aminopeptidase activity in concentrated vaginal secretions. In parallel, all samples were also analyzed with the standard methods in microplates containing either sustrate as a control of the rapid strip test. The test was interpreted after 3–5 min of incubation. Results: The results in the strip and microplate assays were similar in 95% of the samples. Sensitivity was 91.7% and specificity was 94.2%; probability of BV if the test is positive was 92.6% and negative predictive value was 93.4%. Conclusions: These findings indicate that this aminopeptidase rapid strip assay provides a 3–5 min identification of activity of the enzyme in women with BV. The procedure is a rapid, non-expensive, sensitive, and useful test at the gynecologic clinic. PMID:18476142

  10. Oral-Fluid Thiol-Detection Test Identifies Underlying Active Periodontal Disease Not Detected by the Visual Awake Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queck, Katherine E; Chapman, Angela; Herzog, Leslie J; Shell-Martin, Tamara; Burgess-Cassler, Anthony; McClure, George David

    2018-03-20

    Periodontal disease in dogs is highly prevalent but can only be accurately diagnosed by performing an anesthetized oral examination with periodontal probing and dental radiography. In this study, 114 dogs had a visual awake examination of the oral cavity and were administered an oral-fluid thiol-detection test prior to undergoing a a full-mouth anesthetized oral examination and digital dental radiographs. The results show the visual awake examination underestimated the presence and severity of active periodontal disease. The thiol-detection test was superior to the visual awake examination at detecting the presence and severity of active periodontal disease and was an indicator of progression toward alveolar bone loss. The thiol-detection test detected active periodontal disease at early stages of development, before any visual cues were present, indicating the need for intervention to prevent periodontal bone loss. Early detection is important because without intervention, dogs with gingivitis (active periodontal disease) progress to irreversible periodontal bone loss (stage 2+). As suggested in the current AAHA guidelines, a thiol-detection test administered in conjunction with the visual awake examination during routine wellness examinations facilitates veterinarian-client communication and mitigates under-diagnosis of periodontal disease and underutilization of dental services. The thiol-detection test can be used to monitor the periodontal health status of the conscious patient during follow-up examinations based on disease severity.

  11. Alzheimer's disease in the human eye. Clinical tests that identify ocular and visual information processing deficit as biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lily Y L; Lowe, Jennifer; Ardiles, Alvaro; Lim, Julie; Grey, Angus C; Robertson, Ken; Danesh-Meyer, Helen; Palacios, Adrian G; Acosta, Monica L

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia with progressive deterioration of memory and cognition. Complaints related to vision are common among AD patients. Several changes in the retina, lens, and in the vasculature have been noted in the AD eye that may be the cause of visual symptoms experienced by the AD patient. Anatomical changes have been detected within the eye before signs of cognitive impairment and memory loss are apparent. Unlike the brain, the eye is a unique organ that can be visualized noninvasively at the cellular level because of its transparent nature, which allows for inexpensive testing of biomarkers in a clinical setting. In this review, we have searched for candidate biomarkers that could enable diagnosis of AD, covering ocular neurodegeneration associated with functional tests. We explore the evidence that suggests that inexpensive, noninvasive clinical tests could be used to detect AD ocular biomarkers. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Does Vitamin D Supplementation Enhance Musculoskeletal Performance in Individuals Identified as Vitamin D Deficient through Blood Spot Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kellie A.

    This thesis investigated possible changes in performance after one month of vitamin D supplementation in individuals found to be vitamin D deficient or insufficient through blood spot testing. Thirty-two males, ages 18-32, participated. Each subject visited the lab three times in one-month, completing four performance tests each session, including an isometric mid-thigh pull and a vertical jump on a force plate, a isometric 90-degree elbow flexion test using a load cell, and a psychomotor vigilance test on a palm pilot. The initial lab included blood spot tests to find vitamin D levels. In a single blind manner, 16 subjects were assigned vitamin D and 16 the placebo. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis did not reveal any main effects for time (F=2.626, p=0.364), treatment (vitamin D3 vs placebo; F=1.282, p=0.999), or interaction effects for treatment by time (F=0.304, p=0.999) for maximum force production during an isometric mid-thigh pull. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis did not reveal any main effects for time (F=1.323, p=0.999), treatment (vitamin D3 vs placebo; F=0.510, p=0.999), or interaction effects for treatment by time (F= 1.625, p=0.860) for rate of force production during a vertical jump. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis did not reveal any main effects for time (F=0.194, p=0.999), treatment (vitamin D3 vs placebo; F=2.452, p=0.513), or interaction effects for treatment by time (F= 1.179, p=0.999) for maximal force production during a 90-degree isometric elbow flexion. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis did not reveal any main effects for time (F=1.710, p=0.804), treatment (vitamin D3 vs placebo; F=1.471, p=0.94), or interaction effects for treatment by time (F= 0.293, p=0.999) for mean reaction time to random stimuli during the psychomotor vigilance test. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis did not reveal any main effects for time (F=0.530, p=0.999), treatment (vitamin D3 vs placebo; F=0.141, p=0.999), or interaction effects for treatment by time (F=0.784 p=0

  13. Training tomorrow's global health leaders: applying a transtheoretical model to identify behavior change stages within an intervention for health leadership development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Joseph; Farquhar, Carey; Nathanson, Neal; Mashalla, Yohana; Petracca, Frances; Desmond, Michelle; Green, Wendy; Davies, Luke; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2014-12-01

    Training health professionals in leadership and management skills is a key component of health systems strengthening in low-resource settings. The importance of evaluating the effectiveness of these programs has received increased attention over the past several years, although such evaluations continue to pose significant challenges. This article presents evaluation data from the pilot year of the Afya Bora Fellowship, an African-based training program to increase the leadership capacity of health professionals. Firstly, we describe the goals of the Afya Bora Fellowship. Then, we present an adaptation of the transtheoretical model for behavior change called the Health Leadership Development Model, as an analytical lens to identify and describe evidence of individual leadership behavior change among training participants during and shortly after the pilot year of the program. The Health Leadership Development Model includes the following: pre-contemplation (status quo), contemplation (testing and internalizing leadership), preparation - (moving toward leadership), action (leadership in action), and maintenance (effecting organizational change). We used data from surveys, in-depth interviews, journal entries and course evaluations as data points to populate the Health Leadership Development Model. In the short term, fellows demonstrated increased leadership development during and shortly after the intervention and reflected the contemplation, preparation and action stages of the Health Leadership Development Model. However, expanded interventions and/or additional time may be needed to support behavior change toward the maintenance stages. We conclude that the Health Leadership Development Model is useful for informing health leadership training design and evaluation to contribute to sustainable health organizational change. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Online self-test identifies women at high familial breast cancer risk in population-based breast cancer screening without inducing anxiety or distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erkelens, A; Sie, A S; Manders, P; Visser, A; Duijm, L E; Mann, R M; Ten Voorde, M; Kroeze, H; Prins, J B; Hoogerbrugge, N

    2017-06-01

    Identifying high familial breast cancer (FBC) risk improves detection of yet unknown BRCA1/2-mutation carriers, for whom BC risk is both highly likely and potentially preventable. We assessed whether a new online self-test could identify women at high FBC risk in population-based BC screening without inducing anxiety or distress. After their visit for screening mammography, women were invited by email to take an online self-test for identifying highly increased FBC risk-based on Dutch guidelines. Exclusion criteria were previously diagnosed as increased FBC risk or a personal history of BC. Anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Dutch Version), distress (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale) and BC risk perception were assessed using questionnaires, which were completed immediately before and after taking the online self-test and 2 weeks later. Of the 562 women invited by email, 406 (72%) completed the online self-test while 304 also completed questionnaires (response rate 54%). After exclusion criteria, 287 (51%) were included for data analysis. Median age was 56 years (range 50-74). A high or moderate FBC risk was identified in 12 (4%) and three (1%) women, respectively. After completion of the online self-test, anxiety and BC risk perception were decreased while distress scores remained unchanged. Levels were below clinical relevance. Most women (85%) would recommend the self-test; few (3%) would not. The online self-test identified previously unknown women at high FBC risk (4%), who may carry a BRCA1/2-mutation, without inducing anxiety or distress. We therefore recommend offering this self-test to women who attend population-based screening mammography for the first time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Defect Localization Capabilities of a Global Detection Scheme: Spatial Pattern Recognition Using Full-field Vibration Test Data in Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Prabhu, M.; Arnold, S. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a conceptually simple approach, based on the notion of defect energy in material space has been developed and extensively studied (from the theoretical and computational standpoints). The present study focuses on its evaluation from the viewpoint of damage localization capabilities in case of two-dimensional plates; i.e., spatial pattern recognition on surfaces. To this end, two different experimental modal test results are utilized; i.e., (1) conventional modal testing using (white noise) excitation and accelerometer-type sensors and (2) pattern recognition using Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI), a full field method capable of analyzing the mechanical vibration of complex structures. Unlike the conventional modal testing technique (using contacting accelerometers), these emerging ESPI technologies operate in a non-contacting mode, can be used even under hazardous conditions with minimal or no presence of noise and can simultaneously provide measurements for both translations and rotations. Results obtained have clearly demonstrated the robustness and versatility of the global NDE scheme developed. The vectorial character of the indices used, which enabled the extraction of distinct patterns for localizing damages proved very useful. In the context of the targeted pattern recognition paradigm, two algorithms were developed for the interrogation of test measurements; i.e., intensity contour maps for the damaged index, and the associated defect energy vector field plots.

  16. Testing Integration Effects Between the Cee and U.S. Stock Markets During the 2007–2009 Global Financial Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olbryś Joanna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to explicitly test a research hypothesis that there was no integration effect among the U.S. and the eight Central and Eastern European (CEE stock markets during the 2007-2009 Global Financial Crisis (GFC. As growing international integration could lead to a progressive increase in cross-market correlations, the evaluation of integration was carried out by applying equality tests of correlation matrices computed over non-overlapping subsamples: the pre-crisis and crisis periods, in the group of investigated markets. The crisis periods are formally established based on a statistical method of dividing market states into bullish and bearish markets. The sample period May 2004-April 2014 includes the 2007 U.S. subprime financial crisis. The robustness analysis of the integration tests with respect to various data frequencies is provided. The empirical results are not homogeneous and they depend both on the integration test and data frequency. Consequently, it is not possible to conclude whether integration between the investigated markets is present.

  17. Feeling global, acting ethically: global identification and fairtrade consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Gerhard; Kohlmann, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Global identification has become a popular construct in recent psychological debate as it relates to harmonious intergroup relations and a caring for all humanity. Based on social identity theorizing, the current research tests whether global identification can also predict consumer choices, at the expense of lower personal benefit. Importantly, we assumed that concerns about global injustice represent a crucial component of that relation. We predicted that participants who identified strongly with all humanity would rather choose a Fairtrade product alternative over a conventional one, compared with low identifiers. In addition, we assumed that this effect be mediated by perceived global injustice. Both predictions were confirmed in a consumer choice study (N = 68). Overall, global identification and globally relevant consumer behavior seem meaningfully interconnected, and we discuss these findings with regard to recent theoretical developments in Fairtrade consumption research.

  18. Testing local and global stressor impacts on a coastal foundation species using an ecologically realistic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Brian S; Bible, Jillian M; Chang, Andrew L; Ferner, Matthew C; Wasson, Kerstin; Zabin, Chela J; Latta, Marilyn; Deck, Anna; Todgham, Anne E; Grosholz, Edwin D

    2015-02-12

    Despite the abundance of literature on organismal responses to multiple environmental stressors, most studies have not matched the timing of experimental manipulations with the temporal pattern of stressors in nature. We test the interactive effects of diel-cycling hypoxia with both warming and decreased salinities using ecologically realistic exposures. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of negative synergistic effects on Olympia oyster growth; rather, we found only additive and opposing effects of hypoxia (detrimental) and warming (beneficial). We suspect that diel-cycling provided a temporal refuge that allowed physiological compensation. We also tested for latent effects of warming and hypoxia to low-salinity tolerance using a seasonal delay between stressor events. However, we did not find a latent effect, rather a threshold survival response to low salinity that was independent of early life-history exposure to warming or hypoxia. The absence of synergism is likely the result of stressor treatments that mirror the natural timing of environmental stressors. We provide environmental context for laboratory experimental data by examining field time series environmental data from four North American west coast estuaries and find heterogeneous environmental signals that characterize each estuary, suggesting that the potential stressor exposure to oysters will drastically differ over moderate spatial scales. This heterogeneity implies that efforts to conserve and restore oysters will require an adaptive approach that incorporates knowledge of local conditions. We conclude that studies of multiple environmental stressors can be greatly improved by integrating ecologically realistic exposure and timing of stressors found in nature with organismal life-history traits. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Failure to identify an acute exercise effect on executive function assessed by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chih Wang

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Acute aerobic exercise failed to influence executive function as assessed by the WCST, revealing that this classical neuropsychological test tapping executive function may not be sensitive to acute exercise. Our findings suggest that acute exercise does not broadly affect the entire family of executive functions, or its effect on a specific aspect of executive function may be task-dependent, as proposed by Etnier and Chang (2009.

  20. Testing efficacy of teaching food safety and identifying variables that affect learning in a low-literacy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Terezie Tolar; Romero, Angélica Lissette Hernández; Linares, Ana Lucía Molina; Challinor, Julia M; Day, Sara W; Caniza, Miguela

    2015-03-01

    Nurses at a meeting of the Asociación de Hemato Oncología Pediátrica de Centroamérica y El Caribe recognized food safety as one of the main issues affecting patient care. The objective was to increase awareness of food safety issues among caregivers for pediatric cancer patients in Guatemala and El Salvador. A low-literacy booklet about food safety, "Alimentación del niño con cáncer (Feeding the child with cancer)," was developed for caregivers. Tests were developed to assess information acquisition and retention. An educator's guide was developed for consistency of education along with a demographics questionnaire. The efficacy of the booklet was tested with 162 caregivers of patients with newly diagnosed leukemia. Information retention was tested 1 and 3 months after the initial education. The booklet was found to be efficient for food safety education. There was no significant difference between post-educational knowledge in either country at 1 month or in Guatemala at 3 months. Pre-educational knowledge was not associated with any demographic variable except for self-reported ability to read in El Salvador. There was no significant association between learning ability and demographic variables in either country. Caregivers from El Salvador had a better ability to learn than caregivers from Guatemala. Education using the booklet greatly improved food safety knowledge, which remained high 1 and 3 months later. Education with the booklet was efficacious for teaching a low-literacy population about food safety. However, it is unknown which part of the education contributed to the significant improvement in knowledge.

  1. Univariate Tests for Phase Capacity: Tools for Identifying When to Modify a Survey’s Data Collection Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Taylor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To mitigate the potentially harmful effects of nonresponse, most surveys repeatedly follow up with nonrespondents, often targeting a response rate or predetermined number of completes. Each additional recruitment attempt generally brings in a new wave of data, but returns gradually diminish over the course of a fixed data collection protocol, as each subsequent wave tends to consist of fewer responses than the last. Consequently, point estimates begin to stabilize. This is the notion of phase capacity, suggesting some form of design change is in order, such as switching modes, increasing the incentive, or, as is considered exclusively in this research, discontinuing the nonrespondent follow-up campaign altogether. A previously proposed test for phase capacity calls for multiply imputing nonrespondents’ missing data to assess, retrospectively, whether the most recent wave of data significantly altered a key, nonresponse-adjusted point estimate. This study introduces a more flexible adaptation amenable to surveys that instead reweight the observed data to compensate for nonresponse. Results from a simulation study and application indicate that, all else equal, the weighting version of the test is more sensitive to point estimate changes, thereby dictating more follow-up attempts are warranted.

  2. cDNA-library testing identifies transforming genes cooperating with c-myc in mouse pre-B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Inge; Bouquet, Corinne; Melchers, Fritz

    2016-11-01

    While c-myc often contributes to the generation of B cell transformation, its transgenic overexpression alone does not lead to full transformation of B-lineage cells. Synergistically acting second genes must cooperate. Here, we constructed doxycycline-inducible cDNA-libraries from pre-B cell mRNA. These libraries were retrovirally transduced as single copies into single cells and overexpressed in fetal-liver-derived c-myc-overexpressing pre-B cell lines. We scored transformation by survival and/or expansion of differentiating B-lineage cells in vitro and in vivo. Only one double c-myc/cDNA-library-expressing cell line was found in less than 5 × 10 6 library-transduced pre-B cells surviving and expressing a cDNA-library-derived transcript in vitro. This transcript was identified as a shortened form of the Exosc1 gene, encoding the RNA exosome complex component CSL4. Transplantations of double c-myc/Exosc1 short-form- or c-myc/Exosc1 full-length-transgenic cells into Rag1 -/- mice resulted in survival, differentiation to CD19 + CD93 - sIgM + CD5 low/- CD11b + mature B1 cells and, surprisingly, also vigorous expansion in vivo. Strikingly, after transplantations of c-myc/cDNA-library pre-BI cells the frequencies of double-transgenic pre-B cells and their differentiated progeny, expanding in vivo to heterogeneous phenotypes, was at least tenfold higher than in vitro. In a first analysis Ptprcap, Cacybp, Ndufs7, Rpl18a, and Rpl35a were identified. This suggests a strong influence of the host on B-cell transformation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Exposure to multiple metals from groundwater-a global crisis: geology, climate change, health effects, testing, and mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Erika; Frisbie, Seth; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the global extent of naturally occurring toxic metals in groundwater. Adverse health effects attributed to the toxic metals most commonly found in groundwater are reviewed, as well as chemical, biochemical, and physiological interactions between these metals. Synergistic and antagonistic effects that have been reported between the toxic metals found in groundwater and the dietary trace elements are highlighted, and common behavioural, cultural, and dietary practices that are likely to significantly modify health risks due to use of metal-contaminated groundwater are reviewed. Methods for analytical testing of samples containing multiple metals are discussed, with special attention to analytical interferences between metals and reagents. An overview is presented of approaches to providing safe water when groundwater contains multiple metallic toxins.

  4. Well Test Analysis of Naturally Fractured Vuggy Reservoirs with an Analytical Triple Porosity – Double Permeability Model and a Global Optimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Susana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the automatic characterization of Naturally Fractured Vuggy Reservoirs via well test analysis, using a triple porosity-dual permeability model. The inter-porosity flow parameters, the storativity ratios, as well as the permeability ratio, the wellbore storage effect, the skin and the total permeability will be identified as parameters of the model. In this work, we will perform the well test interpretation in Laplace space, using numerical algorithms to transfer the discrete real data given in fully dimensional time to Laplace space. The well test interpretation problem in Laplace space has been posed as a nonlinear least squares optimization problem with box constraints and a linear inequality constraint, which is usually solved using local Newton type methods with a trust region. However, local methods as the one used in our work called TRON or the well-known Levenberg-Marquardt method, are often not able to find an optimal solution with a good fit of the data. Also well test analysis with the triple porosity-double permeability model, like most inverse problems, can yield multiple solutions with good match to the data. To deal with these specific characteristics, we will use a global optimization algorithm called the Tunneling Method (TM. In the design of the algorithm, we take into account issues of the problem like the fact that the parameter estimation has to be done with high precision, the presence of noise in the measurements and the need to solve the problem computationally fast. We demonstrate that the use of the TM in this study, showed to be an efficient and robust alternative to solve the well test characterization, as several optimal solutions, with very good match to the data were obtained.

  5. Genotypic resistance test in proviral DNA can identify resistance mutations never detected in historical genotypic test in patients with low level or undetectable HIV-RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccarelli, Mauro; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Armenia, Daniele; Borghi, Vanni; Gennari, William; Gori, Caterina; Forbici, Federica; Bertoli, Ada; Fabeni, Lavinia; Giannetti, Alberto; Cicalini, Stefania; Bellagamba, Rita; Andreoni, Massimo; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Mussini, Cristina; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Perno, Carlo Federico; Antinori, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Beyond the detection of resistant HIV strains found in plasma samples, archival HIV-DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) might represent a reservoir of additional resistance. To characterize the HIV-1 resistance in PBMCs from patients with suppressed or low-level viremia (50-1000 copies/mL) and evaluate its added value compared to the resistance detected in previous plasma genotypic resistance tests (GRTs). HIV-1 infected patients selected for treatment change despite low/undetectable viremia were tested. Number and type of primary resistance mutations (PRMs) detected in PBMCs were compared to those detected in previous plasma GRTs. Logistic regression assessed factors associated with presence of at least one PRM in PBMCs. 468 patients with a PBMC GRT were analyzed; 149 of them had at least 2 plasma GRTs performed before PBMC genotyping. 42.3% of patients showed at least one PRM in PBMCs. The highest proportion of PRMs in PBMCs was observed for NRTI class (30.6%), followed by NNRTI (22.2%), PI (14.1%) and INI (4.9%). In 20.1% of patients, PRMs were detected only in PBMCs and not in any of the plasma GRT previously performed. By using multivariable analysis, a higher number of previous regimens, injecting drug-use route and a lower nadir CD4 were associated with significantly higher risk of detecting PRMs in PBMCs. Our findings support the usage of PBMC GRT in addition to the current recommended plasma RNA test, especially when therapeutic and/or resistance information is not available. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A feasibility study to identify proteins in the residual Pap test fluid of women with normal cytology by mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Kristin Lm; Afiuni-Zadeh, Somaieh; Geller, Melissa A; Hickey, Kayla; Griffin, Timothy J; Pambuccian, Stefan E; Skubitz, Amy Pn

    2014-01-01

    The proteomic analysis of body fluids is a growing technology for the identification of protein biomarkers of disease. Given that Papanicolaou tests (Pap tests) are routinely performed on over 30 million women annually in the U.S. to screen for cervical cancer, we examined the residual Pap test fluid as a source of protein for analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). In the liquid-based Pap test, cervical cells are collected from the ectocervix and placed into an alcohol-based fixative prior to staining and pathologic examination. We hypothesized that proteins shed by cells of the female genital tract can be detected in the Pap test fixative by MS-based proteomic techniques. We examined the feasibility of using residual fluid from discarded Pap tests with cytologically "normal" results to optimize sample preparation for MS analysis. The protein composition of the cell-free Pap test fluid was determined by silver staining of sodium dodecyl sulfate -polyacrylamide gels, and the abundance of serum proteins was examined by Western immunoblot using an antibody against human serum albumin. Both pooled and individual samples were trypsin digested and analyzed by two-dimensional MS/MS. Proteins were identified by searching against the Human Uniprot database, and characterized for localization, function and relative abundance. The average volume of the residual Pap test fluid was 1.5 ml and the average protein concentration was 0.14 mg/ml. By Western immunoblot we showed that the amount of albumin in each sample was significantly reduced compared to normal serum. By MS/MS, we identified 714 unique proteins in pooled Pap test samples and an average of 431 proteins in individual samples. About 40% of the proteins identified were extracellular or localized to the plasma membrane. Almost 20% of the proteins identified were involved in immunity and defense, characteristic of the healthy cervical-vaginal proteome. By merging the protein sets from the individual and pooled Pap test

  7. A Human Error Analysis Procedure for Identifying Potential Error Modes and Influencing Factors for Test and Maintenance Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Whan; Park, Jin Kyun

    2010-01-01

    Periodic or non-periodic test and maintenance (T and M) activities in large, complex systems such as nuclear power plants (NPPs) are essential for sustaining stable and safe operation of the systems. On the other hand, it also has been raised that human erroneous actions that might occur during T and M activities has the possibility of incurring unplanned reactor trips (RTs) or power derate, making safety-related systems unavailable, or making the reliability of components degraded. Contribution of human errors during normal and abnormal activities of NPPs to the unplanned RTs is known to be about 20% of the total events. This paper introduces a procedure for predictively analyzing human error potentials when maintenance personnel perform T and M tasks based on a work procedure or their work plan. This procedure helps plant maintenance team prepare for plausible human errors. The procedure to be introduced is focusing on the recurrent error forms (or modes) in execution-based errors such as wrong object, omission, too little, and wrong action

  8. Accurate mitochondrial DNA sequencing using off-target reads provides a single test to identify pathogenic point mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Helen R; Pyle, Angela; Blakely, Emma L; Alston, Charlotte L; Duff, Jennifer; Hudson, Gavin; Horvath, Rita; Wilson, Ian J; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Taylor, Robert W; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a common cause of inherited metabolic disease and can be due to mutations affecting mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA. The current diagnostic approach involves the targeted resequencing of mitochondrial DNA and candidate nuclear genes, usually proceeds step by step, and is time consuming and costly. Recent evidence suggests that variations in mitochondrial DNA sequence can be obtained from whole-exome sequence data, raising the possibility of a comprehensive single diagnostic test to detect pathogenic point mutations. We compared the mitochondrial DNA sequence derived from off-target exome reads with conventional mitochondrial DNA Sanger sequencing in 46 subjects. Mitochondrial DNA sequences can be reliably obtained using three different whole-exome sequence capture kits. Coverage correlates with the relative amount of mitochondrial DNA in the original genomic DNA sample, heteroplasmy levels can be determined using variant and total read depths, and-providing there is a minimum read depth of 20-fold-rare sequencing errors occur at a rate similar to that observed with conventional Sanger sequencing. This offers the prospect of using whole-exome sequence in a diagnostic setting to screen not only all protein coding nuclear genes but also all mitochondrial DNA genes for pathogenic mutations. Off-target mitochondrial DNA reads can also be used to assess quality control and maternal ancestry, inform on ethnic origin, and allow genetic disease association studies not previously anticipated with existing whole-exome data sets.

  9. Field validation of the use of RB51 as antigen in a complement fixation test to identify calves vaccinated with Brucella abortus RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adone, R; Ciuchini, F; Olsen, S

    2001-03-01

    In order to confirm the efficiency of an experimental RB51-based complement fixation (CF) test in identifying cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51, 831 sera from 110 vaccinated and 48 unvaccinated Hereford heifers of Iowa, collected for studies conducted in different years, were sent to Italy without coding to be tested in a CF test using RB51 as antigen. Most of the calves, aged from 3 to 10 months, were vaccinated subcutaneously with the recommended dosage of 10(10) CFU of RB51 commercial vaccine, while only six calves received 10(9) CFU of the same vaccine. Serum samples for serologic testing, collected until 16 postinoculation weeks (PIW), were also tested by routine surveillance tests for brucellosis such as rose bengal plate and CF tests performed with B. abortus smooth strain 99 as control antigen. RB51 CF test results obtained by testing sera from cattle vaccinated in 1999 indicate that the sensitivity of the reaction is 97% at 2 to 3 PIW and 90% until 8 PIW and decreases to 65% at 12 PIW, the specificity remaining at 100%. Collectively, the results of this study confirm that serologic standard tests fail to detect antibodies to RB51 while the RB51-based CF test is able to monitor antibody responses to RB51 until 15 to 16 PIW with a specificity of 100%. In addition, unlike the RB51-based dot blot assay, which is the only test currently used to monitor antibody responses to RB51, the CF test also detected specific responses following vaccination with 10(9) CFU of RB51, although seroconversion was only 50% at 8 PIW. In conclusion, because of high specificity and sensitivity, the CF test described here can be used to efficaciously monitor serologic responses following RB51 vaccination in cattle and could also be employed to detect RB51 infection in humans exposed to this strain.

  10. Towards development of a rapid and effective non-destructive testing strategy to identify brominated flame retardants in the plastics of consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallen, Christie; Banks, Andrew; Brandsma, Sicco; Baduel, Christine; Thai, Phong; Eaglesham, Geoff; Heffernan, Amy; Leonards, Pim; Bainton, Paul; Mueller, Jochen F

    2014-09-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) once extensively used in the plastics of a wide range of consumer products. The listing of certain congeners that are constituents of commercial PBDE mixtures (including c-octaBDE) in the Stockholm Convention and tightening regulation of many other BFRs in recent years have created the need for a rapid and effective method of identifying BFR-containing plastics. A three-tiered testing strategy comparing results from non-destructive testing (X-ray fluorescence (XRF)) (n=1714), a surface wipe test (n=137) and destructive chemical analysis (n=48) was undertaken to systematically identify BFRs in a wide range of consumer products. XRF rapidly identified bromine in 92% of products later confirmed to contain BFRs. Surface wipes of products identified tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), c-octaBDE congeners and BDE-209 with relatively high accuracy (>75%) when confirmed by destructive chemical analysis. A relationship between the amounts of BFRs detected in surface wipes and subsequent destructive testing shows promise in predicting not only the types of BFRs present but also estimating the concentrations present. Information about the types of products that may contain persistent BFRs will assist regulators in implementing policies to further reduce the occurrence of these chemicals in consumer products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Item and Test Analysis to Identify Quality Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) from an Assessment of Medical Students of Ahmedabad, Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Sanju; Sharma, Rashmi; Kumar, Pradeep; Rana, Manish

    2014-01-01

    Multiple choice questions (MCQs) are frequently used to assess students in different educational streams for their objectivity and wide reach of coverage in less time. However, the MCQs to be used must be of quality which depends upon its difficulty index (DIF I), discrimination index (DI) and distracter efficiency (DE). To evaluate MCQs or items and develop a pool of valid items by assessing with DIF I, DI and DE and also to revise/ store or discard items based on obtained results. Study was conducted in a medical school of Ahmedabad. An internal examination in Community Medicine was conducted after 40 hours teaching during 1(st) MBBS which was attended by 148 out of 150 students. Total 50 MCQs or items and 150 distractors were analyzed. Data was entered and analyzed in MS Excel 2007 and simple proportions, mean, standard deviations, coefficient of variation were calculated and unpaired t test was applied. Out of 50 items, 24 had "good to excellent" DIF I (31 - 60%) and 15 had "good to excellent" DI (> 0.25). Mean DE was 88.6% considered as ideal/ acceptable and non functional distractors (NFD) were only 11.4%. Mean DI was 0.14. Poor DI (students and some issues with framing of at least some of the MCQs. Increased proportion of NFDs (incorrect alternatives selected by students) in an item decrease DE and makes it easier. There were 15 items with 17 NFDs, while rest items did not have any NFD with mean DE of 100%. Study emphasizes the selection of quality MCQs which truly assess the knowledge and are able to differentiate the students of different abilities in correct manner.

  12. Testing random forest classification for identifying lava flows and mapping age groups on a single Landsat 8 image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Solana, Carmen; Canters, Frank; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2017-10-01

    Mapping lava flows using satellite images is an important application of remote sensing in volcanology. Several volcanoes have been mapped through remote sensing using a wide range of data, from optical to thermal infrared and radar images, using techniques such as manual mapping, supervised/unsupervised classification, and elevation subtraction. So far, spectral-based mapping applications mainly focus on the use of traditional pixel-based classifiers, without much investigation into the added value of object-based approaches and into advantages of using machine learning algorithms. In this study, Nyamuragira, characterized by a series of > 20 overlapping lava flows erupted over the last century, was used as a case study. The random forest classifier was tested to map lava flows based on pixels and objects. Image classification was conducted for the 20 individual flows and for 8 groups of flows of similar age using a Landsat 8 image and a DEM of the volcano, both at 30-meter spatial resolution. Results show that object-based classification produces maps with continuous and homogeneous lava surfaces, in agreement with the physical characteristics of lava flows, while lava flows mapped through the pixel-based classification are heterogeneous and fragmented including much "salt and pepper noise". In terms of accuracy, both pixel-based and object-based classification performs well but the former results in higher accuracies than the latter except for mapping lava flow age groups without using topographic features. It is concluded that despite spectral similarity, lava flows of contrasting age can be well discriminated and mapped by means of image classification. The classification approach demonstrated in this study only requires easily accessible image data and can be applied to other volcanoes as well if there is sufficient information to calibrate the mapping.

  13. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to identify key beliefs underlying chlamydia testing intentions in a sample of young people living in deprived areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Amy R; Norman, Paul; Harris, Peter R; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior was used to identify the key behavioural, normative and control beliefs underlying intentions to test regularly for chlamydia among young people living in socially and economically deprived areas - a high-risk group for infection. Participants (N = 278, 53% male; mean age 17 years) were recruited from a vocational college situated in an area in the most deprived national quintile (England). Participants completed measures of behavioural, normative and control beliefs, plus intention to test regularly for chlamydia. The behavioural, normative and control beliefs most strongly correlated with intentions to test regularly for chlamydia were beliefs about stopping the spread of infection, partners' behaviour and the availability of testing. These beliefs represent potential targets for interventions to increase chlamydia testing among young people living in deprived areas. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Combined Global MHD and Test-Particle Simulation of a Radiation Belt Storm: Comparing Depletion, Recovery and Enhancement with in Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorathia, K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Merkin, V. G.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    During geomagnetic storms the intensities of radiation belt electrons exhibit dramatic variability. In the main phase electron intensities exhibit deep depletion over a broad region of the outer belt. The intensities then increase during the recovery phase, often to levels that significantly exceed their pre-storm values. In this study we analyze the depletion, recovery and enhancement of radiation belt intensities during the 2013 St. Patrick's geomagnetic storm. We simulate the dynamics of high-energy electrons using our newly-developed test-particle radiation belt model (CHIMP) based on a hybrid guiding-center/Lorentz integrator and electromagnetic fields derived from high-resolution global MHD (LFM) simulations. Our approach differs from previous work in that we use MHD flow information to identify and seed test-particles into regions of strong convection in the magnetotail. We address two science questions: 1) what are the relative roles of magnetopause losses, transport-driven atmospheric precipitation, and adiabatic cooling in the radiation belt depletion during the storm main phase? and 2) to what extent can enhanced convection/mesoscale injections account for the radiation belt buildup during the recovery phase? Our analysis is based on long-term model simulation and the comparison of our model results with electron intensity measurements from the MAGEIS experiment of the Van Allen Probes mission.

  15. A Three-Tier Diagnostic Test to Assess Pre-Service Teachers' Misconceptions about Global Warming, Greenhouse Effect, Ozone Layer Depletion, and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Harika Ozge; Cigdemoglu, Ceyhan; Moseley, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the development and validation of a three-tier multiple-choice diagnostic test, the atmosphere-related environmental problems diagnostic test (AREPDiT), to reveal common misconceptions of global warming (GW), greenhouse effect (GE), ozone layer depletion (OLD), and acid rain (AR). The development of a two-tier diagnostic test…

  16. Testing the Flat World Thesis: Using a Public Dataset to Engage Students in the Global Inequality Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabandi, Bhavani; Sweet, Stephen; Swords, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    We present a learning module to engage students in the global inequality debate using Google Public Data World Development Indicators. Goals of this article are to articulate the importance and urgency of teaching global issues to American students; situate the central debate in the globalization literature, paying particular attention to global…

  17. Global MicroRNA Profiling in Human Bone Marrow Skeletal—Stromal or Mesenchymal–Stem Cells Identified Candidates for Bone Regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Chi Chih; Venø, Morten T.; Chen, Li

    2018-01-01

    Bone remodeling and regeneration are highly regulated multistep processes involving posttranscriptional regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs). Here, we performed a global profiling of differentially expressed miRNAs in bone-marrow-derived skeletal cells (BMSCs; also known as stromal or mesenchymal stem......RNAs for enhancing bone tissue regeneration. Scaffolds functionalized with miRNA nano-carriers enhanced osteoblastogenesis in 3D culture and retained this ability at least 2 weeks after storage. Additionally, anti-miR-222 enhanced in vivo ectopic bone formation through targeting the cell-cycle inhibitor CDKN1B...... (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B). A number of additional miRNAs exerted additive osteoinductive effects on BMSC differentiation, suggesting that pools of miRNAs delivered locally from an implanted scaffold can provide a promising approach for enhanced bone regeneration....

  18. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  19. Large-scale groundwater modeling using global datasets: a test case for the Rhine-Meuse basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. Sutanudjaja

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The current generation of large-scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component. Large-scale groundwater models, involving aquifers and basins of multiple countries, are still rare mainly due to a lack of hydro-geological data which are usually only available in developed countries. In this study, we propose a novel approach to construct large-scale groundwater models by using global datasets that are readily available. As the test-bed, we use the combined Rhine-Meuse basin that contains groundwater head data used to verify the model output. We start by building a distributed land surface model (30 arc-second resolution to estimate groundwater recharge and river discharge. Subsequently, a MODFLOW transient groundwater model is built and forced by the recharge and surface water levels calculated by the land surface model. Results are promising despite the fact that we still use an offline procedure to couple the land surface and MODFLOW groundwater models (i.e. the simulations of both models are separately performed. The simulated river discharges compare well to the observations. Moreover, based on our sensitivity analysis, in which we run several groundwater model scenarios with various hydro-geological parameter settings, we observe that the model can reasonably well reproduce the observed groundwater head time series. However, we note that there are still some limitations in the current approach, specifically because the offline-coupling technique simplifies the dynamic feedbacks between surface water levels and groundwater heads, and between soil moisture states and groundwater heads. Also the current sensitivity analysis ignores the uncertainty of the land surface model output. Despite these limitations, we argue that the results of the current model show a promise for large-scale groundwater modeling practices, including for data-poor environments and at the global scale.

  20. Cost intensity of identifying contraindications to driving a company car through psychological tests on the basis of real-world data in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczyk, Grzegorz; Czerw, Aleksandra; Tatara, Tomasz; Duda-Zalewska, Aneta; Walusiak-Skorupa, Joanna; Słoniewski, Robert; Staniszewska, Anna; Olejniczak, Dominik; Religioni, Urszula

    2017-12-01

    The study objective was to determine the cost intensity of identifying contraindications to fleet car driving in preventive care. The objective of a psychological examination is to identify impaired psychomotor function as well as any intellectual, cognitive or emotional incapacities, which may seriously impede safety. Real-world data were collected from the healthcare provider in Poland. A total of 8111 anonymous records from psychomotor tests performed between January 1 and December 31, 2012 were analysed. The number needed to screen to identify one person with contraindications to driving was 737. An individual examination costs PLN 150, thus the estimated cost of identifying one case was PLN 110,550 (EUR 25,000). The average number of tests in a small enterprise with 20-50 fleet cars was estimated at 5-25 in a 5-year period and their cost at PLN 3750 (PLN 750 annually). Health check-ups include ophthalmological and neurological consultations; therefore, psychological examination of fleet car drivers may be considered excessive due to cost and limited preventive value. High costs may be burdensome mainly to larger companies. A final decision regarding necessity of psychological testing should be preceded by medical assessment of the risk of work accidents.

  1. Methods for identifying the cost effective case definition cut-off for sequential monitoring tests: an extension of Phelps and Mushlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Roberta; Baxter, Paul; Hall, Peter; Hewison, Jenny; Afshar, Mehran; Hall, Geoff; McCabe, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of personalized medicine in the clinic means that treatment decisions will increasingly rely on test results. The challenge of limited health care resources means that the dissemination of these technologies will be dependent on their value in relation to their cost; i.e. their cost effectiveness. Phelps and Mushlin have described how to optimize tests to meet cost effectiveness target. However, when tests are applied repeatedly the case mix of the patients tested changes with each administration, and this impacts upon the value of each subsequent test administration. In this paper we present a modification of Phelps and Mushlin’s framework for diagnostic tests; to identify the cost effective cut-off for monitoring tests. Using the Ca125 test monitoring for relapse in Ovarian Cancer, we show how the repeated use of the initial cut-off can lead to a substantially increased false negative rate compared to the monitoring cut-off – over 20% higher than in this example – with the associated harms for individual and population health. PMID:24488576

  2. Multiple Approaches for Testing Novel Coatings in the Laboratory and in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii with Emphasis on the Global, Problem-Fouling Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Multiple Approaches for Testing Novel Coatings in the Laboratory and in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii with Emphasis on the Global, Problem-Fouling Invertebrates 5a...on the Global, Problem-Fouling Invertebrates ONR AWARD NUMBER: N00014-11-1-0167 PRINCIPLE INVESTIGATOR: Michael G. Hadfield, Ph.D...luteoviolacea a phage tail-like component that is capable of inducing the metamorphosis of a marine invertebrate . However, our continued studies in the

  3. Clinical utility of routine laboratory testing to identify possible secondary causes in older men with osteoporosis: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, H A; Litwack-Harrison, S; Taylor, B C; Bauer, D C; Orwoll, E S; Lee, C G; Barrett-Connor, E; Schousboe, J T; Kado, D M; Garimella, P S; Ensrud, K E

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the value of routine laboratory testing for identifying underlying causes in older men diagnosed with osteoporosis. Most osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic men had ≥1 laboratory abnormality. Few individual laboratory abnormalities were more common in osteoporotic men. The benefit of routine laboratory testing in older osteoporotic men may be low. To evaluate the utility of recommended laboratory testing to identify secondary causes in older men with osteoporosis, we examined prevalence of laboratory abnormalities in older men with and without osteoporosis. One thousand five hundred seventy-two men aged ≥65 years in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study completed bone mineral density (BMD) testing and a battery of laboratory measures, including serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), 25-OH vitamin D, total testosterone, spot urine calcium/creatinine ratio, spot urine albumin/creatinine ratio, creatinine-derived estimated glomerular filtration rate, 24-h urine calcium, and 24-h urine free cortisol. Using cross-sectional analyses, we calculated prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for the association of any and specific laboratory abnormalities with osteoporosis and the number of men with osteoporosis needed to test to identify one additional laboratory abnormality compared to testing men without osteoporosis. Approximately 60 % of men had ≥1 laboratory abnormality in both men with and without osteoporosis. Among individual tests, only vitamin D insufficiency (PR, 1.13; 95 % CI, 1.05-1.22) and high alkaline phosphatase (PR, 3.05; 95 % CI, 1.52-6.11) were more likely in men with osteoporosis. Hypercortisolism and hyperthyroidism were uncommon and not significantly more frequent in men with osteoporosis. No osteoporotic men had hypercalciuria. Though most of these older men had ≥1 laboratory abnormality, few routinely recommended individual tests were

  4. Forest, Trees, Dynamics: Results from a novel Wisconsin Card Sorting Test variant Protocol for Studying Global-Local Attention and Complex Cognitive Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eCowley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRecognition of objects and their context relies heavily on the integrated functioning of global and local visual processing. In a realistic setting such as work, this processing becomes a sustained activity, implying a consequent interaction with executive functions.MotivationThere have been many studies of either global-local attention or executive functions; however it is relatively novel to combine these processes to study a more ecological form of attention. We aim to explore the phenomenon of global-local processing during a task requiring sustained attention and working memory.MethodsWe develop and test a novel protocol for global-local dissociation, with task structure including phases of divided ('rule search' and selective ('rule found' attention, based on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task.We test it in a laboratory study with 25 participants, and report on behaviour measures (physiological data was also gathered, but not reported here. We develop novel stimuli with more naturalistic levels of information and noise, based primarily on face photographs, with consequently more ecological validity.ResultsWe report behavioural results indicating that sustained difficulty when participants test their hypotheses impacts matching-task performance, and diminishes the global precedence effect. Results also show a dissociation between subjectively experienced difficulty and objective dimension of performance, and establish the internal validity of the protocol.ContributionWe contribute an advance in the state of the art for testing global-local attention processes in concert with complex cognition. With three results we establish a connection between global-local dissociation and aspects of complex cognition. Our protocol also improves ecological validity and opens options for testing additional interactions in future work.

  5. Global Health Education: a cross-sectional study among German medical students to identify needs, deficits and potential benefits (Part 1 of 2: Mobility patterns & educational needs and demands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Schubert, Kirsten; Menzel-Severing, Johannes; Tinnemann, Peter

    2010-10-08

    , also in developing countries. Formal preparation beyond self-study is virtually non-existent amongst our sample and the participation rate in courses of tropical medicine or global health is appallingly low. We have identified unmet perceived needs and the demand for more learning opportunities in global health in our sample, urging for reforms to adjust curricula to a globalising world.

  6. Global Health Education: a cross-sectional study among German medical students to identify needs, deficits and potential benefits (Part 1 of 2: Mobility patterns & educational needs and demands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    . International health electives are common, also in developing countries. Formal preparation beyond self-study is virtually non-existent amongst our sample and the participation rate in courses of tropical medicine or global health is appallingly low. We have identified unmet perceived needs and the demand for more learning opportunities in global health in our sample, urging for reforms to adjust curricula to a globalising world. PMID:20932277

  7. Global metabolic profile identifies choline kinase alpha as a key regulator of glutathione-dependent antioxidant cell defense in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Anna; Nicoletti, Roberta; Perego, Paola; Iorio, Egidio; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Benigni, Fabio; Ricci, Alessandro; Podo, Franca; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Canevari, Silvana; Bagnoli, Marina; Mezzanzanica, Delia

    2015-05-10

    Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) "cholinic phenotype", characterized by increased intracellular phosphocholine content sustained by over-expression/activity of choline kinase-alpha (ChoKα/CHKA), is a metabolic cellular reprogramming involved in chemoresistance with still unknown mechanisms.By stable CHKA silencing and global metabolic profiling here we demonstrate that CHKA knockdown hampers growth capability of EOC cell lines both in vitro and in xenotransplant in vivo models. It also affected antioxidant cellular defenses, decreasing glutathione and cysteine content while increasing intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, overall sensitizing EOC cells to current chemotherapeutic regimens. Natural recovering of ChoKα expression after its transient silencing rescued the wild-type phenotype, restoring intracellular glutathione content and drug resistance. Rescue and phenocopy of siCHKA-related effects were also obtained by artificial modulation of glutathione levels. The direct relationship among CHKA expression, glutathione intracellular content and drug sensitivity was overall demonstrated in six different EOC cell lines but notably, siCHKA did not affect growth capability, glutathione metabolism and/or drug sensitivity of non-tumoral immortalized ovarian cells. The "cholinic phenotype", by recapitulating EOC addiction to glutathione content for the maintenance of the antioxidant defense, can be therefore considered a unique feature of cancer cells and a suitable target to improve chemotherapeutics efficacy.

  8. Local scale comparisons of biodiversity as a test for global protected area ecological performance: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard W T Coetzee

    Full Text Available Terrestrial protected areas (PAs are cornerstones of global biodiversity conservation. Their efficacy in terms of maintaining biodiversity is, however, much debated. Studies to date have been unable to provide a general answer as to PA conservation efficacy because of their typically restricted geographic and/or taxonomic focus, or qualitative approaches focusing on proxies for biodiversity, such as deforestation. Given the rarity of historical data to enable comparisons of biodiversity before/after PA establishment, many smaller scale studies over the past 30 years have directly compared biodiversity inside PAs to that of surrounding areas, which provides one measure of PA ecological performance. Here we use a meta-analysis of such studies (N = 86 to test if PAs contain higher biodiversity values than surrounding areas, and so assess their contribution to determining PA efficacy. We find that PAs generally have higher abundances of individual species, higher assemblage abundances, and higher species richness values compared with alternative land uses. Local scale studies in combination thus show that PAs retain more biodiversity than alternative land use areas. Nonetheless, much variation is present in the effect sizes, which underscores the context-specificity of PA efficacy.

  9. Evaluation of a sequential global test of improved recovery following stroke as applied to the ICTUS trial of citicoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Kim; Whitehead, John; Cobo, Erik; Secades, Julio J

    2009-01-01

    The International Citicoline Trial in acUte Stroke is a sequential phase III study of the use of the drug citicoline in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke, which was initiated in 2006 in 56 treatment centres. The primary objective of the trial is to demonstrate improved recovery of patients randomized to citicoline relative to those randomized to placebo after 12 weeks of follow-up. The primary analysis will take the form of a global test combining the dichotomized results of assessments on three well-established scales: the Barthel Index, the modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. This approach was previously used in the analysis of the influential National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke trial of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in stroke.The purpose of this paper is to describe how this trial was designed, and in particular how the simultaneous objectives of taking into account three assessment scales, performing a series of interim analyses and conducting treatment allocation and adjusting the analyses to account for prognostic factors, including more than 50 treatment centres, were addressed. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Measurements of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide during the NASA Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation Project: Implications for the global COS budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide COS concentrations were measured by three analytical systems during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project. The three systems all used cryogenic sample preconcentration and gas chromatographic (GC) separation but differed in the method of detection. The FPD system used a flame photometric detector, the MS system used a mass selective detector, and the ECD-S system used a fluorinating catalyst followed by an electron capture detector. With the FPD system, we found a mean COS concentration of 510 ppt over the North Atlantic and 442 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. With the ECD-S system, we found a mean COS concentration of 489 ppt over the North Atlantic and 419 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. All three systems registered a latitudinal gradient in atmospheric COS of between 1.6 and 2.0 ppt per degree of latitude, with increasing COS concentrations northward which was similar to the gradient measured by Bingemer et al. (1990). It is difficult to reconcile the measured latitudinal concentration gradient with present theories of the global COS budget since the largest sink of COS is thought to be a flux to land plants, most of which are in the northern hemisphere.

  11. Measurements of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide during the NASA Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation Project: Implications for the global COS budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1993-12-01

    Atmospheric COS concentrations were measured by three analytical systems during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project. The three systems all used cryogenic sample preconcentration and gas chromatographic (GC) separation but differed in the method of detection. The FPD system used a flame photometric detector, the MS system used a mass selective detector, and the ECD-S system used a fluorinating catalyst followed by an electron capture detector. With the FPD system, we found a mean COS concentration of 510 ppt over the North Atlantic and 442 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. With the ECD-S system, we found a mean COS concentration of 489 ppt over the North Atlantic and 419 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. All three systems registered a latitudinal gradient in atmospheric COS of between 1.6 and 2.0 ppt per degree of latitude, with increasing COS concentrations northward which was similar to the gradient measured by Bingemer et al. (1990). It is difficult to reconcile the measured latitudinal concentration gradient with present theories of the global COS budget since the largest sink of COS is thought to be a flux to land plants, most of which are in the northern hemisphere.

  12. New soil composition data for Europe and Australia: demonstrating comparability, identifying continental-scale processes and learning lessons for global geochemical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Clemens; de Caritat, Patrice

    2012-02-01

    New geochemical data from two continental-scale soil surveys in Europe and Australia are compared. Internal project standards were exchanged to assess comparability of analytical results. The total concentration of 26 oxides/elements (Al2O3, As, Ba, CaO, Ce, Co, Cr, Fe2O3, Ga, K2O, MgO, MnO, Na2O, Nb, Ni, P2O5, Pb, Rb, SiO2, Sr, Th, TiO2, V, Y, Zn, and Zr), Loss On Ignition (LOI) and pH are demonstrated to be comparable. Additionally, directly comparable data for 14 elements in an aqua regia extraction (Ag, As, Bi, Cd, Ce, Co, Cs, Cu, Fe, La, Li, Mn, Mo, and Pb) are provided for both continents. Median soil compositions are close, though generally Australian soils are depleted in all elements with the exception of SiO2 and Zr. This is interpreted to reflect the generally longer and, in places, more intense weathering in Australia. Calculation of the Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) gives a median value of 72% for Australia compared to 60% for Europe. Element concentrations vary over 3 (and up to 5) orders of magnitude. Several elements (total As and Ni; aqua regia As, Co, Bi, Li, Pb) have a lower element concentration by a factor of 2-3 in the soils of northern Europe compared to southern Europe. The break in concentration coincides with the maximum extent of the last glaciation. The younger soils of northern Europe are more similar to the Australian soils than the older soils from southern Europe. In Australia, the central region with especially high SiO2 concentrations is commonly depleted in many elements. The new data define the natural background variation for two continents on both hemispheres based on real data. Judging from the experience of these two continental surveys, it can be concluded that analytical quality is the key requirement for the success of global geochemical mapping. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Whole exome sequencing of a consanguineous family identifies the possible modifying effect of a globally rare AK5 allelic variant in celiac disease development among Saudi patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumana Yousuf Al-Aama

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD, a multi-factorial auto-inflammatory disease of the small intestine, is known to occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Together HLA and Non-HLA genes can explain up to 50% of CD's heritability. In order to discover the missing heritability due to rare variants, we have exome sequenced a consanguineous Saudi family presenting CD in an autosomal recessive (AR pattern. We have identified a rare homozygous insertion c.1683_1684insATT, in the conserved coding region of AK5 gene that showed classical AR model segregation in this family. Sequence validation of 200 chromosomes each of sporadic CD cases and controls, revealed that this extremely rare (EXac MAF 0.000008 mutation is highly penetrant among general Saudi populations (MAF is 0.62. Genotype and allelic distribution analysis have indicated that this AK5 (c.1683_1684insATT mutation is negatively selected among patient groups and positively selected in the control group, in whom it may modify the risk against CD development [p<0.002]. Our observation gains additional support from computational analysis which predicted that Iso561 insertion shifts the existing H-bonds between 400th and 556th amino acid residues lying near the functional domain of adenylate kinase. This shuffling of amino acids and their H-bond interactions is likely to disturb the secondary structure orientation of the polypeptide and induces the gain-of-function in nucleoside phosphate kinase activity of AK5, which may eventually down-regulates the reactivity potential of CD4+ T-cells against gluten antigens. Our study underlines the need to have population-specific genome databases to avoid false leads and to identify true candidate causal genes for the familial form of celiac disease.

  14. Functional Gait Assessment and Balance Evaluation System Test: Reliability, Validity, Sensitivity, and Specificity for Identifying Individuals With Parkinson Disease Who Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Abigail L.; Crowner, Beth E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Gait impairments, balance impairments, and falls are prevalent in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). Although the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) can be considered the reference standard for the determination of fall risk, it has a noted ceiling effect. Development of ceiling-free measures that can assess balance and are good at discriminating “fallers” from “nonfallers” is needed. Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the Functional Gait Assessment (FGA) and the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest) with the BBS among individuals with PD and evaluate the tests' reliability, validity, and discriminatory sensitivity and specificity for fallers versus nonfallers. Design This was an observational study of community-dwelling individuals with idiopathic PD. Methods The BBS, FGA, and BESTest were administered to 80 individuals with PD. Interrater reliability (n=15) was assessed by 3 raters. Test-retest reliability was based on 2 tests of participants (n=24), 2 weeks apart. Intraclass correlation coefficients (2,1) were used to calculate reliability, and Spearman correlation coefficients were used to assess validity. Cutoff points, sensitivity, and specificity were based on receiver operating characteristic plots. Results Test-retest reliability was .80 for the BBS, .91 for the FGA, and .88 for the BESTest. Interrater reliability was greater than .93 for all 3 tests. The FGA and BESTest were correlated with the BBS (r=.78 and r=.87, respectively). Cutoff scores to identify fallers were 47/56 for the BBS, 15/30 for the FGA, and 69% for the BESTest. The overall accuracy (area under the curve) for the BBS, FGA, and BESTest was .79, .80, and .85, respectively. Limitations Fall reports were retrospective. Conclusion Both the FGA and the BESTest have reliability and validity for assessing balance in individuals with PD. The BESTest is most sensitive for identifying fallers. PMID:21071506

  15. The resilience of the Indian economy to rising oil prices as a validation test for a global energy-environment-economy CGE model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guivarch, Celine; Hallegatte, Stephane; Crassous, Renaud

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes to test the global hybrid computable general equilibrium model IMACLIM-R against macroeconomic data. To do so, it compares the modeled and observed responses of the Indian economy to the rise of oil price during the 2003-2006 period. The objective is twofold: first, to disentangle the various mechanisms and policies at play in India's economy response to rising oil prices and, second, to validate our model as a tool capable of reproducing short-run statistical data. With default parameterization, the model predicts a significant decrease in the Indian growth rate that is not observed. However, this discrepancy is corrected if three additional mechanisms identified by the International Monetary Fund are introduced, namely the rise in exports of refined oil products, the imbalance of the trade balance allowed by large capital inflows, and the incomplete pass-through of the oil price increase to Indian customers. This work is a first step toward model validation, and provides interesting insights on the modeling methodology relevant to represent an economy's response to a shock, as well as on how short-term mechanisms - and policy action - can smooth the negative impacts of energy price shocks or climate policies. (author)

  16. The resilience of the Indian economy to rising oil prices as a validation test for a global energy-environment-economy CGE model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guivarch, C.; Hallegatte, St.; Crassous, R.

    2008-09-01

    This paper proposes to test the global hybrid computable general equilibrium model IMACLIM-R against macro-economic data. To do so, it compares the modeled and observed responses of the Indian economy to the rise of oil price during the 2003-2006 period. The objective is twofold: first, to disentangle the various mechanisms and policies at play in India's economy response to rising oil prices and, second, to validate our model as a tool capable of reproducing short-run statistical data. With default parametrization, the model predicts a significant decrease in the Indian growth rate that is not observed. However, this discrepancy is corrected if three additional mechanisms identified by the International Monetary Fund are introduced, namely the rise in exports of refined oil products, the imbalance of the trade balance allowed by large capital inflows, and the incomplete pass-through of the oil price increase to Indian customers. This work is a first step toward model validation, and provides interesting insights on the modeling methodology relevant to represent an economy's response to a shock, as well as on how short-term mechanisms - and policy action - can smooth the negative impacts of energy price shocks or climate policies. (authors)

  17. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theunissen, P.T.; Robinson, J.F.; Pennings, J.L.A.; Herwijnen, M.H. van; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Piersma, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO–BP) were identified after 24 h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO–BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO–BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO–BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  18. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theunissen, P.T., E-mail: Peter.Theunissen@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Robinson, J.F. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pennings, J.L.A. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Herwijnen, M.H. van [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kleinjans, J.C.S. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Piersma, A.H. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO–BP) were identified after 24 h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO–BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO–BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO–BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  19. Evaluation of nitrous oxide as a substitute for sulfur hexafluoride to reduce global warming impacts of ANSI/HPS N13.1 gaseous uniformity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Barnett, J. Matthew; Amidan, Brett G.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2018-03-01

    The ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 standard requires gaseous tracer uniformity testing for sampling associated with stacks used in radioactive air emissions. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), a greenhouse gas with a high global warming potential, has long been the gas tracer used in such testing. To reduce the impact of gas tracer tests on the environment, nitrous oxide (N2O) was evaluated as a potential replacement to SF6. The physical evaluation included the development of a test plan to record percent coefficient of variance and the percent maximum deviation between the two gases while considering variables such as fan configuration, injection position, and flow rate. Statistical power was calculated to determine how many sample sets were needed, and computational fluid dynamic modeling was utilized to estimate overall mixing in stacks. Results show there are no significant differences between the behaviors of the two gases, and SF6 modeling corroborated N2O test results. Although, in principle, all tracer gases should behave in an identical manner for measuring mixing within a stack, the series of physical tests guided by statistics was performed to demonstrate the equivalence of N2O testing to SF6 testing in the context of stack qualification tests. The results demonstrate that N2O is a viable choice leading to a four times reduction in global warming impacts for future similar compliance driven testing.

  20. Global grid for Big Bang research reaches milestone One major test remains as grid project prepares to go live next year

    CERN Multimedia

    Weiss, Todd R

    2006-01-01

    "A huge 100,000-PC grid-computing network being built to help research the origin of the universe passed the third of four major tests recently when it reached a data-transfer milestone, with up to 1GB/sec. of physics data sent over the global grid"(1.5 page)

  1. WHO global salm-surv external quality assurance system (EQAS): an important step toward improving the quality of Salmonella serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Angulo, F. J.

    2002-01-01

    susceptibility testing through international training courses and an External Quality Assurance System (EQAS). In 2000, 44 WHO Global Salm-Surv member laboratories from 35 countries determined the serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern for eight "blinded" Salmonella isolates. For serotyping, 73...

  2. Microbial Contaminants of Cord Blood Units Identified by 16S rRNA Sequencing and by API Test System, and Antibiotic Sensitivity Profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís França

    Full Text Available Over a period of ten months a total of 5618 cord blood units (CBU were screened for microbial contamination under routine conditions. The antibiotic resistance profile for all isolates was also examined using ATB strips. The detection rate for culture positive units was 7.5%, corresponding to 422 samples.16S rRNA sequence analysis and identification with API test system were used to identify the culturable aerobic, microaerophilic and anaerobic bacteria from CBUs. From these samples we recovered 485 isolates (84 operational taxonomic units, OTUs assigned to the classes Bacteroidia, Actinobacteria, Clostridia, Bacilli, Betaproteobacteria and primarily to the Gammaproteobacteria. Sixty-nine OTUs, corresponding to 447 isolates, showed 16S rRNA sequence similarities above 99.0% with known cultured bacteria. However, 14 OTUs had 16S rRNA sequence similarities between 95 and 99% in support of genus level identification and one OTU with 16S rRNA sequence similarity of 90.3% supporting a family level identification only. The phenotypic identification formed 29 OTUs that could be identified to the species level and 9 OTUs that could be identified to the genus level by API test system. We failed to obtain identification for 14 OTUs, while 32 OTUs comprised organisms producing mixed identifications. Forty-two OTUs covered species not included in the API system databases. The API test system Rapid ID 32 Strep and Rapid ID 32 E showed the highest proportion of identifications to the species level, the lowest ratio of unidentified results and the highest agreement to the results of 16S rRNA assignments. Isolates affiliated to the Bacilli and Bacteroidia showed the highest antibiotic multi-resistance indices and microorganisms of the Clostridia displayed the most antibiotic sensitive phenotypes.

  3. Microbial Contaminants of Cord Blood Units Identified by 16S rRNA Sequencing and by API Test System, and Antibiotic Sensitivity Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Luís; Simões, Catarina; Taborda, Marco; Diogo, Catarina; da Costa, Milton S

    2015-01-01

    Over a period of ten months a total of 5618 cord blood units (CBU) were screened for microbial contamination under routine conditions. The antibiotic resistance profile for all isolates was also examined using ATB strips. The detection rate for culture positive units was 7.5%, corresponding to 422 samples.16S rRNA sequence analysis and identification with API test system were used to identify the culturable aerobic, microaerophilic and anaerobic bacteria from CBUs. From these samples we recovered 485 isolates (84 operational taxonomic units, OTUs) assigned to the classes Bacteroidia, Actinobacteria, Clostridia, Bacilli, Betaproteobacteria and primarily to the Gammaproteobacteria. Sixty-nine OTUs, corresponding to 447 isolates, showed 16S rRNA sequence similarities above 99.0% with known cultured bacteria. However, 14 OTUs had 16S rRNA sequence similarities between 95 and 99% in support of genus level identification and one OTU with 16S rRNA sequence similarity of 90.3% supporting a family level identification only. The phenotypic identification formed 29 OTUs that could be identified to the species level and 9 OTUs that could be identified to the genus level by API test system. We failed to obtain identification for 14 OTUs, while 32 OTUs comprised organisms producing mixed identifications. Forty-two OTUs covered species not included in the API system databases. The API test system Rapid ID 32 Strep and Rapid ID 32 E showed the highest proportion of identifications to the species level, the lowest ratio of unidentified results and the highest agreement to the results of 16S rRNA assignments. Isolates affiliated to the Bacilli and Bacteroidia showed the highest antibiotic multi-resistance indices and microorganisms of the Clostridia displayed the most antibiotic sensitive phenotypes.

  4. Abnormal heart-rate response during cardiopulmonary exercise testing identifies cardiac dysfunction in symptomatic patients with non-obstructive coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Sundeep; Kumar, Naresh; Behbahani, Hushyar; Bagai, Akshay; Singh, Binoy K; Menasco, Nick; Lewis, Gregory D; Sperling, Laurence; Myers, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    Symptomatic non-obstructive coronary artery disease is a growing clinical dilemma for which contemporary testing is proving to be of limited clinical utility. New methods are needed to identify cardiac dysfunction. This is a prospective observational cohort study conducted from December 2013 to August 2015 in two outpatient cardiology clinics (symptomatic cohort) and 24 outpatient practices throughout the US (healthy cohort) with centralized methodology and monitoring to compare heart-rate responses during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Participants were 208 consecutive patients (median age, 61; range, 32-86years) with exercise intolerance and without prior heart or lung disease in whom coronary anatomy was defined and 116 healthy subjects (median age, 45; range, 26-66years). Compared to stress ECG, the novel change in heart-rate as a function of work-rate parameter (ΔHR-WR Slope) demonstrated significantly higher sensitivity to detect under-treated atherosclerosis with similar specificity. In men, area under the ROC curve increased from 60% to 94% for non-obstructive CAD and from 64% to 80% for obstructive CAD. In women, AUC increased from 64% to 85% for non-obstructive CAD and from 66% to 90% for obstructive CAD. ΔHR-WR Slope correctly reclassified abnormal studies in the non-obstructive CAD group from 22% to 81%; in the obstructive CAD group from 18% to 84% and in the revascularization group from 35% to 78%. Abnormal heart-rate response during CPET is more effective than stress ECG for identifying under-treated atherosclerosis and may be of utility to identify cardiac dysfunction in symptomatic patients with normal routine cardiac testing. Copyright © 2016 Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Validation Test Report for the 1/8 deg Global Navy Coastal Ocean Model Nowcast/Forecast System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barron, Charlie N; Kara, A. B; Rhodes, Robert C; Rowley, Clark; Smedstad, Lucy F

    2007-01-01

    .... Global NCOM supports predictions of ocean currents, temperatures, salinity, sea surface height, and sound speed both directly and by providing initial and boundary conditions for higher-resolution nested ocean models...

  6. A Novel Class of Schistosoma mansoni Histone Deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) Inhibitors Identified by Structure-Based Virtual Screening and In Vitro Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoben, Conrad V; Robaa, Dina; Chakrabarti, Alokta; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Marek, Martin; Lancelot, Julien; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Melesina, Jelena; Shaik, Tajith B; Pierce, Raymond J; Romier, Christophe; Jung, Manfred; Sippl, Wolfgang

    2018-03-02

    A promising means in the search of new small molecules for the treatment of schistosomiasis (amongst other parasitic ailments) is by targeting the parasitic epigenome. In the present study, a docking based virtual screening procedure using the crystal structure of histone deacetylase 8 from Schistosoma mansoni (smHDAC8) was designed. From the developed screening protocol, we were able to identify eight novel N -(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-3-yl)- n -alkylhydroxamate derivatives as smHDAC8 inhibitors with IC 50 values ranging from 4.4-20.3 µM against smHDAC8. These newly identified inhibitors were further tested against human histone deacetylases (hsHDAC1, 6 and 8), and were found also to be exerting interesting activity against them. In silico prediction of the docking pose of the compounds was confirmed by the resolved crystal structure of one of the identified hits. This confirmed these compounds were able to chelate the catalytic zinc ion in a bidentate fashion, whilst showing an inverted binding mode of the hydroxamate group when compared to the reported smHDAC8/hydroxamates crystal structures. Therefore, they can be considered as new potential scaffold for the development of new smHDAC8 inhibitors by further investigation of their structure-activity relationship.

  7. Utilizing global data to estimate analytical performance on the Sigma scale: A global comparative analysis of methods, instruments, and manufacturers through external quality assurance and proficiency testing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, Sten A

    2016-06-01

    To assess the analytical performance of instruments and methods through external quality assessment and proficiency testing data on the Sigma scale. A representative report from five different EQA/PT programs around the world (2 US, 1 Canadian, 1 UK, and 1 Australasian) was accessed. The instrument group standard deviations were used as surrogate estimates of instrument imprecision. Performance specifications from the US CLIA proficiency testing criteria were used to establish a common quality goal. Then Sigma-metrics were calculated to grade the analytical performance. Different methods have different Sigma-metrics for each analyte reviewed. Summary Sigma-metrics estimate the percentage of the chemistry analytes that are expected to perform above Five Sigma, which is where optimized QC design can be implemented. The range of performance varies from 37% to 88%, exhibiting significant differentiation between instruments and manufacturers. Median Sigmas for the different manufacturers in three analytes (albumin, glucose, sodium) showed significant differentiation. Chemistry tests are not commodities. Quality varies significantly from manufacturer to manufacturer, instrument to instrument, and method to method. The Sigma-assessments from multiple EQA/PT programs provide more insight into the performance of methods and instruments than any single program by itself. It is possible to produce a ranking of performance by manufacturer, instrument and individual method. Laboratories seeking optimal instrumentation would do well to consult this data as part of their decision-making process. To confirm that these assessments are stable and reliable, a longer term study should be conducted that examines more results over a longer time period. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The global shift: shadows of identifiability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Colin T

    2014-02-01

    The presence of overwhelming amounts of information in our big-data era society is growing. Globalisation is increasingly giving these solicitations (regarding information) a more social aspect causing behavioural changes. While restricting my focus on this aspect of the Bentley et al article, I address related medical questions and pin-point the conceptual interest of the roadmap given therein.

  9. Implementing non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy in a national healthcare system: global challenges and national solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schendel, Rachèl V; van El, Carla G; Pajkrt, Eva; Henneman, Lidewij; Cornel, Martina C

    2017-09-19

    Since the introduction of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in 2011, mainly by commercial companies, a growing demand for NIPT from the public and healthcare professionals has been putting pressure on the healthcare systems of various countries. This study identifies the challenges of establishing a responsible implementation of NIPT for aneuploidy in prenatal healthcare, by looking at the Netherlands. A mixed methods approach involving 13 stakeholder interviews, document analysis and (participatory) observations of the Dutch NIPT Consortium meetings were used. The Diffusion of Innovation Theory and a Network of Actors model were used to interpret the findings. Implementation of NIPT was facilitated by several factors. The set-up of a national NIPT Consortium enabled discussion and collaboration between stakeholders. Moreover, it led to the plan to offer NIPT through a nationwide research setting (TRIDENT studies), which created a learning phase for careful implementation. The Dutch legal context was perceived as a delaying factor, but eventually gave room for the parties involved to organise themselves and their practices. This study shows that implementing advanced technologies with profound effects on prenatal care benefit from a learning phase that allows time to carefully evaluate the technical performance and women's experiences and to enable public debate. Such a coordinated learning phase, involving all stakeholders, will stimulate the process of responsible and sustainable implementation.

  10. The Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest) Demonstrates Higher Accuracy in Identifying Older Adult Participants With History of Falls Than Do the BESTest, Berg Balance Scale, or Timed Up and Go Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingyongyudha, Anyamanee; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon; Panichaporn, Wanvisa; Boonsinsukh, Rumpa

    2016-01-01

    Balance deficits a significant predictor of falls in older adults. The Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest) and the Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest) are tools that may predict the likelihood of a fall, but their capabilities and accuracies have not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aimed at examining the capabilities of the BESTest and Mini-BESTest for identifying older adult with history of falls and comparing the participants with history of falls identification accuracy of the BESTest, Mini-BESTest, Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) for identifying participants with a history of falls. Two hundred healthy older adults with a mean age of 70 years were classified into participants with and without history of fall groups on the basis of their 12-month fall history. Their balance abilities were assessed using the BESTest, Mini-BESTest, BBS, and TUG. An analysis of the resulting receiver operating characteristic curves was performed to calculate the area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, cutoff score, and posttest accuracy of each. The Mini-BESTest showed the highest AUC (0.84) compared with the BESTest (0.74), BBS (0.69), and TUG (0.35), suggesting that the Mini-BESTest had the highest accuracy in identifying older adult with history of falls. At the cutoff score of 16 (out of 28), the Mini-BESTest demonstrated a posttest accuracy of 85% with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 75%. The Mini-BESTest had the highest posttest accuracy, with the others having results of 76% (BESTest), 60% (BBS), and 65% (TUG). The Mini-BESTest is the most accurate tool for identifying older adult with history of falls compared with the BESTest, BBS, and TUG.

  11. Validation Test Report for the 1/8 deg Global Navy Coastal Ocean Model Nowcast/Forecast System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-24

    other than enhanced low salinity plumes and increased SSS variability in the vicinity of major rivers such as the Amazon, Orinoco and Plata along the...6 NCOM River Database..............................................................................7 3...beginning the validation period. During the spin-up phase, global rivers were added and various parameters were initially tuned. For the model running

  12. Testing global geopotential models through comparison of a local quasi-geoid model with GPS/leveling data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, P.; Kostelecký, J.; Klokočník, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2009), s. 39-60 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003407; GA MŠk(CZ) LC506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : global geopotential models * CHAMP * GRACE Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2009

  13. Improving Sustainability in Global Supply Chains with Private Certification Standards: Testing An Approach for Assessing Their Performance and Impact Potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Walter; Metselaar, Janneke

    Sustainable supply chain governance approaches aim for improvement of environmental and community living conditions at the developing country's side of the global supply chains. Impact evaluation in remote and multiple sourcing countries is hardly done in practice because of its complexity and

  14. Measuring management's perspective of data quality in Pakistan's Tuberculosis control programme: a test-based approach to identify data quality dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Mustafa; Anjum, Naveed; Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Ishaq, Muhammad; Aamir, Javariya; Haider, Ghulam Rasool

    2018-01-16

    Data quality is core theme of programme's performance assessment and many organizations do not have any data quality improvement strategy, wherein data quality dimensions and data quality assessment framework are important constituents. As there is limited published research about the data quality specifics that are relevant to the context of Pakistan's Tuberculosis control programme, this study aims at identifying the applicable data quality dimensions by using the 'fitness-for-purpose' perspective. Forty-two respondents pooled a total of 473 years of professional experience, out of which 223 years (47%) were in TB control related programmes. Based on the responses against 11 practical cases, adopted from the routine recording and reporting system of Pakistan's TB control programme (real identities of patient were masked), completeness, accuracy, consistency, vagueness, uniqueness and timeliness are the applicable data quality dimensions relevant to the programme's context, i.e. work settings and field of practice. Based on a 'fitness-for-purpose' approach to data quality, this study used a test-based approach to measure management's perspective and identified data quality dimensions pertinent to the programme and country specific requirements. Implementation of a data quality improvement strategy and achieving enhanced data quality would greatly help organizations in promoting data use for informed decision making.

  15. Global Managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barakat, Livia L.; Lorenz, Melanie P.; Ramsey, Jase R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: – The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of cultural intelligence (CQ) on the job performance of global managers. Design/methodology/approach: – In total, 332 global managers were surveyed from multinational companies operating in Brazil. The mediating effect of job...... satisfaction was tested on the CQ-job performance relationship. Findings: – The findings suggest that job satisfaction transmits the effect of CQ to job performance, such that global managers high in CQ exhibit more job satisfaction in an international setting, and therefore perform better at their jobs....... Practical implications: – Results imply that global managers should increase their CQ in order to improve their job satisfaction and ultimately perform better in an international context. Originality/value: – The authors make three primary contributions to the international business literature. First...

  16. Activities of E1210 and comparator agents tested by CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methods against Fusarium and Scedosporium species identified using molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, Mariana; Duncanson, Frederick P; Diekema, Daniel J; Guarro, Josep; Jones, Ronald N; Pfaller, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium (n = 67) and Scedosporium (n = 63) clinical isolates were tested by two reference broth microdilution (BMD) methods against a novel broad-spectrum (active against both yeasts and molds) antifungal, E1210, and comparator agents. E1210 inhibits the inositol acylation step in glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis, resulting in defects in fungal cell wall biosynthesis. Five species complex organisms/species of Fusarium (4 isolates unspeciated) and 28 Scedosporium apiospermum, 7 Scedosporium aurantiacum, and 28 Scedosporium prolificans species were identified by molecular techniques. Comparator antifungal agents included anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. E1210 was highly active against all of the tested isolates, with minimum effective concentration (MEC)/MIC(90) values (μg/ml) for E1210, anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B, respectively, for Fusarium of 0.12, >16, >16, >8, >8, 8, and 4 μg/ml. E1210 was very potent against the Scedosporium spp. tested. The E1210 MEC(90) was 0.12 μg/ml for S. apiospermum, but 1 to >8 μg/ml for other tested agents. Against S. aurantiacum, the MEC(50) for E1210 was 0.06 μg/ml versus 0.5 to >8 μg/ml for the comparators. Against S. prolificans, the MEC(90) for E1210 was only 0.12 μg/ml, compared to >4 μg/ml for amphotericin B and >8 μg/ml for itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Both CLSI and EUCAST methods were highly concordant for E1210 and all comparator agents. The essential agreement (EA; ±2 doubling dilutions) was >93% for all comparisons, with the exception of posaconazole and F. oxysporum species complex (SC) (60%), posaconazole and S. aurantiacum (85.7%), and voriconazole and S. aurantiacum (85.7%). In conclusion, E1210 exhibited very potent and broad-spectrum antifungal activity against azole- and amphotericin B-resistant strains of Fusarium spp. and Scedosporium spp. Furthermore, in vitro

  17. miR-155, identified as anti-metastatic by global miRNA profiling of a metastasis model, inhibits cancer cell extravasation and colonization in vivo and causes significant signaling alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard, Karina Hedelund; Terp, Mikkel G; Lund, Rikke R

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into miRNA regulation in metastasis formation, we used a metastasis cell line model that allows investigation of extravasation and colonization of circulating cancer cells to lungs in mice. Using global miRNA profiling, 28 miRNAs were found to exhibit significantly altered...... in lungs when injected intravenously in immunodeficient mice. Our experiments addressing the underlying mechanism of the altered tumor burden revealed that miR-155-overexpressing CL16 cells were less invasive than CL16 control cells in vitro, while miR-155 overexpression had no effect on cancer cell...... proliferation or apoptosis in established lung tumors. To identify proteins regulated by miR-155 and thus delineate its function in our cell model, we compared the proteome of xenograft tumors derived from miR-155-overexpressing CL16 cells and CL16 control cells using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. >4...

  18. Neuro magnetic resonance spectroscopy using wavelet decomposition and statistical testing identifies biochemical changes in people with spinal cord injury and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanwell, Peter; Siddall, Philip; Keshava, Nirmal; Cocuzzo, Daniel; Ramadan, Saadallah; Lin, Alexander; Herbert, David; Craig, Ashley; Tran, Yvonne; Middleton, James; Gautam, Shiva; Cousins, Michael; Mountford, Carolyn

    2010-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can be accompanied by chronic pain, the mechanisms for which are poorly understood. Here we report that magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements from the brain, collected at 3T, and processed using wavelet-based feature extraction and classification algorithms, can identify biochemical changes that distinguish control subjects from subjects with SCI as well as subdividing the SCI group into those with and without chronic pain. The results from control subjects (n=10) were compared to those with SCI (n=10). The SCI cohort was made up of subjects with chronic neuropathic pain (n=5) and those without chronic pain (n=5). The wavelet-based decomposition of frequency domain MRS signals employs statistical significance testing to identify features best suited to discriminate different classes. Moreover, the features benefit from careful attention to the post-processing of the spectroscopy data prior to the comparison of the three cohorts. The spectroscopy data, from the thalamus, best distinguished control subjects without SCI from those with SCI with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.9 (Percentage of Correct Classification). The spectroscopy data obtained from the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex both distinguished between SCI subjects with chronic neuropathic pain and those without pain with a sensitivity and specificity of 1.0. In this study, where two underlying mechanisms co-exist (i.e. SCI and pain), the thalamic changes appear to be linked more strongly to SCI, while the anterior cingulate cortex and prefrontal cortex changes appear to be specifically linked to the presence of pain. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies polymorphisms associated with the analgesic effect of fentanyl in the preoperative cold pressor-induced pain test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Takahashi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Opioid analgesics are widely used for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. The analgesic effects of opioids are well known to vary among individuals. The present study focused on the genetic factors that are associated with interindividual differences in pain and opioid sensitivity. We conducted a multistage genome-wide association study in subjects who were scheduled to undergo mandibular sagittal split ramus osteotomy and were not medicated until they received fentanyl for the induction of anesthesia. We preoperatively conducted the cold pressor-induced pain test before and after fentanyl administration. The rs13093031 and rs12633508 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs near the LOC728432 gene region and rs6961071 SNP in the tcag7.1213 gene region were significantly associated with the analgesic effect of fentanyl, based on differences in pain perception latency before and after fentanyl administration. The associations of these three SNPs that were identified in our exploratory study have not been previously reported. The two polymorphic loci (rs13093031 and rs12633508 were shown to be in strong linkage disequilibrium. Subjects with the G/G genotype of the rs13093031 and rs6961071 SNPs presented lower fentanyl-induced analgesia. Our findings provide a basis for investigating genetics-based analgesic sensitivity and personalized pain control. Keywords: Opioid sensitivity, Analgesia, Fentanyl, Polymorphism, GWAS

  20. Effect modification of air pollution on Urinary 8-Hydroxy-2'-Deoxyguanosine by genotypes: an application of the multiple testing procedure to identify significant SNP interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiani David C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Air pollution is associated with adverse human health, but mechanisms through which pollution exerts effects remain to be clarified. One suggested pathway is that pollution causes oxidative stress. If so, oxidative stress-related genotypes may modify the oxidative response defenses to pollution exposure. Methods We explored the potential pathway by examining whether an array of oxidative stress-related genes (twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs in nine genes modified associations of pollutants (organic carbon (OC, ozone and sulfate with urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxygunosine (8-OHdG, a biomarker of oxidative stress among the 320 aging men. We used a Multiple Testing Procedure in R modified by our team to identify the significance of the candidate genes adjusting for a priori covariates. Results We found that glutathione S-tranferase P1 (GSTP1, rs1799811, M1 and catalase (rs2284367 and group-specific component (GC, rs2282679, rs1155563 significantly or marginally significantly modified effects of OC and/or sulfate with larger effects among those carrying the wild type of GSTP1, catalase, non-wild type of GC and the non-null of GSTM1. Conclusions Polymorphisms of oxidative stress-related genes modified effects of OC and/or sulfate on 8-OHdG, suggesting that effects of OC or sulfate on 8-OHdG and other endpoints may be through the oxidative stress pathway.

  1. Inter-laboratory study of short time exposure (STE) test for predicting eye irritation potential of chemicals and correspondence to globally harmonized system (GHS) classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Hayashi, Takumi; Watanabe, Shinichi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Koike, Mirei; Aisawa, Noriko; Ebata, Shinya; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Tsuneaki; Kuwahara, Hirofumi; Nishiyama, Naohiro

    2009-12-01

    Short time exposure (STE) test using rabbit corneal cell line (SIRC) cells was developed as an alternative eye irritation test. STE test uses relative viability as the endpoint after cells are exposed to the test material at constant concentrations for 5 min. In this inter-laboratory study with 3 laboratories, 44 chemicals with a wide range of classes were evaluated for the transferability, between-lab reproducibility and predictive capacity of the STE test as an alternative eye irritation test. Globally harmonized system (GHS) classification based on Draize eye irritation test data was used as the comparative in vivo data. Transferability was assessed using standard chemicals (sodium lauryl sulfate, calcium thioglycolate, and Tween 80) and the coefficient variations (CVs) of relative viabilities between 3 labs were less than 0.13. The irritation category (Irritant or Non irritant) at each test concentration (5% and 0.05%) in STE test was the same in 3 laboratories for all 44 tested chemicals. The predictive capacity irritation category classification between STE test and GHS were compared, and a good correlation was confirmed (accuracy was 90.9% at all laboratories). In addition, the STE rankings of 1, 2, and 3 classified by the prediction model (PM) based on the relative viability at two concentrations (5% and 0.05%) were highly correlated with the GHS ranks of non-irritant, category 1, and category 2, respectively (accuracy was 75.0% at all laboratories). These results suggest that the STE test possessed easy transferability, reproducibility, good predictive performance.

  2. Identifying Risk Factors for Recent HIV Infection in Kenya Using a Recent Infection Testing Algorithm: Results from a Nationally Representative Population-Based Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A Kim

    Full Text Available A recent infection testing algorithm (RITA that can distinguish recent from long-standing HIV infection can be applied to nationally representative population-based surveys to characterize and identify risk factors for recent infection in a country.We applied a RITA using the Limiting Antigen Avidity Enzyme Immunoassay (LAg on stored HIV-positive samples from the 2007 Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey. The case definition for recent infection included testing recent on LAg and having no evidence of antiretroviral therapy use. Multivariate analysis was conducted to determine factors associated with recent and long-standing infection compared to HIV-uninfected persons. All estimates were weighted to adjust for sampling probability and nonresponse.Of 1,025 HIV-antibody-positive specimens, 64 (6.2% met the case definition for recent infection and 961 (93.8% met the case definition for long-standing infection. Compared to HIV-uninfected individuals, factors associated with higher adjusted odds of recent infection were living in Nairobi (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 11.37; confidence interval [CI] 2.64-48.87 and Nyanza (AOR 4.55; CI 1.39-14.89 provinces compared to Western province; being widowed (AOR 8.04; CI 1.42-45.50 or currently married (AOR 6.42; CI 1.55-26.58 compared to being never married; having had ≥ 2 sexual partners in the last year (AOR 2.86; CI 1.51-5.41; not using a condom at last sex in the past year (AOR 1.61; CI 1.34-1.93; reporting a sexually transmitted infection (STI diagnosis or symptoms of STI in the past year (AOR 1.97; CI 1.05-8.37; and being aged <30 years with: 1 HSV-2 infection (AOR 8.84; CI 2.62-29.85, 2 male genital ulcer disease (AOR 8.70; CI 2.36-32.08, or 3 lack of male circumcision (AOR 17.83; CI 2.19-144.90. Compared to HIV-uninfected persons, factors associated with higher adjusted odds of long-standing infection included living in Coast (AOR 1.55; CI 1.04-2.32 and Nyanza (AOR 2.33; CI 1.67-3.25 provinces compared to

  3. Global rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosquist, K.

    1980-01-01

    Global rotation in cosmological models is defined on an observational basis. A theorem is proved saying that, for rigid motion, the global rotation is equal to the ordinary local vorticity. The global rotation is calculated in the space-time homogeneous class III models, with Godel's model as a special case. It is shown that, with the exception of Godel's model, the rotation in these models becomes infinite for finite affine parameter values. In some directions the rotation changes sign and becomes infinite in a direction opposite to the local vorticity. The points of infinite rotation are identified as conjugate points along the null geodesics. The physical interpretation of the infinite rotation is discussed, and a comparison with the behaviour of the area distance at conjugate points is given. (author)

  4. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  5. An experimental test of the role of environmental temperature variability on ectotherm molecular, physiological and life-history traits: implications for global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folguera, Guillermo; Bastías, Daniel A; Caers, Jelle; Rojas, José M; Piulachs, Maria-Dolors; Bellés, Xavier; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2011-07-01

    Global climate change is one of the greatest threats to biodiversity; one of the most important effects is the increase in the mean earth surface temperature. However, another but poorly studied main characteristic of global change appears to be an increase in temperature variability. Most of the current analyses of global change have focused on mean values, paying less attention to the role of the fluctuations of environmental variables. We experimentally tested the effects of environmental temperature variability on characteristics associated to the fitness (body mass balance, growth rate, and survival), metabolic rate (VCO(2)) and molecular traits (heat shock protein expression, Hsp70), in an ectotherm, the terrestrial woodlouse Porcellio laevis. Our general hypotheses are that higher values of thermal amplitude may directly affect life-history traits, increasing metabolic cost and stress responses. At first, results supported our hypotheses showing a diversity of responses among characters to the experimental thermal treatments. We emphasize that knowledge about the cellular and physiological mechanisms by which animals cope with environmental changes is essential to understand the impact of mean climatic change and variability. Also, we consider that the studies that only incorporate only mean temperatures to predict the life-history, ecological and evolutionary impact of global temperature changes present important problems to predict the diversity of responses of the organism. This is because the analysis ignores the complexity and details of the molecular and physiological processes by which animals cope with environmental variability, as well as the life-history and demographic consequences of such variability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Globalization and American Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriman, William; Nicoletti, Augustine

    2008-01-01

    Globalization is a potent force in today's world. The welfare of the United States is tied to the welfare of other countries by economics, the environment, politics, culture, information, and technology. This paper identifies the implications of globalization for education, presents applications of important aspects of globalization that teachers…

  7. Identifying sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Houles, Mathieu; Vellas, Bruno

    2012-09-01

    The present review describes and discusses the currently available definitions for sarcopenia from consensus studies. Different sarcopenia definitions have been proposed in these last years. Six main approaches to an operative definition of sarcopenia have been identified. Although the first definitions were solely based on the assessment of the amount of muscle mass, current definitions seem to consistently recognize a bi-dimensional nature of sarcopenia. So, these approaches imply the need of simultaneously assessing both age-related quantitative (i.e. amount of muscle mass) and qualitative (i.e. muscle strength and function) declines of skeletal muscle. Although current consensus exists about a bi-dimensional nature, the proposed approaches to measure sarcopenia are characterized by methodological differences. The majority of the operative definitions proposes to assess muscle mass as an index of appendicular muscle mass divided by squared height (evaluated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), assess strength using hand-held dynamometers, and assess function by evaluating gait speed at habitual pace over a short distance. Nevertheless, the clinically relevant thresholds and how to combine the three aspects in an operative definition in order to identify sarcopenia are heterogeneous. A main drawback is that supportive empirical data are missing for these conceptual definitions regarding the risk-assessment of different clinically significant adverse outcomes.

  8. Operational lessons learned in conducting a multi-country collaboration for vaccine safety signal verification and hypothesis testing: The global vaccine safety multi country collaboration initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard-Maure, Christine; Elango, Varalakshmi; Black, Steven; Perez-Vilar, Silvia; Castro, Jose Luis; Bravo-Alcántara, Pamela; Molina-León, Helvert Felipe; Weibel, Daniel; Sturkenboom, Miriam; Zuber, Patrick L F

    2018-01-08

    Timely and effective evaluation of vaccine safety signals for newly developed vaccines introduced in low and middle- income countries (LMICs) is essential. The study tested the development of a global network of hospital-based sentinel sites for vaccine safety signal verification and hypothesis testing. Twenty-six sentinel sites in sixteen countries across all WHO regions participated, and 65% of the sites were from LMIC. We describe the process for the establishment and operationalization of such a network and the lessons learned in conducting a multi-country collaborative initiative. 24 out of the 26 sites successfully contributed data for the global analysis using standardised tools and procedures. Our study successfully confirmed the well-known risk estimates for the outcomes of interest. The main challenges faced by investigators were lack of adequate information in the medical records for case ascertainment and classification, and access to immunization data. The results suggest that sentinel hospitals intending to participate in vaccine safety studies strengthen their systems for discharge diagnosis coding, medical records and linkage to vaccination data. Our study confirms that a multi-country hospital-based network initiative for vaccine safety monitoring is feasible and demonstrates the validity and utility of large collaborative international studies to monitor the safety of new vaccines introduced in LMICs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Dual Testing Algorithm of BED-CEIA and AxSYM Avidity Index Assays Performs Best in Identifying Recent HIV Infection in a Sample of Rwandan Sex Workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braunstein, S.L.; Nash, D.; Kim, A.A.; Ford, K.; Mwambarangwe, L.; Ingabire, C.M.; Vyankandondera, J.; van de Wijgert, J.H.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the performance of BED-CEIA (BED) and AxSYM Avidity Index (Ax-AI) assays in estimating HIV incidence among female sex workers (FSW) in Kigali, Rwanda. Eight hundred FSW of unknown HIV status were HIV tested; HIV-positive women had BED and Ax-AI testing at baseline and ≥12 months later to

  10. Global miRNA expression analysis of serous and clear cell ovarian carcinomas identifies differentially expressed miRNAs including miR-200c-3p as a prognostic marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilming Elgaaen, Bente; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Haug, Kari Bente Foss; Brusletto, Berit; Sandvik, Leiv; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Gautvik, Kaare M; Davidson, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Improved insight into the molecular characteristics of the different ovarian cancer subgroups is needed for developing a more individualized and optimized treatment regimen. The aim of this study was to a) identify differentially expressed miRNAs in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC), clear cell ovarian carcinoma (CCC) and ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), b) evaluate selected miRNAs for association with clinical parameters including survival and c) map miRNA-mRNA interactions. Differences in miRNA expression between HGSC, CCC and OSE were analyzed by global miRNA expression profiling (Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA 2.0 Arrays, n = 12, 9 and 9, respectively), validated by RT-qPCR (n = 35, 19 and 9, respectively), and evaluated for associations with clinical parameters. For HGSC, differentially expressed miRNAs were linked to differentially expressed mRNAs identified previously. Differentially expressed miRNAs (n = 78) between HGSC, CCC and OSE were identified (FDR < 0.01%), of which 18 were validated (p < 0.01) using RT-qPCR in an extended cohort. Compared with OSE, miR-205-5p was the most overexpressed miRNA in HGSC. miR-200 family members and miR-182-5p were the most overexpressed in HGSC and CCC compared with OSE, whereas miR-383 was the most underexpressed. miR-205-5p and miR-200 members target epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulators, apparently being important in tumor progression. miR-509-3-5p, miR-509-5p, miR-509-3p and miR-510 were among the strongest differentiators between HGSC and CCC, all being significantly overexpressed in CCC compared with HGSC. High miR-200c-3p expression was associated with poor progression-free (p = 0.031) and overall (p = 0.026) survival in HGSC patients. Interacting miRNA and mRNA targets, including those of a TP53-related pathway presented previously, were identified in HGSC. Several miRNAs differentially expressed between HGSC, CCC and OSE have been identified, suggesting a carcinogenetic role for these mi

  11. Theme Enrichment Analysis: A Statistical Test for Identifying Significantly Enriched Themes in a List of Stories with an Application to the Star Trek Television Franchise

    OpenAIRE

    Onsjö, Mikael; Sheridan, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how the hypergeometric test can be used to determine whether a given theme of interest occurs in a storyset at a frequency more than would be expected by chance. By a storyset we mean simply a list of stories defined according to a common attribute (e.g. author, movement, period). The test works roughly as follows: Given a background storyset (e.g. 19th century adventure novels), and a sub-storyset of interest (e.g. Jules Verne novels), the test determines whether a...

  12. Ceftazidime-avibactam and comparator agents tested against urinary tract isolates from a global surveillance program (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, Robert K; Sader, Helio S; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N

    2014-11-01

    Ceftazidime-avibactam, a combination of ceftazidime and the non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam, is in advanced clinical development. In this study, we report results of in vitro testing of ceftazidime-avibactam and comparator agents against a collection of urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates from the United States (USA), Europe and Mediterranean region (EMR), Latin America (LATAM), and the Asia-Pacific/South Africa regions (APAC). Clinical isolates (1 per patient episode) were collected from patients with a UTI during 2011. A total of 1797 isolates were collected from 159 medical centers. Isolates were processed at the medical centers and forwarded to a central monitoring laboratory for confirmatory identification and reference susceptibility testing. Ceftazidime-avibactam was highly active against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The MIC90 values for ceftazidime-avibactam against Enterobacteriaceae in the USA, EMR, and LATAM regions ranged from 0.25 to 0.5μg/mL. The MIC90 in the APAC was slightly elevated at 1μg/mL. A total of 6.1% (8/131) of Escherichia coli in the USA, 23.5% (43/183) in the EMR, 61.2% (30/49) in LATAM, and 75.0% (9/12) in APAC exhibited an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) screen-positive phenotype. A total of 1.6% (2/129) of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in the USA were meropenem-non-susceptible (MIC ≥2μg/mL), but a rate of 10.3% (10/97) was observed in the EMR. All ESBL screen-positive phenotype and meropenem-non-susceptible E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates exhibited a ceftazidime-avibactam MIC ≤4μg/mL. All isolates of P. aeruginosa in the USA and 80.9% (38/47) in the EMR were inhibited at a ceftazidime-avibactam MIC of ≤8μg/mL compared to 88.2% (15/17) and 61.7% (29/47) for ceftazidime alone. Ceftazidime-avibactam demonstrated wide in vitro activity against Gram-negative bacteria from patients with UTI including high potencies against multidrug-resistant organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  13. Real-Time Global Nonlinear Aerodynamic Modeling for Learn-To-Fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Flight testing and modeling techniques were developed to accurately identify global nonlinear aerodynamic models for aircraft in real time. The techniques were developed and demonstrated during flight testing of a remotely-piloted subscale propeller-driven fixed-wing aircraft using flight test maneuvers designed to simulate a Learn-To-Fly scenario. Prediction testing was used to evaluate the quality of the global models identified in real time. The real-time global nonlinear aerodynamic modeling algorithm will be integrated and further tested with learning adaptive control and guidance for NASA Learn-To-Fly concept flight demonstrations.

  14. Lost opportunities to identify and treat HIV-positive patients: results from a baseline assessment of provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Saeed; Schwarz, Monica; Flick, Robert J; Rees, Chris A; Harawa, Mwelura; Simon, Katie; Robison, Jeff A; Kazembe, Peter N; Kim, Maria H

    2016-04-01

    To assess implementation of provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC) for HIV in Malawi. A review of PITC practices within 118 departments in 12 Ministry of Health (MoH) facilities across Malawi was conducted. Information on PITC practices was collected via a health facility survey. Data describing patient visits and HIV tests were abstracted from routinely collected programme data. Reported PITC practices were highly variable. Most providers practiced symptom-based PITC. Antenatal clinics and maternity wards reported widespread use of routine opt-out PITC. In 2014, there was approximately 1 HIV test for every 15 clinic visits. HIV status was ascertained in 94.3% (5293/5615) of patients at tuberculosis clinics, 92.6% (30,675/33,142) of patients at antenatal clinics and 49.4% (6871/13,914) of patients at sexually transmitted infection clinics. Reported challenges to delivering PITC included test kit shortages (71/71 providers), insufficient physical space (58/71) and inadequate number of HIV counsellors (32/71) while providers from inpatient units cited the inability to test on weekends. Various models of PITC currently exist at MoH facilities in Malawi. Only antenatal and maternity clinics demonstrated high rates of routine opt-out PITC. The low ratio of facility visits to HIV tests suggests missed opportunities for HIV testing. However, the high proportion of patients at TB and antenatal clinics with known HIV status suggests that routine PITC is feasible. These results underscore the need to develop clear, standardised PITC policy and protocols, and to address obstacles of limited health commodities, infrastructure and human resources. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The role of sedation tests in identifying sedative drug effects in healthy volunteers and their power to dissociate sedative-related impairments from memory dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezenberg, E; Sabbe, B G C; Hulstijn, W; Ruigt, G S F; Verkes, R J

    2007-08-01

    The study investigated whether four specified drugs would show similar patterns on tests considered to measure sedation. In addition, their drug-effect patterns on sedation and memory performance were compared to determine whether the sedative effects could be differentiated from the memory effects. Two double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies, each with 16 healthy volunteers, were performed, one testing lorazepam (2.5 mg) and mirtazapine (15 mg) and the other olanzapine (10 mg) and haloperidol (2.5 mg). Subjective sedation was assessed by means of visual analogue scales (VAS) and objective sedation using a simple-reaction-time (SRT) task and a choice-reaction-time (CRT) task, code substitution (symbol digit substitution test (SDST)) and the peak velocity of saccadic eye movements (SEM). A verbal memory test (VMT) was administered to evaluate memory capacity. Apart from haloperidol, all drugs proved to impair performance on all five sedation indices. Contrary to the VAS, the objective measures yielded different response profiles. Two types of drug-effect patterns emerged: one for greater impairments in response speed (SRT, SEM) and one for greater impairments in information processing (CRT, SDST). Lorazepam and olanzapine impeded memory performance, whereas mirtazapine did not. With the use of standardized scores it proved possible to differentiate between the size of the effects of the drugs on the sedation and memory tests. To accurately assess the level and nature of sedation and to differentiate sedation from memory impairments different types of sedation measures are required. Besides studying the subjective effects, it is recommended to also test psychomotor responses and information processing speed.

  16. Use of micro-tomography for validation of method to identify interfacial shear strength from tensile tests of short regenerated cellulose fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajlane, A.; Miettinen, A.; Madsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The interfacial shear strength of short regenerated cellulose fibre/polylactide composites was characterized by means of an industry-friendly adhesion test method. The interfacial shear strength was back-calculated from the experimental tensile stress-strain curves of composites by using a micro-...

  17. The role of sedation tests in identifying sedative drug effects in healthy volunteers and their power to dissociate sedative-related impairments from memory dysfunctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, E.; Sabbe, B.G.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Ruigt, G.S.F.; Verkes, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated whether four specified drugs would show similar patterns on tests considered to measure sedation. In addition, their drug-effect patterns on sedation and memory performance were compared to determine whether the sedative effects could be differentiated from the memory effects.

  18. The role of sedation tests in identifying sedative drug effects in healthy volunteers and their power to dissociate sedative-related impairments from memory dysfunctions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, E.; Sabbe, B.G.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Ruigt, G.S.F.; Verkes, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated whether four specified drugs would show similar patterns on tests considered to measure sedation. In addition, their drug-effect patterns on sedation and memory performance were compared to determine whether the sedative effects could be differentiated from the memory

  19. Using the Cognitive Abilities Test (CogAT) 7 Nonverbal Battery to Identify the Gifted/Talented: An Investigation of Demographic Effects and Norming Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Carol A.; Walther, Christine A. P.; Bartsch, Robert A.

    2018-01-01

    The nonverbal battery of the Cognitive Abilities Test (CogAT) is one of the two most common nonverbal measures used in gifted identification, yet the relationships between demographic variables and CogAT7 performance has not yet been fully examined. Additionally, the effect of using the CogAT7 nonverbal battery on the identification of diverse…

  20. Evaluar la Coordinación Motriz Global en Educación Secundaria: El Test Motor SportComp. [Motor co-ordination assessment in Secondary Education: The SportComp Test].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Ruiz-Perez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue el desarrollo y evaluación métrica del Test Motor SportComp, instrumento diseñado para ayudar a los profesores de educación física en la evaluación de la coordinación motriz global de sus alumnos de Educación Secundaria. En la actualidad no existen tests que evalúen la coordinación motriz de forma válida y fiable y que puedan ser empleados por el profesorado de educación física en el contexto de sus clases de manera rápida y económica. El presente test se construyó a partir de una revisión de la literatura científica sobre medición motriz entre los 12 y 17 años. La validez de contenido de las pruebas empleadas fue evaluada por expertos y las pruebas seleccionadas fueron aplicadas a 5732 escolares de estas edades. Se analizaron los resultados mediante la técnica de componentes principales que permitió la extracción de un solo factor formado por 5 tareas motrices relacionadas con la coordinación motriz global. El Coeficiente de Correlación Intraclase (CCI permitió obtener una fiabilidad test-retest de (CCI=0,91. Asimismo, mostró una satisfactoria validez criterial con la batería MABC-2 uno de los más reconocidos para la detección de problemas de coordinación motriz. Las propiedades métricas del presente test son muy satisfactorias y ofrecen buenas posibilidades para ser empleado por los profesores de educación física en sus clases por su bajo coste económico, poco tiempo de aplicación reclamado y poseer normas ajustadas por edad y sexo. Asimismo, este test ofrece el potencial de poder servir para detectar a los alumnos con sospecha de poseer problemas de coordinación motriz y por lo tanto contribuir a la mejora de los programas de educación física que palíen esta condición. Abstract The purpose of this study was the development and metric evaluation of the SportComp Motor Test, an instrument designed to aid physical education teachers in the assessment of gross motor

  1. Combining local lithofacies and global geochemical signals to test the acidification hypothesis for the onset of Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 in the U.S. Western Interior Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. M.; Sageman, B. B.; Selby, D. S.; Oakes, R. L.; Bralower, T. J.; Parker, A. L.; Leckie, R. M.; Sepulveda, J.

    2015-12-01

    Strata preserving Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2), which span the Cenomanian-Turonian (C/T; Late Cretaceous), exhibit evidence of widespread anoxia, a major perturbation to the global carbon cycle, and increased biotic turnover rates. It has been hypothesized that a major volcanic (LIP) eruption, increased CO2 levels, and significant climate warming triggered the event. Recently, OAE2 has also been cited as a potential example of ocean acidification in Earth history and therefore has potential to offer predictive insights on impacts of increasing modern pCO2 levels. As part of an effort to test this hypothesis, the 131-m Smoky Hollow #1 (SH-1) core was drilled near Big Water, Utah during the summer of 2014. The core recovered an expanded stratigraphic record of OAE2 from the mud-rich western margin of the Western Interior Seaway. A high-resolution stable carbon isotope record from bulk organic carbon (δ13Corg) indicates near-continuous preservation of OAE2 with a sustained +2.5‰ excursion that is over 5 times the thickness of the same excursion at the C/T GSSP in Pueblo, Colorado. Notably, this record is characterized by a 1-m thick carbonate-barren interval at the δ13C excursion's onset. This may indicate an episode of ocean acidification driving suppressed carbonate sedimentation or carbonate dissolution. An alternative interpretation is that variations in carbonate concentrations are unrelated to changes in ocean chemistry and are instead driven by changes in local sedimentation patterns (e.g. transgressive-regressive parasequences). To test these hypotheses, a regional lithostratigraphic correlation to the nearshore Cottonwood Canyon section is constructed to assess whether prograding sandy parasequences may have altered carbonate sedimentation rates at the SH-1 locality. Initial osmium and δ13C chemostratigraphies are also developed to constrain the timing of perturbations in global geochemical cycles at the initiation of OAE2, including the onset of large

  2. Global patterns of amphibian phylogenetic diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz, Susanne; Rahbek, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    phylogeny (2792 species). We combined each tree with global species distributions to map four indices of phylogenetic diversity. To investigate congruence between global spatial patterns of amphibian species richness and phylogenetic diversity, we selected Faith’s phylogenetic diversity (PD) index......Aim  Phylogenetic diversity can provide insight into how evolutionary processes may have shaped contemporary patterns of species richness. Here, we aim to test for the influence of phylogenetic history on global patterns of amphibian species richness, and to identify areas where macroevolutionary...... processes such as diversification and dispersal have left strong signatures on contemporary species richness. Location  Global; equal-area grid cells of approximately 10,000 km2. Methods  We generated an amphibian global supertree (6111 species) and repeated analyses with the largest available molecular...

  3. Globalization and human cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Nancy R.; Grimalda, Gianluca; Wilson, Rick; Brewer, Marilynn; Fatas, Enrique; Foddy, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Globalization magnifies the problems that affect all people and that require large-scale human cooperation, for example, the overharvesting of natural resources and human-induced global warming. However, what does globalization imply for the cooperation needed to address such global social dilemmas? Two competing hypotheses are offered. One hypothesis is that globalization prompts reactionary movements that reinforce parochial distinctions among people. Large-scale cooperation then focuses on favoring one's own ethnic, racial, or language group. The alternative hypothesis suggests that globalization strengthens cosmopolitan attitudes by weakening the relevance of ethnicity, locality, or nationhood as sources of identification. In essence, globalization, the increasing interconnectedness of people worldwide, broadens the group boundaries within which individuals perceive they belong. We test these hypotheses by measuring globalization at both the country and individual levels and analyzing the relationship between globalization and individual cooperation with distal others in multilevel sequential cooperation experiments in which players can contribute to individual, local, and/or global accounts. Our samples were drawn from the general populations of the United States, Italy, Russia, Argentina, South Africa, and Iran. We find that as country and individual levels of globalization increase, so too does individual cooperation at the global level vis-à-vis the local level. In essence, “globalized” individuals draw broader group boundaries than others, eschewing parochial motivations in favor of cosmopolitan ones. Globalization may thus be fundamental in shaping contemporary large-scale cooperation and may be a positive force toward the provision of global public goods. PMID:19255433

  4. Global ambitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruton, M.

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses global ambitions concerning the Norwegian petroleum industry. With the advent of the NORSOK (Forum for development and operation) cost reduction programme and a specific focus on key sectors of the market, the Norwegian oil industry is beginning to market its considerable technological achievements internationally. Obviously, the good fortune of having tested this technology in a very demanding domestic arena means that Norwegian offshore support companies, having succeeded at home, are perfectly poised to export their expertise to the international sector. Drawing on the traditional strengths of the country's maritime heritage, with mobile rig and specialized vessel business featuring strongly, other key technologies have been developed. 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Mosaic and Intronic Mutations in TSC1/TSC2 Explain the Majority of TSC Patients with No Mutation Identified by Conventional Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyburczy, Magdalena E; Dies, Kira A; Glass, Jennifer; Camposano, Susana; Chekaluk, Yvonne; Thorner, Aaron R; Lin, Ling; Krueger, Darcy; Franz, David N; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Sahin, Mustafa; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2015-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant tumor suppressor gene syndrome due to germline mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. 10-15% of TSC individuals have no mutation identified (NMI) after thorough conventional molecular diagnostic assessment. 53 TSC subjects who were NMI were studied using next generation sequencing to search for mutations in these genes. Blood/saliva DNA including parental samples were available from all subjects, and skin tumor biopsy DNA was available from six subjects. We identified mutations in 45 of 53 subjects (85%). Mosaicism was observed in the majority (26 of 45, 58%), and intronic mutations were also unusually common, seen in 18 of 45 subjects (40%). Seventeen (38%) mutations were seen at an allele frequency mutation detection, show that analysis of TSC-related tumors can increase the mutation detection rate, indicate that it is not likely that a third TSC gene exists, and enable provision of genetic counseling to the substantial population of TSC individuals who are currently NMI.

  6. Global Educators' Personal Attribution of a Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carano, Kenneth Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This case study of self-identifying global educators investigated factors that they attributed to the development of their global perspective and how it influenced curricular decision-making. Analysis resulted in seven themes identified by the participants as having attributed to the development of a global perspective: (a) family, (b) exposure to…

  7. A rapid kinetic dye test to predict the adsorption of 2-methylisoborneol onto granular activated carbons and to identify the influence of pore volume distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Michael J; Redding, Adam M; Cannon, Fred S

    2015-01-01

    The authors have developed a kinetic dye test protocol that aims to predict the competitive adsorption of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) to granular activated carbons (GACs). The kinetic dye test takes about two hours to perform, and produces a quantitative result, fitted to a model to yield an Intraparticle Diffusion Constant (IDC) during the earlier times of dye sorption. The dye xylenol orange was probed into six coconut-based GACs and five bituminous-based GACs that hosted varied pore distributions. Correlations between xylenol orange IDCs and breakthrough of MIB at 4 ppt in rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs) were found with R²s of 0.85 and 0.95 for coconut carbons that processed waters with total organic carbon (TOCs) of 1.9 and 2.2 ppm, respectively, and with an R² of 0.94 for bituminous carbons that processed waters with a TOC of 2.5 ppm. The author sought to study the influence of the pore sizes, which provide the adsorption sites and the diffusion conduits that are necessary for the removal of those compounds. For coconut carbons, a linear correlation was established between the xylenol orange IDCs and the volume of pores in the range of 23.4-31.8 Å widths (R² = 0.98). For bituminous carbons, best correlation was to pores ranging from 74 to 93 Å widths (R² = 0.94). The differences in adsorption between coconut carbons and bituminous carbons have been attributed to the inherently dissimilar graphene layering resulting from the parent materials and the activation processes. When fluorescein dye was employed in the kinetic dye tests, the correlations to RSSCT-MIB performance were not as high as when xylenol orange was used. Intriguingly, it was the same pore size ranges that exhibited the strongest correlation for MIB RSSCT's, xylenol orange kinetics, and fluoroscein kinetics. When methylene blue dye was used, sorption occurred so rapidly as to be out of the scope of the IDC model.

  8. Dual testing algorithm of BED-CEIA and AxSYM Avidity Index assays performs best in identifying recent HIV infection in a sample of Rwandan sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, Sarah L; Nash, Denis; Kim, Andrea A; Ford, Ken; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Ingabire, Chantal M; Vyankandondera, Joseph; van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M

    2011-04-12

    To assess the performance of BED-CEIA (BED) and AxSYM Avidity Index (Ax-AI) assays in estimating HIV incidence among female sex workers (FSW) in Kigali, Rwanda. Eight hundred FSW of unknown HIV status were HIV tested; HIV-positive women had BED and Ax-AI testing at baseline and ≥12 months later to estimate assay false-recent rates (FRR). STARHS-based HIV incidence was estimated using the McWalter/Welte formula, and adjusted with locally derived FRR and CD4 results. HIV incidence and local assay window periods were estimated from a prospective cohort of FSW. At baseline, 190 HIV-positive women were BED and Ax-AI tested; 23 were classified as recent infection (RI). Assay FRR with 95% confidence intervals were: 3.6% (1.2-8.1) (BED); 10.6% (6.1-17.0) (Ax-AI); and 2.1% (0.4-6.1) (BED/Ax-AI combined). After FRR-adjustment, incidence estimates by BED, Ax-AI, and BED/Ax-AI were: 5.5/100 person-years (95% CI 2.2-8.7); 7.7 (3.2-12.3); and 4.4 (1.4-7.3). After CD4-adjustment, BED, Ax-AI, and BED/Ax-AI incidence estimates were: 5.6 (2.6-8.6); 9.7 (5.0-14.4); and 4.7 (2.0-7.5). HIV incidence rates in the first and second 6 months of the cohort were 4.6 (1.6-7.7) and 2.2 (0.1-4.4). Adjusted incidence estimates by BED/Ax-AI combined were similar to incidence in the first 6 months of the cohort. Furthermore, false-recent rate on the combined BED/Ax-AI algorithm was low and substantially lower than for either assay alone. Improved assay specificity with time since seroconversion suggests that specificity would be higher in population-based testing where more individuals have long-term infection.

  9. Dual testing algorithm of BED-CEIA and AxSYM Avidity Index assays performs best in identifying recent HIV infection in a sample of Rwandan sex workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Braunstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To assess the performance of BED-CEIA (BED and AxSYM Avidity Index (Ax-AI assays in estimating HIV incidence among female sex workers (FSW in Kigali, Rwanda. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Eight hundred FSW of unknown HIV status were HIV tested; HIV-positive women had BED and Ax-AI testing at baseline and ≥12 months later to estimate assay false-recent rates (FRR. STARHS-based HIV incidence was estimated using the McWalter/Welte formula, and adjusted with locally derived FRR and CD4 results. HIV incidence and local assay window periods were estimated from a prospective cohort of FSW. At baseline, 190 HIV-positive women were BED and Ax-AI tested; 23 were classified as recent infection (RI. Assay FRR with 95% confidence intervals were: 3.6% (1.2-8.1 (BED; 10.6% (6.1-17.0 (Ax-AI; and 2.1% (0.4-6.1 (BED/Ax-AI combined. After FRR-adjustment, incidence estimates by BED, Ax-AI, and BED/Ax-AI were: 5.5/100 person-years (95% CI 2.2-8.7; 7.7 (3.2-12.3; and 4.4 (1.4-7.3. After CD4-adjustment, BED, Ax-AI, and BED/Ax-AI incidence estimates were: 5.6 (2.6-8.6; 9.7 (5.0-14.4; and 4.7 (2.0-7.5. HIV incidence rates in the first and second 6 months of the cohort were 4.6 (1.6-7.7 and 2.2 (0.1-4.4. CONCLUSIONS: Adjusted incidence estimates by BED/Ax-AI combined were similar to incidence in the first 6 months of the cohort. Furthermore, false-recent rate on the combined BED/Ax-AI algorithm was low and substantially lower than for either assay alone. Improved assay specificity with time since seroconversion suggests that specificity would be higher in population-based testing where more individuals have long-term infection.

  10. Prevalence and global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease group distribution of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease detected by preoperative pulmonary function test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Choi

    Full Text Available Despite being a major public health problem, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD remains underdiagnosed, and only 2.4% COPD patients are aware of their disease in Korea. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of COPD detected by spirometry performed as a preoperative screening test and to determine the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD group distribution and self-awareness of COPD.We reviewed the medical records of adults (age, ≥ 40 years who had undergone spirometry during preoperative screening between April and August 2013 at a tertiary hospital in Korea. COPD was defined as a postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio of 40 years who had undergone spirometry as a preoperative screening test, 474 (15.6%; 404 men; median age, 70 years; range, 44-93 years were diagnosed with COPD. Only 26 (5.5% patients reported previous diagnosis of COPD (2.1%, emphysema (0.8%, or chronic bronchitis (2.5%. The GOLD group distribution was as follows: 63.3% in group A, 31.2% in group B, 1.7% in group C, and 3.8% in group D.The prevalence of COPD diagnosed by preoperative spirometry was 15.6%, and only 5.5% patients were aware of their disease. Approximately one-third of the COPD patients belonged to GOLD groups B, C, and D, which require regular treatment.

  11. A global, incremental development method for a web-based prostate cancer treatment decision aid and usability testing in a Dutch clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Maarten; Lamers, Romy Ed; Kil, Paul Jm; The, Regina; Karssen, Klemens; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; de Vries, Marieke

    2017-07-01

    Many new decision aids are developed while aspects of existing decision aids could also be useful, leading to a sub-optimal use of resources. To support treatment decision-making in prostate cancer patients, a pre-existing evidence-based Canadian decision aid was adjusted to Dutch clinical setting. After analyses of the original decision aid and routines in Dutch prostate cancer care, adjustments to the decision aid structure and content were made. Subsequent usability testing (N = 11) resulted in 212 comments. Care providers mainly provided feedback on medical content, and patients commented most on usability and summary layout. All participants reported that the decision aid was comprehensible and well-structured and would recommend decision aid use. After usability testing, final adjustments to the decision aid were made. The presented methods could be useful for cultural adaptation of pre-existing tools into other languages and settings, ensuring optimal usage of previous scientific and practical efforts and allowing for a global, incremental decision aid development process.

  12. Software test plan/description/report (STP/STD/STR) for the enhanced logistics intratheater support tool (ELIST) global data segment. Version 8.1.0.0, Database Instance Segment Version 8.1.0.0, ...[elided] and Reference Data Segment Version 8.1.0.0 for Solaris 7; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritz, K.; Absil-Mills, M.; Jacobs, K.

    2002-01-01

    This document is the Software Test Plan/Description/Report (STP/STD/STR) for the DII COE Enhanced Logistics Intratheater Support Tool (ELIST) mission application. It combines in one document the information normally presented separately in a Software Test Plan, a Software Test Description, and a Software Test Report; it also presents this information in one place for all the segments of the ELIST mission application. The primary purpose of this document is to show that ELIST has been tested by the developer and found, by that testing, to install, deinstall, and work properly. The information presented here is detailed enough to allow the reader to repeat the testing independently. The remainder of this document is organized as follows. Section 1.1 identifies the ELIST mission application. Section 2 is the list of all documents referenced in this document. Section 3, the Software Test Plan, outlines the testing methodology and scope-the latter by way of a concise summary of the tests performed. Section 4 presents detailed descriptions of the tests, along with the expected and observed results; that section therefore combines the information normally found in a Software Test Description and a Software Test Report. The remaining small sections present supplementary information. Throughout this document, the phrase ELIST IP refers to the Installation Procedures (IP) for the Enhanced Logistics Intratheater Support Tool (ELIST) Global Data Segment, Database Instance Segment, Database Fill Segment, Database Segment, Database Utility Segment, Software Segment, and Reference Data Segment

  13. Use of a scenario-development procedure to identify potentially disruptive scenarios, Greater Confinement Disposal facility, Area 5, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzowski, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Safety and Risk Assessment Dept.

    1994-12-31

    The Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) facility includes four boreholes that contain transuranic (TRLT) waste. Presence of the TRU waste means that this facility must comply with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Waste-Final Rule 40 CFR Part 191. To comply with the Containment Requirements of this rule, all potentially disruptive events and processes, and by implication all potentially disruptive combinations of events and processes (scenarios), must be identified for possible inclusion in performance assessments. Screening of the FEPs identified four events for scenario development: exploratory drilling for natural resources, drilling withdrawal wells, irrigation, and subsidence. Recent environmental-isotope analyses of the vadose zone suggest that radionuclide transport from the boreholes to the water table by infiltration is not a feasible transport mechanism within the time frame of regulatory concern. For this reason, the event of drilling withdrawal wells was merged with exploratory drilling for resources. The descriptions of the remaining three events were modified slightly to aid in estimation of event probabilities and consequence analyses. The three events are: exploratory drilling for resources penetrates a TRU borehole, irrigation occurs at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), and subsidence occurs at the RWMS. Use of a logic diagram with these three events resulted in the construction of eight scenarios, including base-case (undisturbed) conditions. Screening these scenarios at this stage of scenario development was beyond the scope of this task. Based on the implementation assumptions, this scenario-development procedure produced a comprehensive set of mutually exclusive scenarios that are reproducible and auditable for use in GCD performance assessments.

  14. Combined receptor antagonist stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis test identifies impaired negative feedback sensitivity to cortisol in obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Cecilia; Reynolds, Rebecca M; Simonyte, Kotryna; Olsson, Tommy; Walker, Brian R

    2009-04-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation may underlie disorders including obesity, depression, cognitive decline, and the metabolic syndrome. Conventional tests of HPA axis negative feedback rely on glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonists such as dexamethasone but do not test feedback by endogenous cortisol, potentially mediated by both GR and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR). The objective of the study was to use a combination of GR (RU38486, mifepristone) and MR (spironolactone) antagonists to explore the poorly understood activation of the HPA axis that occurs in obesity. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover study. The study was conducted at a clinical research facility. Participants included 15 lean (body mass index 22.0 +/- 1.6 kg/m(2)) and 16 overweight/obese (body mass index 30.1 +/- 3.5 kg/m(2)) men. Subjects attended on four occasions for blood and saliva sampling every 30 min between 1800 and 2200 h. At 1100 and 1600 h before visits, subjects took 200 mg spironolactone, 400 mg RU38486, 200 mg spironolactone + 400 mg RU38486, or placebo orally. Serum cortisol levels after drug or placebo were measured. Cortisol levels did not differ between lean and obese after placebo. Spironolactone and RU38486 alone had modest effects, increasing cortisol by less than 50% in both groups. However, combined spironolactone plus RU38486 elevated cortisol concentrations substantially, more so in lean than obese men [2.9- (0.3) vs. 2.2 (0.3)-fold elevation, P = 0.002]. Combined receptor antagonist stimulation of the HPA axis reveals redundancy of MR and GR in negative feedback in humans. Obese men have impaired responses to combined receptor antagonist stimulation, suggesting impaired negative feedback by endogenous cortisol. Such an approach may be useful to dissect abnormal HPA axis control in neuropsychiatric and other disorders.

  15. Seroepidemiology of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV in the Adamawa Region of Cameroon and use of the SPOT test to identify herds with PI calves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian G Handel

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhoea, caused by the bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV in the Pestivirus genus of the Flaviviridae, is one of the most important diseases of cattle world wide causing poor reproductive performance in adult cattle and mucosal disease in calves. In addition it causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility to other infections, the impact of which is uncertain, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa where animals are exposed to a much wider range and higher intensity of infections compared to Europe. There are no previous estimates of the seroprevalence of BVDV in cattle in Cameroon. This paper describes the serological screening for antibodies to BVDV and antigen of BVDV in a cattle population in the Adamawa Region of Cameroon in 2000. The estimates of herd-level and within herd seroprevalences adjusted for test imperfections were 92% and 30% respectively and 16.5% of herds were classed as having a persistently infected calf (PI in the herd within the last year based on the "spot" test approach. There was evidence of clustering of herds with PI calves across the north and west of the Region which corresponds with the higher cattle density areas and of self-clearance of infection from herds. A multivariable model was developed for the risk of having a PI calf in the herd; proximity to antelope, owning a goat, mixing with > 10 other herds at grazing and the catchment area of the veterinary centre the herd was registered at were all significant risk factors. Very little is known about BVDV in sub-Saharan Africa and these high seroprevalences suggest that there is a large problem which may be having both direct impacts on fertility and neonate mortality and morbidity and also indirect effects through immunosuppression and susceptibility to other infections. Understanding and accounting for BVDV should be an important component of epidemiological studies of other diseases in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Characterization of Xe-133 global atmospheric background: Implications for the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achim, Pascal; Generoso, Sylvia; Morin, Mireille; Gross, Philippe; Le Petit, Gilbert; Moulin, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring atmospheric concentrations of radioxenons is relevant to provide evidence of atmospheric or underground nuclear weapon tests. However, when the design of the International Monitoring Network (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) was set up, the impact of industrial releases was not perceived. It is now well known that industrial radioxenon signature can interfere with that of nuclear tests. Therefore, there is a crucial need to characterize atmospheric distributions of radioxenons from industrial sources—the so-called atmospheric background—in the frame of the CTBT. Two years of Xe-133 atmospheric background have been simulated using 2013 and 2014 meteorological data together with the most comprehensive emission inventory of radiopharmaceutical facilities and nuclear power plants to date. Annual average simulated activity concentrations vary from 0.01 mBq/m3 up to above 5 mBq/m3 nearby major sources. Average measured and simulated concentrations agree on most of the IMS stations, which indicates that the main sources during the time frame are properly captured. Xe-133 atmospheric background simulated at IMS stations turn out to be a complex combination of sources. Stations most impacted are in Europe and North America and can potentially detect Xe-133 every day. Predicted occurrences of detections of atmospheric Xe-133 show seasonal variations, more accentuated in the Northern Hemisphere, where the maximum occurs in winter. To our knowledge, this study presents the first global maps of Xe-133 atmospheric background from industrial sources based on two years of simulation and is a first attempt to analyze its composition in terms of origin at IMS stations.

  17. The need for a life-cycle based aging paradigm for nanomaterials: importance of real-world test systems to identify realistic particle transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrano, Denise M.; Nowack, Bernd

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the risks of manufactured nanomaterials (MNM) has been almost exclusively focused on the pristine, as-produced materials with far fewer studies delving into more complex, real world scenarios. However, when considering a life-cycle perspective, it is clear that MNM released from commercial products during manufacturing, use and disposal are far more relevant both in terms of more realistic environmental fate and transport as well as environmental risk. The quantity in which the particles are released and their (altered) physical and chemical form should be identified and it is these metrics that should be used to assess the exposure and hazard the materials pose. The goal of this review is to (1) provide a rationale for using a life-cycle based approach when dealing with MNM transformations, (2) to elucidate the different chemical and physical forces which age and transform MNM and (3) assess the pros and cons of current analytical techniques as they pertain to the measurement of aged and transformed MNM in these complex release scenarios. Specifically, we will describe the possible transformations common MNM may undergo during the use or disposal of nano-products based on how these products will be used by the consumer by taking stock of the current nano-enabled products on the market. Understanding the impact of these transformations may help forecast the benefits and/or risks associated with the use of products containing MNM.

  18. Rapid diagnostic test supply chain and consumption study in Cabo Delgado, Mozambique: estimating stock shortages and identifying drivers of stock-outs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselback, Leah; Crawford, Jessica; Chaluco, Timoteo; Rajagopal, Sharanya; Prosser, Wendy; Watson, Noel

    2014-08-02

    Malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are particularly useful in low-resource settings where follow-through on traditional laboratory diagnosis is challenging or lacking. The availability of these tests depends on supply chain processes within the distribution system. In Mozambique, stock-outs of malaria RDTs are fairly common at health facilities. A longitudinal cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate drivers of stock shortages in the Cabo Delgado province. Data were collected from purposively sampled health facilities, using monthly cross-sectional surveys between October 2011 and May 2012. Estimates of lost consumption (consumption not met due to stock-outs) served as the primary quantitative indicator of stock shortages. This is a better measure of the magnitude of stock-outs than binary indicators that only measure frequency of stock-outs at a given facility. Using a case study based methodology, distribution system characteristics were qualitatively analysed to examine causes of stock-outs at the provincial, district and health centre levels. 15 health facilities were surveyed over 120 time points. Stock-out patterns varied by data source; average monthly proportions of 59%, 17% and 17% of health centres reported a stock-out on stock cards, laboratory and pharmacy forms, respectively. Estimates of lost consumption percentage were significantly high; ranging from 0% to 149%; with a weighted average of 78%. Each ten-unit increase in monthly-observed consumption was associated with a nine-unit increase in lost consumption percentage indicating that higher rates of stock-outs occurred at higher levels of observed consumption. Causes of stock-outs included inaccurate tracking of lost consumption, insufficient sophistication in inventory management and replenishment, and poor process compliance by facility workers, all arguably stemming from inadequate attention to the design and implementation of the distribution system. Substantially high levels of RDT

  19. Stimulus-response compatibility tests of implicit preference for food and body image to identify people at risk for disordered eating: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saira; Petróczi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to incorporate implicit measures of relevant social cognition into eating disorder research. Fifty-three females diagnosed with an eating disorder (ED), and 41 at-risk females were recruited via ED support websites, along with 23 healthy females for comparison. Computerised online tests assessing subconscious normative ideal body image (IBI-BIAT) and personalised self-identification body image (PBI-BIAT) associations and food preferences (FP-AAT) were administered, followed by the modified version of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Anthropometric data, age, need for social approval, self-reported measures of self-esteem, normative perception and body image satisfaction were recorded. Self-reported diagnosed ED status was corroborated with BMI and EDE-Q. Diagnostic performance of the implicit measures was assessed with ROC analysis. Those diagnosed with ED showed significantly stronger automatic preferences for and self-identification with thin body image, compared to healthy females, but no differences were found in food preferences. The IBI-BIAT showed better diagnostic power than PBI-BIAT, correctly classifying 87% of the diagnosed participants. No correlation was found between IBI-BIAT and the explicit measures. The results suggest that the underlying subconscious social cognitive factors of pathological eating are linked to body image, not to food items per se. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Feeling younger and identifying with older adults: Testing two routes to maintaining well-being in the face of age discrimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana M Armenta

    Full Text Available Integrating the social identity and aging literatures, this work tested the hypothesis that there are two independent, but simultaneous, responses by which adults transitioning into old age can buffer themselves against age discrimination: an individual response, which entails adopting a younger subjective age when facing discrimination, and a collective response, which involves increasing identification with the group of older adults. In three experimental studies with a total number of 488 older adults (50 to 75 years of age, we manipulated age discrimination in a job application scenario and measured the effects of both responses on perceived health and self-esteem. Statistical analyses include individual study results as well as a meta-analysis on the combined results of the three studies. Findings show consistent evidence only for the individual response, which was in turn associated with well-being. Furthermore, challenging previous research, the two responses (adopting a younger subjective age and increasing group identification were not only theoretically, but also empirically distinct. This research complements prior research by signaling the value of considering both responses to discrimination as complementary rather than mutually exclusive.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of alternative thresholds of the fasting plasma glucose test to identify the target population for type 2 diabetes prevention in adults aged ≥45 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ping; Kahn, Henry S; Gregg, Edward W

    2013-12-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of alternative fasting plasma glucose (FPG) thresholds to identify adults at high risk for type 2 diabetes for diabetes preventive intervention. We used a validated simulation model to examine the change in lifetime quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and medical costs when the FPG threshold was progressively lowered in 5-mg/dL decrements from 120 to 90 mg/dL. The study sample includes nondiabetic adults aged ≥45 years in the United States using 2006-2010 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. High-risk individuals were assumed to receive a lifestyle intervention, as that used in the Diabetes Prevention Program. We calculated cost per QALY by dividing the incremental cost by incremental QALY when lowering the threshold to the next consecutive level. Medical costs were assessed from a health care system perspective. We conducted univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness of the results using different simulation scenarios and parameters. Progressively lowering the FPG threshold would monotonically increase QALYs, cost, and cost per QALY. Reducing (in 5-mg/dL decrements) the threshold from 120 to 90 mg/dL cost $30,100, $32,900, $42,300, $60,700, $81,800, and $115,800 per QALY gained, respectively. The costs per QALY gained were lower for all thresholds under a lower-cost and less-effective intervention scenario. Lowering the FPG threshold leads to a greater health benefit of diabetes prevention but reduces the cost-effectiveness. Using the conventional benchmark of $50,000 per QALY, a threshold of 105 mg/dL or higher would be cost effective. A lower threshold could be selected if the intervention cost could be lowered.

  2. Physics-based Tests to Identify the Accuracy of Solar Wind Ion Measurements: A Case Study with the Wind Faraday Cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Szabo, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present techniques for comparing measurements of velocity, temperature, and density with constraints imposed by the plasma physics of magnetized bi-Maxwellian ions. Deviations from these physics-based constraints are interpreted as arising from measurement errors. Two million ion spectra from the Solar Wind Experiment Faraday Cup instruments on the Wind spacecraft are used as a case study. The accuracy of velocity measurements is determined by the fact that differential flow between hydrogen and helium should be aligned with the ambient magnetic field. Modeling the breakdown of field alignment suggests velocity uncertainties are less than 0.16% in magnitude and 3deg in direction. Temperature uncertainty is found by examining the distribution of observed temperature anisotropies in high-beta solar wind intervals where the firehose, mirror, and cyclotron microinstabilities should drive the distribution to isotropy. The presence of a finite anisotropy at high beta suggests overall temperature uncertainties of 8%. Hydrogen and helium number densities are compared with the electron density inferred from observations of the local electron plasma frequency as a function of solar wind speed and year. We find that after accounting for the contribution of minor ions, the results are consistent with a systematic offset between the two instruments of 34%. The temperature and density methods are sensitive to non-Maxwellian features such as heat flux and proton beams and as a result are more suited to slow solar wind where these features are rare. These procedures are of general use in identifying the accuracy of observations from any solar wind ion instrument.

  3. Discriminative ability of LDL-cholesterol to identify patients with familial hypercholesterolemia: a cross-sectional study in 26,406 individuals tested for genetic FH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijgen, Roeland; Hutten, Barbara A; Kindt, Iris; Vissers, Maud N; Kastelein, John J P

    2012-06-01

    Screening for familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) within affected families is often based on cutoff values for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). However, the diagnostic accuracy of LDL-C levels is influenced by the magnitude of the LDL-C overlap between FH patients and unaffected relatives. The purpose of the current study was to assess to what extent this overlap is influenced by the severity of specific FH mutations. Individuals were eligible if they underwent family screening for FH between 2003 and 2010. The entire cohort was then compared with those who were investigated for the presence of the most severe mutations (class 1). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve and the sensitivity of the 90th percentile of LDL-C were calculated for both cohorts. We included 26 406 individuals, of whom 9169 (35%) carried an FH-causing mutation. In the entire cohort at baseline, mean LDL-C was 4.63 ± 1.44 mmol/L for FH carriers (n=5372) and 2.96 ± 0.96 mmol/L for unaffected relatives (n=15 148); P<0.001. The corresponding operating characteristics curve (95% CI) was 86.6% (85.9%-87.2%), and the cutoff level of LDL-C above the 90th percentile showed a sensitivity of 68.5%. The operating characteristics curve and sensitivity significantly improved when the 5933 individuals tested for class 1 mutations were assessed separately; 96.2% (95.3%-97.1%) and 91.3%, respectively. In summary, the overlap in terms of LDL-C levels between those with molecularly proven FH and unaffected relatives is to a large extent because of the high prevalence of modestly severe LDL-receptor mutations in the Netherlands.

  4. Global warning, global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benarde, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This book provides insights into the formidable array of issues which, in a warmer world, could impinge upon every facet of readers lives. It examines climatic change and long-term implications of global warming for the ecosystem. Topics include the ozone layer and how it works; the greenhouse effect; the dangers of imbalance and its effects on human and animal life; disruptions to the basic ecology of the planet; and the real scientific evidence for and against aberrant climatic shifts. The author also examines workable social and political programs and changes that must be instituted to avoid ecological disaster

  5. Globalization and Landscape Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Robert R. Hewitt

    2014-01-01

    The literature review examines globalization and landscape architecture as discourse, samples its various meanings, and proposes methods to identify and contextualize its specific literature. Methodologically, the review surveys published articles and books by leading authors and within the WorldCat.org Database associated with landscape architecture and globalization, analyzing survey results for comprehensive concept...

  6. Forms of global governence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim V. Kharkevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global governance as a concept defines the meaning of contemporary world politics both as a discipline and as reality. Interdependent and globalized world requires governance, and a global government has not been formed yet. The theoretical possibility of global governance without global government is proved and justified. The purpose of this article is to analytically identify possible forms of global governance. Three such forms of global governance are identified: hierarchical, market and network. In a hierarchy the governance is due to the asymmetry of power between the parties. Market control happens via anonymous pricing mechanism. Network, in contrast to the market is characterized by a closer value link between the actors, but unlike the hierarchical relationship actors are free to leave the network. Global governance takes three forms and is being implemented by different actors. To determine the most efficient form of global governance is impossible. Efficiency depends on the match between a form and an object of government. It should be noted that meta governance is likely to remain a monopoly of institutionally strong states in global governance.

  7. Global Landslide Catalog Export

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Landslide Catalog (GLC) was developed with the goal of identifying rainfall-triggered landslide events around the world, regardless of size, impacts or...

  8. Can we Identify the Heart Rate Deflection Point and Rating of Perceived Exertion Threshold during the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1 in University Basketball Players? A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymczak Conde Juan Henrique

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to identify the heart rate deflection point (HRDP and the rating of perceived exertion (RPE threshold (DmaxRPE during the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1 in university basketball players. Methods. Eleven male university basketball athletes performed two incremental tests, interspersed by seven days, in a random crossover pattern: (1 the treadmill test with the initial velocity of 6 km ‧ h-1, increments of 1 km ‧ h-1 each 2 minutes, and pauses of 15 seconds between the stages; (2 the Yo-Yo IR1. Results. During the Yo-Yo IR1, the HRDP and the DmaxRPE were identified only in six and seven subjects, respectively. In the treadmill test, the HRDP and the DmaxRPE were found in 11 and 10 individuals, respectively. Additionally, there were no differences between the velocity of occurrence of the HRDP and the DmaxRPE recognized in the treadmill test and in the Yo-Yo IR1 (p > 0.05. Conclusions. The results suggest that if the goal is to determine aerobic capacity by the HRDP and the DmaxRPE, Yo-Yo IR1 should not be used. Instead, the treadmill test is a reliable tool.

  9. Against Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Lotte; Baggesgaard, Mads Anders

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand globalization, we need to consider what globalization is not. That is, in order to understand the mechanisms and elements that work toward globalization, we must, in a sense, read against globalization, highlighting the limitations of the concept and its inherent conflicts....... Only by employing this as a critical practice will we be analytically able to gain a dynamic understanding of the forces of globalization as they unfold today and as they have developed historically....

  10. Globalization, Globalisation

    OpenAIRE

    Wilfred J. Ethier

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses a complex of globalization issues: the effect of globalization on the skill premium; the effect of globalization on unemployment; the relative importance of globalization and exogenous technical change; the effect of globalization on the ability of national governments to conduct independent social policies. Thinking about these topics has been dominated by a large empirical literature concluding that trade has played a relatively minor role in the rise of the skill premi...

  11. The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Episodic Memory Impairment in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Do Episodic Memory Deficits Identified at Classification Remain Evident When Later Examined with Different Memory Tests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Zofia Klekociuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of mild cognitive impairment (MCI have been criticised for using the same battery of neuropsychological tests during classification and longitudinal followup. The key concern is that there is a potential circularity when the same tests are used to identify MCI and then subsequently monitor change in function over time. The aim of the present study was to examine the evidence of this potential circularity problem. The present study assessed the memory function of 72 MCI participants and 50 healthy controls using an alternate battery of visual and verbal episodic memory tests 9 months following initial comprehensive screening assessment and MCI classification. Individuals who were classified as multiple-domain amnestic MCI (a-MCI+ at screening show a significantly reduced performance in visual and verbal memory function at followup using a completely different battery of valid and reliable tests. Consistent with their initial classification, those identified as nonamnestic MCI (na-MCI or control at screening demonstrated the highest performance across the memory tasks. The results of the present study indicate that persistent memory deficits remain evident in amnestic MCI subgroups using alternate memory tests, suggesting that the concerns regarding potential circularity of logic may be overstated in MCI research.

  12. Global Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping

    2013-01-01

    Global strategy differs from domestic strategy in terms of content and process as well as context and structure. The content of global strategy can contain five key elements, while the process of global strategy can have six major stages. These are expounded below. Global strategy is influenced...... by rich and complementary local contexts with diverse resource pools and game rules at the national level to form a broad ecosystem at the global level. Further, global strategy dictates the interaction or balance between different entry strategies at the levels of internal and external networks....

  13. Global aspects of radiation memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winicour, J

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational radiation has a memory effect represented by a net change in the relative positions of test particles. Both the linear and nonlinear sources proposed for this radiation memory are of the ‘electric’ type, or E mode, as characterized by the even parity of the polarization pattern. Although ‘magnetic’ type, or B mode, radiation memory is mathematically possible, no physically realistic source has been identified. There is an electromagnetic counterpart to radiation memory in which the velocity of charged test particles obtain a net ‘kick’. Again, the physically realistic sources of electromagnetic radiation memory that have been identified are of the electric type. In this paper, a global null cone description of the electromagnetic field is applied to establish the non-existence of B-mode radiation memory and the non-existence of E-mode radiation memory due to a bound charge distribution. (paper)

  14. New insights from direct monitoring of turbidity currents; and a proposal for co-ordinating international efforts at a series of global "turbidity current test sites"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talling, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Turbidity currents, and other types of submarine sediment density flow, arguably redistribute more sediment across the surface of the Earth than any other flow process. It is now over 60 years since the seminal publication of Kuenen and Migliorini (1950) in which they made the link between sequences of graded bedding and turbidity currents. The deposits of submarine sediment density flows have been described in numerous locations worldwide, and this might lead to the view that these flows are well understood. However, it is sobering to note quite how few direct measurements we have from these submarine flows in action. Sediment concentration is the critical parameter controlling such flows, yet it has never been measured directly for flows that reach and build submarine fans. How then do we know what type of flow to model in flume tanks, or which assumptions to use to formulate numerical simulations or analytical models? It is proposed here that international efforts are needed for an initiative to monitor active turbidity currents at a series of 'test sites' where flows occur frequently. The flows evolve significantly, such that source to sink data are needed. We also need to directly monitor flows in different settings with variable triggering factors and flow path morphologies because their character can vary significantly. Such work should integrate numerical and physical modelling with the collection of field observations in order to understand the significance of field observations. Such an international initiative also needs to include coring of deposits to link flow processes to deposit character, because in most global locations flow behaviour must be inferred from deposits alone. Collection of seismic datasets is also crucial for understanding the larger-scale evolution and resulting architecture of these systems, and to link with studies of subsurface reservoirs. Test site datasets should thus include a wide range of data types, not just from direct flow

  15. Evaluation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 concentration and values of global tests concerning the coagulation system of patients suffering from subarachnoid haemorrage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Sitta Al-Drawi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction. [/b]The term ‘subarachnoid haemorrhage’ (SAH stands for bleeding into the subarachnoid space, regardless of its source. It may be of primary character when the source of bleeding is situated within the subarachnoid space. Subarachnoid haemorrhage is often described as spontaneous bleeding, mainly in order to differentiate it from post-traumatic bleeding. [b]Objective.[/b] The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentration of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the blood of patients in the early phase following subarachnoid haemorrhage in terms of searching for markers useful in subarachnoid bleeding diagnostics and monitoring a patient’s clinical state. [b]Materials and method. [/b]The study comprised 85 patients (47 women, 38 men, aged 29–81 (average 53±12 years, suffering from subarachnoid haemorrhage. The control group comprised 45 healthy people selected according to gender and age corresponding with the experimental group. [b]Results. [/b]The study revealed that the concentration of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was significantly higher in patients suffering from subarachnoid haemorrhage. Additionally, the concentration of fibrinogen decreased, aPTT was shorter and the concentration of D-dimers increased. The studied parameters did not differ with respect to the age or gender of the patients. It was stated that according to the Hunt and Hess scale, the concentration of ICAM-1 was considerably higher in the group of patients in the most severe neurological state, compared to other patients. It was also observed that the concentration of fibrinogen was significantly higher, aPTT was shorter, and the concentration of D-dimers increased in the afore-mentioned group. [b]Conclusions[/b]. Evaluation of the concentration of adhesion molecules, as well as values of global tests concerning the coagulation system, may serve as a useful diagnostic tool for SAH.

  16. Pre-analytical effects of pneumatic tube system transport on routine haematology and coagulation tests, global coagulation assays and platelet function assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quellec, Sandra; Paris, Mickaël; Nougier, Christophe; Sobas, Frédéric; Rugeri, Lucia; Girard, Sandrine; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Négrier, Claude; Dargaud, Yesim

    2017-05-01

    Pneumatic tube system (PTS) in hospitals is commonly used for the transport of blood samples to clinical laboratories, as it is rapid and cost-effective. The aim was to compare the effects on haematology samples of a newly acquired ~2km-long PTS that links 2 hospitals with usual transport (non-pneumatic tube system, NPTS). Complete blood cell count, routine coagulation assays, platelet function tests (PFT) with light-transmission aggregometry and global coagulation assays including ROTEM® and thrombin generation assay (TGA) were performed on blood samples from 30 healthy volunteers and 9 healthy volunteers who agreed to take aspirin prior to blood sampling. The turnaround time was reduced by 31% (p<0.001) with the use of PTS. No statistically significant difference was observed for most routine haematology assays including PFT, and ROTEM® analysis. A statistically significant, but not clinically relevant, shortening of the APTT after sample transport by PTS was found (mean±SD: 30s±1.8 vs. 29.5s±2.1 for NPTS). D-dimer levels were 7.4% higher after transport through PTS but were not discordant. A statistically significant increase of thrombin generation was found in both platelet poor- and platelet rich- plasma samples after PTS transport compared to NPTS transport. PTS is suitable for the transport of samples prior to routine haematology assays including PFT, but should not be used for samples intended for thrombin generation measurement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prognostic validity of the Timed Up-and-Go test, a modified Get-Up-and-Go test, staff's global judgement and fall history in evaluating fall risk in residential care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Ellinor; Lindelöf, Nina; Rosendahl, Erik; Jensen, Jane; Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor

    2008-07-01

    to evaluate and compare the prognostic validity relative to falls of the Timed Up-and-Go test (TUG), a modified Get-Up-and-Go test (GUG-m), staff's judgement of global rating of fall risk (GLORF) and fall history among frail older people. cohort study, 6-month prospective follow-up for falls. 183 frail persons living in residential care facilities in Sweden, mean age 84 years, 73% women. the occurrence of falls during the follow-up period were compared to the following assessments at baseline: the TUG at normal speed; the GUG-m, a rating of fall risk scored from 1 (no risk) to 5 (very high risk); the GLORF, staff's rating of fall risk as 'high' or 'low'; a history of falls in the previous 6 months. These assessment tools were evaluated using sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR(+) to rule in and LR(-) to rule out a high fall risk). 53% of the participants fell at least once. Various cut-off values of the TUG (12, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 s) and the GUG-m showed LR(+) between 0.9 and 2.6 and LR(-) between 0.1 and 1.0. The GLORF showed an LR(+) of 2.8 and an LR(-) of 0.6 and fall history showed an LR(+) of 2.4 and an LR(-) of 0.6. in this population of frail older people, staff judgement of their residents' fall risk as well as previous falls both appear superior to the performance-based measures TUG and GUG-m in ruling in a high fall risk. A TUG score of less than 15 s gives guidance in ruling out a high fall risk but insufficient information in ruling in such a risk. The grading of fall risk by GUG-m appears of very limited value.

  18. Globalization & technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narula, Rajneesh

    Technology and globalization are interdependent processes. Globalization has a fundamental influence on the creation and diffusion of technology, which, in turn, affects the interdependence of firms and locations. This volume examines the international aspect of this interdependence at two levels...

  19. Global optimization and sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    A new direction for the analysis of nonlinear models of nuclear systems is suggested to overcome fundamental limitations of sensitivity analysis and optimization methods currently prevalent in nuclear engineering usage. This direction is toward a global analysis of the behavior of the respective system as its design parameters are allowed to vary over their respective design ranges. Presented is a methodology for global analysis that unifies and extends the current scopes of sensitivity analysis and optimization by identifying all the critical points (maxima, minima) and solution bifurcation points together with corresponding sensitivities at any design point of interest. The potential applicability of this methodology is illustrated with test problems involving multiple critical points and bifurcations and comprising both equality and inequality constraints

  20. PEMANASAN GLOBAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivi Triana

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Pemanasan global (global warming pada dasarnya merupakan fenomena peningkatan temperature global dari tahun ke tahun karena terjadinya efek rumah kaca (greenhouse effect yang disebabkan oleh meningkatnya emisi gas-gas seperti karbondioksida (CO2, metana (CH4, dinitrooksida (N2O dan CFC sehingga energy matahari terperangkap dalam atmosfer bumi. Berbagai literatur menunjukkan kenaikan temperatur global termasuk Indonesia yang terjadi pada kisaran 1,5 – 40 °C pada akhir abad 21.

  1. Global Europa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian

    2010-01-01

    at the mythology of ‘global Europa' - the EU in the world. It concludes with a reflection on the way in which the many diverse myths of global Europa compete for daily attention, whether as lore, ideology, or pleasure. In this respect the mythology of global Europa is part of our everyday existence, part of the EU...

  2. Differential evolution algorithm for global optimizations in nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chong

    2017-04-01

    We explore the applicability of the differential evolution algorithm in finding the global minima of three typical nuclear structure physics problems: the global deformation minimum in the nuclear potential energy surface, the optimization of mass model parameters and the lowest eigenvalue of a nuclear Hamiltonian. The algorithm works very effectively and efficiently in identifying the minima in all problems we have tested. We also show that the algorithm can be parallelized in a straightforward way.

  3. Global usability

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The concept of usabil